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Sample records for venous catheter-related bloodstream

  1. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

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    Patil, Harsha V.; Patil, Virendra C.; Ramteerthkar, M. N.; Kulkarni, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Aims: This study was conducted to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs) and to identify the factors influencing it. So far, there are very few studies that have been conducted on CRBSI in the intensive care unit in India. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) over a period of 1 year from January to December 2004. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients with indwelling central venous catheters of age group between 20 and 75 years were included. The catheters were cultured using the standard semiquantitative culture (SQC) method. Statistical analysis used SPSS-10 version statistical software. Results: A total of 54 CVC catheters with 319 catheter days were included in this study. Of 54 patients with CVCs studied for bacteriology, 39 (72.22%) catheters showed negative SQCs and also negative blood cultures. A total of 15 (27.77%) catheters were positive on SQC, of which 10 (18.52%) were with catheter-associated infection and four (7.41%) were with catheter-associated bacteremia; the remaining one was a probable catheter-associated bacteremia. CRIs were high among catheters that were kept in situ for more than 3 days and emergency procedures where two or more attempts were required for catheterization (P catheter in situ for >3 days, inexperienced venupucturist, more number of attempts and emergency CVC were associated with more incidence of CVCBSIs, with P catheter in situ was negatively correlated (-0.53) and number of attempts required to put CVC was positively correlated (+0.39) with incidence of CVCBSIs. Sixty-five percent of the isolates belonged to the CONS group (13/20). Staphylococcus epidermidis showed maximum susceptibility to amikacin, doxycycline and amoxycillin with clavulanic

  2. Antimicrobial-impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection in newborn infants.

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    Balain, Munisha; Oddie, Sam J; McGuire, William

    2015-09-27

    Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in newborn infants cared for in neonatal units. Potential strategies to prevent these infections include the use of central venous catheters impregnated with antimicrobial agents. To determine the effect of antimicrobial-impregnated central venous catheters in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection in newborn infants. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 8), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2015), EMBASE (1980 to September 2015), CINAHL (1982 to September 2015), conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing central venous catheters impregnated or coated with any antibiotic or antiseptic versus central venous catheters without antibiotic or antiseptic coating or impregnation in newborn infants. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Group, with independent evaluation of risk of bias and data extraction by two review authors. We found only one small trial (N = 98). This trial found that silver zeolite-impregnated umbilical venous catheters reduced the incidence of bloodstream infection in very preterm infants (risk ratio 0.11, 95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.87; risk difference -0.17, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.04; number needed to treat for benefit 6, 95% CI 3 to 25]. Although the data from one small trial indicates that antimicrobial-impregnated central venous catheters might prevent catheter-related bloodstream infection in newborn infants, the available evidence is insufficient to guide clinical practice. A large, simple and pragmatic randomised controlled trial is needed to resolve on-going uncertainty.

  3. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

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    Masato Kimura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  4. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

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    Kimura, Masato; Kawai, Eichiro; Yaoita, Hisao; Ichinoi, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  5. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus: microbiology and risk factors

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    Geraldo Sadoyma

    Full Text Available Although central vascular catheters (CVC are indispensable in modern medicine, they are an important risk factor for primary bacteremias. We examined the incidence and risk factors associated with catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI caused by Staphylococcus aureus in surgical patients. A prospective study was carried out in the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (HC-UFU from September 2000 to December 2002. The skin insertion site, catheter tip, and blood were microbiologically analyzed. Demographics and risk factors were recorded for each patient, and cultures were identified phenotypically. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen, with an incidence rate of 4.9 episodes of CR-BSIs per 1,000 catheter/days. Based on logistic regression, the independent risk factors were: colonization on the insertion site =200 colony forming units (CFU/20 cm² (p=0.03; odds ratio (OR =6.89 and catheter tip (p=0.01; OR=7.95. The CR-BSI rate was high; it was mainly associated with S. aureus, and skin colonization at the insertion site and on the catheter tip were important risk factors for CR-BSI.

  6. Disparity in race-specific comorbidities associated with central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (AHRQ-PSI7).

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    Studnicki, James; Ekezue, Bola F; Tsulukidze, Maka; Honoré, Peggy; Moonesinghe, Ramal; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    Studies of racial disparities in hospital-level patient safety outcomes typically apply a race-common approach to risk adjustment. Risk factors specific to a minority population may not be identified in a race-common analysis if they represent only a small percentage of total cases. This study identified patient comorbidities and characteristics associated with the likelihood of a venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicator 7 [PSI7]) separately for blacks and whites using race-specific logistic regression models. Hospitals were ranked by the racial disparity in PSI7 and segmented into 4 groups. The analysis identified both black- and white-specific risk factors associated with PSI7. Age showed race-specific reverse association, with younger blacks and older whites more likely to have a PSI7 event. These findings suggest the need for race-specific covariate adjustments in patient outcomes and provide a new context for examining racial disparities.

  7. Classification tree analysis of race-specific subgroups at risk for a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection.

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    Studnicki, James; Ekezue, Bola F; Tsulukidze, Maka; Honoré, Peggy; Moonesinghe, Ramal; Fisher, John

    2014-03-01

    Studies of racial disparities in patient safety events often do not use race-specific risk adjustment and do not account for reciprocal covariate interactions. These limitations were addressed by using classification tree analysis separately for black patients and white patients to identify characteristics that segment patients who have increased risks for a venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of 5,236,045 discharges from 103 Florida acute hospitals in 2005-2009 was conducted. Hospitals were rank ordered on the basis of the black/white Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) 7 rate ratio as follows: Group 1 (white rate higher), Group 2, (equivalent rates), Group 3, (black rate higher), and Group 4, (black rate highest). Predictor variables included 26 comorbidities (Elixhauser Comorbidity Index) and demographic characteristics. Four separate classification tree analyses were completed for each race/hospital group. Individual characteristics and groups of characteristics associated with increased PSI 7 risk differed for black and white patients. The average age for both races was different across the hospital groups (p < .01). Weight loss was the strongest single delineator and common to both races. The black subgroups with the highest PSI 7 risk were Medicare beneficiaries who were either < or = 25.5 years without hypertension or < or = 39.5 years without hypertension but with an emergency or trauma admission. The white subgroup with the highest PSI 7 risk consisted of patients < or = 45.5 years who had congestive heart failure but did not have either hypertension or weight loss. Identifying subgroups of patients at risk for a rare safety event such as PSI 7 should aid effective clinical decisions and efficient use of resources and help to guide patient safety interventions.

  8. Changing epidemiology of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: increasing prevalence of Gram-negative pathogens.

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    Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex; Iñurrieta, Amaia; Martínez, José A; Romero, Alberto; Cobos, Nazaret; Hernández, Cristina; Almela, Manel; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep

    2011-09-01

    Gram-positive microorganisms have been the predominant pathogens in central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). Recent guidelines recommend empirical therapy according to this and restrict coverage for Gram-negatives to specific circumstances. This study aimed to analyse the epidemiological changes in CRBSIs over the 1991-2008 period and to analyse predictors of Gram-negative CRBSIs. A prospectively collected cohort of patients with confirmed CRBSIs was analysed. Strains isolated and antimicrobial susceptibility, as well as clinical and demographic variables were recorded. Differences observed during the study period were analysed by means of a χ² trend test and factors associated with Gram-negative CRBSIs by means of multivariable analysis. Between 1991 and 2008, 1129 episodes of monomicrobial CRBSIs were recorded. There was an increase in the incidence of CRBSIs, from 0.10 (1991-92) to 0.31 (2007-08) episodes/1000 patient-days. A significant increase in the number of Gram-negative strains among the total isolates was also found, from 3 (4.7%) in 1991-92 to 70 (40.23%) in 2007-08, with a parallel decrease in the percentage of Gram-positives. Solid organ transplantation, prior use of penicillins and hospital stay longer than 11 days were independently associated with a significantly higher risk of Gram-negative CRBSIs, while cirrhosis, diabetes and use of quinolones were associated with a higher risk of Gram-positives. Gram-negative strains are an increasing cause of CRBSIs, reaching a prevalence of 40% in the 2007-08 period in our hospital. If this trend is confirmed in other centres, a broad-spectrum empirical therapy should be considered in managing these infections.

  9. The risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection with femoral venous catheters as compared to subclavian and internal jugular venous catheters: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

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    Marik, Paul E; Flemmer, Mark; Harrison, Wendy

    2012-08-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Current guidelines recommend that femoral venous access should be avoided to reduce this complication (1A recommendation). However, the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infections from femoral as compared to subclavian and internal jugular venous catheterization has not been systematically reviewed. A systematic review of the literature to determine the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infections related to nontunneled central venous catheters inserted at the femoral site as compared to subclavian and internal jugular placement. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, and an Internet search (Google). Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies that reported the frequency of catheter-related bloodstream infections (infections per 1,000 catheter days) in patients with nontunneled central venous catheters placed in the femoral site as compared to subclavian or internal jugular placement. Data were abstracted on study design, study size, study setting, patient population, number of catheters at each insertion site, number of catheter-related bloodstream infections, and the prevalence of deep venous thrombosis. Studies were subgrouped according to study design (cohort and randomized controlled trials). Meta-analytic techniques were used to summarize the data. Two randomized controlled trials (1006 catheters) and 8 cohort (16,370 catheters) studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Three thousand two hundred thirty catheters were placed in the subclavian vein, 10,958 in the internal jugular and 3,188 in the femoral vein for a total of 113,652 catheter days. The average catheter-related bloodstream infections density was 2.5 per 1,000 catheter days (range 0.6-7.2). There was no significant difference in the risk of catheter-related bloodstream

  10. Incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonates following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

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    Casner, Michael; Hoesli, Sandra J; Slaughter, James C; Hill, Melissa; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-associated bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and healthcare cost in the neonatal ICU. Previous studies examining the prevalence of bloodstream infections after removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in neonates are equivocal. A retrospective cohort study. All infants with peripherally inserted central venous catheters treated at the Vanderbilt neonatal ICU between 2007 and 2009. We evaluated the following outcomes: 1) bloodstream infections, 2) culture-negative sepsis, 3) number of sepsis evaluations, and 4) number of significant apnea/bradycardia events comparing odds ratios between 72 hours before and 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal. We analyzed a total of 1,002 peripherally inserted central venous catheters in 856 individual infants with a median (interquartile range) gestational age of 31 weeks (28-37 wk) and a median birth weight of 1,469 g (960-2,690 g). Comparing 72 hours before with 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal did not show a difference in the prevalence of bloodstream infections (9 vs 3, p = 0.08), prevalence of culture-negative sepsis (37 vs 40, p = 0.73), number of sepsis evaluations (p = 0.42), or number of apnea/bradycardia events (p = 0.32). However, in peripherally inserted central venous catheter not used for delivery of antibiotics, there was a 3.83-fold increase in odds for culture-negative sepsis following peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal (95% confidence interval, 1.48-10.5; p = 0.001). For infants less than 1,500 g birth weight (very low birth weight), odds for culture-negative sepsis increased to 6.3-fold following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters not used for antibiotic delivery (95% confidence interval, 1.78-26.86; p central venous catheter removal, they suggests that very low birth weight infants not recently exposed to antibiotics are at increased odds for

  11. Comparative Efficacy of Antimicrobial Central Venous Catheters in Reducing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults: Abridged Cochrane Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

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    Chong, Huey Yi; Lai, Nai Ming; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-05-15

    The efficacy of antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) remains questionable. In this network meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of antimicrobial CVC impregnations in reducing catheter-related infections in adults. We searched 4 electronic databases (Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, CINAHL) and internet sources for randomized controlled trials, ongoing clinical trials, and unpublished studies up to August 2016. Studies that assessed CVCs with antimicrobial impregnation with nonimpregnated catheters or catheters with another impregnation were included. Primary outcomes were clinically diagnosed sepsis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and all-cause mortality. We performed a network meta-analysis to estimate risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Sixty studies with 17255 catheters were included. The effects of 14 impregnations were investigated. Both CRBSI and catheter colonization were the most commonly evaluated outcomes. Silver-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced clinically diagnosed sepsis compared with silver-impregnated cuffs (RR, 0.54 [95% CI, .29-.99]). When compared to no impregnation, significant CRBSI reduction was associated with minocycline-rifampicin (RR, 0.29 [95% CI, .16-.52]) and silver (RR, 0.57 [95% CI, .38-.86]) impregnations. No impregnations significantly reduced all-cause mortality. For catheter colonization, significant decreases were shown by miconazole-rifampicin (RR, 0.14 [95% CI, .05-.36]), 5-fluorouracil (RR, 0.34 [95% CI, .14-.82]), and chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (RR, 0.60 [95% CI, .50-.72]) impregnations compared with no impregnation. None of the studies evaluated antibiotic/antiseptic resistance as the outcome. Current evidence suggests that the minocycline-rifampicin-impregnated CVC appears to be the most effective in preventing CRBSI. However, its overall benefits in reducing clinical sepsis and mortality remain uncertain

  12. Propensity score analysis confirms the independent effect of parenteral nutrition on the risk of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection in oncological patients.

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    Touré, Abdoulaye; Chambrier, Cécile; Vanhems, Philippe; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Ecochard, René

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition is known as a high-risk factor for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBSI) in cancer patients. Owing to ethical and technical problems, the studies in the literature have nonrandomized designs and are therefore often confounded by biases. We performed a propensity score analysis to estimate the effect of parenteral nutrition on CVC-RBSI in digestive cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy. Data were collected prospectively. A logistic regression model was used to calculate a propensity score, which was the probability of receiving parenteral nutrition. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression model were used to estimate the effect of the parenteral nutrition on CVC-RBSI after adjustment for the propensity score. Before the propensity score analysis, the differences between patients with (n = 113) and without (n = 312) parenteral nutrition were identified including: male gender, body weight, weight loss, performance status, location of primary cancer, FOLFIRI, and previous long-term corticotherapy. After propensity score stratification, all of the covariates were balanced within each stratum. After adjustment, patients with parenteral nutrition were at a higher risk for CVC-RBSI. By using the propensity score analysis, this study confirmed that parenteral nutrition was an independent risk factor for CVC-RBSI in digestive cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

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    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ≤60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion.

  14. Catheter related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI in ICU patients: making the decision to remove or not to remove the central venous catheter.

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    Rodrigo Octávio Deliberato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 150 million central venous catheters (CVC are used each year in the United States. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI are one of the most important complications of the central venous catheters (CVCs. Our objective was to compare the in-hospital mortality when the catheter is removed or not removed in patients with CR-BSI. METHODS: We reviewed all episodes of CR-BSI that occurred in our intensive care unit (ICU from January 2000 to December 2008. The standard method was defined as a patient with a CVC and at least one positive blood culture obtained from a peripheral vein and a positive semi quantitative (>15 CFU culture of a catheter segment from where the same organism was isolated. The conservative method was defined as a patient with a CVC and at least one positive blood culture obtained from a peripheral vein and one of the following: (1 differential time period of CVC culture versus peripheral culture positivity of more than 2 hours, or (2 simultaneous quantitative blood culture with ≥ 5:1 ratio (CVC versus peripheral. RESULTS: 53 CR-BSI (37 diagnosed by the standard method and 16 by the conservative method were diagnosed during the study period. There was a no statistically significant difference in the in-hospital mortality for the standard versus the conservative method (57% vs. 75%, p = 0.208 in ICU patients. CONCLUSION: In our study there was a no statistically significant difference between the standard and conservative methods in-hospital mortality.

  15. Central Venous Catheter-Related Hydrothorax

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    Se Hun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of 88-year-old women who developed central venous catheter-related bilateral hydrothorax, in which left pleural effusion, while right pleural effusion was being drained. The drainage prevented accumulation of fluid in the right pleural space, indicating that there was neither extravasation of infusion fluid nor connection between the two pleural cavities. The only explanation for bilateral hydrothorax in this case is lymphatic connections. Although vascular injuries by central venous catheter can cause catheter-related hydrothorax, it is most likely that the positioning of the tip of central venous catheter within the lymphatic duct opening in the right sub-clavian-jugular confluence or superior vena cava causes the catheter-related hydrothorax. Pericardial effusion can also result from retrograde lymphatic flow through the pulmonary lymphatic chains.

  16. Central Venous Catheter-related Fungemia Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis.

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    Miglietta, Fabio; Letizia Faneschi, Maria; Braione, Adele; Palumbo, Claudio; Rizzo, Adriana; Lobreglio, Giambattista; Pizzolante, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection due to Rhodotorula glutinis is extremely rare and mostly associated with underlying immunosuppression or cancer. Vascular access devices provide the necessary surfaces for biofilm formation and are currently responsible for a significant percentage of human infections. In this work, we describe a rare case of central venous catheter-related Rhodotorula glutinis fungemia in a female patient with acute myelogenous leukemia in remission. The timely removal of central venous catheter was an essential element for overcoming this CVC-related Rhodotorula fungemia.

  17. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension

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    Kristen A. Wendorf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients.

  18. Catheter-related bloodstream infections caused by Trichosporon species.

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    Issarachaikul, Ratima; Lertwannawit, Orapin; Detporntewan, Pitaks; Uaprasert, Noppacharn; Plongla, Rongpong; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Chindamporn, Ariya; Suankratay, Chusana

    2014-03-01

    Trichosporonosis is an emerging invasive opportunistic fungal infection in immunocompromised patients. We report 5 catheter related blood stream infections caused by Trichosporon species over a five-year period at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. All the patients were immunocompromised, had received broad-spectrum antibiotics and had a central venous catheter or arterial line inserted for a mean duration of 16.2 days (range 10-30 days). Four patients developed disseminated infection and only 2 survived, giving a mortality rate of 60%. Because of the prevalence of Trichosporon catheter related blood stream infections at our institute, health care providers should have a high index of suspicion for Trichosporon species infections in patients with risk factors and prolonged presence of a central venous catheter.

  19. Antibiogram for Haemodialysis Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections

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    Abdul Halim Abdul Gafor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Haemodialysis (HD catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs are a major complication of long-term catheter use in HD. This study identified the epidemiology of HD CRBSIs and to aid in the choice of empiric antibiotics therapy given to patients with HD CRBSIs. Methods. Patients with HD CRBSIs were identified. Their blood cultures were performed according to standard sterile technique. Specimens were sent to the microbiology lab for culture and sensitivity testing. Results were tabulated in antibiograms. Results. 18 patients with a median age of 61.0 years (IQR: 51.5–73.25 were confirmed to have HD CRBSIs based on our study criteria. Eight (44.4% patients had gram-negative infections, 7 (38.9% patients gram-positive infections, and 3 (16.7% patients had polymicrobial infections. We noted that most of the gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to ceftazidime. Unfortunately, cloxacillin resistance was high among gram-positive organisms. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Bacillus sp. were the most common gram-positive organisms and they were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Our study revealed the increased incidence of gram-negative organism in HD CRBSIs. Antibiogram is an important tool in deciding empirical antibiotics for HD CRBSIs. Tailoring your antibiotics accordingly to the antibiogram can increase the chance of successful treatment and prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance.

  20. [Blood-stream catheter related infection in inpatient children receiving parenteral nutrition].

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    Vaquero Sosa, E; Izquierdo García, E; Arrizabalaga Asenjo, M; Gómez Peñalba, C; Moreno Villares, J M

    2011-01-01

    Blood-stream catheter related infection is the most severe complication in patients carrying a central venous catheter. Parenteral nutrition (PN) use seems to be a risk factor for developing a catheter-related infection (CRI). In order to know the incidence of CRI in children to further implement policies to reduce nosocomial infection, we review all charts of children (1 month to 17 years) who received parenteral nutrition while in hospital. All episodes of fever + positive blood culture were recorded. Infection rate was defined as number of episodes/1000 Parenteral nutrition days. 48 positive blood cultures was obtained from 120 patients. Infection rate was 37.8/1000 days. Incidence was significantly higher in infants and toddlers (52% vs 29.8%, p = 0.016). Most frequent organisms were coagulase negative Staph. (56.8%), Gram negative bacilli (20.8%), Staph aureus (12.5%) and fungus (12.5%). No difference in incidence were found according to the underlying disease or the length of PN use. Infection rate in our PN inpatient patients was significantly higher. PN may represent a risk factor for developing a CRI. Specific measurements and policies need to be implemented to overcome present situation.

  1. CHLORHEXIDINE-IMPREGNATED DRESSING FOR PREVENTION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTION: A META-ANALYSIS

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    Safdar, Nasia; O’Horo, John C.; Ghufran, Aiman; Bearden, Allison; Didier, Maria Eugenia; Chateau, Dan; Maki, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and effective methods for their prevention are needed. Objective To assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing for prevention of central venous catheter-related colonization and CRBSI using meta-analysis. Data Sources Multiple computerized database searches supplemented by manual searches including relevant conference proceedings. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing compared with conventional dressings for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI. Data Extraction Data were extracted on patient and catheter characteristics and outcomes. Data Synthesis Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and I2. Subgroup analyses were used to explore heterogeneity. Results Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Use of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing resulted in a reduced incidence of CRBSI (random effects RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.42–0.79, P=0.002). The incidence of catheter colonization was also markedly reduced in the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing group (random effects RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67, Pchlorhexidine-impregnated dressing is beneficial in preventing catheter colonization and, more importantly, CRBSI and warrants routine use in patients at high risk of CRBSI and CVC or arterial catheter colonization in ICUs. PMID:24674924

  2. [Exposition to total parenteral nutrition increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection].

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    Vergara, Teresa; Véliz, Elena; Fica, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Infectious complications associated to central venous catheter (CVC) increase morbidity, mortality and costs. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is one of the risk factors described for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). The aim of this study was explore if TPN and time of exposition, are risk factors for CR-BSI among patient exposed to this therapy. Cohort study of patients with CVC exposed and not exposed to TPN with calculation of the relative risk (RR) for CR-BSI and percentage of CR-BSI according to different times of exposition to TPN. Study encompassed years 2010-2015 and only adult patients were included. During the study period 51 events of CR-BSI were identified, with 27 occurring among those exposed to TPN and 24 among those not exposed. CR-BSI incidence rate was 6.3 in the group with TPN and 1.2 in those without this therapy (RR 5.4; IC 95 3.6-8.2). The percentage of patients with CR-BSI increased in parallel to exposition time (Pearson coefficient +0.91) and the OR increased for expositions ≥ 7 days (OR 2.8; IC 95 1.047.4; p < 0.05). Exposition to TPN increases the risk to CR-BSI in adult patients with CVC and this risk raise with exposition time.

  3. Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients on hemodialysis: challenges and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soi V

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Soi, Carol L Moore, Lalathakasha Kumbar, Jerry Yee Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the end-stage renal disease population. Although alternative accesses to undergoing renal replacement therapy exist, many patients begin hemodialysis with a dialysis catheter due to logistic and physiologic factors involved in arteriovenous fistula creation and maturation. Colonization of catheters via skin flora leads to the production of biofilm, which acts as a reservoir for virulent bacteria. Preventative therapies center on appropriate catheter maintenance, infection control measures, and early removal of devices as patients transition to other access. Despite best efforts, when conservative measures fail to prevent infections in a high-risk population, antimicrobial lock therapy should be considered as an option to combat catheter-related bloodstream infections. Keywords: hemodialysis, CRBSI, catheter, end-stage renal disease, ESRD

  4. Successful Salvage of Central Venous Catheters in Patients with Catheter-Related or Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections by Using a Catheter Lock Solution Consisting of Minocycline, EDTA, and 25% Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Issam; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Zakhour, Ramia; Jordan, Mary; Al Hamal, Zanaib; Jiang, Ying; Yousif, Ammar; Garoge, Kumait; Mulanovich, Victor; Viola, George M; Kanj, Soha; Pravinkumar, Egbert; Rosenblatt, Joel; Hachem, Ray

    2016-06-01

    In cancer patients with long-term central venous catheters (CVC), removal and reinsertion of a new CVC at a different site might be difficult because of the unavailability of accessible vascular sites. In vitro and animal studies showed that a minocycline-EDTA-ethanol (M-EDTA-EtOH) lock solution may eradicate microbial organisms in biofilms, hence enabling the treatment of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) while retaining the catheter in situ Between April 2013 and July 2014, we enrolled 30 patients with CLABSI in a prospective study and compared them to a historical group of 60 patients with CLABSI who had their CVC removed and a new CVC inserted. Each catheter lumen was locked with an M-EDTA-EtOH solution for 2 h administered once daily, for a total of 7 doses. Patients who received locks had clinical characteristics that were comparable to those of the control group. The times to fever resolution and microbiological eradication were similar in the two groups. Patients with the lock intervention received a shorter duration of systemic antibiotic therapy than that of the control patients (median, 11 days versus 16 days, respectively; P < 0.0001), and they were able to retain their CVCs for a median of 74 days after the onset of bacteremia. The M-EDTA-EtOH lock was associated with a significantly decreased rate of mechanical and infectious complications compared to that of the CVC removal/reinsertion group, who received a longer duration of systemic antimicrobial therapy. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01539343.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F; Petersen, Anne H

    2017-01-01

    , and prior CRBSI incidence. The prior CRBSI incidence in the study population was 2.4 episodes/1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days [95% Poisson confidence limits (CLs): 2.12, 2.71 episodes/1000 CVC days]. The maximum treatment period was 2 y or until occurrence of a CRBSI or right-censoring because......Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution.......02).Conclusions: In patients with intestinal failure who are life dependent on HPS, the taurolidine-citrate-heparin catheter lock demonstrates a clinically substantial and cost-beneficial reduction of CRBSI occurrence in a high-risk population compared with heparin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials...

  6. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  7. Incidence, risk factors and microbiology of central vascular catheter-related bloodstream infection in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjej, Zied; Nasri, Mourad; Sellami, Walid; Gharsallah, Hedi; Labben, Iheb; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2014-03-01

    Although there are many studies about catheter related infection in industrialized countries, very few have analyzed it in emerging countries. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence, microbiological profile and risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in a Tunisian medical intensive care unit. Over eight months (1 January 2012-30 August 2012) a prospective, observational study was performed in an 18-bed medical surgical intensive care unit at Tunis military hospital. Patients who required central venous catheter (CVC) placement for a duration greater than 48 h were included in the study. Two hundred sixty patients, with a total of 482 CVCs were enrolled. The mean duration of catheterization was 9.6 ± 6.2 days. The incidence for CRBSI and catheter colonization (CC) was 2.4 and 9.3 per 1000 catheter days, respectively. Risk factors independently associated with CRBSI were diabetes mellitus, long duration of catheterization, sepsis at insertion and administration of one or more antibiotics before insertion. The mortality rate among the CRBSI group was 21.8%. The predominant microorganisms isolated from CRBSI and CC episodes were Gram negative bacilli. All Gram negative organisms isolated among dead patients in CRBSI group were Extensive Drug Resistant (XDR). In our study the mortality rate among patients with CRBSI was high despite a low incidence of CRBSI. This high rate can be explained by the high-virulent status of Gram negative bacteria involved in CRBSI. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Taurolidine lock is superior to heparin lock in the prevention of catheter related bloodstream infections and occlusions.

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    Evelyn D Olthof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients. METHODS: Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation. RESULTS: Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9-8.7 for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.1 for occlusions. CONCLUSIONS: Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin.

  9. Método bundle na redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateteres centrais: revisão integrativa Método bundle en la redución de infecciones relacionadas a catéteres centrales: una revisión integrativa Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Dane Pereira Brachine

    2012-12-01

    éter con su retirada inmediata cuando posible. La mayoría de los estudios analizados mostraron una reducción significante de infección sanguínea relacionadas o asociadas con catéteres intravenosos centrales.This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  10. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Methods Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association’s Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter–related complications (MCRCs). Results Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter–related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. Conclusions The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters

  11. Use of the Tego needlefree connector is associated with reduced incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients

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    Brunelli SM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Brunelli,1 Levi Njord,2 Abigail E Hunt,1 Scott P Sibbel1 1DaVita Clinical Research®, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2DaVita HealthCare Partners, Inc, Denver, CO, USA Background and objectives: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs are common in hemodialysis patients using central venous catheters, and catheter occlusion also occurs frequently. The Tego needlefree connector was developed to reduce the incidence of these complications; however, existing studies of its effectiveness and safety are limited. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis compared outcomes among patients of a large dialysis organization receiving in-center hemodialysis using a central venous catheter with either the Tego connector or standard catheter caps between October 1 and June 30, 2013. Incidence rates for intravenous (IV antibiotic starts, receipt of an IV antibiotic course, positive blood cultures, mortality, and missed dialysis treatments were calculated, and incidence-rate ratios (IRRs were estimated using Poisson regression models. Utilization of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs and thrombolytics was described for each patient-month and compared using mixed linear models. Models were run without adjustment, adjusted for covariates that were imbalanced between cohorts, or fully adjusted for all potential confounders. Results: The analysis comprised 10,652 Tego patients and 6,493 controls. Tego use was independently associated with decreased risk of CRBSI, defined by initiation of IV antibiotics (adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–0.97 or initiation of IV antibiotic course (adjusted IRR 0.89, 95% CI 0.84–0.95. Tego use was independently associated with decreased rate of missed dialysis treatments (adjusted IRR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97–1.00; no significant difference between Tego and control cohorts was observed with respect to mortality. Tego use was associated with decreased likelihood of thrombolytic use (adjusted per

  12. Central venous catheter-related infection in a prospective and observational study of 2,595 catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leonardo; Henry, Christophe; Martín, María M; Jiménez, Alejandro; Mora, María L

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Central venous catheterization is commonly used in critically ill patients and may cause different complications, including infection. Although there are many studies about CVC-related infection, very few have analyzed it in detail. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence of catheter-related local infection (CRLI) and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) with central venous catheters (CVCs) according to different access sites. Methods This is a prospective and observational study, conducted in a 24-bed medical surgical intensive care unit of a 650-bed university hospital. All consecutive patients admitted to the ICU during 3 years (1 May 2000 and 30 April 2003) were included. Results The study included 2,018 patients. The number of CVCs and days of catheterization duration were: global, 2,595 and 18,999; subclavian, 917 and 8,239; jugular, 1,390 and 8,361; femoral, 288 and 2,399. CRLI incidence density was statistically higher for femoral than for jugular (15.83 versus 7.65, p < 0.001) and subclavian (15.83 versus 1.57, p < 0.001) accesses, and higher for jugular than for subclavian access (7.65 versus 1.57, p < 0.001). CRBSI incidence density was statistically higher for femoral than for jugular (8.34 versus 2.99, p = 0.002) and subclavian (8.34 versus 0.97, p < 0.001) accesses, and higher for jugular than for subclavian access (2.99 versus 0.97, p = 0.005). Conclusion Our results suggest that the order for punction, to minimize the CVC-related infection risk, should be subclavian (first order), jugular (second order) and femoral vein (third order). PMID:16280064

  13. [Risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection in non-critical patients with total parenteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocón Bretón, María Julia; Mañas Martínez, Ana Belén; Medrano Navarro, Ana Lidia; García García, Blanca; Gimeno Orna, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the most important complications in patients with a central venous catheter (CVC), due to its association with increased mortality, morbidity and health care cost. The administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is considered a CRBSI risk factor. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence rate and risk factors of CRBSI in patients with TPN that were hospitalized at the medical-surgical wards. This is a prospective observational study in non-critical patients who received TPN and were admitted at our hospital from January 2010 to November 2011. The clinical end point was the CRBSI. CRBSI incidence rate was calculated from episodes by every 1000 CVC-day. CRBSI independent risk factors were obtained from logistic regression analysis. A total of 331 patients were prescribed TPN during our study. The mean time of catheterization was 12.4 (DE 8.7) days and the mean TPN duration was 10.4 (DE 8.3) days. 47 cases of CRBSI were recorded, with an incidence rate of 11.4/1,000 CVC-day and of 13.7/1,000 NPT-day. Risk factors for CRBSI on univariante analysis included duration of catheterization more than 20 days (OR = 2.48; IC 95%: 1.16-5.26), TPN duration more than 2 weeks (OR= 4.63; IC 95%: 2.16-9.90) and the presence of fistulas (OR = 3.08; IC 95%: 1.24-7.63). At multivariate analysis, TPN duration (OR for a duration more than 14 days= 4.9; IC 95%: 2.2-10.9; p < 0.0001) was the only independent risk factor for CRBSI. In non-critical adult patients hospitalized at the medical-surgical wards, we have demonstrated that duration of TPN infusion increases the CRBSI risk. This risk increase is especially remarkable, being multiplied by 5, with a duration superior to 2 weeks. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2017-08-11

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Etiology and epidemiology of catheter related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition in a gastromedical center at a tertiary hospital in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Chen, Ming; Hellesøe, Anne-Marie Blok

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective epidemiologic study of catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in patients receiving long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) from January 2002 to December 2005. Our results showed that coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) were the most prevalent pathogens...

  16. Nosocomial catheter-related bloodstream infections in a pediatric intensive care unit: risk and rates associated with various intravascular technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O; Moler, Frank W; Dechert, Ronald E; VanDerElzen, Kristen; Chenoweth, Carol

    2003-10-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections are associated with increased patient morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. More than 90% of these infections are related to the use of intravascular catheter devices. This study was done to assess the risk and rates of catheter related-bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) associated with different intravascular technologies in a pediatric intensive care unit population. Retrospective cohort study. A 16-bed pediatric intensive care unit in a tertiary children's hospital. All admissions between July 1997 and December 1999 requiring placement of an intravascular access device for care were examined. Patients with CR-BSI were identified through ongoing surveillance using Centers for Disease Control/National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System definitions for bloodstream infection. None. Of the 2,728 admissions during the review period, 1,043 (38.3%) required placement of an intravascular access device. Bivariate analysis revealed that patients who required intravascular cannulae for extracorporeal life support had a 10-fold increased risk of developing a CR-BSI, and patients requiring vascular access for renal replacement therapy demonstrated a 4-fold increase in the risk of developing CR-BSI compared with the referent group. There was a significant increase in the CR-BSI rate associated with the use of more intravascular access devices per patient admission. Multivariate logistic regression identified the use of extracorporeal life support therapy and the total duration of use of intravascular access devices as significant independent predictors of CR-BSI when controlling for other predictors. The use of extracorporeal life support therapy, the presence of multiple intravascular access devices, and the total duration of intravascular access device use were associated with an increase in the rate and risk of developing CR-BSI in our pediatric intensive care unit population. Larger, prospective studies may help elucidate

  17. Catheter related venous thrombosis with cooling and warming catheters: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunet, Bertrand; Lacroix, Guillaume; Bordes, Julien; Poyet, Raphael; D'Aranda, Erwan; Goutorbe, Philippe

    2009-09-08

    Intravascular cooling and warming catheters are among a range of proliferating technologies used for temperature control. Complications related to the use of these devices are few, and no definitive evidence has been presented thus far to indicate any differences in complication rates between these balloon catheters and other central vein catheters. We report two cases of cooling and warming catheter-related venous thrombosis. They are the both first ones report of this kind in the literature. The first case was a 17-year-old man admitted with severe head trauma. On day 6, he presented with severe intracranial hypertension, requiring increased medical treatment: mannitol osmotherapy, barbiturate-induced coma, and mild therapeutic hypothermia. A double-lumen Alsius CoolLine catheter was placed in the inferior veina cava via the left femoral vein and active cooling was begun. On day 10, physical examination of the left inguinal area and echo-doppler revealed catheter-related thrombophlebitis with left iliocaval vein occlusion. The second case was a 42-year-old man admitted with a severe burn. On day 2, the patient was taken to the operating room for the first staged excision of his burn wounds. A triple lumen Alsius Icy catheter was placed in the inferior vena cava via the right femoral vein and active core warming of the patient was begun. From day 2 to day 7, active core warming of the patient was maintained. On day 7, he presented with a septic thrombophlebitis. Echo-doppler revealed a 4-cm-long thrombus at the femoral catheter site with complete blood flow obstruction and blood cultures and catheter tip were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Although generally considered safe, cooling and warming catheters can be associated with mechanical complications such as catheter-related venous thrombosis. Intensivists who use these devices should be aware of this possible complication. Finally, as with any other invasive catheter, to reduce the

  18. Randomized controlled trial of care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçeker, Gülçin Özalp; Yardımcı, Figen; Aydınok, Yeşim

    2017-06-01

    To compare the effects of the care bundles including chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings on the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in pediatric hematology-oncology patients with central venous catheters (CVCs). Twenty-seven PHO patients were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study in Turkey. The researcher used care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing in the experimental group (n = 14), and care bundles with advanced dressings in the control group (n = 13). According to the study results, 28.6% of the patients in the experimental group had CRBSI, while this rate was 38.5% in the control group patients. The CRBSI rate in the experimental group was 3.9, and the control group had 4.4 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. There was no exit-site infection in the experimental group. However, the control group had 1.7 per 1000 inpatient catheter days. Even though there was no difference between the two groups in which the researcher implemented care bundles with chlorhexidine dressing and advanced dressings in terms of CRBSI development, there was reduction in the CRBSI rates thanks to the care bundle approach. It is possible to control the CRBSI rates using care bundles in pediatric hematology-oncology patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of Subsequent Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Using Catheter Locks in High-Risk Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jacob B; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Okano, Akiko; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Bonnes, Sara L; Kelly, Darlene G; Mundi, Manpreet S; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-05-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a serious complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) and ethanol lock therapy (ELT) can be used to prevent CRBSI episodes in high-risk patients. Following institutional review board approval, all patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic HPN program from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2013, with catheter locking were eligible to be included. Patients without research authorization and ELT were estimated in all patients. A total of 63 patients were enrolled during the study period. Of 59 eligible patients, 29 (49%) were female, and 30 (51%) were male. The median duration of HPN was 3.66 (interquartile range, 0.75-8.19) years. The mean age ± SD at initiation of HPN was 49.89 ± 14.07 years. A total of 51 patients were instilled with ALT, and 8 patients were instilled with ELT during their course of HPN. A total of 313 CRBSI episodes occurred in these patients, 264 before locking and 49 after locking ( P ELT can reduce the overall rate of infections per 1000 catheter days. ALT or ELT can be used in appropriate clinical setting for patients receiving HPN.

  20. [Species distribution of pathogens and prognostic factors for catheter-related bloodstream infections in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yu, Li; Yang, Junhui; Long, Ding; Zhang, Yuanchao; Bu, Xiaofen

    2015-03-10

    To explore the incidence and species distribution of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in intensive care unit (ICU) at our hospital and analyze the risk factors for CRBSI. Hospitalized patients microbiologically diagnosed as CRBSI were recruited from January 2012 to June 2013. And the clinical data were collected retrospectively and analyzed by software IBM SPSS 19.0. Among 67 patients diagnosed as nosocomial CRBSI, 24 cases (35.8%) died while 43 survived. And a total of 81 strains were detected, including 42 Gram-positive (G⁺) bacteria (51.9%), 36 Gram-negative (G⁻) bacteria (44.4%) and 3 fungi (3.7%).The predominant pathogenic G⁺ and G⁻ bacteria were Staphylococcus epidermidis and Acinetobacter baumannii respectively. With multiple Logistic regressions, age ≥ 65 years, higher acute physiology & chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score and polymicrobial CRBSI were independent predictors of worse outcomes. The recent prevalent pathogens of CRBSI in ICU are S.epidermidis and A.baumannii. Advanced age, disease severity and polymicrobial CRBSI are significant independent risk factor of mortality for CRBSI patients in ICU.

  1. Cumulative Evidence of Randomized Controlled and Observational Studies on Catheter-Related Infection Risk of Central Venous Catheter Insertion Site in ICU Patients: A Pairwise and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvaniti, Kostoula; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Blot, Stijn; Apostolidou-Kiouti, Fani; Koulenti, Despoina; Haidich, Anna-Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Selection of central venous catheter insertion site in ICU patients could help reduce catheter-related infections. Although subclavian was considered the most appropriate site, its preferential use in ICU patients is not generalized and questioned by contradicted meta-analysis results. In addition, conflicting data exist on alternative site selection whenever subclavian is contraindicated. To compare catheter-related bloodstream infection and colonization risk between the three sites (subclavian, internal jugular, and femoral) in adult ICU patients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, CINAHL, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials and observational ones. Extracted data were analyzed by pairwise and network meta-analysis. Twenty studies were included; 11 were observational, seven were randomized controlled trials for other outcomes, and two were randomized controlled trials for sites. We evaluated 18,554 central venous catheters: 9,331 from observational studies, 5,482 from randomized controlled trials for other outcomes, and 3,741 from randomized controlled trials for sites. Colonization risk was higher for internal jugular (relative risk, 2.25 [95% CI, 1.84-2.75]; I = 0%) and femoral (relative risk, 2.92 [95% CI, 2.11-4.04]; I = 24%), compared with subclavian. Catheter-related bloodstream infection risk was comparable for internal jugular and subclavian, higher for femoral than subclavian (relative risk, 2.44 [95% CI, 1.25-4.75]; I = 61%), and lower for internal jugular than femoral (relative risk, 0.55 [95% CI, 0.34-0.89]; I = 61%). When observational studies that did not control for baseline characteristics were excluded, catheter-related bloodstream infection risk was comparable between the sites. In ICU patients, internal jugular and subclavian may, similarly, decrease catheter-related bloodstream infection risk, when compared with femoral. Subclavian could be suggested as the most

  2. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature

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    Zumrut Sahbudak Bal

    Full Text Available Brevibacterium spp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram- positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of B. casei catheter-related bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia. We aim to enhance the awareness of pediatric hematology and infectious disease specialists about this pathogen and review of the literature.

  3. Chronic Complications After Femoral Central Venous Catheter-related Thrombosis in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, Jeanine J.; Knoester, Hennie; de Neef, Marjorie; Smets, Anne M. J. B.; Betlem, Aukje; van Ommen, C. Heleen

    2015-01-01

    Prescription of thromboprophylaxis is not a common practice in pediatric intensive care units. Most thrombi are catheter-related and asymptomatic, without causing acute complications. However, chronic complications of these (a)symptomatic catheter-related thrombi, that is, postthrombotic syndrome

  4. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review

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    Janislei Gislei Dorociaki Stocco

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. Method: systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. Results: 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%, relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15 and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96. Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%, relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85 and number needed to treat 5. Conclusion: the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects.

  5. The Correlation Between Biofilm Production and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections Sustained by Candida. A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Grazia; Visconti, Valeria; Ghezzi, Maria Cristina; Giordano, Alessandra; Raponi, Giammarco

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm forming capacity of yeasts colonizing the intravenous devices is considered a key factor involved in the pathogenesis of Candida catheter-related bloodstream infections (CCRBSI). The biofilm production of strains of Candida spp. isolated both from the CVC and from the blood of patients with CCRBSI was compared to that of strains isolated from patients not having CCRBSI. Results, expressed in terms of Biofilm Index (BI), revealed that biofilm-producing strains were isolated in the CCRBSI group with a frequency significantly higher than in the non-CCRBSI group (χ(2) = 4.25, p = 0.03). The species more frequently cultured was C. parapsilosis complex (including C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis). When this species was isolated from the CVC tip cultures of the CCRBSI group it showed BIs significantly (p = 0.05) higher than those found in the non-CCRBSI group. All the strains of C. tropicalis isolated from the CCRBSI group produced biofilm. Instead most of the isolates of C. glabrata were non-producers. The cumulative BI of non-albicans Candida strains isolated from CCRBSI patients was significantly higher than that of non-albicans strains cultured from patients non-CCRBSI (χ(2) = 6.91; p = 0.008). C. albicans was a biofilm producer both in the CCRBSI and in the non-CCRBSI group. When isolated from the blood it showed enhanced biofilm production in the CCRBSI group only, while when colonizing the CVC it displayed high BIs both in the CCRBSI group and in non-CCRBSI group. Our data seem to indicate that the biofilm production capacity should be considered in the clinical management of CCRBSI.

  6. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Zumrut Sahbudak; Sen, Semra; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Aydemir, Sohret; Vardar, Fadil

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacterium spp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram-positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of B. casei catheter-related bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia. We aim to enhance the awareness of pediatric hematology and infectious disease specialists about this pathogen and review of the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of bloodstream infection in children (the CATCH trial): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ruth E; Mok, Quen; Dwan, Kerry; Harron, Katie; Moitt, Tracy; Millar, Mike; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Tibby, Shane M; Hughes, Dyfrig; Gamble, Carrol

    2016-04-23

    Impregnated central venous catheters are recommended for adults to reduce bloodstream infections but not for children because there is not enough evidence to prove they are effective. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of any type of impregnation (antibiotic or heparin) compared with standard central venous catheters to prevent bloodstream infections in children needing intensive care. We did a randomised controlled trial of children admitted to 14 English paediatric intensive care units. Children younger than 16 years were eligible if they were admitted or being prepared for admission to a participating paediatric intensive care unit and were expected to need a central venous catheter for 3 or more days. Children were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a central venous catheter impregnated with antibiotics, a central venous catheter impregnated with heparin, or a standard central venous catheter with computer generated randomisation in blocks of three and six, stratified by method of consent, site, and envelope storage location within the site. The clinician responsible for inserting the central venous catheter was not masked to allocation, but allocation was concealed from patients, their parents, and the paediatric intensive care unit personnel responsible for their care. The primary outcome was time to first bloodstream infection between 48 h after randomisation and 48 h after central venous catheter removal with impregnated (antibiotic or heparin) versus standard central venous catheters, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. Safety analyses compared central venous catheter-related adverse events in the subset of children for whom central venous catheter insertion was attempted (per-protocol population). This trial is registered with ISRCTN number, ISRCTN34884569. Between Nov 25, 2010, and Nov 30, 2012, 1485 children were recruited to this study. We randomly assigned 502 children to receive standard central venous catheters, 486 to receive

  8. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  9. [Analysis on the prevalence of central venous catheter-related infection in burn patients and its risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Fan; Sun, Kedai; Zhou, Tao; Gong, Yali; Peng, Yizhi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of central venous catheter-related infection (CRI) in burn patients and its risk factors, so as to guide the clinical practice. Clinical data of 5 026 days of 480 cases of central venous catheterization altogether in 228 burn patients admitted to our ward from June 2011 to December 2014, conforming to the study criteria, were retrospectively analyzed. (1) The incidence of CRI and that of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in patients (the infection rates per thousand days were calculated) and mortality due to them, and detection of concerning bacteria were recorded after each case of catheterization. (2) The incidence of CRI after each case of catheterization in patients was recorded according to the classification of their gender, age, total burn area, full-thickness burn area, cause of injury, severity of inhalation injury, location of catheterization, whether catheterization through wound or not, duration of catheterization, and the data were processed with chi-square test. Indexes with statistically significant differences were selected, and they were processed with multivariate logistic stepwise regression analysis to screen the independent risk factors of CRI. (3) To all cases of catheterization and cases with catheterization through wound, incidence of CRI after each case of catheterization in patients at each time period was recorded according to the sorting of duration of catheterization. Data were processed with chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, and the values of P were adjusted by Bonferroni. (1) Infection rate of CRI per thousand days was 50.14‰ (252/5 026), resulting in the mortality rate of 3.51% (8/228). Infection rate of CRBSI per thousand days was 18.70‰ (94/5 026), resulting in the mortality rate of 2.19% (5/228). Respectively 319 and 105 strains of pathogens were detected in CRI and CRBSI, in which the top four bacteria detected were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  10. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F; Petersen, Anne H; Petersen, Jørgen H; Fuglsang, Kristian A; Staun, Michael; Broebech, Per; Moser, Claus E; Jeppesen, Palle B

    2017-09-01

    Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution, taurolidine-citrate-heparin, compared with heparin 100 IE/mL on CRBSI occurrence.Design: Forty-one high-risk patients receiving HPS followed in a tertiary HPS unit were randomly assigned in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. External, stratified randomization was performed according to age, sex, and prior CRBSI incidence. The prior CRBSI incidence in the study population was 2.4 episodes/1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days [95% Poisson confidence limits (CLs): 2.12, 2.71 episodes/1000 CVC days]. The maximum treatment period was 2 y or until occurrence of a CRBSI or right-censoring because of CVC removal. The exact permutation tests were used to calculate P values for the log-rank tests.Results: Twenty patients received the taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock and 21 received the heparin lock, with 9622 and 6956 treatment days, respectively. In the taurolidine-citrate-heparin arm, no CRBSIs occurred, whereas 7 CRBSIs occurred in the heparin arm, with an incidence of 1.0/1000 CVC days (95% Poisson CLs: 0.4, 2.07/1000 CVC days; P = 0.005). The CVC removal rates were 0.52/1000 CVC days (95% Poisson CLs: 0.17, 1.21/1000 CVC days) and 1.72/1000 CVC days (95% Poisson CLs: 0.89, 3.0/1000 CVC days) in the taurolidine-citrate-heparin and heparin arm, respectively, tending to prolong CVC survival in the taurolidine arm (P = 0.06). Costs per treatment year were lower in the taurolidine arm (€2348) than in the heparin arm (€6744) owing to fewer admission days related to treating CVC-related complications (P = 0.02).Conclusions: In patients with intestinal failure who are life dependent on HPS, the taurolidine-citrate-heparin catheter lock demonstrates a clinically substantial and

  11. Risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection: a prospective multicenter study in Brazilian intensive care units

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    Daniela Bicudo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Central venous catheters (CVC are devices of great importance in health care. The advantages gained from the use of catheters outweigh the complications that might result from their use, among which bloodstream infections (BSI. In spite of its importance, few national studies have addressed this issue. OBJECTIVE: The aim this study was to determine the incidence of BSI in patients with CVC, hospitalized in ICU, as well as the variables associated with this complication. METHODS: Multicentric cohort study carried out at ICUs of three hospitals at Universidade Federal de São Paulo complex. RESULTS: A total of 118 cases of BSI in 11.546 catheters day were observed: 10.22 BSI per 1,000 catheters day. On average, BSI was associated to seven additional days of hospital stay in our study (p < 0.001, with a significant difference between types of catheters. Concerning the place of insertion, there was no statistical difference in BSI rates. CONCLUSION: We concluded that a patient who uses a catheter for longer than 13 days presents a progressive risk for infection of approximately three times higher in relation to a patient who uses the catheter for less than 13 days (p < 0.001. The median duration of catheter use was 14 days among patients with BSI and 9 days in patients without infection (p < 0.001. There was higher prevalence of Gram-negative infections. The risk factors for BSI were utilization of multiple-lumen catheters, duration of catheterization and ICU length of stay.

  12. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektaş, Ayhan; Kara, Ateş; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. Results: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046). The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043) and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003). The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048). The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024). Conclusion: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury. PMID:26316482

  13. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Pektaş

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. METHODS: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. RESULTS: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046. The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043 and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003. The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048. The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury.

  14. Chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine coating on central venous catheters is not sufficient for protection against catheter-related infection: Simulation-based laboratory research with clinical validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ji; Lim, Jae Kwan; Park, Jeong Jun; Huh, Hyub; Kim, Dong-Joo; Gong, Chang-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of chlorhexidine- and silver sulfadiazine-coated central venous catheters (CSS-CVC) against catheter-related infection remains controversial. We hypothesized that the loss of silver nanoparticles may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of CSS-CVCs and that this loss could be due to the frictional force between the surface of the CVC and the bloodstream. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the antimicrobial effect of CSS-CVCs decreases with increasing exposure time in a bloodstream model and quantitatively assay the antimicrobial effect of CSS-CVCs compared with polyurethane and antiseptic-impregnated CVCs. Methods Each CVC was subjected to 120 hours of saline flow and analyzed at intervals over 24 hours. The analyses included energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical density after a Staphylococcus aureus incubation test. Results The weight percentage of silver in the CSS-CVCs significantly decreased to 56.18% (44.10% ± 3.32%) with 48-hour catheterization and to 18.88% (14.82% ± 1.33%) with 120-hour catheterization compared with the initial weight percentage (78.50% ± 6.32%). In the S. aureus incubation test, the antibacterial function of CSS-CVCs was lost after 48 hours [3 (N/D) of OD]. Similar results were observed in a pilot clinical study using 18 CSS-CVCs. Conclusions We found that the efficacy of CSS-CVCs decreased over time and that the antibacterial function was lost after 48 hours of simulated wear-out. Therefore, antibiotic-impregnated CVCs may be a better option when longer (>48 hours) indwelling is needed. PMID:28534703

  15. Executive summary: Diagnosis and Treatment of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection: Clinical Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) and the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernando; Garnacho-Montero, José; Del Pozo, José Luis; Bouza, Emilio; Capdevila, José Antonio; de Cueto, Marina; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Esteban, Jaime; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Fernández Sampedro, Marta; Fortún, Jesús; Guembe, María; Lorente, Leonardo; Paño, Jose Ramón; Ramírez, Paula; Salavert, Miguel; Sánchez, Miguel; Vallés, Jordi

    2018-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) constitute an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. The aim of these guidelines is to provide updated recommendations for the diagnosis and management of CRBSI in adults. Prevention of CRBSI is excluded. Experts in the field were designated by the two participating Societies (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias). Short-term peripheral venous catheters, non-tunneled and long-term central venous catheters, tunneled catheters and hemodialysis catheters are covered by these guidelines. The panel identified 39 key topics that were formulated in accordance with the PICO format. The strength of the recommendations and quality of the evidence were graded in accordance with ESCMID guidelines. Recommendations are made for the diagnosis of CRBSI with and without catheter removal and of tunnel infection. The document establishes the clinical situations in which a conservative diagnosis of CRBSI (diagnosis without catheter removal) is feasible. Recommendations are also made regarding empirical therapy, pathogen-specific treatment (coagulase-negative staphylococci, Sthaphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, Gram-negative bacilli, and Candida spp), antibiotic lock therapy, diagnosis and management of suppurative thrombophlebitis and local complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

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    Aya Amer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC, who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management.

  17. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Aya; Broadbent, Roland S; Edmonds, Liza; Wheeler, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC), who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management.

  18. Clinical-epidemiological characteristics and outcome of patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections in Europe (ESGNI-006 Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, P; Bouza, E; San Juan, R

    2004-01-01

    (1.55 vs. 0.33/1,000 admissions). Most (67%) catheters were non-tunneled central venous catheters, were in the jugular vein (44%), had been implanted for > 7 days (70%), were made of polyurethane (61%) and were multi-lumen (67%). In 36% of cases, catheters were implanted by physicians other than...

