WorldWideScience

Sample records for velocity shear layers

  1. Electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in the proximity of the velocity shear layer in the TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Cortes, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Hidalgo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the electrostatic and magnetic turbulence changes in the proximity of the naturally velocity shear layer in the TJ-I tokamak. A decorrelation in the broad-band magnetic fluctuations and a decreasing in the density fluctuation levels have been observed in the proximity (scrape-off layer side) of the shear layer. The results are interpreted in terms of turbulence characteristics modified by sheared poloidal flows or/and magnetic configuration. (author) 8 fig. 16 ref

  2. Prediction of wall shear stresses in transitional boundary layers using near-wall mean velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo Pyung; Shin, Sung Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The local wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer was estimated from the near-wall mean velocity data using the principle of Computational Preston tube Method(CPM). The previous DNS and experimental databases of transitional boundary layers were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and to provide the applicable range of wall unit y + . The skin friction coefficients predicted by the CPM agreed well with those from previous studies. To reexamine the applicability of the CPM, near-wall hot-wire measurements were conducted in developing transitional boundary layers on a flat plate with different freestream turbulence intensities. The intermittency profiles across the transitional boundary layers were reasonably obtained from the conditional sampling technique. An empirical correlation between the representative intermittency near the wall and the free parameter K 1 of the extended wall function of CPM has been newly proposed using the present and other experimental data. The CPM has been verified as a useful tool to measure the wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy

  3. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  4. Using digital holographic microscopy for simultaneous measurements of 3D near wall velocity and wall shear stress in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2008-12-01

    A digital holographic microscope is used to simultaneously measure the instantaneous 3D flow structure in the inner part of a turbulent boundary layer over a smooth wall, and the spatial distribution of wall shear stresses. The measurements are performed in a fully developed turbulent channel flow within square duct, at a moderately high Reynolds number. The sample volume size is 90 × 145 × 90 wall units, and the spatial resolution of the measurements is 3 8 wall units in streamwise and spanwise directions and one wall unit in the wall-normal direction. The paper describes the data acquisition and analysis procedures, including the particle tracking method and associated method for matching of particle pairs. The uncertainty in velocity is estimated to be better than 1 mm/s, less than 0.05% of the free stream velocity, by comparing the statistics of the normalized velocity divergence to divergence obtained by randomly adding an error of 1 mm/s to the data. Spatial distributions of wall shear stresses are approximated with the least square fit of velocity measurements in the viscous sublayer. Mean flow profiles and statistics of velocity fluctuations agree very well with expectations. Joint probability density distributions of instantaneous spanwise and streamwise wall shear stresses demonstrate the significance of near-wall coherent structures. The near wall 3D flow structures are classified into three groups, the first containing a pair of counter-rotating, quasi streamwise vortices and high streak-like shear stresses; the second group is characterized by multiple streamwise vortices and little variations in wall stress; and the third group has no buffer layer structures.

  5. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  6. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziman, M; Hazreek, Z A M; Azhar, A T S; Haimi, D S

    2016-01-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data. (paper)

  7. Experimental investigation of separated shear layer from a leading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shear layer development over a thick flat plate with a semi-circular leading edge is investigated for a range of angles of attack under different pressure gradients for a Reynolds number of 2.44×105 (based on chord and free-stream velocity). The characteristics of the separated shear layer are very well documented through ...

  8. Turbulent shear layers in confining channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Graham P.; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Hewitt, Ian J.; Please, Colin P.; Style, Rob W.; Bird, Paul A. D.

    2018-06-01

    We present a simple model for the development of shear layers between parallel flows in confining channels. Such flows are important across a wide range of topics from diffusers, nozzles and ducts to urban air flow and geophysical fluid dynamics. The model approximates the flow in the shear layer as a linear profile separating uniform-velocity streams. Both the channel geometry and wall drag affect the development of the flow. The model shows good agreement with both particle image velocimetry experiments and computational turbulence modelling. The simplicity and low computational cost of the model allows it to be used for benchmark predictions and design purposes, which we demonstrate by investigating optimal pressure recovery in diffusers with non-uniform inflow.

  9. Shear layer characteristics of supersonic free and impinging jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. B.; Kumar, R.

    2015-09-01

    The initial shear layer characteristics of a jet play an important role in the initiation and development of instabilities and hence radiated noise. Particle image velocimetry has been utilized to study the initial shear layer development of supersonic free and impinging jets. Microjet control employed to reduce flow unsteadiness and jet noise appears to affect the development of the shear layer, particularly near the nozzle exit. Velocity field measurements near the nozzle exit show that the initially thin, uncontrolled shear layer develops at a constant rate while microjet control is characterized by a rapid nonlinear thickening that asymptotes downstream. The shear layer linear growth rate with microjet control, in both the free and the impinging jet, is diminished. In addition, the thickened shear layer with control leads to a reduction in azimuthal vorticity for both free and impinging jets. Linear stability theory is used to compute unstable growth rates and convection velocities of the resultant velocity profiles. The results show that while the convection velocity is largely unaffected, the unstable growth rates are significantly reduced over all frequencies with microjet injection. For the case of the impinging jet, microjet control leads to near elimination of the impingement tones and an appreciable reduction in broadband levels. Similarly, for the free jet, significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels in the peak radiation direction is observed.

  10. Shear wave propagation in piezoelectric-piezoelectric composite layered structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Mli Gaur

    Full Text Available The propagation behavior of shear wave in piezoelectric composite structure is investigated by two layer model presented in this approach. The composite structure comprises of piezoelectric layers of two different materials bonded alternatively. Dispersion equations are derived for propagation along the direction normal to the layering and in direction of layering. It has been revealed that thickness and elastic constants have significant influence on propagation behavior of shear wave. The phase velocity and wave number is numerically calculated for alternative layer of Polyvinylidene Difluoride (PVDF and Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H in composite layered structure. The analysis carried out in this paper evaluates the effect of volume fraction on the phase velocity of shear wave.

  11. Determination of wall shear stress from mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Schultz, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the Reynolds shear stress profile in steady, two-dimensional wall-bounded flows using the mean streamwise velocity. The method is then utilized with experimental data to determine the local wall shear stress. The procedure is applicable to flows on smooth and rough surfaces with arbitrary pressure gradients. It is based on the streamwise component of the boundary layer momentum equation, which is transformed into inner coordinates. The method requires velocity profiles from at least two streamwise locations, but the formulation of the momentum equation reduces the dependence on streamwise gradients. The method is verified through application to laminar flow solutions and turbulent DNS results from both zero and nonzero pressure gradient boundary layers. With strong favorable pressure gradients, the method is shown to be accurate for finding the wall shear stress in cases where the Clauser fit technique loses accuracy. The method is then applied to experimental data from the literature from zero pressure gradient studies on smooth and rough walls, and favorable and adverse pressure gradient cases on smooth walls. Data from very near the wall are not required for determination of the wall shear stress. Wall friction velocities obtained using the present method agree with those determined in the original studies, typically to within 2%.

  12. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  13. Velocity-pressure correlation measurements in complex free shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, Yoshitsugu; Obi, Shinnosuke

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of fluctuating velocity and pressure were performed in various turbulent free shear flows including a turbulent mixing layer and the wing-tip vortex trailing from a NACA0012 half-wing. Two different methods for fluctuating static pressure measurement were considered: a direct method using a miniature Pitot tube and an indirect method where static pressure was calculated from total pressure. The pressure obtained by either of these methods was correlated with the velocity measured by an X-type hot-wire probe. The results from these two techniques agreed with each other in the turbulent mixing layer. In the wing-tip vortex case, however, some discrepancies were found, although overall characteristics of the pressure-related statistics were adequately captured by both methods.

  14. Shear layer flame stabilization sensitivities in a swirling flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Foley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of different flame configurations and heat release distributions exist in high swirl, annular flows, due to the existence of inner and outer shear layers as well a vortex breakdown bubble. Each of these different configurations, in turn, has different thermoacoustic sensitivities and influences on combustor emissions, nozzle durability, and liner heating. This paper presents findings on the sensitivities of the outer shear layer- stabilized flames to a range of parameters, including equivalence ratio, bulkhead temperature, flow velocity, and preheat temperature. There is significant hysteresis for flame attachment/detachment from the outer shear layer and this hysteresis is also described. Results are also correlated with extinction stretch rate calculations based on detailed kinetic simulations. In addition, we show that the bulkhead temperature near the flame attachment point has significant impact on outer shear layer detachment. This indicates that understanding the heat transfer between the edge flame stabilized in the shear layer and the nozzle hardware is needed in order to predict shear layer flame stabilization limits. Moreover, it shows that simulations cannot simply assume adiabatic boundary conditions if they are to capture these transitions. We also show that the reference temperature for correlating these transitions is quite different for attachment and local blow off. Finally, these results highlight the deficiencies in current understanding of the influence of fluid mechanic parameters (e.g. velocity, swirl number on shear layer flame attachment. For example, they show that the seemingly simple matter of scaling flame transition points with changes in flow velocities is not understood.

  15. Prediction of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines are compared with the turbulent boundary layers on airfoils. Seven different aspects are examined. The limits of boundary layer theory are investigated. Boundary layer prediction methods are applied to analysis of the flow in turbomachines.

  16. Comparison of shear-wave velocity measurements by crosshole, downhole and seismic cone penetration test methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suthaker, N.; Tweedie, R. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are an integral part of geotechnical studies for major structures and are an important tool in their design for site specific conditions such as site-specific earthquake response. This paper reported on a study in which shear wave velocities were measured at a proposed petrochemical plant site near Edmonton, Alberta. The proposed site is underlain by lacustrine clay, glacial till and upper Cretaceous clay shale and sandstone bedrock. The most commonly used methods for determining shear wave velocity include crosshole seismic tests, downhole seismic tests, and seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT). This paper presented the results of all 3 methods used in this study and provided a comparison of the various test methods and their limitations. The crosshole test results demonstrated a common trend of increasing shear wave velocity with depth to about 15 m, below which the velocities remained relatively constant. An anomaly was noted at one site, where the shear wave velocity was reduced at a zone corresponding to clay till containing stiff high plastic clay layers. The field study demonstrated that reasonable agreement in shear wave velocity measurements can be made using crosshole, downhole and seismic tests in the same soil conditions. The National Building Code states that the shear wave velocity is the fundamental method for determining site classification, thus emphasizing the importance of obtaining shear wave velocity measurements for site classification. It was concluded that an SCPT program can be incorporated into the field program without much increase in cost and can be supplemented by downhole or crosshole techniques. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  17. Particle transport across a circular shear layer with coherent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lynov, J.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics of coherent structures, forced circular shear flows offer many desirable features. The inherent quantisation of circular geometries due to the periodic boundary conditions makes it possible to design experiments in which the spatial and temporal complexity of the coherent structures can be accurately controlled. Experiments on circular shear flows demonstrating the formation of coherent structures have been performed in different physical systems, including quasi-neutral plasmas, non-neutral plasmas and rotating fluids. In this paper we investigate the evolution of such coherent structures by solving the forced incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically using a spectral code. The model is formulated in the context of a rotating fluid but apply equally well to low frequency electrostatic oscillations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma. In order to reveal the Lagrangian properties of the flow and in particular to investigate the transport capacity in the shear layer, passive particles are traced by the velocity field. (orig.)

  18. Influence of velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Satyanarayana, P.; Huba, J.D.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a transverse velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is found that a sheared velocity flow can substantially reduce the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in short wavelength regime (i.e., kL>1 where L is the scale length of the density inhomogeneity), and causes the growth rate to maximize at kL<1.0. Applications of this result to ionospheric phenomena [equatorial spread F (ESF) and ionospheric plasma clouds] are discussed. In particular, the effect of shear could account for, at times, the 100's of km modulation observed on the bottomside of the ESF ionosphere and the km scale size wavelengths observed in barium cloud prompt striation phenomena

  19. Self-organization in circular shear layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, K.; Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on forced circular shear layers performed in both magnetized plasmas and in rotating fluids reveal qualitatively similar self-organization processes leading to the formation of patterns of coherent vortical structures with varying complexity. In this paper results are presented from...... both weakly nonlinear analysis and full numerical simulations that closely reproduce the experimental observations. Varying the Reynolds number leads to bifurcation sequences accompanied by topological changes in the distribution of the coherent structures as well as clear transitions in the total...

  20. Velocity shear generated Alfven waves in electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogava, A.D.; Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Linear MHD modes in cold, nonrelativistic electron-positron plasma shear flow are considered. The general set of differential equations, describing the evolution of perturbations in the framework of the nonmodal approach is derived. It is found, that under certain circumstances, the compressional and shear Alfven perturbations may exhibit large transient growth fuelled by the mean kinetic energy of the shear flow. The velocity shear also induces mode coupling allowing the exchange of energy as well as the possibility of a strong mutual transformation of these modes into each other. The compressional Alfven mode may extract the energy of the mean flow and transfer it to the shear Alfven mode via this coupling. The relevance of these new physical effects to provide a better understanding of the laboratory e + e - plasma is emphasized. It is speculated that the shear-induced effects in the electron-positron plasmas could also help solve some astrophysical puzzles (e.g., the generation of pulsar radio emission). Since most astrophysical plasma are relativistic, it is shown that the major results of the study remain valid for weakly sheared relativistic plasmas. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  1. Physics of Transitional Shear Flows Instability and Laminar–Turbulent Transition in Incompressible Near-Wall Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boiko, Andrey V; Grek, Genrih R; Kozlov, Victor V

    2012-01-01

    Starting from fundamentals of classical stability theory, an overview is given of the transition phenomena in subsonic, wall-bounded shear flows. At first, the consideration focuses on elementary small-amplitude velocity perturbations of laminar shear layers, i.e. instability waves, in the simplest canonical configurations of a plane channel flow and a flat-plate boundary layer. Then the linear stability problem is expanded to include the effects of pressure gradients, flow curvature, boundary-layer separation, wall compliance, etc. related to applications. Beyond the amplification of instability waves is the non-modal growth of local stationary and non-stationary shear flow perturbations which are discussed as well. The volume continues with the key aspect of the transition process, that is, receptivity of convectively unstable shear layers to external perturbations, summarizing main paths of the excitation of laminar flow disturbances. The remainder of the book addresses the instability phenomena found at l...

  2. Amphibious Shear Velocity Structure of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, H. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Abers, G. A.; Gao, H.

    2017-12-01

    The amphibious Cascadia Initiative crosses the coastline of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) deploying seismometers from the Juan de Fuca ridge offshore to beyond the volcanic arc onshore. This allows unprecedented seismic imaging of the CSZ, enabling examination of both the evolution of the Juan de Fuca plate prior to and during subduction as well as the along strike variability of the subduction system. Here we present new results from an amphibious shear velocity model for the crust and upper mantle across the Cascadia subduction zone. The primary data used in this inversion are surface-wave phase velocities derived from ambient-noise Rayleigh-wave data in the 10 - 20 s period band, and teleseismic earthquake Rayleigh wave phase velocities in the 20 - 160 s period band. Phase velocity maps from these data reflect major tectonic structures including the transition from oceanic to continental lithosphere, Juan de Fuca lithosphere that is faster than observations in the Pacific for oceanic crust of its age, slow velocities associated with the accretionary prism, the front of the fast subducting slab, and the Cascades volcanic arc which is associated with slower velocities in the south than in the north. Crustal structures are constrained by receiver functions in the offshore forearc and onshore regions, and by active source constraints on the Juan de Fuca plate prior to subduction. The shear-wave velocities are interpreted in their relationships to temperature, presence of melt or hydrous alteration, and compositional variation of the CSZ.

  3. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  4. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  5. Spectral analysis of surface waves method to assess shear wave velocity within centrifuge models

    OpenAIRE

    MURILLO, Carol Andrea; THOREL, Luc; CAICEDO, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    The method of the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is tested out on reduced scale centrifuge models, with a specific device, called the mini Falling Weight, developed for this purpose. Tests are performed on layered materials made of a mixture of sand and clay. The shear wave velocity VS determined within the models using the SASW is compared with the laboratory measurements carried out using the bender element test. The results show that the SASW technique applied to centrifuge test...

  6. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  7. Lunar near-surface shear wave velocities at the Apollo landing sites as inferred from spectral amplitude ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, P.; Latham, G. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The horizontal-to-vertical amplitude ratios of the long-period seismograms are reexamined to determine the shear wave velocity distributions at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 lunar landing sites. Average spectral ratios, computed from a number of impact signals, were compared with spectral ratios calculated for the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves in media consisting of homogeneous, isotropic, horizontal layers. The shear velocities of the best fitting models at the different sites resemble each other and differ from the average for all sites by not more than 20% except for the bottom layer at station 14. The shear velocities increase from 40 m/s at the surface to about 400 m/s at depths between 95 and 160 m at the various sites. Within this depth range the velocity-depth functions are well represented by two piecewise linear segments, although the presence of first-order discontinuities cannot be ruled out.

  8. Extended theory of main ion and impurity rotation and bootstrap current in a shear layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Hinton, F.L.; St. John, H.; Taylor, T.S.; Wroblewski, D.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, standard neoclassical theory has been extended into the shear layer. Main ion and impurity ion rotation velocity and bootstrap current within shear layer in H-mode are discussed. Inside the H-mode shear layer, standard neoclassical theory is not valid since the ion poloidal gyroradius becomes comparable to pressure gradient and electric field gradient scale length. To allow for arbitrary ratio of ρθi/L n and ρθi/L Er a new kinetic theory of main ion species within electric field shear layer has been developed with the assumption that ρθi/R o is still small. As a consequence, both impurity flows and bootstrap current have to be modified. We present modified expressions of impurity flows and bootstrap current are presented neglecting ion temperature gradient. Comparisons with DIII-D measurements are also discussed

  9. The formation of sporadic E layers by a vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal wind shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Didebulidze

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the mid-latitude sporadic E layers (Es layers by an atmospheric vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal shear flow (horizontal wind with a horizontal linear shear is investigated. A three-dimensional atmospheric vortical perturbation (atmospheric shear waves, whose velocity vector is in the horizontal plane and has a vertical wavenumber kz≠0, can provide a vertical shear of the horizontal wind. The shear waves influence the vertical transport of heavy metallic ions and their convergence into thin and dense horizontal layers. The proposed mechanism takes into account the dynamical influence of the shear wave velocity in the horizontal wind on the vertical drift velocity of the ions. It also can explain the multi-layer structure of Es layers. The pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the value of the shear-wave vertical wavelength, the ion-neutral collision frequency and the direction of the background horizontal wind. The modelling of formation of sporadic E layers with a single and a double peak is presented. Also, the importance of shear wave coupling with short-period atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs on the variations of sporadic E layer ion density is examined and discussed.

  10. Constitutive Curve and Velocity Profile in Entangled Polymers during Start-Up of Steady Shear Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Qi, Haibo; Cohen, Itai; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    -4]. Surprisingly, we find that even polymer systems which exhibit transient, nonmonotonic shear stress-shear rate relationships in bulk rheology experiments manifest time-dependent velocity profiles that are decidedly linear and show no evidence of unstable flow

  11. Fluid Effects on Shear Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-01-01

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored by this modulus by a term that ranges from the smallest to the largest shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the increase in shear energy overall is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of shear modulus, being about 20% of the permitted range, when gas is fully replaced by liquid. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. Thus, an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable - i.e., when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy), and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity

  12. Structure of high and low shear-stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomit, G.; de Kat, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and wall-shear-stress sensor measurements were performed to study structures associated with shear-stress events in a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at a Reynolds number Reτ≈4000 . The PIV field of view covers 8 δ (where δ is the boundary layer thickness) along the streamwise direction and captures the entire boundary layer in the wall-normal direction. Simultaneously, wall-shear-stress measurements that capture the large-scale fluctuations were taken using a spanwise array of hot-film skin-friction sensors (spanning 2 δ ). Based on this combination of measurements, the organization of the conditional wall-normal and streamwise velocity fluctuations (u and v ) and of the Reynolds shear stress (-u v ) can be extracted. Conditional averages of the velocity field are computed by dividing the histogram of the large-scale wall-shear-stress fluctuations into four quartiles, each containing 25% of the occurrences. The conditional events corresponding to the extreme quartiles of the histogram (positive and negative) predominantly contribute to a change of velocity profile associated with the large structures and in the modulation of the small scales. A detailed examination of the Reynolds shear-stress contribution related to each of the four quartiles shows that the flow above a low wall-shear-stress event carries a larger amount of Reynolds shear stress than the other quartiles. The contribution of the small and large scales to this observation is discussed based on a scale decomposition of the velocity field.

  13. Spectral analysis of surface waves method to assess shear wave velocity within centrifuge models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Carol Andrea; Thorel, Luc; Caicedo, Bernardo

    2009-06-01

    The method of the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is tested out on reduced scale centrifuge models, with a specific device, called the mini Falling Weight, developed for this purpose. Tests are performed on layered materials made of a mixture of sand and clay. The shear wave velocity VS determined within the models using the SASW is compared with the laboratory measurements carried out using the bender element test. The results show that the SASW technique applied to centrifuge testing is a relevant method to characterize VS near the surface.

  14. Large scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer and their imprint on wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a turbulent boundary layer developing on a flat plate model under zero pressure gradient flow. A MEMS differential capacitive shear stress sensor with a 1 mm × 1 mm floating element was used to capture the fluctuating wall shear stress simultaneously with streamwise velocity measurements from a hot-wire anemometer traversed in the wall normal direction. Near the wall, the peak in the cross correlation corresponds to an organized motion inclined 45° from the wall. In the outer region, the peak diminishes in value, but is still significant at a distance greater than half the boundary layer thickness, and corresponds to a structure inclined 14° from the wall. High coherence between the two signals was found for the low-frequency content, reinforcing the belief that large scale structures have a vital impact on wall shear stress. Thus, estimation of the wall shear stress from the low-frequency velocity signal will be performed, and is expected to be statistically significant in the outer boundary layer. Additionally, conditionally averaged mean velocity profiles will be presented to assess the effects of high and low shear stress. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Adiabatic Shear Banding at Different Impact Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    plasticity and ASB’s is the Double-notch Shear specimen, it has been decided to use this concept in shear testing at medium and high strain rates...is the Double-notch Shear specimen. it has been decided to use this concept in shear testing at medium and high strain rates. Originally, Campbell...7] C. Fressengeas, Analyse dynamique 61asto-viscoplastique de l’h6tdrogdndit6 de la ddforma- tion plastique de cisalllement, Proc. Int. Conf. on

  16. Rayleigh wave group velocity and shear wave velocity structure in the San Francisco Bay region from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Thurber, Clifford

    2018-06-01

    We derive new Rayleigh wave group velocity models and a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the upper crust in the San Francisco Bay region using an adaptive grid ambient noise tomography algorithm and 6 months of continuous seismic data from 174 seismic stations from multiple networks. The resolution of the group velocity models is 0.1°-0.2° for short periods (˜3 s) and 0.3°-0.4° for long periods (˜10 s). The new shear wave velocity model of the upper crust reveals a number of important structures. We find distinct velocity contrasts at the Golden Gate segment of the San Andreas Fault, the West Napa Fault, central part of the Hayward Fault and southern part of the Calaveras Fault. Low shear wave velocities are mainly located in Tertiary and Quaternary basins, for instance, La Honda Basin, Livermore Valley and the western and eastern edges of Santa Clara Valley. Low shear wave velocities are also observed at the Sonoma volcanic field. Areas of high shear wave velocity include the Santa Lucia Range, the Gabilan Range and Ben Lomond Plutons, and the Diablo Range, where Franciscan Complex or Silinian rocks are exposed.

  17. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  19. Conditional analysis near strong shear layers in DNS of isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Hunt, Julian C R, E-mail: ishihara@cse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [University College of London (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    Data analysis of high resolution DNS of isotropic turbulence with the Taylor scale Reynolds number R{sub {lambda}} = 1131 shows that there are thin shear layers consisting of a cluster of strong vortex tubes with typical diameter of order 10{eta}, where {eta} is the Kolmogorov length scale. The widths of the layers are of the order of the Taylor micro length scale. According to the analysis of one of the layers, coarse grained vorticity in the layer are aligned approximately in the plane of the layer so that there is a net mean shear across the layer with a mean velocity jump of the order of the root-mean-square of the fluctuating velocity, and energy dissipation averaged over the layer is larger than ten times the average over the whole flow. The mean and the standard deviation of the energy transfer T(x, {kappa}) from scales larger than 1/{kappa} to scales smaller than 1/{kappa} at position x are largest within the layers (where the most intense vortices and dissipation occur), but are also large just outside the layers (where viscous stresses are weak), by comparison with the average values of T over the whole region. The DNS data are consistent with exterior fluctuation being damped/filtered at the interface of the layer and then selectively amplified within the layer.

  20. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization

  1. Compressibility effects in the shear layer over a rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin; Casper, Katya Marie

    2016-10-26

    we studied the influence of compressibility on the shear layer over a rectangular cavity of variable width in a free stream Mach number range of 0.6–2.5 using particle image velocimetry data in the streamwise centre plane. As the Mach number increases, the vertical component of the turbulence intensity diminishes modestly in the widest cavity, but the two narrower cavities show a more substantial drop in all three components as well as the turbulent shear stress. Furthermore, this contrasts with canonical free shear layers, which show significant reductions in only the vertical component and the turbulent shear stress due to compressibility. The vorticity thickness of the cavity shear layer grows rapidly as it initially develops, then transitions to a slower growth rate once its instability saturates. When normalized by their estimated incompressible values, the growth rates prior to saturation display the classic compressibility effect of suppression as the convective Mach number rises, in excellent agreement with comparable free shear layer data. The specific trend of the reduction in growth rate due to compressibility is modified by the cavity width.

  2. Shear-wave velocity models and seismic sources in Campanian volcanic areas: Vesuvius and Phlegraean fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidarelli, M; Zille, A; Sarao, A [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Natale, M; Nunziata, C [Dipartimento di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Panza, G F [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    This chapter summarizes a comparative study of shear-wave velocity models and seismic sources in the Campanian volcanic areas of Vesuvius and Phlegraean Fields. These velocity models were obtained through the nonlinear inversion of surface-wave tomography data, using as a priori constraints the relevant information available in the literature. Local group velocity data were obtained by means of the frequency-time analysis for the time period between 0.3 and 2 s and were combined with the group velocity data for the time period between 10 and 35 s from the regional events located in the Italian peninsula and bordering areas and two station phase velocity data corresponding to the time period between 25 and 100 s. In order to invert Rayleigh wave dispersion curves, we applied the nonlinear inversion method called hedgehog and retrieved average models for the first 30-35 km of the lithosphere, with the lower part of the upper mantle being kept fixed on the basis of existing regional models. A feature that is common to the two volcanic areas is a low shear velocity layer which is centered at the depth of about 10 km, while on the outside of the cone and along a path in the northeastern part of the Vesuvius area this layer is absent. This low velocity can be associated with the presence of partial melting and, therefore, may represent a quite diffused crustal magma reservoir which is fed by a deeper one that is regional in character and located in the uppermost mantle. The study of seismic source in terms of the moment tensor is suitable for an investigation of physical processes within a volcano; indeed, its components, double couple, compensated linear vector dipole, and volumetric, can be related to the movements of magma and fluids within the volcanic system. Although for many recent earthquake events the percentage of double couple component is high, our results also show the presence of significant non-double couple components in both volcanic areas. (author)

  3. Angular velocity of a spheroid log rolling in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibohm, Jan; Candelier, Fabien; Rosen, Tomas; Einarsson, Jonas; Lundell, Fredrik; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω -> equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω / s = - 1 / 2 + 0 . 0540Re 3 / 2 where s is the shear rate and Re is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  4. Shear-wave velocities beneath the Harrat Rahat volcanic field, Saudi Arabia, using ambient seismic noise analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilini, F.; Mooney, W.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.; Zahran, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present seismic shear-velocities for Harrat Rahat, a Cenozoic bimodal alkaline volcanic field in west-central Saudi Arabia, using seismic tomography from natural ambient noise. This project is part of an overall effort by the Saudi Geological Survey and the United States Geological Survey to describe the subsurface structure and assess hazards within the Saudi Arabian shield. Volcanism at Harrat Rahat began approximately 10 Ma, with at least three pulses around 10, 5, and 2 Ma, and at least several pulses in the Quaternary from 1.9 Ma to the present. This area is instrumented by 14 broadband Nanometrics Trillium T120 instruments across an array aperture of approximately 130 kilometers. We used a year of recorded natural ambient noise to determine group and phase velocity surface wave dispersion maps with a 0.1 decimal degree resolution for radial-radial, transverse-transverse, and vertical-vertical components of the empirical Green's function. A grid-search method was used to carry out 1D shear-velocity inversions at each latitude-longitude point and the results were interpolated to produce pseudo-3D shear velocity models. The dispersion maps resolved a zone of slow surface wave velocity south-east of the city of Medina spatially correlated with the 1256 CE eruption. A crustal layer interface at approximately 20 km depth was determined by the inversions for all components, matching the results of prior seismic-refraction studies. Cross-sections of the 3D shear velocity models were compared to gravity measurements obtained in the south-east edge of the field. We found that measurements of low gravity qualitatively correlate with low values of shear-velocity below 20 km along the cross-section profile. We apply these methods to obtain preliminary tomography results on the entire Arabian Shield.

  5. Numerical Investigation of a Heated, Sheared Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yu-Chieng

    1996-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer (PBL) developed on 11 July, 1987 during the First International Satellites Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) is investigated numerically by a two dimensional and a three dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model. Most of the simulated mean and statistical properties are utilized to compare or verify against the observational results extracted from single Doppler lidar scans conducted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) on the same day. Through the methods of field measurements and numerical simulations, it is found that this PBL, in contrast to the well-known convective boundary layer (CBL), is driven by not only buoyancy but also wind shear. Large eddies produced by the surface heating, as well as internal gravity waves excited by the convection, are both present in the boundary layer. The most unique feature is that in the stable layer, the momentum flux ({overlinerm u^' w^'}), transported by the gravity waves, is counter-gradient. The occurrence of this phenomenon is interpreted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) using the theory of critical layer singularity, and is confirmed by the numerical simulations in this study. Qualitative agreements are achieved between the model-generated and lidar-derived results. However, quantitative comparisons are less satisfactory. The most serious discrepancy is that in the stable layer the magnitudes of the observed momentum flux ({overlinerm u^ ' w^'}) and vertical velocity variance ({overlinerm w^'^2}) are much larger than their simulated counterparts. Nevertheless, through the technique of numerical simulation, evidence is collected to show inconsistencies among the observations. Thus, the lidar measurements of {overline rm u^' w^'} and {overlinerm w^ '^2} seem to be doubtful. A Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) experiment is performed in order to connect the evolution of the model integration with the observations. The results indicate that the dynamical relaxation

  6. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  7. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  8. Hot Wire Measurements in a Axisymmetric Shear Layer with Swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, D.; Pollard, A.