  19. Impact of revising the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System definition for catheter-related bloodstream infection in ICU: reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network case definition in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Leon J; Brett, Judy; Bull, Ann L; McBryde, Emma S; Russo, Philip L; Richards, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Effective and comparable surveillance for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in the intensive care unit requires a reproducible case definition that can be readily applied by infection control professionals. Using a questionnaire containing clinical cases, reproducibility of the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NNIS) surveillance definition for CLABSI was assessed in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals participating in the Victorian Hospital Acquired Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS). The same questionnaire was then used to evaluate the reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition for CLABSI. Target hospitals were defined as large metropolitan (1A) or other large hospitals (non-1A), according to the Victorian Department of Human Services. Questionnaire responses of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NHSN surveillance experts were used as gold standard comparator. Eighteen of 21 eligible VICNISS centers participated in the survey. Overall concordance with the gold standard was 57.1%, and agreement was highest for 1A hospitals (60.6%). The proportion of congruently classified cases varied according to NNIS criteria: criterion 1 (recognized pathogen), 52.8%; criterion 2a (skin contaminant in 2 or more blood cultures), 83.3%; criterion 2b (skin contaminant in 1 blood culture and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted), 58.3%; non-CLABSI cases, 51.4%. When survey questions regarding identification of cases of CLABSI criterion 2b were removed (consistent with the current NHSN definition), overall percentage concordance increased to 62.5% (72.2% for 1A centers). Further educational interventions are required to improve the discrimination of primary and secondary causes of bloodstream infection in Victorian intensive care units. Although reproducibility of the CLABSI case definition is relatively poor, adoption of the revised NHSN definition

  20. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  1. Genetic characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections and from colonized healthcare workers in a Belgian hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis is a pathogen that is frequently encountered in the hospital environment. Healthcare workers (HCWs) can serve as a reservoir for the transmission of S. epidermidis to patients. Methods The aim of this study was to compare and identify differences between S. epidermidis isolated from 20 patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) and from the hands of 42 HCWs in the same hospital in terms of antimicrobial resistance, biofilm production, presence of the intercellular adhesion (ica) operon and genetic diversity (pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing). Results S. epidermidis isolates that caused CRBSI were resistant to significantly more non-betalactam drugs than were isolates collected from HCWs. Among the 43 mecA positive isolates (26 from HCWs), the most frequent SCCmec type was type IV (44%). The ica operon was significantly more prevalent in CRBSI isolates than in HCWs (P epidermidis ST2, mecA-positive and icaA-positive isolates, which caused the majority of clinically severe CRBSI, were not recovered from the HCW’s hands. PMID:24899534

  2. A role for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshiro; Kohda, Kyuhei; Konuma, Yuichi; Hiraoka, Yasuko; Ichikawa, Yukari; Ono, Kaoru; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Takada, Kouichi; Iyama, Satoshi; Kato, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Central venous catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSIs) are a serious complication in patients with hematological malignancies. However, it remains unclear whether there is a difference in the rate of CR-BSI associated with the conventional type of central venous catheters (cCVCs) and peripherally inserted CVCs (PICCs) in such patients. To address this question, we retrospectively investigated the incidence of CR-BSIs associated with PICCs versus cCVCs in patients with hematological malignancies. We used PICCs in all consecutive patients requiring CVC placement between February 2009 and February 2013. We compared the CR-BSI rate in patients with PICCs with that in patients with cCVCs treated between September 2006 and January 2009 (control group). Eighty-four patients received PICCs and 85 received cCVCs. The most common reason for removal due to catheter-related complications was CR-BSI. The CR-BSI rate in the PICC group was significantly lower than that in the cCVC group (PICCs: 1.23/1000 catheter days; cCVCs: 5.30/1000 catheter days; P Catheter-related complications other than CR-BSIs occurred at an extremely low rate in the PICC group. The median catheter-related complication-free survival duration was significantly longer in the PICC group than in the cCVC group. Our study shows that PICCs are useful in patients with hematological malignancies.

  3. Use of corporate Six Sigma performance-improvement strategies to reduce incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in a surgical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Heidi L; Crede, William B; Topal, Jeffrey E; Roumanis, Sarah A; Devlin, Marie W; Foley, Andrea B

    2005-09-01

    Corporate performance-improvement methodologies can outperform traditional ones in addressing ICU-based adverse events. My colleagues and I used Six Sigma methodology to address our catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) rate, which considerably exceeded the nationally established median over a 9-year period. We hypothesized that use of Six Sigma methodology would result in a substantial and sustainable decrease in our CR-BSI rate. All patients were directly cared for by a geographically localized surgical ICU team in an academic tertiary referral center. CR-BSIs were identified by infection control staff using CDC definitions. Personnel trained in Six Sigma techniques facilitated performance-improvement efforts. Interventions included barrier precaution kits, new policies for catheter changes over guide wires, adoption of a new site-preparation antiseptic, direct attending supervision of catheter insertions, video training for housestaff, and increased frequency of dressing changes. After additional data analysis, chlorhexidine-silver catheters were used selectively in high-risk patients. The impact of interventions was assessed by monitoring the number of catheters placed between CR-BSIs. Before the intervention period, 27 catheters were placed, on average, between individual CR-BSIs, a CR-BSI rate of 11 per 1,000 catheter days. After all operations were implemented, 175 catheters were placed between line infections, and average CR-BSI rate of 1.7/1,000 catheter days, a 650% improvement (p Six Sigma corporate performance-improvement method impacting purely clinical outcomes. CR-BSI reduction was highly substantial and sustained after other traditional strategies had failed.

  4. Evaluation of the usefulness of a quantitative blood culture in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection: Comparative analysis of two periods (2002 and 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planes, Anna Maria; Calleja, Raquel; Bernet, Albert; Campins-Martí, Magda; Almirante, Benito; Pumarola, Tomàs; Fernández-Hidalgo, Núria

    2016-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the usefulness of systematic quantitative blood culture (QBC) in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) during two 1-year periods (2002 and 2012). The study included all QBC requests sent to the microbiology laboratory for suspected CRBSI in adults (≥18 years) with any type of intravascular catheter (IVC). Based on a ratio of ≥4:1CFU/mL of the same microorganism between IVC blood culture from any lumen and peripheral blood culture, 5 diagnostic groups were defined: confirmed or probable CRBSI, primary BSI, other focus of infection, and colonization. In total, 4521 QBCs were evaluated; 24% positive in 2002 and 16% in 2012 (P<0.0001). There were 243 episodes of suspected CRBSI (101 in 2002 and 142 in 2012). Confirmed CRBSI episodes were higher in 2002 than 2012 (56% vs 34%) (P<0.0001), whereas colonization episodes were lower (18% vs 38%) (P=0.0006). Gram-positive cocci decrease in 2012 relative to 2002 (56% vs 79.7%) (P=0.022). Almost one-third (32%) of confirmed CRBSI would have been missed if blood from all catheter lumens had not been cultured. QBC is a useful method for diagnosing CRBSI. Blood samples from all catheter lumens must be cultured to avoid missing around one-third of CRBSI diagnoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Michael Z

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  6. Ethanol lock therapy (E-Lock in the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI after major heart surgery (MHS: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Pérez-Granda

    Full Text Available Lock-therapy with antimicrobials has been used for the treatment and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI. Experiences with Ethanol-Locks (E-locks have included therapeutic interventions with variable results. Patients undergoing Major Heart Surgery (MHS are a high-risk population for CR-BSI.The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerance to E-Locks in the prevention of CR-BSI of patients undergoing MHS.This is an academic, prospective, randomized, non-blinded and controlled clinical trial assessing the incidence of CR-BSI of patients with E-locks (E-lock and the tolerance to the procedure in comparison with patients receiving conventional catheter-care (CCC. Patients undergoing MHS with intravascular catheters for more than 48 hours were randomly assigned into treatment or control group by a computer-generated list of randomly assigned numbers. In the treatment group, all their catheter lumens were locked with an ethanol solution at 70% for two hours, every three days (E-Locks. The control group received conventional catheter-care (CCC. Overall, 200 patients with 323 catheters were included in the study, which was stopped after 10 months due to adverse events. Of them, 179 catheters (113 patients had E-Locks and 144 catheters (87 patients were CCC. Euroscore Surgical Risk in both groups was 4.04 vs 4.07 p = 0.94 respectively. The results for the E-Locks and CCC were as follows: Incidence of CR-BSI/1000 days of exposure 2.1 vs 5.2 (p = 0.33, catheter tip colonization 14 (7.8% vs 6 (4.2% patients (p = 0.17, median length of hospital stay, 15 vs 16 days (p = 0.77. Seven patients (6.19%, all in the ethanol branch, had to discontinue the trial due to intolerance or adverse events.We do not recommend prophylaxis of CR-BSI with ethanol-lock on a routine basis in patients undergoing Major Heart Surgery.Clinical Trials.gov NCT01229592.

  7. Antimicrobial dressings for the prevention of catheter-related infections in newborn infants with central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Nai Ming; Taylor, Jacqueline E; Tan, Kenneth; Choo, Yao Mun; Ahmad Kamar, Azanna; Muhamad, Nor Asiah

    2016-03-23

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) provide secured venous access in neonates. Antimicrobial dressings applied over the CVC sites have been proposed to reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) by decreasing colonisation. However, there may be concerns on the local and systemic adverse effects of these dressings in neonates. We assessed the effectiveness and safety of antimicrobial (antiseptic or antibiotic) dressings in reducing CVC-related infections in newborn infants. Had there been relevant data, we would have evaluated the effects of antimicrobial dressings in different subgroups, including infants who received different types of CVCs, infants who required CVC for different durations, infants with CVCs with and without other antimicrobial modifications, and infants who received an antimicrobial dressing with and without a clearly defined co-intervention. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group (CNRG). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 9), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE (EBCHOST), CINAHL and references cited in our short-listed articles using keywords and MeSH headings, up to September 2015. We included randomised controlled trials that compared an antimicrobial CVC dressing against no dressing or another dressing in newborn infants. We extracted data using the standard methods of the CNRG. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and risk of bias of the retrieved records. We expressed our results using risk difference (RD) and risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Out of 173 articles screened, three studies were included. There were two comparisons: chlorhexidine dressing following alcohol cleansing versus polyurethane dressing following povidone-iodine cleansing (one study); and silver-alginate patch versus control (two studies). A total of 855 infants from level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) were evaluated, 705 of

  8. Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections In Patients Of The Intensive Care Unit

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    Ana Carolina Coimbra de Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the prevalence of bloodstream infection associated with the Catheter related Blood stream infections in patients of the Intensive Care Unit, and the characteristics of its use and handling. Methods: Descriptive and transversal study with a sample of 88 participants. Data were collected through the observational method and the records in the medical records. The absolute and relative frequencies were used for data analysis. Results: 73.86% of the patients had central venous access in the subclavian vein, 100% used double lumen Catheter related Blood stream infections, 0.5% chlorhexidine solution for skin antisepsis, dressing coverage is performed mostly with Sterile gauze and tape, with a daily exchange. The rate of infection related to the use of the Catheter related Blood stream infections was (6.81%. The most infused pharmacological drugs were antimicrobials (69.32%. Conclusion: The study showed that care with central venous accesses is performed according to recommendations for prevention of bloodstream infection related to the use of these devices. The infection rate is close to the standards found in the literature. Key words: Central Venous Catheterization. Hospital Infection. Intensive care unit. Risk factors. Catheter-Related Infection..

  9. Early removal versus expectant management of central venous catheters in neonates with bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Oddie, Sam J; McGuire, William

    2016-04-20

    Uncertainty exists regarding the management of newborn infants with a bloodstream infection and a central venous catheter in place. The central venous catheter may act as a nidus for infecting organisms and observational studies have suggested that early removal of the catheter is associated with a lower incidence of persistent or complicated infection. However, since central venous catheters provide secure vascular access to deliver nutrition and medications, the possible harms of early removal versus expectant management also need to be considered. To determine the effect of early removal versus expectant management of central venous catheters on morbidity and mortality in newborn infants with bloodstream infections. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1966 to October 2015), EMBASE (1980 to October 2015), CINAHL (1982 to October 2015), conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared early removal versus expectant management of central venous catheters in neonates with bloodstream infections. We used the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We did not identify any eligible randomised controlled trials. There are no trial data to guide practice regarding early removal versus expectant management of central venous catheters in newborn infants with bloodstream infections. A simple and pragmatic randomised controlled trial is needed to resolve the uncertainty about optimal management in this common and important clinical scenario.

  10. Incidence of catheter-related thrombosis in acute leukemia patients: a comparative, retrospective study of the safety of peripherally inserted vs. centrally inserted central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaei, Mohammad; Fernandes, Bruna; Brandwein, Joseph; Goodyear, Marilyn Dawn; Pokhrel, Arun; Wu, Cynthia

    2016-12-01

    Central venous catheters are a leading cause of upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis. Concomitant severe thrombocytopenia makes anticoagulation for catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) in patients with acute leukemia (AL) a challenge. Incidence of CRT has been reported to be increased in those with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) vs. those with centrally inserted ones (CICC). Our objective is to compare the incidence rate of CRT in leukemia inpatients who received either a PICC vs. CICC. We retrospectively reviewed adult inpatients admitted to hematology wards with a new diagnosis of AL and who received either a PICC or a CICC. Baseline patient and catheter characteristics were recorded. Our primary outcome was the incidence rate of CRT in each group. The secondary outcomes included rates of infectious and mechanical complications. Six hundred sixty-three patients received at least one PICC (338) or CICC (325) insertion. A total of 1331 insertions were recorded, with 82 (11.7 %) and 41 (6.5 %) CRT in the PICC and CICC groups, respectively. The incidence rates were 1.89 and 0.52 per 1000 catheter day in the PICC and CICC groups, respectively. A PICC, when compared to CICC, was a significant risk factor for CRT (sHR 2.5, p central venous catheter.

  11. Use of semi-quantitative and quantitative culture methods and typing for studying the epidemiology of central venous catheter-related infections in neonates on parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Premru, M; Gubina, M; Kaufmann, M E; Primozic, J; Cookson, B D

    1999-05-01

    To study the epidemiology - especially the impact of contaminated stopcocks - on central venous catheter (CVC) infection and catheter-related sepsis (CRS), semi-quantitative (SQ) and quantitative (Q) culture methods and typing of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were employed in 49 neonates with clinical signs of sepsis while receiving parenteral nutrition in the paediatric intensive care unit. The patients were divided into two groups according to stopcock contamination: group A consisted of 18 patients (36%) with contaminated stopcocks and group B consisted of 31 patients (64%) with sterile stopcocks. Five specimens were obtained from each patient, in addition to that from the stopcock: a swab taken from the skin surrounding the catheter puncture site; the CVC tip; the intradermal segment (IDC); and samples of parenteral fluid and blood. A total of 294 specimens (392 sites) was cultured and micro-organisms were identified. All CNS isolated were typed by biotyping, antibiogram, plasmid analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the discriminatory power of the typing methods was compared. The CVC tips were infected in 25 patients (51%); 15 (83%) in group A and 10 (32%) in group B. Sepsis was detected in 24 neonates (49%), 13 in group A and 11 in group B. This was catheter-related in 15 patients (63%), 12 in group A and 3 in group B. CNS were recovered from 13 (52%) of 25 infected CVCs, nine in group A and four in group B. Sixty-five CNS isolates were recovered from these patients and belonged to 14 biotypes, 22 antibiograms, 22 plasmid profiles and 26 PFGE types. Typing showed that in six of nine patients in group A, CNS of the same type were recovered from the catheter tip and the stopcock, in one patient the catheter tip and skin isolates were the same and in two others the catheter tip isolates were different from stopcock and skin isolates. In all four patients in group B, different CNS types were recovered from CVC tips and skin

  12. Subclavian central venous catheter-related thrombosis in trauma patients: incidence, risk factors and influence of polyurethane type

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to a central venous catheter varies considerably in ICUs depending on the population included. The aim of this study was to determine subclavian central venous catheter (SCVC)-related DVT risk factors in severely traumatized patients with regard to two kinds of polyurethane catheters. Methods Critically ill trauma patients needing a SCVC for their usual care were prospectively included in an observational study. Depending on the month of inclusion, patients received one of the two available products in the emergency unit: either an aromatic polyurethane SCVC or an aliphatic polyurethane SCVC. Patients were screened weekly by ultrasound for SCVC-related DVT. Potential risk factors were collected, including history-related, trauma-related and SCVC-related characteristics. Results A total of 186 patients were included with a median Injury Severity Sore of 30 and a high rate of severe brain injuries (21% of high intracranial pressure). Incidence of SCVC-related DVT was 37% (95% confidence interval: 26 to 40) in patients or 20/1,000 catheter-days. SCVC-related DVT occurred within 8 days in 65% of cases. There was no significant difference in DVT rates between the aromatic polyurethane and aliphatic polyurethane SCVC groups (38% vs. 36%). SCVC-related DVT independent risk factors were age >30 years, intracranial hypertension, massive transfusion (>10 packed red blood cell units), SCVC tip position in the internal jugular or in the innominate vein, and ipsilateral jugular catheter. Conclusion SCVC-related DVT concerned one-third of these severely traumatized patients and was mostly clinically silent. Incidence did not depend on the type of polyurethane but was related to age >30 years, intracranial hypertension or misplacement of the SCVC. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of routine screening in these patients in whom thromboprophylaxis may be hazardous. PMID:23718723

  13. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-08-08

    to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. evaluar la efectividad y seguridad del uso de catéteres venosos centrales de segunda generación, impregnados en clorhexidina y sulfadiazina de plata, comparados con otros catéteres impregnados o no impregnados, para prevención de infección de la corriente sanguínea. revisión sistemática con metaanálisis. La búsqueda fue realizada en las bases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; fueron consultados anales de congresos y registros de ensayos clínicos. fueron identificados 1.235 estudios, 97 preseleccionados y cuatro incluidos. En la infección de la

  14. Ultraviolet-C Irradiation for Prevention of Central Venous Catheter Related Infections: An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Tegos, George P.; St. Denis, Tyler G.; Anderson, Don; Sinofsky, Ed; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are widely used in the United States and are associated with 250,000 to 500,000 CVC-related infections in hospitals annually. We used a catheter made from ultraviolet-C (UVC) transmissive material to test whether delivery of UVC from the lumen would allow inactivation of microorganisms on the outer surface of CVC. When the catheter was exposed to UVC irradiation from a cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) inside the catheter lumen at a radiant exposure of 3.6 mJ/cm2, more than 6-log10 of drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria adhered to the outer surface of the catheter were inactivated. Three to 7-log10 of drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and 2.8 log10 of fungi were inactivated at a radiant exposure of 11 mJ/cm2. UVC irradiation also offered a highly selective inactivation of bacteria over keratinocytes under exactly comparable conditions. After 11 mJ/cm2 UVC light had been delivered, over 6 log10 of bacteria were inactivated while the viability loss of the keratinocytes was only about 57%. PMID:21073470

  15. Hospital readmissions for catheter-related bloodstream infection and use of ethanol lock therapy: comparison of patients receiving parenteral nutrition or intravenous fluids in the home vs a skilled nursing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Mandy L; Pogatschnik, Cassandra; Konrad, Denise; Kirby, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is the most serious long-term infectious complication of long-term home parenteral nutrition (PN). Ethanol is being used more commonly as a catheter locking solution in the home PN setting for prevention of CRBSI; however, no current literature reports the use of ethanol lock (ETL) in skilled nursing facility (SNF) patients. The authors evaluated the number of hospital readmissions for CRBSI and length of stay between SNF (not receiving ETL) and home patients (receiving or not receiving ETL) receiving PN or intravenous fluid therapy. SNF patients had a significantly longer length of stay (LOS) for CRBSI hospital admissions compared with patients receiving PN at home with or without ETL (P ETL. Home PN patients not receiving ETL were more likely to have a CRBSI from Staphylococcus sp (48% vs 27%; P = .015), whereas SNF PN patients not receiving ETL were more likely to have a CRBSI from Enterococcus sp (16% vs 3%; P = .004). Despite different causative organisms and medical acuity likely affecting the differences observed in LOS, the SNF population is another setting ETL can be used to prevent CRBSI.

  16. Effectiveness of Minocycline and Rifampin vs Chlorhexidine and Silver Sulfadiazine-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters in Preventing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in a High-Volume Academic Intensive Care Unit: A Before and after Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Stephanie; Mazuski, John E; Sona, Carie; Schallom, Marilyn; Boyle, Walter; Buchman, Timothy G; Bochicchio, Grant V; Coopersmith, Craig M; Schuerer, Douglas J E

    2015-09-01

    Use of chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine-impregnated (CSS) central venous catheters (CVCs) has not been shown to decrease the catheter-related bloodstream infection rate in an ICU. The purpose of this study was to determine if use of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated (MR) CVCs would decrease central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates compared with those observed with use of CSS-impregnated CVCs. A total of 7,181 patients were admitted to a 24-bed university hospital surgical ICU: 2,551 between March 2004 and August 2005 (period 1) and 4,630 between April 2006 and July 2008 (period 2). All patients requiring CVC placement in period 1 had a CSS catheter inserted, and in period 2 all patients had MR CVCs placed. Twenty-two CLABSIs occurred during 7,732 catheter days (2.7 per 1,000 catheter days) in the 18-month period when CSS lines were used. After the introduction of MR CVCs, 21 catheter-related bloodstream infections occurred during 15,722 catheter days (1.4 per 1,000 catheter days). This represents a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the CLABSI rate after introduction of MR CVCs. Mean length of time to infection developing after catheterization (8.6 days for CSS vs 6.1 days for MR) was also different (p = 0.04). The presence of MR did not alter the microbiologic profile of catheter-related infections, and it did not increase the incidence of resistant organisms. The CLABSI rate decreased more with the use of MR CVCs compared with CSS CVCs in an ICU where the CLABSI rate was already low. The types of organisms causing infection were similar. With continued use of MR-impregnated CVCs in our ICU in the subsequent 5 years, we have seen sustained low rates of CLABSIs. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence, risk factors, microbiology of venous catheter associated bloodstream infections - A prospective study from a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Central venous catheters (CVCs though indispensable in current medical and intensive care treatment, also puts patients at risk of catheter related infection (CRI resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We analysed the incidence, risk factors, bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates in central venous catheter associated bloodstream infection (CVC-BSI in the intensive care unit (ICU patients and studied the formation of biofilm in CVCs. Materials and Methods: The following case control study included 115 patients with CVC in situ. Quantitative blood cultures (QBC and catheter tip cultures were performed for the diagnoses. Direct catheter staining was done for an early diagnosis by acridine orange (AO and Gram staining methods. Biofilm production in catheters was detected by ′tissue culture plate′ (TCP method. The results were analysed using the computer-based program statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS. Results : In 25/115 patients, definite diagnosis of CVC-BSI was made. The mean age was 48.44 ± 17.34 years (cases vs 40.10 ± 18.24 years (controls and the mean duration of catheterisation was 25.72 ± 8.73 days (cases vs 11.89 ± 6.38 days (controls. Local signs of infection (erythema, tenderness and oozing were found more significantly in CVC-BSI cases. The AO staining was more sensitive and Gram staining of catheters showed higher specificity. Staphylococcus aureus followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and non-albicans Candida were common CVC-BSI pathogens. Multidrug-resistant (MDR strains were isolated in bacterial agents of CVC-BSI. Non-albicans Candida and Enterococcus faecalis showed strong biofilm production. Conclusion : The incidence of CVC-BSI was 21.73% and the rate was 14.59 per 1000 catheter days. Prolonged ICU stay and longer catheterisation were major risk factors. S. aureus was isolated most commonly in CVC-BSI cases. The menace of multidrug resistance and

  18. Alteplase use for malfunctioning central venous catheters correlates with catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Courtney M; Miller, Kathryn E; Beardsley, Andrew L; Ahmed, Sheikh S; Rojas, Luis A; Hedlund, Terri L; Speicher, Richard H; Nitu, Mara E

    2013-03-01

    A catheter thrombosis and the presence of a catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CBSI) often occur simultaneously, but it is unclear if or to what degree the two complications relate. Several animal and adult studies indicate a relationship between fibrin sheaths and thrombi in the development of CBSIs. To date, there has been limited human investigation in the pediatric population to determine a clear link between the presence of a thrombus and bacteremia. The use of alteplase for malfunctioning central venous catheter may indicate the formation of intraluminal thrombus or fibrin sheath. A catheter that requires alteplase is at higher risk of a CBSI. A retrospective chart review from July 2008 to December 2010. PICU. All patients with central catheters admitted to the PICU. No interventions performed with the retrospective study. Number of total central venous catheters, number of central venous catheters that received treatment with alteplase, and number of CBSIs. Preliminary data during the study period identified 3,289 central venous catheters. Twelve percent of these catheters required at least one dose of alteplase. There were 40 CBSIs during this same time period of which 28% received alteplase during the 5 days preceding the positive blood culture. The odds ratio for getting a CBSI when alteplase is administered is 2.87 (confidence interval 1.42-5.80; p = 0.002). The average age of the central venous catheters at time of infection was not statistically different, 16.1 days in the alteplase catheters compared with 25.6 days for the catheters that did not receive alteplase (p = 0.6). There is a positive correlation between the use of alteplase for malfunctioning central venous catheters and the development of a CASBI. This is likely associated with the presence of an intraluminal fibrin sheath or thrombus. This study adds evidence linking thrombus formation to CBSI.

  19. Central Venous Catheters and Bloodstream Infection During Induction Therapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Kristin; Hasle, Henrik; Asdahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    treated at 3 pediatric centers in Denmark between 2008 and 2014. A total of 136 patients were followed from initial CVC placement until first BSI, CVC removal, death, or day 28, whichever occurred first. Thirty-nine BSIs were detected, of which 67% were gram-positive infections, and 59% met the criteria......The purpose of the study was to assess the risk of firsttime bloodstream infection (BSI) according to type of central venous catheter (CVC) during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients eligible for our analysis were all newly diagnosed children with ALL...... for being CVC associated. The 28-day cumulative incidence of BSI was similar in 77 patients with a nontunneled CVC (28%; 95% confidence interval, 19%-40%) and in 59 patients with a tunneled CVC with external lines (TE) (33%; 95% confidence interval, 23%-47%). Subgroup analyses showed that gram...

  20. Bloodstream Infection Incidence of Different Central Venous Catheters in Neonates: A Descriptive Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdina H. Dubbink-Verheij

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs in neonates are associated with a risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI. Most reports on the incidence of CLABSI in neonates focus on umbilical venous catheters (UVCs and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CLABSI in a cohort of neonates with femoral venous catheters (FVCs, UVCs, and PICCs, with a gestational age ≥34 weeks born between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2013. We included 2,986 neonates with a total of 656 catheters. The CLABSI incidence rate varied from 12.3 per 1,000 catheter-days in FVCs to 10.6 per 1,000 catheter-days in UVCs and 5.3 per 1,000 catheter-days in PICCs. In a Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, we did not find a difference in CLABSI risk between the catheter types (p = 0.29. The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of CLABSI: parenteral nutrition [hazard ratio (HR 2.60, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.25–5.41], male gender (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.17–5.90, and higher birth weight (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.002–1.09, whereas antibiotic treatment at birth (HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12–0.52 was associated with a decreased risk. Conclusion: In our cohort, we did not find a difference between the CLABSI incidence in FVCs, PICCs, and UVCs. Occurrence of CLABSI is associated with parenteral nutrition, male gender, and higher birth weight. Antibiotic treatment at birth was associated with a decreased risk of CLABSI.

  1. Bloodstream Infection Incidence of Different Central Venous Catheters in Neonates: A Descriptive Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbink-Verheij, Gerdina H; Bekker, Vincent; Pelsma, Iris C M; van Zwet, Erik W; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; Steggerda, Sylke J; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) in neonates are associated with a risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). Most reports on the incidence of CLABSI in neonates focus on umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CLABSI in a cohort of neonates with femoral venous catheters (FVCs), UVCs, and PICCs, with a gestational age ≥34 weeks born between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2013. We included 2,986 neonates with a total of 656 catheters. The CLABSI incidence rate varied from 12.3 per 1,000 catheter-days in FVCs to 10.6 per 1,000 catheter-days in UVCs and 5.3 per 1,000 catheter-days in PICCs. In a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, we did not find a difference in CLABSI risk between the catheter types ( p  = 0.29). The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of CLABSI: parenteral nutrition [hazard ratio (HR) 2.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-5.41], male gender (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.17-5.90), and higher birth weight (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.002-1.09), whereas antibiotic treatment at birth (HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12-0.52) was associated with a decreased risk. In our cohort, we did not find a difference between the CLABSI incidence in FVCs, PICCs, and UVCs. Occurrence of CLABSI is associated with parenteral nutrition, male gender, and higher birth weight. Antibiotic treatment at birth was associated with a decreased risk of CLABSI.

  2. Bacteriophage K antimicrobial-lock technique for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus central venous catheter-related infection: a leporine model efficacy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungren, Matthew P; Donlan, Rodney M; Kankotia, Ravi; Paxton, Ben E; Falk, Irene; Christensen, Diana; Kim, Charles Y

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether a bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock technique can reduce bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on indwelling central venous catheters in a rabbit model. Cuffed central venous catheters were inserted into the jugular vein of female New Zealand White rabbits under image guidance. Catheters were inoculated for 24 hours with broth culture of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The inoculum was aspirated, and rabbits were randomly assigned to two equal groups for 24 hours: (i) untreated controls (heparinized saline lock), (ii) bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock (staphylococcal bacteriophage K, propagated titer > 10(8)/mL). Blood cultures were obtained via peripheral veins, and the catheters were removed for quantitative culture and scanning electron microscopy. Mean colony-forming units (CFU) per cm(2) of the distal catheter segment, as a measure of biofilm, were significantly decreased in experimental animals compared with controls (control, 1.2 × 10(5) CFU/cm(2); experimental, 7.6 × 10(3); P = .016). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that biofilms were present on the surface of five of five control catheters but only one of five treated catheters (P = .048). Blood culture results were not significantly different between the groups. In a rabbit model, treatment of infected central venous catheters with a bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock technique significantly reduced bacterial colonization and biofilm presence. Our data represent a preliminary step toward use of bacteriophage therapy for prevention and treatment of central venous catheter-associated infection. Copyright © 2014 SIR. All rights reserved.

  3. Does antimicrobial lock solution reduce catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients with central venous catheters? A Bayesian network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Rongke; Ge, Long; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Tian, Jinhui

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of our study is to carry out a Bayesian network meta-analysis comparing the efficacy of different antimicrobial lock solutions (ALS) for prevention of catheter-related infections (CRI) in patients with hemodialysis (HD) and ranking these ALS for practical consideration. We searched six electronic databases, earlier relevant meta-analysis and reference lists of included studies for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared ALS for preventing episodes of CRI in patients with HD either head-to-head or against control interventions using non-ALS. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and extracted relevant information according to a predesigned extraction form. Data were analysed using the WinBUGS (V.1.4.3) and the Stata (V.13.0). Finally, 18 studies involving 2395 patients and evaluating 9 ALS strategies were included. Network meta-analysis showed that gentamicin plus citrate (OR 0.07, 95% CrI 0.00-0.48) and gentamicin plus heparin (OR 0.04, 95% CrI 0.00-0.23) were statistically superior to heparin alone in terms of reducing CRBSI. For exit site infection and all-cause mortality, no significant difference in the intervention effect (p > 0.05) was detected for all included ALS when compared to heparin. Moreover, all ALS were similar in efficacy (p > 0.05) from each other for CRBSI, exit site infection and all-cause mortality. Our findings indicated that gentamicin plus heparin may be selected for the prophylaxis of CRI in patients undergoing HD with CVCs. Whether this strategy will lead to antimicrobial resistance remains unclear in view of the relatively short duration of included studies. More attentions should be made regarding head-to-head comparisons of the most commonly used ALS in this field.

  4. Risk Factors of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection With Percutaneously Inserted Central Venous Catheters in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Center's Experience in Taiwan

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    Jen-Fu Hsu

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: It is important to avoid inserting a PICC at the femoral site. Strict catheter care protocol should also be applied to reduce local site bacterial colonization and removal of PICCs as soon as they are no longer essential for patient care to reduce the incidence of infection.

  5. University HealthSystem Consortium quality performance benchmarking study of the insertion and care of central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Brian P; Talbot, Thomas R; Dellit, Timothy H; Hebden, Joan; Cuny, Joanne; Greene, William H; Segreti, John

    2008-05-01

    We report data from an observational benchmarking study of adherence to recommended practices for insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters at a heterogeneous group of academic medical centers. These centers demonstrated a need for significant improvement in implementation and documentation of quality performance measures for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

  6. INTERVENTIONS TO DECREASE CATHETER-ASSOCIATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS IN NEWBORNS: AN INTEGRATIVE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Curan, Gabriela Ramos Ferreira; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to perform an integrative review of strategies presented in care bundles to decrease central catheter-associated bloodstream infection among newborns. . Method a search was conducted of the Cochrane Library, IBECS, PubMed, Lilacs, Medline and Scielo catalogues, using the terms "bundle", "catheter-related infection", "infection control", "prevention", "evidence-based nursing"," evidence-based medicine" and" central venous catheter". Inclusion criteria were: papers publish...

  7. Minimising central line-associated bloodstream infection rate in inserting central venous catheters in the adult intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Hedaya Rateb; McDowell, Joan R S

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the procedural aspects in inserting central venous catheters that minimise central line-associated bloodstream infection rates in adult intensive care units through a structured literature review. In adult intensive care units, central line-associated bloodstream infections are a major cause of high mortality rates and increased in costs due to the consequences of complications. Eligible articles were identified by combining indexed keywords using Boolean operator of "AND" under databases of Ovid and CINAHL. Titles and abstract of retrieved papers were screened and duplicates removed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to derive the final papers, which contained seminal studies. The quality of papers was assessed using a special data extraction form. The number of papers retrieved from all databases was 337, reduced to 302 after removing duplicates. Papers were scanned for titles and abstract to locate those relevant to the review question. After this, 250 papers were excluded for different reasons and a total of 52 papers were fully accessed to assess for eligibility. The final number of papers included was 10 articles. Many interventions can be implemented in the adult intensive care unit during the insertion of a central venous catheter to minimise central line-associated bloodstream infections rates. These include choosing the subclavian site to insert the catheters as the least infectious and decolonising patients' skin with alcoholic chlorhexidine gluconate preparation due to its broad antimicrobial effect and durability. Choosing optimal sites for central venous catheter insertion is a complex process that relies on many factors. Furthermore, the introduction of chlorhexidine gluconate preparations should be accompanied with multifaceted interventions including quality improvement initiatives to improve healthcare workers' compliance. As a quality marker in adult intensive care units, healthcare sectors should work on establishing

  8. Use of central venous catheter and peripheral venous catheter as risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection in very-low-birth-weight infants.

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    Geffers, Christine; Gastmeier, Anne; Schwab, Frank; Groneberg, Katrin; Rüden, Henning; Gastmeier, Petra

    2010-04-01

    To describe the relationship between the use of central and peripheral venous catheters and the risk of nosocomial, primary, laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI) for neonates with a birth weight less than 1,500 g (very-low-birth-weight [VLBW] infants). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis with time-dependent variable was used to determine the risk factors for the occurrence of BSI in a cohort of VLBW infants. We analyzed previously collected surveillance data from the German national nosocomial surveillance system for VLBW infants. All VLBW infants in 22 participating neonatal departments who had a complete daily record of patient information were included. Of 2,126 VLBW infants, 261 (12.3%) developed a BSI. The incidence density for BSI was 3.3 per 1,000 patient-days. The multivariate analysis identified the following significant independent risk factors for BSI: lower birth weight (hazard ratio [HR], 1.1-2.2), vaginal delivery (HR, 1.5), central venous catheter use (HR, 6.2) or peripheral venous catheter use (HR, 6.0) within 2 days before developing BSI, and the individual departments (HR, 0.0-4.6). After adjusting for other risk factors, use of peripheral venous catheter and use of central venous catheter were significantly related to occurrence of BSI in VLBW infants.

  9. Medical-grade honey does not reduce skin colonization at central venous catheter-insertion sites of critically ill patients: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kwakman (Jan); M.C. Müller (Marcella); J.M. Binnekade (Jan); J.P. van den Akker (Johannes); C.A. de Borgie (Corianne); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); S.A.J. Zaat (Sebastiaan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) associated with short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients are a major clinical problem. Bacterial colonization of the skin at the CVC insertion site is an important etiologic factor for

  10. Prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in paediatric oncology patients using 70% ethanol locks : A randomised controlled multi-centre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, Reineke A.; van Ommen, C. Heleen; Stijnen, Theo; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Michiels, Erna; Abbink, Floor C. H.; Raphael, Martine F.; Heij, Hugo A.; Lieverst, Jan A.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Zwaan, C. Michel; Caron, Huib N.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.

    Background: The prevention of central venous catheter (CVC) associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) in paediatric oncology patients is essential. Ethanol locks can eliminate pathogens colonising CVCs and microbial resistance is rare. Aim of this study was to determine whether two hour 70% ethanol

  11. Is diabetes a risk factor for central venous access port-related bloodstream infection in oncological patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touré, A; Vanhems, P; Lombard-Bohas, C; Souquet, J-C; Lauverjat, M; Chambrier, C

    2013-01-01

    It was a dogma that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at increased risk of infection or death associated with an infection. However, in cancer patients, this has not been well investigated. The aim was to investigate whether diabetic patients with cancer are at high risk of central venous access port (CVAP)-related bloodstream infection (BSI), and to analyse mortality after CVAP-BSI. A total of 17 patients with type 1 DM (T1DM), 66 with type 2 DM (T2DM) and 307 non-diabetic patients were included. Each patient was followed up until the first late CVAP-BSI or for a maximum for 1 year in the absence of a CVAP-BSI. Fifty-three CVAP-BSIs occurred in 66,528 catheter-days. The cumulative incidence of CVAP-BSI was not higher in T1DM (5.9 %; p = 0.17) and T2DM (19.7 %; p = 0.70) compared with the non-diabetic patients (12.7 %). However, in patients with CVAP-BSI, the 1-month crude mortality rate was higher in DM patients (42.9 % vs. 15.4 %; p = 0.04), whereas the mortality in patients without CVAP-BSI was similar in both groups of patients (19.8 % vs. 17.1 %; p = 0.58). Of the 12 deaths that occurred within 1 month of CVAP-BSI, 16.66 % was attributable to CVAP-BSI. The predictive factor of 1-month mortality was DM (p = 0.04). Parenteral nutrition (PN) was independently associated with CVAP-BSI in diabetic patients (p = 0.001). In this study, diabetes did not increase the risk of CVAP-BSI, but mortality was higher in diabetic patients who had a CVAP-BSI. This suggests, in addition to medical treatment, CVAP should be withdrawn after infection onset.

  12. Epidemiology and prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, A. Y. Y.; Kamphuisen, P. W.

    . Central venous catheters are extensively used in patients with cancer to secure delivery of chemotherapy and facilitate phlebotomy. Unfortunately, considerable morbidity can result from early complications or late sequelae, ranging from arterial puncture, pneumothorax and bloodstream infections to

  13. Catheter-related thrombosis: : lifeline or a pain in the neck?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Lee, Agnes Y. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are used extensively in cancer patients for the administration of therapy and phlebotomy. An important complication of CVCs is the development of catheter-related thrombosis (CRT), which becomes symptomatic in approximately 5% of the patients. Several factors, such as

  14. Can procalcitonin be a diagnostic marker for catheter-related blood stream infection in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Oktay Arıkan, Kamile; Bayhan, Cihangül; Karadağ-Öncel, Eda; Emre Aycan, Ahmet; Gürbüz, Venhar; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of procalcitonin (PCT) in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSIs) is still unclear and requires further research. The diagnostic value of serum PCT for the diagnosis of CRBSI in children is evaluated here. This study was conducted between October 2013 and November 2014, and included patients with suspected CRBSI from 1 month to 18 years of age who were febrile, with no focus of infection, and had a central venous catheter. Levels of PCT and other serum markers were measured, and their utility as CRBSI markers was assessed. Additionally, the clinical performance of a new, automated, rapid, and quantitative assay for the detection of PCT was tested. Among the 49 patients, 24 were diagnosed with CRBSI. The PCT-Kryptor and PCT-RTA values were significantly higher in proven CRBSI compared to those in unproven CRBSI (p=0.03 and p=0.03, respectively). There were no differences in white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between proven CRBSI and unproven CRBSI. Among the 24 patients with CRBSI, CRP was significantly higher among those with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections. PCT-Kryptor was also significantly higher among patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections (p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). The authors suggest that PCT could be a helpful rapid diagnostic marker in children with suspected CRBSIs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Can procalcitonin be a diagnostic marker for catheter-related blood stream infection in children?

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    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The potential role of procalcitonin (PCT in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSIs is still unclear and requires further research. The diagnostic value of serum PCT for the diagnosis of CRBSI in children is evaluated here. Method This study was conducted between October 2013 and November 2014, and included patients with suspected CRBSI from 1 month to 18 years of age who were febrile, with no focus of infection, and had a central venous catheter. Levels of PCT and other serum markers were measured, and their utility as CRBSI markers was assessed. Additionally, the clinical performance of a new, automated, rapid, and quantitative assay for the detection of PCT was tested. Results Among the 49 patients, 24 were diagnosed with CRBSI. The PCT-Kryptor and PCT-RTA values were significantly higher in proven CRBSI compared to those in unproven CRBSI (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively. There were no differences in white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP levels between proven CRBSI and unproven CRBSI. Among the 24 patients with CRBSI, CRP was significantly higher among those with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections. PCT-Kryptor was also significantly higher among patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively. Conclusions The authors suggest that PCT could be a helpful rapid diagnostic marker in children with suspected CRBSIs.

  16. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J.; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral

  17. Catheter-Related Sepsis Due to Rhodotorula glutinis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2003-01-01

    We describe a central venous catheter-related (Port-A-Cath; Smiths Industries Medical Systems [SIMS] Deltec, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) infection caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 51-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. He was treated with fluconazole for 8 weeks and had the catheter removed. Two isolates of R. glutinis recovered from blood specimens (one obtained via peripheral veins and one via the catheter) before administration of fluconazole and one recovered from the removed catheter 17 days after initiation of fluconazole therapy exhibited high-level resistance to fluconazole (MICs, >256 μg/ml). These three isolates were found to belong to a single clone on the basis of identical antibiotypes determined by the E test (PDM Epsilometer; AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden) and biotypes determined by API ID32 C (bioMerieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) and their identical random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. PMID:12574300

  18. Delayed Presentation of Catheter-Related Subclavian Artery Pseudoaneurysm

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    Hwa Rim Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization is a common diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in modern clinical practice. Pseudoaneurysms of the subclavian artery are rare and usually occur immediately after the causative event, whether the cause was trauma or a medical procedure. Here we report the rare case of a 71-year-old woman with delayed presentation of catheter-related subclavian pseudoaneurysm. The patient was treated for aspiration pneumonia with respiratory failure in another hospital. The patient's chest wall swelling began two weeks after the initial catheterization in the other hospital, probably because of slow leakage of blood from the injured subclavian artery caused by incomplete compression of the puncture site and uremic coagulopathy. She was successfully treated with ultrasound-guided thrombin and angiography-guided histoacryl injection without stent insertion or surgery. Her condition improved, and she was discharged to her home.

  19. Central Venous Access in the Pediatric Population With Emphasis on Complications and Prevention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesing, Lori A; Fawley, Jason A; Wagner, Amy J

    2016-08-01

    Central venous catheters are often necessary in the pediatric population. Access may be challenging, and each vessel presents its own unique set of risks and complications. Central venous catheterization is useful for hemodynamic monitoring, rapid fluid infusion, and administration of hyperosmolar medications, including vasopressors, antibiotics, chemotherapy, and parenteral nutrition. Recent advances have improved the catheters used as well as techniques for insertion. A serious complication of central access is infection, which is associated with morbidity, mortality, and significant financial costs. Reduction of catheter-related bloodstream infections is realized with use of ethanol locks, single lumens when appropriate, and prudent adherence to insertion and maintenance bundles. Ultrasound guidance used for central venous catheter placement improves accuracy of placement, reducing time and unsuccessful insertion and complication rates. Patients with central venous catheters are best served by multidisciplinary team involvement. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in managing catheter-related blood stream infection in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xixi; He, Mei; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), a proactive tool, was applied to reduce errors associated with the process which begins with assessment of patient and ends with treatment of complications. The aim of this study is to assess whether FMEA implementation will significantly reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in intensive care unit.The FMEA team was constructed. A team of 15 medical staff from different departments were recruited and trained. Their main responsibility was to analyze and score all possible processes of central venous catheterization failures. Failure modes with risk priority number (RPN) ≥100 (top 10 RPN scores) were deemed as high-priority-risks, meaning that they needed immediate corrective action. After modifications were put, the resulting RPN was compared with the previous one. A centralized nursing care system was designed.A total of 25 failure modes were identified. High-priority risks were "Unqualified medical device sterilization" (RPN, 337), "leukopenia, very low immunity" (RPN, 222), and "Poor hand hygiene Basic diseases" (RPN, 160). The corrective measures that we took allowed a decrease in the RPNs, especially for the high-priority risks. The maximum reduction was approximately 80%, as observed for the failure mode "Not creating the maximal barrier for patient." The averaged incidence of CRBSIs was reduced from 5.19% to 1.45%, with 3 months of 0 infection rate.The FMEA can effectively reduce incidence of CRBSIs, improve the security of central venous catheterization technology, decrease overall medical expenses, and improve nursing quality. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First reported case of Staphylococcus condimenti infection associated with catheter-related bacteraemia

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    Y. Misawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient who experienced a catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Staphylococcus condimenti, which was first isolated from soy sauce mash. This is the first reported case of human infection. Although blood culture isolates and the catheter tip tube did not reveal coagulase or clumping factor, false-positive results were obtained from latex agglutination tests for clumping factor and protein A due to self-agglutination. Care is needed when performing only latex agglutination test without a coagulase test. Further studies are needed to determine the pathogenic potential of S. condimenti based on appropriate identification.

  2. Catheter related infection in hemodialysis patients

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    Nabi Zahid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency of hemodialysis (HD catheter related infection, causative microorganisms and predisposing factors contributing to these infections at our center, we con-ducted a prospective study in 2007 involving 57 (45.6% males patients in whom a temporary catheter was inserted for HD. The patients were followed for one month to document any episodes of hemodialysis catheter related infection (HCRI. There were 11 (19.3% patients who developed HCRI proven by blood culture; 5 patients were infected with more than one organism. Staphyloco-ccus Coagulase negative and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus remain the most common patho-gens. All the organisms were sensitive to antibiotics administered empirically, however, 3 patients developed multiple resistant S. aureus (MRSA. All the infected patients experienced previous epi-sodes of HCRI, which formed a risk factor in addition to low albumin when compared to the non-infected group (P=0.024 and P= 0.001, respectively. We conclude that the rate of HCRI and the causative organisms found in our study is comparable to previous reports. We still need to adopt measures to minimize the use of temporary vascular accesses by creation of fistulas in a timely fashion.

  3. Anti-infective external coating of central venous catheters: a randomized, noninferiority trial comparing 5-fluorouracil with chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine in preventing catheter colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, J Matthias; Avelar, Rui L; Longtine, Karen J; Carter, Kent L; Mermel, Leonard A; Heard, Stephen O

    2010-11-01

    The antimetabolite drug, 5-fluorouracil, inhibits microbial growth. Coating of central venous catheters with 5-fluorouracil may reduce the risk of catheter infection. Our objective was to compare the safety and efficacy of central venous catheters externally coated with 5-fluorouracil with those coated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine. Prospective, single-blind, randomized, active-controlled, multicentered, noninferiority trial. Twenty-five US medical center intensive care units. A total of 960 adult patients requiring central venous catheterization for up to 28 days. Patients were randomized to receive a central venous catheter externally coated with either 5-fluorouracil (n = 480) or chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine (n = 480). The primary antimicrobial outcome was a dichotomous measure (forming units or ≥ 15 colony-forming units) for catheter colonization determined by the roll plate method. Secondary antimicrobial outcomes included local site infection and catheter-related bloodstream infection. Central venous catheters coated with 5-fluorouracil were noninferior to chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine coated central venous catheters with respect to the incidence of catheter colonization (2.9% vs. 5.3%, respectively). Local site infection occurred in 1.4% of the 5-fluorouracil group and 0.9% of the chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine group. No episode of catheter-related bloodstream infection occurred in the 5-fluorouracil group, whereas two episodes were noted in the chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine group. Only Gram-positive organisms were cultured from 5-fluorouracil catheters, whereas Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and Candida were cultured from the chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine central venous catheters. Adverse events were comparable between the two central venous catheter coatings. Our results suggest that central venous catheters externally coated with 5-fluorouracil are a safe and effective alternative to

  4. Synergy of ambroxol with vancomycin in elimination of catheter-related Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhui; Fu, Yakun; Yu, Jialin; Ai, Qing; Li, Junshuai; Peng, Ningning; Song, Sijie; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters are widely used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) nowadays. The commonest cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) is coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Ambroxol, an active metabolite of bromhexine, exhibits antimicrobial activity against strains producing biofilm and enhances the bactericidal effect of some antibiotic by breaking the structure of biofilm. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of ambroxol with vancomycin on the biofilm of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, the biofilm of S. epidermidis was assessed by XTT reduction assay and analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In the in vivo study, a rabbit model of CRBSIs was created by intravenous intubation with a tube covered with S. epidermidis biofilm. The rabbits received one of the following four treatments by means of antibiotic lock therapy: normal heparin, ambroxol, vancomycin, or vancomycin plus ambroxol each for 3 days. The microstructure of the biofilm was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of bacterial colonies in the organs (liver, heart, and kidney) and on the intravenous tubes was measured on agar plates. Pathological changes in the organs (liver, heart, and kidney) were observed with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The ambroxol exhibits significant efficacy to potentiate the bactericidal effect of vancomycin on S. epidermidis biofilm both in vitro and in vivo. The antibiotic lock therapy using a combination of ambroxol and vancomycin reveals a high ability to eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms in vivo. These results provide the basis of a useful anti-infection strategy for the treatment of CRBSIs. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Central Venous Catheter Repair is Associated with an Increased Risk of Bacteremia and Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection in Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUNDGREN, INGRID S.; ZHOU, CHUAN; MALONE, FRANCES R.; MCAFEE, NANCY G.; GANTT, SOREN; ZERR, DANIELLE M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Repair of broken central venous catheters (CVCs) is common in pediatric patients. We hypothesized that this practice predisposes to bacteremia and CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). Methods We conducted a retrospective case-crossover study of pediatric patients aged 1 month to 21 years with CVC breakages who underwent a first-time repair at our institution, using repair kits provided by CVC manufacturers. We compared rates of bacteremia and CLABSI (defined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria) in the 30 days pre-repair (control period) and the 30 days post-repair (exposure period), with adjustment for within-patient correlation using conditional Poisson regression. Results The mean pre-repair rate of bacteremia was 9.9 per 1000 catheter days, which increased to 24.5 post-repair, resulting in an adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.87 (95% CI 1.05 – 3.33, p = 0.034). Risk of CLABSI demonstrated a greater than two-fold increase (IRR 2.15, 95% CI 1.02 – 4.53, p = 0.045) when all catheter days were included, and a four-fold increase when days on antibiotics were excluded (IRR 4.07, 95% CI 1.43 – 11.57, p = 0.008). Conclusions We found that repair of a broken CVC was associated with a two to four-fold higher risk of developing CLABSI within 30 days of repair in pediatric patients. Further studies are needed to determine interventions to reduce this risk and to better define the relative merits of CVC repair compared with replacement in selected patient populations. PMID:22146741

  6. [Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Luan-Ying; Hamvas, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    To assess the risk factors for nosocomial blood-stream infection (BSI) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Clinical data from the neonates admitted to the NICU in the St. Louis Children's Hospital in Washington University School of Medicine between January 2005 and December 2006 were retrospectively studied. A total of 1 290 neonates were included. Overall, 175 nosocomial BSIs occurred. Catheter-related BSIs accounted for 62.3% (109 cases). The incidence of nosocomial BSI was 4.22 per 1 000 patient-days. Logistic regression analysis revealed that low gestational age, low Apgar scores at 5 minutes, use of central venous catheter (CVC), and longer CVC use were risk factors for the development of nosocomial BSI. In the subgroup of neonates with CVC, mechanical ventilation was an additional independent risk factor for BSI. Catheter-related BSI is the major source of nosocomial BSI in the NICU. Prematurity, low Apgar scores at birth and prolonged CVC use are risk factors for the development of BSI.

  7. Central Venous Catheter Insertion Site and Colonization in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-04

    Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI); Central Venous Catheter Associated Bloodstream Infection; Heart; Surgery, Heart, Functional Disturbance as Result; Congenital Heart Disease; Newborn; Infection

  8. Microbiological and clinical features of four cases of catheter-related infection by Methylobacterium radiotolerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Han, Xiang Y

    2015-04-01

    Four cases of central venous catheter-related Methylobacterium radiotolerans infection are presented here. The patients were all long-term catheter carriers with an underlying diagnosis of leukemia, and they mostly manifested fevers. The isolated bacterial strains all showed far better growth on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar during the initial isolation and/or subcultures than they did on sheep blood or chocolate agar. This microbiological feature may improve the culture recovery of this fastidious pink Gram-negative bacillus that has rarely been isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahleh Zeina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended.

  10. Catheter-related Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia manifested with skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Hsin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previously rare, catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria is now increasingly encountered, especially among cancer patients who have catheters implanted for chemotherapy treatments. A 73-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML had Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia with manifestations of multiple skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy 4 months after the implantation of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC for the delivery of chemotherapy. The catheter-related M. abscessus bacteremia was confirmed by positive blood cultures of specimens drawn from a PICC line and a peripheral vein. She defervesced with the administration of meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and by the removal of PICC. Her fever subsided for 3 months with the disappearance of skin and lung lesions; however, she died of AML relapse. Bacteremia and skin infection caused by M. abscessus can be detected by culture and pathological examinations and should be considered in leukemia patients with a PICC. With appropriate laboratory diagnosis, M. abscessus bacteremia with disseminated infections can improve with catheter removal and combination antimicrobial therapy.