    1996-11-01

    It is well known that the introduction of swirl in an axisymmetric jet can influence the development of and mixing in the near field of the jet. Recent efforts to compute this flow have demonstrated that the development of the near field is dependent on parameters at the jet outlet other than distribution of the swirl component, such as the distribution the mean radial velocity (Xai, J.L., Smith, B.L., Benim, A. C., Schmidli, J., and Yadigaroglu, G. (1996) Influence of Boundary Conditions on Swirling Flow in Combustors, Proc. ASME Fluid. Eng. Div. Summer Meeting), San Diego, Ca., July 7-11.. An experimental rig has been designed to produce co-axial round and annular swirling jets with uniform outlet conditions in each flow. The flow rate and swirl component from each of these jets can be controlled independently and the rig can be configured to produce both co- and counter-swirling flows. Thus, the rig can be used to carry out an extensive investigation of the effect of swirl on the development of axisymmetric flows. The key design features of the rig and the first sets of hot-wire measurements in the shear layer will be reported here.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in astrophysics. 4. Single shear layer in MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale); Trussoni, E [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik)

    1983-11-01

    In this further paper on the physics of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities the case in which the fluids in relative motion are magnetized and separated by a shear layer is investigated. The present study points out, with respect to previous treatments, that different velocity profiles affect perturbations of short wavelength (as compared to the scale of the shear). Another new result is in the destabilizing effect, even in the subsonic regime, of the magnetic field on modes neutrally stable in the vortex sheet approximation. Such a behaviour is analogous to that found in the fluid case for Mach numbers >approx. = to 2. Possible astrophysical implications are also discussed.

  10. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  11. Convection of wall shear stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Mills, David; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The fluctuating wall shear stress is measured in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer of Reτ 1700 simultaneously with velocity measurements using either hot-wire anemometry or particle image velocimetry. These experiments elucidate the patterns of large scale structures in a single point measurement of the wall shear stress, as well as their convection velocity at the wall. The wall shear stress sensor is a CS-A05 one-dimensional capacitice floating element from Interdisciplinary Consulting Corp. It has a nominal bandwidth from DC to 5 kHz and a floating element size of 1 mm in the principal sensing direction (streamwise) and 0.2 mm in the cross direction (spanwise), allowing the large scales to be well resolved in the current experimental conditions. In addition, a two sensor array of CS-A05 aligned in the spanwise direction with streamwise separations O (δ) is utilized to capture the convection velocity of specific scales of the shear stress through a bandpass filter and peaks in the correlation. Thus, an average wall normal position for the corresponding convecting event can be inferred at least as high as the equivalent local streamwise velocity. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  12. Constitutive Curve and Velocity Profile in Entangled Polymers during Start-Up of Steady Shear Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2010-05-11

    Time-dependent shear stress versus shear rate, constitutive curve, and velocity profile measurements are reported in entangled polymer solutions during start-up of steady shear flow. By combining confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we determine the time-dependent velocity profile in polybutadiene and polystyrene solutions seeded with fluorescent 150 nm silica and 7.5 μm melamine particles. By comparing these profiles with time-dependent constitutive curves obtained from experiment and theory, we explore the connection between transient nonmonotonic regions in the constitutive curve for an entangled polymer and its susceptibility to unstable flow by shear banding [Adams et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 102, 067801-4]. Surprisingly, we find that even polymer systems which exhibit transient, nonmonotonic shear stress-shear rate relationships in bulk rheology experiments manifest time-dependent velocity profiles that are decidedly linear and show no evidence of unstable flow. We also report that interfacial slip plays an important role in the steady shear flow behavior of entangled polymers at shear rates above the reciprocal terminal relaxation time but has little, if any, effect on the shape of the velocity profile. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Renal shear wave velocity by acoustic radiation force impulse did not reflect advanced renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Koda, Masahiko; Sugihara, Takaaki; Sugihara, Shinobu; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Matono, Tomomitsu; Hosho, Keiko; Mae, Yukari; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse is a noninvasive method for evaluating tissue elasticity on ultrasound. Renal shear wave velocity measured by this technique has not been fully investigated in patients with renal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare renal shear wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients and that in patients without chronic kidney disease and to investigate influencing factors. Renal shear wave velocities were measured in 59 healthy young subjects (control group), 31 subjects without chronic kidney disease (non-CKD group), and 39 end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD group). Each measurement was performed 10 times at both kidneys, and the mean value of eight of 10 measurements, excluding the maximum and minimum values, was compared. Renal shear wave velocity could be measured in all subjects. Renal shear wave velocity in the control group was higher than in the non-CKD group and in the ESRD group, and no difference was found between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group. Age and depth were negatively correlated to the renal shear wave velocity. In multiple regression analysis, age and depth were independent factors for renal shear wave velocity, while renal impairment was not. There was no difference between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group, even when ages were matched and depth was adjusted. Renal shear wave velocity was not associated with advanced renal impairment. However, it reflected alteration of renal aging, and this technique may be useful to detect renal impairment in the earlier stages. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  14. Effects of the shear layer growth rate on the supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yuta; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Mamori, Hiroya; Fukushima, Naoya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    Strong acoustic waves emitted from rocket plume might damage to rocket payloads because their payloads consist of fragile structure. Therefore, understanding and prediction of acoustic wave generation are of importance not only in science, but also in engineering. The present study makes experiments of a supersonic jet flow at the Mach number of 2.0 and investigates a relationship between growth rate of a shear layer and noise generation of the supersonic jet. We conducted particle image velocimetry (PIV) and acoustic measurements for three different shaped nozzles. These nozzles were employed to control the condition of a shear layer of the supersonic jet flow. We applied single-pixel ensemble correlation method (Westerweel et al., 2004) for the PIV images to obtain high-resolution averaged velocity profiles. This correlation method enabled us to obtain detailed data of the shear layer. For all cases, acoustic measurements clearly shows the noise source position at the end of a potential core of the jet. In the case where laminar to turbulent transition occurred in the shear layer, the sound pressure level increased by 4 dB at the maximum. This research is partially supported by Presto, JST (JPMJPR1678) and KAKENHI (25709009 and 17H03473).

  15. Simultaneous wall-shear-stress and wide-field PIV measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomit, Guillaume; Fourrie, Gregoire; de Kat, Roeland; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and hot-film shear stress sensor measurements were performed to study the large-scale structures associated with shear stress events in a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at a high Reynolds number (Reτ ~ 4000). The PIV measurement was performed in a streamwise-wall normal plane using an array of six high resolution cameras (4 ×16MP and 2 ×29MP). The resulting field of view covers 8 δ (where δ is the boundary layer thickness) in the streamwise direction and captures the entire boundary layer in the wall-normal direction. The spatial resolution of the measurement is approximately is approximately 70 wall units (1.8 mm) and sampled each 35 wall units (0.9 mm). In association with the PIV setup, a spanwise array of 10 skin-friction sensors (spanning one δ) was used to capture the footprint of the large-scale structures. This combination of measurements allowed the analysis of the three-dimensional conditional structures in the boundary layer. Particularly, from conditional averages, the 3D organisation of the wall normal and streamwise velocity components (u and v) and the Reynolds shear stress (-u'v') related to a low and high shear stress events can be extracted. European Research Council Grant No-277472-WBT.

  16. Extremely high wall-shear stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chong; Kwon, Yongseok

    2018-04-01

    The present work studies the fluctuating characteristics of the streamwise wall-shear stress in a DNS of a turbulent boundary layer at Re τ =1500 from a structural view. The two-dimensional field of the fluctuating friction velocity u‧ τ (x,z) is decomposed into the large- and small-scale components via a recently proposed scale separation algorithm, Quasi-bivariate Variational Mode Decomposition (QB-VMD). Both components are found to be dominated by streak-like structures, which can be regarded as the wall signature of the inner-layer streaks and the outer-layer LSMs, respectively. Extreme positive/negative wall-shear stress fluctuation events are detected in the large-scale component. The former’s occurrence frequency is nearly one order of magnitude higher than the latter; therefore, they contribute a significant portion of the long tail of the wall-shear stress distribution. Both two-point correlations and conditional averages show that these extreme positive wall-shear stress events are embedded in the large-scale positive u‧ τ streaks. They seem to be formed by near-wall ‘splatting’ process, which are related to strong finger-like sweeping (Q4) events originated from the outer-layer positive LSMs.

  17. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartantyo, Eddy, E-mail: hartantyo@ugm.ac.id [PhD student, Physics Department, FMIPA, UGM. Sekip Utara Yogyakarta 55281 Indonesia (Indonesia); Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo [Geophysics Laboratory, FMIPA, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  19. Shear wave velocity structure of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgaswane, EM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available crustal layers may be as high as 3.7–3.8 km/s, consistent with the presence of mafic lithologies. These results favor a continuous-sheet model for the Bushveld Complex in which the outcropping mafic layers of the western and eastern limbs are continuous...

  20. 3D shear wave velocity structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a DAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.

    2017-12-01

    An 8700-m Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable was deployed at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 in a 1.5 by 0.5 km study area. The layout of the DAS array was designed with a zig-zag geometry to obtain relatively uniform areal and varied angular coverage, providing very dense coverage with a one-meter channel spacing. This array continuously recorded signals of a vibroseis truck, earthquakes, and traffic noise during the 15-day deployment. As shown in a previous study (Zeng et al., 2017), ambient noise tomography can be applied to DAS continuous records to image shear wave velocity structure in the near surface. To avoid effects of the vibroseis truck operation, only continuous data recorded during the nighttime was used to compute noise cross-correlation functions for channel pairs within a given linear segment. The frequency band of whitening was set at 5 to 15 Hz and the length of the cross-correlation time window was set to 60 second. The phase velocities were determined using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) methodology. The phase velocity dispersion curve was then used to invert for shear wave velocity profiles. A preliminarily velocity model at Brady's Hot Springs (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 2015) was used as the starting model and the sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities were computed with this model. As the sensitivity kernel shows, shear wave velocity in the top 200 m can be constrained with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities in our frequency band. With the picked phase velocity data, the shear wave velocity structure can be obtained via Occam's inversion (Constable et al., 1987; Lai 1998). Shear wave velocity gradually increases with depth and it is generally faster than the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2015) model. Furthermore, that model has limiting constraints at shallow depth. The strong spatial variation is interpreted to reflect the different sediments and

  1. Shear velocity structure of the laterally heterogeneous crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, G.; Rai, S. S.; Panza, G. F.

    1997-08-01

    The shear velocity structure of the Indian lithosphere is mapped by inverting regionalized Rayleigh wave group velocities in time periods of 15-60 s. The regionalized maps are used to subdivide the Indian plate into several geologic units and determine the variation of velocity with depth in each unit. The Hedgehog Monte Carlo technique is used to obtain the shear wave velocity structure for each geologic unit, revealing distinct velocity variations in the lower crust and uppermost mantle. The Indian shield has a high-velocity (4.4-4.6 km/s) upper mantle which, however, is slower than other shields in the world. The central Indian platform comprised of Proterozoic basins and cratons is marked by a distinct low-velocity (4.0-4.2 km/s) upper mantle. Lower crustal velocities in the Indian lithosphere generally range between 3.8 and 4.0 km/s with the oceanic segments and the sedimentary basins marked by marginally higher and lower velocities, respectively. A remarkable contrast is observed in upper mantle velocities between the northern and eastern convergence fronts of the Indian plate. The South Bruma region along the eastern subduction front of the Indian oceanic lithosphere shows significant velocity enhancement in the lower crust and upper mantle. High velocities (≈4.8 km/s) are also observed in the upper mantle beneath the Ninetyeast ridge in the northeastern Indian Ocean.

  2. Numerical Study of the Critical Impact Velocity in Shear. Appendix Number 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klosak, M

    1996-01-01

    .... A numerical study of impact shearing of a layer has been performed by the FE code ABAQUS. It was intended to verify available experimental results for VAR 4340 steel 52 HRC, obtained by direct...

  3. High resolution 3-D shear wave velocity structure in South China from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, S.; Guo, Z.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Using continuous data from a total of 638 seismic stations, including 484 from CEArray between 2008 and 2013 and 154 from SINOPROBE between 2014 and 2015, we perform both ambient noise and earthquake Rayleigh wave tomography across South China. Combining Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 6and 40s periods from ambient noise tomography and Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 20and 140s from teleseismic two-plane-wave tomography, we obtain phase velocity maps between 6 and140 s periods. We then invert Rayleigh wave phase velocity to construct a 3-D shear wave velocity structure of South China by Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Similar to other inversion results, our results correspond topography well. Moreover, our results also reveal that velocity structure of the eastern South China in mantle depth is similar to eastern North China, the core of the western South China, Sichuan Block (SB),still exists thick lithosphere. However, owing to much more data employed and some data quality control techniques in this research, our results reveal more detailed structures. Along Qinling-Dabie Orogenic Belt (QDOB), North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) and the Sichuan-Yunnan Rhombic Block (SYRB), there are obvious high speed anomalies in depths of 10-20 km, which possibly imply ancient intrusions. Moreover, it seems that Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone (TLFZ) has already cut through QDOB, forming a deep fracture cutting through the crust of the whole China continent. Although SB still exists thick lithosphere, there are indications for thermal erosion. At the same time, the lithosphere of the central SYRB seems to be experiencing delamination process, obviously forming a barrier to prevent the hot Tibetan Plateau (TP) mantle material from flowing further southeast. Upwelling hot mantle material possibly triggered by this delamination process might be the cause of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province. There exists an intercontinental low velocity layer in the crust of the TP

  4. Limiting velocity of reconnection in a current layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgornyj, A.N.; Syrovatskij, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Formation of a plasma current layer from a strong perturbation wave with the Mach magnetic number Msub(a)=1 is investigated numerically within the framework of magnetic hydrodynamics. It is shown that velocity of plasma flowing into the layer is established as small one as compared with the Alfven velocity. At the current layer boundary the Mach magnetic number Msub(a, c)=0.14-0.2. A great decrease in plasma velocity to the current layer results from the counterpressure of a magnetic field, intensity of which near the layer increases due to the storage of magnetic force lines which do not yet reconnect. Calculational results demonstrate the existence of limiting velocity of magnetic reconnection constituting tenth shares of the Mach magnetic number. Influence of this phenomenon on a character of reconnection in the Earth magnetosphere is discussed

  5. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  6. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  7. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahoo Maleki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN. Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  8. Research on definition of hard rock shear wave velocity of site for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhenkun; Xia Zufeng

    2013-01-01

    Background: The definition of hard rock shear wave velocity is one of the most critical issues in the work of site selection. Purpose: To make a definition of hard rock site on which the model can be assumed as fixed-base condition, a series of research had been done. Several possible hard rock site soil models were developed. Methods: Shear wave velocity of hard rock had been assumed from 1100 m/s to 3200 m/s. For each case, free field analysis and soil structure analysis had been performed. And responses in soil and key nodes of structure were compared. Results: In free field analysis, responses of models that shear wave velocity below 2400 m/s decreased a lot. In SSI analysis, structure responses didn't change much when shear wave velocity was above 2400 m/s. Conclusions: 2400 m/s was the lowest shear wave velocity for hard rock site for fixed-base assumption. (authors)

  9. Shear-wave velocity of marine sediments offshore Taiwan using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Tse; Lin, Jing-Yi; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Yeh, Yi-Chin; Cheng, Win-Bin

    2017-04-01

    continental margin offshore SW Taiwan. This observation could be linked to the presence of numerous volcanic outcrops in the shallow marine sediments is the OT area. By comparing the 1-D velocity shear-wave profile with the previous studies, we found that the low Vs area could be associated with a sedimentary layer filled with gas in the OT and the creeping area along the continental margin. The Vs range estimated from our study also shows a good agreement with the velocity profile obtained based on the OBS seismic refraction experiment, suggesting that this method could be a more economical and effective way for the acquisition of the Vs parameters.

  10. LES-ODT Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas; Echekki, Tarek

    2012-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) simulations of a spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layer with heat release and high Reynolds numbers were conducted and compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the same configuration. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine ODT grid, which is embedded in the LES computational domain. The shear layer is simulated with a single-step, second-order reaction with an Arrhenius reaction rate. The transport equations are solved using a low Mach number approximation. The LES-ODT simulations yield reasonably accurate predictions of turbulence and passive/reactive scalars' statistics compared to DNS results.

  11. Critical Velocity for Shear Localization in A Mature Mylonitic Rock Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; van den Ende, M.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Highly localized slip zones, seen within ductile shear zones developed in nature, such as pseudotachylite bands occurring within mylonites, are widely recognized as evidence for earthquake nucleation and/or propagation within and overprinting the ductile regime. To understand brittle/frictional localization processes in ductile shear zones and to connect these to earthquake nucleation and propagation processes, we performed large velocity step-change tests on a brine-saturated, 80:20 (wt. %) halite and muscovite gouge mixture, after forming a mature mylonitic structure through pressure solution creep at low-velocity. The sharp increase in sliding strength that occurs in response to an instantaneous upward velocity-step (direct effect) is an important parameter in determining the potential for and nature of seismic rupture nucleation. We obtained reproducible results regarding low velocity mechanical behavior compared with previous work of Niemeijer and Spiers, [2006], but also obtained new insights into the effects of sudden increases in slip velocity on localization and strength evolution, at velocities above a specific critical velocity Vc ( 20 μm/sec). We found that once a ductile, mylonitic structure has developed in a shear zone, subsequent cataclastic deformation at high velocity (> Vc) is consistently localized in a narrow zone characterized by fine grains of halite aligned in arrays between foliated muscovite Due to this intense localization, structures presumably developed under low velocity conditions were still preserved in large parts of the gouge body. This switch to localized deformation is controlled by the imposed velocity, and becomes most apparent at velocities over Vc. In addition, the direct effect a decreases rapidly when the velocity exceeds Vc. This implies that slip can localize and accelerate towards seismic velocities more or less instantly once Vc is exceeded. Obtaining a measure for Vc in natural faults is therefore of key importance

  12. Estimation of shear velocity contrast for dipping or anisotropic medium from transmitted Ps amplitude variation with ray-parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Amplitude versus offset analysis of P to P reflection is often used in exploration seismology for hydrocarbon exploration. In the present work, the feasibility to estimate crustal velocity structure from transmitted P to S wave amplitude variation with ray-parameter has been investigated separately for dipping layer and anisotropy medium. First, for horizontal and isotropic medium, the approximation of P-to-s conversion is used that is expressed as a linear form in terms of slowness. Next, the intercept of the linear regression has been used to estimate the shear wave velocity contrast (δβ) across an interface. The formulation holds good for isotropic and horizontal layer medium. Application of such formula to anisotropic medium or dipping layer data may lead to erroneous estimation of δβ. In order to overcome this problem, a method has been proposed to compensate the SV-amplitude using shifted version of SH-amplitude, and subsequently transforming SV amplitudes equivalent to that from isotropic or horizontal layer medium as the case may be. Once this transformation has been done, δβ can be estimated using isotropic horizontal layer formula. The shifts required in SH for the compensation are π/2 and π/4 for dipping layer and anisotropic medium, respectively. The effectiveness of the approach has been reported using various synthetic data sets. The methodology is also tested on real data from HI-CLIMB network in Himalaya, where the presence of dipping Moho has already been reported. The result reveals that the average shear wave velocity contrast across the Moho is larger towards the Indian side compared to the higher Himalayan and Tibetan regions.

  13. Study of low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu

    2018-06-01

    The low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores was studied. The impact tests indicated that the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores showed excellent properties of energy dissipation and stress distribution. In comparison to the similar sandwich panels with chloroprene rubber cores and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer cores, the shear-thickening gel cores led to the obviously smaller contact forces and the larger energy absorptions. Numerical modelling with finite element analysis was used to investigate the stress distribution of the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores and the results agreed well with the experimental results. Because of the unique mechanical property of the shear-thickening gel, the concentrated stress on the front facesheets were distributed to larger areas on the back facesheets and the peak stresses were reduced greatly.

  14. Shear Wave Velocity for Evaluation of State of Cohesionless Soils with Fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Mirosław J.; Wdowska, Małgorzata K.; Jaroń, Łukasz

    2017-10-01

    The paper concerns evaluation of cohesionless soils containing fines. In clean sands, state of soil is usually quantified by relative density DR with use of field techniques like static or dynamic probes. However, in cohesionless soils containing considerable amount of fines, relative density alone, which is based solely on void ratio values, is not representative. This results from the fact that in case of cohesionless soil there is no unique intrinsic compressibility line, like it is in case of cohesive soils. Thus state of soil depends not only on void ratio but also state of stress. For this reason it is necessary to look for an alternative means to quantify state of soils with fines. The paper concerns possibility of evaluation of state of soil containing various amount of fines on the basis of shear wave velocity measurement. The idea rests on the fact that void ratio and state of stress are the major factors which contribute to a state of soil and shear wave velocity as well. When measured shear wave velocities are normalised with respect to stresses the resulting values might be strictly correlated to void ratio. To validate this approach, an experimental test programme (based on series of sophisticated triaxial tests) was carried out on four kinds of sandy material containing various amount of fines up to 60%. The experimental data made possible to establish basic correlation between soil states and shear wave velocity for each kind of soil. Normalized shear wave velocity was compared with void ratio and state parameter as well. The obtained results revealed that determination of void ratio on the basis of shear wave velocity in a certain range of fines can be much more adequate than for clean sands. However, if the fines content exceeds certain value, the obtained correlation is no longer as good.

  15. Towards a new technique to construct a 3D shear-wave velocity model based on converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, G.; Colavitti, L.

    2017-12-01

    A 3D model is essential in all branches of solid Earth sciences because geological structures can be heterogeneous and change significantly in their lateral dimension. The main target of this research is to build a crustal S-wave velocity structure in 3D. The currently popular methodologies to construct 3D shear-wave velocity models are Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) and Local Earthquake Tomography (LET). Here we propose a new technique to map Earth discontinuities and velocities at depth based on the analysis of receiver functions. The 3D model is obtained by simultaneously inverting P-to-S converted waveforms recorded at a dense array. The individual velocity models corresponding to each trace are extracted from the 3D initial model along ray paths that are calculated using the shooting method, and the velocity model is updated during the inversion. We consider a spherical approximation of ray propagation using a global velocity model (iasp91, Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) for the teleseismic part, while we adopt Cartesian coordinates and a local velocity model for the crust. During the inversion process we work with a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity, with a flexible mesh for the depth of the interfaces. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter space. Depending on the studied area, this method can accommodate possible independent and complementary geophysical data (gravity, active seismics, LET, ANT, etc.), helping to reduce the non-linearity of the inversion. Our first focus of application is the Central Alps, where a 20-year long dataset of

  16. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  17. Velocity Spectra in the Unstable Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højstrup, Jørgen

    1982-01-01

    Models for velocity spectra of all three components in the lower half of the unstable PBL are presented. The model spectra are written as a sum of two parts, nS(n) = A(fi, z/zi)w*2 + B(f, z/zi)u*02, a mixed layer part with a stability dependence, and a surface layer part without stability...

  18. Identification of the Viscous Superlayer on the Low-Speed Side of a Single-Stream Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, John; Peabody, Jason

    2010-11-01

    Image pairs (elevation/plan views) have been acquired of a smoke streakline originating in the irrotational region on the low-speed side of a high Re single-stream shear layer of Morris and Foss (2003). The viscous superlayer (VSL) is identified as the terminus of the streak; 1800 such images provide VSL position statistics. Hot-wire data acquired concurrently at the shear layer edge and interior are used to investigate the relationship between these velocity magnitudes and the large-scale motions. Distinctive features (plumes) along the streakline are tracked between images to provide discrete irrotational region velocity magnitudes and material trajectories. A non-diffusive marker, introduced in the separating (high speed) boundary layer and imaged at x/θo=352, has revealed an unexpected bias in the streak-defined VSL locations. The interpretation of this bias clarifies the induced flow patterns in the entrainment region. The observations are consistent with a conception of the large-scale shear layer motions as "billows" of vortical fluid separated by re-entrant "wedges" of irrotational fluid, per Phillips (1972). Morris, S.C. and Foss, J.F. (2003). "Turbulent Boundary Layer to Single Stream Shear Layer: The Transition Region." Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Vol. 494, pp. 187-221. Phillips, O. M. (1972). "The Entrainment Interface." Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Vol. 51, pp. 97-118.

  19. Sheared flow layer formation in tokamak plasmas with reversed magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Long, Y.X.; Mou, Z.Z.; Zhang, J.H.; Li, J.Q.

    2005-01-01

    Sheared flow layer (SFL) formation due to magnetic energy release through tearing-reconnections in tokamak plasmas is investigated. The characteristics of the SFLs created in the development of double tearing mode, mediated by electron viscosity in configurations with non-monotonic safety factor q profiles and, therefore, two rational flux surfaces of same q value, are analyzed in detail as an example. Quasi-linear simulations demonstrate that the sheared flows induced by the mode have desirable characteristics (lying at the boundaries of the magnetic islands), and sufficient levels required for internal transport barrier (ITB) formation. A possible correlation of the SFLs with experimental observations, that double transport barrier structures are preferentially formed in proximity of the two rational surfaces, is also proffered. (author)

  20. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing of gases in free shear layers is simulated using a weighted essentially nonoscillatory implementation of ɛ- and L-based Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. Specifically, the air/air shear layer with velocity ratio 0.6 studied experimentally by Bell and Mehta (1990) is modeled. The detailed predictions of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate and lengthscale models are compared to one another, and to the experimental data. The role of analytical, self-similar solutions for model calibration and physical insights is also discussed. It is shown that turbulent lengthscale-based models are unable to predict both the growth parameter (spreading rate) and turbulent kinetic energy normalized by the square of the velocity difference of the streams. The terms in the K, ɛ, and L equation budgets are compared between the models, and it is shown that the production and destruction mechanisms are substantially different in the ɛ and L equations. Application of the turbulence models to the Brown and Roshko (1974) experiments with streams having various velocity and density ratios is also briefly discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Angular velocity of a sphere in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibohm, J.; Candelier, F.; Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number Res, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω /s =-1 /2 +0.0540 Res3 /2 where s is the shear rate. The O (Res3 /2) correction differs from that derived by Lin et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 1 (1970), 10.1017/S0022112070001659], who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  2. Turbulent transport reduction by E x B velocity shear during edge plasma biasing in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oost, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Adamek, J.; Antoni, V.; Balan, P.; Boedo, J.A.; Devynck, P.; Duran, I.; Eliseev, L.; Gunn, J.P.; Hron, M.; Ionita, C.; Jachmich, S.; Kirnev, G.S.; Martines, E.; Melnikov, A.; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Silva, C.; Stoeckel, J.; Tendler, M.; Varandas, C.; Van Schoor, M.; Vershkov, V.; Weynants, R.R.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments in the tokamaks TEXTOR, CASTOR, T-10 and ISTTOK have provided new and complementary evidence on the physics of the universal mechanism of E x B velocity shear stabilization of turbulence, concomitant transport barrier formation and radial conductivity by using various edge biasing techniques. (orig.)

  3. Evolution of symmetric reconnection layer in the presence of parallel shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Haoyu [Space Science Institute, School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Sate Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Jinbin [Space Science Institute, School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The development of the structure of symmetric reconnection layer in the presence of a shear flow parallel to the antiparallel magnetic field component is studied by using a set of one-dimensional (1D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The Riemann problem is simulated through a second-order conservative TVD (total variation diminishing) scheme, in conjunction with Roe's averages for the Riemann problem. The simulation results indicate that besides the MHD shocks and expansion waves, there exist some new small-scale structures in the reconnection layer. For the case of zero initial guide magnetic field (i.e., B{sub y0} = 0), a pair of intermediate shock and slow shock (SS) is formed in the presence of the parallel shear flow. The critical velocity of initial shear flow V{sub zc} is just the Alfven velocity in the inflow region. As V{sub z{infinity}} increases to the value larger than V{sub zc}, a new slow expansion wave appears in the position of SS in the case V{sub z{infinity}} < V{sub zc}, and one of the current densities drops to zero. As plasma {beta} increases, the out-flow region is widened. For B{sub y0} {ne} 0, a pair of SSs and an additional pair of time-dependent intermediate shocks (TDISs) are found to be present. Similar to the case of B{sub y0} = 0, there exists a critical velocity of initial shear flow V{sub zc}. The value of V{sub zc} is, however, smaller than the Alfven velocity of the inflow region. As plasma {beta} increases, the velocities of SS and TDIS increase, and the out-flow region is widened. However, the velocity of downstream SS increases even faster, making the distance between SS and TDIS smaller. Consequently, the interaction between SS and TDIS in the case of high plasma {beta} influences the property of direction rotation of magnetic field across TDIS. Thereby, a wedge in the hodogram of tangential magnetic field comes into being. When {beta}{yields}{infinity}, TDISs disappear and the guide magnetic field becomes constant.

  4. Observations of intense velocity shear and associated electrostatic waves near an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.; Carlson, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    An intense shear in plasma flow velocity of magnitude 20 (m/s)m -1 has been detected at the edge of an auroral arc. The region of shear appears to display structure with two characteristic scale sizes. The larger structures were of the order of a few kilometers in size and were identified by a deviation of the direction of the charge sheets crossed by the rocket from a direction parallel to the visible arc. As is shown in the companion paper (Carlson and Kelley, 1977), the average (undisturbed) charge sheet was parallel to the arc. These observations are consistent with television studies which often display such structures propagating along the edges of auroral forms. Additional intense irregularities were detected with characteristic wavelengths smaller than the scale size of the shear. The irregularities are discussed in light of the branches of a velocity shear driven instability suggested by several workers: the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability operating at the longest wavelengths and the drift shear instability at the shorter. Neither mode has wavelengths as short as those observed however. A velocity shear mechanism operating at wavelengths short in comparison with the shear scale length, such as those observed here, would be of significant geophysical importance. For example, it could be responsible for production of high-latitude irregularities which exist throughout the polar cap and for the short-wavelength waves responsible for intense 3-m backscatter during equatorial spread F conditions. Since the wavelengths produced by the short-wavelength mode are in the range of typical auroral E region radars, such data must be carefully checked for F region contamination

  5. Spectral calculations for pressure-velocity and pressure-strain correlations in homogeneous shear turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Kishore

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical analyses of pressure related turbulent statistics are vital for a reliable and accurate modeling of turbulence. In the inertial subrange of turbulent shear flow, pressure-velocity and pressure-strain correlations are affected by anisotropy imposed at large scales. Recently, Tsuji and Kaneda (2012 J. Fluid Mech. 694 50) performed a set of experiments on homogeneous shear flow, and estimated various one-dimensional pressure related spectra and the associated non-dimensional universal numbers. Here, starting from the governing Navier-Stokes dynamics for the fluctuating velocity field and assuming the anisotropy at inertial scales as a weak perturbation of an otherwise isotropic dynamics, we analytically derive the form of the pressure-velocity and pressure-strain correlations. The associated universal numbers are calculated using the well-known renormalization-group results, and are compared with the experimental estimates of Tsuji and Kaneda. Approximations involved in the perturbative calculations are discussed.