  11. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Leung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%. The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis.

  12. Anti-fouling strategies for central venous catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albadawi, Hassan; Patel, Nikasha; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Naidu, Sailendra; Knuttinen, Grace; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are ubiquitous in the healthcare industry and carry two common complications, catheter related infections and occlusion, particularly by thrombus. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are an important cause of nosocomial infections that increase patient morbidity, mortality, and hospital cost. Innovative design strategies for intravenous catheters can help reduce these preventable infections. Antimicrobial coatings can play a major role in preventing disease. These coatings can be divided into two major categories: drug eluting and non-drug eluting. Much of these catheter designs are targeted at preventing the formation of microbial biofilms that make treatment of CRBSI nearly impossible without removal of the intravenous device. Exciting developments in catheter impregnation with antibiotics as well as nanoscale surface design promise innovative changes in the way that physicians manage intravenous catheters. Occlusion of a catheter renders the catheter unusable and is often treated by tissue plasminogen activator administration or replacement of the line. Prevention of this complication requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of platelet aggregation, signaling and cross-linking. This article will look at the advances in biomaterial design specifically drug eluting, non-drug eluting, lubricious coatings and micropatterning as well as some of the characteristics of each as they relate to CVCs. PMID:29399528

  13. Complication rates among peripherally inserted central venous catheters and centrally inserted central catheters in the medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Matthew E; Yadav, Hemang; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo

    2016-02-01

    There are limited contemporary data describing the rates of catheter-related deep vein thrombosis (CRDVT) and central line-associated bloodstream infection for peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central venous catheters (CICCs) in the medical intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 200 PICCs (dual/triple lumen) and 200 CICCs (triple/quadruple lumen) placed in medical ICU adults at Mayo Rochester between 2012 and 2013. Central lines were followed from insertion time until hospital dismissal (primary analysis) or ICU discharge (secondary analysis). Symptomatic CRDVT was determined by Doppler ultrasound. Central line-associated bloodstream infection was defined according to federal reporting criteria. During 1730 PICC days and 637 CICC days, the incidence of CRDVT when followed until hospital dismissal was 4% and 1% (4.6 and 3.1 per 1000 catheter-days), respectively, P = .055. When censored at the time of ICU dismissal, the rates were 2% and 1% (5.3 and 3.7 per 1000 catheter-days), P = .685. Only 1 central line-associated bloodstream infection occurred in a PICC following ICU dismissal, P > .999. Thrombotic and infectious complications were uncommon following PICC and CICC insertion, with no significant difference in complication rates observed. Half of PICC DVTs occurred on the general floor, and like all central catheters placed in the ICU, PICCs should be aggressively discontinued when no longer absolutely needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiseptic-impregnated central venous catheters: their evaluation in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G; Bolgiani, A; Patiño, O; Prezzavento, G; Guastavino, P; Durlach, R; Fernandez Caniggia, L; Benaim, F

    2006-06-30

    Central venous catheter-related infections are an important source of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Antiseptic impregnated catheters have been recommended to prevent infections related to central venous lines in high-risk patients who require short-term catheters. This prospective, randomized, and controlled study compared the efficacy of standard and antiseptic devices in reducing catheter-related infections in burn patients. Twenty-two patients were included in the study with an average age of 47.6 yr and an average burned total body surface area of 38.7%. Thirty-eight silver-sulphadiazine, chlorhexidine catheters were compared with 40 non-antiseptic catheters. No differences in bacteraemia or colonization rates were observed between standard and antiseptic-coated catheters. Antiseptic catheters were more effective in reducing S. epidermidiscolonization than standard catheters (4% vs 31%, p < 0.01). However, Gram-negative bacilli were responsible more often than Gram-positive cocci for catheter tip colonization (53% vs 46%) and they were responsible for all the bacteraemias (5.1%) related to catheters in the present study. We conclude that antiseptic-impregnated catheters could be more effective for Gram-positive cocci and could therefore be less effective in patients with high Gram-negative bacilli bloodstream infection prevalence, as burn patients are.

  15. Comparison of complication rates between umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnts, Inge Johanna Jacoba; Bullens, Lauren Maria; Groenewoud, Joannes Martinus Maria; Liem, Kian Djien

    2014-01-01

    To compare the complication rates between umbilical central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns and to investigate whether other variables might increase complication rates. A retrospective observational study. A Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Newborns (gestational age 24-42 weeks). All central venous catheter-related complications were retrospectively analyzed in newborns. The differences in survival rates between the two types of central venous catheters were evaluated using a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with removal because of complications as the event of interest. In total, 140 umbilical venous catheters and 63 peripherally inserted central catheters were included. There were no significant differences in removals due to complications between the two catheters. The central line-associated bloodstream infections had the highest complication incidence, followed by obstruction, dislocation, leakage, and extravasation. There were no influences of gestational age, birth weight, and the use of subsequent catheters on the complication incidence. A high complication incidence resulted in removal of the catheters, but it was not significantly different between the two catheters. The prevention of complications should be an important goal in the daily care of infants in the NICU. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  16. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  17. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  18. Long-term central venous access in a pediatric leukemia population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Aurelia B; Hodgman, Erica I; Burkhalter, Lorraine S; Renkes, Rachel; Slone, Tamra; Alder, Adam C

    2016-10-01

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) play an important role in the management of pediatric oncology patients; unfortunately, they are also associated with potentially serious complication rates. We hypothesized that, despite the significantly different disease courses typical of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia, there would be identifiable risk factors for premature CVAD removal. We retrospectively studied clinical characteristics and procedure records for all patients admitted with a leukemia diagnosis at our institution from May 2009 to July 2014. Our observed perioperative complication rate was 6%; over 70% of lines had at least one long-term complication (thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infection, or unexplained line malfunction). Obesity (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% CI, 1.62-29.43), preoperative dosage of packed red blood cells (in mL/kg; OR, 3.13; 1.07-9.21), bloodstream infection (OR, 5.75; 1.69-19.56) were associated with increased risk of premature catheter removal; unexplained malfunction was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.28; 0.09-0.93). Obesity, the preoperative dosage of packed red blood cells, the presence of a bloodstream infection, and unexplained line malfunction are significant predictors of premature CVAD removal in a pediatric leukemia population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Catheter-related blood stream infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sękowska, Alicja; Dylewska, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Bogiel, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Raoultella spp. representatives are Gram-negative capsulated, nonmotile rods. These bacteria are found in the natural environment: plants, water, soil and insects. R. ornithinolytica is one of the three species of Raoultella. R. ornithinolytica is the only species within the genus which has the ability to produce ornithine decarboxylase. Human infections related to R. ornithinolytica are exceedingly rare. The present case report describes catheter-related blood stream infection caused by R. ornithinolytica and successfully treated with antibiotic therapy.

  20. Catheter-related blood stream infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Sękowska, Alicja; Dylewska, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Bogiel, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella spp. representatives are Gram-negative capsulated, nonmotile rods. These bacteria are found in the natural environment: plants, water, soil and insects. R. ornithinolytica is one of the three species of Raoultella. R. ornithinolytica is the only species within the genus which has the ability to produce ornithine decarboxylase. Human infections related to R. ornithinolytica are exceedingly rare. The present case report describes catheter-related blood stream infection caused by R. o...

  1. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  2. Prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: A questionnaire evaluating the knowledge of the selected 11 evidence-based guidelines by Polish nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedunska, Karina; Dyk, Danuta

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the questionnaire testing nurses' knowledge about the maintenance of a central venous catheter (CVC) and assessed it with regard to age, work experience, type of ward, frequency of trainings, and postgraduate education. There were 1,180 questionnaires (N = 784; 66.4% of the total sample) distributed in several regions of Poland for a period of 7 months. The difficulty level for each question ranged from 0.22-0.88. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-07-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral nutrition. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy, safety and feasibility of anticoagulant use for preventing and treating catheter-related thrombosis during parenteral nutrition. We searched for interventional and observational studies on adults and children receiving systemic anticoagulants during either short- or long-term parenteral nutrition delivered via central venous access. Primary outcomes were: objectively-confirmed catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and bleeding. Secondary outcomes were: heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, prevalence of anticoagulation, and quality of International Normalised Ratio management in vitamin K antagonist-treated patients. We identified 1,199 studies, of which 23 were included. Seven interventional studies of short-term parenteral nutrition (adult population, n=5) were classified as low-quality: in those, intravenous unfractionated heparin did not prevent catheter-related thrombosis if compared to saline. No interventional studies were conducted in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. Observational data were sparse, rarely focusing on anticoagulation, and overall of low quality. The reported use of anticoagulants was between 22 and 66% in recent multicentre cohorts. The amount and quality of data in this area are very suboptimal: most studies are outdated and involved heterogeneous populations. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to allow conclusions to be reached regarding the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants in this setting.

  4. Prevention of intrathecal drug delivery catheter-related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Kenneth A; Burchiel, Kim; Deer, Timothy; Dupen, Stuart; Prager, Joshua; Turner, Michael S; Coffey, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to improve the performance of implantable intrathecal drug delivery systems, a group of physicians experienced in the management of such devices reviewed surgical practices and principles that were associated with low catheter-related complication rates. Clinical study and postmarket data identified physicians whose patients experienced a relatively low rate of catheter-related complications. Six of those physicians (three anesthesiologists and three neurosurgeons) reviewed the number and types of intrathecal drug pumps and catheters they had implanted, with an emphasis on the specific details of successful catheter implantation techniques. The authors pooled their experiences to reach a consensus on implant techniques that are associated with a low rate of postoperative complications.  The authors found that complications were minimized by the use of specific methods for catheter placement that included: a mid-to-upper lumbar dural entry level, a shallow-angle paramedian oblique insertion trajectory, and meticulous catheter anchoring and tunneling techniques. Systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, attention to pump pocket location, and surgical wound closure techniques also were important in reducing the incidence of postoperative device-related complications. Their experience indicates that specific implantation techniques using a variety of catheters and accessories can be expected to reduce the incidence of complications after implantation of intrathecal drug administration systems.

  5. Assessment of central venous catheter-associated infections using semi-quantitative or quantitative culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Pizzolitto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Semiquantitative (Maki and quantitative (Brun- Buisson culture techniques were employed in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI in patients who have a short-term central venous catheter (inserted for 30 days. The diagnosis of CRBSI was based on the results of semiquantitative and quantitative culture of material from the removed catheters. Catheter tips (118 from 100 patients were evaluated by both methods. Semiquantitative analysis revealed 34 catheters (28.8% colonized by ≥15 colonyforming units (cfu, while quantitative cultures (34 catheters, 28.8% showed the growth of ≥103 cfu/mL. Bacteremia was confirmed in four patients by isolating microorganisms of identical species from both catheters and blood samples. Using the semiquantitative culture technique on short-term central venous catheter tips, we have shown that with a cut-off level of ≥15 cfu, the technique had 100.0% sensitivity, specificity of 68.4%, 25.0% positive predictive value (PPV and 100.0% negative predictive value (NPV, efficiency of 71.4% and a prevalence of 9.5%. The quantitative method, with a cut-off limit of ≥103 cfu/mL, gave identical values: the sensitivity was 100.0%, specificity 68.4%, positive predictive value (PPV 25.0%, negative predictive value (NPV 100.0%, efficiency 71.4% and prevalence 9.5%. We concluded that the semiquantitative and quantitative culture methods, evaluated in parallel, for the first time in Brazil, have similar sensitivity and specificity. Keywords: central venous catheter; semi-quantitative culture; quantitative culture; catheter-related bacteremia.

  6. Prevention of catheter-related bacteremia with a daily ethanol lock in patients with tunnelled catheters: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennert Slobbe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI results in significant attributable morbidity and mortality. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we studied the efficacy and safety of a daily ethanol lock for the prevention of CRBSI in patients with a tunnelled central venous catheter (CVC.From 2005 through 2008, each lumen of the CVC of adult hematology patients was locked for 15 minutes per day with either 70%-ethanol or placebo, where after the lock solution was flushed through. As a primary endpoint, the incidence rates of endoluminal CRBSI were compared.The intent-to-treat analysis was based on 376 patients, accounting for 448 CVCs and 27,745 catheter days. For ethanol locks, the incidence of endoluminal CRBSI per 1000 CVC-days was 0.70 (95%-CI, 0.4-1.3, compared to 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.9 for placebo (incidence rate-ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-1.30; P = .19. For endoluminal CRBSI according to the strictest definition (positive hub culture and identical bacterial strain in blood, a 3.6-fold, non-significant, reduction was observed for patients receiving ethanol (2 of 226 versus 7 of 222; P = .103. No life-threatening adverse events were observed. More patients receiving ethanol discontinued lock-therapy (11 of 226 versus 1 of 222; P = .006 or continued with decreased lock-frequency (10 of 226 versus 0 of 222; P = .002, due to non-severe adverse events.In this study, the reduction in the incidence of endoluminal CRBSI using preventive ethanol locks was non-significant, although the low incidence of endoluminal CRBSI precludes definite conclusions. Therefore, the lack of statistical significance may partially reflect a lack of power. Significantly more patients treated with ethanol locks discontinued their prophylactic treatment due to adverse effects, which were non-severe but reasonably ethanol related. Additional studies should be performed in populations with higher incidence of

  7. A European perspective on intravascular catheter-related infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouza, E; San Juan, R; Muñoz, P

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory workload, microbiological techniques and aetiology of catheter-related infections in European hospitals are mostly unknown. The present study (ESGNI-005) comprised a 1-day (22 October 2001), laboratory-based, point-prevalence survey based on a questionnaire completed by microbiology...... by these institutions was 121,363,800, and the estimated number of admissions during 2000 was 6,712,050. The total number of catheter tips processed during 2000 was 142,727, or 21/1,000 admissions, of which 23.7% were considered to be positive in the institutions using semiquantitative or quantitative techniques....... Overall, EU centres received significantly more catheter tip samples/1,000 admissions and had a significantly higher rate of 'positivity' (p...

  8. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Infections in a Cohort of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzad, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.bouzad@gmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Duron, Sandrine, E-mail: duronsandrine@yahoo.fr [GSBdD, Military Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CESPA) (France); Bousquet, Aurore, E-mail: aurorebousquet@yahoo.fr [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Bacteriology Department (France); Arnaud, François-Xavier, E-mail: fxa0160@hotmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Valbousquet, Laura, E-mail: laura.valbousquet@gmail.com [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Weber-Donat, Gabrielle, E-mail: weberdonatgabrielle@yahoo.fr; Teriitehau, Christophe, E-mail: cteriitehau@me.com; Baccialone, Jacques, E-mail: jacques.baccialone@wanadoo.fr; Potet, Julien, E-mail: potet-julien@yahoo.fr [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections.

  9. Cefotaxime-heparin lock prophylaxis against hemodialysis catheter-related sepsis among Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers undergoing hemodialysis (HD through tunneled cuffed catheters (TCCs form a high-risk group for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI and ensuing morbidity. The efficacy of antibiotic-locks on the outcomes of TCCs among S. aureus nasal carriers has not been studied earlier. Persistent nasal carriage was defined by two or more positive cultures for methicillin-susceptible (MSSA or methicillin-resistant (MRSA S. aureus of five standardized nasal swabs taken from all the participants dialyzed at a large out-patient HD center affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Of 218 participants, 82 S. aureus nasal carriers dialyzed through TCCs (n = 88 were identified through April 2005 to March 2006 and randomized to two groups. Group I comprised of 39 nasal carriers who had TCCs (n = 41 "locked" with cefotaxime/heparin while group II included 43 patients with TCCs (n = 47 filled with standard heparin. The CRBSI incidence and TCC survival at 365 days were statistically compared between the two groups. A significantly lower CRBSI incidence (1.47 vs. 3.44/1000 catheter-days, P <0.001 and higher infection-free TCC survival rates at 365 days (80.5 vs. 40.4%, P <0.0001 were observed in the cefotaxime group compared with the stan-dard heparin group. However, no significant difference in MRSA-associated CRBSI incidence was observed between the two groups. Cefotaxime-heparin "locks" effectively reduced CRBSI-incidence associated with gram-positive cocci, including MSSA, among S. aureus nasal carriers. There remains a compelling requirement for antibiotic-locks effective against MRSA.

  10. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer: a randomized controlled open-labelled trial of taurolidine versus heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  11. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infection Due to Candida spp. in China: Species Distribution, Clinical Features, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Du, Mingmei; Chen, Liang-An; Liu, Yunxi; Liang, Zhixin

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the distribution of Candida spp., predictors of mortality, and effects of therapeutic measures on outcomes of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Candida spp. This retrospective, population-based study enrolled adult patients with Candida nosocomial BSI from January 2010 to December 2014 in one tertiary care hospital. The demographics, comorbidities, species distribution, risk factors, and effects of antifungal treatment were assessed. In total, 190 episodes of Candida BSI were identified. The most prevalent species was C. albicans (38.9 %), followed by C. parapsilosis (23.2 %) and C. tropicalis (20.5 %). In vitro susceptibility testing showed that 88.9 % of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole. The 30-day hospital mortality was 27.9 %, while the early mortality (within 7 days) was 16.3 %. In a multivariate regression analysis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [odds ratio (OR) 1.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.080-1.390; P = 0.002] and severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 15.35; 95 % CI 2.391-98.502; P = 0.004) were independently correlated with early mortality. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 24.75; 95 % CI 5.099-120.162; P risk factor for 30-day mortality, while proven catheter-related candidemia (OR 0.16; 95 % CI 0.031-0.810; P = 0.027) was a positive factor for 30-day mortality. Early central venous catheter removal and adequate antifungal treatment were closely related to decreased mortality in patients with primary candidemia. The proportion of candidemia caused by C. albicans was lower than that caused by non-albicans species. The severity of illness influenced early mortality, and the origin of the central venous catheter remarkably affected 30-day mortality.

  12. Central or peripheral catheters for initial venous access of ICU patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jean-Damien; Salomon, Laurence; Boyer, Alexandre; Thiery, Guillaume; Meybeck, Agnes; Roy, Carine; Pasquet, Blandine; Le Mière, Eric; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2013-09-01

    The vast majority of ICU patients require some form of venous access. There are no evidenced-based guidelines concerning the use of either central or peripheral venous catheters, despite very different complications. It remains unknown which to insert in ICU patients. We investigated the rate of catheter-related insertion or maintenance complications in two strategies: one favoring the central venous catheters and the other peripheral venous catheters. Multicenter, controlled, parallel-group, open-label randomized trial. Three French ICUs. Adult ICU patients with equal central or peripheral venous access requirement. Patients were randomized to receive central venous catheters or peripheral venous catheters as initial venous access. The primary endpoint was the rate of major catheter-related complications within 28 days. Secondary endpoints were the rate of minor catheter-related complications and a composite score-assessing staff utilization and time spent to manage catheter insertions. Analysis was intention to treat. We randomly assigned 135 patients to receive a central venous catheter and 128 patients to receive a peripheral venous catheter. Major catheter-related complications were greater in the peripheral venous catheter than in the central venous catheter group (133 vs 87, respectively, p=0.02) although none of those was life threatening. Minor catheter-related complications were 201 with central venous catheters and 248 with peripheral venous catheters (p=0.06). 46% (60/128) patients were managed throughout their ICU stay with peripheral venous catheters only. There were significantly more peripheral venous catheter-related complications per patient in patients managed solely with peripheral venous catheter than in patients that received peripheral venous catheter and at least one central venous catheter: 1.92 (121/63) versus 1.13 (226/200), pcentral venous catheter-related complications per patient between patients initially randomized to peripheral

  13. Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

    2014-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for

  14. Intravascular catheter-related infection - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... or more colonies are isolated from the blood drawn from the vascular catheter ... Catheter colonisation: growth of ≥ 15 colony-forming units (semiquantitative culture) or ≥ 103 colony-forming units. (quantitative culture) ..... Miller JJ, Venus B, Mathru M. Comparison of the sterility of long-term central venous.

  15. Polyurethane versus silicone catheters for central venous port devices implanted at the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Lueg, Claudia; Borgmeyer, Sebastian; Karimov, Ilham; Braun, Ulrike; Kiechle, Marion; Meier, Reinhard; Koehler, Michael; Ettl, Johannes; Berger, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to analyse short and long-term complications of polyurethane (PU) versus silicone catheters used in totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) implanted at the forearm. Retrospective analysis of 698 consecutively implanted TIVAPs was performed. Primary end-points were defined as rates of major complications associated with either type of central venous port catheter. Technical success rate, device service interval as well as minor complications not requiring port explantation were defined as secondary end-points. A total of 698 port devices were implanted in 681 patients, 396 equipped with a PU catheter, 302 with a silicone catheter. The technical success rate was 99.9% with no major periprocedural complications. During follow-up a total of 211 complications in 146 patients were observed (1.0/1000 catheter days), 183 occurred associated with PU catheters (1.8/100 catheter days), 28 (0.3/1000 catheter days) with silicone catheters (log rank test p Catheter-related bloodstream infections as well as thrombotic complications occurred significantly more frequently with PU catheters, while silicone catheters exhibited a trend towards a higher rate of mechanical failure such as disconnection or catheter rupture. Major complications requiring explantation of the device occurred more frequently with PU-based catheters (10.6%) compared to silicone catheter carrying ports (4.6%, log rank test p catheters are more susceptible to catheter-related infections and exhibit a higher thrombogenicity, compared to silicone catheters. Silicone catheters instead exhibit a trend towards decreased mechanical stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of infection control training for interns on PICU-acquired bloodstream infections in a middle-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yun Yun; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed El-Amin; Gan, Chin Seng; Siham, Anis; Zainol, Hasimah; Lum, Lucy Chai See

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to determine the impact of an extended infection control training programme, which was conducted for all interns posted to the Department of Paediatrics, on the incidence of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)-acquired bloodstream infections (BSIs) in University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. The development of nosocomial BSIs during the baseline period (1 January-31 October 2008) and intervention period (1 November-31 December 2009) was monitored. During the intervention period, all paediatric interns underwent training in hand hygiene and aseptic techniques for accessing vascular catheters. A total of 25 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period, while 18 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period (i.e. infection rate of 88 per 1,000 and 41 per 1,000 admissions, respectively). The infections were related to central venous catheters (CVCs) in 22 of the 25 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period and 11 of the 18 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period. Thus, the incidence rates of catheter-related BSIs were 25.2 per 1,000 CVC-days and 9.3 per 1,000 CVC-days, respectively (p low-cost intervention, resulted in a substantial reduction in the incidence of PICU-acquired BSIs.

  17. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  18. Hemodialysis tunneled central venous catheters: five-year outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfo, Salvatore; Acconcia, Pasqualina; Bucci, Raffaella; Corradi, Bruno; Farina, Marco; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Stucchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tunneled central venous catheters (tCVCs) are considered inferior to arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and grafts in all nephrology guidelines. However, they are being increasingly used as hemodialysis vascular access. The purpose of this study was to document the natural history of tCVCs and determine the rate and type of catheter replacement. This was a prospective study of 141 patients who underwent hemodialysis with tCVCs between January 2008 and December 2012. The patients used 154 tCVCs. Standard protocols about management of tCVCs, according to European Renal Best Practice, were well established. All catheters were inserted in the internal jugular vein. Criteria for catheter removal were persistent bloodstream infection, detection of an outbreak of catheter-related bloodstream (CRBS) infections, or catheter dysfunction. Event rates were calculated per 1,000 catheter days; tCVC cumulative survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Catheter replacement occurred in 15 patients (0.29 per 1,000 days); catheter dysfunction was the main cause of replacement (0.18 per 1,000 days), typically within 12 months of surgical insertion. A total of 53 CRBS events in 36 patients were identified (0.82 per 1,000 days); 17 organisms, most commonly Gram-positive pathogens, were isolated; 87% of CVC infections were treated by systemic antibiotics associated with lock therapy. tCVC cumulative survival was 91% at 1 year, 88% at 2 years and 85% at 4 years. Our data show a high survival rate of tCVCs in hemodialysis patients, with low incidence of catheter dysfunction and CRBS events. These data justify tCVC use for hemodialysis vascular access, also as first choice, especially in patients with exhausted peripheral access and limited life expectancy.

  19. Comparative Epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis Isolates from Patients with Catheter-Related Bacteremia and from Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, B.; Deplano, A.; Nonhoff, C.; Denis, O.; Hallin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). Recent studies suggested the existence of well-adapted, highly resistant, hospital-associated S. epidermidis clones. The molecular epidemiology of S. epidermidis in Belgian hospitals and the Belgian community has not been explored yet. We compared a set of 33 S. epidermidis isolates causing CRBSI in hospitalized patients with a set of 33 commensal S. epidermidis isolates. The factors analyzed included resistance to antibiotics and genetic diversity as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and SCCmec typing. Additionally, the presence of virulence-associated mobile genetic elements, the ica operon and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), was assessed and compared against clinical data. CRBSI S. epidermidis isolates were significantly resistant to more antibiotics than commensal S. epidermidis isolates. The two populations studied were very diverse and genetically distinct as only 23% of the 37 PFGE types observed were harbored by both CRBSI and commensal isolates. ACME was found in 76% of S. epidermidis strains, regardless of their origin, while the ica operon was significantly more prevalent in CRBSI isolates than in commensal isolates (P epidermidis isolates causing CRBSI were more resistant and more often ica positive than commensal S. epidermidis isolates, which were genetically heterogeneous and susceptible to the majority of antibiotics tested. Clinically severe CRBSIs were due to isolates belonging to two closely related MLST types, ST2 and ST54. PMID:23486718

  20. The Changing Epidemiology of Bloodstream Infections and Resistance in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mücahit Yemişen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT are exposed to highly immunosuppressive conditions and bloodstream infections (BSIs are one of the most common major complications within this period. Our aim, in this study, was to evaluate the epidemiology of BSIs in these patients retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The epidemiological properties of 312 patients with HSCT were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 312 patients, followed between 2000 and 2011, who underwent autologous (62% and allogeneic (38% HSCT were included in the study. The most common underlying malignancies were multiple myeloma (28% and Hodgkin lymphoma (21.5%. A total of 142 (45% patients developed at least 1 episode of BSI and 193 separate pathogens were isolated from the blood cultures. There was a trend of increase in the numbers of BSIs in 2005-2008 and a relative increase in the proportion of gram-positive infections in recent years (2009-2011, and central venous catheter-related BSI was found to be most common source. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (49.2% and Acinetobacter baumannii (8.8% were the most common pathogens. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains were 23% and 22% among Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, respectively. Quinolone resistance was detected in 10% of Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance to carbapenems was not detected in Enterobacteriaceae, while it was seen at 11.1% and 23.5% in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains, respectively. Conclusion: A shift was detected from gram-negative bacteria to gram-positive in the etiology over the years and central lines were the most common sources of BSIs.

  1. Implementation of a children's hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.F. Kornelisse (René); C. van der Starre (Cynthia); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); M.J. Poley (Marten); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation

  2. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of central venous catheters treated with Minocycline and Rifampicin in preventing bloodstream infections in intensive care patients [Medizinische Wirksamkeit und Kosteneffektivität von Minocyclin/Rifampicin-beschichteten zentralvenösen Kathetern zur Prävention von Blutbahninfektionen bei Patienten in intensivmedizinischer Betreuung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusser, Silke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] The use of central venous catheters coated with antibiotics can avoid bloodstream infections with intensive care patients. This is the result of a scientific examination which has been published by the DIMDI. Costs could be also saved in this way. However, according to the authors, the underlying studies do not allow absolutely valid statements.[german] Der Einsatz bestimmter Antibiotika-beschichteter Venenkatheter kann bei Intensivpatienten Blutbahninfektionen vermeiden. So das Ergebnis einer wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung, die das DIMDI veröffentlicht hat. Auch ließen sich damit Kosten einsparen. Allerdings erlauben, laut den Autoren, die zugrunde gelegten Studien keine uneingeschränkt gültigen Aussagen.

  3. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN CHLORHEXIDINE 2% AND POVIDONE-IODINE 10% IN PREVENTING CATHETER-RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Invasive skin pathogens play an important role in the occurrence of infections. Intravascular catheters which are commonly used in the hospitals for patient care can lead to serious infectious complications. Use of an antiseptic solution for disinfecting the skin at the catheter insertion site helps to prevent catheter-related infections. Cleaning of the skin with antiseptics before the surgical or cutaneous intervention clearly reduces the infection risk. AIM To compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine 2% and povidone-iodine 10% in preventing catheter-related blood stream infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective comparative study was conducted for a period of 2 months in our hospital. 100 patients who were posted for elective surgeries under epidural anaesthesia (epidural catheters were included in our study. The patients were divided into two groups of 50 each. For group I patients, chlorhexidine was used and for group II patients, povidone-iodine was used as an antiseptic solution over the area of catheter insertion. Totally, two skin swabs were obtained from the patients in each group, one before cleansing and the other one subsequently after cleansing the area where catheter was inserted. RESULTS Before the antiseptic painting at the catheter site the most common organism found was CoNS, followed by micrococcus and few Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacilli among both the groups and the colonies had shown between poor-to-moderate growth. After painting the disinfectant, no organism was detected in both the chlorhexidine group and the povidone-iodine group. The povidone-iodine takes a longer time to dry when compared to chlorhexidine and the difference was found to be statistically significant. CONCLUSION It is recommended that either of the two agents can be used before conducting procedures such as catheterisation or venous puncture. Chlorhexidine 2%, due to its significantly shorter contact time, may be of value in

  4. Dressings and securement devices for central venous catheters (CVC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Amanda J; Cooke, Marie L; Mitchell, Marion; Lin, Frances; New, Karen; Long, Debbie A; Mihala, Gabor; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-09-10

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) play a vital role in the management of acute and chronic illness. Dressings and securement devices must ensure CVCs do not dislodge or fall out, provide a barrier protection from microbial colonisation and infection, and be comfortable for the patient. There is a large range of dressing and securement products available for clinicians to use. To compare the available dressing and securement devices for CVCs, in terms of catheter-related bloodstream infection (BSI), catheter colonisation, entry- and exit-site infection, skin colonisation, skin irritation, failed catheter securement, dressing condition and mortality. In June 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); The Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHSEED); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; EBSCO CINAHL; six clinical trial registries and reference lists of identified trials. There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication or study setting. We included randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of dressing and securement devices for CVCs. All types of CVCs were included, i.e. short- and long-term CVCs, tunnelled and non-tunnelled, port-a-caths, haemodialysis catheters, and peripherally-inserted central catheters (PICCs). We used standard Cochrane Collaboration methods including independent review of titles and abstracts for relevance, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment of the included studies by two review authors. Results are expressed using risk ratio (RR) for categorical data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For outcomes best presented as a rate-per-time-period, rate ratios and standard errors have been used. We performed multiple treatment meta-analyses to rank the effectiveness of each intervention for each outcome. We included 22 studies

  5. The economics of hemodialysis catheter-related infection prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, S Daisy; Lok, Charmaine E

    2013-01-01

    Hemodialysis central venous catheter (CVC) use is associated with the highest morbidity, mortality, and cost of all types of hemodialysis vascular access. CVC-related infection drives much of the cost associated with CVC use. The magnitude of the cost associated with CVC-related infection varies depending on the type and severity of that infection; however, estimates of the total direct and indirect costs associated with hospitalizations due to hemodialysis CVC-related infections range from 17,000 USD to 32,000 USD per episode. Thus, it is critically important, to not only have effective strategies to limit CVC-related infection but also evaluate whether these strategies are an efficient use of resources. Prophylactic strategies can be considered economically efficient only if the value of its implementation and the corresponding drop in infection rate offer greater value than standard care. The optimal CVC-related infection prophylaxis strategy should work to limit infection risk with minimal risk, inconvenience, and discomfort to the patient, and at minimal cost. The aim of this review was to examine the clinical and economic impact of some commonly described interventions used for CVC infection prophylaxis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Central venous catheters and biofilms: where do we stand in 2017?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gominet, Marie; Compain, Fabrice; Beloin, Christophe; Lebeaux, David

    2017-04-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVC) is associated with a risk of microbial colonization and subsequent potentially severe infection. Microbial contamination of the catheter leads to the development of a microbial consortia associated with the CVC surface and embedded in an extracellular matrix, named biofilm. This biofilm provides bacterial cells the ability to survive antimicrobial agents and the host immune system and to disseminate to other sites of the body. The best preventive strategy is to avoid any unnecessary catheterization or to reduce indwelling duration when a CVC is required. Beside aseptic care and antibiotic-impregnated catheters (like minocycline/rifampin), preventive locks can be proposed in some cases, whereas non-biocidal approaches are under active research like anti-adhesive or competitive interactions strategies. When the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is suspected on clinical symptoms, it requires a microbiological confirmation by paired blood cultures in order to avoid unnecessary catheter removal. The treatment of CRBSI relies on catheter removal and systemic antimicrobials. However, antibiotic lock technique (ALT) can be used as an attempt to eradicate biofilm formed on the inside lumen of the catheter in case of uncomplicated long-term catheter-related BSI caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) or Enterobacteriaceae. Recently, promising strategies have been developed to improve biofilm eradication; they rely on matrix degradation or destabilization or the development of anti-persister compounds, targeting the most tolerant bacterial cells inside the biofilm. Understanding biofilm formation at the molecular level may help us to develop new approaches to prevent or treat these frequent infections. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antiseptic barrier cap effective in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voor In 't Holt, Anne F; Helder, Onno K; Vos, Margreet C; Schafthuizen, Laura; Sülz, Sandra; van den Hoogen, Agnes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343075156; Ista, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microorganisms can intraluminally access a central venous catheter via the catheter hub. The catheter hub should be appropriately disinfected to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). However, compliance with the time-consuming manual disinfection process is

  8. Daptomycin Antibiotic Lock Therapy in a Rat Model of Staphylococcal Central Venous Catheter Biofilm Infections▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, Andrew D. G.; Li, Tongchuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Bertolami, Shellie; Mortin, Lawrence I.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) is an adjunctive procedure to prevent or treat central venous catheter infections, ensuing catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is rapidly bactericidal against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The efficacies of daptomycin against central venous catheter biofilms, catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections were evaluated by adapting a previously reported central venous catheter biofilm model in rats. Combined daptomycin ALT and systemic dosing resulted in the clearance of an established in vivo S. aureus central venous catheter biofilm after just two daily ALT treatments (30 min with daptomycin at 5 mg/ml) with concurrent systemic daptomycin dosing (40 mg/kg of body weight/day subcutaneously [s.c.]; equivalent exposure of 6 mg/kg/day in people). Daptomycin ALT solutions formulated in either saline or lactated Ringer's solution were equally fast in eradicating established in vivo methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) central venous catheter biofilms. However, the lactated Ringer's formulation was superior to that of saline in sustaining the bacterial clearance of treated central venous catheters (83% versus 50%). In MRSE-infected central venous catheter studies, 3 days of daptomycin or vancomycin ALT (18 h at 5 mg/ml) with systemic s.c. dosing (40 mg/kg/day daptomycin or 100 mg/kg/day vancomycin) was equally effective 1 week posttherapy in maintaining cleared central venous catheters (90% [n = 10] versus 100% [n = 8]). These results suggest that daptomycin ALT, along with systemic dosing, could be an effective treatment option for the prevention or eradication of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections, thereby reducing the occurrence of catheter-related bacteremia or catheter-related metastatic infections. PMID:21709082

  9. Treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia with an antibiotic lock protocol: effect of bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Christopher V; Carlton, Donna; Bimbo, Lisa; Allon, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The standard therapy of dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia involves both systemic antibiotics and catheter replacement. We reported recently that instillation of an antibiotic lock (highly concentrated antibiotic solution) into the catheter lumen after dialysis sessions, in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, can successfully treat many episodes of catheter-related bacteraemia without requiring catheter removal. The present study evaluated whether the likelihood of achieving a cure with this protocol depends on the type of pathogen. This was a historically controlled interventional study of an antibiotic lock protocol for the treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia. We analysed prospectively the likelihood of clinical cure (fever resolution and negative surveillance cultures) with an antibiotic lock protocol among patients with dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia. In addition, infection-free catheter survival was evaluated for up to 150 days, and compared with that observed among patients managed with routine catheter replacement. Overall, the antibiotic lock protocol was successful in 33 of 47 infected patients (70%) with catheter-related bacteraemia. The likelihood of a clinical cure was 87% for Gram-negative infections, 75% for Staphylococcus epidermidis infections, and only 40% for Staphylococcus aureus infections (P = 0.04). The median infection-free catheter survival with the antibiotic lock protocol was longer than that observed among patients with routine catheter replacement (154 vs 71 days, P = 0.02). The clinical success of an antibiotic lock protocol in eradicating catheter-related bacteraemia while salvaging the catheter is highly dependent on the bacterial pathogen. Thus, the overall success rate in an individual dialysis programme will depend on the relative frequencies of different bacterial pathogens.

  10. Complications of total implantable access ports and efficacy of Taurolidine-citrate lock solution against catheter-related infections

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    Emine Ince

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Totally, implantable access ports (TIAPs are used for long standing venous catheterization. This study was designed to present our experiences of the TIAPs applications and efficacy of Taurolidine-citrate lock solution (TCLS against catheter-related infections. Materials and Methods: We evaluated records of the 108 patients implanted with 112 TIAPs, which had been performed using heparin solution or TCLS between 2005 and 2013. Results: Duration of exposure to TIAPs was 17-2051 days (median: 411 days. The primary diagnoses were solid tumours (n = 57, lymphoma (n = 23, haematologic diseases (n = 23, nephrotic syndrome (n = 4, Hirschsprung disease (n = 1. The right external jugular vein was most frequently used vascular access route (72.3%. Mechanical complications were observed in four cases. TIAPs were removed due to remission in 19 cases and infection in 19 cases. Median time from implantation and to the development of infection was 60 days. Heparin solution had been used for care in 33 ports, whereas heparin and TCLS had been used in 79 ports. Based on statistical comparison, use of TCLS was considered to be an important factor for preventing infection (P = 0.03. Conclusion: We consider that TCLS reduces infection prevalence so TIAPs would be used more extensively and effectively to prevent infections.

  11. Long-Term Outcome of Catheter-Related Arterial Thrombosis in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Mattia; Kroiss, Sabine; Kretschmar, Oliver; Forster, Ishilde; Brotschi, Barbara; Albisetti, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of catheter-related arterial thrombosis in children. Data from clinical and radiologic long-term follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease developing arterial thrombosis following femoral catheterization are presented. Ninety-five infants with radiologically proven arterial thrombosis because of cardiac catheter (n = 52; 55%) or indwelling arterial catheter (n = 43; 45%) were followed for a median time of 23.5 months (IQR 13.3-47.3). Overall, radiologic complete thrombus resolution was observed in 64 (67%), partial resolution in 8 (9%), and no resolution in 23 (24%) infants. Complete resolution was significantly more frequent in infants with indwelling arterial catheter-related thrombosis compared with cardiac catheter-related thrombosis (P = .001). Patients with complete resolution had a significantly lower blood pressure difference and increased ankle-ankle index compared with patients with partial or no resolution (P < .0001). However, symptoms of claudication were present only in 1 case and clinical significant legs growth retardation (≥ 15 mm) was present in 1%. A significant percentage of persistent occlusion is present in children with arterial catheter-related thrombosis on long-term follow-up. In these children, the magnitude of leg growth retardation is small and possibly not clinically relevant. However, in children with congenital heart disease, the high prevalence of persistent arterial occlusion may hamper future diagnostic and/or interventional catheterization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dialysis catheter-related septicaemia--focus on Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Ladefoged, S D; Kolmos, H J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dialysis catheters are a common cause of nosocomial septicaemia in haemodialysis units usually due to staphylococci, of which Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic. In this study, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dialysis catheter-related infections were studied, and methods...

  13. Cholorhexidine, octenidine or povidone iodine for catheter related infections: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Bilir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection of the catheter site by antimicrobial agents is one of the most important factors in the prevention of infection. Povidone iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate are the most common used agents for dressing. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of povidone iodine, chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine hydrochloride in preventing catheter related infections. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized to receive; 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, 10% povidone iodine or octenidine hydrochlorodine for cutaneous antisepsis. Cultures were taken at the site surrounding catheter insertion and at the catheter hub after removal to help identify the source of microorganisms. Results: Catheter related sepsis was 10.5% in the povidone iodine and octenidine hydrochlorodine groups. Catheter related colonization was 26.3% in povidone iodine group and 21.5% in octenidine hydrochlorodine group. Conclusion: 4% chlorhexidine or octenidine hydrochlorodine for cutaneous disinfection before insertion of an intravascular device and for post-insertion site care can reduce the catheter related colonization.

  14. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanıl Kendirli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of central line-associated bloodstream infections, risk factors, their relationship with catheter insertion location, and the effect of central line-associated bloodstream infections on mortality and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU length of stay. Methods: This was a prospective, observational and cohort study, carried out between November 2009 and February 2011. During this period, all the patients who had central-line were monitored for central line-associated bloodstream infection. Results: In the study period, 275 patients were admitted to our PICU. The frequency of invasive device usage was 38.9% (107 for central venous catheter, 38.2% (105 for mechanical ventilation, 53.3% (147 for urinary catheter, and 11.3% (32 for artery line. Central line-associated bloodstream infection was detected in 16 (14.8% of the patients and 23 central line-associated bloodstream infection attacks were observed. There were 14 central line-associated bloodstream infection attacks in 1.000 central venous catheter usage days. There were 168 patients without central venous catheter and 4 (2.4% of them had blood stream infection. Thirty-six patients died and the mortality rate was 13%. Five of these patients (13.8% died due to central line-associated bloodstream infection, 27 (25% of them had central venous catheter and 9 (6% of them did not (p=0.001. Conclusion: In conclusion, central line-associated bloodstream infection is one of the serious healthcare-associated infections, and it is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in PICUs.

  15. Intervenções de enfermagem e flebites decorrentes de cateteres venosos periféricos. Revisão sistemática da literatura. Intervenciones de enfermería y flebitis resultantes de cateteres venosos periféricos. Revisión sistemática de la literatura Nursing interventions and peripheral venous catheter-related phlebitis. Systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela de Sousa Salgueiro Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    enfermería relacionadas con la inserción del CVP; con la vigilancia de los enfermos y con los conocimientos de los enfermeros. Las tres áreas fueron identificadas como relevantes y con influencia en la aparición de flebitis. Las intervenciones de enfermería realizadas a enfermos portadores de CVP pueden prevenir la aparición de flebitis. La producción científica es, no obstante, reducida, habiendo necesidad de profundizar e investigar sobre el impacto de la formación de los enfermeros en la práctica clínica y sus intervenciones.Nursing care provided to patients using peripheral venous catheters (PVC is a constant need due to the high frequency of catheter use. The aim of this systematic review was to define the scientific evidence on nursing interventions for patients with peripheral venous catheters and their impact on the prevention of phlebitis. Scientific studies published in reference databases, between April 2004 and March 2010, were selected following the PICOD model and previously defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Nineteen studies were identified and divided into three main areas: nursing interventions related to PVC placement; to patient surveillance; and to nurses’ knowledge. These three areas were identified as relevant and as having an impact on the occurrence of phlebitis. Nursing interventions for patients having PVC can prevent phlebitis. However, the scientific evidence is limited, and so there is a need for further research on the impact of nurses’ training on their clinical practice and interventions.

  16. Chlorhexidine-impregnated transparent dressings decrease catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apata, Ibironke W; Hanfelt, John; Bailey, James L; Niyyar, Vandana Dua

    2017-03-21

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are associated with increased infection rates, morbidity and mortality compared to other hemodialysis vascular access. Chlorhexidine-impregnated transparent (CHG-transparent) dressings allow for continuous antimicrobial exposure and easy visibility of the CVC insertion site. We conducted a quality improvement project to compare catheter-related infection (CRI) rates in two dressing regimens - CHG-transparent dressings and adhesive dry gauze dressing in hemodialysis patients with tunneled CVCs. The study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1, CHG-transparent dressing was introduced to EDC hemodialysis unit, while EDG and EDN hemodialysis units, served as the control sites and maintained adhesive dry gauze dressing. Phase 2 of the study involved replacing the adhesive dry gauze dressing with CHG-transparent dressing at EDG and EDN and maintaining CHG-transparent dressing at EDC. CRI rates at each hemodialysis unit during the 12-month intervention were compared to CRI rates for the 12-month pre-intervention period for each study phase. CRI rates were also compared between all three hemodialysis units. In phase 1, CRI rates (per 1000 days) in EDC (intervention site) decreased by 52% (1.69 vs. 0.82, pphase 2, CRI rates at EDG and EDN (intervention sites) decreased by 86% (1.86 vs. 0.26 p<0.05), and 53% (1.89 vs. 0.88, p<0.05), respectively, and decreased by 20% at EDC (0.73 vs. 0.58, p = 0.65). Replacing adhesive dry gauze dressing with CHG-transparent dressing for hemodialysis patients with tunneled CVC was associated with decreased CRI rates.

  17. Investigation of biofilm formation on a charged intravenous catheter relative to that on a similar but uncharged catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards GA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy A Richards,1,2 Adrian J Brink,3 Ross McIntosh,4 Helen C Steel,5,6 Riana Cockeran5,61Department of Critical Care, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ampath National Laboratory Services, Milpark Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa; 4Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 5Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department of Immunology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; 6National Health Laboratory Service, Pretoria, South AfricaAbstract: Catheter-related blood stream infections increase morbidity, mortality, and costs. This study investigated whether Certofix® protect antimicrobial catheters carry a surface charge and whether this inhibits biofilm formation. The capacitance of the catheter surfaces was measured and, to determine if the catheters released ions, distilled water was passed through and current measured as a function of voltage. With probes touching the inner and outer surfaces, capacitance was not voltage-dependent, indicating surfaces were uncharged or carried a similar charge. When one probe penetrated the catheter wall, capacitance was weakly voltage-dependent, indicating the presence of a surface charge. Standard and charged catheters were also exposed to phosphate buffered saline as controls or 2×106 colony forming units/mL (in phosphate buffered saline of six different microorganisms for 60 or 120 minutes. When the growth of detached bacteria was measured, biofilm formation was significantly reduced, (P<0.05, for charged catheters for all organisms.Keywords: central venous catheters, electrical charge, biofilm

  18. Catheter-related infection in Irish intensive care units diagnosed with HELICS criteria: a multi-centre surveillance study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2013-03-01

    Catheter-related infection (CRI) surveillance is advocated as a healthcare quality indicator. However, there is no national CRI surveillance programme or standardized CRI definitions in Irish intensive care units (ICUs).

  19. Central venous catheter placement by advanced practice nurses demonstrates low procedural complication and infection rates--a report from 13 years of service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Evan; Spencer, Timothy R; Frost, Steven A; Mifflin, Nicholas; Davidson, Patricia M; Hillman, Ken M

    2014-03-01

    To report procedural characteristics and outcomes from a central venous catheter placement service operated by advanced practice nurses. Single-center observational study. A tertiary care university hospital in Sydney, Australia. Adult patients from the general wards and from critical care areas receiving a central venous catheter, peripherally inserted central catheter, high-flow dialysis catheter, or midline catheter for parenteral therapy between November 1996 and December 2009. None. Prevalence rates by indication, site, and catheter type were assessed. Nonparametric tests were used to calculate differences in outcomes for categorical data. Catheter infection rates were determined per 1,000 catheter days after derivation of the denominator. A total of 4,560 catheters were placed in 3,447 patients. The most common catheters inserted were single-lumen peripherally inserted central catheters (n = 1,653; 36.3%) and single-lumen central venous catheters (n = 1,233; 27.0%). A small proportion of high-flow dialysis catheters were also inserted over the reporting period (n = 150; 3.5%). Sixty-one percent of all catheters placed were for antibiotic administration. The median device dwell time (in d) differed across cannulation sites (p catheter placement had the longest dwell time with a median of 16 days (interquartile range, 8-26 d). Overall catheter dwell was reported at a cumulative 63,071 catheter days. The overall catheter-related bloodstream infection rate was 0.2 per 1,000 catheter days. The prevalence rate of pneumothorax recorded was 0.4%, and accidental arterial puncture (simple puncture-with no dilation or cannulation) was 1.3% using the subclavian vein. This report has demonstrated low complication rates for a hospital-wide service delivered by advance practice nurses. The results suggest that a centrally based service with specifically trained operators can be beneficial by potentially improving patient safety and promoting organizational efficiencies.

  20. How Should Long-Term Tunneled Central Venous Catheters Be Managed in Microbiology Laboratories in Order To Provide an Accurate Diagnosis of Colonization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines recommend the roll-plate technique for short-term central venous catheter (CVC) tip cultures. However, the issue of whether the roll-plate technique is better than the sonication method for long-term CVCs remains unresolved. In addition, no data are available for predicting the value of direct Gram staining in anticipating catheter colonization or catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in these long-term CVCs. Our objectives were to compare the roll-plate technique and the sonication method and to define the validity values of Gram staining for the prediction of colonization and CRBSI in patients with long-term tunneled CVCs. During the study period, all tunneled CVCs removed at our institution were prospectively and routinely sent to the microbiology laboratory for Gram staining (first) and tip culture (the Maki technique and sonication, in a random order). We received 149 tunneled CVCs, 39 (26.2%) of which were colonized and 11 (7.4%) of which were associated with CRBSI. Overall, the roll-plate method detected 94.9% of the colonized catheters, whereas sonication detected only 43.6% (P bacteria in long-term tunneled CVCs. Gram staining of the tips of tunneled CVCs can anticipate a positive culture and rule out CRBSI. In our opinion, direct Gram staining should be incorporated into routine microbiological assessments of long-term catheter tips. PMID:22170928

  1. Sodium citrate versus saline catheter locks for non-tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheters in critically ill adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermite, Laure; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Nadji, Abdelouaid; Barbar, Saber David; Charles, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hamet, Maël; Jacquiot, Nicolas; Ghiringhelli, François; Freysz, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Sodium citrate has antibacterial and anticoagulant properties that are confined to the catheter when used as a catheter lock. Studies of its use as a catheter lock in chronic hemodialysis patients suggest it may be efficacious in preventing infection and thrombotic complications. We compared sodium citrate with saline catheter locks for non-tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheters in critically ill adult patients. Primary endpoint was catheter life span without complication. This was a randomized, controlled, open-label trial involving intensive care patients with acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis. Events were defined as catheter-related bloodstream infection and catheter malfunction. Seventy-eight patients were included. Median catheter life span without complication was 6 days (saline group) versus 12 days (citrate group) [hazard ratio (HR) 2.12 (95% CI 1.32-3.4), p = 0.0019]. There was a significantly higher rate of catheter malfunction in the saline group compared with in the citrate group (127 catheter events/1,000 catheter-days, saline group vs. 26 events/1,000 catheter-days, citrate group, p catheter life span. This study shows for the first time that citrate lock reduced catheter complications and increased catheter life span as compared to saline lock in critically ill adults requiring hemodialysis.

  2. Rate, risk factors, and outcomes of nosocomial primary bloodstream infection in pediatric intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogaraj, Jeya S; Elward, Alexis M; Fraser, Victoria J

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the rate, risk factors, and outcomes of nosocomial primary bloodstream infection in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Prospective cohort study. This study was performed at St Louis Children's Hospital, a 235-bed academic tertiary care center with a combined 22-bed medical and surgical PICU. Subjects for this study were patients admitted to the PICU between September 1, 1999, and May 31, 2000. None. Patients were monitored for the development of nosocomial bloodstream infections from the day of PICU admission until 48 hours after PICU discharge. Of 911 patients, 526 (58%) were male and 674 (74%) were white. Congenital heart disease (29%), lung disease (25%), and genetic syndrome (18%) were common. There were 65 episodes of primary bloodstream infection in 57 patients; 5 were polymicrobial and 7 patients had multiple bloodstream infections. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the leading cause of bloodstream infection (n = 28), followed by Enterobacter cloacae (n = 8). The rate of bloodstream infection was 13.8 per 1000 central venous catheter days. In multiple logistic regression analysis, patients with bloodstream infection were more likely to have multiple central venous catheters (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.9-10.9), arterial catheters (aOR: 5.5; 95% CI: 1.8-16.3), invasive procedures performed in the PICU (aOR: 4.0; 95%CI: 2.0-7.8), and be transported out of the PICU (aOR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.8-6.7) to the radiology or operating room suites. Severity of illness as measured by admission Pediatric Risk of Mortality score, underlying illnesses, and medications were not associated with increased risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Conclusions This study identified a high rate of bloodstream infection among St Louis Children's Hospital PICU patients. Risk factors for bloodstream infection were related more to process of care than to severity of illness. Additional

  3. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

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    Başak Akça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 μ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 μ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0 and 15 (t1, 60 (t2, 120 (t3, and 360 (t4 minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042 was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044.The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004 were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017. Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034 and the control group (p=0.005. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed.

  4. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catheter-related infections in a northwestern São Paulo reference unit for burned patients care

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    Cláudio Penido Campos Júnior

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in care and rehabilitation of burned patients, infections still remain the main complication and death cause. Catheter-related infections are among the four most common infections and are associated with skin damage and insertion site colonization. There are few studies evaluating this kind of infection worldwide in this special group of patients. Padre Albino Hospital Burn Care Unit (PAHBCU is the only reference center in the Northwestern São Paulo for treatment of burned patients. This paper presents the results of a retrospective study aiming at describing the epidemiological and clinical features of catheter-related infections at PAHBCU.