  6. Shear-wave velocity compilation for Northridge strong-motion recording sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Fumal, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Borehole and other geotechnical information collected at the strong-motion recording sites of the Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994 provide an important new basis for the characterization of local site conditions. These geotechnical data, when combined with analysis of strong-motion recordings, provide an empirical basis to evaluate site coefficients used in current versions of US building codes. Shear-wave-velocity estimates to a depth of 30 meters are derived for 176 strong-motion recording sites. The estimates are based on borehole shear-velocity logs, physical property logs, correlations with physical properties and digital geologic maps. Surface-wave velocity measurements and standard penetration data are compiled as additional constraints. These data as compiled from a variety of databases are presented via GIS maps and corresponding tables to facilitate use by other investigators.

  7. Linear and nonlinear studies of velocity shear driven three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamics instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Gurudatt; Das, Amita

    2012-01-01

    The study of electron velocity shear driven instability in electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) regime in three dimensions has been carried out. It is well known that the instability is non-local in the plane defined by the flow direction and that of the shear, which is the usual Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, often termed as the sausage mode in the context of EMHD. On the other hand, a local instability with perturbations in the plane defined by the shear and the magnetic field direction exists which is termed as kink mode. The interplay of these two modes for simple sheared flow case as well as that when an external magnetic field exists has been studied extensively in the present manuscript in both linear and nonlinear regimes. Finally, these instability processes have been investigated for the exact 2D dipole solutions of EMHD equations [M. B. Isichenko and A. N. Marnachev, Sov. Phys. JETP 66, 702 (1987)] for which the electron flow velocity is sheared. It has been shown that dipoles are very robust and stable against the sausage mode as the unstable wavelengths are typically longer than the dipole size. However, we observe that they do get destabilized by the local kink mode.

  8. Velocity and shear stress distribution downstream of mechanical heart valves in pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersiepen, M; Krause, U; Knott, E; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1989-04-01

    Ten mechanical valves (TAD 27 mm): Starr-Edwards Silastic Ball, Björk-Shiley Standard, Björk-Shiley Concave-Convex, Björk-Shiley Monostrut, Hall-Kaster (Medtronic-Hall), OmniCarbon, Bicer Val, Sorin, Saint-Jude Medical and Hemex (Duromedics) are investigated in a comparative in vitro study. The velocity and turbulent shear stress profiles of the valves were determined by Laser Doppler anemometry in two different downstream axes within a model aortic root. Depending on the individual valve design, velocity peaks up to 1.5 m/s and turbulent shear stress peaks up to 150 N/m2 were measured during the systolic phase. These shear stress peaks mainly occurred in areas of flow separation and intense momentum exchange. Directly downstream of the valves (measuring axis 0.55.dAorta) turbulent shear stress peaks occurred at peak systole and during the deceleration phase, while in the second measuring axis (1.5.dAorta) turbulence levels were lower. Shear stress levels were high at the borders of the fluid jets. The results are discussed from a fluid-dynamic point of view.

  9. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions using Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delph, J. R.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Biryol, C. B.; Ward, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Anatolian Plate consists of various lithospheric terranes amalgamated during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, and is currently extruding to the west in response to a combination of the collision of the Arabian plate in the east and the roll back of the Aegean subduction zone in the west. We used Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) at periods structure of the Anatolian Plate. We computed a total of 13,779 unique cross-correlations using one sample-per-second vertical component broadband seismic data from 215 stations from 8 different networks over a period of 7 years to compute fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves following the method of Benson et al. (2007). We then inverted the dispersion data to calculate phase velocity maps for 11 periods from 8 s - 40 s throughout Anatolia and the Aegean regions (Barmin et al. 2001). Using smoothed Moho values derived from Vanacore et al. (2013) in our starting models, we inverted our dispersion curves using a linear least-squares iterative inversion scheme (Herrmann & Ammon 2004) to produce a 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle throughout Anatolia and the Aegean. We find a good correlation between our seismic shear wave velocities and paleostructures (suture zones) and modern deformation (basin formation and fault deformation). The most prominent crustal velocity contrasts occur across intercontinental sutures zones, resulting from the juxtaposition of the compositionally different basements of the amalgamated terranes. At shallow depths, seismic velocity contrasts correspond closely with surficial features. The Thrace, Cankiri and Tuz Golu basins, and accretionary complexes related to the closure of the Neotethys are characterized by slow shear wave velocities, while the Menderes and Kirsehir Massifs, Pontides, and Istanbul Zone are characterized by fast velocities. We find that the East Anatolia Plateau has slow shear-wave velocities, as expected due to high heat flow and active

  10. Shear wave velocity structure of northern and North-Eastern Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebede, F.; Mammo, T.; Panza, G.F.; Vuan, A.; Costa, G.

    1995-10-01

    The non-linear inversion technique known as hedgehog is utilized to define the average crustal structure of North and North-Eastern Ethiopia. To accomplish the task a two dimensional frequency-time analysis is performed to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves. Six earthquakes recorded by the broad-band digital seismograph installed at the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University are utilized. The crustal structure between the Gulf of Tadjura (western Gulf of Aden) and Addis Ababa crossing southern Afar (path I) can be approximated by a total thickness of about 22 km with average S-wave velocity in the range 2.3 - 3.9 km/s. The crust-mantle transition is poorly developed at greater depths and the shear wave velocity ranges from 4.0 km/s to 4.3 km/s. If the effect of the plateau part is taken into account the average total crustal thickness is found to be less than 18 km and the average S-wave velocity varies in the range 2.4 - 3.9 km/s. The low shear wave velocity under the Afar crust is consistent with the result of other geophysical studies. For path II, which passes through the border of the Western Ethiopian plateau, the average crustal structure is found to be approximated by a thickness of about 40 km and average S-wave velocity between 3.0 km/s and 3.9 km/s. The crust overlies a lithospheric mantle with a shear wave velocity in the range 4.1-4.4 km/s. (author). 37 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs

  11. Confirmation of a change in the global shear velocity pattern at around 1000 km depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y.; Zaroli, C.; Lambotte, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we confirm the existence of a change in the shear velocity spectrum around 1000 km depth based on a new shear velocity tomographic model of the Earth's mantle, SEISGLOB2. This model is based on Rayleigh surface wave phase velocities, self- and cross-coupling structure coefficients of spheroidal normal modes and body wave traveltimes which are, for the first time, combined in a tomographic inversion. SEISGLOB2 is developed up to spherical harmonic degree 40 and in 21 radial spline functions. The spectrum of SEISGLOB2 is the flattest (i.e. richest in 'short' wavelengths corresponding to spherical harmonic degrees greater than 10) around 1000 km depth and this flattening occurs between 670 and 1500 km depth. We also confirm various changes in the continuity of slabs and mantle plumes all around 1000 km depth where we also observed the upper boundary of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces. The existence of a flatter spectrum, richer in short-wavelength heterogeneities, in a region of the mid-mantle can have great impacts on our understanding of the mantle dynamics and should thus be better understood in the future. Although a viscosity increase, a phase change or a compositional change can all concur to induce this change of pattern, its precise origin is still very uncertain.

  12. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/dΔ. Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation

  13. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  14. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Shear wave crustal velocity model of the Western Bohemian Massif from Love wave phase velocity dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Brokešová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 81-104 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA AV ČR IAA300460705; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : love waves * phase velocity dispersion * frequency-time analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2011 www.springerlink.com/content/w3149233l60111t1/

  16. Enhancing PIV image and fractal descriptor for velocity and shear stresses propagation around a circular pier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Keshavarzi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fractal dimensions of velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds shear stresses propagation for flow around a circular bridge pier are presented. In the study reported herein, the fractal dimension of velocity fluctuations (u′, v′, w′ and the Reynolds shear stresses (u′v′ and u′w′ of flow around a bridge pier were computed using a Fractal Interpolation Function (FIF algorithm. The velocity fluctuations of flow along a horizontal plane above the bed were measured using Acoustic Doppler Velocity meter (ADV and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. The PIV is a powerful technique which enables us to attain high resolution spatial and temporal information of turbulent flow using instantaneous time snapshots. In this study, PIV was used for detection of high resolution fractal scaling around a bridge pier. The results showed that the fractal dimension of flow fluctuated significantly in the longitudinal and transverse directions in the vicinity of the pier. It was also found that the fractal dimension of velocity fluctuations and shear stresses increased rapidly at vicinity of pier at downstream whereas it remained approximately unchanged far downstream of the pier. The higher value of fractal dimension was found at a distance equal to one times of the pier diameter in the back of the pier. Furthermore, the average fractal dimension for the streamwise and transverse velocity fluctuations decreased from the centreline to the side wall of the flume. Finally, the results from ADV measurement were consistent with the result from PIV, therefore, the ADV enables to detect turbulent characteristics of flow around a circular bridge pier.

  17. Absolute/convective secondary instabilities and the role of confinement in free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arratia, Cristóbal; Mowlavi, Saviz; Gallaire, François

    2018-05-01

    We study the linear spatiotemporal stability of an infinite row of equal point vortices under symmetric confinement between parallel walls. These rows of vortices serve to model the secondary instability leading to the merging of consecutive (Kelvin-Helmholtz) vortices in free shear layers, allowing us to study how confinement limits the growth of shear layers through vortex pairings. Using a geometric construction akin to a Legendre transform on the dispersion relation, we compute the growth rate of the instability in different reference frames as a function of the frame velocity with respect to the vortices. This approach is verified and complemented with numerical computations of the linear impulse response, fully characterizing the absolute/convective nature of the instability. Similar to results by Healey on the primary instability of parallel tanh profiles [J. Fluid Mech. 623, 241 (2009), 10.1017/S0022112008005284], we observe a range of confinement in which absolute instability is promoted. For a parallel shear layer with prescribed confinement and mixing length, the threshold for absolute/convective instability of the secondary pairing instability depends on the separation distance between consecutive vortices, which is physically determined by the wavelength selected by the previous (primary or pairing) instability. In the presence of counterflow and moderate to weak confinement, small (large) wavelength of the vortex row leads to absolute (convective) instability. While absolute secondary instabilities in spatially developing flows have been previously related to an abrupt transition to a complex behavior, this secondary pairing instability regenerates the flow with an increased wavelength, eventually leading to a convectively unstable row of vortices. We argue that since the primary instability remains active for large wavelengths, a spatially developing shear layer can directly saturate on the wavelength of such a convectively unstable row, by

  18. SECULAR GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF A DUST LAYER IN SHEAR TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    We perform a linear stability analysis of a dust layer in a turbulent gas disk. Youdin investigated the secular gravitational instability (GI) of a dust layer using hydrodynamic equations with a turbulent diffusion term. We obtain essentially the same result independently of Youdin. In the present analysis, we restrict the area of interest to small dust particles, while investigating the secular GI in a more rigorous manner. We discuss the time evolution of the dust surface density distribution using a stochastic model and derive the advection-diffusion equation. The validity of the analysis by Youdin is confirmed in the strong drag limit. We demonstrate quantitatively that the finite thickness of a dust layer weakens the secular GI and that the density-dependent diffusion coefficient changes the growth rate. We apply the results obtained to the turbulence driven by the shear instability and find that the secular GI is faster than the radial drift when the gas density is three times as large as that in the minimum-mass disk model. If the dust particles are larger than chondrules, the secular GI grows within the lifetime of a protoplanetary disk.

  19. Dynamic propagation of a weak-discontinuous interface crack between two dissimilar functionally graded layers under anti-plane shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jeong Woo; Lee, Young Shin

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic propagation of an interface crack between two functionally graded material (FGM) layers under anti-plane shear is analyzed using the integral transform method. The properties of the FGM layers vary continuously along their thicknesses. The properties of the two FGM layers vary and the two layers are connected weak-discontinuously. A constant velocity Yoffe-type moving crack is considered. The Fourier transform is used to reduce the problem to a dual integral equation, which is then expressed to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. Numerical values on the dynamic energy release rate (DERR) are presented for the FGM to show the effect of the gradient of material properties, crack moving velocity, and thickness of FGM layers. The following are helpful to increase resistance to interface crack propagation in FGMs: a) increasing the gradient of material properties, b) an increase of shear modulus and density from the interface to the upper and lower free surface, and c) increasing the thickness of the FGM layer. The DERR increases or decreases with increase of the crack moving velocity

  20. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  1. Lithospheric shear velocity structure of South Island, New Zealand, from amphibious Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Justin S.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Stachnik, Joshua C.; Lin, Fan-Chi; Yeck, William L.; Collins, John A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a crust and mantle 3-D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath the South Island as well as the Campbell and Challenger Plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18-70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8-25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 4 land-based and 29 ocean bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa experiment with 28 land-based seismometers from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs 50 km) beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with upper mantle earthquake hypocenters beneath the Alpine Fault. The ~400 km long low-velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island and the inner Bounty Trough underlies Cenozoic volcanics and the locations of mantle-derived helium measurements, consistent with asthenospheric upwelling in the region.

  2. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  3. Approximation of wave action flux velocity in strongly sheared mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemi, Saeideh; Kirby, James T.; Dong, Zhifei

    2017-08-01

    Spectral wave models based on the wave action equation typically use a theoretical framework based on depth uniform current to account for current effects on waves. In the real world, however, currents often have variations over depth. Several recent studies have made use of a depth-weighted current U˜ due to [Skop, R. A., 1987. Approximate dispersion relation for wave-current interactions. J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Eng. 113, 187-195.] or [Kirby, J. T., Chen, T., 1989. Surface waves on vertically sheared flows: approximate dispersion relations. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1013-1027.] in order to account for the effect of vertical current shear. Use of the depth-weighted velocity, which is a function of wavenumber (or frequency and direction) has been further simplified in recent applications by only utilizing a weighted current based on the spectral peak wavenumber. These applications do not typically take into account the dependence of U˜ on wave number k, as well as erroneously identifying U˜ as the proper choice for current velocity in the wave action equation. Here, we derive a corrected expression for the current component of the group velocity. We demonstrate its consistency using analytic results for a current with constant vorticity, and numerical results for a measured, strongly-sheared current profile obtained in the Columbia River. The effect of choosing a single value for current velocity based on the peak wave frequency is examined, and we suggest an alternate strategy, involving a Taylor series expansion about the peak frequency, which should significantly extend the range of accuracy of current estimates available to the wave model with minimal additional programming and data transfer.

  4. Shear wave velocity versus quality factor: results from seismic noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxberger, Tobias; Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the shear wave velocity (vs) and shear wave quality factor (Qs) for the shallow structure below a site is necessary to characterize its site response. In the past, methods based on the analysis of seismic noise have been shown to be very efficient for providing a sufficiently accurate estimation of the vs versus depth at reasonable costs for engineering seismology purposes. In addition, a slight modification of the same method has proved to be able to provide realistic Qs versus depth estimates. In this study, data sets of seismic noise recorded by microarrays of seismic stations in different geological environments of Europe and Central Asia are used to calculate both vs and Qs versus depth profiles. Analogous to the generally adopted approach in seismic hazard assessment for mapping the average shear wave velocity in the uppermost 30 m (vs30) as a proxy of the site response, this approach was also applied to the quality factor within the uppermost 30 m (Qs30). A slightly inverse correlation between both parameters is found based on a methodological consistent determination for different sites. Consequently, a combined assessment of vs and Qs by seismic noise analysis has the potential to provide a more comprehensive description of the geological structure below a site.

  5. Effects of magnetic field, sheared flow and ablative velocity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Zhang, W.L.; Wu, Z.W.