  6. An ethanol/sodium citrate locking solution compared to heparin to prevent hemodialysis catheter-related infections: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, Lavern M; Allan, Don R; Armstrong, Sean W; Zacharias, James M; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the initial safety and efficacy of a novel 30% ethanol/4% sodium citrate catheter-locking solution to heparin in a hemodialysis population. This was a prospective, randomized, pilot study of 40 hemodialysis patients randomized to a 30% ethanol/4% sodium citrate or heparin 1000 units/mL locking solution. The primary outcome was identification of any serious adverse events over the study duration. Secondary outcomes included the rate per 1000 catheter days for catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), alteplase use, catheter dysfunction, and catheter removal. Three serious adverse events were reported as possibly related to the catheter solutions. Only one CRBSI was observed during the study in the heparin arm. The rate of alteplase use was 1.5/1000 catheter days in the heparin arm compared to 2.8/1000 catheter days in the ethanol/citrate arm (rate ratio = 1.85, 90% CI 0.48, 7.07, p value = 0.45), while the rate of catheter dysfunction was 6.8/1000 catheter days in the heparin arm compared to 1.9/1000 catheter days in the ethanol citrate arm (rate ratio = 0.27, 90% CI 0.10, 0.74, p value = 0.04). Catheter survival to first catheter outcome was longer in the ethanol/citrate group compared to heparin and there were no catheter removals due to bacteremia or thrombosis. The ethanol/sodium citrate locking solution was safely used in this study. It appears to prevent CRBSI and may improve catheter survival compared to heparin. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01394458.

  7. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bal, Zumrut Sahbudak; Sen, Semra; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Aydemir, Sohret; Vardar, Fadil

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacterium spp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram-positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published...

  8. Long-term infectious complications and their relation to treatment duration in catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeylemaker, M.M.; Jaspers, C.A.; Visser, M.R.; Hoepelman, I.M.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The optimal duration of treatment for catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is not known. Short courses (< or = 2 weeks) of therapy should be viewed with caution because essential data on late complications, such as osteomyelitis and metastatic abscesses, are lacking. This study

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a central venous catheter care bundle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A Halton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bundled approach to central venous catheter care is currently being promoted as an effective way of preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI. Consumables used in the bundled approach are relatively inexpensive which may lead to the conclusion that the bundle is cost-effective. However, this fails to consider the nontrivial costs of the monitoring and education activities required to implement the bundle, or that alternative strategies are available to prevent CR-BSI. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a bundle to prevent CR-BSI in Australian intensive care patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the bundle relative to remaining with current practice (a non-bundled approach to catheter care and uncoated catheters, or use of antimicrobial catheters. We assumed the bundle reduced relative risk of CR-BSI to 0.34. Given uncertainty about the cost of the bundle, threshold analyses were used to determine the maximum cost at which the bundle remained cost-effective relative to the other approaches to infection control. Sensitivity analyses explored how this threshold alters under different assumptions about the economic value placed on bed-days and health benefits gained by preventing infection. If clinicians are prepared to use antimicrobial catheters, the bundle is cost-effective if national 18-month implementation costs are below $1.1 million. If antimicrobial catheters are not an option the bundle must cost less than $4.3 million. If decision makers are only interested in obtaining cash-savings for the unit, and place no economic value on either the bed-days or the health benefits gained through preventing infection, these cost thresholds are reduced by two-thirds. CONCLUSIONS: A catheter care bundle has the potential to be cost-effective in the Australian intensive care setting. Rather than anticipating cash-savings from this intervention, decision

  10. Infecciones asociadas a catéteres en niños tratados con hemodiálisis Catheter-related infections in hemodyalisis-treated children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Patricia Durán Casal

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron los expedientes clínicos de los 22 pacientes incluidos en el plan de enfermos crónicos del Servicio de Hemodiálisis de nuestro hospital en el 2005. Diez de estos pacientes tenían como acceso vascular temporal para hemodiálisis un catéter venoso central percutáneo (45,5 % y en ellos se registraron 26 procesos infecciosos relacionados con el cateterismo −algunos de ellos presentaron más de un episodio de infección relacionado con el catéter. Los catéteres utilizados fueron colocados por vía percutánea en las venas subclavia, femoral y yugular interna. Los catéteres insertados en la vena femoral presentaron el mayor número de complicaciones infecciosas. El hemocultivo fue positivo para el mismo germen en 14 casos del total de pacientes infectados, lo que evidenció que 53,8 % de los pacientes desarrollaron una infección asociada al uso del catéter. Los gérmenes que predominaron fueron los grampositivos (53,7 %, representados mayoritariamente por el estafilococo coagulasa-negativo. Las sepsis sistémicas predominaron en el estudio y todos los pacientes desarrollaron manifestaciones clínicas. En nuestro servicio la tasa estimada de sepsis por catéter para hemodiálisis fue de 18,1 %.The medical histories of the 22 patients from the chronically-ill patient program of Hemodyalisis Service at our hospital were studied in 2005. Ten of them had a central percutaneous venous catheter as a temporary vascular access for hemodyalisis (45,5%, but they also suffered 26 catheter-related infectious processes, some of them even more than one episode of infection. The used catheters were percutaneously placed in subclavian, femoral and internal jugular veins. Those catheters inserted into the femoral vein exhibited the highest number of infectious complications. Hemoculture was positive to the same germ in 14 cases of the total number of infected patients, which proved that 53,8% of patients developed catheter-related infection

  11. Drug shortage-associated increase in catheter-related blood stream infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralls, Matthew W; Blackwood, R Alexander; Arnold, Meghan A; Partipilo, M Luisa; Dimond, James; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) has been shown to reduce the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) in intestinal failure (IF) patients. Dosing and frequency remains undefined. Scrutiny of pharmaceutical facilities by the Food and Drug Administration led to the voluntary shutdown of the sole supplier of ethanol, resulting in a nationwide shortage. To conserve supply, we reduced ELT frequency from a daily regimen. We examined the impact that reduction in ELT frequency had on CRBSI in pediatric IF patients. We retrospectively reviewed our parenteral nutrition-dependent IF children. Primary outcome measure was CRBSI per 1000 catheter days after ELT frequency reduction. Data were compared (paired t test) to the same group over 1 year before ethanol shortage and to historical controls. During the shortage 13 outpatients received ELT. Eight met study criteria. Mean ± SD age was 9.1 ± 7.8 years. Mean CRBSI rate per 1000 catheter days was 0.7 ± 1.3 before ELT shortage. This increased to 6.2 ± 2.5 after frequency reduction (P Gram-negatives (6), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (1), and Candida spp (1). ELT frequency reduction resulted in complete failure in CRBSI prophylaxis. The nationwide shortage of this drug has been costly both financially and in patient morbidity.

  12. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with umbilical venous catheterisation in neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Gerdina; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne; Rozendaal, Lieke; Blom, Nico; Walther, Frans; Lopriore, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) are commonly used in the management of severely ill neonates. Several life-threatening complications have been described, including catheter-related infections, myocardial perforation, pericardial effusion and cardiac arrhythmias. This report describe two neonates with cardiac arrhythmias due to umbilical venous catheterisation. One neonate had a supraventricular tachycardia requiring treatment with intravenous adenosine administration. Another neonate had an atrial flutter and was managed successfully with synchronised cardioversion. The primary cause of cardiac arrhythmias after umbilical venous catheterisation is inappropriate position of the UVC within the heart and the first step to treat them should be to pull back or even remove the catheter. Cardiac arrhythmia is a rare but potentially severe complication of umbilical venous catheterisation in neonates. PMID:21691401

  13. [Venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms.

  14. Current strategies for the prevention and management of central line-associated bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolin Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Zhuolin Han, Stephen Y Liang, Jonas MarschallDivision of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Central venous catheters are an invaluable tool for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in today’s medicine, but their use can be complicated by bloodstream infections (BSIs. While evidence-based preventive measures are disseminated by infection control associations, the optimal management of established central line-associated BSIs has been summarized in infectious diseases guidelines. We prepared an overview of the state-of-the-art of prevention and management of central line-associated BSIs and included topics such as the role of antibiotic-coated catheters, the role of catheter removal in the management, and a review of currently used antibiotic compounds and the duration of treatment.Keywords: central venous catheters, bloodstream infections, guidelines, prevention

  15. Bloodstream infections among patients using central venous catheters in intensive care units Infección de corriente sanguínea en pacientes con catéter venosos central en unidades de cuidado intensivo Infecções da corrente sangüínea em pacientes em uso de cateter venoso central em unidades de terapia intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Rosa Aires Borba Mesiano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Central Venous Catheters (CVC, widely used in Intensive Care Units (ICU are important sources of bloodstream infections (BSI. This prospective cohort epidemiological analytical study, aimed to infer the incidence of BSI, the risk factors associated and evaluate the care actions related to the use of these catheters in seven ICU in the Federal District - Brasília, Brazil. From the 630 patients using CVC, 6.4% developed BSI (1.5% directly related to the catheter and 4.9% clinic BSI. The hospitalization term was 3.5 times greater among these patients. Different modalities of catheter insertion and antiseptic substances use were observed. Time of CVC permanence was significantly associated to infection incidence (pLos catéteres venosos centrales (CVC utilizados principalmente en unidades de cuidados intensivos - UCIs, son importantes fuentes de infección de la corriente sanguínea (ICS. Este estudio epidemiológico analítico, de corte prospectivo, enfoca la incidencia de ICS, factores de riesgo asociados y medidas asistenciales relacionadas con el uso de estos catéteres en 7 UCIs del Distrito Federal. Del total de 630 pacientes con CVC, 6,4% presentaron ICS (1,5% relacionado al catéter y 4,9% ICS-Clínica. El tiempo de hospitalización fue 3,5 veces mayor para este grupo de pacientes. Fueron observadas diferentes conductas con relación a la inserción de catéteres y al uso de antisépticos. El tiempo de permanencia del CVC estuvo asociado a la incidencia de infección (pOs cateteres venosos centrais (CVC, utilizados, principalmente em unidades de terapia intensiva-UTIs, são importantes fontes de infecção da corrente sangüínea (ICS. Este estudo epidemiológico analítico, tipo coorte prospectiva, enfoca a incidência de ICS, fatores de risco associados e ações assistenciais relacionadas ao uso desses cateteres em 7 UTIs no Distrito Federal. Dos 630 pacientes com CVC, 6,4% apresentaram ICS (1,5% relacionadas ao cateter e 4,9% ICS

  16. Persistent catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy.

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    Ki-Ho Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CRSAB occasionally persists despite catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of persistent CRSAB after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with CRSAB were prospectively included from over a 41-month period. We compared the clinical features, 40 bacterial virulence genes, and outcomes between patients with persistent CRSAB (i.e., bacteremia for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and non-persistent CRSAB. RESULTS: Among the 220 episodes of CRSAB, the catheter was kept in place in 17 (6% and removed in 203 (94% cases. In 43 (21% of the 203 episodes, bacteremia persisted for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance (Odds ratio [OR], 9.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05-26.61; P<0.001, non-catheter prosthetic devices (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 1.62-17.80; P=0.006, and renal failure (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.48-7.08; P=0.003 were independently associated with persistent CRSAB. Patients with persistent CRSAB were more like to experience complication than were those with non-persistent CRSAB (72% vs. 15%; P<0.001. Among all episodes due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus, persistent CRSAB isolates were associated with accessory gene regulator (agr group II (P= .04, but presence of other bacterial virulence genes, distribution of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration distribution, and frequency of vancomycin heteroresistance did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CRSAB, bacteremia persisted in 21% of cases despite catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance, renal failure, and non-catheter prosthetic devices were independent risk factors for persistent CRSAB, which was

  17. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

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    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  18. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin C; Taylor, George A

    2016-02-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15° standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3° SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as

  19. Hickman Catheter-Related Bacteremia with Kluyvera cryocrescens: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Demet; Soysal, Ahmet; Turel, Ozden; Dal, Tuba; Ozkan, Ozlem; Soyletir, Guner; Bakir, Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    This report describes a 2-year-old child with neuroectodermal tumor presenting with febrile neutropenia. Blood cultures drawn from the peripheral vein and Hickman catheter revealed Kluyvera cryocrescens growth. The Hickman catheter was removed and the patient was successfully treated with cefepime and amikacin. Isolation of Kluyvera spp. from clinical specimens is rare. This saprophyte microorganism may cause serious central venous catheter infections, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Clinicians should be aware of its virulence and resistance to many antibiotics.

  20. Complications Involving Central Venous Catheter Insertion in Newborns Admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU

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    Torkaman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Developments in the use of central venous catheters have improved the treatment of critically ill newborns. Objectives The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the rate of catheter-related complications and associated risk factors in newborns. Patients and Methods This cross sectional study evaluated 60 infants with indications for central venous catheters who were selected by census from 2007 to 2014 in Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The catheters were Broviac numbers 14 - 16. Results Ultimately, 60 cases (17 males and 43 females with a mean age of 26.25 ± 20.09 days (Min = 1 day and Max = 153 days underwent analysis. The most common reasons for venous catheter placement (98.3% were prolonged hospitalization and lack of peripheral vessels. The most common complication was catheter-related infection, which occurred in 20 patients (33.3%. Death occurred in 24 patients (40.0%, but only 3 deaths (5% were due to complications from the central venous catheter. A significant relationship was evident between infection and catheterization duration (P = 0.02. Conclusions Most of the catheter-related deaths were due to severe sepsis and hemothorax, and a significant relationship was noted between infection and both the mortality rate and catheterization duration. A significant relationship was also evident between birth weight and infection rates.

  1. Endovascular electrocardiography to guide placement of totally implantable central venous catheters in oncologic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagatti, Cecilia; Villa, Gianluca; Casini, Andrea; Chelazzi, Cosimo; De Gaudio, Angelo Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate tip position of totally implantable central venous catheters is essential in order to prevent catheter-related complications, in particular thrombosis. Endovascular electrocardiography is an economic and safe method to guide placement of catheters into the central veins. Although widely utilized, there is still lack of conclusive evidence about its efficacy. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of endovascular electrocardiographic guided placement compared to the anthropometric method. Endovascular ECG was employed to guide electrocardiographic placement of a central venous catheter in a cohort of oncologic patients. The rate of correct placement and the incidence of catheter-related thrombosis were considered. Patients in which central venous catheters were inserted with the anthropometric technique were considered as control group. The rate of correct placement was 91% and 50% for ECG-guided and anthropometric catheters (pcatheter-related vascular thrombosis was lower for ECG-guided catheters (3.6% vs. 9.6%, n.s.), in particular for left-inserted catheters (0% vs. 33.3%, p=0.02). Endovascular electrocardiography was more effective than the anthropometric technique in placement of implantable central venous catheters and was associated with a lower incidence of catheter-related thrombosis, in particular for those inserted from the left-side.

  2. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  3. Catheter-Related Acremonium kiliense Fungemia in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis under Treatment with Infliximab

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    Fernando A. Díaz-Couselo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acremonium spp. are filamentous, cosmopolitan fungi commonly isolated from plant debris and soil. They are infrequent pathogens in humans. Acremonium fungemia has been reported in neutropenic patients associated with central venous catheters and in nonneutropenic patients receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition. TNF-α blockade is associated with fungal infections, but no Acremonium spp. infection had been reported up to the present. In this paper, we present a patient with ulcerative colitis who developed Acremonium kiliense fungemia associated with infliximab therapy while receiving total parenteral nutrition. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Acremonium sp. infection must be suspected as another cause of fungal infection in patients under treatment with infliximab.

  4. Management of venous port systems in oncology: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescia, S; Baumgärtner, A K; Jacobs, V R; Kiechle-Bahat, M; Rody, A; Loibl, S; Harbeck, N

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decades, many changes have occurred in oncology with new chemotherapy combinations and more complex application schemes becoming available. Central venous catheters and implantable venous port systems have become widely used and have facilitated the problem of vascular access. However, important complications are associated with permanent central venous catheters. This review summarizes evidence on venous port system use published in Medline up to February 2007. Moreover, recent guidelines for the prevention and management of catheter-related infections issued by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American College of Critical Care Medicine, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology are included. Sterile precautions are essential when implanting and accessing port systems. Infections must be treated with adequate antimicrobial therapy. Catheter-related thromboembolic complications were found at a rate of 12-64% in retrospective studies. Five current clinical trials investigated the effect of prophylactic anticoagulation with either low molecular weight heparin or warfarin in cancer patients with central venous devices. On the basis of these results, routine anticoagulation cannot be recommended. This article reviews the current literature on long-term complications of venous port systems, focusing on infection and thrombosis. In addition, it summarizes the evidence regarding routine maintenance of port systems in follow-up care.

  5. Finding evidences on oncohematological patients (2nd part: Catheter-related infection and pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Estrada Lorenzo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an enormous knowledge base in the field of health which has no application. Its growth is not limited by its discovery but by the lack of its implementation. The necessity of implementing conclusions is evident in evaluating the real repercussion on quality daily cares; as “strategies” and “outcomes”. In talking about oncohematological nursing, some health outcomes would be: the reduction of adverse events such as nosocomial infections and pressure ulcers. Consequently, our objective has been: to find and summarize the evidences about Venous Catheterization and Pressure Ulcers; in order to encourage the spread of knowledge and promote changes in practice.Method: Databases as CINAHL, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Pascal Biomed, LILACS, CUIDEN, CUIDEN qualitative y CUIDATGE were revised in Spanish, French and English. No time restrictions were applied.Findings: The main findings and recommendations were synthesised on a poster, next to suggestions for practical changes to implement, evidence levels used, and the clinic problem significance. The suggested changes arose from nursing staff based on evidences found that includes behaviours and attitudes changes, which should facilitate more rapid innovations diffusion.

  6. Candida Infection of the Bloodstream - Candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candida Infection of the Bloodstream– Candidemia Fungal Disease Series #4 Candida is the single most important cause of fungal infections worldwide. In the U.S., Candida is the 4th most common cause of bloodstream ...

  7. Risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Tong, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Miao-Zun; Zhu, Hui-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have examined risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections. However risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit have never been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate this topic. Retrospective surgical intensive care unit patients' data were collected in a tertiary hospital from January 2010 to August 2014. Infected and non-infected patients were compared with univariate analysis of categorical variables to obtain statistical significance risk factors. Then multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to acquire the final risk factors. 98 patients were diagnosed with nosocomial bloodstream infections in total. Mortality rate was 29.6% (n=29). The data indicated gram-positive cocci were the main pathogens (64.3%; n=63). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that age (>65 years old) (OR, 2.297; CI95, 0.870 to 6.062), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (>18) (OR, 6.981; CI95, 2.330 to 15.865), multiple organ dysfunction score (>8) (OR, 9.857; CI95, 6.395 to 19.505), mechanical ventilation (OR, 4.583; CI95, 2.134 to 10.956), central venous catheter (OR, 5.875; CI95, 2.212 to 13.456) and selective surgery (OR, 3.455; CI95, 3.442-9.235) were risk factors of nosocomial BSI. Patients with nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit setting often have a poor prognosis. Age (>65 years old), chronic health evaluation II score (>18), multiple organ dysfunction score (>8), usage of mechanical ventilation, central venous catheter and selective surgery can be regarded as risk factors.

  8. Increased rates of local complication of central venous catheters in the targeted anticancer therapy era: a 2-year retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, R; Rinaldi, S; Santini, D; Vincenzi, B; Giampieri, R; Maccaroni, E; Marcucci, F; Francoletti, M; Onofri, A; Lucarelli, A; Pierantoni, C; Tonini, G; Cascinu, S

    2015-05-01

    Totally implantable central venous accesses (port-a-cath) are often used for chemotherapy administration or prolonged intravenous infusions in cancer patients. Local and systemic complications may occur both during and after placement of port-a-cath despite the well-established techniques for its placement and care. Out of other catheter-related local complications, thrombosis and infections represent the most common. Complications related to central venous catheter may be associated with infusion of both conventional chemotherapy and molecularly targeted therapy. Incidence and nature of complications of central venous catheter have been well established for long-term chemotherapy. However, very sparse data exists on the incidence of complications of molecularly targeted therapies administered through a central venous catheter. Hence, we decided to retrospectively analyze the local complications of a central venous catheter in patients receiving molecularly targeted therapy and conventional chemotherapy, respectively. Over a 2-year period, 459 devices were placed in two academic Italian institutions. Patients' characteristics, catheter-related complications, and their relationship with targeted therapy administration were retrospectively assessed. Catheter-related complications occurred in 30 out of the 459 analyzed cancer patients (7 %). Local complications occurred in 12 (40 %) and 18 (60 %) patients receiving standard chemotherapy and biological drugs, respectively. Eighteen (72 %) out of 25 patients developing biological complications (BC) were receiving biological drugs. Infusion of a biological drug through a central venous catheter has been shown to increase the risk of central venous catheter complications (p = 0.02). No difference between the incidence of complication between anti-angiogenic and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents was observed in our study despite the statistically significant early development of port

  9. Complications of central venous catheter insertion in a teaching hospital

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    Pedro Henrique Comerlato

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Central venous catheters are fundamental to daily clinical practice. This procedure is mainly performed by residents, often without supervision or structured training. Objective: To describe the characteristics of central venous catheterization and the complication rate related to it. Method: Retrospective cohort study. Adult patients undergoing central venous catheter insertion out of the intensive care unit (ICU of a teaching hospital were selected from March 2014 to February 2015. Data were collected from medical charts using an electronic form. Clinical and laboratory characteristics from patients, procedure characteristics, and mechanical and infectious complications rates were assessed. Patients with and without complications were compared. Results: Three hundred and eleven (311 central venous catheterizations were evaluated. The main reasons to perform the procedure were lack of peripheral access, chemotherapy and sepsis. There were 20 mechanical complications (6% of procedures. Arterial puncture was the most common. Procedures performed in the second semester were associated with lower risk of complications (odds ratio 0.35 [95CI 0.12-0.98; p=0.037]. Thirty-five (35 catheter-related infection cases (11.1% were reported. They were related to younger patients and procedures performed by residents with more than one year of training. Procedures performed after the first trimester had a lower chance of infection. Conclusion: These results show that the rate of mechanical complications of central venous puncture in our hospital is similar to the literature, but more attention should be given to infection prevention measures.

  10. A European perspective on intravascular catheter-related infections: report on the microbiology workload, aetiology and antimicrobial susceptibility (ESGNI-005 Study).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouza, E.; San Juan, R.; Munoz, P.; Pascau, J.; Voss, A.; Desco, M.

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory workload, microbiological techniques and aetiology of catheter-related infections in European hospitals are mostly unknown. The present study (ESGNI-005) comprised a 1-day (22 October 2001), laboratory-based, point-prevalence survey based on a questionnaire completed by microbiology

  11. Pediatric central venous access devices: nursing interventions

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    Duffy EA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Duffy, Kathryn N Nelson Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: A central venous catheter (CVC is an indwelling catheter that provides permanent or temporary stable venous access for both acute and chronically ill pediatric patients. These catheters provide stable venous access that can be used for a variety of medical purposes including drawing blood, hemodynamic monitoring, infusion of intravenous medications, infusion of intravenous fluids, chemotherapy, blood products, and parenteral nutrition. Each day, nurses access and care for CVCs in infants, children, and adolescents; the precision of this care can prevent life-threatening complications. The purpose of this review and the case study is to highlight the importance and components of evidence-based nursing practice in pediatric CVC care. A historical perspective of CVC care is provided in conjunction with current national initiatives to improve patient outcomes for children with CVCs. Infection prevention, clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement, and evidence-based care bundles are discussed. Keywords: pediatric nursing, central venous catheters, central line-associated bloodstream infection, care bundles, pediatric case study 

  12. A Short Communication: Bloodstream infection among cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Short Communication: Bloodstream infection among cancer patients at Shafa cancer hospital- Ahwaz. ... Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology ... We performed a prospective assessment of the current epidemiology of bacteraemia in 612 cancer patients, with patient's age (mean 30, range 1-81 years), ...

  13. Catheter-related urinary nosocomial infections in intensive care units: An epidemiologic study in North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of nosocomial catheter- associated UTI and its related factors in hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who were admitted in hospitals and urinary catheterization was performed for them. Beds of intensive care units were followed-up for the occurrence of catheter-associated UTI for 14 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Results: Our results showed that of the 1409 patients (11648 catheter - days), the incidence of catheter-related UTI was 18.2% (among 256 individuals) equals to 21.987 per 1,000 catheter - days. E. coli was the most important cause of UTI. The results show that the history of the underlying disease, duration of catheterization and perineal washing were significantly associated with the incidence of UTIs. Conclusion: The findings of this study show a high incidence of UTIs caused by catheters in ICU. The incidence of this infection increased hospital length of stay and hospital cost. It seems that the necessary use of urinary catheters and its reduced duration use can be effective in decreasing this incidence. PMID:28702145

  14. Comparison of Oligon catheters and chlorhexidine-impregnated sponges with standard multilumen central venous catheters for prevention of associated colonization and infections in intensive care unit patients: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvaniti, Kostoula; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Clouva-Molyvdas, Phyllis; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Mouloudi, Eleni; Synnefaki, Eleni; Koulourida, Vasiliki; Georgopoulos, Dimitrios; Gerogianni, Nikoleta; Nakos, Georgios; Matamis, Dimitrios

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate silver-impregnated (Oligon) central venous catheters and chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponges for reducing catheter-related colonization and infection, nonbacteremic or bacteremic. Multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled study. Five general intensive care units in Greece. Intensive care unit patients requiring a multilumen central venous catheter between June 2006 and May 2008. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a standard catheter (standard group), a standard catheter plus chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponge (chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponge group), or an Oligon catheter (Oligon group). Catheter colonization was defined as a positive quantitative tip culture (≥10 colony-forming units/mL), catheter-related infection was defined by the previous criterion plus clinical evidence of sepsis, and bacteremia catheter-related infection as catheter-related infection plus a positive peripheral blood culture with the same micro-organism as in the catheter tip. Data were obtained from 465 patients, 156 in the standard-group, 150 in the chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponge group, and 159 in the Oligon-group. Colonization occurred in 24 (15.4%) standard catheters, 21 (14%) in the chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponge group, and 25 (15.7%) in the Oligon catheters (p = .35) (20.9, 19.9, 21.8/1000 catheter-days, respectively). Catheter-related infections were recorded in nine (5.8%) standard catheters, six (4%) in the chlorhexidine-gluconate-impregnated sponge group, and seven (4.4%) in the Oligon catheters (p = .58) (7.8/1,000, 5.7/1,000, 6.1/1,000 catheter-days, respectively). No difference was observed between the chlorhexidine- gluconate-impregnated sponge group and the standard group regarding catheter colonization (hazard ratio 1.21; 95% confidence interval 0.56-2.61; p = .64) and catheter-related infections (hazard ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.23-1.85; p = .42). The Oligon catheter did not reduce

  15. [Catheter-related bladder discomfort after urological surgery: importance of the type of surgery and efficiency of treatment by clonazepam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maro, S; Zarattin, D; Baron, T; Bourez, S; de la Taille, A; Salomon, L

    2014-09-01

    Bladder catheter can induce a Catheter-Related Bladder Discomfort (CRBD). Antagonist of muscarinic receptor is the gold standard treatment. Clonazepam is an antimuscarinic, muscle relaxing oral drug. The aim of this study is to look for a correlation between the type of surgical procedure and the existence of CRBD and to evaluate the efficiency of clonazepam. One hundred patients needing bladder catheter were evaluated. Sexe, age, BMI, presence of diabetes, surgical procedure and existence of CRBD were noted. Pain was evaluated with analogic visual scale. Timing of pain, need for specific treatment by clonazepam and its efficiency were noted. Correlation between preoperative data, type of surgical procedure, existence of CRBD and efficiency of treatment were evaluated. There were 79 men and 21 women (age: 65.9 years, BMI: 25.4). Twelve patients presented diabetes. Surgical procedure concerned prostate in 39 cases, bladder in 19 cases (tumor resections), endo-urology in 20 cases, upper urinary tract in 12 cases (nephrectomy…) and lower urinary tract in 10 cases (sphincter, sub-uretral tape). Forty patients presented CRBD, (pain 4.5 using VAS). This pain occurred 0.6 days after surgery. No correlation was found between preoperative data and CRBD. Bladder resection and endo-urological procedures were surgical procedures which procured CRBD. Clonazepam was efficient in 30 (75 %) out of 40 patients with CRBD. However, it was less efficient in case of bladder tumor resection. CRBD is frequent and occurred immediately after surgery. Bladder resection and endo-urology were the main surgical procedures which induced CRBD. Clonazepam is efficient in 75 %. Bladder resection is the surgical procedure which is the most refractory to treatment. 5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of tolterodine in the management of postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort: Findings in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijani, K H; Akanmu, N O; Olatosi, J O; Ojewola, R W

    2017-04-01

    Patient discomfort secondary to an indwelling urethral catheter in the post operative period can be very distressing. These symptoms resemble the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Muscarinic receptor blockers have been successful in the management of OAB. However, information on the use of these drugs in the management of the postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in sub-Saharan Africa is still relatively sparse. To assess the efficacy of preoperative oral tolterodine in the management of CRBD in surgical patients in the immediate postoperative period. This was a double-blind placebo-controlled study consisting of 56 patients in each arm who underwent general anesthesia. Each patient was given oral tolterodine or placebo 1 hour before the induction of anesthesia. The patient was later assessed at the recovery room at intervals after recovery from anesthesia. The presence of CRBD was noted and graded. The overall incidence of CRBD in both the tolterodine group and the control were 85.7% and 91.1%, respectively. Overall, tolterodine prophylaxis (TP) was associated with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 5.4%, relative risk reduction (RRR) of 5.8%, and a number needed to treat (NNT) of 19. The incidence of moderate-to-severe CRBD in the tolterodine and control groups were 10.7% and 78%, respectively, with an ARR of 74.5% with TP. TP does not significantly reduce the incidence of CRBD in the immediate postoperative period but appears to be efficient in the reduction of the severity of postoperative CRBD.

  17. Rapid Diagnosis of Staphylococcal Catheter-Related Bacteraemia in Direct Blood Samples by Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboromyrska, Yuliya; De la Calle, Cristina; Soto, Marcelo; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Soriano, Alex; Alvarez-Martínez, Míriam José; Almela, Manel; Marco, Francesc; Arjona, Ruth; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; Mensa, José; Martínez, José Antonio; Mira, Aurea; Vila, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients, being staphylococci the main etiologic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the use of a PCR-based assay for detection of staphylococci directly from blood obtained through the catheter to diagnose CRB caused by these microorganisms and to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis. A total of 92 patients with suspected CRB were included in the study. Samples were obtained through the catheter. Paired blood cultures were processed by standard culture methods and 4 ml blood samples were processed by GeneXpert-MRSA assay for the detection of methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) or methicillin-resistant (MRSA) Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS). Sixteen CRB caused by staphylococci were diagnosed among 92 suspected patients. GeneXpert detected 14 out of 16 cases (87.5%), including 4 MSSA and 10 MR-CoNS in approximately 1 hour after specimen receipt. The sensitivity and specificity of GeneXpert were 87.5% (CI 95%: 60.4-97.8) and 92.1% (CI 95%: 83-96.7), respectively, compared with standard culture methods. The sensitivity of GeneXpert for S. aureus was 100%. Regarding a cost-effectiveness analysis, the incremental cost of using GeneXpert was of 31.1€ per patient while the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of GeneXpert compared with blood culture alones was about 180€ per life year gained. In conclusion, GeneXpert can be used directly with blood samples obtained through infected catheters to detect S. aureus and MR-CoNS in approximately 1h after sampling. In addition, it is cost-effective especially in areas with high prevalence of staphylococcal CRB.

  18. External jugular vein cross-over as a new technique for percutaneous central venous port access in case of left central venous occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Pierre Yves; El Hajjam, Mostafa; Lacout, Alexis; Nöel, Caroline; Simon, Jean Jacques; Figl, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To report the cross-over venous catheter technique in case of left-sided central venous (internal jugular, subclavian and innominate veins) occlusion and right-sided central vein patency. A 60-year-old right breast cancer patient presented with a local recurrence requiring chemotherapy. He presented with a left-sided catheter-related central venous occlusion and radiodermatitis of the right chest and neck. The nonsymptomatic side of insertion was defined as the patient's left side. Successful percutaneous left-to-right external jugular vein (EJV) cross-over access tips and tricks are reported. They include performing (a) the EJV access at the lower neck, (b) the 0.032 hydrophilic guidewire (GW) catheterization of the venous curves, (c) the GW anchor technique into the inferior vena cava, (d) the GW + Glidecath catheter stiffening technique and (e) the over-the-stiff wire implantable catheter push. The cross-over technique was successful by using real-time ultrasonography/X-ray monitoring and interventional radiology tools (hydrophilic 0.032 in. and stiff 0.0035 in. GW and "J-shaped" Glidecath catheter) and the five-step technique. In case of left innominate vein occlusion and necessity of left neck venous access, percutaneous EJV access should be attempted under real-time ultrasound/X-ray monitoring when other standard (subclavian venous port and internal jugular vein) routes are no longer available.

  19. Use of sodium hypochlorite for skin antisepsis before inserting a peripheral venous catheter: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Cristiana; Sabattini, Tania; D'Alessandro, Fabio; Fiorani, Ambra; Gamberini, Simonetta; Maso, Alessandra; Curci, Rosa; Zanotti, Enrichetta; Chiari, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Although it can be prevented, catheter-related bacteremia is common and dangerous. The antiseptics most widely used during insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) include povidone iodine, alcohol, and chlorhexidine. Another widely used antiseptic is a solution of 0.057 g sodium hypochlorite. This pilot study explored the contamination rate of the PVC tip inserted after skin decontamination with sodium hypochlorite. Culture analysis of the tips of the PVCs inserted into the 42 participants showed 7 (16.7%) colonized catheters. The results of this pilot study suggest taking into serious consideration the assessment of this antiseptic in randomized experimental studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000157.htm Central venous catheter - flushing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  1. Complications associated with 2 different types of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Chiang, Chiao-Ching; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2011-03-01

    To identify the prevalence and risk factors for complications associated with percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) and evaluate the effect of different catheter types and their indwelling time on catheter-related complications. Retrospective cohort study. A 49-bed neonatal intensive-care teaching hospital in Taiwan. Between 2004 and 2007, 518 single-lumen PICCs (defined as "old type") and 290 PICCs with a stiffening stylet and a thicker introducer ("new type") were inserted in a total of 534 neonates with a birth body weight of 1,500 g or less. Independent risk factors of catheter-related sepsis (CRS) were longer duration for PICC placement and PICC inserted at femoral site (compared with nonfemoral sites) (odds ratio [OR], 1.53 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.07-2.25]; P = .044). An independent predictor of catheter-related noninfectious complications was time spent for PICC insertion of more than 60 minutes (compared with less than 30 minutes) (OR, 1.96 [95% CI, 1.08-3.53]; P = .026). New-type PICCs were significantly associated with a higher rate of femoral site insertion, catheter-related noninfectious complications, and longer time for successful insertion than old-type PICCs. The hazard rates of CRS according to indwelling time, determined over 5-day periods by survival analysis, showed 0.05% for catheters in place for 4 days or less; 0.27% for 5-9 days; 0.40% for 10-14 days; 0.68% for 15-19 days; 1.18% for 20-24 days; 3.96% for 25-29 days; and 10.45% for 30 or more days. Different catheters do influence the complication rates. Spending more than 60 minutes for successful PICC insertion and PICCs indwelling for more than 30 days are associated with higher rates of catheter-related complications.

  2. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.K.; Thomsen, T.R.; Moser, C.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Catheters are the most common cause of nosocomial infections and are associated with increased risk of mortality, length of hospital stay and cost. Prevention of infections and fast and correct diagnosis is highly important. METHODS: In this study traditional semiquantitative...... culture-dependent methods for diagnosis of bacteria involved in central venous catheter-related infections as described by Maki were compared with the following culture-independent molecular biological methods: Clone libraries, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis, phylogeny and fluorescence in situ...... observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. CONCLUSION: The results show that diagnosis based on molecular methods improves the detection of microorganisms involved in central catheter-related infections. The importance...

  3. Epidemiology of Bloodstream Infections at a Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Velasco

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Cancer patients are at unusually high risk for developing bloodstream infections (BSI, which are a major cause of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological characteristics and the etiology of BSI in cancer patients. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Terciary Oncology Care Center. PARTICIPANTS: During a 24-month period all hospitalized patients with clinically significant BSI were evaluated in relation to several clinical and demographic factors. RESULTS: The study enrolled 435 episodes of BSI (349 patients. The majority of the episodes occurred among non-neutropenic patients (58.6% and in those younger than 40 years (58.2%. There was a higher occurrence of unimicrobial infections (74.9%, nosocomial episodes (68.3% and of those of undetermined origin (52.8%. Central venous catheters (CVC were present in 63.2% of the episodes. Overall, the commonest isolates from blood in patients with hematology diseases and solid tumors were staphylococci (32% and 34.7%, respectively. There were 70 episodes of fungemia with a predominance of Candida albicans organisms (50.6%. Fungi were identified in 52.5% of persistent BSI and in 91.4% of patients with CVC. Gram-negative bacilli prompted the CVC removal in 45.5% of the episodes. Oxacillin resistance was detected in 26.3% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates and in 61.8% of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not observed. Initial empirical antimicrobial therapy was considered appropriate in 60.5% of the cases. CONCLUSION: The identification of the microbiology profile of BSI and the recognition of possible risk factors in high-risk cancer patients may help in planning and conducting more effective infection control and preventive measures, and may also allow further analytical studies for reducing severe infectious complications in such groups of patients.

  4. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francimar Tinoco de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. METHOD An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. RESULTS In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69 were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56 of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. CONCLUSION Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care.

  5. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by multidrug resistant gram-negative bacilli in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana V. Arnoni

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli. From November 2001 to December 2003, in the Pediatric Department of the Santa Casa de São Paulo, a retrospective case-control study was developed concerning patients who had nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by Gram-negative bacilli. Patients with multidrug resistant infections were designated as case patients, and control patients were those with an infection that did not meet the criteria for multidrug resistance. Previous use of central venous catheter and previous use of vancomycin plus third generation cephalosporins were associated to a higher chance of infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (Odds ratio - 5.8 and 5.2, respectively. Regarding sensitivity of the isolated agents, 47.8% were multidrug resistant, 54.2% were Klebsiella spp. ESBL producers and 36.4% were imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lethality rate was 36.9% in the studied cases and this rate was significantly higher in the group of patients with multidrug resistant infections (p=0.013. Risk factor identification as well as the knowledge of the susceptibility of the nosocomial infectious agents gave us the possibility to perform preventive and control strategies to reduce the costs and mortality related to these infections.

  6. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by multidrug resistant gram-negative bacilli in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoni, Mariana V; Berezin, Eitan N; Martino, Marinês D V

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli. From November 2001 to December 2003, in the Pediatric Department of the Santa Casa de São Paulo, a retrospective case-control study was developed concerning patients who had nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by Gram-negative bacilli. Patients with multidrug resistant infections were designated as case patients, and control patients were those with an infection that did not meet the criteria for multidrug resistance. Previous use of central venous catheter and previous use of vancomycin plus third generation cephalosporins were associated to a higher chance of infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (Odds ratio--5.8 and 5.2, respectively). Regarding sensitivity of the isolated agents, 47.8% were multidrug resistant, 54.2% were Klebsiella spp. ESBL producers and 36.4% were imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lethality rate was 36.9% in the studied cases and this rate was significantly higher in the group of patients with multidrug resistant infections (p=0.013). Risk factor identification as well as the knowledge of the susceptibility of the nosocomial infectious agents gave us the possibility to perform preventive and control strategies to reduce the costs and mortality related to these infections.

  7. Orbital venous pattern in relation to extraorbital venous drainage and superficial lymphatic vessels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloveska, Marcela; Kresakova, Lenka; Vdoviakova, Katarina; Petrovova, Eva; Elias, Mario; Panagiotis, Artemiou; Andrejcakova, Zuzana; Supuka, Peter; Purzyc, Halina; Kissova, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the normal and variant anatomy of extraorbital and intraorbital venous drainage together with retroorbital communication, and determine the lymphatic drainage from the superficial orbital region with a potential outlet of lymphatic vessel into the venous bloodstream. The study of the venous system was carried out on 32 Wistar rats by using corrosion casts methods and radiography, while the lymphatic system was studied in 12 Wistar rats following ink injection. Superficially, orbital veins are connected with extraorbital veins running through angular vein of the eye and the superficial temporal vein, and via the pterygoid plexus with the maxillary vein, which provide readily accessible communication routes in the spread of infection. The extent of intraorbital and periorbital venous drainage was ensured by the dorsal and ventral external ophthalmic vein through the infraorbital vein, which together formed the principal part of the ophthalmic plexus. Venous drainage of the eyeball was carried out mainly by the vortex veins, ciliary veins and internal ophthalmic vein. The highest variability, first presented by differences in structural arrangement and formation of anastomoses, was observed within the ventral external ophthalmic vein (22 cases) and the medial vortex vein (10 cases). Four vortex veins, one vein in each quadrant of the eye, were observed in rats. The vortex vein located on the ventral side of the eyeball was occasionally found as two veins (in four cases) in the present study. The lymphatic vessel from the lower eyelid entered into the mandibular lymph centre, and from the upper eyelid entered into the superficial cervical lymph centre, but both drained into the deep cranial cervical lymph node. The direct entry of lymph entering the veins without passing through lymph nodes was not observed.

  8. The impact of parenteral nutrition preparation on bloodstream infection risk and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, R S; Solem, C; Pontes-Arruda, A; Sanon, M; Mehta, S; Xiaoqing Liu, F; Botteman, M

    2014-08-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a serious problem leading to increased morbidity, longer hospital stay, and hence, additional costs. This study evaluated the risk of BSI and the cost of parenteral nutrition (PN) in Germany. A retrospective observational chart review of patients hospitalized from October 2009 to April 2011 and receiving PN via ready-to-use three-chamber bag (MCB), single bottle (SB) or hospital compounded admixture (CPN) was conducted across Germany. Propensity score-adjusted models were used to evaluate the association between the type of PN, BSI (Cox Proportional Hazards) and hospitalization cost (generalized linear models) within a subgroup receiving all three macronutrients (lipids, amino acids, glucose). Of the 1995 patient records reviewed (MCB=816; CPN=584; SB=595), 1457 patients received all three macronutrients. After adjustment, SB was associated with an increased hazard of BSI, vs MCB without additions (hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI))=2.53 (1.66-3.86)) in the total cohort. Adding supplements to MCB on the ward also increased the BSI risk in both total and subgroup analyses. In patients receiving all three macronutrients, adjusted total costs were MCB (no additions): \\[euro]6,572 (95% CI: \\[euro]6,896-6263); CPN: \\[euro]6,869 (\\[euro]7,283-6479); SB: \\[euro]6,872 (\\[euro]7,242-6521); MCB (ward additions): \\[euro]7,402 (\\[euro]7,878-6955); PMCB does not appear to increase treatment costs, possibly by reducing the risk of infection. This study identified several PN preparation methods associated with a significantly increased hazard for BSI; definitive CPN findings are limited by our inability to distinguish automated from manual pharmacy compounding.

  9. Characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections at a Hungarian cardiac surgery centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trethon, András; Prinz, Gyula; Varga, Andrea; Kocsis, István

    2012-06-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) is a common finding in cardiac surgery intensive care units and is associated with excess mortality and hospital costs. Additional data are needed about incidence, characteristics, predictors, associated microorganisms of nosocomial BSI in cardiac surgical patients in order to refine measures to prevent nosocomial infections and to improve recovery outcomes in this patient population. The 3912 cardio-thoracic surgery patients from all age groups were admitted to the study at the Gottsegen György Hungarian Institute of Cardiology between January 1999 and December 2000. In each patient with BSI demographic, epidemiological and clinical variables were recorded along with potential risk factors. Incidence of associated pathogens and their possible sources were evaluated and outcome and mortality risk factors were assessed. There were a total of 134 episodes of BSI. The incidence was 34.25 per 1000 admissions. The leading microorganisms were staphylococci (37.7%). Bacteremic episodes developed secondary to an identifiable source in 27.6% of the cases, or were catheter-related (16.4%). In 56% of the cases the source was not identified. The crude mortality rate was 33.3%. Higher mortality rate was associated with intracardial grafts (p < 0.05), low left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.04), diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05), an age above 16 years (p < 0.02), severe sepsis (p < 0.001) and high APACHE II score (p < 0.001). As the identified main sources of BSI were intravascular lines, mortality from BSI could probably be reduced by paying more attention to the prevention, early recognition and prompt management of intravascular device associated infections.

  10. A 12-year review of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in haemodialysis patients: more work to be done.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, S F

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. This study describes a 12-year retrospective review of S. aureus BSI in a large haemodialysis centre in a tertiary referral hospital. The overall rate of S. aureus BSI was 17.9 per 100 patient-years (range 9.7-36.8). The rate of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) BSI was 5.6 per 100 patient-years (range 0.9-13.8). Infective complications occurred in 11% of episodes, the most common being infective endocarditis (7.6%). Ten percent of patients died within 30 days of S. aureus being isolated from blood. Most cases of S. aureus BSI (83%) were related to vascular catheters. The provision of lower-risk vascular access, such as arteriovenous fistulae, and reduced use of intravascular catheters should be priorities in all haemodialysis units. Where alternative vascular access cannot be established, interventions to reduce the risk of catheter-related infections should be implemented to reduce morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable patient group.

  11. Multicenter study in monitoring central venous catheters complications in hematologic patiennts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen García Gabás

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Most hematological patients suffer a significant venous damage related to different administrated intravenous therapy, being necessary to place central venous catheters (CVC. CVC is associated with various complications. The most common catheter-related complications are occlusion and infection. To avoid such of them, the development of protocols for insertion and care are needed, as well as recording and following up complications. To this end, we propose a cross-sectional carried out during 13 months whose main goal is to know the incidence of CVC- related complications (mainly occlusion and infection in hematological patients.Population included all the =14 ages patients admitted to different hematological units at Ramon y Cajal and Gregorio Marañón hospitals in Madrid and who signed informed consent. Socio-demographic, clinical characteristics and complications were entered into a log which included a pursuit of care protocol.

  12. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author).

  13. Persistent portal venous gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huurman, Volkert A L; Visser, Leo G; Steens, Stefan C A; Terpstra, Onno T; Schaapherder, Alexander F M

    2006-05-01

    This case report describes a patient diagnosed with ongoing portal venous gas, initiated by a rather common Campylobacter enterocolitis and maintained by septic thrombophlebitis and possibly by chronic cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy attenuated the patient's septic condition. The etiology of portal venous gas determines both the patient's prognosis and the choice for either conservative or surgical treatment. This report describes persistence of portal venous gas for a long period and a possible role for chronic cholecystitis as a cause.

  14. Catheter-related thrombosis in children with intestinal failure and long-term parenteral nutrition: How to treat and to prevent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommen, C. Heleen; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of children with chronic intestinal failure has increased as result of administration of home parenteral nutrition. Crucial for the successful management of home parenteral nutrition is the availability of an adequate central venous access. Venous access can be fraught by episodes of

  15. Interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters : results and complications in 557 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Do, Young Soo; Paik, Chul H. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate prospectively the results of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters, and subsequent complications. Between April 1997 and April 1998, a total of 557 tunneled central venous catheters were percutaneously placed in 517 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. The indications were chemotherapy in 533 cases, total parenteral nutrition in 23 and transfusion in one. Complications were evaluated prospectively by means of a chart review, chest radiography, central vein angiography and blood/catheter culture. The technical success rate for tunneled central venous catheter placement was 100% (557/557 cases). The duration of catheter placement ranged from 4 to 356 (mean, 112{+-}4.6) days; Hickman catheters were removed in 252 cases during follow-up. Early complications included 3 cases of pneumothorax(0.5%), 4 cases of local bleeding/hematoma(0.7%), 2 cases of primary malposition(0.4%), and 1 case of catheter leakage(0.2%). Late complications included 42 cases of catheter-related infection(7.5%), 40 cases of venous thrombosis (7.2%), 18 cases of migration (3.2%), 5 cases of catheter / pericatheter of occlusion(0.8%), and 1 case of pseudoaneurysm(0.2%). The infection rate and thrombosis rate per 1000 days were 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. The technical success rate of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters was high. In comparison to conventional surgical placement, it is a more reliable method and leads to fewer complications.

  16. The impact of sodium citrate on dialysis catheter function and frequency of catheter-related bacteriemia and haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Szymczak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access is one of the most important problems of hemodialysis therapy. It is known that an arteriovenous fi sutla provides the best vascular access, but its creation is not always possible. Other solutions, such as the insertion of a central venous catheter, are then required. Adequate protection of such catheters by interdialytic fi ll with locking solution affects the frequency of hemodialysis-related complications. The most widespread catheter locking solution is heparin. Sodium citrate is being used more frequent recently. Available data indicate that hemorrhage is 11.9 times more frequent if the catheter locking solution is 5000 IU/ml heparin than if 4�0sodium citrate or 1000 IU/ml heparin is used. Other data indicate that the frequency of infection is statistically decreased when 30�0sodium citrate is used to fi ll the catheter instead of 5000 IU/ml heparin. Analogous data on 46.7�0sodium citrate are not consistent. It seems that the use of 4�0sodium citrate instead of 5000 IU/ml heparin does not decrease the frequency of infections. Numerous studies indicate that sodium citrate at various concentrations exerts a positive infl lence on catheter function. However, not all data are in accord. The spill of sodium citrate from the catheter to the systemic circulation is connected with a risk of adverse events. It may be dangerous if the citrate concentration is 46.7�20However, adequate fi lling of the catheter should prezent such events. Available data indicate that fi lling of the catheter with a solution of citrate of a concentration of no more than 30�0should be safe. Data on 46.7�0citrate are not conclusive, so precautions should be taken.

  17. Lifestyle and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth Rebekka

    2008-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), a large population-based case-control study, we investigated lifestyle factors as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption were addressed and pregnancy and

  18. Comparing the Incidence of Catheter-Related Complications with Straight and Coiled Tenckhoff Catheters in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients—A Single-Center Prospective Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Chu-Jun; Huang, Feng-Xian; Yang, Qiong-Qiong; Jiang, Zong-Pei; Chen, Wei; Qiu, Yagui; Yu, Xue-Qing

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: We aimed to prospectively compare the incidence of catheter-related complications and catheter survival for straight (SCs) and coiled (CCs) Tenckhoff catheters in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. ♦ Methods: This open prospective randomized trial recruited 189 PD patients with end-stage renal disease from the department of nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University from 6 November 2007 to 27 August 2008. The patients were randomized to a SC (n = 99) or a CC (n = 90) and were then followed for 2 years. All catheter placements were performed by two designated experienced nephrologists who used a standardized institutional placement protocol. The primary study outcomes were catheter-related complications and catheter survival at 1 and 2 years. ♦ Results: We observed no significant differences in clinical and demographic characteristics between the groups at baseline. The overall incidence of catheter dysfunction was higher in the CC group than in the SC group (17.8% vs 7.1%, p = 0.03), and most of the events occurred 4 weeks or more after the catheters were implanted. Catheter tip migration and omental wrapping were the most common causes of catheter dysfunction. Surgical catheter rescue was more common in patients with CCs than in patients with SCs (9 vs 3 patients respectively, p = 0.05). No significant differences were observed in other catheter-related complications, including dialysate leaks, hernias, and PD-related infections (peritonitis, exit-site, and tunnel infections). Catheter survival rates in the SC and CC groups were similar at 1 year (96.7% ± 1.9% vs 96.5% ± 2.0%, p = 0.98) and at 2 years (95.3% ± 2.3% vs 92.4% ± 3.6%, p = 0.76). ♦ Conclusions: The incidence of PD catheter–related complications is probably higher with CCs than with SCs. The results of our study suggest that a SC is the better option to reduce subsequent catheter complications. PMID:24584608

  19. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection: Importance of Appropriate Initial Antimicrobial Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Micek, Scott T; Lloyd, Ann E.; David J. Ritchie; Reichley, Richard M.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Kollef, Marin H

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection is a serious infection with significant patient mortality and health-care costs. Nevertheless, the relationship between initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment and clinical outcomes is not well established. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis employing automated patient medical records and the pharmacy database at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Three hundred five patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection were identified over a 6-yea...

  1. [Catheter-related infection in home-based parenteral nutrition: outcomes from the NADYA group and presentation of a new protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, Compés C; Bretón, Lesmes I; Bonada Sanjaume, A; Planas Vila, M

    2006-01-01

    Hom parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a nutritional support modality that allows for the supply of parenteral nutrition bags to the patient's home. Since its first use in the late 60s, this therapy has allowed maintaining patients with intestinal failure alive that previously were doomed to death. In our country, this therapy is used by 2.15 patients pmp. According to the NADYA data, catheter-related infections account for 50% of all HPN-related complications. In larger series, infection rates are 0.5-2 infections/1000 days or 0.3-0.5 infections/patient/year. Most of them are produced by gram-positive organisms that migrate from the skin or from catheter connections to the tip. These infections are diagnosed by means of clinical data and with different microbiological cultures. When treating these infections, it is important to keep the catheter in place, and administering antibiotics through it, conventionally or with the antibioticolade technique.

  2. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopolou, Eleni; Katsaris, Georgios; Katostaras, Theophanis

    A retrospective study of 205 patients was performed to identify the risk factors associated with nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). The study occurred during a 5-month period in four medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Athens, Greece. Risk factors were determined using single and multivariate analyses. Thirty-five patients developed nosocomial BSI (17.1%). The incidence density (defined as the number of new cases of BSI divided by the total of patient-days in the population studied; Jarvis, 1997) of BSI was 14.3 per 1000 patient-days (total number of days that patients are in the ICU during the selected time period). A multivariate model showed that only three factors were significantly and independently responsible for nosocomial BSI: the length of ICU stay (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) 1.052, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.018-1.087, P = 0.002); the presence of trauma at admission (AOR 2.622, 95% CI 1.074-6.404, P = 0.034); and nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia (AOR 6.153, 95% CI 2.305-16.422, P = 0.000). These results show that the factors that had most influence on the development of nosocomial BSI were those factors associated with the treatment received by patients during ICU stay.

  3. Central venous catheters and bloodstream infections during induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, K.; Hasle, H.; Asdahl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rehabilitation was introduced back in 1950-60, and has been accepted as part of comprehensive care aimed at patients with cardiac diseases for more than 20 years. There is well established evidence that rehabilitation improves quality of life, and physical and psychological function...

  4. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  5. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  6. Central venous device-related thrombosis as imaged with MDCT in oncologic patients: prevalence and findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Orlando; Castelguidone, Elisabetta de Lutio di; Granata, Vincenza; D' Errico, Adolfo Gallipoli (Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Institute ' Fondazione G Pascale' (Italy)), email: orlandcat@tin.it; Sandomenico, Claudia (Dept. of Esophago-gastro-bilio-pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Institute ' Fondazione G Pascale' (Italy)); Petrillo, Mario (Dept. of Radiology, Second Univ. of Naples (Italy)); Aprea, Pasquale (Dept. of Critical Illness and Anaesthesiology, National Cancer Institute ' Fondazione G Pascale' , Naples, (Italy))

    2011-02-15

    Background: Venous thrombosis is a common occurrence in cancer patients, developing spontaneously or in combination with indwelling central venous devices (CVD). Purpose: To analyze the multidetector CT (MDCT) prevalence, appearance, and significance of catheter related thoracic venous thrombosis in oncologic patients and to determine the percentage of thrombi identified in the original reports. Material and Methods: Five hundred consecutive patients were considered. Inclusion criteria were: presence of a CVD; availability of a contrast-enhanced MDCT; and cancer history. Exclusion criteria were: direct tumor compression/infiltration of the veins; poor image quality; device tip not in the scanned volume; and missing clinical data. Seventeen (3.5%) out of the final 481 patients had a diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Results: Factors showing the highest correlation with thrombosis included peripherally-inserted CVD, right brachiocephalic vein tip location, patient performance status 3, metastatic stage disease, ongoing chemotherapy, and longstanding CVD. The highest prevalence was in patients with lymphoma, lung carcinoma, melanoma, and gynecologic malignancies. Eleven out of 17 cases had not been identified in the original report. Conclusion: CVD-related thrombosis is not uncommon in cancer patients and can also be observed in outpatients with a good performance status and a non-metastatic disease. Thrombi can be very tiny. Radiologists should be aware of the possibility to identify (or overlook) small thrombi

  7. The prevention, diagnosis and management of central venous line infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesshyre, Emily; Goff, Zoy; Bowen, Asha; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    With advancing paediatric healthcare, the use of central venous lines has become a fundamental part of management of neonates and children. Uses include haemodynamic monitoring and the delivery of lifesaving treatments such as intravenous fluids, blood products, antibiotics, chemotherapy, haemodialysis and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite preventative measures, central venous catheter-related infections are common, with rates of 0.5-2.8/1000 catheter days in children and 0.6-2.5/1000 catheter days in neonates. Central line infections in children are associated with increased mortality, increased length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, treatment interruptions, and increased complications. Prevention is paramount, using a variety of measures including tunnelling of long-term devices, chlorhexidine antisepsis, maximum sterile barriers, aseptic non-touch technique, minimal line accessing, and evidence-based care bundles. Diagnosis of central line infections in children is challenging. Available samples are often limited to a single central line blood culture, as clinicians are reluctant to perform painful venepuncture on children with a central, pain-free, access device. With the advancing evidence basis for antibiotic lock therapy for treatment, paediatricians are pushing the boundaries of line retention if safe to do so, due to among other reasons, often limited venous access sites. This review evaluates the available paediatric studies on management of central venous line infections and refers to consensus guidelines such as those of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Venous ulcer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  9. Venous ulcer review

    OpenAIRE

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Paul Bevis, Jonothan Earnshaw Department of Vascular Surgery, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Great Western Road, Gloucester, UKDate of preparation: 3 February 2011Conflict of interest: None declared.Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers?Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recu...

  10. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in Brazilian pediatric patients: microbiology, epidemiology, and clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Pires Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. METHODS: We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project. RESULTS: In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age. Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS (21.3%, Klebsiella spp. (15.7%, Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%, and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%. The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342. Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU. The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%. Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%. Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%. Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. CONCLUSIONS: In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients.

  11. ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one episode of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in the USA ranged from $8000 in 1988 to more than $28 000 for intensive care patients in 1994. On the basis of these figures, the economic burden from CRBSI is substantial. Central venous catheters (CVCs) account for an estimated. 90% of all CRBSJ.

  12. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    : three patients had UTI out of 37 catheterized patients (8% at 10 days LOS, while 42 patients had UTI out of 49 catheterized patients (85.7% at 18 days LOS. The longer the LOS, the higher the UTI rate: LOS for each patient (median 18 days for infected patients versus 10 days for noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, and number of hospital-acquired catheter-related UTI (100 patients had UTI out of 250 catheterized patients, P=0.04.Conclusion: Reduction of the duration of catheterization and LOS of the patient have a positive impact in reduction of catheter-related UTI.Keywords: urinary catheters, catheter duration, adult

  13. Genotypic analysis of Acinetobacter bloodstream infection isolates in a Turkish university hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Esel, D.; Yildiz, O.; Voss, A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Doganay, M.

    2006-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant pathogen of bloodstream infections in hospital patients that frequently causes single clone outbreaks. We aimed to evaluate the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, in order to obtain insight into

  14. Dialysis catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome with patent vena cava: Long term efficacy of unilateral viatorr stent-graft avoiding catheter manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaretti, Pietro; Galli, Franco; Maramarco, Lorenzo Paplo; Corti, Riccardo; Leati, Giovanni; Fiorina, Ilaria; Maestri, Marcello [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Central venous catheters are the most frequent causes of benign central vein stenosis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman on hemodialysis through a twin catheter in the right internal jugular vein, presenting with superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome with patent SVC. The clinically driven endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the venous syndrome with a unilateral left brachiocephalic stent-graft without manipulation of the well-functioning catheter. The follow-up was uneventful until death 94 months later.

  15. Mortality in enterococcal bloodstream infections increases with inappropriate antimicrobial therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, M.; Aabenhus, R.; Harboe, Z.B.

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus species are common in nosocomial bloodstream infections and their incidence is rising. Although well recognized in several serious bacterial infections, the influence of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in enterococcal bacteraemia has not been fully settled. The aim of the study.......7-10), thrombocytopenia (3.9, 1.6-9.3), chronic liver failure (3.3, 1.1-10) and age >/=60 years (2.2, 0.99-5.0). Antibiotics not appropriately covering enterococci are frequently administered empirically in suspected bloodstream infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was an independent risk factor for mortality...

  16. Study of Candida Bloodstream Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients and Susceptibility Profile of the Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya S. Rajmane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increased incidence of fungal infections in the past two decades has been overwhelming. Despite the fact that invasive fungal infections are still under-diagnosed and underreported, bloodstream infection due to Candida is now being recognized as an important public health problem especially in ICU patients with considerable morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Objective: To study the incidence, risk factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida bloodstream infection in our hospital. Material and Methods: In the present study, the blood samples were collected from patients admitted in Surgical ICU. Samples were processed and antifungal susceptibility of the isolates was performed using standard protocol. Results: Out of total 93 patients, 14 (15.05% were positive for candidemia with equal distribution of both C. albicans and nonalbicans Candida spp. The risk factors associated with candidemia showing statistical significance were length of ICU stay > 7 days, mechanical ventilation, central venous catheters and uncontrolled diabetes. Among the patients with candidemia the mortality rate was 78.57 %. Resistance to Amphotericin B was seen in 33.33 % isolates of C. tropicalis and 100 % isolates of C. rugosa. 33.33 % of C. tropicalis and 50 % of C. rugosa showed dose dependent susceptibility to Fluconazole. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and antifungal susceptibility testing is very important in the treatment of candidemia for reducing the mortality rate.

  17. Comparison of the VersaTREK blood culture system against the Bactec9240 system in patients with suspected bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zyl Danie G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the VersaTREK (TREK Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, Ohio blood culture system against the Bactec9240 (BD Microbiology, Cockeysville, MD, for the recovery of bloodstream pathogens. Methods Venous blood from patients with suspected bacterial sepsis was evenly distributed into bottles of each system. Positive signals were recorded and bottles processed onto standard media for organism recovery. False positive signals were regarded if no organisms were seen on Gram stain and no growth was observed. Results 177 bottles were available for analysis; the Bactec9240 system yielded 43 positive, 134 negative results and no false positive signals. The VersaTREK system had 58 positive signals with 14 being false positives. Conclusions In our setting with high background burden of immuno-compromised patients, the VersaTREK system compared favourably with the Bactec9240 in recovering blood stream aerobic and facultative anaerobic pathogens from patients with suspected bacterial sepsis. A concern is the high false positivity rate. Due to its versatility to accommodate small and large workloads as well as using smaller volumes of blood, this system may establish itself as a useful alternative for the recovery of bloodstream pathogens.

  18. Outcomes and Predictive Factors Associated with Adequacy of Antimicrobial Therapy in Patients with Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues; Belucci, Talita Rantin; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Edmond, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are significant risk factors for bloodstream infection (BSI), which are directly associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study was a retrospective cohort study for the time period of July 2011-June 2014 in patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) to determine the microbiological profile and antimicrobial adequacy of patients with CLABSI in a tertiary hospital. One hundred and twenty-one CLABSI cases were identified. Ninety-two percent (n = 111) of patients had monomicrobial BSI. Gram-negative bacteria were the most prevalent (49%, n = 63), with Klebsiella spp. predominating (30%, n = 19). Among the Gram-positive bacteria (n = 43, 33%), coagulase-negative staphylococci was the major pathogen (58%, n = 25), and all isolates were methicillin resistant. Antimicrobial therapy was assessed as adequate in 81% (n = 98) of cases. In-hospital mortality was 36% (n = 43 cases). Our CLABSI patients had a high mortality, although antimicrobial therapy was appropriate. Gram-negative bacteria were responsible for almost half of the cases and there was a high rate of bacteria resistance to extended-spectrum antibiotics.

  19. Effect of catheter-lock solutions on catheter-related infection and inflammatory syndrome in hemodialysis patients: heparin versus citrate 46% versus heparin/gentamicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditto, Marcia; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Robert, Jérôme; Trystam, David; Dighiero, Jean; Hue, Danièle; Bessette, Christelle; Deray, Gilbert; Mercadal, Lucile

    2010-01-01

    Prevention strategies are emerging with the use of catheter-lock solutions (CLS) to prevent catheter-related infections. We compared 3 CLS: heparin, citrate (46%) and heparin/gentamicin (H/G). Three periods of 6 months using the three CLS were compared. 265 catheters were studied. The CRI rate per 1,000 catheter-days was 2.9 for heparin, 3.4 for citrate and 0.4 for H/G. The free-infection catheter survival tended to be higher with H/G (log-rank test, p = 0.06) and the CRP had a significant decreasing course (p = 0.03). Since 2006 H/G was used as CLS in our dialysis unit. The resistance to gentamicin of Enterobacteriaceae increased in the nephrology department and in the entire hospital. On the other hand, the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to gentamicin dropped to nil. CLS with heparin/gentamicin tended to decrease CRI compared to citrate 46% and heparin and frankly improved the CRP course after catheter insertion. Gentamicin resistance should be monitored.

  20. In Vitro Approach for Identification of the Most Effective Agents for Antimicrobial Lock Therapy in the Treatment of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S; Zapotoczna, M; Stevens, N T; Humphreys, H; O'Gara, J P; O'Neill, E

    2016-05-01

    Infection of intravascular catheters by Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor within the health care setting. To treat these infections and attempt salvage of an intravascular catheter, antimicrobial lock solutions (ALSs) are being increasingly used. However, the most effective ALSs against these biofilm-mediated infections have yet to be determined, and clinical practice varies greatly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacies of antibiotics and antiseptics in current clinical use against biofilms produced by reference and clinical isolates of S. aureus Static and flow biofilm assays were developed using newly described in vivo-relevant conditions to examine the effect of each agent on S. aureus within the biofilm matrix. The antibiotics daptomycin, tigecycline, and rifampin and the antiseptics ethanol and Taurolock inactivated established S. aureus biofilms, while other commonly used antistaphylococcal antibiotics and antiseptic agents were less effective. These findings were confirmed by live/dead staining of S. aureus biofilms formed and treated within a flow cell model. The results from this study demonstrate the most effective clinically used agents and their concentrations which should be used within an ALS to treat S. aureus-mediated intravascular catheter-related infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Lidocaine-prilocaine cream reduces catheter-related bladder discomfort in male patients during the general anesthesia recovery period: A prospective, randomized, case-control STROBE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Li; Geng, Li-Cheng; Xu, Hui; Luo, Man; Geng, Jing-Miao; Li, Li

    2017-04-01

    Urethral catheterization is a predictor of agitation during the general anesthesia recovery period. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intraurethral 5% lidocaine and 25 mg/g prilocaine cream in reducing catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in male patients during the general anesthesia recovery period. Adult male patients undergoing elective operations that required urinary catheterization under general anesthesia were enrolled and assigned randomly to 2 groups. In the lidocaine-prilocaine cream group (n = 72), approximately 5 g of topical cream was spread in the preputial sac, the glans, the meatus, and on the urinary catheter surface before urinary catheterization. In the control group (n = 74), the urinary catheter was lubricated with lidocaine gel. The incidence and severity of CRBD were assessed 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes postoperatively. We found that the incidence of CRBD in the lidocaine-prilocaine cream group was significantly lower than in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that lidocaine-prilocaine cream applications reduced moderate or severe CRBD. Thirty minutes postoperation was the most frequent time point for the incidence of CRBD. Application of lidocaine-prilocaine cream on the surface of the urinary catheter is an efficient and safe method to reduce the incidence and severity of CRBD.

  2. [Asymptomatic fungemia caused by Acremonium sp associated with colonization of a central venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Juárez, Patricia; Velásquez-Acosta, Consuelo; Martínez-Roque, Victoria; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms considered saprophytes have emerged as invasive or indolent pathogens among immuno-compromised patients. We detected an initial case of catheter-related Acremonium sp fungemia on a previously asymptomatic patient. We diagnosed a second case five weeks later. Both patients had a non-tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) that had been cared for following routine protocol by nurses in the Intravenous Therapy Team on a weekly basis. The sole risk factor that both patients shared was that they had received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) by a CVC 5 months prior to the date the catheter-related fungemia was detected. We retrospectively studied all patients who had received TPN during this period. We found two cases ofAcremonium fungemia, patients had gastric adenocarcinoma and received TPN for an average of 19 days. Infection was resolved with catheter removal and antifungic therapy. Another eight patients received TPN from the same commercial firm during this period; average administration was 9.5 days (range, 6-20). Neither blood cultures nor tip-catheters culture reported Acremonium sp. Patients with CVC for TPN should be closely monitored to identify colonization with a low pathogenic microorganism that could be mistakenly diagnosed as asymptomatic.

  3. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  4. Dwell time and risk of central-line-associated bloodstream infection in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, E; Yeo, K T; Wang, A Y; Callander, I; Bajuk, B; Bolisetty, S; Lui, K

    2017-11-01

    Umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), widely used in high-risk neonates, may have a threshold dwell time for subsequent increased risk of central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). To evaluate the CLABSI risks in neonates having either UVC, PICC, or those having both sequentially. The study included 3985 infants who had UVC or PICC inserted between 2007 and 2009 cared for in 10 regional neonatal intensive care units: 1392 having UVC only (group 1), 1317 PICC only (group 2), and 1276 both UVC and PICC (group 3). There were 403 CLABSIs among 6000 venous catheters inserted, totalling 43,302 catheter-days. CLABSI rates were higher in group 3 infants who were of lowest gestation (16.9 per 1000 UVC-days and 12.5 per 1000 PICC-days; median: 28 weeks) when compared with group 1 (3.3 per 1000 UVC-days; 37 weeks) and group 2 (4.8 per 1000 PICC-days; 30 weeks). Life table and Kaplan-Meier hazard analysis showed that UVC CLABSI rate increased stepwise to 42 per 1000 UVC-days by day 10, with the highest rate in group 3 (85 per 1000 UVC-days). PICC CLABSI rates remained relatively stable at 12-20 per 1000 PICC-days. Compared to PICC, UVC had a higher adjusted CLABSI risk controlled for dwell time. Among group 3, replacing UVC electively before day 4 may have a trend of lower CLABSI risk than late replacement. There was no cut-off duration beyond which PICC should be removed electively. Early UVC removal and replacement by PICC before day 4 might be considered. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is Clostridium difficile infection a risk factor for subsequent bloodstream infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Robert J; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A; Young, Vincent B; Rao, Krishna

    2017-06-29

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal illness increasingly associated with mortality in United States. The underlying factors and mechanisms behind the recent increases in morbidity from CDI have not been fully elucidated. Murine models suggest a mucosal barrier breakdown leads to bacterial translocation and subsequent bloodstream infection (BSI). This study tests the hypothesis that CDI is associated with subsequent BSI in humans. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 1132 inpatients hospitalized >72 h with available stool test results for toxigenic C. difficile. The primary outcome was BSI following CDI. Secondary outcomes included 30-day mortality, colectomy, readmission, and ICU admission. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were developed. CDI occurred in 570 of 1132 patients (50.4%). BSI occurred in 86 (7.6%) patients. Enterococcus (14%) and Klebsiella (14%) species were the most common organisms. Patients with BSI had higher comorbidity scores and were more likely to be male, on immunosuppression, critically ill, and have a central venous catheter in place. Of the patients with BSI, 36 (42%) had CDI. CDI was not associated with subsequent BSI (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.44-1.08; P = 0.103) in unadjusted analysis. In multivariable modeling, CDI appeared protective against subsequent BSI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.34-0.96; P = 0.036). Interaction modeling suggests a complicated relationship among CDI, BSI, antibiotic exposure, and central venous catheter use. In this cohort of inpatients that underwent testing for CDI, CDI was not a risk factor for developing subsequent BSI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sodium citrate versus heparin catheter locks for cuffed central venous catheters: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Albert; Duncan, Neill; Singh, Seema K; Brown, Wendy; Dalby, Elizabeth; Edwards, Claire; Lynch, Kathleen; Prout, Virginia; Cairns, Tom; Griffith, Megan; McLean, Adam; Palmer, Andrew; Taube, David

    2009-06-01

    Sodium citrate has antibacterial and anticoagulant properties that are confined to the catheter when used as a catheter lock. Studies of its use as a catheter lock have suggested its efficacy in preventing infection and bleeding complications compared with sodium heparin. Open-label randomized controlled trial of 2 catheter locks to examine the hypothesis that sodium citrate catheter locks will reduce catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection. 232 consenting long-term hemodialysis patients in 4 satellite dialysis units to a large dialysis program with protocolized treatment and targets. All patients were using twin-catheter single-lumen Tesio-Caths (MedComp, Harleysville, PA). 6 months' use of 46.7% sodium citrate (citrate) or 5% heparin (heparin) locked postdialysis in the dead space of the central venous catheter. Primary end point of catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection. Secondary end points of catheter thrombosis defined by the use of urokinase lock and infusion, new catheter insertion, catheter-related admission, blood transfusions, parenteral iron, and erythropoietin requirements. Catheter-related bacteremia did not differ in the 2 groups, with an incidence of 0.7 events/1,000 catheter-days. There was no significant difference in rates of exit-site infection (0.7 versus 0.5 events/1,000 catheter-days; P = 0.5). The secondary end point of catheter thrombosis defined by the use of a urokinase lock was significantly more common in the citrate group, with an incidence of 8 versus 4.3/1,000 catheter-days (P < 0.001). Other secondary end points did not differ. Citrate treatment was curtailed compared with heparin because of a greater incidence of adverse events, with a mean treatment duration before withdrawal of 4.8 +/- 2.0 versus 5.7 +/- 1.2 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Low baseline catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection event rates may have underpowered this study. High adverse-event rates may have been related to high

  7. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  8. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions...

  9. Nosocomial and community-acquired Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream infection: risk factors for and prevalence of SHV-12 in multiresistant isolates in a medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C-P; Wang, N-Y; Lee, C-M; Weng, L-C; Tseng, H-K; Liu, C-W; Chiang, C-S; Huang, F-Y

    2004-09-01

    In a medical centre in northern Taiwan, 60 patients had bloodstream infection caused by Enterobacter cloacae from 1 January 2002 to 30 April 2003. Forty (66.7%) were nosocomial and 26 were caused by multiresistant isolates. Twenty patients died due to the infection. Central venous catheterization and mechanical ventilation were relative risks for nosocomial E. cloacae infection. Age and mechanical ventilation were risk factors for multiresistant E. cloacae infection. Mortality was associated with multiresistant isolates and polymicrobial infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed, the 26 multiresistant isolates comprised 12 different types, with type A predominating (12 isolates). Excluding the patients infected with PFGE type A, central venous catheterization was a relative risk for infection, and polymicrobial infection was a risk factor for mortality. All but one of the 26 multiresistant isolates had the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase SHV-12. TEM-1 and ampC beta-lactamase genes were also detected in 25 of the 26 multiresistant isolates. Southern blotting indicated that the SHV-12 gene was located on plasmids. Eleven of the 26 multiresistant isolates had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) > or =16 mg/L for cefepime, which was reduced by the addition of sulbactam for most isolates, resulting in susceptibility. The combination of cefepime and sulbactam may be effective in the treatment of multiresistant E. cloacae bloodstream infection.

  10. Management of occlusion and thrombosis associated with long-term indwelling central venous catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Howard, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters (CVC) facilitate care for patients with chronic illnesses, but catheter occlusions and catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) are common complications. This review summarizes management of CVC and CRT. Mechanical CVC occlusions require cause-specific therapy; whereas, thrombotic occlusions usually resolve with thrombolytic therapy, such as alteplase. Prophylaxis with thrombolytic flushes may decrease CVC infections and CRT, but confirmatory studies and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed. Risk factors for CRT include previous catheter infections, malposition of the catheter tip, and prothrombotic states. CRT can lead to catheter infection, pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. CRT is diagnosed primarily using Doppler ultrasound or venography and treated with anticoagulation for 6 weeks to a year, depending on the extent of the thrombus, response to initial therapy, and whether thrombophilic factors persist. Prevention of CRT includes proper positioning of the CVC and prevention of infections; anticoagulation prophylaxis is not recommended at present. PMID:19595350

  11. Health care failure mode and effect analysis to reduce NICU line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandonnet, Celeste J; Kahlon, Prerna S; Rachh, Pratik; Degrazia, Michele; Dewitt, Eileen C; Flaherty, Kathleen A; Spigel, Nadine; Packard, Stephanie; Casey, Denise; Rachwal, Christine; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2013-06-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in NICU result in increased mortality, morbidity, and length of stay. Our NICU experienced an increase in the number of CLABSIs over a 2-year period. We sought to reduce risks for CLABSIs using health care failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA) by analyzing central line insertion, maintenance, and removal practices. A multidisciplinary team was assembled that included clinicians from nursing, neonatology, surgery, infection prevention, pharmacy, and quality management. Between March and October 2011, the team completed the HFMEA process and implemented action plans that included reeducation, practice changes, auditing, and outcome measures. The HFMEA identified 5 common failure modes that contribute to the development of CLABSIs. These included contamination, suboptimal environment of care, improper documentation and evaluation of central venous catheter dressing integrity, issues with equipment and suppliers, and lack of knowledge. Since implementing the appropriate action plans, the NICU has experienced a significant decrease in CLABSIs from 2.6 to 0.8 CLABSIs per 1000 line days. The process of HFMEA helped reduce the CLABSI rate and reinforce the culture of continuous quality improvement and safety in the NICU.

  12. Venous oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dural sinus thrombosis - A rare manifestation of internal jugular venous occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dural sinus thrombosis is an uncommon complication of a commonly done procedure of central venous catheterisation. We present a case of massive hemorrhagic venous infarct with gross cerebral edema due to dural sinus thrombosis along with right internal jugular vein thrombus. A 21-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department with fever and swelling of the right neck four days following discharge after his prior hospitalization two weeks ago for acute renal failure due to severe gastroenteritis, when he underwent hemodialysis through right internal jugular access. On presentation, he was conscious, with swelling on right side of the neck, which was diagnosed as right internal jugular vein occlusion. However, he rapidly dete-riorated and developed signs of raised intracranial pressure despite being on treatment with heparin. He was diagnosed as having massive hemorrhagic cerebral venous infarct with gross cerebral edema complicated with shift of the ventricles to the left due to dural sinus thrombosis. Despite emergency decompressive craniotomy, he succumbed in the next two days due to coning. Asymptomatic catheter-related thrombosis is frequent in the intensive care units, but major complications like retrograde extension into dural sinus causing thrombosis is rare. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this major catastrophe for an early and meaningful intervention.

  14. Urethral catheter-related urinary infection in critical patients admitted to the ICU. Descriptive data of the ENVIN-UCI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, F; Gracia-Arnillas, M P; Palomar, M; Olaechea, P; Insausti, J; López-Pueyo, M J; Otal, J J; Gimeno, R; Seijas, I

    2013-03-01

    To describe trends in national catheter-related urinary tract infection (CRUTI) rates, as well as etiologies and multiresistance markers. An observational, prospective, multicenter voluntary participation study was conducted from 1 April to 30 June in the period between 2005 and 2010. Intensive Care Units (ICUs) that participated in the ENVIN-ICU registry during the study period. We included all patients admitted to the participating ICUs and patients with urinary catheter placement for more than 24 hours (78,863 patients). Patient monitoring was continued until discharge from the ICU or up to 60 days. CRUTIs were defined according to the CDC system, and frequency is expressed as incidence density (ID) in relation to the number of urinary catheter-patients days. A total of 2329 patients (2.95%) developed one or more CRUTI. The ID decreased from 6.69 to 4.18 episodes per 1000 days of urinary catheter between 2005 and 2010 (p<0.001). In relation to the underlying etiology, gramnegative bacilli predominated (55.6 to 61.6%), followed by fungi (18.7 to 25.2%) and grampositive cocci (17.1 to 25.9%). In 2010, ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains (37.1%) increased, as well as imipenem-resistant (36.4%) and ciprofloxacin-resistant (37.1%) strains of P. aeruginosa. A decrease was observed in CRUTI rates, maintaining the same etiological distribution and showing increased resistances in gramnegative pathogens, especially E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Venous ulcer: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffetto, Joseph D; Marston, William A

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of venous dermal abnormality in chronic venous ulcers is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in the microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase activation, and altered cellular function. Red blood cells and macromolecules extravasate into the interstitium and activate endothelial cells. Endothelial expression of specific adhesion molecules recruits leukocytes and causes diapedesis of these cells into the dermal microvasculature, promoting an inflammatory response with activation of cytokines and proteinases. Altered cell function enhances a state of vulnerability in the surrounding tissues, initiating specific changes associated with venous disease. Ultimately, the persistent inflammatory-proteinase activity leads to advanced chronic venous insufficiency and ulcer formation. The mainstay of therapy in venous ulcer abnormality is correction of the underlying venous hypertension through compression therapy and/or surgery. Understanding the science involved in the pathophysiology of venous ulcer formation has led to the development of adjunctive treatment directed at the dysregulated molecular pathways. Randomized clinical trials are critical for determining the most effective evidence-based treatments for venous ulcer, and this review discusses important trials that have had a significant impact on venous ulcer healing. In addition, the authors have included subsections referred to as "Translational Implications for Therapy" in the basic science sections of the review to help bridge the basic science knowledge with clinical applications that may help to modulate the molecular abnormalities in the pathophysiologic cascade leading to venous ulcers.

  16. Central Venous Catheter (CVC related infections: a local retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Fresu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central venous catheter (CVC related infection is associated with significant increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care cost.This local surveillance study was carry out to monitor the frequency of occurrence of CVC-related blood stream infections. Materials and methods. During the period January – December 2005, 226 CVC specimens were analyzed (quantitative method and microrganism identification from positive samples was performed by Vitek II. In 53 patients it was possible to compare quantitative results with those obtained from blood cultures. Results. Positive CVC samples were 125 (55% and 130 microrganisms were isolated: 109 Gram-positives (84%, 4 Gram-negatives (3%, and 17 mycetes (13%. Among pathogens collected simultaneously from CVC and blood samples, the most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci and 20%. S. aureus and Candida spp. (45%. In the group of patients that presented positive CVC and negative blood samples the most frequently recovered microrganisms were staphylococci. Many isolates (33% were polymicrobial. Conclusions. Catheter-related infections occurred in those patients who presented the same pathogen in both CVC and blood cultures. These infections were principally caused by staphylococci and Candida spp. On the contrary, a possible CVC contamination could be suspected when positive CVC and negative blood cultures were found.

  17. Chlorhexidine 2% and choice of transparent dressing increase skin reactions at central venous catheter insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Mark; Dobson, Pauline; Boyle, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Infection at central venous catheter (CVC) sites remains a common problem, particularly with long-term use. This report discusses the influence of choice of transparent dressing type and chlorhexidine concentration on skin reactions at CVC insertion sites. A concentration of 2% chlorhexidine is associated with a higher rate of skin reactions than either 0.5% or 1% chlorhexidine. Higher chlorhexidine concentrations may not decrease the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An alternative central venous route for cardiac surgery: supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocum, Aysu; Sener, Mesut; Calıskan, Esra; Bozdogan, Nesrin; Atalay, Hakan; Aribogan, Anis

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical success rate, safety, and usefulness for intraoperative central venous pressure monitoring, and the intravenous access of the supraclavicular subclavian vein approach when compared with the infraclavicular subclavian vein approach and the internal jugular vein approach for central venous catheterization during open-chest cardiac surgery. A prospective, randomized, single-center study. A university hospital. One hundred ninety-five patients scheduled for open-chest cardiac surgery. The study population consisted of patients for whom central vein catheterization was intended during cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized to 3 groups according to the route of central vein catheterization: the supraclavicular group: the supraclavicular approach for the subclavian vein (n = 65); the infraclavicular group: the infraclavicular approach for the subclavian vein (n = 65); and the jugular group: the internal jugular vein approach (n = 65). After the induction of anesthesia, central venous catheterization was performed according to the assigned approach. The success rates for the assigned approach were 98%, 98%, and 92% for the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and jugular groups, respectively (p > 0.05). The success rates in the first 3 attempts in patients who were catheterized successfully according to the assigned approach were 96%, 100%, and 96% for the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and jugular groups, respectively (p > 0.05). There was no difference among groups in catheter insertion time (p > 0.05). After sternal retraction, central venous pressure trace loss and difficulty in fluid infusion were significantly more frequent in the infraclavicular group (21%) when compared with the supraclavicular (3%) and jugular groups (0%) (p = 0.01). There was no difference among groups in terms of catheter malposition, complications during catheterization, and rate of catheter-related infection. The supraclavicular approach for subclavian vein

  19. Genetics in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Yasmin; Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun

    2017-02-01

    Chronic venous disease is highly prevalent in the Western world, with varicose veins being the most common form of clinical manifestation. With recent developments in sequencing technology, clinicians and geneticists alike are embarking on a journey to identify and unravel the genetic candidates of chronic venous disease. There is now currently substantial evidence to suggest the presence of genetic influences in the aetiology and pathology of venous disease. Despite this, the precise nature and profile of the genes involved in chronic venous disease remain a poorly understood entity. Moreover, it is strikingly apparent that the majority of venous genetic studies conducted over the past decade do not adhere to fundamental research principles. The emergence of high-throughput genotyping platforms permits a more systematic search for inherited components of venous disease. Pursuing a genome-wide frontier has the potential to reveal novel critical metabolic pathways and explain the genetic susceptibility of chronic venous disease. An expedited knowledge of the genetic factors in the aetiology of venous disease may translate into better prevention or treatment, which would benefit patients suffering from its clinical sequelae. Researchers should be urged to foster collaborative links and design a genome-wide case-control association study as an international consortium to provide a statistically robust paradigm in the field of chronic venous disease genetics. This will carry promise for clinically relevant progress and represent a first step towards better understanding of the genetics of chronic venous disease aetiology.

  20. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  1. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  2. Vascular catheter tip cultures for suspected catheter-related blood stream infection in the intensive care unit: a tradition whose time has passed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Lisa; Zimmerman, Lisa Hall; Rose, Alexander; Zhao, Jing; Wahby, Krista; Dotson, Bryan; Wilson, Robert; Tennenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSIs) are estimated to occur in 80,000 patients in intensive care units (ICUs) each year in the United States. We sought to determine the clinical utility of vascular catheter cultures in critically ill patients with suspected CR-BSI. We reviewed retrospectively all positive (≥15 colony forming units/roll) vascular catheter tip cultures (CTCs) documented over a four-year period in the ICUs of two hospitals. A CR-BSI was defined as matching positive blood and catheter cultures. The time interval between catheter removal and blood culture was recorded. A total of 1,391 CTCs were obtained, of which 468 (34%) were positive and 143 (31% of the positive cultures) were associated with a diagnosis of CR-BSI. In 133 of these 143 cases (93%), the positive blood culture was obtained before or within 24 h after catheter removal and dictated antibiotic therapy. In only 10 of 143 cases (7%) did catheter removal and culture significantly (>1 day) precede the positive blood culture. In 55% of the CR-BSI cases, the catheter was removed empirically and close to the time of blood culture (-1.3±19.0 h). In the remaining 45%, the catheter was removed clinically (after a blood culture was positive), and this action was more remote in time (23.6±19.4 h; p<0.001 vs. empiric removal). Total microbiology laboratory costs for the CTCs were $75,300, and 600 microbiology technician hours were required. In an ICU patient population, only about one-third of vascular catheter cultures were positive, and only about one-third of the positive CTCs were associated with CR-BSI. Ninety-three percent of all CR-BSIs were identified by bacteremia either before or coinciding with catheter removal, and the results of the blood culture dictated antimicrobial therapy. Because CTCs rarely changed therapy, they may not be appropriate in the management of suspected CR-BSI in the ICU setting.

  3. Bloodstream infection in paediatric cancer centres--leukaemia and relapsed malignancies are independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, R A; Laws, H J; Schrey, D; Ehlert, K; Moser, O; Dilloo, D; Bode, U; Wawer, A; Schrauder, A; Cario, G; Laengler, A; Graf, N; Furtwängler, R; Simon, A

    2015-05-01

    In a prospective multicentre study of bloodstream infection (BSI) from November 01, 2007 to July 31, 2010, seven paediatric cancer centres (PCC) from Germany and one from Switzerland included 770 paediatric cancer patients (58% males; median age 8.3 years, interquartile range (IQR) 3.8-14.8 years) comprising 153,193 individual days of surveillance (in- and outpatient days during intensive treatment). Broviac catheters were used in 63% of all patients and Ports in 20%. One hundred forty-two patients (18%; 95% CI 16 to 21%) experienced at least one BSI (179 BSIs in total; bacteraemia 70%, bacterial sepsis 27%, candidaemia 2%). In 57%, the BSI occurred in inpatients, in 79% after conventional chemotherapy. Only 56 % of the patients showed neutropenia at BSI onset. Eventually, patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML), relapsed malignancy and patients with a Broviac faced an increased risk of BSI in the multivariate analysis. Relapsed malignancy (16%) was an independent risk factor for all BSI and for Gram-positive BSI. This study confirms relapsed malignancy as an independent risk factor for BSIs in paediatric cancer patients. On a unit level, data on BSIs in this high-risk population derived from prospective surveillance are not only mandatory to decide on empiric antimicrobial treatment but also beneficial in planning and evaluating preventive bundles. • Paediatric cancer patients face an increased risk of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs). • In most cases, these BSIs are associated with the use of a long-term central venous catheter (Broviac, Port), severe and prolonged immunosuppression (e.g. neutropenia) and other chemotherapy-induced alterations of host defence mechanisms (e.g. mucositis). What is New: • This study is the first multicentre study confirming relapsed malignancy as an independent risk factor for BSIs in paediatric cancer patients. • It describes the epidemiology of nosocomial BSI in

  4. Excess mortality in women with hospital-acquired bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, L; Paul, M; Weinberger, M; Koenigsberger, H; Drucker, M; Samra, Z; Yahav, J; Pitlik, S D

    2001-08-01

    We examined the outcomes of bloodstream infection in men and in women and whether any sex-related differences were explained by underlying disorders, severity of disease, or clinical management. Using a prospectively collected database, we compared in-hospital mortality in men and women. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to test whether sex-related differences could be due to potential confounders. Of 4250 patients with bloodstream infections, 1750 (41%) had hospital-acquired infections. The overall case fatality was 31% (625 of 2032) in women and 29% (631 of 2218, P = 0.1) in men. However, 43% (325/758) of the women with hospital-acquired infections died, compared with 33% (327/992) of the men (P = 0.0001). In a multivariate analysis, female sex was associated with greater mortality in patients with hospital-acquired infections (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.6). The excess mortality in women was mainly seen in patients with major underlying disorders (fatality rate of 45% [234 of 525] in women vs. 32% in men [234 of 743, P = 0.0001). Mortality in women with hospital-acquired bloodstream infections is substantially greater than in men. The excess mortality was concentrated in women with severe underlying disorders, suggesting that sepsis might have accentuated differences in the outcome of underlying disorders in women.

  5. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Daniel A; Feigl, Eric O

    2011-01-01

    ...) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return...

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters to Reduce Central Venous Catheter Use on the Inpatient Medical Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, Benjamin T; Southern, William N

    The traditional technique of placing a peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is successful in most cases on inpatient wards. However, when the traditional method fails, a central venous catheter may be placed to maintain IV access. These catheters are associated with risks including central line-associated bloodstream infection. We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of an ultrasound-guided peripheral IV service to reduce the number of newly placed central venous catheters on an inpatient ward. Central venous catheters were counted daily on intervention and control wards using a standard protocol, and rates of newly placed catheters were compared using a Poisson regression model. Nurses were surveyed to assess acceptability and perceived benefit. We found a reduction in the rate of newly placed central venous catheters on the intervention unit compared with the control unit at 90 days: mean 0.47 versus 0.67 newly placed central venous catheters/day, but the difference was not significant (P = .08). Nurses were in favor of the ultrasound-guided IV service, with perceived benefit to their patients. Ultrasound-guided peripheral IV might reduce unnecessary central venous catheters on general inpatient wards. A portable ultrasound used for this purpose was found to be acceptable by nursing staff.

  7. Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic venous insufficiency is an important complication following iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. Early thrombus removal may preserve venous function and prevent this complication. This study represents the largest reported South African series of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for iliofemoral ...

  8. Infection related to implantable central venous access devices in cancer patients: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maristela P; Pierrotti, Ligia C; Zerati, Antônio E; Araújo, Pedro H X N; Motta-Leal-Filho, J M; Duarte, Laiane P G; Ibrahim, Karim Y; Souza, Antonia A L; Diz, Maria P E; Pereira, Juliana; Hoff, Paulo M; Abdala, Edson

    2013-07-01

    To describe the epidemiology of infections related to the use of implantable central venous access devices (CVADs) in cancer patients and to evaluate measures aimed at reducing the rates of such infections. Prospective cohort study. Referral hospital for cancer in São Paulo, Brazil. We prospectively evaluated all implantable CVADs employed between January 2009 and December 2011. Inpatients and outpatients were followed until catheter removal, transfer to another facility, or death. Outcome measures were bloodstream infection and pocket infection. We also evaluated the effects that the creation of a multidisciplinary team for CVAD care, avoiding in-hospital implantation of CVADs, and limiting CVAD insertion in neutropenic patients have on the rates of such infections. During the study period, 966 CVADs (mostly venous ports) were implanted in 933 patients, for a combined total of 243,792 catheter-days. We identified 184 episodes of infection: 154 (84%) were bloodstream infections, 21 (11%) were pocket infections, and 9 (5%) were surgical site infections. During the study period, the rate of CVAD-related infection dropped from 2.2 to 0.24 per 1,000 catheter-days ([Formula: see text]). Multivariate analysis revealed that relevant risk factors for such infection include surgical reintervention, implantation in a neutropenic patient, in-hospital implantation, use of a cuffed catheter, and nonchemotherapy indication for catheter use. Establishing a multidisciplinary team specifically focused on CVAD care, together with systematic reporting of infections, appears to reduce the rates of infection related to the use of these devices.

  9. Does antimicrobial use density at the ward level influence monthly central line-associated bloodstream infection rates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Junichi Yoshida, Yukiko Harada, Tetsuya Kikuchi, Ikuyo Asano, Takako Ueno, Nobuo Matsubara Infection Control Committee, Shimonoseki City Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan Abstract: The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD, for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose/(defined daily dose × patient days ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰, 14 (42.4% of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6% were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936–15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527–0.922 (P=0.038. Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R2=0.1897. Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated. Keywords: bloodstream infection, central line, antimicrobial use density

  10. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000156.htm Central venous catheter - dressing change To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  11. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  12. Venous Thromboembolism in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Samková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE during childhood is low with two peaks – neonatal and adolescent age. This retrospective study is focused on clinical characteristics of VTE during adolescence. The main goals are to assess the most frequent inherited and acquired risk factors and to evaluate the benefit of D-dimers in diagnostics of venous thromboemblism. The data of 18 adolescents were analysed – 16 girls (88.9%, 2 boys (11.1%. In 9 patients (50% thrombosis of the lower limb deep veins was diagnosed, six patients (33.3% suffered from symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE and 3 patients (16.7% from thrombosis at unusual sites. One patient had an idiopathic VTE, the mean number of the inherited and acquired risk factors was 2.6. The most frequent inherited risk factor was Leiden mutation of factor V (27.8%. The most frequent acquired risk factor was oral contraception (OC in 12 out of 16 girls (75%. All of our patients on oral contraception had one or more additional risk factors. 10 out of 18 (55.6% patients with VTE had elevated activity of factor VIII. The sensitivity of D-dimers was low (50% in patients with distal lower limb thrombosis, but very high (100% in patients with PE.

  13. A prospective survey on incidence and outcome of Broviac/Hickman catheter-related complications in pediatric patients affected by hematological and oncological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Simone; Corrò, Roberta; Pelosin, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Fusaro, Fabio; Pillon, Marta; Cusinato, Riccardo; Zampieri, Chiara; Magagna, Laura; Cavaliere, Mara; Tridello, Gloria; Zanon, Gianfranco; Zanesco, Luigi

    2004-03-01

    A prospective pediatric survey on the incidence of central venous catheter (CVC) complications was performed aimed at identifying risk factors of premature CVC removal. The study comprised 129 Broviac-Hickman CVCs inserted during a 13-month period in 112 children. The total number of CVC days was 19,328 (median: 122 days, range: 1-385). The overall rate of complications was 6.2/1000 CVC days, i.e., 4.5/1000 and 1.7/1000 CVC days for mechanical and infectious complications, respectively. Interestingly, only two CVC-related cases of septicemia and no thrombotic events were documented. At the end of the study period, 38 of 129 CVC (29.5%) had been removed: 20 due to CVC-related complications (dislocation18, rupture 2), 10 due to the patient's death, and 8 due to completion of therapy. Age at CVC insertion pediatric patients to reduce accidental dislocations.

  14. Risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheters: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle de Mendonça Henrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Infections related to central venous catheter (CVC use constitute an important a problem. It is estimated that approximately 90% of bloodstream infections (BSI are caused by CVC use. This study aims at reviewing the risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheter use. Methods: A total of 12 articles published in the last 5 years and indexed in the databases of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS, Nursing Database (BDENF, International Literature on Health Sciences (Medline/Pubmed were selected, as well as publications related to the recommendations for BSI prevention, such as: Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC and the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. Results: Two categories were identified: prevention and control measures and risk factors for BSI associated with central venous catheter use. Conclusions: Some recommendations that were well-defined over the years have been questioned by some authors and continuing training and education of the multidisciplinary team are the most important factors for the prevention of bloodstream infections associated with CVC use.

  15. Bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected adults attending a Lagos teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Adeleye I; Sulaiman, Akanmu A; Solomon, Bamiro B; Chinedu, Obosi A; Victor, Inem A

    2010-08-01

    An investigation was carried out during October 2005-September 2006 to determine the prevalence of bloodstream infections in patients attending the outpatient department of the HIV/AIDS clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. Two hundred and one patients--86 males and 115 females--aged 14-65 years were recruited for the study. Serological diagnosis was carried out on them to confirm their HIV status. Their CD4 counts were done using the micromagnetic bead method. Twenty mL of venous blood sample collected from each patient was inoculated into a pair of Oxoid Signal blood culture bottles for 2-14 days. Thereafter, 0.1 mL of the sample was plated in duplicates on MacConkey, blood and chocolate agar media and incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 hours. The CD4+ counts were generally low as 67% of 140 patients sampled had Salmonella spp., S. Typhimurium (4), S. Enteritidis (2); Pseudomonas fluorescens (1), Escherichia coli (1), Ochrobactrum anthropi (1), Moraxella sp. (1), and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that coagulase-negative staphylococci had good sensitivities to vancomycin and most other antibiotics screened but were resistant mainly to ampicilin and tetracycline. The Gram-negative organisms isolated also showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and septrin. This study demonstrates that coagulase-negative staphylococci and non-typhoidal Salmonellae are the most common aetiological agents of bacteraemia among HIV-infected adults attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The organisms were resistant to older-generation antibiotics often prescribed in this environment but were sensitive to vancomycin, cefotaxime, cefuroxime, and other new-generation antibiotics.

  16. Burn-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric burn patients: Time distribution of etiologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, İlker; Kara, Ahu; Düzgöl, Mine; Karkıner, Aytaç; Bayram, Nuri; Temir, Günyüz; Şencan, Arzu; Sorguç, Yelda; Gülfidan, Gamze; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-02-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with burns in burn units. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with burns may result from burn wound infection, use of invasive devices such as central venous catheters, and translocation of the gastrointestinal flora. In this study, we investigated the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance of causative pathogens in children with burns and the durational changes of microorganisms in the distribution of BSIs in children. This study was conducted at the Pediatric Burn Unit (PBU) of Dr. Behçet Uz Children Research and Training Hospital during the period of November 2008-April 2015. The study subjects were all the patients admitted to the PBU, in whom microorganisms were isolated at least from one of the cultures, including blood and catheter cultures. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common causative agents of BSI in patients with burns (66.4%), followed by gram-negative bacteria (22.1%) and fungi (11.5%). The median duration of development of BSIs caused by gram-positive bacteria from the time of burn was 5 days (ranging from 2 to 54 days of burn), which was significantly shorter than that of BSIs caused by gram-negative bacteria (12 days) and fungal pathogens (13 days). The etiologic agents of BSIs in children may differ from those in adults. Gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria such as multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were important agents of BSI in patients with burns, especially in the long term; however, gram-positive bacteria should also be considered while deciding the antimicrobial therapy, especially in the early periods of burn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Catheter Dwell Time on Risk of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Cochran, Keith M; Smith, P Brian; Edson, Barbara S; Schulman, Joseph; Lee, Henry C; Govindaswami, Balaji; Pantoja, Alfonso; Hardy, Doug; Curran, John; Lin, Della; Kuo, Sheree; Noguchi, Akihiko; Ittmann, Patricia; Duncan, Scott; Gupta, Munish; Picarillo, Alan; Karna, Padmani; Cohen, Morris; Giuliano, Michael; Carroll, Sheri; Page, Brandi; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith; Walker, M Whit; Garland, Jeff; Ancona, Janice K; Ellsbury, Dan L; Laughon, Matthew M; McCaffrey, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    Central venous catheters in the NICU are associated with significant morbidity and mortality because of the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of catheter dwell time on risk of CLABSI. Retrospective cohort study of 13,327 infants with 15,567 catheters (93% peripherally inserted central catheters [PICCs], 7% tunneled catheters) and 256,088 catheter days cared for in 141 NICUs. CLABSI was defined using National Health Surveillance Network criteria. We defined dwell time as the number of days from line insertion until either line removal or day of CLABSI. We generated survival curves for each week of dwell time and estimated hazard ratios for CLABSI at each week by using a Cox proportional hazards frailty model. We controlled for postmenstrual age and year, included facility as a random effect, and generated separate models by line type. Median postmenstrual age was 29 weeks (interquartile range 26-33). The overall incidence of CLABSI was 0.93 per 1000 catheter days. Increased dwell time was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI for PICCs. For tunneled catheters, infection incidence was significantly higher in weeks 7 and 9 compared with week 1. Clinicians should not routinely replace uninfected PICCs for fear of infection but should consider removing tunneled catheters before week 7 if no longer needed. Additional studies are needed to determine what daily maintenance practices may be associated with decreased risk of infection, especially for tunneled catheters. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Effect of Catheter Dwell Time on Risk of Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rachel G.; Cochran, Keith M.; Smith, P. Brian; Edson, Barbara S.; Schulman, Joseph; Lee, Henry C.; Govindaswami, Balaji; Pantoja, Alfonso; Hardy, Doug; Curran, John; Lin, Della; Kuo, Sheree; Noguchi, Akihiko; Ittmann, Patricia; Duncan, Scott; Gupta, Munish; Picarillo, Alan; Karna, Padmani; Cohen, Morris; Giuliano, Michael; Carroll, Sheri; Page, Brandi; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith; Walker, M. Whit; Garland, Jeff; Ancona, Janice K.; Ellsbury, Dan L.; Laughon, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Central venous catheters in the NICU are associated with significant morbidity and mortality because of the risk of central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of catheter dwell time on risk of CLABSI. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of 13 327 infants with 15 567 catheters (93% peripherally inserted central catheters [PICCs], 7% tunneled catheters) and 256 088 catheter days cared for in 141 NICUs. CLABSI was defined using National Health Surveillance Network criteria. We defined dwell time as the number of days from line insertion until either line removal or day of CLABSI. We generated survival curves for each week of dwell time and estimated hazard ratios for CLABSI at each week by using a Cox proportional hazards frailty model. We controlled for postmenstrual age and year, included facility as a random effect, and generated separate models by line type. RESULTS: Median postmenstrual age was 29 weeks (interquartile range 26–33). The overall incidence of CLABSI was 0.93 per 1000 catheter days. Increased dwell time was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI for PICCs. For tunneled catheters, infection incidence was significantly higher in weeks 7 and 9 compared with week 1. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should not routinely replace uninfected PICCs for fear of infection but should consider removing tunneled catheters before week 7 if no longer needed. Additional studies are needed to determine what daily maintenance practices may be associated with decreased risk of infection, especially for tunneled catheters. PMID:26574587

  19. Trends in nosocomial bloodstream infections following health care restructuring in Alberta between 1999 and 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mao-Cheng; Saxinger, Lynora; Forgie, Sarah E; Taylor, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    A previous study at the University of Alberta Hospital/Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, revealed an increase in hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) rates associated with an increase in patient acuity during a period of public health care delivery restructuring between 1993 and 1996. The present study assessed trends in BSIs since the end of the restructuring. Prospective surveillance for BSIs was performed using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (USA) criteria for infection. BSI cases between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005, were reviewed. Available measures of patient volumes, acuity and BSI risk factors between 1999 and 2005 were also reviewed from hospital records. The University of Alberta Hospital/Stollery Children's Hospital (617 adult and 139 pediatric beds, respectively). All pediatric and adult patients admitted during the above-specified period with one or more episodes of BSIs. There was a significant overall decline in the BSI number and rate over the study period between 1999 and 2005. The downward trend was widespread, involving both adult and pediatric populations, as well as primary and secondary BSIs. During this period, the number of hospital-wide and intensive care unit admissions, intensive care unit central venous catheter-days, total parenteral nutrition days and number of solid-organ transplants were either unchanged or increased. Gram-positive bacterial causes of BSIs showed significant downward trends, but Gram-negative bacterial and fungal etiologies were unchanged. These data imply that, over time, hospitals can gradually adjust to changing patient care circumstances and, in this example, control infectious complications of health care delivery.

  20. Clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Ansar Qureshi, Mohamed; Mujeeb Hasan, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) as nosocomial pathogens or contaminants is significant for microbiologists and clinicians. This study aimed to determine the frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance patterns of CoNS isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and to identify risk factors associated with true bacteremia caused by these emerging pathogens in a Saudi tertiary care hospital. All CoNS-positive cultures from inpatients were identified using the standard methods during a 10-month period. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the reference broth microdilution method. A total of 208 isolates were identified; of these 75 (32.2%) were considered infection associated, and 133 (67.8%) were considered contamination. S. epidermidis accounted for 34.7% of bacteremia cases, followed by S. hominis (21.3%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and S. saprophyticus (12%). Central venous catheters (p ≤ 0.0001), prior antibiotic therapy (p ≤ 0.0001), the occurrence of more than one positive blood culture (p ≤ 0.0001), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p = 0.007) were all independently associated with CoNS bacteremia. Overall, all isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (94.7%), oxacillin (90.7%), and erythromycin (85.3%). The rates of susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and teicoplanin were 98.7%, 98.7%, and 93.3%, respectively. Our results further highlight that accurate identification and susceptibility testing of CoNS isolates from nosocomial BSIs are crucial to minimize excessive antibiotic use and unnecessary catheter removal. In addition, daptomycin may be an efficient alternative therapeutic option for CoNS resistant to oxacillin and other commonly used antibiotics.

  1. Incidence of and risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections in adults in the United States, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Stetzer, Frank; Hewitt, Jeanne Beauchamp

    2009-11-01

    Although many studies have examined nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI), US national estimates of incidence and case-fatality rates have seldom been reported. The purposes of this study were to generate US national estimates of the incidence and severity of nosocomial BSI and to identify risk factors for nosocomial BSI among adults hospitalized in the United States on the basis of a national probability sample. This cross-sectional study used the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the year 2003 to estimate the incidence and case-fatality rate associated with nosocomial BSI in the total US population. Cases of nosocomial BSI were defined by using 1 or more International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes in the secondary field(s) that corresponded to BSIs that occurred at least 48 hours after admission. The comparison group consisted of all patients without BSI codes in their NIS records. Weighted data were used to generate US national estimates of nosocomial BSIs. Logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for nosocomial BSI. The US national estimated incidence of nosocomial BSI was 21.6 cases per 1,000 admissions, while the estimated case-fatality rate was 20.6%. Seven of the 10 leading causes of hospital admissions associated with nosocomial BSI were infection related. We estimate that 541,081 patients would have acquired a nosocomial BSI in 2003, and of these, 111,427 would have died. The final multivariate model consisted of the following risk factors: central venous catheter use (odds ratio [OR], 4.76), other infections (OR, 4.61), receipt of mechanical ventilation (OR, 4.97), trauma (OR, 1.98), hemodialysis (OR, 4.83), and malnutrition (OR, 2.50). The total maximum rescaled R(2) was 0.22. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was useful for estimating national incidence and case-fatality rates, as well as examining independent predictors of nosocomial BSI.