    2005-01-01

    It is found that magnetic field has a stabilization effect whereas the sheared flow has a destabilization effect on the RT instability in the presence of sharp interface. RT instability only occurs in the long wave region and can be completely suppressed if the stabilizing effect of magnetic field dominates. The RT instability increases with wave number and flow shear, and acts much like a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when destabilizing effect of sheared flow dominates. It is shown that both of ablation velocity and magnetic filed have stabilization effect on RT instability in the presence of continued interface. The stabilization effect of magnetic field takes place for whole waveband and becomes more significant for the short wavelength. The RT instability can be completely suppressed by the cooperated effect of magnetic field and ablation velocity so that the ICF target shell may be unnecessary to be accelerated to very high speed. The growth rate decreases as the density scale length increases. The stabilization effect of magnetic field is more significant for the short density scale length. (author)

  6. Standard deviation of vertical two-point longitudinal velocity differences in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1971-01-01

    Statistical estimates of wind shear in the planetary boundary layer are important in the design of V/STOL aircraft, and for the design of the Space Shuttle. The data analyzed in this study consist of eleven sets of longitudinal turbulent velocity fluctuation time histories digitized at 0.2 sec intervals with approximately 18,000 data points per time history. The longitudinal velocity fluctuations were calculated with horizontal wind and direction data collected at the 18-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, and 150-m levels. The data obtained confirm the result that Eulerian time spectra transformed to wave-number spectra with Taylor's frozen eddy hypothesis possess inertial-like behavior at wave-numbers well out of the inertial subrange.

  7. Towards a new tool to develop a 3-D shear-wave velocity model from converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavitti, Leonardo; Hetényi, György

    2017-04-01

    The main target of this work is to develop a new method in which we exploit converted waves to construct a fully 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust. A reliable 3-D model is very important in Earth sciences because geological structures may vary significantly in their lateral dimension. In particular, shear-waves provide valuable complementary information with respect to P-waves because they usually guarantee a much better correlation in terms of rock density and mechanical properties, reducing the interpretation ambiguities. Therefore, it is fundamental to develop a new technique to improve structural images and to describe different lithologies in the crust. In this study we start from the analysis of receiver functions (RF, Langston, 1977), which are nowadays largely used for structural investigations based on passive seismic experiments, to map Earth discontinuities at depth. The RF technique is also commonly used to invert for velocity structure beneath single stations. Here, we plan to combine two strengths of RF method: shear-wave velocity inversion and dense arrays. Starting from a simple 3-D forward model, synthetic RFs are obtained extracting the structure along a ray to match observed data. During the inversion, thanks to a dense stations network, we aim to build and develop a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity. The initial model should be chosen simple to make sure that the inversion process is not influenced by the constraints in terms of depth and velocity posed at the beginning. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999a, b), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter

  8. Structure of parallel-velocity-shear-driven mode in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Xu, W.B.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Horton, W.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the Fourier-ballooning representation is appropriate for the study of short-wavelength drift-like perturbation in toroidal plasmas with a parallel velocity shear (PVS). The radial structure of the mode driven by a PVS is investigated in a torus. The Reynolds stress created by PVS turbulence, and proposed as one of the sources for a sheared poloidal plasma rotation, is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a finite ion temperature may strongly enhance the Reynolds stress creation ability from PVS-driven turbulence. The correlation of this observation with the requirement that ion heating power be higher than a threshold value for the formation of an internal transport barrier is discussed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. Studying the instantaneous velocity field in gas-sheared liquid films in a horizontal duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasques, Joao; Tokarev, Mikhail; Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Azzopardi, Barry

    2016-11-01

    In annular flow, the experimental validation of the basic assumptions on the liquid velocity profile is vital for developing theoretical models of the flow. However, the study of local velocity of liquid in gas-sheared films has proven to be a challenging task due to the highly curved and disturbed moving interface of the phases, small scale of the area of interrogation, high velocity gradients and irregular character of the flow. This study reports on different optical configurations and interface-tracking methods employed in a horizontal duct in order to obtain high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data in such types of complex flows. The experimental envelope includes successful measurements in 2D and 3D waves regimes, up to the disturbance wave regime. Preliminary data show the presence of complex structures in the liquid phase, which includes re-circulation areas below the liquid interface due to the gas-shearing action, together with non-uniform transverse movements of the liquid phase close to the wall due to the presence of 3D waves at the interface. With the aid of the moving interface-tracking, PIV, time-resolved particle-tracking velocimetry and vorticity measurements were performed.

  10. Loading direction-dependent shear behavior at different temperatures of single-layer chiral graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Shuhong; Yu, Peishi; Zhao, Junhua

    2018-06-01

    The loading direction-dependent shear behavior of single-layer chiral graphene sheets at different temperatures is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that the shear properties (such as shear stress-strain curves, buckling strains, and failure strains) of chiral graphene sheets strongly depend on the loading direction due to the structural asymmetry. The maximum values of both the critical buckling shear strain and the failure strain under positive shear deformation can be around 1.4 times higher than those under negative shear deformation. For a given chiral graphene sheet, both its failure strain and failure stress decrease with increasing temperature. In particular, the amplitude to wavelength ratio of wrinkles for different chiral graphene sheets under shear deformation using present MD simulations agrees well with that from the existing theory. These findings provide physical insights into the origins of the loading direction-dependent shear behavior of chiral graphene sheets and their potential applications in nanodevices.

  11. Calanoid Copepod Behavior in Thin Layer Shear Flows: Freshwater Versus Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2015-11-01

    Marine copepods have been shown to behaviorally respond to vertical gradients of horizontal velocity and aggregate around thin layers. The current study addresses whether a freshwater copepod from an alpine lake demonstrates similar behavior response. Hesperodiaptomus shoshone is often the greatest biomass in alpine lakes and is the dominant zooplankton predator within its environment. The hypothesis is that H. shoshone responds to vertical gradients of horizontal velocity, which are associated with river outflows from alpine lakes, with fine-scale changes in swimming kinematics. The two calanoid copepods studied here, H. shoshone (freshwater) and Calanus finmarchicus(marine), are of similar size (2 - 4 mm), have similar morphologies, and utilize cruising as their primary swimming mode. The two animals differ not only in environment, but also in diet; H. shoshone is a carnivore, whereas C. finmarchicusis an herbivore. A laminar, planar jet (Bickley) was used in the laboratory to simulate a free shear flow. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantified the flow field. The marine species changed its swimming behavior significantly (increased swimming speed and turning frequency) and spent more time in the layer (40% vs. 70%) from control to treatment. In contrast, the freshwater species exhibited very few changes in either swimming behavior or residence time. Swimming kinematics and residence time results were also similar between males and females. Unlike the marine copepod, the results suggest the environmental flow structure is unimportant to the freshwater species.

  12. Shear velocities in the oceanic crust at the East Pacific Rise 9° 18' N to 10° 30' N from compliance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooner, S. L.; Webb, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    Compliance was measured at 21 sites along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 9° 18' N to 10° 30' N during the MADCAP (Melt And Diking from Compliance And Pressure) experiment on the R/V Atlantis from February 13 to March 19, 2007. Measurements at 10° 30' N across the ridge segment 22 km north of the Clipperton transform fault show a stiff lower crust, which suggests that there is little crustal melt. This is consistent with previous descriptions of this segment as "magmatically starved" based on its morphology. Most of the compliance measurements were made on the EPR segment south of the Clipperton transform fault. At the northern end of this ridge segment, a compliance transect at 10° 2' N spans the ridge axis and continues to a seamount 16 km east. These measurements indicate that shear velocities are low beneath the ridge axis but increase rapidly off axis to the east, suggesting no magmatic connection between the ridge axis and the Watchstander seamount chain. Shear velocities beneath the nearest (and most recently active) seamount are similar to other off axis sites, suggesting that there is little or no crustal melt there. A 26 km long compliance transect across the ridge axis near 9° 20' N suggests that the region of low crustal shear velocities is constrained to within 3-4 km of the ridge axis. The compliance measurements preclude the existence of a melt body 18-20 km east of the ridge axis as had been inferred from an apparent mid-crustal reflector observed in a recent OBS experiment. The compliance over that site show low shear velocities only in the uppermost crust associated with a thick layer 2A. A final compliance transect stretches northward along the ridge axis and across the Clipperton ridge-transform intersection (RTI). Measurements made north of where the ridge crosses the inferred location of the RTI show lower crustal shear velocities than normal for off-axis crust, but this observation is consistent with previous refraction work that

  13. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  14. Shear-wave velocity-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, R.; Moss, R.E.S.; Thompson, E.M.; Seed, R.B.; Cetin, K.O.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) offers a means to determine the seismic resistance of soil to liquefaction by a fundamental soil property. This paper presents the results of an 11-year international project to gather new Vs site data and develop probabilistic correlations for seismic soil liquefaction occurrence. Toward that objective, shear-wave velocity test sites were identified, and measurements made for 301 new liquefaction field case histories in China, Japan, Taiwan, Greece, and the United States over a decade. The majority of these new case histories reoccupy those previously investigated by penetration testing. These new data are combined with previously published case histories to build a global catalog of 422 case histories of Vs liquefaction performance. Bayesian regression and structural reliability methods facilitate a probabilistic treatment of the Vs catalog for performance-based engineering applications. Where possible, uncertainties of the variables comprising both the seismic demand and the soil capacity were estimated and included in the analysis, resulting in greatly reduced overall model uncertainty relative to previous studies. The presented data set and probabilistic analysis also help resolve the ancillary issues of adjustment for soil fines content and magnitude scaling factors.

  15. Comparison of Oceanic and Continental Lithosphere, Asthenosphere, and the LAB Through Shear Velocity Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Data from the ALBACORE Amphibious Array in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, K.; Rathnayaka, S.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Continental and oceanic lithosphere, which form in different tectonic environments, are studied in a single amphibious seismic array across the Southern California continental margin. This provides a unique opportunity to directly compare oceanic and continental lithosphere, asthenosphere, and the LAB (Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary) in a single data set. The complex history of the region, including spreading center subduction, block rotation, and Borderland extension, allows us to study limits in the rigidity and strength of the lithosphere. We study Rayleigh wave phase velocities obtained from the ALBACORE (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) offshore seismic array project and invert for shear wave velocity structure as a function of depth. We divide the study area into several regions: continent, inner Borderland, outer Borderland, and oceanic seafloor categorized by age. A unique starting Vs model is used for each case including layer thicknesses, densities, and P and S velocities which predicts Rayleigh phase velocities and are compared to observed phase velocities in each region. We solve for shear wave velocities with the best fit between observed and predicted phase velocity data in a least square sense. Preliminary results indicate that lithospheric velocities in the oceanic mantle are higher than the continental region by at least 2%. The LAB is observed at 50 ± 20 km beneath 15-35 Ma oceanic seafloor. Asthenospheric low velocities reach a minimum of 4.2 km/s in all regions, but have a steeper positive velocity gradient at the base of the oceanic asthenosphere compared to the continent. Seismic tomography images in two and three dimensions will be presented from each study region.

  16. Shear wave velocity-based evaluation and design of stone column improved ground for liquefaction mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguo; Sun, Zhengbo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yunmin; Chen, Renpeng

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation and design of stone column improvement ground for liquefaction mitigation is a challenging issue for the state of practice. In this paper, a shear wave velocity-based approach is proposed based on the well-defined correlations of liquefaction resistance (CRR)-shear wave velocity ( V s)-void ratio ( e) of sandy soils, and the values of parameters in this approach are recommended for preliminary design purpose when site specific values are not available. The detailed procedures of pre- and post-improvement liquefaction evaluations and stone column design are given. According to this approach, the required level of ground improvement will be met once the target V s of soil is raised high enough (i.e., no less than the critical velocity) to resist the given earthquake loading according to the CRR- V s relationship, and then this requirement is transferred to the control of target void ratio (i.e., the critical e) according to the V s- e relationship. As this approach relies on the densification of the surrounding soil instead of the whole improved ground and is conservative by nature, specific considerations of the densification mechanism and effect are given, and the effects of drainage and reinforcement of stone columns are also discussed. A case study of a thermal power plant in Indonesia is introduced, where the effectiveness of stone column improved ground was evaluated by the proposed V s-based method and compared with the SPT-based evaluation. This improved ground performed well and experienced no liquefaction during subsequent strong earthquakes.

  17. Locating the origin of stick slip instabilities in sheared granular layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is a non-invasive technique widely used to evaluate the state of materials and structures. We have developed a system that can locate the source of AE events associated with unstable sliding (stick-slip) of sheared granular layers during laboratory friction experiments. Our aim is to map the spatial distribution of energy release due to permanent microstructural changes, using AE source locations as proxies. This will allow us to determine the distribution of applied work in a granular medium, which will be useful in developing constitutive laws that describe the frictional behavior of such materials. The AE monitoring system is installed on a rotary shear apparatus. This type of apparatus is used to investigate the micromechanical processes responsible for the macroscopic frictional behavior of granular materials at large shear displacements. Two arrays of 8 piezoelectric sensors each are installed into the ring-shaped steel pistons that confine our samples. The sensors are connected to a high-speed, multichannel oscilloscope that can record full waveforms. The apparatus is also equipped with a system that continuously records normal and lateral (shear) loads and displacements, as well as pore fluid pressure. Thus, we can calculate the frictional and volumetric response of our granular aggregates, as well as the location of AE sources. Here, we report on the results of room temperature experiments on granular aggregates consisting of glass beads or segregated mixtures of glass beads and calcite, at up to 5 MPa normal stress and sliding velocities between 1 and 100 μm/s. Under these conditions, glass beads exhibit unstable sliding behavior accompanied by significant AE activity, whereas calcite exhibits stable sliding and produces no AEs. We recorded a range of unstable sliding behaviors, from fast, regular stick slip at high normal stress (> 4 MPa) and sliding velocities below 20 μm/s, to irregular stick slip at low normal

  18. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young

    2015-01-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal

  19. Detection of the Velocity Shear Effect on the Spatial Distributions of the Galactic Satellites in Isolated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  20. A First Layered Crustal Velocity Model for the Western Solomon Islands: Inversion of Measured Group Velocity of Surface Waves using Ambient Noise Cross-Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, C. S.; Kuo, Y. T.; Chao, W. A.; You, S. H.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.; Yih-Min, W.

    2017-12-01

    Two earthquakes, MW 8.1 in 2007 and MW 7.1 in 2010, hit the Western Province of Solomon Islands and caused extensive damage, but motivated us to set up the first seismic network in this area. During the first phase, eight broadband seismic stations (BBS) were installed around the rupture zone of 2007 earthquake. With one-year seismic records, we cross-correlated the vertical component of ambient noise recorded in our BBS and calculated Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion curves on inter-station paths. The genetic algorithm to invert one-dimensional crustal velocity model is applied by fitting the averaged dispersion curves. The one-dimensional crustal velocity model is constituted by two layers and one half-space, representing the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle respectively. The resulted thickness values of the upper and lower crust are 6.4 and 14.2 km, respectively. Shear-wave velocities (VS) of the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle are 2.53, 3.57 and 4.23 km/s with the VP/VS ratios of 1.737, 1.742 and 1.759, respectively. This first layered crustal velocity model can be used as a preliminary reference to further study seismic sources such as earthquake activity and tectonic tremor.

  1. An analytic interface dynamo over a shear layer of finite depth

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovay, K.; Kerekes, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Parker's analytic Cartesian interface dynamo is generalized to the case of a shear layer of finite thickness and low resistivity ("tachocline"), bounded by a perfect conductor ("radiative zone") on the one side, and by a highly diffusive medium ("convective zone") supporting an $\\alpha$-effect on the other side. In the limit of high diffusivity contrast between the shear layer and the diffusive medium, thought to be relevant for the Sun, a pair of exact dispersion relations for the growth rat...