  2. Bloodstream infection following 217 consecutive systemic-enteric drained pancreas transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Walter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combined kidney pancreas transplantation (PTx evolved as excellent treatment for diabetic nephropathy. Infections remain common and serious complications. Methods 217 consecutive enteric drained PTxs performed from 1997 to 2004 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to bloodstream infection. Immunosuppression consisted of antithymocyteglobuline induction, tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids for the majority of cases. Standard perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of pipercillin/tazobactam in combination with ciprofloxacin and fluconazole. Results One year patient, pancreas and kidney graft survival were 96.4%, 88.5% and 94.8%, surgical complication rate was 35%, rejection rate 30% and rate of infection 59%. In total 46 sepsis episodes were diagnosed in 35 patients (16% with a median onset on day 12 (range 1–45 post transplant. Sepsis source was intraabdominal infection (IAI (n = 21, a contaminated central venous line (n = 10, wound infection (n = 5, urinary tract infection (n = 2 and graft transmitted (n = 2. Nine patients (4% experienced multiple episodes of sepsis. Overall 65 pathogens (IAI sepsis 39, line sepsis 15, others 11 were isolated from blood. Gram positive cocci accounted for 50 isolates (77%: Coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 28, i.e. 43% (nine multi-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11, i.e. 17% (four multi-resistant, enterococci (n = 9, i.e. 14% (one E. faecium. Gram negative rods were cultured in twelve cases (18%. Patients with blood borne infection had a two year pancreas graft survival of 76.5% versus 89.4% for those without sepsis (p = 0.036, patient survival was not affected. Conclusion Sepsis remains a serious complication after PTx with significantly reduced pancreas graft, but not patient survival. The most common source is IAI.

  3. The use of central venous lines in the treatment of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczykowska, Ewa; Szwed-Kolińska, Marzena; Wróbel-Bania, Agnieszka; Ślusarz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic diseases in children is a special medical problem. Maintaining constant access to the central vascular system is necessary for long-term hemato-oncological and nephrological therapies as well as parenteral nutrition. Providing such access enables chemotherapic treatment, complete parenteral nutrition, long-term antibiotic therapy, hemodialysis, treatment of intensive care unit patients, monitoring blood pressure in the pulmonary artery and stimulation of heart rate in emergency situations as well as treatment of patients suffering from complications, especially when chances of access into peripheral veins are exhausted. Continuous access to the central vascular system is desirable in the treatment of chronically ill children. Insertion of a central venous catheter line eliminates the unnecessary pain and stress to a child patient accompanying injection into peripheral vessels. In order to gain long-term and secure access to the central venous system, respecting the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention contained in the updated 'Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections' is necessary.

  4. Ten-year surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections: trends of aetiology and antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, R; Ghezzi, Tl; Sandri, Mt; Radice, D; Biffi, R

    2011-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infectious conditions in cancer patients and are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs and significant mortality. Several clinical trials have reported an improved survival in patients treated with appropriate empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Early detection of pathogens and determination of their susceptibility are essential for the optimization of treatment. Variability between hospitals is substantial and requires the individual analysis of local trends. The aim of this study is to assess the local epidemiology of BSI in a single cancer centre over a 10-year period. Retrospective microbiological surveillance of all febrile/infective episodes occurring in oncological and surgical patients in a high-volume cancer centre between January 1999 and December 2008 were considered. Patients' data were collected, processed and analyzed using the epidemiological resource of the Virtuoso Plus software (Metafora Informatica Srl, Milano, Italy). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, including the two-tailed test of significance, was used to investigate trends of incidence and rate of antibiotic resistance over the 10-year period. A total of 13,058 blood cultures (BCs) were performed in 2,976 patients. BCs were positive in 2,447 tests, representing 740 infective/febrile episodes: 358 (48%) in medical oncology and 382 (52%) in surgical wards. Gram-positives were responsible for the majority of episodes in oncological and surgical divisions (about 63% and 55%, respectively). Gram-positives were also the most common organism in non-catheter-related BSIs (CRBSIs) both in medical oncology (75%) and in surgical divisions (50%). Enterococci showed an increased resistance to levofloxacin, from 5.6% to 25.7% (p = 0.02) and to erythromycin, from 41.7% to 61.4%, (p = 0.05). Similarly, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) developed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin

  5. The effect of diluent pH on bloodstream infection rates in patients receiving IV treprostinil for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Jonathan D; Glassner, Cherylanne; Wade, Michael; Coslet, Sandra; Arneson, Carl; Doran, Aimee; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported an increase in catheter-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) and gram-negative BSIs among patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with IV treprostinil. One possible explanation is the neutral pH of the treprostinil diluent compared with the basic pH of epoprostenol. We hypothesized that administering IV treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent will lower the rate of gram-negative BSI. We prospectively enrolled patients treated with IV treprostinil and changed the diluent from native diluent to epoprostenol diluent. We compared the incidence of BSI and gram-negative BSI between those receiving IV treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent (n = 25) and those actively receiving IV epoprostenol (n = 61), as well as with a cohort of patients who received IV treprostinil in native diluent (n = 34). Incidence rates of BSI were expressed as a fraction of 1,000 medicine treatment days. There were similar rates of BSI in those treated with treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent and those treated with epoprostenol (0.32 of 1,000 vs 0.40 of 1,000; P = .79). Also, there were similar rates of gram-negative BSI in these two cohorts (0.08 of 1,000 vs 0.20 of 1,000; P = .46). BSI rates were not statistically different between those treated with treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent and those treated with treprostinil (0.32 of 1,000 vs 0.90 of 1,000; P = .06). However, gram-negative BSIs were significantly lower in patients treated with treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent than in those treated with treprostinil (0.08 of 1,000 vs 0.71 of 1,000, respectively; P = .01). Patients treated with treprostinil with epoprostenol diluent have a lower incidence of gram-negative BSI than do those treated with treprostinil and a similar rate to those treated with epoprostenol. Changing the diluent of treprostinil to epoprostenol diluent, in combination with the use of water-tight seals throughout the delivery system, appears to be an effective safety

  6. Complication Rates Observed in Silicone and Polyurethane Catheters of Totally Implanted Central Venous Access Devices Implanted in the Upper Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Jasmin D; Vens, Maren; Mahler, Catherine; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald

    2017-08-01

    To present frequency and types of complications related to silicone (SI) versus polyurethane (PUR) catheters of totally implanted venous access devices (TIVADs) placed in the upper arm. A cohort of 2,491 consecutive patients with TIVADs implanted between 2006 and 2015 was retrospectively analyzed. Complications were classified according to SIR guidelines. Pearson χ 2 test was used for categorical variables, and Student t test was used for continuous variables. Nominal P values were reported, and 2-sided P values catheter, and 1,732 had a PUR catheter. Total dwell time was 584,853 catheter days. Mean total complication rate was 12.25% (SI, 14.87%; PUR, 11.43%; P = .040). Subanalysis revealed significant differences for material failures (eg, catheter fracture [SI, 3.35%; PUR, 0.06%; P catheter occlusion/venous thromboses [SI, 2.79%/0.74%; PUR, 1.33%/3.17%; P catheter-related sepsis [SI, 4.64%; PUR, 4.68%; P = 1]) or other nonthrombotic dysfunctions (eg, catheter detachment, line migration, wound dehiscence [SI, 3.35%; PUR, 2.19%; P = .179]). The reported data suggest different risk profiles in SI catheters compared with PUR catheters, with more material failures and thrombotic catheter occlusions in SI catheters and more venous thromboses in PUR catheters. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José Manuel; Canhão, Patrícia; Aguiar de Sousa, Diana

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has an incidence of 1.32/100,000/years in high-income countries, and higher in middle- and low-income countries. CVT is more frequent in infants and children young adults and females, especially during pregnancy/puerperium. CVT are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency because of the increased awareness and higher use of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for investigating patients with acute and subacute headaches and new onset seizures. CVT rarely present as a stroke syndrome. Their most frequent presentations are isolated headache, intracranial hypertension syndrome, seizures, a lobar syndrome and encephalopathy. The confirmation of the diagnosis of CVT relies on the demonstration of thrombi in the cerebral veins and/or sinuses by MR/MR venography or veno CT. The more frequent risk factors/associated conditions for CVT are genetic prothrombotic conditions, antiphospholipid syndrome and other acquired prothrombotic diseases, including cancer, oral contraceptives, puerperium and pregnancy, infections and trauma. The prognosis of CVT is in general favorable, as acute death rate is below 5% and only 15% of the patients remain dependent or die. Treatment in the acute phase includes management of the associated condition, anticoagulation with either low molecular weight or unfractionated heparin, treatment of intracranial hypertension, prevention of recurrent seizures and headache relief. In patients in severe condition on admission or who deteriorate despite anticoagulation, local thrombolysis or thrombectomy is an option. Decompressive surgery is lifesaving in patients with large venous infarcts or hemorrhage with impending herniation. After the acute phase, patients should anticoagulated for a variable period of time, depending on their inherent thrombotic risk. CVT patients may experience recurrent seizures. Prophylaxis with anti-epileptic drugs is recommended after the first seizure, in those with hemispheric lesions. There

  8. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasen, M H; Charnsangavej, C

    1998-03-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax (Fig. 1). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations).

  9. Safety and Complications of Double-Lumen Tunnelled Cuffed Central Venous Dialysis Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Rana S.; Kakaria, Anupam K.; Khan, Saif A.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the technical success, safety and immediate and delayed complications of double-lumen tunnelled cuffed central venous catheters (TVCs) at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January 2012 and October 2013. The clinical records and radiological data of all patients who underwent ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided TVC placement at SQUH during the study period were reviewed. Demographic data and information regarding catheter placement, technical success and peri- and post-procedure complications (such as catheter-related infections or thrombosis) were collected. Results: A total of 204 TVCs were placed in 161 patients. Of these, 68 were female (42.2%) and 93 were male (57.8%). The mean age of the patients was 54.4 ± 17.3 years. The most common reason for catheter placement was the initiation of dialysis (63.4%). A total of 203 procedures were technically successful (99.5%). The right internal jugular vein was the most common site of catheter placement (74.9%). Mild haemorrhage which resolved spontaneously occurred in 11 cases (5.4%). No other complications were observed. Subsequent follow-up data was available for 132 catheters (65.0%); of these, thrombosis-related catheter malfunction was observed in 22 cases (16.7%) and catheter-related infection in 29 cases (22.0%). Conclusion: Radiological-guided placement of tunnelled haemodialysis catheters can be performed safely with excellent technical success. The success rate of catheter insertion at SQUH was favourable in comparison with other studies reported in the literature. PMID:26629377

  10. A fresh look at polymicrobial bloodstream infection in cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Royo-Cebrecos

    Full Text Available To assess the current incidence, clinical features, risk factors, aetiology, antimicrobial resistance and outcomes of polymicrobial bloodstream infection (PBSI in patients with cancer.All prospectively collected episodes of PBSI in hospitalised patients were compared with episodes of monomicrobial bloodstream infection (MBSI between 2006 and 2015.We identified 194 (10.2% episodes of PBSI and 1702 MBSI (89.8%. The presence of cholangitis, biliary stenting, neutropenia, corticosteroids, neutropenic enterocolitis and other abdominal infections were identified as risk factors for PBSI. Overall, Gram-negative organisms were the most frequent aetiology, but Enterococcus spp. were especially frequent causes of Gram-positive PBSI (30.8%. Multidrug-resistant (MDR organisms were more commonly found in PBSI than in MBSI (20.6% vs 12.9%; p = 0.003. Compared to patients with MBSI, those with PBSI presented with higher early (15% vs 1.4%; p = 0.04 and overall (32% vs 20.9%; p<0.001 case-fatality rates. Risk factors for overall case-fatality were a high-risk MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer index score, corticosteroid use, persistent bacteraemia and septic shock.PBSI is a frequent complication in patients with cancer and is responsible for high mortality rates. Physicians should identify patients at risk for PBSI and provide empiric antibiotic therapy that covers the most frequent pathogens involved in these infections, including MDR strains.

  11. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Emerging technologies for rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Atul; Morgan, Margie; Haake, David A

    2014-07-15

    Technologies for rapid microbial identification are poised to revolutionize clinical microbiology and enable informed decision making for patients with life-threatening bloodstream infections. Species identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures can be performed in minutes using commercial fluorescence in situ hybridization tests or mass spectroscopy. Microorganisms in positive blood cultures can also be identified within 1-2.5 hours using automated polymerase chain reaction-based systems that can also detect selected antibiotic resistance markers, such as methicillin resistance. When combined with antibiotic stewardship programs, these approaches improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare expenditures. Tests for direct detection in whole blood samples are highly desirable because of their potential to identify bloodstream pathogens without waiting 1-2 days for blood cultures to become positive. However, results for pathogen detection in whole blood do not overlap with those of conventional blood culture techniques and we are still learning how best to use these approaches. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Healthcare associated bloodstream infections in Polish hospitals: prevalence, epidemiology and microbiology-summary data from the ECDC Point Prevalence Survey of Healthcare Associated Infections 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deptuła, Aleksander; Trejnowska, Ewa; Dubiel, Grzegorz; Wanke-Rytt, Monika; Deptuła, Maria; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2017-11-30

    Aggregated data from the Polish Point Prevalence Survey of Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use (PPS HAI&AU) collected between 2012 and 2015 were used to describe the epidemiology of healthcare associated bloodstream infections (BSI) in Polish hospitals, in order to assess the rationale for introducing a BSI surveillance programme in our country and analyse selected risk factors. Data were collected according to the ECDC PPS HAI&AU protocol. Within four years, records for 71,039 patients were collected in 36 (2012), 32 (2013), 112 (2014), and 158 (2015) hospitals; representativeness was evaluated as good in 2012-2013, and excellent from 2014. HAI was found in 4,258 of these patients; laboratory confirmed BSI, including catheter related infections (CRI), and neonatal BSI accounted for 7.7% (329 cases). A representative control group was selected during a random selection process. Out of 329 cases of BSI, 48.9% were associated with vascular access, and 70.8% of them met the criteria of (CRI). The most frequently isolated microorganisms were Staphylococci with 150 isolates (45.6%). Most of them were coagulase-negative (64.4%) that usually caused CRI. Out of 53 S. aureus isolates 24.5% were methicillin-resistant. Enterobacteriaceae were responsible for 31.3% of BSI (n = 103), 50.0% of them were resistant to third generation cephalosporins and 6 (5.8%) to carbapenems. Since little is known about the epidemiology of BSI in Poland, introduction of a countrywide surveillance programme based on incidence is justified, in order to create national prevention initiatives based on local epidemiology, as well as bundle focusing on prevention of CRI.

  14. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Mandatory Public Reporting of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections on Blood Culture and Antibiotic Utilization in Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Kelly B; Ozonoff, Al; Graham, Dionne A; Sandora, Thomas J; Priebe, Gregory P

    2015-08-01

    As mandatory public reporting of healthcare-associated infections increases, there is concern that clinicians could attempt to decrease rates by avoiding the diagnosis of reportable infections. To determine whether blood culture and antibiotic utilization changed after mandatory public reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Interrupted time-series of blood culture and antibiotic rates before and after state-specific implementation of mandatory public reporting. We analyzed data from pediatric and neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) at 17 children's hospitals that contributed to the Pediatric Health Information System administrative database. We used multivariable regression with generalized linear mixed-effects models to determine adjusted rate ratios (ARRs) after implementation of mandatory public reporting. We conducted subgroup analysis on patients with central venous catheters. To assess temporal trends, we separately analyzed data from 4 pediatric hospitals in states without mandatory public reporting. There was no significant effect of mandatory public reporting on rates of blood culture (pediatric ICU ARR, 1.03 [95% CI, 0.82-1.28]; neonatal ICU ARR, 1.06 [0.85-1.33]) or antibiotic utilization (pediatric ICU ARR, 0.86 [0.72-1.04]; neonatal ICU ARR, 1.09 [0.87-1.35]). Results were similar in the subgroup of patients with central venous catheter codes. Hospitals with and without mandatory public reporting experienced small decreases in blood culture and antibiotic use across the study period. Mandatory public reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infection did not impact blood culture and antibiotic utilization, suggesting that clinicians have not shifted their practice in an attempt to detect fewer infections.

  16. Central Venous Catheter (Central Line)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... venous catheter (KATHeter), also known as a central line or CVC, is long, soft, thin, hollow tube ... into a large vein (blood vessel). A central line is much like an intravenous (IV) catheter that ...

  17. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    circulation, causing either partial or complete obstruction of pulmonary blood flow (in 4–13% of ... Keywords:anticoagulants, deep vein thrombosis, DVT, embolus, NOAC, PE, pulmonary embolism, thromboprophylaxis, thrombus, venous thromboembolism ... Cigarette smoking, including passive smoking. Hypercoagulability ...

  18. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fiebig, Andreas; Krusche, Petra; De Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all ove...

  19. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Haley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE, and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow’s triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the

  20. [MRSA bloodstream infections in hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, 2010 : Results of the mandatory notification and suggestions for improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, U; Otto, U; Gottschalk, R

    2011-09-01

    Since 1 July 2009 in accordance with the statuary order based on the German law for infectious diseases (Infektionsschutzgesetz), MRSA in blood and liquor must be notified to the public health authorities. The aim of extension of the notification to report is to improve the surveillance of nosocomial infections and the prevention of nosocomial MRSA infections. In addition to MRSA detection, data on symptoms and risk factors, e.g., medical devices, must also be reported. In this report, data of bloodstream MRSA infections in hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, for the first complete year (2010)were evaluated. In 2010, 58 MRSA-positive bloodstream infections were reported by the 17 hospitals in Frankfurt to the health protection authorities, i.e., 0.0360 MRSA/1,000 patient-days (range: 0- 0.109/1,000 patient-days). However, 10 of these infections initially had not been reported to the public health department in charge for the hospitals, but to the health departments according to the patient's addresses. Although most of the infections were reported from large hospitals (>100,000 patient-days/year), the highest incidences (0.0416/1,000 patient-days) were reported from small hospitals (bloodstream suffered from fever, 80% had sepsis and 34.5% suffered from pneumonia. Medical devices, such as central venous catheters and PEG, were reported from 60% of the patients. In the MRE network Rhine-Main region, the public health authorities asked for some more detailed information, such as risk factors for MRSA colonization (history for MRSA, recent hospital stay or antibiotic therapy, skin disorders, dialysis, residence in a retirements home), and for screening results as well as for the MRSA management, i.e., isolation of the patient and, if necessary, the contact patient. In 55% of the cases, the patients were identified by the clinics themselves as being patients with MRSA risk factors, mainly because of a history of MRSA (29%), recent hospital stay (71%), and

  1. POLYCLONAL OUTBREAK OF BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS CAUSED BY Burkholderia cepacia COMPLEX IN HEMATOLOGY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT OUTPATIENT UNITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boszczowski, Icaro; do Prado, Gladys Villas Boas; Dalben, Mirian F.; Telles, Roberto C. P.; Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Guimarães, Thaís; Oliveira, Maura S.; Rosa, Juliana F.; Soares, Robson E.; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Costa, Silvia F.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The objective was to describe an outbreak of bloodstream infections by Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) in bone marrow transplant and hematology outpatients. Methods: On February 15, 2008 a Bcc outbreak was suspected. 24 cases were identified. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated. Environment and healthcare workers' (HCW) hands were cultured. Species were determined and typed. Reinforcement of hand hygiene, central venous catheter (CVC) care, infusion therapy, and maintenance of laminar flow cabinet were undertaken. 16 different HCWs had cared for the CVCs. Multi-dose heparin and saline were prepared on counter common to both units. Findings: 14 patients had B. multivorans (one patient had also B. cenopacia), six non-multivorans Bcc and one did not belong to Bcc. Clone A B. multivorans occurred in 12 patients (from Hematology); in 10 their CVC had been used on February 11/12. Environmental and HCW cultures were negative. All patients were treated with meropenem, and ceftazidime lock-therapy. Eight patients (30%) were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. After control measures (multidose vial for single patient; CVC lock with ceftazidime; cleaning of laminar flow cabinet; hand hygiene improvement; use of cabinet to store prepared medication), no new cases occurred. Conclusions: This polyclonal outbreak may be explained by a common source containing multiple species of Bcc, maybe the laminar flow cabinet common to both units. There may have been contamination by B. multivorans (clone A) of multi-dose vials. PMID:24553612

  2. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI. Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85% have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD. Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD- BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined.

  3. Etiology, clinical features and outcomes of pre-engraftment and post-engraftment bloodstream infection in hematopoietic SCT recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, C; Garcia-Vidal, C; Arnan, M; Sánchez-Ortega, I; Patiño, B; Duarte, R; Carratalà, J

    2014-06-01

    We conducted an observational study to assess the etiology, clinical features and outcomes of bloodstream infection (BSI) in 172 hematopoietic SCT (HCST) recipients. One hundred episodes of BSI in the pre-engraftment period (early onset) were compared with 89 episodes in the post-engraftment phase (late onset). More patients with late-onset BSI received an allogeneic HSCT, had GVHD and had received corticosteroids, whereas patients with early-onset BSI were more likely to have neutropenia, severe mucositis and a central venous catheter (CVC) in place. CVC was the most frequent site of infection, followed by an endogenous source. Pneumonia and gastrointestinal infection were particularly frequent in late-onset BSI, whereas mucositis was more frequent in the early-onset group. Gram-positive organisms predominated over Gram negatives. Streptococcus pneumoniae was more frequent in patients with late-onset BSI. Patients with late-onset BSI presented worse outcomes regarding septic shock, intensive care unit admission and early and overall case-fatality rates. Early-onset BSI was mainly related to the presence of neutropenia, mucositis and CVC, whereas late-onset BSI mainly affected severely immunosuppressed allogeneic HSCT recipients with GVHD and corticosteroids. Late-onset BSI caused high case-fatality rates. BSI due to S. pneumoniae was especially frequent late after transplantation. The development of better vaccination strategies is needed.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance predicts death in Tanzanian children with bloodstream infections: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msangi Viola

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infection is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity and death in children. The impact of antimicrobial resistance and HIV infection on outcome is not firmly established. Methods We assessed the incidence of bloodstream infection and risk factors for fatal outcome in a prospective cohort study of 1828 consecutive admissions of children aged zero to seven years with signs of systemic infection. Blood was obtained for culture, malaria microscopy, HIV antibody test and, when necessary, HIV PCR. We recorded data on clinical features, underlying diseases, antimicrobial drug use and patients' outcome. Results The incidence of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection was 13.9% (255/1828 of admissions, despite two thirds of the study population having received antimicrobial therapy prior to blood culture. The most frequent isolates were klebsiella, salmonellae, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, 21.6% had malaria and 16.8% HIV infection. One third (34.9% of the children with laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection died. The mortality rate from Gram-negative bloodstream infection (43.5% was more than double that of malaria (20.2% and Gram-positive bloodstream infection (16.7%. Significant risk factors for death by logistic regression modeling were inappropriate treatment due to antimicrobial resistance, HIV infection, other underlying infectious diseases, malnutrition and bloodstream infection caused by Enterobacteriaceae, other Gram-negatives and candida. Conclusion Bloodstream infection was less common than malaria, but caused more deaths. The frequent use of antimicrobials prior to blood culture may have hampered the detection of organisms susceptible to commonly used antimicrobials, including pneumococci, and thus the study probably underestimates the incidence of bloodstream infection. The finding that antimicrobial resistance, HIV-infection and malnutrition predict fatal

  5. [Duplexsonography investigation in patients with venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneret-Gris, Christina

    2011-03-01

    Venous hypertension due to venous insufficiency causes venous ulcers. Duplexsonography is a widely accepted non invasive method to assess venous insufficiency with venous reflux measurements. Retrograde venous flow is defined as venous reflux. The testing of venous reflux is reliable if transvalvular pressure is sufficiently high and transvalvular flow velocity exceeds 30 cm/s. Reflux testing in the proximal leg veins (V. femoralis communis, V. femoralis, V. saphena magna) is done using a standardised Valsalva Manoeuvre (exspiration into a tube up to a pressure of 30 mmHg, pressure established within 0.5 seconds, pressure hold for 3 seconds). Distal leg vein testing (V. poplitea, V. tibialis posterior, V. saphena parva) is recommended with a two handed - compression distally to the tested veins. The most important parameter is venous reflux time, a cut off of > 2 seconds is recommended.

  6. Developmental venous anomaly (DVA); Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Ahlhelm, F.; Viera, J.; Reith, W.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Hagen, T. [Radiologische Praxis, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term ''venous angioma'' is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques. (orig.) [German] Als eine embryologische Variante der venoesen Drainage macht die so genannte ''developmental venous anomaly'' (DVA) etwa 60% aller zerebralen vaskulaeren Malformationen aus. Der vormalige Terminus ''venoeses Angiom'' sollte nicht mehr benutzt werden, da er abnormale Gefaessstrukturen mit einem erhoehten Blutungsrisiko impliziert. Die DVA werden oft inzidentell entdeckt und sind nur selten symptomatisch. Das typische Erscheinungsbild ist durch dilatierte, medusenhauptartig angeordnete venoese Marklagergefaesse gekennzeichnet, die in eine groessere Sammelvene drainieren. Der Abfluss erfolgt ueber das oberflaechliche oder tiefe Venensystem. Klinisch wichtig ist die haeufige Assoziation mit anderen zerebralen Gefaessmalformationen, insbesondere kavernoesen Angiomen, nach denen im Rahmen der Diagnostik explizit gesucht werden muss, da diese eine potenzielle Blutungsquelle darstellen und ein therapeutisches Vorgehen erfordern koennen. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuypere, Saskia; Meehan, Conor J; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3-V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination.

  8. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Decuypere

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI.The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3-V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046. Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030.Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination.

  9. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Contemporary diagnosis of venous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee BB

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BB Lee,1 I Baumgartner21Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 2Swiss Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Bern, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Venous malformation is a congenital vascular malformation resulting from defective development during various stages of embryogenesis and selectively affecting the venous system. Depending on the embryologic stage when the developmental arrest occurred, the clinical presentation of venous malformation is extremely variable in location, extent, severity, natural progression, and hemodynamic impact. Extratruncular lesions occur in the earlier stages of embryonic life, and retain characteristics unique to mesenchymal cells (angioblasts, growing and proliferating when stimulated internally (eg, by menarche, pregnancy, and hormones or externally (eg, by trauma or surgery. These lesions also have a significant hemodynamic impact on the venous system involved, in addition to the risk of localized intravascular coagulopathy. However, truncal lesions, as defective developments along the late stage, no longer carry the risk of proliferation and recurrence due to lack of mesenchymal characteristics. Although, they often have serious hemodynamic consequences due to direct involvement of the main vein trunk. Therefore, a thorough clinical history and careful physical examination should be followed by an appropriate combination of noninvasive and less invasive tests (eg, Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography to confirm the clinical impression as well as to define the extent and severity of the venous malformation. Invasive tests, eg, phlebography or angiography, are seldom needed for the diagnosis per se. Additional evaluation for coagulation abnormalities, eg, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels, is generally recommended, especially for the treatment of surgery and endovascular candidates with extensive lesions to assess the localized intravascular

  11. Chlorhexidine and gauze and tape dressings for central venous catheters: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivane Pedrolo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the effectiveness of the chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing in comparison to the gauze and tape dressing in the use of central venous catheters.METHOD: a randomized clinical trial was conducted in the intensive care and adult semi intensive care units of a university hospital in the south of Brazil. The subjects were patients using short-term central venous catheters, randomly assigned to the intervention (chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing or control (gauze and micro porous tape groups.RESULTS: a total of 85 patients were included: 43 in the intervention group and 42 in the control group. No statistically significant differences were found between dressings in regard to the occurrence of: primary bloodstream infections (p-value = 0.5170; local reactions to the dressing (p-value = 0.3774; and dressing fixation (p-value = 0.2739.CONCLUSION: both technologies are effective in covering central venous catheters in regard to the investigated variables and can be used for this purpose. Registry ECR: RBR-7b5ycz.

  12. Diferença de tempo de positividade: método útil no diagnóstico de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada com cateter? Differential time to positivity: a useful tool for the diagnosis of catheter-related infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline de Lemes Giuntini Corrêa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As infecções de corrente sanguínea relacionadas com cateter (ICSRCs apresentam impacto significativo na morbidade e na mortalidade de pacientes internados, além de elevar custos hospitalares. A utilização de equipamentos automatizados no processamento de hemoculturas gerou uma alternativa para diagnóstico de ICSRC por meio da análise da diferença de tempo de positividade (DTP entre hemoculturas pareadas (coletadas simultaneamente de sangue periférico e sangue de cateter. Um diagnóstico acurado e rápido dessas infecções pode otimizar as condutas clínicas e terapêuticas, poupando a retirada precoce dos cateteres. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar na rotina a DTP como ferramenta auxiliar no diagnóstico de ICSRC e determinar os principais microrganismos isolados. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas retrospectivamente hemoculturas coletadas no complexo do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC/FMUSP de maio a agosto de 2008. Somente amostras que apresentaram DTP maior que 120 minutos foram consideradas possíveis ICSRCs pelo critério laboratorial. RESULTADOS: A seção processou 11.017 hemoculturas aeróbias durante o período de estudo; somente 5% foram coletadas de forma pareada. Destas, 148 (28% foram positivas, sendo 9% com crescimento somente em sangue periférico, 41% somente em sangue de cateter e 50% em ambas as amostras com 88% de homologia de microrganismos identificados. A DTP apresentou valores acima de 120 minutos em 50% dos casos e os microrganismos mais isolados foram Staphylococcus aureus (22%, Candida spp. (18%, Klebsiella spp. (7% e Enterobacter spp. (7%. CONCLUSÃO: A determinação da DTP como ferramenta auxiliar no diagnóstico de ICSRC é viável e fácil de ser executada em laboratórios de rotina com automação, porém o processo de coleta das amostras pareadas deve ser rigidamente padronizado.INTRODUCTION: Not only do catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs have

  13. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  14. Secular Trends in Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections : Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Increase the Total Burden of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Harbarth, S.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Crook, D. W.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Hanberger, H.; Herwaldt, L. A.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Kola, A.; Kuchenbecker, R. S.; Lingaas, E.; Meessen, N.; Morris-Downes, M. M.; Pottinger, J. M.; Rohner, P.; dos Santos, R. P.; Seifert, H.; Wisplinghoff, H.; Ziesing, S.; Walker, A. S.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. Methods. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence

  15. Impact estimates of nosocomial bloodstream infection: looking from a different angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaers, Dirk; Lambert, Marie-Laurence; Blot, Stijn

    2011-01-01

    Mortality associated with nosocomial bloodstream infection is multifactorial. Source of infection, etiology, age, underlying disease, acute illness, and appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy all contribute to the final outcome. As such, estimates of mortality attributable to bloodstream infection may differ largely according to the presence or absence of risk factors in distinct patient populations. The adverse effect of nosocomial bloodstream infection for the individual patient is substantial, with about a doubling of the risk of death. Yet, in settings with a high standard of care in terms of infection prevention and control, the occurrence rate of bloodstream infection is relatively low and therefore its impact on overall ICU mortality rather limited. As a consequence, untargeted interventional studies focused on infection prevention should use occurrence rate of infection rather than mortality as outcome variable.

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  17. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francimar Tinoco de; Ferreira, Maria Manuela Frederico; Araújo, Silvia Teresa Carvalho de; Bessa, Amanda Trindade Teixeira de; Moraes, Advi Catarina Barbachan; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição

    2017-04-03

    To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69) were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56) of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care. Descrever a aplicação do Positive Deviance como estratégia na prevenção e no controle da infecção de corrente sanguínea. Estudo de intervenção realizado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital universitário, com os membros das equipes de enfermagem e médica, de junho a dezembro de 2014. Foram aplicados os quatro passos da metodologia Positive Deviance: Definir, Determinar, Descobrir e Desenhar. Em 90 dias 188 ações foram observadas, destas, 36,70% (n=69) estavam relacionadas aos curativos dos cateteres. Em 81,15% (n=56) desses curativos, o uso da haste flexível estéril para realização da antissepsia do local de inserção do cateter e de sua placa de fixação foi a ação de maior adesão. O Positive Deviance auxiliou na implementação de propostas de melhorias de processo de trabalho e no desenvolvimento da equipe para os problemas identificados no cuidado com o cateter venoso central.

  18. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tanıl Kendirli; Ayhan Yaman; Çağlar Ödek; Halil Özdemir; Adem Karbuz; Bilge Aldemir; Haluk Güriz; Can Ateş; Gamze Özsoy; Derya Aysev; Ergin Çiftçi; Erdal İnce

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of central line-associated bloodstream infections, risk factors, their relationship with catheter insertion location, and the effect of central line-associated bloodstream infections on mortality and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) length of stay. Methods: This was a prospective, observational and cohort study, carried out between November 2009 and February 2011. During this period, all the patients who had central-lin...

  20. Procalcitonin Levels in Gram-Positive, Gram-Negative, and Fungal Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Leli; Marta Ferranti; Amedeo Moretti; Zainab Salim Al Dhahab; Elio Cenci; Antonella Mencacci

    2015-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8?ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 3.4?44.1) bacteremias was significantly hi...

  1. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  2. Traditional Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Versus Transhepatic Venous Catheters in Infants and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amanda Marie; Danford, David A; Curzon, Christopher L; Anderson, Venus; Delaney, Jeffrey W

    2017-10-01

    Children with congenital heart disease may require long-term central venous access for intensive care management; however, central venous access must also be preserved for future surgical and catheterization procedures. Transhepatic venous catheters may be an useful alternative. The objective of this study was to compare transhepatic venous catheters with traditional central venous catheters regarding complication rate and duration of catheter service. Retrospective review of 12 congenital heart disease patients from September 2013 to July 2015 who underwent placement of one or more transhepatic venous catheters. Single freestanding pediatric hospital located in the central United States. Pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent placement of transhepatic venous catheter. Cohort's central venous catheter complication rates and duration of catheter service were compared with transhepatic venous catheter data. Twelve patients had a total of 19 transhepatic venous lines. Transhepatic venous lines had a significantly longer duration of service than central venous lines (p = 0.001). No difference between the two groups was found in the number of documented thrombi, thrombolytic burden, or catheter sites requiring wound care consultation. A higher frequency of infection in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was found, isolated to four transhepatic venous lines that had a total of nine infections. All but one was successfully managed without catheter removal. The difference in the proportion of infections to catheters in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was significant (p = 0.0001), but no difference in the rate of infection-related catheter removal was found. Without compromising future central venous access sites, transhepatic venous lines had superior duration of service without increased thrombosis, thrombolytic use, or insertion site complications relative to central venous lines. Transhepatic venous

  3. Venous leg ulcer in the context of chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Sánchez, F S; Marinel lo Roura, J; Carrasco Carrasco, E; González-Porras, J R; Escudero Rodríguez, J R; Sánchez Nevarez, I; Díaz Sánchez, S

    2014-05-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a frequent disorder with a high socioeconomic impact. Little is known about the possible differences between healed ulcer (C5 group) and active ulcer (C6 group) in terms of disease severity and quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to determine the possible differences in severity disease and QoL between the C5-C6 and C1 (control) group. Data from a national, multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study (n = 1598) were used to compare three groups of CVD: C1 (n = 243), C5 (n = 136) and C6 (n = 70). CVD severity was assessed with the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and QoL with the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) and Chronic Lower Limb Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20). Patients with active ulcers had a higher mean total VCSS than patients with healed ulcers (P ulcers than in those with C1 (P ulcers (C6) had lower QoL scores, but the differences were not statistically significant. Patients with venous leg ulcers (C5-C6) are associated with high severity and poor QoL. However, the healing of a leg ulcer did not contribute to improvement of QoL.

  4. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p<0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p<0.05). There are subsets of patients ith high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC.

  5. Hydrophilic surface coatings with embedded biocidal silver nanoparticles and sodium heparin for central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kris N J; Croes, Sander; Boersma, Rinske S; Stobberingh, Ellen E; van der Marel, Cees; van der Veen, Frederik H; Knetsch, Menno L W; Koole, Leo H

    2011-02-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) have become indispensable in the treatment of neonates and patients undergoing chemotherapy or hemodialysis. A CVC provides easy access to the patient's circulation, thus enabling facile monitoring of hemodynamic parameters, nutritional support, or administration of (cytostatic) medication. However, complications with CVCs, such as bacterial bloodstream infection or thromboembolism, are common. Bloodstream infections, predominantly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, are notoriously difficult to prevent and treat. Furthermore, patients receiving infusion therapy through a CVC are at risk for deep-vein thrombosis, especially of the upper limbs. Several recent clinical trials have shown that prophylactic anticoagulation (low-molecular-weight heparin or vitamin K antagonists) is not effective. Here, we report on the systematic development of a new bifunctional coating concept that can -uniquely- be applied to make CVC surfaces antimicrobial and antithrombogenic at the same time. The novel coating consists of a moderately hydrophilic synthetic copolymer of N-vinylpyrrollidinone (NVP) and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), containing embedded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and sodium heparin. The work demonstrates that the AgNPs strongly inhibit adhesion of S. aureus (reference strain and clinical isolates). Surprisingly, heparin not only rendered our surfaces practically non-thrombogenic, but also contributed synergistically to their biocidal activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiby Niels

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catheters are the most common cause of nosocomial infections and are associated with increased risk of mortality, length of hospital stay and cost. Prevention of infections and fast and correct diagnosis is highly important. Methods In this study traditional semiquantitative culture-dependent methods for diagnosis of bacteria involved in central venous catheter-related infections as described by Maki were compared with the following culture-independent molecular biological methods: Clone libraries, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis, phylogeny and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results In accordance with previous studies, the cultivation of central venous catheters from 18 patients revealed that S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci were most abundant and that a few other microorganisms such as P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae occasionally were found on the catheters. The molecular analysis using clone libraries and sequencing, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing provided several important results. The species found by cultivation were confirmed by molecular methods. However, many other bacteria belonging to the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also found, stressing that only a minor portion of the species present were found by cultivation. Some of these bacteria are known to be pathogens, some have not before been described in relation to human health, and some were not closely related to known pathogens and may represent new pathogenic species. Furthermore, there was a clear difference between the bacterial species found in biofilm on the external (exluminal and internal (luminal side of the central venous catheter, which can not be detected by Maki's method. Polymicrobial biofilms were observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. Conclusion The results show that diagnosis

  7. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  8. Lower-limb venous thrombosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    307. Lower-limb venous thrombosis. July 2009 Vol.27 No.7 CME. Most DVTs arise in calf muscle veins, particularly within the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (calf vein DVT). Many of these remain localised to the muscle and will not cause any clinical problem. If, however, the circumstances that initially caused the.

  9. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, K.B.; Lyytikäinen, O.; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  10. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  11. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  12. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, Eric M., E-mail: walser.eric@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  13. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease in the ge......BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease...... in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...... was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs

  14. Radiologically-placed venous ports in children under venous anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joo Yeon; Jeon, Ung Bae; Choo, Ki Seok; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ool; Lim, Young Tak [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiologic venous port placement in children under venous anesthesia. Between April 2009 and July 2011, 44 ports were implanted in 41 children (24 boys, 17 girls). The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 19 years (mean, 6.5 years) and their body weights ranged from 6.8 kg to 56.3 kg (mean, 23.2 kg). Right internal jugular vein access was used in 42 ports, right subclavian vein in 1, and left subclavian in 1. Durability and complications of port implantation were reviewed. The technical success rate was 100%. The catheter life was 10-661 days (mean 246 days). Two patients died during the follow-up period, 21 and 6 ports were removed at the end of treatment or as a result of complications, respectively. One port was removed and replaced by a Hickmann catheter. Three ports were explanted due to port-related sepsis, one due to a catheter kink, and two for unexplained fever or insertion site pain. The overall port-related infection was 3 cases (6.8%, 0.28/1000 catheter days). Venous port placement by interventional radiologists in children under intravenous sedation is relatively safe, with a high rate of technical success and low rate of complications.

  15. Iliac venous pressure estimates central venous pressure after laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Brian A; Kirk, Katherine A; Tucker, Nikia; Gunn, Scott; Forsythe, Raquel

    2014-09-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) is traditionally obtained through subclavian or internal jugular central catheters; however, many patients who could benefit from CVP monitoring have only femoral lines. The accuracy of illiac venous pressure (IVP) as a measure of CVP is unknown, particularly following laparotomy. This was a prospective, observational study. Patients who had both internal jugular or subclavian lines and femoral lines already in place were eligible for the study. Pressure measurements were taken from both lines in addition to measurement of bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, and peak airway pressure. Data were evaluated using paired t-test, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression. Measurements were obtained from 40 patients, 26 of which had laparotomy. The mean difference between measurements was 2.2 mm Hg. There were no significant differences between patients who had laparotomy and nonsurgical patients (P = 0.93). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of 1.63 ± 2.44 mm Hg. There was no correlation between IVP accuracy and bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, or peak airway pressure. IVP is an adequate measure of CVP, even in surgical patients who have had recent laparotomy. Measurement of IVP to guide resuscitation is encouraged in patients who have only femoral venous catheter access. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Infektioner relateret til centralt venekateter hos børn med maligne lidelser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are an essential part of the treatment of children with haematological and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, CVC also represent a major risk factor of bloodstream infections. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in children are often diagnosed based...... on blood cultures from the CVC only. Most CRBSI can be treated without catheter removal. On suspicion of CRBSI empirical antibiotic treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem or ampicillin in combination with gentamicin is recommended. The systemic treatment can be combined with catheter...

  17. Addition of lipids to parenteral nutrition does not cause fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Meguid, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) that includes lipid emulsion is considered to increase both bacterial and fungal central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections. This concept is based on several erroneous metrics: Reports in age-old literature at a time when preparing PN admixtures lacked stringent quality control, when its infusion, the techniques of insertion, maintenance of vascular access devices, and delivery systems were not well identified or enforced. Additionally, concepts of glucohomeostasis were different and higher glucose levels were accepted. We provide updated information with supporting literature to show that associating PN with lipids with an increase in bloodstream infections is not justified. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Administration of chemotherapy by an arteriovenous fistula in a patient with metastatic rectal cancer after life-threatening, port thrombosis-associated cava superior syndrome. An option for patients without possibility of peripheral or central venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alexander; Hiemer, Sonja; Jordan, Karin; Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Patients with solid tumors have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, potentially related to a venous port system. In case of catheter-related thrombosis despite full anticoagulation, further treatment administration is difficult. A 41-year-old female patient with a K-Ras wild-type adenocarcinoma of the rectum was diagnosed with systemic disease in June 2008 after several local recurrences treated with surgery and additive chemotherapy. To administer chemotherapy with FOLFIRI (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan) and bevacizumab, a venous port system into the vena subclavia was implanted. In April 2009, the computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a portassociated thrombosis with cava superior syndrome, despite treatment with phenprocoumon and an international normalized ratio (INR) of 3.75 at the time of the event. The port system was explanted. According to the possible relationship to bevacizumab, treatment was discontinued, followed by rapid disease progression. Access to peripheral veins became virtually impossible. Therefore, a radiocephalic fistula was established. For 9 months, the patient has been receiving several therapeutic agents with 20 punctures of the fistula, revealing no locoregional events (e.g. arterial, venous or cutaneous). The application of current therapeutic agents by an arteriovenous fistula seems to be a feasible option for patients with restricted peripheral or central vein status and/or medical history of thrombotic events disabling the use of a port system. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Surgical treatment of chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Antonio; Slagsvold, Carl-Erik; Jørgensen, Jørgen J; Sandbaek, Gunnar

    2009-11-19

    Patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) may develop serious symptoms such as pain, oedema, venous claudication and leg ulcers. Conventional therapy includes compression therapy, elevation of the extremities, and in some cases surgical elimination of superficial varicose veins. This article presents and discusses surgical treatment (reconstructive deep venous surgery and transplantation) and endovascular therapy (percutaneous recanalization of post-thrombotic deep venous occlusions). The article is based on literature identified through non-systematic searches in the PubMed and Cochrane databases. After reconstructive deep venous surgery, ulcer healing is reported in 60-78 % of cases and clinical improvement in 90 %. After such surgery, the median ulcer-free period seems to be longer in primary (congenital, familial), 54 months, than in secondary (after deep vein thrombosis) chronic venous insufficiency (18 months). Recanalization of deep venous occlusions is successful in 90 % of patients who have undergone endovascular treatment of venous claudication and leg ulcer. Reconstructive deep venous surgery constitutes a real treatment choice for patients with chronic venous insufficiency for whom conventional measures have failed. The benefits are ulcer-free periods, clinical improvement, return to work and improved quality of life.

  20. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections in a tertiary hospital in Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Freitas Tenório

    Full Text Available We observed the clinical and microbiological characteristics of several stages of bloodstream infections (BSI, as well as the mortality attributed to it in a tertiary hospital in the northeast of Brazil (in the city of Maceió, Alagoas. A prospective cohort of 143 patients who had at least one positive blood culture was enrolled in the study. Their clinical evolution was followed up for 30 days from October 2005 to December 2006. The relation among the qualitative variables was verified through Chi-square test. The significance level was 5%. The statistical package adopted was SPSS 15.0 for Windows. Up to the thirtieth day, 30.1% of the patients presented bacteremia and 69.9% developed sepsis.Among these, 20.3% developed severe sepsis and 10.5% septic shock. The mortality attributed to it was 37.8%. In bacteremia, sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock conditions, mortality rates were 9.3%, 50%, 65.5%, and 84.6%, respectively. Respiratory (32.2% and urinary (14% sources and the ones related to central venous catheter (14% were prevalent. In the wards 55.12% of the cases developed sepsis, whereas in the intensive care units, the rate was 87.69% (p < 0.05. Chronic renal failure, diabetes melitus, and neuropathy were present in 21.7%, 26.6%, and 29.4% of the cases, respectively. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (25.9%, Staphylococcus aureus (21%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14% were the most present microorganism in the sample. The high morbidity and mortality rates in this study are attributed to the lack of knowledge on BSI characteristics and on instituted protocols for detection and treatment in early stages.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: risk factors and clinical outcome in non-intensive-care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karinne Spirandelli Carvalho Naves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is spread out in hospitals across different regions of the world and is regarded as the major agent of nosocomial infections, causing infections such as skin and soft tissue pneumonia and sepsis. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for methicillin-resistance in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI and the predictive factors for death. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of fifty-one patients presenting bacteraemia due to S. aureus between September 2006 and September 2008 was analysed. Staphylococcu aureus samples were obtained from blood cultures performed by clinical hospital microbiology laboratory from the Uberlândia Federal University. Methicillinresistance was determined by growth on oxacillin screen agar and antimicrobial susceptibility by means of the disk diffusion method. RESULTS: We found similar numbers of MRSA (56.8% and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (43.2% infections, and the overall hospital mortality ratio was 47%, predominantly in MRSA group (70.8% vs. 29.2% (p=0.05. Age (p=0.02 was significantly higher in MRSA patients as also was the use of central venous catheter (p=0.02. The use of two or more antimicrobial agents (p=0.03 and the length of hospital stay prior to bacteraemia superior to seven days (p=0.006 were associated with mortality. High odds ratio value was observed in cardiopathy as comorbidity. CONCLUSIONS: Despite several risk factors associated with MRSA and MSSA infection, the use of two or more antimicrobial agents was the unique independent variable associated with mortality.

  2. Bloodstream infection in patients with end-stage renal disease in a teaching hospital in central-western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Trelha Gauna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis is considered a critical determinant of bloodstream infection (BSI and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of BSI in patients with end-stage renal disease using central venous catheters for hemodialysis. Methods A cohort study was conducted in a public teaching hospital in central-western Brazil from April 2010 to December 2011. For every patient, we noted the presence of hyperemia/exudation upon catheter insertion, as well as fever, shivering, and chills during hemodialysis. Results Fifty-nine patients were evaluated. Thirty-five (59.3% patients started dialysis due to urgency, 37 (62.7% had BSI, and 12 (20% died. Hyperemia at the catheter insertion site (64.9% was a significant clinical manifestation in patients with BSI. Statistical analysis revealed 1.7 times more cases of BSI in patients with hypoalbuminemia compared with patients with normal albumin levels. The principal infective agents identified in blood cultures and catheter-tip cultures were Staphylococcus species (24 cases, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (7 cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and 5 cases of Chryseobacterium indologenes, and Candida species (6. Among the Staphylococci identified, 77.7% were methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococci. Of the bacteria isolated, the most resistant were Chryseobacterium indologenes and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions Blood culture was demonstrated to be an important diagnostic test and identified over 50% of positive BSI cases. The high frequency of BSI and the isolation of multiresistant bacteria were disturbing findings. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated microorganism, although Gram-negative bacteria predominated overall. These results highlight the importance of infection prevention and control measures in dialysis units.

  3. Surveillance Provinciale des Infections Nosocomiales (SPIN) Program: implementation of a mandatory surveillance program for central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Patricia S; Platt, Robert W; Rocher, Isabelle; Frenette, Charles; Moore, Dorothy; Fortin, Élise; Buckeridge, David; Pai, Madhukar; Quach, Caroline

    2011-05-01

    In 2003, the Surveillance Provinciale des Infections Nosocomiales (SPIN) program was launched to gather data on incidence rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Province of Quebec. To improve the generalizability of SPIN benchmarks, in 2007 participation in SPIN became mandatory for all ICUs with ≥10 beds. To describe the implementation process, surveillance methods, and overall results of the SPIN program between 2003 and 2009. SPIN surveillance methods are based on the National Healthcare Safety Network. Participation is open to all Quebec ICUs and as of January 2007 is mandatory for all units with ≥10 beds. Data include CLABSI incidence rates for 2003-2009 and the epidemiology of CLABSI cases. Mandatory participation in the SPIN program increased the number of ICUs by 100% (from 30 to 60 units). For 2003-2009, the overall CLABSI incidence rates were 1.67 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for adult ICUs, 2.24 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for pediatric ICUs, and 4.40 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for neonatal ICUs. The patients with CLABSI were predominately female (60%), mean patient age was 44 ± 32 years, and 64% of the patients had a regular central venous line in place. The implementation of mandatory participation was essential to increase the generalizability of SPIN CLABSI incidence rates, which also improved the quality of these data for use as provincial benchmarks. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: risk factors and clinical outcome in non-intensive-care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Karinne Spirandelli Carvalho; Vaz da Trindade, Natália; Gontijo Filho, Paulo Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is spread out in hospitals across different regions of the world and is regarded as the major agent of nosocomial infections, causing infections such as skin and soft tissue pneumonia and sepsis. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for methicillin-resistance in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) and the predictive factors for death. A retrospective cohort of fifty-one patients presenting bacteraemia due to S. aureus between September 2006 and September 2008 was analysed. Staphylococcu aureus samples were obtained from blood cultures performed by clinical hospital microbiology laboratory from the Uberlândia Federal University. Methicillinresistance was determined by growth on oxacillin screen agar and antimicrobial susceptibility by means of the disk diffusion method. We found similar numbers of MRSA (56.8%) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (43.2%) infections, and the overall hospital mortality ratio was 47%, predominantly in MRSA group (70.8% vs. 29.2%) (p=0.05). Age (p=0.02) was significantly higher in MRSA patients as also was the use of central venous catheter (p=0.02). The use of two or more antimicrobial agents (p=0.03) and the length of hospital stay prior to bacteraemia superior to seven days (p=0.006) were associated with mortality. High odds ratio value was observed in cardiopathy as comorbidity. Despite several risk factors associated with MRSA and MSSA infection, the use of two or more antimicrobial agents was the unique independent variable associated with mortality.

  5. Risk factors for nosocomial primary bloodstream infection in pediatric intensive care unit patients: a 2-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elward, Alexis M; Fraser, Victoria J

    2006-06-01

    The primary objective was to determine the rate of and risk factors for nosocomial primary bloodstream infection (BSI) in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients in order to determine the validity of our previously published findings. The secondary objective was to analyze whether risk factors for primary BSI differed by organism type, particularly whether device use was more strongly associated with BSI due to gram-positive organisms. Prospective cohort study. St. Louis Children's Hospital, a 235-bed academic tertiary care center with a 28-bed combined medical and surgical PICU. PICU patients admitted between September 1, 1999, and September 1, 2001. Nosocomial primary BSIs. Of 2,310 patients, 55% were male, and 73% were white. There were 124 episodes of primary BSI in 87 patients (3.8%). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus organisms were the leading cause of BSI (42 of 124 episodes). The rate of BSI was 9 BSIs/1,000 central venous catheter-days. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that independent predictors of nosocomial primary BSI included higher number of arterial catheter-days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.7 per day of arterial catheterization; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4-9.8), higher number of packed red blood cell transfusions (aOR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4), and genetic syndrome (aOR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.8-12). Severity of illness, underlying illnesses, and medications were not independently associated with increased risk of nosocomial BSI. Arterial catheter use and packed red blood cell transfusion are potentially modifiable risk factors for nosocomial primary BSI in PICU patients. Genetic syndromes may be markers for unrecognized immune defects that impair host defense against microorganisms.

  6. Hyperhomocysteinemia and venous thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Mazzola, G; Crippa, L; Fermo, I; Viganò D'Angelo, S

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the large number of reports showing that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and arterial occlusive disease, this metabolite of the methionine pathway is measured in relatively few laboratories and its importance is not fully appreciated. Recent data strongly suggest that mild HHcy is also involved in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolic disease. The aim of this paper is to analyze the most recent advances in this field. The material examined in the present review includes articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index and Medline. In addition the authors of the present article have been working in the field of mild HHcy as cause of venous thromboembolic disease. The studies examined provide very strong evidence supporting the role of moderate HHcy in the development of premature and/or recurrent venous thromboembolic disease. High plasma homocysteine levels are also a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis in the general population. Folic acid fortification of food has been proposed as a major tool for reducing coronary artery disease mortality in the United States. Vitamin supplementation may also reduce recurrence of venous thromboembolic disease in patients with HHcy. At the present time, however, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not been tested. In addition, the bulk of evidence indicates that fasting total homocysteine determinations can identify up to 50% of the total population of hyperhomocysteinemic subjects. Patients with isolated methionine intolerance may benefit from vitamin B6 supplementation. Homocysteine-lowering vascular disease prevention trials are urgently needed. Such controlled studies, however, should not focus exclusively on fasting homocysteine determinations and folic acid monotherapy.

  7. Venous drainage of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, S; Imanishi, N; Yoshimura, Y; Inoue, Y; Sakamoto, Y; Chang, H; Okumoto, T

    2017-04-01

    The venous anatomy of the face was examined in 12 fresh cadavers. Venograms and arteriovenograms were obtained after the injection of contrast medium. In 8 of the 12 cadavers, a large loop was formed by the facial vein, the supratrochlear vein, and the superficial temporal vein, which became the main trunk vein of the face. In 4 of the 12 cadavers, the superior lateral limb of the loop vein was less well developed. The loop vein generally did not accompany the arteries of the face. Cutaneous branches of the loop vein formed a polygonal venous network in the skin, while communicating branches ran toward deep veins. These findings suggest that blood from the dermis of the face is collected by the polygonal venous network and enters the loop vein through the cutaneous branches, after which blood flows away from the face through the superficial temporal vein, the facial vein, and the communicating branches and enters the deep veins. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The changing pattern of bloodstream infections associated with the rise in HIV prevalence in northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierakul, W; Rajanuwong, A; Wuthiekanun, V; Teerawattanasook, N; Gasiprong, M; Simpson, A; Chaowagul, W; White, N J

    2004-11-01

    A survey of bloodstream infections was conducted in the large regional hospital in Ubon Ratchatani, northeastern Thailand between 1989 and 1998, during the onset of the HIV epidemic. The incidence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella/Enterobacter and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemias remained constant whereas infections caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, non-typhoid Salmonellae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Penicillum marneffei and to a lesser extent Streptococcus pneumoniae all rose. Burkholderia pseudomallei infections were unrelated to HIV, whereas the other infections were associated directly with HIV. Group D non-typhoid Salmonellae bloodstream infections (mainly Salmonella enteritidis) rose coincident with the increase in HIV seroprevalence, and preceded the increase in the other HIV-associated infections. Other non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemias increased two years after the rise in group D infections, and invasive yeast infections increased four years later, coincident with the increase in AIDS. Increasing Group D non-typhoid Salmonella bloodstream infections are an early warning signal of an impending rise in AIDS.

  9. Starling curves and central venous pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, Cheryl; Bakker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies challenge the utility of central venous pressure monitoring as a surrogate for cardiac preload. Starting with Starling’s original studies on the regulation of cardiac output, this review traces the history of the experiments that elucidated the role of central venous pressure in circulatory physiology. Central venous pressure is an important physiologic parameter, but it is not an independent variable that determines cardiac output.

  10. Evaluating safety of tunneled small bore central venous catheters in chronic kidney disease population: A quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Gauri; El Ters, Mireille; Kremers, Walter K; Klunder, Joe L; Taler, Sandra J; Williams, Amy W; Stockland, Andrew H; Hogan, Marie C

    2017-04-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) may adversely impact future successful arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). As part of a quality improvement project, the performance of tunneled small bore tunneled central venous catheters (TSB-CVCs), as alternatives to PICCs, was evaluated. A retrospective observational study, involving individuals ≥18 years of age who underwent TSB-CVC placement by Interventional Radiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between 1/1/2010 and 8/30/2013. The study cohort included 92 patients with a median age of 55 (46-67) years, who underwent 108 TSB-CVC placements. Baseline renal disease was present in 71% (77/108). Most TSB-CVCs were placed in hospitalized patients (94%; 102/108); five French in diameter (61%; 66/108) and located in an internal jugular vein (84%; 91/108). Median catheter indwelling time was 20 (11-43) days (n = 84). TSB-CVC-related bloodstream infection, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and superficial venous thrombosis (SpVT) rates per line were 0.009 (1/108), 0.018 (2/108), and 0.009 (1/108), respectively. Venous outcomes in a subgroup of 54 patients, who had documented PICC placements (n = 161) in addition to TSB-CVC (n = 58) were compared. TSB-CVC-DVT rate was lower than the PICC-DVT rate (0.017 [1/58] vs. 0.106 per line [17/161]; P = 0.04). The TSB-CVC-SpVT rate was not different from the PICC-SpVT rate (0 [0/58] vs. 0.037 [6/161] per line; P = 0.14). TSB-CVCs demonstrated an excellent safety profile in our study. These catheters should be preferentially utilized for arm vein preservation in advanced kidney disease. Their impact on future AVF success needs further evaluation. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  11. Calf venous compliance measured by venous occlusion plethysmography: methodological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Lindenberger, Marcus; Ekman, Mikael; Ewerman, Lea; Länne, Toste

    2015-02-01

    Calf venous compliance (C calf) is commonly evaluated with venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) during a standard cuff deflation protocol. However, the technique relies on two not previously validated assumptions concerning thigh cuff pressure (P cuff) transmission and the impact of net fluid filtration (F filt) on C calf. The aim was to validate VOP in the lower limb and to develop a model to correct for F filt during VOP. Strain-gauge technique was used to study calf volume changes in 15 women and 10 age-matched men. A thigh cuff was inflated to 60 mmHg for 4 and 8 min with a subsequent decrease of 1 mmHg s(-1). Intravenous pressure (P iv) was measured simultaneously. C calf was determined with the commonly used equation [Compliance = β 1 + 2β 2 × P cuff] describing the pressure-compliance relationship. A model was developed to identify and correct for F filt. Transmission of P cuff to P iv was 100 %. The decrease in P cuff correlated well with P iv reduction (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). Overall, our model showed that C calf was underestimated when F filt was not accounted for (all P < 0.01). F filt was higher in women (P < 0.01) and showed a more pronounced effect on C calf compared to men (P < 0.05). The impact of F filt was similar during 4- and 8-min VOP. P cuff is an adequate substitute for P iv in the lower limb. F filt is associated with an underestimation of C calf and differences in the effect of F filt during VOP can be accounted for with the correction model. Thus, our model seems to be a valuable tool in future studies of venous wall function.

  12. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in ICU and non-ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suljagić, Vesna; Cobeljić, Miloje; Janković, Slavenka; Mirović, Veljko; Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Romić, Predrag; Mikić, Dragan

    2005-08-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSI) create a serious health problem in hospitals all over the world. The objectives of our study were to explore putative disease markers and potential risk factors with nosocomial BSI in patients in intensive care units (ICU) and non-ICU patients and to determine risk factors associated with increased 28-day mortality rate in patients with nosocomial BSI acquired in combined medical-surgical ICU. However, the major purposes of this report were to identify epidemiologic differences between nosocomial BSI acquired in ICU and non-ICU, as well as analyses outcomes for patients with nosocomial BSI acquired in ICU. A 1-year prospective cohort study was performed to determine the incidence of nosocomial BSI in hospitalized patients. Patient characteristics, risk factors related to health care, and source of infection of patients with BSI acquired in non-ICU were compared with those patient with BSI acquired in ICU. Also, nested case-control study of patients to nosocomial BSI acquired in ICU was performed to evaluate outcome. Patients were identified by active surveillance and positive blood culture during the study period. The incidence of nosocomial BSI was 2.2 per 1000 admission in non-ICU patients and 17.4 per 1000 admission in ICU patients. The 28-day crude mortality rate was 69% in ICU patients. A multivariate model showed that nasogastric tube (RR, 25.1; 95% CI: 3.845-163.85; P=.001), mechanical ventilation (RR, 13.04; 95% CI: 1.974-96.136; P=.008), and H2 blockers (RR, 12.16; 95% CI: 1.748-84.623; P=.012) were more prevalent among patients with BSI acquired in ICU, and aggressive procedures (RR, 8.65; 95% CI: 1.70-44.00; P=.009) were more prevalent among patients with BSI acquired in non-ICU patients. Risk factors independently associated with increased 28-day mortality rate in ICU patients were mechanical ventilation (OR, 8.63; 95% CI: 1.5-49.8; P=.016) and SAPS II >40 (OR, 6.0; 95% CI: 1.0-35.7; P=.049). The most common

  13. Central venous line complications and tip detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Rezaee Gheshlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Central venous line is one of a creative instrument that saves human’s life in critical medical situation. Central venous line access is frequently involved in the disease management. It is used for rapid fluid therapy, transvenous pacemakers, infusion of some medications, hemodialysis or plasmapheresis and etc. Most of the emergency departments have some staffs that are trained for central venous line insertion but related complications occur during central venous line placement.Central venous line might have some complications and complication follow-up should be considered. Thromboembolism and infection are two important medical complications. Arterial puncture, hematoma, pneumothorax and hemothorax are mechanical Central venous line complications. Chest X-ray and some other techniques should be used for detecting these complications.Central venous line tip misplace is a considerable problem for emergency department staffs, previously chest X-ray has been used for central venous line misplace detection. In some recent studies, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and intravascular electrocardiography have been used for central venous line misplace.

  14. Reducing catheter-associated bloodstream infections in the pediatric intensive care unit: Business case for quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jeffrey E; Brilli, Richard J; Lake, Michael R; Sparling, Karen W; Butcher, John; Schulte, Marion; Wheeler, Derek S

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether catheter-associated bloodstream infections were associated with increased lengths of stay in pediatric intensive care units and hospitals and increased healthcare costs in critically ill children. Previous studies have shown that hospital-acquired bloodstream infections are associated with longer stays in pediatric intensive care units, increased hospital costs, and increased hospital mortality. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections comprise the vast majority of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections. Retrospective, case-matched, cohort study and financial analysis. University-affiliated children's medical center. Twenty-two critically ill children with catheter-associated bloodstream infections and their matched controls. None. We compared the length of stay, mortality, and hospital costs in critically ill children with catheter-associated bloodstream infections and matched controls. The presence of catheter-associated bloodstream infections extended the entire hospital length of stay by 9 days (6.5 days while in the pediatric intensive care unit) and increased hospital costs by $33,039, primarily driven by the increase in length of stay days. Quality improvement efforts directed at reducing the prevalence of catheter-associated bloodstream infections during the period of study decreased total hospital days by 354, reduced total hospital costs by $1,298,271, and reduced total costs to payers by $1,415,676. The potential cost savings from reducing or eliminating catheter-associated bloodstream infections in the pediatric intensive care unit are significant. Elimination of catheter-associated bloodstream infections will directly reduce hospital costs, improve asset utilization, and most importantly, improve clinical care.

  15. Evaluation of hyoscine N-butyl bromide efficacy on the prevention of catheter-related bladder discomfort after transurethral resection of prostate: a randomized, double-blind control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetian, Golnar; Zand, Farid; Asadpour, Elham; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Adibi, Pourya; Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Zeyghami, Shahryar; Masihi, Farzaneh

    2017-11-01

    Transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) is the most common treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Urinary tract catheter is inserted post-operatively which results in catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in many patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the preventive effect of hyoscine N-butyl bromide on CRBD caused by a urinary tract catheter after TURP surgery in patients with BPH. Twenty-four and twenty-six patients in the treatment and control groups were enrolled, respectively. At the end of the surgery, slow intravenous injection of 20 mg hyoscine N-butyl bromide was administered to the patients of treatment group. The severity of CRBD was followed up at five different time periods and up to 2 h after surgery. On arrival to PACU and after 30 min of injection, statistically significant less CRBD was seen in the treatment group comparing to the control group (P ≤ 0.05 and P ≤ 0.007). The total utilized meperidine dose during PACU stay and the time to discharge for the intervention group were significantly lower than those for the control group (P ≤ 0.0001) with no significant difference in adverse effects (P > 0.05). Hyoscine N-butyl bromide could reduce the severity of CRBD related to TURP in patients with BPH and their need for analgesic consumption either. It shortened the length of stay in the recovery room. Regarding its availability and low cost, it can be an effective pain relief drug for CRBD discomfort related to TURP in BPH patients.

  16. The influence of intensive care unit-acquired central line-associated bloodstream infection on in-hospital mortality: A single-center risk-adjusted analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S W; Gantner, D; McGloughlin, S; Leong, T; Worth, L J; Klintworth, G; Scheinkestel, C; Pilcher, D; Cheng, A C; Udy, A A

    2016-05-01

    To explore the risk-adjusted association between intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and in-hospital mortality. Retrospective observational study. Forty-five-bed adult ICU. All non-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation ICU admissions between July 1, 2008, and April 30, 2014, requiring a central venous catheter (CVC), with a length of stay > 48 hours, were included. Data were extracted from our infection prevention and ICU databases. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to identify independent risk factors for ICU-acquired CLABSI. The propensity toward developing CLABSI was then included in a logistic regression of in-hospital mortality. Six thousand three hundred fifty-three admissions were included. Forty-six cases of ICU-acquired CLABSI were identified. The overall CLABSI rate was 1.12 per 1,000 ICU CVC-days. Significant independent risk factors for ICU-acquired CLABSI included: double lumen catheter insertion (odds ratio [OR], 2.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-5.77), CVC exposure > 7 days (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.06-4.04), and CVC insertion before 2011 (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.22-3.97). ICU-acquired CLABSI was crudely associated with greater in-hospital mortality, although this was attenuated once the propensity to develop CLABSI was adjusted for (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.54-2.68). A greater propensity toward ICU-acquired CLABSI was independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality, although line infection itself was not. The requirement for prolonged specialized central venous access appears to be a key risk factor for ICU-acquired CLABSI, and likely informs mortality as a marker of persistent organ dysfunction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Brennan, Rachel C; Shook, David R; Stokes, Dennis C; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as "non-laminar." Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-21.5; p monitoring as highly acceptable. In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate these findings, assess the predictive value for other clinical outcomes, and determine the impact of pre-emptive therapy. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01737554.

  18. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jens Kristian; Ellingsen Moe, Espen; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing. O...

  19. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Lijfering, Willem M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Parlevliet, Karien J.; Krediet, Ray T.; Boeschoten, Els W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis

  20. An unusual Complication of Central Venous Cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvini Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter (CVC hub fracture is a rare complication of central venous cannulation. We report a case where catheter hub fracture was detected immediately after CVC insertion. Causes of catheter hub fracture and its complications are discussed.

  1. Pulmonary venous abnormalities encountered on pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) elegantly renders pulmonary venous anatomy. With increasing numbers of radiofrequency ablation procedures being performed, there is now a greater emphasis on pre-procedure imaging to delineate this anatomy. Pulmonary venous mapping studies can be performed with or ...

  2. VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE ... Background: There are no local guidelines for prophylaxis against Venous Thrombo-Embolism (VTE). In the absence of any .... of leg ulceration in the age matched general population. (9.6% to 12.6%).

  3. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  4. Thromboelastography in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Karen; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Hendriks, Herman G. D.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Cramwinckel, Ivo R.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Meer, Jan

    Introduction: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare presentation of venous thrombosis and has been associated with many conditions. In about 20% no risk factor is identified. The aim of this study was to assess the clot formation by thromboelastography (TEG) in patients with a history of CVT

  5. Starling curves and central venous pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies challenge the utility of central venous pressure monitoring as a surrogate for cardiac preload. Starting with Starling’s original studies on the regulation of cardiac output, this review traces the history of the experiments that elucidated the role of central venous

  6. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  7. Compression for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Susan; Cullum, Nicky A; Nelson, E Andrea

    2009-01-21

    Around one percent of people in industrialised countries will suffer from a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of these leg ulcers are due to problems in the veins, resulting in an accumulation of blood in the legs. Leg ulcers arising from venous problems are called venous (varicose or stasis) ulcers. The main treatment has been a firm compression garment (bandage or stocking) in order to aid venous return. There is a large number of compression garments available and it is unclear whether they are effective in treating venous ulcers and which compression garment is the most effective. To undertake a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials of the clinical effectiveness of compression bandage or stocking systems in the treatment of venous leg ulceration.Specific questions addressed by the review are:1. Does the application of compression bandages or stockings aid venous ulcer healing? 2. Which compression bandage or stocking system is the most effective? For this update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (14/10/08); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4 2008); Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to October Week 1 2008); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2008 Week 41) and Ovid CINAHL (1982 to October Week 1 2008). No date or language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials recruiting people with venous leg ulceration that evaluated any type of compression bandage system or compression hosiery were eligible for inclusion. Comparators included no compression (e.g. primary dressing alone, non-compressive bandage) or an alternative type of compression. Trials had to report an objective measure of ulcer healing in order to be included (primary outcome for the review). Secondary outcomes of the review included ulcer recurrence, costs, quality of life, pain, adverse events and withdrawals. There was no restriction on date, language or publication status of trials. Details of eligible studies were

  8. [Central venous blood gas analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Guiotto, Giovanna; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The hemodialysis might interfere with patients hemodynamic, as the technique allows a sophisticated game with extra and intravascular fluids. As the cardiocirculatory response could sometimes be unpredictable, it is interesting to collect valuable information by reaching a deep understanding of the tissue metabolism which is mirrored by the blood gas analysis of variations in arterial and central venous blood samples. Particularly interesting are the time course variations of the central venous hemoglobin saturation (ScvO2), which are directly related to the patient with O2-demand as well as to the O2-Delivery (DO2). The ScvO2 is determined by four parameters (cardiac output, Hb concentration, arterial Hb saturation and O2 consumption): If the fluids subtraction during dialysis was about to determine an occult hypoperfusion, the ScvO2 reduction would be a timely warning sign to be considered. Moreover, while the normal veno-arterial PCO2 difference is 2-4 mmHg, whenever a mismatch between O2-demand and DO2arise, a larger v-aPCO2 difference should be observed.

  9. Routine Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Cohort: Do Patients Benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Rigby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI. Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT.

  10. Characterization of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from bloodstream infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank; Olsen, Stefan S; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of 87 third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (3GC-R Ec) from bloodstream infections in Denmark from 2009. Sixty-eight of the 87 isolates were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, whereas 17 isolates...

  11. Epidemiological investigation of Candida species causing bloodstream infection in paediatric small bowel transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Mallory J; Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Banjara, Nabaraj; Florescu, Diana F; Mercer, David F; Iwen, Peter C; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2017-06-01

    Small bowel transplantation (SBT) can be a life-saving medical procedure. However, these recipients experience high risk of bloodstream infections caused by Candida. This research aims to characterise the SBT recipient gut microbiota over time following transplantation and investigate the epidemiology of candidaemia in seven paediatric patients. Candida species from the recipients' ileum and bloodstream were identified by internal transcribed spacer sequence and distinguished to strain by multilocus sequence typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream isolates was determined against nine antifungals. Twenty-two ileostomy samples harboured at least one Candida species. Fungaemia were caused by Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida pelliculosa. All but three bloodstream isolates showed susceptibility to all the antifungals tested. One C. glabrata isolate showed multidrug resistance to itraconazole, amphotericin B and posaconazole and intermediate resistance to caspofungin. Results are congruent with both endogenous (C. albicans, C. glabrata) and exogenous (C. parapsilosis) infections; results also suggest two patients were infected by the same strain of C. parapsilosis. Continuing to work towards a better understanding of sources of infection-particularly the exogenous sources-would lead to targeted prevention strategies. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Particle-bound enzymes in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Borst, P.; Spits, H.

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei for the presence of enzymes that could serve as markers for the microbodies and the highly repressed mitochondrion of this organism. None of seven known microbody enzymes were detected at all, but glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase, ATPase,

  13. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  14. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  15. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bloodstream infections and pneumonia in Southern Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Chlebowicz, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Szczypta, Anna; Natkaniec, Joanna; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pobiega, Monika; Dzikowska, Miroslawa; Krawczyk, Lech; Koziol, Joanna; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus remains the most important cause of infections in hospitals and long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to analyse the resistance, virulence, and epidemiological and genetic relationships of S. aureus from bloodstream infections (BSIs) and pneumonia

  16. Weather parameters and nosocomial bloodstream infection: a case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Silvia Maria; Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro da; Akazawa, Renata Tamie; Moreira, Rayana Gonçalves; Souza, Lenice do Rosário de; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if temperature and humidity influenced the etiology of bloodstream infections in a hospital from 2005 to 2010. METHODS The study had a case-referent design. Individual cases of bloodstream infections caused by specific groups or pathogens were compared with several references. In the first analysis, average temperature and humidity values for the seven days preceding collection of blood cultures were compared with an overall "seven-days moving average" for the study period. The second analysis included only patients with bloodstream infections. Several logistic regression models were used to compare different pathogens and groups with respect to the immediate weather parameters, adjusting for demographics, time, and unit of admission. RESULTS Higher temperatures and humidity were related to the recovery of bacteria as a whole (versus fungi) and of gram-negative bacilli. In the multivariable models, temperature was positively associated with the recovery of gram-negative bacilli (OR = 1.14; 95%CI 1.10;1.19) or Acinetobacter baumannii (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.16;1.37), even after adjustment for demographic and admission data. An inverse association was identified for humidity. CONCLUSIONS The study documented the impact of temperature and humidity on the incidence and etiology of bloodstream infections. The results correspond with those from ecological studies, indicating a higher incidence of gram-negative bacilli during warm seasons. These findings should guide policies directed at preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections.

  17. Community-acquired bloodstream infection caused by Pseudomonas paucimobilis: case report and review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, A J; Shulman, J. A

    1986-01-01

    Various sources of Pseudomonas paucimobilis bacterial infections have been documented. We report the third human case of bloodstream infection due to P. paucimobilis and review the literature in English regarding community-acquired and nosocomial infection due to this bacterium. Biochemical and genetic characteristics supporting the pathogenic potential of P. paucimobilis are presented, and the antibiotic susceptibility profile of the organism is summarized.

  18. Patients with Central Lines - What You Need to Know to Avoid a Bloodstream Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-01

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates bloodstream infections in patients with central lines are largely preventable when healthcare providers use CDC-recommended infection control steps.  Created: 3/1/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/1/2011.

  19. [Physiopathology of superficial venous circulation in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerando, A; Pelliccia, A

    1981-01-01

    The venous circulation in athletes doing sports involving medium or heavy cardiac strain means that considerable physiological modifications may occur, notably vascular expansion. This phenomenon may be observed in the superficial venous circulation of both the upper and lower members, as well as in pulmonary circulation. Varices of the lower members are common in about 5% of practising athletes, notably in weight-lifters and wrestlers who are particularly prone to this risk, and precisely because venous return is impeded by the predominantly static effort which characterizes these sports. Karate, judo, canoeing, football, high jump and long jump are similar: mechanical blocks or sudden increases of venous pressure following the rapid changes in body-position or particular posture. Nevertheless, these phenomena can only be explained by the supposition that the valvular mechanism of certain subjects is particularly vulnerable. There are other sports, on the other hand, which have a beneficial effect on venous return, especially swimming and long-distance running.

  20. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of valid...... and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  1. Postpartum venous thromboembolism: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Boulet, Sheree L; Whiteman, Maura K; Monsour, Michael; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hooper, W Craig; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2014-05-01

    To calculate incidence of postpartum venous thromboembolism by week after delivery and to examine potential risk factors for venous thromboembolism overall and at different times during the postpartum period. A deidentified health care claims information database from employers, health plans, hospitals, and Medicaid programs across the United States was used to identify delivery hospitalizations among women aged 15-44 years during the years 2005-2011. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedure codes were used to identify instances of venous thromboembolism and associated characteristics and conditions among women with recent delivery. Incidence proportions of venous thromboembolism by week postpartum through week 12 were calculated per 10,000 deliveries. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for selected risk factors among women with postpartum venous thromboembolism and among women with venous thromboembolism during the early or later postpartum periods. The incidence proportion of postpartum venous thromboembolism was highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery, dropping from nine per 10,000 during the first week to one per 10,000 at 4 weeks after delivery and decreasing steadily through the 12th week. Certain obstetric procedures and complications such as cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and postpartum infection conferred an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 6.4), which persisted over the 12-week period compared with women without these risk factors. Risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism is highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery. Women with obstetric complications are at highest risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism, and this risk remains elevated throughout the first 12 weeks after delivery. II.

  2. [Clinical features of invasive candidiasis and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in children: a multicenter study in Urumqi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai Er Ken, Ai Bi Bai; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Xiong, Dai-Qin; Xu, Pei-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features of invasive candidiasis in children and the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection. A retrospective study was performed on 134 children with invasive candidiasis and hospitalized in 5 tertiary hospitals in Urumqi, China, between January 2010 and December 2015. The Candida species distribution was investigated. The clinical data were compared between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection. The risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 134 Candida strains were isolated from 134 children with invasive candidiasis, and non-albicans Candida (NAC) accounted for 53.0%. The incidence of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and other pediatric wards were 41.8% and 48.5% respectively. Sixty-eight patients (50.7%) had Candida bloodstream infection, and 45 patients (33.6%) had Candida urinary tract infection. There were significant differences in age, rate of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and incidence rates of chronic renal insufficiency, heart failure, urinary catheterization, and NAC infection between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection (Pcandidiasis is similar between the PICU and other pediatric wards. NAC is the most common species of invasive candidiasis. Candida bloodstream infection is the most common invasive infection. Younger age (1-24 months) and NAC infection are the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection.

  3. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted.

  4. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Byung Boong; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due...... not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect...... for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all...

  5. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  6. Influence of parenteral nutrition delivery system on the development of bloodstream infections in critically ill patients: an international, multicenter, prospective, open-label, controlled study--EPICOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes-Arruda, Alessandro; Dos Santos, Maria Cecília Freitas Cesarino; Martins, Laércia Ferreira; González, Eddy René Rodriguez; Kliger, Ruben Gustavo; Maia, Marcelo; Magnan, Gisele Brocco

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with an increased risk of developing bloodstream infections (BSIs) but the impact of the PN delivery system upon BSI rates remains unclear. This was an international, multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, controlled trial that investigated the differences of BSIs associated with 2 different PN systems. Patients were randomly allocated in a 2:1:1 ratio to receive either PN delivered by a multichamber bag (MCB group), or by compounded PN made with olive oil (COM1 group) or with MCT/LCT (COM2 group). Blood cultures were performed to evaluate the incidence of BSIs, and catheter use data was collected to calculate CLAB and central venous catheter device use ratio (CVC-DUR). Secondary outcomes included the development of severe sepsis/septic shock, number of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital days, and all-cause mortality at Day 28. 406 patients were included: 202 in the MCB group, 103 in the COM1 group, and 101 in the COM2 group. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between the 3 groups, BSIs were significantly higher in patients receiving compounded PN (46 BSIs for COM1+COM2 vs 34 BSIs for MCB; p = 0.03).CLAB was higher in patients receiving compounded PN (13.2 for COM1+COM2 vs 10.3 for MCB; p MCB PN may play a role in reducing the incidence of BSIs in patients who receive PN. NCT00798681.

  7. Distribution of pathogens in central line-associated bloodstream infections among patients with and without neutropenia following chemotherapy: evidence for a proposed modification to the current surveillance definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, James P; Robichaux, Chad; Tejedor, Sheri Chernetsky; Reyes, Mary Dent; Jacob, Jesse T

    2013-02-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSIs) occurring in patients with febrile neutropenia following cytotoxic chemotherapy are due to translocation of intestinal microbiota. However, these infections meet the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definition of central line-associated BSIs (CLABSIs). We sought to determine the differences in the microbiology of NHSN-defined CLABSIs in patients with and without neutropenia and, using these data, to propose a modification of the CLABSI definition. Retrospective review. Two large university hospitals over 18 months. All hospital-acquired BSIs occurring in patients with central venous catheters in place were classified using the NHSN CLABSI definition. Patients with postchemotherapy neutropenia (500 neutrophils/mm(3) or lower) at the time of blood culture were considered neutropenic. Pathogens overrepresented in the neutropenic group were identified to inform development of a modified CLABSI definition. Organisms that were more commonly observed in the neutropenic group compared with the nonneutropenic group included Escherichia coli (22.7% vs 2.5%; P definition (removing BSI with enterococci, streptococci, or E. coli) excluded 33 of 66 neutropenic CLABSIs and decreased the CLABSI rate in one study hospital with large transplant and oncology populations from 2.12 to 1.79 cases per 1,000 line-days. Common gastrointestinal organisms were more common in the neutropenia group, suggesting that many BSIs meeting the NHSN criteria for CLABSI in the setting of neutropenia may represent translocation of gut organisms. These findings support modification of the NHSN CLABSI definition.

  8. Gamification and Microlearning for Engagement With Quality Improvement (GAMEQI): A Bundled Digital Intervention for the Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwoll, Benjamin; Diane, Shelley; Henry, Duncan; Tsang, Lisa; Chu, Kristin; Meer, Carrie; Hartman, Kevin; Roy-Burman, Arup

    2017-05-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) cause major patient harm, preventable through attention to line care best practice standards. The objective was to determine if a digital self-assessment application (CLABSI App), bundling line care best practices with social gamification and in-context microlearning, could engage nurses in CLABSI prevention. Nurses caring for children with indwelling central venous catheters in 3 high-risk units were eligible to participate. All other units served as controls. The intervention was a 12-month nonrandomized quality improvement study of CLABSI App implementation with interunit competitions. Compared to the preceding year, the intervention group (9886 line days) CLABSI rate decreased by 48% ( P = .03). Controls (7879 line days) did not change significantly. In all, 105 unique intervention group nurses completed 673 self-assessments. Competitions were associated with increased engagement as measured by self-assessments and unique participants. This model could be extended to other health care-associated infections, and more broadly to process improvement within and across health care systems.

  9. Mortality markers in nosocomial Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bulent; Hakyemez, Ismail Necati; Bolukcu, Sibel; Okay, Gulay; Gultepe, Bilge; Aslan, Turan

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common endogen agent for nosocomial infections. In this study, mortality markers were investigated in patients with nosocomial K. pneumoniae blood stream infection (NKp BSI). The characteristics of patients >16 years who had NKp BSI diagnosis by daily active surveillance between January 2012 and January 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients who died until 28th day of the clinical follow up and those who survived until this time were statistically compared in terms of various risk factors. One hundred ninety patients were included into the study. Mortality rate was 47.9%, carbapenem resistance was 43.2%. Statistical analysis have shown that in presence of post-NKp BSI sepsis, septic shock, following in intensive care unit (ICU), meropenem resistance, kidney failure, NKp BSI secondary to pneumonia, use of invasive instruments such as central venous catheter (CVC), urinary catheter (UC) and mechanical ventilator (MV), colostomy, transfusion and hemodialysis mortality was significantly higher. In patients admitted into the hospital for neurological disorders, pancreaticobiliary tract (PBT) diseases and patients who have undergone endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and patients in whom NKp BSI secondary to PBT infection mortality rate was lower. Sepsis, septic shock, clinical conditions requiring ICU treatment and meropenem resistance increase mortality rates in NKp BSI significantly. Mortality was higher also in patients with NKp BSI secondary to pneumonia, in kidney failure and when invasive instruments were used. On the other hand, in patients who were admitted to the hospital for neurological disorders and PBT diseases mortality rate was lower.

  10. Hyperglycemia at the Time of Acquiring Central Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections Is Associated With Mortality in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsillio, Lauren E; Ginsburg, Sarah L; Rosenbaum, Cecilia H; Coffin, Susan E; Naim, Maryam Y; Priestley, Margaret A; Srinivasan, Vijay

    2015-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is common and may be a risk factor for nosocomial infections, including central catheter-associated bloodstream infections in critically ill children. It is unknown whether hyperglycemia at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric critical illness is associated with worse outcomes. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration > 126 mg/dL [> 7 mmol/L]) at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections (from 4 d prior to the day of first positive blood culture, i.e., central catheter-associated bloodstream infections) in critically ill children is common and associated with ICU mortality. Retrospective observational cohort study. Fifty-five-bed PICU and 26-bed cardiac ICU at an academic freestanding children's hospital. One hundred sixteen consecutively admitted critically ill children from January 1, 2008, to June 30, 2012, who were 0-21 years with central catheter-associated bloodstream infections were included. We excluded children with diabetes mellitus, metabolic disorders, and those with a "do not attempt resuscitation" order. None. The study cohort had an overall ICU mortality of 23%, with 48% of subjects developing hyperglycemia at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections. Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors experienced more hyperglycemia both at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections and subsequently. Median blood glucose at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections was higher in nonsurvivors compared with survivors (139.5 mg/dL [7.7 mmol/L] vs 111 mg/dL [6.2 mmol/L]; p 7 mmol/L) during the 7 days following central catheter-associated bloodstream infections (in comparison to 45% of survivors; p = 0.03). After controlling for severity of illness and interventions, hyperglycemia at the time of acquiring central catheter-associated bloodstream infections

  11. Familial Clustering of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Gundlund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is of utmost importance to improve current prophylactic regimes and treatment guidelines. The extent to which a family history contributes to the risk of VTE needs further exploration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relative...... rate of VTE in first-degree relatives compared with the general population. METHODS: By crosslinking Danish nationwide registries we identified patients with VTE between 1978 and 2012, and their familial relations. The first member in a family to acquire VTE was defined as the proband. All first...... regression models, with the general population as a fixed reference. RESULTS: We identified 70,767 children of maternal probands, 66,065 children of paternal probands, and 29,183 siblings to sibling probands. Having a maternal proband or a paternal proband were associated with a significantly increased VTE...

  12. Platelet recruitment to venous stent thrombi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBane, Robert D; Karnicki, Krzysztof; Wysokinski, Waldemar E

    2013-11-01

    Thrombosis following venous stent placement is a morbid clinical outcome. Whether to target platelets or coagulation factors for venous stent thromboprophylaxis remains unclear. We sought to determine whether integrin α(IIb)β3 antagonism with lamifiban would inhibit platelet recruitment to venous stent thrombosis. Anti-thrombotic efficacy was compared between venous and arterial circulations. Pigs received either lamifiban (0.2 mg/kg bolus plus 0.2 mg/kg/h infusion; n = 6) or saline (n = 12). Carotid arteries were crush injured and then harvested 30 min later to provide an assessment of antithrombotic efficacy in the arterial circulation. Iliac venous stents were then deployed and thrombi allowed to propagate for 2 h before harvesting. Platelet deposition was measured by scintillation detection of autologous (111)In-platelets. Venous thrombi were quantified by weight and compared to platelet, Von Willebrand factor (VWF) and fibrinogen content. Arterial platelet deposition (×10(6)/cm(2)) was reduced >80% by lamifiban (398 ± 437) compared to controls (1,540 ± 883; p thrombi occurs in part through the integrin α(IIb)β3 receptor. Unlike arterial thrombosis, inhibition of this receptor is insufficient to prevent venous stent thrombosis.

  13. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, P.L. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pecklingtan@hotmail.com; Gibson, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications.

  14. Detection of tumour cells in the bloodstream of patients with uveal melanoma: influence of surgical manipulation on the dissemination of tumour cells in the bloodstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitoudis, Georgios; Schuster, Ronny; Joussen, Antonia M; Keilholz, Ulrich; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E

    2016-04-01

    The detection of circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream before and after surgical manipulation, and the qualitative detection of potential shedding of tumour cells during surgical manipulation of patients with uveal melanoma. 202 patients treated for a newly diagnosed uveal melanoma were included in the study. Blood samples were acquired 24 h before and 30 min after the basic surgical steps. Detection of potential circulating melanoma cells was extrapolated from the presence of tyrosinase and MelanA/Mart1 transcripts by reverse transcription PCR. Based on the measurement of tyrosinase transcripts, as a result of the first and second surgical manipulation there were three and zero transitions from negative to positive respectively, while there were two and one transitions from positive to negative, respectively. According to MelanA/Mart1 transcripts, there were 19 and 5 transitions from negative to positive respectively, and 15 and 2 transitions from positive to negative, respectively. No statistically significant differences were documented, concerning the presence of circulating tumour cells in the blood samples acquired before and after the first surgical manipulation or the second one. The change in the percentage of patients with detected tumour cells in their bloodstream was not statistically significant. The frequent shifts from negative to positive samples as well as from positive to negative samples comparing preoperative to postoperative samples indicates discontinuous shedding or variation due to measurements close to the threshold of detection. As a conclusion, the surgical manipulation does not seem to have a measurable contribution to the spread of melanoma cells in the bloodstream. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  16. The Impact of Lower Extremity Venous Ulcers due to Chronic Venous Insufficiency on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Koupidis, Sotirios A; Paraskevas, Kosmas I.; Stathopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2008-01-01

    Lower extremity venous ulcers comprise a complex medical and social issue. The conservative and/or surgical management of venous ulcers is often inadequate. In addition, the psychosocial aspect of the disease is often overlooked and most often undertreated. Common symptoms such as pain, low self-esteem and patient isolation are usually not recognized and therefore not adequately managed. This mini-review summarizes the current data on the management of lower extremity venous ulcers and their ...

  17. Central Venous Line Insertion Revealing Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return: Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Alzghoul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous line malposition is a well-known complication of line insertion. Rarely, it can be mal-positioned in an anomalous pulmonary vein. We present an unusual case of a 56-year-old woman that was found to have partial anomalous pulmonary venous return on central venous line insertion. In this report, we describe a systematic approach to diagnosis and management of this unusual situation.

  18. Central Venous Line Insertion Revealing Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Bashar; Innabi, Ayoub; Chada, Aditya; Tarawneh, Ahmad R; Kakkera, Krishna; Khasawneh, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Central venous line malposition is a well-known complication of line insertion. Rarely, it can be mal-positioned in an anomalous pulmonary vein. We present an unusual case of a 56-year-old woman that was found to have partial anomalous pulmonary venous return on central venous line insertion. In this report, we describe a systematic approach to diagnosis and management of this unusual situation.

  19. Bacterial bloodstream infections in a tertiary infectious diseases hospital in Northern Vietnam: aetiology, drug resistance, and treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dat, V.Q.; Vu, H.N.; The, H. de; Nguyen, H.T.; Hoang, L.B.; Viet, D. Vu Tien; Bui, C.L.; Nguyen, K. Van; Nguyen, T.V.; Trinh, D.T.; Torre, A.; Doorn, H.R. van; Nadjm, B.; Wertheim, H.F.L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. However their aetiology, antimicrobial susceptibilities and associated outcomes differ between developed and developing countries. Systematic data from Vietnam are scarce. Here we present aetiologic

  20. Early oral switch therapy in low-risk Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (SABATO) : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasch, Achim J.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Prinz-Langenohl, Reinhild; Paulus, Ursula; Hellmich, Martin; Weiß, Verena; Jung, Norma; Rieg, Siegbert; Kern, Winfried V.; Seifert, Harald; Lewalter, Karl; Lemmen, Sebastian; Stijnis, Cornelis; Van der Meer, Jan; Soriano, Alex; Ruiz, Laura Morata; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Kluytmans, Jan; Veenemans, Jacobien; Brodt, Hans Reinhard; Stephan, Christoph; Wolf, Timo; Kessel, Johanna; Joost, Insa; Sinha, Bhanu; van Assen, Sander; Wilting, Kasper; Tobias Welte, Welte; Christiane Mölgen, Mölgen; Julia Freise, Freise; Brunkhorst, Frank; Pletz, Mathias; Hagel, Stefan; Becker, Christian; Frieling, Thomas; Kösters, Katrin; Reuter, Stefan; Hsiao, Mikai; Rupp, Jan; Dalhoff, Klaus; Turner, David; Snape, Susan; Crusz, Shanika; Venkatesan, Pradhib; Salzberger, Bernd; Hanses, Frank; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesùs; Méndez, Adoración Valiente; López-Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Cisneros, José Miguel; Navarro-Amuedo, Maria Dolores; Bonten, Marc; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend that patients with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (SAB) are treated with long courses of intravenous antimicrobial therapy. This serves to avoid SAB-related complications such as relapses, local extension and distant metastatic foci. However, in

  1. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  2. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  3. Spontaneous thrombosis of developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with venous infarct and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-08-01

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA), formally known as venous angioma, is a congenital anatomic variant of the venous drainage of the brain. Although they typically have a benign clinical course and a low symptomatic rate, thrombosis of a drainage vein may occur, leading to potentially debilitating complications. We report a unique case of spontaneous thrombosis of a posterior fossa developmental venous anomaly with cerebellar infarct in a 61-year-old man who presented with acute onset cerebellar ataxia. DVA thrombosis was well-depicted on CT and MR studies. Patient was put on anticoagulant therapy and complete recanalization was seen on follow-up imaging.

  4. Imaging of cerebral venous complications in patients with infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local infections can cause cerebrovascular complications in the central nervous system. The involvement of cerebral venous system would result in venous or dural venous sinus thrombophlebitis. Images can help evaluate the venous complications in patients with central nervous system infection and provide information in guiding treatment and prognosis. The main focus of this review is to emphasize the proper utilization of imaging modalities in assessment the complications of cerebral venous system in patients with infection.

  5. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  6. Tuberculosis and Venous Thromboembolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ivone M; Alves, Daniela Costa; Carvalho, Aurora; do Ceu Brito, Maria; Calvario, Fernando; Duarte, Raquel

    2009-12-16

    Tuberculosis remains an infectious disease with a high prevalence worldwide and represents a major public health issue. Although venous thromboembolism is a rare complication of this disease, it may be a potentially life-threatening event. We report two cases of severe pulmonary tuberculosis associated with venous thromboembolism. A 38 year-old caucasian male that had a thromboembolic event as an unsual presentation form of tuberculosis and a 51 year-old caucasian male that developed deep venous thrombosis later in the course of the disease. An association between inflamation induced by tuberculosis and a hypercoagulable state has been described. Therefore, the occurence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolic episods, should be considered in patients with tuberculosis particulary during the first weeks of treatment. The physician's awarness of these phenomena is important to an early diagnostic suspicion and prompt treatment in order to prevent fatal outcomes.

  7. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  9. Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 differentially controls motility and cytokinesis in procyclic and bloodstream forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Anaïs; Rotureau, Brice; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Blisnick, Thierry; Salmon, Didier; Bastin, Philippe; Pays, Etienne; Vanhamme, Luc; Pérez-Morga, David

    2013-02-01

    FKBP12 proteins are able to inhibit TOR kinases or calcineurin phosphatases upon binding of rapamycin or FK506 drugs, respectively. The Trypanosoma brucei FKBP12 homologue (TbFKBP12) was found to be a cytoskeleton-associated protein with specific localization in the flagellar pocket area of the bloodstream form. In the insect procyclic form, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of TbFKBP12 affected motility. In bloodstream cells, depletion of TbFKBP12 affected cytokinesis and cytoskeleton architecture. These last effects were associated with the presence of internal translucent cavities limited by an inside-out configuration of the normal cell surface, with a luminal variant surface glycoprotein coat lined up by microtubules. These cavities, which recreated the streamlined shape of the normal trypanosome cytoskeleton, might represent unsuccessful attempts for cell abscission. We propose that TbFKBP12 differentially affects stage-specific processes through association with the cytoskeleton.

  10. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Lúcia P. da Silva

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  11. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Carmem Lúcia P. da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  12. [Risk factors for bloodstream infections in liver or kidney transplantation recipients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiquan; Xiao, Xuefei; Ye, Qifa; Zhou, Jiandang

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the possible risk factors for death among liver or kidney recipients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). A retrospective study of 138 episodes of bloodstream infections documented in 103 patients was conducted to assess potential risk factors for mortality. The risk factors were identified by logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the patients was 12-66 (42.3±12.7) years. The majority of infections were nosocomial (78.6%). The BSIs-related mortality rate was 39.8% (41/103). The following variables were identified as risk factors for BSIs-related mortality by univariate analysis: intraabdominal/ biliary focus (P=0.003), polymicrobial infection (Prisk factors for increased

  13. Is an increased dwell time of a peripherally inserted catheter associated with an increased risk of bloodstream infection in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K; Cotten, C Michael; Schultz, Eric; Guo, Rose; Nowell, Lisa; Smithwick, Mary Laura; Thornburg, Courtney D

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the risk of bloodstream infection associated with catheter dwell time in infants. Retrospective study. Duke University Medical Center neonatal intensive care unit, an academic, level 3 nursery in Durham, North Carolina. A case of catheter-associated bloodstream infection was defined as one that occurred in an infant whose culture-positive blood sample was collected more than 24 hours after catheter insertion or within 72 hours after catheter removal. We used multivariable logistic regression to control for the catheter's position and dwell time as well as the infant's sex, gestational age, age at time of catheter insertion, birth weight, and weight at time of catheter insertion. We identified 135 cases of catheter-associated bloodstream infection. The mean catheter dwell time was 12.2 days (range, 0-113 days), and the mean time to bloodstream infection was 10.8 days (range, 1-57 days). An increase in catheter dwell time was associated with a lower risk of bloodstream infection (odds ratio, 0.975 [95% confidence interval, 0.954-0.996]; P = .02). No increased risk of catheter-associated bloodstream infection was observed with increased catheter dwell time. This may have been due to the infant's improved nutrition, decreased need for other invasive devices, and maturing skin and immune system as catheter dwell time increased.

  14. Infection Probability Score, APACHE II and KARNOFSKY scoring systems as predictors of bloodstream infection onset in hematology-oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzis Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream Infections (BSIs in neutropenic patients often cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the surveillance and early identification of patients at high risk for developing BSIs might be useful for the development of preventive measures. The aim of the current study was to assess the predictive power of three scoring systems: Infection Probability Score (IPS, APACHE II and KARNOFSKY score for the onset of Bloodstream Infections in hematology-oncology patients. Methods A total of 102 patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours in a hematology-oncology department in Athens, Greece between April 1st and October 31st 2007 were included in the study. Data were collected by using an anonymous standardized recording form. Source materials included medical records, temperature charts, information from nursing and medical staff, and results on microbiological testing. Patients were followed daily until hospital discharge or death. Results Among the 102 patients, Bloodstream Infections occurred in 17 (16.6% patients. The incidence density of Bloodstream Infections was 7.74 per 1,000 patient-days or 21.99 per 1,000 patient-days at risk. The patients who developed a Bloodstream Infection were mainly females (p = 0.004, with twofold time mean length of hospital stay (p Conclusion Between the three different prognostic scoring systems, Infection Probability Score had the best sensitivity in predicting Bloodstream Infections.

  15. Bacterial bloodstream infections in the allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant patient: new considerations for a persistent nemesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandoy, C E; Ardura, M I; Papanicolaou, G A; Auletta, J J

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) cause significant transplant-related morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). This manuscript reviews the risk factors for and the bacterial pathogens causing BSIs in allo-HCT recipients in the contemporary transplant period. In addition, it offers insight into emerging resistant pathogens and reviews clinical management considerations to treat and strategies to prevent BSIs in allo-HCT patients.

  16. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Pnosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein A Suppresses Immune Responses during Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity. Importance  Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections; however, a vaccine with clinical efficacy is not available. Using mice to model staphylococcal infection, earlier work identified protective antigens; however, corresponding human clinical trials did not reach their endpoints. We show that B cell receptor (IgM) cross-linking by protein A is an important immune evasion strategy of S. aureus that can be monitored in a guinea pig model of bloodstream infection. Further, immunization with nontoxigenic protein A enables infected guinea pigs to elicit antibody responses that are protective against S. aureus. Thus, the guinea pig model may support preclinical development of staphylococcal vaccines. PMID:25564466

  18. [Nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by gram-negative bacilli: epidemiology and risk factors for mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizaso, Diego; Aguilera C, Karina; Correa, Malena; Yantorno, María Laura; Cuitiño, Mario; Pérez, Lorena; Lares, Mónica; Parra, Gloria de la; Esposto, Amadeo

    2008-10-01

    Nosocomial bacteremia is a major cause of hospital infection, associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and higher costs. However, few prospective studies analyse the prognostic factors associated with mortality of gramnegative rods bloodstream infections in hospital wards outside of intensive care units. A prospective/descriptive study was conducted from March to December 2006. All patients with nosocomial-acquired bloodstream infection due to gramnegative rods were included. Epidemiology and clinical features were analysed as potential prognostic factors for mortality. During the study period, 84 cases were detected, being A. baumannii, Burkholderia sp and E. coli the most frequent isolates, with a mortality of 48%>. Bacteremia derived from a high-mortality associated septic focus (RR 4.9, IC95%> 1.3 - 18.8) and admission to intensive care unit (RR 4.78, IC95%> 1.7- 13.1) were independent variables associated with mortality. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment was not associated with greater risk of mortality. Nosocomial gramnegative bloodstream infections in our series were mainly due to non-fermentative bacilli and were associated with high mortality rates when their origin was a high risk septic focus or the patient was admitted to intensive care unit.

  19. Procalcitonin levels in gram-positive, gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leli, Christian; Ferranti, Marta; Moretti, Amedeo; Al Dhahab, Zainab Salim; Cenci, Elio; Mencacci, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8 ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 3.4-44.1) bacteremias was significantly higher than in Gram-positive (2.1 ng/mL, IQR 0.6-7.6) or fungal (0.5 ng/mL, IQR 0.4-1) infections (P Gram-negatives from Gram-positives at the best cut-off value of 10.8 ng/mL and an AUC of 0.944 (95% CI 0.919-0.969, P Gram-negatives from fungi at the best cut-off of 1.6 ng/mL. Additional results showed a significant difference in median PCT values between Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria (17.1 ng/mL, IQR 5.9-48.5 versus 3.5 ng/mL, IQR 0.8-21.5; P Gram-negative from Gram-positive and fungal bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, its utility to predict different microorganisms needs to be assessed in further studies.

  20. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  1. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  2. No agreement of mixed venous and central venous saturation in sepsis, independent of sepsis origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van Ingen, Jan; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Holman, Nicole D.; Groen, Henk; Koopmans, Matty; Spronk, Peter E.; Kuiper, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Controversy remains regarding the relationship between central venous saturation (ScvO(2)) and mixed venous saturation (SvO(2)) and their use and interchangeability in patients with sepsis or septic shock. We tested the hypothesis that ScvO(2) does not reliably predict SvO(2) in sepsis. Additionally

  3. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  4. Ultrasound and Fluoroscopy-Guided Placement of Central Venous Ports via Internal Jugular Vein: Retrospective Analysis of 1254 Port Implantations at a Single Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kimn, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Yin, Yong Hu; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Sang Bu [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To assess the technical success and complication rates of the radiologic placement of central venous ports via the internal jugular vein. We retrospectively reviewed 1254 central venous ports implanted at our institution between August 2002 and October 2009. All procedures were guided by using ultrasound and fluoroscopy. Catheter maintenance days, technical success rates, peri-procedural, as well as early and late complication rates were evaluated based on the interventional radiologic reports and patient medical records. A total of 433386 catheter maintenance days (mean, 350 days; range 0-1165 days) were recorded. The technical success rate was 99.9% and a total of 61 complications occurred (5%), resulting in a post-procedural complication rate of 0.129 of 1000 catheter days. Among them, peri-procedural complications within 24 hours occurred in five patients (0.4%). There were 56 post-procedural complications including 24 (1.9%, 0.055 of 1000 catheter days) early and 32 (2.6%, 0.074 of 1000 catheter days) late complications including, infection (0.6%, 0.018 of 10000 catheter days), thrombotic malfunction (1.4%, 0.040 of 1000 catheter days), nonthrombotic malfunction (0.9%, 0.025 of 1000 catheter days), venous thrombosis (0.5%, 0.014 of 1000 catheter days), as well as wound problems (1.1%, 0.032 of 1000 catheter days). Thirty six CVPs (3%) were removed due to complications. Bloodstream infections and venous thrombosis were the two main adverse events prolonging hospitalization (mean 13 days and 5 days, respectively). Radiologic placement of a central venous port via the internal jugular vein is safe and efficient as evidenced by its high technical success rate and a very low complication rate.

  5. Circulating tumour cells in the central and the peripheral venous compartment in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, D J E; Van den Eynden, G G; van Dam, P-J; Prové, A; Benoy, I H; van Dam, P A; Vermeulen, P B; Pauwels, P; Peeters, M; Van Laere, S J; Dirix, L Y

    2011-04-26

    The enumeration of circulating tumour cells (CTC) has prognostic significance in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and monitoring of CTC levels over time has considerable potential to guide treatment decisions. However, little is known on CTC kinetics in the human bloodstream. In this study, we compared the number of CTC in both 7.5 ml central venous blood (CVB) and 7.5 ml peripheral venous blood (PVB) from 30 patients with MBC starting with a new line of chemotherapy. The number of CTC was found to be significantly higher in CVB (median: 43.5; range: 0-4036) than in PVB (median: 33; range: 0-4013) (P=0.001). When analysing samples pairwise, CTC counts were found to be significantly higher in CVB than in PVB in 12 out of 26 patients with detectable CTC. In contrast, only 2 out of 26 patients had higher CTC counts in PVB as compared with CVB, whereas in 12 remaining patients no significant difference was seen. The pattern of CTC distribution was independent of the sites of metastatic involvement. A substantial difference in the number of CTC was observed between CVB and PVB of patients with MBC. Registration of the site of blood collection is warranted in studies evaluating the role of CTC assessment in these patients.