  2. Surface shear stress dependence of gas transfer velocity parameterizations using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Air-water gas-exchange is studied in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free-surface flows driven by natural convection and weak winds. The wind is modeled as a constant surface-shear-stress and the gas-transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The simulations are characterized via a Richardson number Ri=Bν/u*4 where B, ν, and u* are the buoyancy flux, kinematic viscosity, and friction velocity respectively. The simulations comprise 0Ric or kg=AShearu*Sc-n, Ri

  3. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITY IN THE CRYSTALLIZED TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. BUESCH; K.H. STOKOE; M. SCHUHEN

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the seismic response of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities, rims on lithophysae and some fractures, spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture), amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization, and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (V s ), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good ''first order'' correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger V s values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have V s values that are beyond the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, ''large'' lithophysal cavities, or ''missing pieces'' relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as V s data from small-scale samples (typical and ''flawed'' core) to larger scale traverses in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties

  4. Combined estimation of kappa and shear-wave velocity profile of the Japanese rock reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Edwards, Benjamin; Fäh, Donat

    2013-04-01

    The definition of a common soil or rock reference is a key issue in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), microzonation studies, local site-response analysis and, more generally, when predicted or observed ground motion is compared for sites of different characteristics. A scaling procedure, which accounts for a common reference, is then necessary to avoid bias induced by the differences in the local geology. Nowadays methods requiring the definition of a reference condition generally prescribe the characteristic of a rock reference, calibrated using indirect estimation methods based on geology or on surface proxies. In most cases, a unique average shear-wave velocity value is prescribed (e.g. Vs30 = 800m/s as for class A of the EUROCODE8). Some attempts at defining the whole shape of a reference rock velocity profile have been described, often without a clear physical justification of how such a selection was performed. Moreover, in spite of its relevance in affecting the high-frequency part of the spectrum, the definition of the associated reference attenuation is in most cases missing or, when present, still remains quite uncertain. In this study we propose an approach that is based on the comparison between empirical anelastic amplification functions from spectral modeling of earthquakes and average S-wave velocities computed using the quarter-wavelength approach. The method is an extension of the approach originally proposed by Poggi et al. (2011) for Switzerland, and is here applied to Japan. For the analysis we make use of a selection of 36 stiff-soil and rock sites from the Japanese KiK-net network, for which a measured velocity profile is available. With respect to the previous study, however, we now analyze separately the elastic and anelastic contributions of the estimated empirical amplification. In a first step - which is consistent with the original work - only the elastic part of the amplification spectrum is considered. This procedure allows

  5. Detailed experimental investigations on flow behaviors and velocity field properties of a supersonic mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Hao; Hou, Juwei

    2018-03-01

    The flow behaviors and mixing characteristics of a supersonic mixing layer with a convective Mach number of 0.2 have been experimentally investigated utilizing nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering and particle image velocimetry techniques. The full development and evolution process, including the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, breakdown of large-scale structures and establishment of self-similar turbulence, is exhibited clearly in the experiments, which can give a qualitative graphically comparing for the DNS and LES results. The shocklets are first captured at this low convective Mach number, and their generation mechanisms are elaborated and analyzed. The convective velocity derived from two images with space-time correlations is well consistent with the theoretical result. The pairing and merging process of large-scale vortices in transition region is clearly revealed in the velocity vector field. The analysis of turbulent statistics indicates that in weakly compressible mixing layers, with the increase of convective Mach number, the peak values of streamwise turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress experience a sharp decrease, while the anisotropy ratio seems to keep quasi unchanged. The normalized growth rate of the present experiments shows a well agreement with former experimental and DNS data. The validation of present experimental results is important for that in the future the present work can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical data.

  6. Wingtip Vortices and Free Shear Layer Interaction in the Vicinity of Maximum Lift to Drag Ratio Lift Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammad Omar

    Cost-effective air-travel is something everyone wishes for when it comes to booking flights. The continued and projected increase in commercial air travel advocates for energy efficient airplanes, reduced carbon footprint, and a strong need to accommodate more airplanes into airports. All of these needs are directly affected by the magnitudes of drag these aircraft experience and the nature of their wingtip vortex. A large portion of the aerodynamic drag results from the airflow rolling from the higher pressure side of the wing to the lower pressure side, causing the wingtip vortices. The generation of this particular drag is inevitable however, a more fundamental understanding of the phenomenon could result in applications whose benefits extend much beyond the relatively minuscule benefits of commonly-used winglets. Maximizing airport efficiency calls for shorter intervals between takeoffs and landings. Wingtip vortices can be hazardous for following aircraft that may fly directly through the high-velocity swirls causing upsets at vulnerably low speeds and altitudes. The vortex system in the near wake is typically more complex since strong vortices tend to continue developing throughout the near wake region. Several chord lengths distance downstream of a wing, the so-called fully rolled up wing wake evolves into a combination of a discrete wingtip vortex pair and a free shear layer. Lift induced drag is generated as a byproduct of downwash induced by the wingtip vortices. The parasite drag results from a combination of form/pressure drag and the upper and lower surface boundary layers. These parasite effects amalgamate to create the free shear layer in the wake. While the wingtip vortices embody a large portion of the total drag at lifting angles, flow properties in the free shear layer also reveal their contribution to the aerodynamic efficiency of the aircraft. Since aircraft rarely cruise at maximum aerodynamic efficiency, a better understanding of the balance

  7. Clinical value of liver and spleen shear wave velocity in predicting the prognosis of patients with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Da-Feng; Zhang, Mei-Wu; Fan, Xiao-Xiang

    2017-12-07

    To explore the relationship of liver and spleen shear wave velocity in patients with liver cirrhosis combined with portal hypertension, and assess the value of liver and spleen shear wave velocity in predicting the prognosis of patients with portal hypertension. All 67 patients with liver cirrhosis diagnosed as portal hypertension by hepatic venous pressure gradient in our hospital from June 2014 to December 2014 were enrolled into this study. The baseline information of these patients was recorded. Furthermore, 67 patients were followed-up at 20 mo after treatment, and liver and spleen shear wave velocity were measured by acoustic radiation force impulse at the 1 st week, 3 rd month and 9 th month after treatment. Patients with favorable prognosis were assigned into the favorable prognosis group, while patients with unfavorable prognosis were assigned into the unfavorable prognosis group. The variation and difference in liver and spleen shear wave velocity in these two groups were analyzed by repeated measurement analysis of variance. Meanwhile, in order to evaluate the effect of liver and spleen shear wave velocity on the prognosis of patients with portal hypertension, Cox's proportional hazard regression model analysis was applied. The ability of those factors in predicting the prognosis of patients with portal hypertension was calculated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The liver and spleen shear wave velocity in the favorable prognosis group revealed a clear decline, while those in the unfavorable prognosis group revealed an increasing tendency at different time points. Furthermore, liver and spleen shear wave velocity was higher in the unfavorable prognosis group, compared with the favorable prognosis group; the differences were statistically significant ( P portal hypertension was significantly affected by spleen hardness at the 3 rd month after treatment [relative risk (RR) = 3.481]. At the 9 th month after treatment, the prognosis

  8. Compensation of shear waves in photoacoustic tomography with layered acoustic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, Robert W; Anastasio, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    An image reconstruction formula is presented for photoacoustic computed tomography that accounts for conversion between longitudinal and shear waves in a planar-layered acoustic medium. We assume the optical absorber that produces the photoacoustic wave field is embedded in a single fluid layer and any elastic solid layers present are separated by one or more fluid layers. The measurement aperture is assumed to be planar. Computer simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate and investigate the proposed reconstruction formula.

  9. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  10. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... structure i.e. no additional filter layers were applied. For both experiments, high-speed video recordings were synchronised with the pressure measurements for a detailed investigation of the coupling between the run-up and run-down flow processes and the measured pressure variations. Outward directed...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  11. Sensitivity of ground motion parameters to local site effects for areas characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Paolucci, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that earthquake damage at a particular site depends on the source, the path that the waves travel through and the local geology. The latter is capable of amplifying and changing the frequency content of the incoming seismic waves. In regions of sparse or no strong ground motion records, like Malta (Central Mediterranean), ground motion simulations are used to obtain parameters for purposes of seismic design and analysis. As an input to ground motion simulations, amplification functions related to the shallow subsurface are required. Shear-wave velocity profiles of several sites on the Maltese islands were obtained using the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (H/V), the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique and the Genetic Algorithm. The sites chosen were all characterised by a layer of Blue Clay, which can be up to 75 m thick, underlying the Upper Coralline Limestone, a fossiliferous coarse grained limestone. This situation gives rise to a velocity inversion. Available borehole data generally extends down till the top of the Blue Clay layer therefore the only way to check the validity of the modelled shear-wave velocity profile is through the thickness of the topmost layer. Surface wave methods are characterised by uncertainties related to the measurements and the model used for interpretation. Moreover the inversion procedure is also highly non-unique. Such uncertainties are not commonly included in site response analysis. Yet, the propagation of uncertainties from the extracted dispersion curves to inversion solutions can lead to significant differences in the simulations (Boaga et al., 2011). In this study, a series of sensitivity analyses will be presented with the aim of better identifying those stratigraphic properties which can perturb the ground motion simulation results. The stochastic one-dimensional site response analysis algorithm, Extended Source Simulation (EXSIM; Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005), was used to perform

  12. Sound field separation with a double layer velocity transducer array (L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    of the array. The technique has been examined and compared with direct velocity based reconstruction, as well as with a technique based on the measurement of the sound pressure and particle velocity. The double layer velocity method circumvents some of the drawbacks of the pressure-velocity based...

  13. Correlation of Point Shear Wave Velocity and Kidney Function in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu, Iulia; Bob, Flaviu; Sporea, Ioan; Popescu, Alina; Şirli, Roxana; Schiller, Adalbert

    2018-04-24

    Point shear wave elastography is a quantitative ultrasound-based imaging method used in the assessment of renal disease. Among point shear wave elastographic options, 2 techniques have been studied considerably: Virtual Touch quantification (VTQ; Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) and ElastPQ (EPQ; Philips Healthcare, Bothell, WA). Both rely on the tissue response to an acoustic beam generated by the ultrasound transducer. The data on renal VTQ are more extensive, whereas EPQ has been used less thus far in the assessment of the kidneys. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of EPQ in the kidney and compare it with VTQ. We studied 124 participants using EPQ: 22 with no renal disease and 102 with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Ninety-one were studied with both the EPQ and VTQ methods. We obtained 5 valid measurements in each kidney, expressed in meters per second. The mean kidney stiffness measurements ± SD obtained with EPQ in the healthy control group were as follows: right kidney, 1.23 ± 0.33 m/s; and left kidney, 1.26 ± 0.32 m/s (P = .6). In the patients with CKD (all stages), the mean kidney stiffness measurements obtained were significantly lower: right kidney, 1.09 ± 0.39 m/s; and left kidney, 1.04 ± 0.38 m/s (P = .4). We observed that, similar to VTQ, EPQ values decreased with CKD progression, based on analysis of variance results using different CKD stages. From a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the cutoff value for an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 45 mL/min was 1.24 m/s, and the value for an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 30 mL/min was 1.07 m/s. When using EPQ, the kidney shear wave velocity is decreased in patients with CKD, an observation similar to that obtained by using the VTQ method. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Liquefaction assessment based on combined use of CPT and shear wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Mahler, András; Győri, Erzsébet

    2017-04-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the most devastating secondary effects of earthquakes and can cause significant damage in built infrastructure. For this reason liquefaction hazard shall be considered in all regions where moderate-to-high seismic activity encounters with saturated, loose, granular soil deposits. Several approaches exist to take into account this hazard, from which the in-situ test based empirical methods are the most commonly used in practice. These methods are generally based on the results of CPT, SPT or shear wave velocity measurements. In more complex or high risk projects CPT and VS measurement are often performed at the same location commonly in the form of seismic CPT. Furthermore, VS profile determined by surface wave methods can also supplement the standard CPT measurement. However, combined use of both in-situ indices in one single empirical method is limited. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop such an empirical method within the framework of simplified empirical procedures where the results of CPT and VS measurements are used in parallel and can supplement each other. The combination of two in-situ indices, a small strain property measurement with a large strain measurement, can reduce uncertainty of empirical methods. In the first step by careful reviewing of the already existing liquefaction case history databases, sites were selected where the records of both CPT and VS measurement are available. After implementing the necessary corrections on the gathered 98 case histories with respect to fines content, overburden pressure and magnitude, a logistic regression was performed to obtain the probability contours of liquefaction occurrence. Logistic regression is often used to explore the relationship between a binary response and a set of explanatory variables. The occurrence or absence of liquefaction can be considered as binary outcome and the equivalent clean sand value of normalized overburden corrected cone tip

  15. Spanwise vorticity and wall normal velocity structure in the inertial region of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Bautista, Juan Carlos; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; White, Christopher; Chini, Gregory; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress gradient is a leading order mechanism on the inertial domain of turbulent wall-flows. This quantity can be described relative to the sum of two velocity-vorticity correlations, vωz and wωy . Recent studies suggest that the first of these correlates with the step-like structure of the instantaneous streamwise velocity profile on the inertial layer. This structure is comprised of large zones of uniform momentum segregated by slender regions of concentrated vorticity. In this talk we study the contributions of the v and ωz motions to the vorticity transport (vωz) mechanism through the use of experimental data at large friction Reynolds numbers, δ+. The primary contributions to v and ωz were estimated by identifying the peak wavelengths of their streamwise spectra. The magnitudes of these peaks are of the same order, and are shown to exhibit a weak δ+ dependence. The peak wavelengths of v, however, exhibit a strong wall-distance (y) dependence, while the peak wavelengths of ωz show only a weak y dependence, and remain almost O (√{δ+}) in size throughout the inertial domain. This research was partially supported by the National Science Foundation and partially supported by the Australian Research Council.

  16. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Batu Pahat (Malaysia); Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer [Faculty of Civil Engineering Omar Al Mukhtar University, Bayda, Libya, Africa (Libya)

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  17. Performance of a Polymer Flood with Shear-Thinning Fluid in Heterogeneous Layered Systems with Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sang Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the potential of a polymer flood for mobility control requires an accurate model on the viscosities of displacement fluids involved in the process. Because most polymers used in EOR exhibit shear-thinning behavior, the effective viscosity of a polymer solution is a highly nonlinear function of shear rate. A reservoir simulator including the model for the shear-rate dependence of viscosity was used to investigate shear-thinning effects of polymer solution on the performance of the layered reservoir in a five-spot pattern operating under polymer flood followed by waterflood. The model can be used as a quantitative tool to evaluate the comparative studies of different polymer flooding scenarios with respect to shear-rate dependence of fluids’ viscosities. Results of cumulative oil recovery and water-oil ratio are presented for parameters of shear-rate dependencies, permeability heterogeneity, and crossflow. The results of this work have proven the importance of taking non-Newtonian behavior of polymer solution into account for the successful evaluation of polymer flood processes. Horizontal and vertical permeabilities of each layer are shown to impact the predicted performance substantially. In reservoirs with a severe permeability contrast between horizontal layers, decrease in oil recovery and sudden increase in WOR are obtained by the low sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough through highly permeable layer, especially for shear-thinning fluids. An increase in the degree of crossflow resulting from sufficient vertical permeability is responsible for the enhanced sweep of the low permeability layers, which results in increased oil recovery. It was observed that a thinning fluid coefficient would increase injectivity significantly from simulations with various injection rates. A thorough understanding of polymer rheology in the reservoir and accurate numerical modeling are of fundamental importance for the exact estimation

  18. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques. This is essential to explore and resolve the deeper

  19. Experimental investigation of the effects of high-frequency electroactive morphing on the shear-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Johannes; Rizzo, Karl-Joseph; Jodin, Gurvan; Duhayon, Eric; Rouchon, Jean-François; Hunt, Julian; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved PIV measurements are conducted at a Reynolds number of 270 . 000 downstream of the trailing edge of a NACA4412 airfoil equipped with trailing-edge piezoelectric tab actuators to investigate the high-frequency low-amplitude actuation's effect on the shear-layer. A comparison of the time-averaged Reynolds stress tensor components at different actuation frequency reveals a significant impact of the actuation on the shear-layer dynamics. A proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is conducted in order to investigate the actuation's impact on the vortex breakdown. It will be shown that a specific low-amplitude actuation frequency enables a reduction of the predominant shear-layer frequencies.