  6. Evidence-based measures to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Daniele Cristina; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal

    2016-09-01

    to identify evidence-based care to prevent CLABSI among adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. systematic review conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf and Cochrane Studies addressing care and maintenance of central venous catheters, published from January 2011 to July 2014 were searched. The 34 studies identified were organized in an instrument and assessed by using the classification provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute. the studies presented care bundles including elements such as hand hygiene and maximal barrier precautions; multidimensional programs and strategies such as impregnated catheters and bandages and the involvement of facilities in and commitment of staff to preventing infections. care bundles coupled with education and the commitment of both staff and institutions is a strategy that can contribute to decreased rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections among adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units. identificar evidências de cuidados para prevenção de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateter venoso central em pacientes adultos em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva. revisão Sistemática realizada por meio de busca nas bases de dados Pubmed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf e Cochrane. Foram buscadas pesquisas com cuidados com a cateterização e manutenção do cateter venoso central, publicados de janeiro de 2011 a julho de 2014. Os 34 estudos incluídos foram organizados em um instrumento e avaliados por meio da classificação do The Joanna Briggs Institute. os estudos apresentaram bundles de cuidados com elementos como a higiene das mãos e precauções máximas de barreira; programas multidimensionais e estratégias como cateteres e curativos impregnados e o envolvimento da instituição e engajamento da equipe nos esforços para prevenção de infecção. os cuidados no formato de bundles aliados com a educação e engajamento da equipe e

  7. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  8. Differences between "classical" risk factors for infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by multiple clones of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV MRSA strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paula M; Trindade, Priscila A; Garcia, Tamara O; Pacheco, Renata L; Costa, Silvia F; Reinert, Cristina; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Mamizuka, Elsa M; Garcia, Cilmara P; Levin, Anna S

    2009-02-01

    To identify risk factors associated with nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by multiple clones of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An unmatched case-control study (at a ratio of 1:2) performed during the period from October 2002 through September 2003. A 2,000-bed tertiary care teaching hospital affiliated with the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. Case patients (n=30) were defined either as patients who had a bloodstream infection due to SCCmec type IV MRSA diagnosed at least 48 hours after hospital admission or as neonates with the infection who were born in the hospital. Control patients (n=60) were defined as patients with SCCmec type III MRSA infection diagnosed at least 48 hours after hospital admission. Genes encoding virulence factors were studied in the isolates recovered from case patients, and molecular typing of the SCCmec type IV MRSA isolates was also done by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. In multivariate analysis, the following 3 variables were significantly associated with having a nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by SCCmec type IV strains of MRSA: an age of less than 1 year, less frequent use of a central venous catheter (odds ratio [OR], 0.07 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.02-0.28]; p= .025), and female sex. A second analysis was performed that excluded the case and control patients from the neonatal unit, and, in multivariate analysis, the following variables were significantly associated with having a nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by SCCmec type IV strains of MRSA: less frequent use of a central venous catheter (OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.03-0.55]; p= .007), lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission (OR, 0.14 [95% CI, 0.03-0.61]; p= .009), less frequent surgery (OR, 0.21 [95% CI, 0.06-0.83]; p= .025), and female sex (OR, 5.70 [95% CI, 1.32-24.66]; p= .020). Of

  9. Impact of alcohol-impregnated port protectors and needleless neutral pressure connectors on central line-associated bloodstream infections and contamination of blood cultures in an inpatient oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Michael A; Cumpston, Aaron; Briggs, Frank; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2012-12-01

    A major risk factor for the development of bloodstream infection is the presence of a central venous catheter (CVC), especially in immunocompromised patients. CVC hub contamination is a risk factor for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). This observational before-after trial in a tertiary care hospital's oncology unit included adult patients with a CVC. During the intervention period, the practice of central line hub care was changed from cleaning with alcohol wipes to using alcohol-impregnated port protectors. To accommodate the protectors, the needless hubs were changed to a neutral pressure connector. The intervention period (January-July 2010) was compared with a historical control (January-December 2009). A total of 3,005 central line-days and 1 CLABSI (a rate of 0.3 infections/1,000 central line-days) were documented during the intervention period, compared with 6,851 central line-days and 16 CLABSIs (2.3 infections/1,000 central line-days) during the control period (relative risk, 0.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-1.07; P = .03). The rate of contaminated blood cultures (CBCs) from central lines was 2.5% (17 of 692) during the control period, but only 0.2% (1 of 470) during the intervention period (relative risk, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01-0.65; P = .002). The implementation of alcohol-impregnated port protectors and needleless neutral pressure connectors significantly reduced the rates of CLABSIs and CBCs in our oncology patient population. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial bloodstream infections in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients before and after implementation of a central line-associated bloodstream infection protocol: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alicia K; Foca, Marc D; Jin, Zhezhen; Vasudev, Rahul; Laird, Mary; Schwartz, Sharon; Qureshi, Mahvish; Kolb, Michelle; Levinson, Anya; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew; Garvin, James; George, Diane; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Whittier, Susan; Saiman, Lisa; Satwani, Prakash

    2016-12-01

    There are only few reports describing the influence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention strategies on the incidence of bacterial bloodstream infections (BBSIs). We performed a retrospective cohort study among pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) to assess potential changes in BBSI rates during 3 time periods: pre-CLABSI prevention era (era 1, 2004-2005), CLABSI prevention implementation era (era 2, 2006-2009), and maintenance of CLABSI prevention era (era 3, 2010-2012). BBSI from day 0-365 following allo-HCT were studied. The comparison of person-years incidence rates among different periods was carried out by Poisson regression analysis. The mean age of patients was 10.0 years. During the study period, 126 (65%) of 190 patients had at least a single BBSI. From day 0-30, day 31-100, day 101-180, and day 181-365, 20%, 28%, 30%, and 17% of patients, respectively, experienced BBSIs. The rate of Staphylococcus epidermidis and gram-negative pathogens significantly declined from 3.16-0.93 and 6.32-2.21 per 100 person-months during era 1 and era 3, respectively (P = .001). Patients undergoing allo-HCT during era 3 were associated with decreased risk of BBSI (P = .012). Maintenance of CLABSI protocols by nursing staff and appropriate education of other care providers is essential to lower incidence of BBSI in this high-risk population, and further strategies to decrease infection burden should be studied. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Essentials of Parathyroid Hormone Venous Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, NYU School of Medicine (United States); Trerotola, Scott O., E-mail: streroto@uphs.upenn.edu [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology (United States); Sacks, Barry, E-mail: bsacks@bidmc.harvard.edu [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Oklu, Rahmi, E-mail: oklu.rahmi@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Deipolyi, Amy, E-mail: deipolya@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Hyperparathyroidism is an excess of parathyroid hormone in the blood due to over-activity of one or more parathyroid gland. Localization of abnormal glands with noninvasive imaging modalities, such as technetium sestamibi scan and cross-sectional imaging, has a high success rate. Parathyroid venous sampling is performed for patients with persistent or recurrent disease after previous parathyroid surgery, when repeat noninvasive imaging studies are negative or discordant. The success of invasive localization studies and results interpretation is dependent on the interventional radiologist’s understanding of the normal and ectopic anatomic locations of parathyroid glands, as well as their blood supply and venous drainage. Anatomic and technical considerations for selective parathyroid venous sampling are reviewed.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of central venous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J. G.; Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for the noninvasive measurement of CVP in man was developed. The method involves monitoring venous velocity at a point in the periphery with a transcutaneous Doppler ultrasonic velocity meter while the patient performs a forced expiratory maneuver. The idea is the CVP is related to the value of pressure measured at the mouth which just stops the flow in the vein. Two improvements were made over the original procedure. First, the site of venous velocity measurement was shifted from a vein at the antecubital fossa (elbow) to the right external jugular vein in the neck. This allows for sensing more readily events occurring in the central veins. Secondly, and perhaps most significantly, a procedure for obtaining a curve of relative mean venous velocity vs mouth pressure was developed.

  13. Complications of central venous stenosis due to permanent central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinat, Choni; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Feinstein, Sofia; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently used as access for hemodialysis (HD) in children. One of the known complications is central venous stenosis. Although this complication is not rare, it is often asymptomatic and therefore unacknowledged. Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis is obviously suspected in the presence of upper body edema, but several other signs and symptoms are often unrecognized as being part of this syndrome. We describe four patients with various manifestations of central venous stenosis and SVC syndrome. These sometimes life- or organ-threatening conditions include obstructive sleep apnea, unresolving stridor, increased intracranial pressure, increased intraocular pressure, right-sided pleural effusion, protein-losing enteropathy and lymphadenopathy. The temporal relationship of these complications associated with the use of central venous catheters and documentation of venous stenosis, together with their resolution after alleviation of high venous pressure, points to a causal role. We suggest pathophysiological mechanisms for the formation of each of these complications. In patients with occlusion of the SVC, various unexpected clinical entities can be caused by high central venous pressure. As often the etiology is not obvious, a high index of suspicion is needed as in some cases prompt alleviation of the high pressure is mandatory.

  14. Sepsis from the gut: the enteric habitat of bacteria that cause late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Mike A; Ndao, I Malick; Springman, A Cody; Manning, Shannon D; Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian D; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Weinstock, Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M; Wylie, Todd N; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Stevens, Harold J; Hall-Moore, Carla; Julian, Samuel; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Warner, Barbara B; Tarr, Phillip I

    2014-05-01

    Late-onset sepsis is a major problem in neonatology, but the habitat of the pathogens before bloodstream invasion occurs is not well established. We examined prospectively collected stools from premature infants with sepsis to find pathogens that subsequently invaded their bloodstreams, and sought the same organisms in stools of infants without sepsis. Culture-based techniques were used to isolate stool bacteria that provisionally matched the bloodstream organisms, which were then genome sequenced to confirm or refute commonality. Of 11 children with late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections, 7 produced at least 1 stool that contained group B Streptococcus (GBS), Serratia marcescens, or Escherichia coli before their sepsis episode with provisionally matching organisms. Of 96 overlap comparison subjects without sepsis temporally associated with these cases, 4 were colonized with provisionally matching GBS or S. marcescens. Of 175 comparisons of stools from randomly selected infants without sepsis, 1 contained a GBS (this infant had also served as an overlap comparison subject and both specimens contained provisionally matching GBS). Genome sequencing confirmed common origin of provisionally matching fecal and blood isolates. The invasive E. coli were present in all presepticemic stools since birth, but gut colonization with GBS and S. marcescens occurred closer to time of bloodstream infection. The neonatal gut harbors sepsis-causing pathogens, but such organisms are not inevitable members of the normal microbiota. Surveillance microbiology, decolonization, and augmented hygiene might prevent dissemination of invasive bacteria between and within premature infants.

  15. Clinical features and diagnosis of venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsh, J.; Hull, R.D.; Raskob, G.E.

    1986-12-01

    The clinical diagnosis of venous thrombosis is inaccurate because the clinical findings are both insensitive and nonspecific. The sensitivity of clinical diagnosis is low because many potentially dangerous venous thrombi are clinically silent. The specificity of clinical diagnosis is low because the symptoms or signs of venous thrombosis all can be caused by nonthrombotic disorders. A current approach to the diagnosis of clinically suspected venous thrombosis favors the use of impedance plethysmography over Doppler ultrasonography as the main test for this disorder. This is because impedance plethysmography is precise and objective, whereas the interpretation of Doppler ultrasonography is subjective and requires considerable skill and experience to form reliable diagnoses. The use of serial impedance plethysmography has been evaluated recently in a prospective study. The rationale of repeated impedance plethysmography evaluation is based on the premise that calf vein thrombi are only clinically important when they extend into the proximal veins, at which point detection with impedance plethysmography is possible. Therefore, by performing repeated examinations with impedance plethysmography in patients with clinically suspected venous thrombosis, it is possible to identify patients with extending calf vein thrombosis who can be treated appropriately. Impedance plethysmography is performed immediately on referral; if it is positive in the absence of clinical conditions that are known to produce falsely positive results, the diagnosis of venous thrombosis is established, and the patient is treated accordingly. If the result of the initial impedance plethysmography evaluation is negative, anticoagulant therapy is withheld, and impedance plethysmography is repeated the following day, again on day 5 to 7 and on day 10 to 14. 87 references.

  16. Use of Implementation Science for a Sustained Reduction of Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a High-Volume, Regional Burn Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Geeta; Caffrey, Julie; Krout, Kelly; Khouri-Stevens, Zeina; Gerold, Kevin; Riedel, Stefan; McIntyre, Janet; Maragakis, Lisa L; Blanding, Renee; Zenilman, Jonathan; Bennett, Richard; Pronovost, Peter

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE We describe the use of implementation science at the unit level and organizational level to guide an intervention to reduce central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in a high-volume, regional, burn intensive care unit (BICU). DESIGN A single center observational quasi-experimental study. SETTING A regional BICU in Maryland serving 300-400 burn patients annually. INTERVENTIONS In 2011, an organizational-level and unit-level intervention was implemented to reduce the rates of CLABSI in a high-risk patient population in the BICU. At the organization level, leaders declared a goal of zero infections, created an infrastructure to support improvement efforts by creating a coordinating team, and engaged bedside staff. Performance data were transparently shared. At the unit level, the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP)/ Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) model was used. A series of interventions were implemented: development of new blood culture procurement criteria, implementation of chlorhexidine bathing and chlorhexidine dressings, use of alcohol impregnated caps, routine performance of root-cause analysis with executive engagement, and routine central venous catheter changes. RESULTS The use of an implementation science framework to guide multiple interventions resulted in the reduction of CLABSI rates from 15.5 per 1,000 central-line days to zero with a sustained rate of zero CLABSIs over 3 years (rate difference, 15.5; 95% confidence interval, 8.54-22.48). CONCLUSIONS CLABSIs in high-risk units may be preventable with the a use a structured organizational and unit-level paradigm. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1306-1311.

  17. Incidence, risk factors and associated mortality of central line-associated bloodstream infections at an intensive care unit in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S B; Misra, R; Azim, A; Baronia, A K; Prasad, K N; Dhole, T N; Gurjar, M; Singh, R K; Poddar, B

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence, risk factors and associated mortality of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in India. This prospective observational study was conducted over a period of 16 months at a tertiary care referral medical center. We conducted this study over a period of 16 months at a tertiary care referral medical center. All patients with a central venous catheter (CVC) for >48 h admitted to the ICU were enrolled. Patient characteristics included were underlying disease, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) scores and outcome. Statistical analysis of risk factors for their association with mortality was also done. There were 3235 inpatient-days and 2698 catheter-days. About 46 cases of CLABSI were diagnosed during the study period. The overall rate of CLABSI was 17.04 per 1000 catheter-days and 14.21 per 1000 inpatient-days. The median duration of hospitalization was 23.5 days while the median number of days that a CVC was in place was 17.5. The median APACHE II and SOFA scores were 17 and 10, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common organism (n = 22/55, 40%). Immunosuppressed state and duration of central line more than 10 days were significant factors for developing CLABSI. SOFA and APACHE II scores showed a tendency towards significance for mortality. Our results underscore the need for strict institutional infection control measures. Regular training module for doctors and nurses for catheter insertion and maintenance with a checklist on nurses' chart for site inspection and alerts in all shifts are some measures planned at our center.

  18. Late onset sepsis in newborn babies: epidemiology and effect of a bundle to prevent central line associated bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Daiane Silva; Peppe, Anna Laura Gil; dos Reis, Heloisio; Abdallah, Vânia Olivetti Steffen; Ribas, Rosineide Marques; Gontijo Filho, Paulo Pinto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed late onset sepsis (LOS) rates of neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) before and after implementing an evidence-based bundle to prevent these infections in a country with poor resources. We evaluate trends of LOS between October 2010 and August 2012 in a large tertiary hospital in Brazil. We designed a protocol based of CDC guidelines for insertion of maintenance of central venous catheter targeted to reduction of bloodstream infections. During this period two major events occurred: a great increase of LOS rates in January months and relocation of the unit to a provisory place. Additionally we evaluated the risk factors and etiology of these infections. A total of 112 (20.3%) cases defined as LOS were found. The overall incidence rate of LOS in the study was 16.1/1000 patient/days and 23.0/1000 CVC-days. Our monthly rates data of LOS/1000 patient-day reveal fluctuations over the studied period, with incidence rates of these infections in staff vacation period (January 2011 and 2012) significantly higher (59.6/1000 patients-days) than compared with the other months rates (16.6/1000 patients-days) (IRR=3.59; p<0.001). As opposite, the incidence rates of LOS during relocation period was lower (10.3/1000 patients-days) when compared with baseline period 26.7/1000 patients-days (IRR=2.59; p=0.007). After the intervention period, these rates decreased in the post intervention period, when compared with preintervention 14.7/1000 patients-days and 23.4/1000 patients-days, respectively (IRR=1.59; p=0.04). Through simple infection control measures, LOS can be successfully controlled especially in NICUs of limited resources countries such as ours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of prolonged use of intravenous administration sets in paediatric cancer patients on CVAD-related bloodstream infection rates and hospital resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A; Fleischhack, G; Wiszniewsky, G; Hasan, C; Bode, U; Kramer, M H

    2006-10-01

    To assess the effects of extending the routine intravenous administration set (IVAS) change-interval from 72 h (group 1) to 7 days (group 2) on the incidence density for central venous access device (CVAD)-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) and on resource expenditures in a singlecentre pilot study. Prospective pre-/post-intervention comparison of two consecutive 12-month surveillance periods (2001-2003) in a 17-bed paediatric oncology tertiary care unit. IVAS changes and nosocomial infections (NIs) were prospectively analysed using a standardized unit-based surveillance system (Oncopaed NI). All 175 eligible patients were enrolled, 96 in group 1 and 79 in group 2. Both groups had similar distributions of primary diagnoses and risk factors. The proportion of IVAS changes performed after 3 days increased from 5.6% to 22.5%, but only 8% of IVASs in group 2 were changed after 7 days. Most IVAS changes (64.8% in group 1 and 92.9% in group 2) were done because of therapeutic interventions (blood products, parenteral nutrition [TNP]) before the scheduled endpoint. Overall, the rates and incidence densities of NIs were significantly lower during the second period. The corresponding results for CVAD-related BSIs did not show significant differences. No death attributable to a NI occurred. The '7-day' strategy resulted in cost savings for devices (3,300 dollars/year) and of nursing time (23 working days/year). Extending the routine IVAS change-interval from 3 days to 7 days appears to be safe and cost-effective in a paediatric oncology unit with high infection control standards and continuous surveillance for NIs. These results do not prove that 7-day intervals prevent infections, but they do suggest that this policy probably is not harmful and that a prospectively randomized study with sufficient power is needed.

  20. Risk factors and impact of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections in the adult intensive care unit: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, T-N; Lee, S-H; Huang, C-H; Lee, C-L; Chen, W-Y

    2009-10-01

    During a nine-year study period, 96 episodes of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii were identified in the adult intensive care units (ICUs) of Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital. Seventy-seven (80.2%) of these were available for matching in terms of age, sex, primary diagnosis of ICU admission, ICU ward, and disease severity. Univariate analysis showed that central venous catheter use, ventilator use, prior A. baumannii colonisation, and respiratory and cardiovascular organ failure were significantly associated with acquiring A. baumannii BSI in the ICU. By multivariate analysis, only prior A. baumannii colonisation [odds ratio (OR): 3.81; Prisk factors. The lower respiratory tract (32/77; 41.6%) was the most frequent source of infection, followed by intravascular catheters (13/77; 16.9%). Cumulative survival curves for patients with A. baumannii BSI and control patients showed no significant difference (30 day crude mortality: 29.9% and 27.3%, respectively; P=0.916). However, the mean length of ICU and hospital stay and mean hospital cost of patients with A. baumannii BSI significantly increased, with an estimated 8.7 days excess length of ICU stay, 19.1 days excess hospital stay, and US $8480 extra hospital costs. Imipenem and meropenem remained the most active antimicrobial agents, both with 95.5% susceptibility (MIC50=0.25 and 0.5, respectively). Improving hand hygiene of healthcare workers and aseptic care of vascular catheters and endotracheal tubes are important measures to prevent A. baumannii colonisation and decrease the incidence of BSI.

  1. Risk factors and outcomes for bloodstream infections with extended-spectrum beta -lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ; Findings of the nosocomial surveillance system in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, Emese; Füzi, M; Böröcz, Karolina; Kurcz, Andrea; Tóth, A; Nagy, K

    2009-09-01

    Risk factors for and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by ESBL-producing and by ESBL-non-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared in a four-year multicenter study in Hungary. One hundred ESBL-positive and one hundred ESBL-negative patients were included as cases and controls. Investigated risk factors were related to demographics, comorbid conditions, treatments, invasive procedures, surgery prior bacteremia, presence of additional nosocomial infections and preceding hospital admission within a year. Measured outcomes were crude mortality, mortality related to infection and delay in introducing appropriate therapy (DAT). Though some risk factors for infection (admission to intensive care units, having central venous and/or urinary catheter, mechanical ventilation) were shared by both groups, in other respects cases and controls were found to differ substantially. The 36 percent of patients with BSIs with ESBL-producing Klebsiella died versus 23 percent of controls (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-5.4; p = 0.02). The 18 percent of deaths in cases versus 9% in controls could be attributed to infection (OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.5-16.2; p = 0.006). Cases more often received previous antibiotic therapy than controls (OR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.7; p = 0.02) and delay in the introduction of appropriate antibiotic treatment was observed in 44% of cases versus 19% of controls (OR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.6-7.3; p = 0.001). The results demonstrate that BSIs caused by ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae are related to previous antibiotic therapy and are associated with a high rate of mortality that is often linked to delay in the introduction of appropriate antibiotic therapy. This confirms that besides infection control measures the early identification and antibiotic resistance profiling of the infecting pathogen is salient in the control of BSIs caused by ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae .

  2. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  3. Venous thrombosis: the history of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a frequent disease. It is surprising, therefore, that no case truly compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was apparently reported in the antiquity. There is no case that could be reasonably attributed to a venous thrombus in the writings of Hippocrates, Galenus, Celius Aurelianus, Ibn an-Nafiz, Avicenna and others. Venous thrombosis is not among the many diseases mentioned in the Bible. The term "leucophlegmasia", first used by Hippocrates and then by Celius Aurelianus, refers to cases of bilateral leg edema, most likely due to conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis and renal insufficiency. Nothing compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis can be found in pieces of art from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Persia and South America. While in these sources there are sometimes representations of varicose veins and ulcers, unilateral leg edema or other pictures compatible with venous thrombosis are not featured. The first well documented case of venous thrombosis is depicted in a beautifully illustrated manuscript written in the 13th century and currently preserved in Paris at the Bibliothèque Nationale (MS Fr 2829, Folio 87). The manuscript describes the case of a young man from Normandy named Raoul who at the age of twenty developed unilateral edema in the right ankle that subsequently extended up to the thigh, with no obvious symptoms in the contralateral leg. Raoul was advised to visit the tomb of Saint Louis who was buried in the church of Saint Denis, where the patient spent several days confessing his sins and praying the saint. Afterwards he chose to collect the dust accumulating below the stone that covered the tomb and to apply it on the fistulae and ulcers of his foot. The openings stopped running and were filled with flesh. He was first obliged to use crutches but subsequently he could walk with a cane, to be eventually able to dispose of all devices, even though his foot throbbed a little. Raoul was cured as

  4. Management of Peripheral and Truncal Venous Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantafillos G. Giannakopoulos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Civilian injuries are increasing according to the World Health Organization, and this is attributed mainly to road traffic accidents and urban interpersonal violence. Vascular injuries are common in these scenarios and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Associated peripheral venous trauma is less likely to lead to death and controversy remains whether ligation or repair should be the primary approach. Conversely, non-compressible truncal venous insult can be lethal due to exsanguination, thus a high index of suspicion is crucial. Operative management is demanding with fair results but recent endovascular adjuncts demonstrate promising results and seem to be the way forward for these serious conditions.

  5. Jugular Venous Catheterization: A Case of Knotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Erkılıç

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman, diagnosed for cancer of the ovary, had a central catheter that was placed with difficulty through the right internal jugular vein intraoperatively. After oophorectomy, it was realized that the catheter was knotted. Thus, the central venous catheter was removed successfully using a traction technique in the operating room. Central venous catheter use may result in various complications, although it has been used as an invasive method for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid and drug infusion. Here, we present catheter knotting in a case with solutions for this complication, under literature review.

  6. Venous capacity, venous refill time and the effectiveness of the calf muscle pump in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendsen, G J; van den Berg, J W

    1984-03-01

    With strain gauge plethysmography various procedures to assess the competence of the venous system in the lower leg were compared in 10 normal subjects. The reproducibility and ease of use were established, and normal values were obtained. It is concluded, that measurements in the sitting position are preferable to those in the standing position. To measure the venous capacity, the dependency test is the method of choice. Rhythmic exercise to assess the effectiveness of the calf muscle pump can be restricted to five successive contractions. The refill time after exercise is not a suitable parameter to assess the competence of the venous valves.

  7. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  8. Epidemic increase in Salmonella bloodstream infection in children, Bwamanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoba, M-F; De Boeck, H; Ifeka, B B; Dawili, J; Lunguya, O; Vanhoof, R; Muyembe, J-J; Van Geet, C; Bertrand, S; Jacobs, J

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of bloodstream infection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, but few data are available from Central-Africa. We documented during the period November 2011 to May 2012 an epidemic increase in invasive Salmonella bloodstream infections in HGR Bwamanda, a referral hospital in Equateur Province, DR Congo. Salmonella spp. represented 90.4 % (103 out of 114) of clinically significant blood culture isolates and comprised Salmonella Typhimurium (54.4 %, 56 out of 103), Salmonella Enteritidis (28.2 %, 29 out of 103) and Salmonella Typhi (17.5 %, 18 out of 103), with Salmonella Enteritidis accounting for most of the increase. Most (82 out of 103, 79.6 %) isolates were obtained from children Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were 14 months (14 days to 64 years) and 19 months (3 months to 8 years) respectively. Clinical presentation was non-specific; the in-hospital case fatality rate was 11.1 %. More than two thirds (69.7 %, 53 out of 76) of children Salmonella isolates as well as 6/18 (33.3 %) Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant (i.e. resistant to the first-line oral antibiotics amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol), one (1.0 %) Salmonella Typhimurium had decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility owing to a point mutation in the gyrA gene (Gly81Cys). Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (MLVA) analysis of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates revealed closely related patterns comprising three major and four minor profiles, with differences limited to one out of five loci. These data show an epidemic increase in clonally related multidrug-resistant Salmonella bloodstream infection in children in DR Congo.

  9. Population-based assessment of the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of anaerobic bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, J T; Parkins, M D; Gregson, D B; Pitout, J D D; Ross, T; Church, D L; Laupland, K B

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobes are a relatively uncommon but important cause of bloodstream infection. However, their epidemiology has not been well defined in non-selected populations. We sought to describe the incidence of, risk factors for, and outcomes associated with anaerobic bacteremia. Population-based surveillance for bacteremia with anaerobic microorganisms was conducted in the Calgary area (population 1.2 million) during the period from 2000 to 2008. A total of 904 incident cases were identified, for an overall population incidence of 8.7 per 100,000 per year; 231 (26 %) were nosocomial, 300 (33 %) were healthcare-associated community-onset, and 373 (41 %) were community-acquired. Elderly males were at the greatest risk. The most common pathogens identified were: Bacteroides fragilis group (3.6 per 100,000), Clostridium (non-perfringens) spp. (1.1 per 100,000), Peptostreptococcus spp. (0.9 per 100,000), and Clostridium perfringens (0.7 per 100,000). Non-susceptibility to metronidazole was 2 %, to clindamycin 17 %, and to penicillin 42 %. Relative to the general population, risk factors for anaerobic bloodstream infection included: male sex, increasing age, a prior diagnosis of cancer, chronic liver disease, heart disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and/or hemodialysis-dependent chronic renal failure (HDCRF). The 30-day mortality was 20 %. Increasing age, nosocomial acquisition, presence of malignancy, and several other co-morbid illnesses were independently associated with an increased risk of death. Anaerobic bloodstream infection is responsible for a significant burden of disease in general populations. The data herein establish the extent to which anaerobes contribute to morbidity and subsequent mortality. This information is key in developing preventative, empiric treatment and research priorities.

  10. suPAR remains uninfluenced by surgery in septic patients with bloodstream infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabensteiner, Jasmin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical trauma induces activation of the immune system and may cause an increase of inflammatory biomarkers tested postoperatively in septic patients treated for bloodstream infection. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of surgical interventions on the novel sepsis biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR and to compare results with those of routine laboratory parameters CRP, PCT, and IL-6 in patients with culture-proven bloodstream infection. Forty-six adult patients with positive blood culture undergoing minor or major surgical intervention were investigated, 12 blood culture positive patients served as control group. Blood was collected 24 hours before and after surgical intervention for determination of the sepsis biomarkers suPAR, CRP, PCT, and IL-6. Within the surgical study cohort, a non-significant increase of suPAR, CRP, and PCT was observed postoperatively ( 0.642; 0.773; 0.087. In contrast, a slight decrease of IL-6 ( 0.599 was observed. A significant correlation was calculated for the pre- and postoperative difference of CRP ( 0.028 and PCT and type of surgical intervention received: after minor surgical intervention only PCT decreased significantly (<0.001, while after major surgical interventions no significant differences were observed for all biomarkers evaluated. In the control group, a significant decrease of CRP ( 0.005 and PCT ( 0.005 was observed. In patients treated adequately for bloodstream infections, postoperative suPAR levels remained uninfluenced of the surgical trauma and might therefore be a reliable parameter for postoperative infectious monitoring. After minor surgical intervention, PCT seems to be the most reliable parameter.

  11. Clinical analysis of bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli in elderly patients with hepatobiliary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Qian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical characteristics and drug resistance in elderly patients with hepatobiliary disease and bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli, and to provide a basis for clinical therapy. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical characteristics and drug susceptibility of 57 elderly inpatients with hepatobiliary disease and bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli in our hospital from 2009 to 2012. Comparison of continuous data between the two groups was made by t test, and comparison of categorical data was made by chi-square test. ResultsThe majority of patients had liver cirrhosis, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was the major infection source. A total of 57 strains of Escherichia coli were isolated from elderly patients with hepatobiliary disease, and 24 (421% out of them were positive for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL. ESBL-positive strains had a significantly higher level of drug resistance than ESBL-negative strains (P<0.05, except for imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, cefoperazone/sulbactum, ticarcillin/clavulanate, and minocycline. However, there were no significant differences in age, gender, basic disease, infection source, peak body temperature, white blood cell count, and the percentage of neutrophils between the ESBL-positive group and the ESBL-negative group (P>0.05. The case-fatality rate in patients with septic shock, hepatic encephalopathy, or acute kidney injury was significantly higher than that in patients with no complications (χ2=9541,7622,9733,respectively, P<0.05. ConclusionElderly patients with hepatobiliary disease and bloodstream infections caused by ESBL-positive Escherichia coli had a high level of drug resistance and a poor prognosis for severe complications. Antibiotic therapy combined with prevention and control of severe complications should be taken as early as possible to reduce the case-fatality rate.

  12. Resistant patterns of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections at a university hospital in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Alam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bloodstream infections is often empirical and based on the knowledge of local antimicrobial activity profiles of the most common bacteria causing such infections. Aims : The present study was aimed to investigate frequency of bacterial pathogens causing septicemia and their antimicrobial resistant pattern in hospital admitted patients. Settings and Design : It was a prospective study, conducted at Majeedia Hospital, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India. Material and Methods : We examined prospectively, 168 bacterial strains isolated from 186 clinically diagnosed septicemia cases admitted at a University Hospital in New Delhi, over a period of six months from July 2009 to December 2009. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, USA guidelines. Results : The most frequently identified Gram-positive bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci 63.5%, Staphylococcus aureus 23.1%, enterococci 5.8% and alpha-haemolytic streptococci 5.8%. The most frequently Gram-negative bacteria identified were Acinetobacter species 31%, Salmonella typhi 24.1%, Escherichia coli 23.3% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 13.8%. Coagulase-negative staphylococci showed maximum resistance to cefaclor 57.1% and ampicillin 46.9%. Staphylococcus aureus showed maximum resistance to amoxicillin 100% and ampicillin 91.7%. Acinetobacter species showed maximum resistance to amoxicillin 89.7%, amoxiclav 87.1% and ampicillin 85.7%. Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed maximum resistance to ampicillin, 46.4%, 92%, 93.8% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions : Gram-negative pathogens predominated in bloodstream infections. Resistance to most of the antimicrobial agents for a number of pathogens implicated in bloodstream infections, especially in Gram-negative bacteria, has reached worrisome levels and continues to increase.

  13. Procalcitonin Levels in Gram-Positive, Gram-Negative, and Fungal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Procalcitonin (PCT can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8 ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR 3.4–44.1 bacteremias was significantly higher than in Gram-positive (2.1 ng/mL, IQR 0.6–7.6 or fungal (0.5 ng/mL, IQR 0.4–1 infections (P<0.0001. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC for PCT of 0.765 (95% CI 0.725–0.805, P<0.0001 in discriminating Gram-negatives from Gram-positives at the best cut-off value of 10.8 ng/mL and an AUC of 0.944 (95% CI 0.919–0.969, P<0.0001 in discriminating Gram-negatives from fungi at the best cut-off of 1.6 ng/mL. Additional results showed a significant difference in median PCT values between Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria (17.1 ng/mL, IQR 5.9–48.5 versus 3.5 ng/mL, IQR 0.8–21.5; P<0.0001. This study suggests that PCT may be of value to distinguish Gram-negative from Gram-positive and fungal bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, its utility to predict different microorganisms needs to be assessed in further studies.

  14. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections in an endemic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchaim, Dror; Levit, Dana; Zigron, Roy; Gordon, Michal; Lazarovitch, Tsillia; Carrico, Joao A; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Moran-Gilad, Jacob

    2017-03-01

    The transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in endemic settings, and the relation between microbial properties and patients' clinical outcomes, are yet obscure and hampered by insufficient metadata. Of 20 consecutive patients with A. baumannii bloodstream infection that were thoroughly analyzed at a single center, at least one transmission opportunity was evident for 85% of patients. This implies that patient-to-patient transmission is the major mode of A. baumannii acquisitions in health facilities. Moreover, all patients who died immediately (baumannii ST457 lineage compared with other strains.

  15. Fatal Cases of Bloodstream Infection by Fusarium solani and Review of Published Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabas, Yubhisha; Bakhshi, Sameer; Xess, Immaculata

    2016-04-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitously present in environment and are well known as human pathogens with high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. We report here two cases where immunocompromised patients developed fatal bloodstream infections by this organism. Isolates were further identified by ITS1 region sequencing which confirmed them as Fusarium solani. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done following CLSI M38-A2 guidelines to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, and micafungin. Both patients had a fatal outcome and expired of septic shock. Therefore, identification up to species level is of utmost importance as that helps in directing the management of the patient thereby leading to a favourable outcome.

  16. Patterns of cranial venous system from the comparative anatomy in vertebrates. Part I, introduction and the dorsal venous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurboonyawat, T; Suthipongchai, S; Pereira, V; Ozanne, A; Lasjaunias, P

    2007-12-01

    Many classifications of the cerebral venous system are found in the literature but they are seldom based on phylogenic study. Among vertebrates, venous drainage of the brain vesicles differs depending on the species. Due to the variability, poorly descriptive articles, and many different names used for the veins, the comparative study of the cranial venous system can hardly be performed in detail. The cranial venous system in vertebrates can be divided into three systems based on the evolution of the meninges and structures of the brain vesicles: the dorsal, lateral-ventral and ventricular systems. This study proposes a new classification of the venous drainage of brain vesicles using knowledge from a comparative study of vertebrates and focusing on the dorsal venous system. We found that the venous drainage of the neopallium and neocerebellum is involved with this system which may be a recent acquisition of cranial venous evolution.

  17. Misplaced left internal jugular venous catheter with an exceptional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year in the intensive care units and misplacement occurs frequently. Many critically ill patients require central venous catheterization for multiple and varied reasons. Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter is one of the most frequent central venous catheters in ...

  18. Mechanochemical endovenous ablation and new frontiers in venous intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, D

    2017-01-01

    Venous insufficiency of the lower extremities is a common condition and related to various symptoms, including venous ulcers. The effect of venous insufficiency on patients’ health-related quality of life is substantial and comparable with other chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and

  19. [Etiology, nomenclature and pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmhofer, W

    2016-06-01

    This article presents current notions and conceptions of the aetiopathogenesis of primary varicosis and chronic venous insufficiency, as well as an updated version of the nomenclature and terminology of venous disorders, which was recently agreed on in an international consensus conference. Furthermore, both CEAP-classification and venous severity score system are discussed.

  20. The recalcitrant venous leg ulcer - A never ending story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); M.B. Maessen-Visch (Birgitte); S.I. Langendoen; K.P. de Roos; H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In general, four particular causes of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers may be distinguished. These are foot pump insufficiency, chronic venous compartment syndrome and non-re-canalized popliteal vein thrombosis. The fourth cause of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers is

  1. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Preoperative Anatomy, Physiology, Imaging, and Interventional Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Venous Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Morray, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection refers to a spectrum of cardiac anomalies where the pulmonary veins fail to return to the left atrium and the pulmonary venous blood returns through a systemic vein or directly to the right atrium. There is a wide anatomical variety of venous connections and degrees of pulmonary venous obstruction that affect the presentation, surgical repair, and outcomes. In this review, we explore the preoperative physiology, echocardiographic diagnosis, and approach to postoperative complications.

  2. Trends and outcome of nosocomial and community-acquired bloodstream infections due to Staphylococcus aureus in Finland, 1995-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyytikäinen, O; Ruotsalainen, E; Järvinen, A; Valtonen, V; Ruutu, P

    2005-06-01

    In Finland, Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections are caused predominantly (>99%) by methicillin-sensitive strains. In this study, laboratory-based surveillance data on Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections occurring in Finland from 1995 to 2001 were analyzed. Preceding hospitalizations for all persons with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections were obtained from the national hospital discharge registry, and data on outcome was obtained from the national population registry. An infection was defined as nosocomial when a positive blood culture was obtained more than 2 days after hospital admission or within 2 days of admission if there was a preceding hospital discharge within 7 days. A total of 5,045 cases were identified. The annual incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection rose by 55%, from 11 per 100,000 population in 1995 to 17 in 2001. The increase was detected in all adult age groups, though it was most distinct in patients >74 years of age. Nosocomial infections accounted for 51% of cases, a proportion that remained unchanged. The 28-day death-to-case ratio ranged from 1% in the age group 1-14 years to 33% in patients >74 years of age. The 28-day death-to-case ratios for nosocomial and community-acquired infections were 22% and 13%, respectively, and did not change over time. The increase in incidence among elderly persons resulted in an increase in the annual rate of mortality associated with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections, from 2.6 to 4.2 deaths per 100,000 population per year. Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections are increasing in Finland, a country with a very low prevalence of methicillin resistance. While the increase may be due in part to increased reporting, it also reflects a growing population at risk, affected by such factors as high age and/or severe comorbidity.

  3. Apixaban for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Buller, Harry R.; Cohen, Alexander; Curto, Madelyn; Gallus, Alexander S.; Johnson, Margot; Porcari, Anthony; Raskob, Gary E.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Gallus, Alexander; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey; Prins, Martin; Brandjes, Dees; Kolbach, Dinanda; Limburg, Martinus; Mac Gillavry, Melvin; Otten, Johannes Martinus; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Segers, Annelise; Slagboom, Ton; Bounameaux, Henry; Hirsh, Jack; Samama, Meyer Michel; Wedel, Hans; Masiukiewicz, Urszula; Pak, Raphael; Sanders, Paul; Sisson, Melanie; Sullivan, Beth; Thompson, John; Auerbach, Jennifer; Cesario, Lynne; Gamero, Miguel; Gordon, Margot; Griffiths, Angela; Noble, Melanie; Ott, Jana; Pennington, Ann; Peffer, Allison; Reinhold, Peggy; Simmons, Melanie; Urwin, Keri; Ceresetto, Jose; McRae, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto; Spencer, Fred; Gorican, Karel; Husted, Steen Elkiaer; Mottier, Dominique; Harenberg, Job; Pinjala, Ramakrishna; Zeltser, David; Imberti, Davide; Sandset, Morten; Torbicki, Adam; Fijalkowska, Anna; Albino, Jose Pereira; Kirienko, Alexander; Shvarts, Yury; Monreal, Manuel; Jacobson, Barry; Dolan, Gerry; Gudz, Ivan; Ortel, Tom; Spyropoulos, Alex; Torbicki, A.; Fijalkowska, A.; Skupyy, O.; Beryer-Westendorf, J.; de Pellegrin, A.; Prasol, V.; Schellong, S.; Jacobson, B.; Falvo, N.; Abramov, I.; Cizek, V.; Husted, S.; Desai, S.; Gudz, I.; Barillari, G.; Sergeev, O.; Chetter, I.; Inbal, A.; McCollum, C.; Shvalb, P.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Vasylyuk, S.; Kraemmer Nielsen, H.; Pernod, G.; Schmidt, J.; Bova, C.; Gerasymov, V.; Pabinger-Fasching, I.; Skalicka, L.; Zaichuk, A.; Achkar, A.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Chochola, J.; Gould, T.; Khalafallah, A.; Jakobsen, T.; Rose, P.; Zhukov, B.; Dedek, V.; Mirete Ferrer, J.; Pesant, Y.; Repin, A.; Salem, H.; Solis Morales, L.; Spacek, R.; Cannon, K.; Grzelakowski, P.; Jindal, R.; Pereira, A.; Zidkova, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Cardozo, M.; Dunaj, M.; Gallus, A.; Gavish, D.; Ghanima, W.; Harenberg, J.; Leduc, J. J.; Mismetti, P.; Panico, M.; Porreca, E.; Riera, A.; Bareford, D.; Chong, B.; Dvoryashina, I.; Gómez Cerezo, J.; Kobza, I.; Nielsen, T.; Pendleton, R.; Pullman, J.; Schiffman, G.; Stanbro, M.; Zwettler, U.; Aquilanti, S.; Bratsch, H.; Cohen, K.; Elias, D.; Gan, E.; Holaj, R.; Klinke, W.; Liu, H. S. Y.; Sandset, P. M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; Álvarez-Sala, L. A.; Basson, M.; Braester, A.; Bura-Riviere, A.; Calvo Vargas, C.; Cohen, A.; Correa, J.; Elias, M.; Frost, L.; Imberti, D.; Landolfi, R.; Marschang, P.; Moreira, R.; Mottier, D.; Natarajan, S.; Pottier, P.; Tosetto, A.; Tuxen, C.; Vöhringer, H. F.; Alexander, A.; Barbarash, O.; Fajardo Campos, P.; Graham, M.; Gubka, O.; Hudcovic, M.; Hussein, O.; Jackson, D.; Katelnitskiy, I.; Lawall, H.; Monreal, M.; Palareti, G.; Poggio, R.; Roos, J.; Simonneau, G.; Smith, S. W.; Szopinski, P.; Ortel, T.; Zimlichman, R.; Bridgers, D.; Colan, D.; Czekalski, P.; de Jong, D.; Fortinez, J. T.; Garcia Bragado, F.; Harrington, D.; Izbicki, G.; Kadr, H.; Koslow, A.; Loftus, I.; Marais, H.; Neumeister, A.; Oliven, A.; Palla, A.; Pop, C.; Prandoni, P.; Puskas, A.; Sanchez Llamas, F.; Shotan, A.; Shvarts, Y.; Singh, P.; Tveit, A.; Baker, R.; Borja, V.; Brenner, B.; Brown, H.; Ceresetto, J.; Cha, T. J.; Cohen, Y.; D'Angelo, A.; Dhar, A.; Friis, E.; Hueur, H.; Jiménez Rodríguez Madridejos, R.; Karl, J.; Karrasch, J.; Lishner, M.; Manenti, E.; McRae, S.; Meneveau, N.; Nguyen, D.; Sanchez-Escalante, L.; Santoscoy Ibarra, J.; Sokurenko, G.; Staroverov, I.; Stein, R.; Abdullah, I.; Agnelli, G.; Alcocer Gamba, M.; Balanda, J.; Bruckner, I.; Calabuig Alborch, J.; Caraco, Y.; Comerota, A.; Cromer, M.; de Araujo Filho, J.; de los Rios Ibarra, M.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Doshi, A.; Ebrahim, I.; Fessel, W. J.; Fletcher, E.; Fourie, N.; Fu, C.; Gutowski, P.; Haddad, G.; Hoffman, U.; Jardula, M.; Kvasnicka, T.; Lewczuk, J.; Leyden, M.; Livneh, A.; Lodigiani, C.; Lovell, C.; Miekus, P.; Paloma, M. J.; Parakh, R.; Raval, M.; Schmidt-Lucke, J.; Shtutin, O.; Soroka, V.; Stevens, D.; Sulik, P.; Tay, J. C.; Vejby-Christensen, H.; Vinereanu, D.; Baghestanian, M.; Bono, J.; Cerana, S.; Freire, A.; Gibson, K.; Giumelli, C.; Iastrebner, C.; Karpenko, A.; Kelly, A.; Lacroix, P.; LaFata, J.; Lobo, S.; Macik, B. G.; Marchena Yglesias, P.; Nishinari, K.; Pinjala, R.; Podczeck-Schweighofer, A.; Raby, K.; Sirpal, S.; Solymoss, S.; Spencer, F.; van Zyl, L.; Vargas Núñez, J. A.; von Bilderling, P.; Warr, T.; Wronski, J.; Wurster, M.; Albino, J. A.; Albuquerque, L.; Averill, F.; Baek, S. H.; Bello, F.; Bergoeing, M.; Blanc, F. X.; Bloomberg, R.; Bolster, D.; Brockmyre, A.; Calimano, C.; Checketts, D.; Cieplinski, W.; Chervu, A.; Collado, F.; Denaro, C.; Gaciong, Z.; Game, M.; Iskander, A.; Kaatz, S.; Kim, D. I.; Koura, F.; Laguna, F.; Lanas Zanetti, F.; Lindhoff-Last, E.; Melaniuk, M.; Meade, A.; Murphy, T.; Ng, H. J.; Páramo Fernández, J. A.; Patil, C.; Piovella, F.; Prisco, D.; Pruszczyk, P.; Reimers, G.; Rivera, E.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Rosenthal, S.; Salbach, P.; Salvador, D.; Schuller, D.; Siragusa, S.; Staniszewski, R.; Torp, R.; Vora, K.; Yip, G.; Alfieri, A.; Belaji, V.; Bhagavan, N.; Carnovali, M.; Cobos Segarra, J.; Di Todaro, F.; Dowell, A.; Corder, C.; Crispin, P.; Cuadrado, J.; Flippo, G.; Fraiz, J.; Guillaumon, A.; Gvora, T.; Hakki, S.; Harris, L.; Ison, R.; Htun, P. T.; Jasani, R.; Kates, M.; Kaminski, L.; Kamerkar, D.; Kirienko, A.; Kroger, K.; LaPerna, L.; Leiva, J.; Luber, J.; McCann, A.; McKenzie, W.; Menna Barreto, S.; Moran, J.; Nikulnikov, P.; Paliwal, Y.; Patel, M.; Pilger, E.; Renwick, W.; Shevela, A.; Starosiliz, D.; Stringam, S.; Spyropoulos, A.; To, R.; Updegrove, J.; van Bellen, B.; Waintrub, M.; White, J.; Yeo, E.; Zangroniz, P.; Zeltser, D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor that can be administered in a simple, fixed-dose regimen, may be an option for the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared two doses of apixaban (2.5 mg and 5 mg, twice daily) with

  4. Travel and venous thrombosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Schreijer, A. J. M.; Cannegieter, S. C.; Bueller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous publications on the association between venous thrombosis (VT) and travel have been published. Relative and absolute risks of VT after travel, and particularly after travel by air, have been studied in case-control and observational follow-up studies, whereas the effect

  5. The aetiology of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P C; Agutter, P S

    2006-09-01

    Most ideas about the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are dominated by a 'consensus model' first articulated around 1962. This model invokes 'Virchow's triad' and attributes thrombogenesis in veins to some combination of 'hypercoagulability', 'stasis' and 'intimal injury'. This arose as a by-product of studies on the mechanisms of haemostasis and bleeding diatheses that were at best only indirectly relevant to thrombosis, and there are reasons for doubting the causal significance of 'hypercoagulability' and 'stasis' in the aetiology of DVT. Proponents of the consensus model make little reference to a substantial literature, mostly historical, that: (a) emphasizes the significance of the venous valve pockets (VVP) and blood rheology in DVT pathogenesis; and (b) describes morphological features specific to venous thrombi that a valid aetiological model must explain. This literature provides the basis for an alternative hypothesis of DVT aetiology, published some 30 years ago, which has been experimentally corroborated and is compatible with recent cell and molecular biological studies of the venous endothelium. We review this alternative hypothesis, considering its potential value for future research on DVT and embolism, and its significance for clinical practice.

  6. Thermodilution-determined Internal Jugular Venous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Widmer, Mario; Hilty, Matthias P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases ~20% during whole body exercise although a Kety-Schmidt-determined CBF is reported to remain stable; a discrepancy that could reflect evaluation of arterial vs. internal jugular venous (IJV) flow and/or that CBF is influenced by posture. Here we test...

  7. Venous thromboembolism: Risk profile and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study aims to describe the venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk profile of women undergoing elective gynaecological surgery in a tertiary hospital and to audit the VTE prophylaxis prescribed. Methods. One hundred and nine women who underwent elective gynaecological surgery at Kalafong Provincial ...

  8. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism | Schellack | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) encompasses two vascular conditions that are of significant importance, namely deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is also the most common cause of PE. Medical and surgical patients, and individuals who are at increased risk of developing VTE through a ...

  9. Venous thromboembolism: awareness and practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the high level of thromboprophylaxis practice appears doubtful because only a few of these physicians carry out VTE risk assessment for their patients as well as follow clinical guidelines on VTE thromboprophylaxis. Key words: Venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, risk factor, ...

  10. Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for extensive iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, ...

  11. Urethro-venous intravasation during urethrography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.M. Ratkal

    Abstract. Retrograde urethrography is a procedure used to evaluate urethral strictures. Urethro-venous intravasation, rarely seen during retrograde urethrography, can result in bacteremia, adverse reactions to contrast agents, renal failure and even pulmonary embolism. We report one such case of a male patient who ...

  12. Central venous pressure monitoring in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Katie

    This article provides an overview of central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in clinical practice. It explores the underpinning anatomy and physiology, as well as the indications and means of access, for the procedure. The mechanics and practicalities of measuring CVP are discussed and information for troubleshooting is provided.

  13. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  14. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Harron

    Full Text Available We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569.BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97 to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751.The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74 per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005. The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days.The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates.

  15. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Parslow, Roger; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Gilbert, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569). BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet) with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97) to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751. The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74) per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005). The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates.

  16. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Thrombophlebitis of venous sinuses in otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczkowski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of dura venous sinuses is a rare intracranial complication of otitis media, which may be sometimes accompanied by symptoms or sepsis. Anatomical conditions and early diagnosis of this vascular complication determine the treatment modality. Aim of this study was the assessment of diagnostics and treatment of venous sinuses thrombophlebitis in acute and chronic otitis media considering anatomy and the venous sinuses and status of coagulation system. Otogenic thrombophlebitis may occur in lateral, transverse, upper and lower petrosal sinuses, and rarely in cavernous. In some cases thrombophlebitis proces may expand into brain or emissary mastoid veins. Lateral sinus thrombophlebitis in chronic otitis media usually appears clinically as septic fever, earache, and increasing neurologic signs. In acute otitis media when thrombophlebitis develops the patient complains about headache, high fever and visual acquity. Diagnosis of venous sinus thrombophlebitis is based on clinical signs, radiological imaging (CT scan, MRI), bacteriological examinations and laboratory biochemical tests. Contrast enhanced CT scan shows "delta sign". Septic thrombophlebitis sinus sigmoidei is caused by mixed bacterial flora. Surgical treatment in cases with septic thrombus consists of radical modiffied ear operation and lateral sinus exposure. Thrombectomy and jugular vein ligation is performed when sepsis or thrombus is present. Mastoidectomy and tympanic cavity drainage is performed in cases with lateral sinus thrombosis in acute mastoiditis. Intravenous antibiotics therapy should be continued for 2 weeks. Anticoagulants should be given taking into consideration parameters of coagulation system and the type of thrombus. Treatment results of venous sinuses thrombophlebitis are good if they are not accompanied by other intracranial complications.

  18. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina D. Garciarena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation.

  19. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  20. Diagnostic and predictive values of procalcitonin in bloodstream infections for nosocomial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sheng Tao; Sun, Li Chao; Lian, Rui; Tao, Yong Kang; Zhang, Hong Bo; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2018-01-11

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PCT to distinguish between gram-negative (GN) and gram-positive (GP) bloodstream infections nosocomial pneumonia (NP) patients and compared PCT levels with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) for predicting mortality. Data were collected retrospectively for blood culture-positive NP patients between January 2014 and August 2016. PCT levels were compared between patients with GN versus GP infections. Outcome variables included 28- and 60-day mortality. PCT level was higher in GN infections than in GP infections. PCT could differentiate between GN and GP infections with an AUC value of 0.706. At a PCT cutoff of 5.4 ng/mL, the specificity for GN infections were 80.3%. The AUCs for 28- and 60-day mortality were 0.758 and 0.759 for PSI, and 0.620 and 0.634 for PCT. Serum PCT level was less predictive of mortality in GN NP patients compared with that for GP NP patients. There was a significantly positive correlation between PCT and PSI, and the correlation in GP NP patients was better than that in GN NP patients. PCT could differentiate between GN and GP bloodstream infections in patients with NP. However, PCT levels were less predictive of mortality compared with the PSI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    Full Text Available In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle tissue releases extracellular vesicles (EVs, which carry microRNAs in the bloodstream under physiological conditions such as physical exercise. Using density gradient separation of plasma from sedentary and physically fit young men we found EVs positive for TSG101 and alpha-sarcoglycan (SGCA, and enriched for miR-206. Cytometric analysis showed that the SGCA+ EVs account for 1-5% of the total and that 60-65% of these EVs were also positive for the exosomal marker CD81. Furthermore, the SGCA-immuno captured sub-population of EVs exhibited higher levels of the miR-206/miR16 ratio compared to total plasma EVs. Finally, a significant positive correlation was found between the aerobic fitness and muscle-specific miRNAs and EV miR-133b and -181a-5p were significantly up-regulated after acute exercise. Thus, our study proposes EVs as a novel means of muscle communication potentially involved in muscle remodeling and homeostasis.

  2. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida isolates from bloodstream infections in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, B; Martins, M A; Bonfietti, L X; Szeszs, M W; Jacobs, J; Garcia, C; Melhem, M S C

    2014-06-01

    Yeast identification and in vitro susceptibility testing provide helpful information for appropriate administration of antifungal treatments; however, few reports from the Latin American region have been published. The aim of this study was to identify the species present in isolates from bloodstream infections diagnosed in nine hospitals in Lima, Peru and to determine their in vitro susceptibility to four antifungal drugs. We tested and identified 153 isolates collected between October 2009 and August 2011 using standard methods. PCR and PCR-RFLP assays were performed to distinguish Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis and to identify species of the Candida parapsil