  20. INVESTIGATION OF INNER SHEAR RESISTANCE OF GEOGRIDS BUILT UNDER GRANULAR PROTECTION LAYERS AND RAILWAY BALLAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sz. Fischer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Using adequate granular materials and layer structures in the railway super- and substructure is able to stabilise railway track geometry. For this purpose special behaviour of above materials has to be determined, e.g. inner shear resistance. Inner shear resistance of granular media with and without geogrid reinforcement in different depths is not known yet. Methodology. The author developed a special laboratory method to measure and define inner shear resistance of granular materials, it is called «multi-level shear box test». This method is adequate to determine inner shear resistance (pushing force vs. depth (distance from the «zero» surface. Two different granular materials: andesite railway ballast (31.5/63 mm and andesite railway protection layer material (0/56 mm, and seven different types of geogrids (GG1…GG7 were used during the tests. Findings. Values of inner shear resistance functions of andesite railway ballast without geogrid reinforcement and reinforced with different types of geogrids and andesite granular protection layer in function of the vertical distance from the geogrid plane were determined with multi-layer shear box tests when the material aggregation is uncompacted and compacted. Only the compacted sample was tested in case of the 0/56 mm protection layer. Cubic polynomial regression functions fitted on the mean values of the measurements are described graphically. Determination coefficients with values of R2>0.97 were resulted in all the cases of regression functions. Based on the polynomial regression functions fitted on the mean values of the test results, three increasing factors were determined in function of the distance measured from the geogrid. Increasing factor «A», «B» and «D». Originality. Multi-level shear box test, developed by the author, is certified unequivocally adequate for determining inner shear resistance of reinforced and unreinforced granular materials, e.g. railway ballast

  1. Blanking Clearance and Punch Velocity Effects on The Sheared Edge Characteristic in Micro-Blanking of Commercially Pure Copper Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didin Zakaria Lubis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the influences between clearance and punch velocity on the part edge quality of blanked parts. Experiments have been conducted using material copper, punch-die clearance and punch velocity variations. In order to determine the reachable punch-die clearance and punch velocity required for blanking. The quality of the part-edge characteristics shows that higher punch velocity and decreases clearance value can improve the part-edge quality, resulting in smaller burr height and rollover, and a larger shear zone. Furthermore, it could be observed that the part-edge quality improvement when blanking with high punch velocity is much more distinct for stele than for copper. According to blanking theory, this improvement was expected because copper have much higher heat conduction coefficients. Therefore, the heat dissipates faster and the desired stress relief effect does not take place to the same degree as for stele.

  2. Examples of invasive and non-invasive methods for estimation of shear-wave velocity profile in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.; Albota, E.; Yamanaka, H.; Fukumoto, S.; Poiata, N.

    2007-01-01

    The estimation of subsurface shear-wave velocity is of major importance for understanding and modelling site-response and surface ground motion. The shear-wave velocity profile strongly influence the shear-wave part of the seismic motion that proved to be the most damaging one. The improvement of input seismic ground motion for design is one of the long-term objectives within the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Project in Romania. Two approaches were used: installation of a digital seismic network and soil investigations (in situ and in laboratory). National Center for Seismic Risk Reduction (NCSRR, Romania), the implementing agency of JICA Project, performed these activities in cooperation with Japanese partner institutions, and an efficient know-how transfer was achieved. Between the soil investigation activities, a special importance was given to the estimation of shear-wave velocity profile. The present paper presents results from PS logging tests at NCSRR seismic station sites, and from single-station and array microtremor measurements. Other results from PS logging tests, surface-wave method and in situ and laboratory geotechnical investigations are presented in other papers in these proceedings. In future, a joint-collaborative effort of Romanian institutions may allow an improved characterisation of the soil profile beneath Bucharest. (authors)

  3. Momentum transport process in the quasi self-similar region of free shear mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamure, K.; Ito, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Iwano, K.; Hayase, T.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we performed a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially developing shear mixing layer covering both developing and developed regions. The aim of this study is to clarify the driving mechanism and the vortical structure of the partial counter-gradient momentum transport (CGMT) appearing in the quasi self-similar region. In the present DNS, the self-similarity is confirmed in x/L ≥ 0.67 (x/δU0 ≥ 137), where L and δU0 are the vertical length of the computational domain and the initial momentum thickness, respectively. However, the trend of CGMT is observed at around kδU = 0.075 and 0.15, where k is the wavenumber, δU is the normalized momentum thickness at x/L = 0.78 (x/δU0 = 160), and kδU = 0.075 corresponds to the distance between the vortical/stretching regions of the coherent structure. The budget analysis for the Reynolds shear stress reveals that it is caused by the pressure diffusion term at the off-central region and by -p (∂ u /∂ y ) ¯ in the pressure-strain correlation term at the central region. As the flow moves toward the downstream direction, the appearance of those terms becomes random and the unique trend of CGMT at the specific wavenumber bands disappears. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between the CGMT and vorticity distribution in the vortex region of the mixing layer, in association with the spatial development. In the upstream location, the high-vorticity region appears in the boundary between the areas of gradient momentum transport and CGMT, although the high-vorticity region is not actively producing turbulence. The negative production area gradually spreads by flowing toward the downstream direction, and subsequently, the fluid mass with high-vorticity is transported from the forehead stretching region toward the counter-gradient direction. In this location, the velocity fluctuation in the high-vorticity region is large and turbulence is actively produced. In view of this, the trend of

  4. Hybrid ANFIS with ant colony optimization algorithm for prediction of shear wave velocity from a carbonate reservoir in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Fattahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocity (Vs data are key information for petrophysical, geophysical and geomechanical studies. Although compressional wave velocity (Vp measurements exist in almost all wells, shear wave velocity is not recorded for most of elderly wells due to lack of technologic tools. Furthermore, measurement of shear wave velocity is to some extent costly. This study proposes a novel methodology to remove aforementioned problems by use of hybrid adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS with ant colony optimization algorithm (ACO based on fuzzy c–means clustering (FCM and subtractive clustering (SCM. The ACO is combined with two ANFIS models for determining the optimal value of its user–defined parameters. The optimization implementation by the ACO significantly improves the generalization ability of the ANFIS models. These models are used in this study to formulate conventional well log data into Vs in a quick, cheap, and accurate manner. A total of 3030 data points was used for model construction and 833 data points were employed for assessment of ANFIS models. Finally, a comparison among ANFIS models, and six well–known empirical correlations demonstrated ANFIS models outperformed other methods. This strategy was successfully applied in the Marun reservoir, Iran.

  5. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  6. Numerical Simulations of the Effects of a Tidal Turbine Array on Near-Bed Velocity and Local Bed Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gillibrand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to consider the potential effects of energy extraction by an array of tidal turbines on the ambient near-bed velocity field and local bed shear stress in a coastal channel with strong tidal currents. Local bed shear stress plays a key role in local sediment dynamics. The model solves the Reynold-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations on an unstructured mesh using mixed finite element and finite volume techniques. Tidal turbines are represented through an additional form drag in the momentum balance equation, with the thrust imparted and power generated by the turbines being velocity dependent with appropriate cut-in and cut-out velocities. Arrays of 1, 4 and 57 tidal turbines, each of 1.5 MW capacity, were simulated. Effects due to a single turbine and an array of four turbines were negligible. The main effect of the array of 57 turbines was to cause a shift in position of the jet through the tidal channel, as the flow was diverted around the tidal array. The net effect of this shift was to increase near-bed velocities and bed shear stress along the northern perimeter of the array by up to 0.8 m·s−1 and 5 Pa respectively. Within the array and directly downstream, near-bed velocities and bed shear stress were reduced by similar amounts. Changes of this magnitude have the potential to modify the known sand and shell banks in the region. Continued monitoring of the sediment distributions in the region will provide a valuable dataset on the impacts of tidal energy extraction on local sediment dynamics. Finally, the mean power generated per turbine is shown to decrease as the turbine array increased in size.

  7. Insights into the growth rate of spatially evolving plane turbulent free-shear layers from 2D vortex-gas simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2017-02-01

    Although the free-shear or mixing layer has been a subject of extensive research over nearly a century, there are certain fundamental issues that remain controversial. These include the influence of initial and downstream conditions on the flow, the effect of velocity ratio across the layer, and the nature of any possible coupling between small scale dynamics and the large scale evolution of layer thickness. In the spirit of the temporal vortex-gas simulations of Suryanarayanan et al. ["Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics," Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)], we revisit the simple 2D inviscid vortex-gas model with extensive computations and detailed analysis, in order to gain insights into some of the above issues. Simulations of the spatially evolving vortex-gas shear layer are carried out at different velocity ratios using a computational model based on the work of Basu et al. ["Vortex sheet simulation of a plane canonical mixing layer," Comput. Fluids 21, 1-30 (1992) and "Modelling plane mixing layers using vortex points and sheets," Appl. Math. Modell. 19, 66-75 (1995)], but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the origin of the free shear layer and at the exit to the computational domain can affect flow evolution in their respective downstream and upstream neighbourhoods, the latter being particularly strong in the single stream limit. In between these neighbourhoods at the ends is a regime of universal self-preserving growth rate given by a universal function of velocity ratio. The computed growth rates are generally located within the scatter of experimental data on plane mixing layers and closely agree with recent high Reynolds number experiments and 3D large eddy simulation studies. These findings support the view that observed free-shear layer growth can be largely explained by the 2D vortex dynamics of

  8. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  9. Lithospheric Shear Velocity Structure of South Island, New Zealand from Rayleigh Wave Tomography of Amphibious Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F. C.; Collins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first 3D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath Campbell and Challenger plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18 -70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8 - 25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 29 ocean-bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 with 28 New Zealand land-based seismometers. The ocean-bottom seismometers and 4 of the land seismometers were part of the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, and the remaining land seismometers are from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs<4.3km/s) body extending to at least 75km depth beneath the Banks and Otago peninsulas, a high-velocity (Vs~4.7km/s) upper mantle anomaly underlying the Southern Alps to a depth of 100km, and discontinuous lithospheric velocity structure between eastern and western Challenger Plateau. Using the 4.5km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau is substantially greater than that of Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with subcrustal earthquake hypocenters along the Alpine Fault (Boese et al., 2013). The ~400km-long low velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island underlies Cenozoic volcanics and mantle-derived helium observations (Hoke et al., 2000) on the surface. The NE-trending low-velocity zone dividing Challenger Plateau in our model underlies a prominent magnetic discontinuity (Sutherland et al., 1999). The latter feature has been interpreted to represent a pre-Cretaceous crustal boundary, which our results suggest may involve the entire mantle lithosphere.

  10. Effects of soot formation on shape of a nonpremixed laminar flame established in a shear boundary layer in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H Y; Merino, J L Florenciano; Dagaut, P

    2011-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to give a quantitative description of a heavily sooting, nonpremixed laminar flame established in a shear boundary layer in microgravity. Controlling mechanisms of three dimensional flow, combustion, soot and radiation are coupled. Soot volume fraction were predicted by using three approaches, referred respectively to as the fuel, acetylene and PAH inception models. It is found that the PAH inception model, which is based on the formation of two and three-ringed aromatic species, reproduces correctly the experimental data from a laminar ethylene diffusion flame. The PAH inception model serves later to better understand flame quenching, flame stand-off distance and soot formation as a function of the dimensionless volume coefficient, defined as C q = V F /V ox where V F is the fuel injection velocity, and V ox air stream velocity. The present experiments showed that a blue unstable flame, negligible radiative feedback, may change to a yellow stable flame, significant radiative loss with an increase of C q ; this experimental trend was numerically reproduced. The flame quenching occurs at the trailing edge due to radiative heat loss which is significantly amplified by increasing V F or decreasing V ox , favouring soot formation. Along a semi-infinite fuel zone, the ratio, d f /d b , where d f is the flame standoff distance, and d b the boundary layer thickness, converges towards a constant value of 1.2, while soot resides always within the boundary layer far away from the flame sheet.

  11. Ion temperature gradient driven mode in presence of transverse velocity shear in magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sheared poloidal flow on the toroidal branch of the ion temperature gradient driven mode of magnetized nonuniform plasma is studied. A novel "nonmodal" calculation is used to analyze the problem. It is shown that the transverse shear flow considerably reduced the growth...

  12. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  13. Bias of shear wave elasticity measurements in thin layer samples and a simple correction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianqiang; Xu, Hao; Qiang, Bo; Giambini, Hugo; Kinnick, Randall; An, Kai-Nan; Chen, Shigao; Luo, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an emerging technique for measuring biological tissue stiffness. However, the application of SWE in thin layer tissues is limited by bias due to the influence of geometry on measured shear wave speed. In this study, we investigated the bias of Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer gelatin-agar phantoms, and compared the result with finite element method and Lamb wave model simulation. The result indicated that the Young's modulus measured by SWE decreased continuously when the sample thickness decreased, and this effect was more significant for smaller thickness. We proposed a new empirical formula which can conveniently correct the bias without the need of using complicated mathematical modeling. In summary, we confirmed the nonlinear relation between thickness and Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer samples, and offered a simple and practical correction strategy which is convenient for clinicians to use.

  14. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  15. Control of a three-dimensional turbulent shear layer by means of oblique vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Werner; Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    2018-04-01

    The effect of local forcing on the separated, three-dimensional shear layer downstream of a backward-facing step is investigated by means of large-eddy simulation for a Reynolds number based on the step height of 10,700. The step edge is either oriented normal to the approaching turbulent boundary layer or swept at an angle of 40°. Oblique vortices with different orientation and spacing are generated by wavelike suction and blowing of fluid through an edge parallel slot. The vortices exhibit a complex three-dimensional structure, but they can be characterized by a wavevector in a horizontal section plane. In order to determine the step-normal component of the wavevector, a method is developed based on phase averages. The dependence of the wavevector on the forcing parameters can be described in terms of a dispersion relation, the structure of which indicates that the disturbances are mainly convected through the fluid. The introduced vortices reduce the size of the recirculation region by up to 38%. In both the planar and the swept case, the most efficient of the studied forcings consists of vortices which propagate in a direction that deviates by more than 50° from the step normal. These vortices exhibit a spacing in the order of 2.5 step heights. The upstream shift of the reattachment line can be explained by increased mixing and momentum transport inside the shear layer which is reflected in high levels of the Reynolds shear stress -ρ \\overline{u'v'}. The position of the maximum of the coherent shear stress is found to depend linearly on the wavelength, similar to two-dimensional free shear layers.

  16. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas.

  17. Time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting in the first year after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan: shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Snieder, Roel

    2013-04-01

    We detect time-lapse changes in P- and S-wave velocities (hereafter, VP and VS, respectively) and shear wave splitting parameters associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan, at depths between 0 and 504 m. We estimate not only medium parameters but also the 95 per cent confidence interval of the estimated velocity change by applying a new least squares inversion scheme to the deconvolution analysis of KiK-net vertical array records. Up to 6 per cent VS reduction is observed at more than half of the analysed KiK-net stations in northeastern Japan with over 95 per cent confidence in the first month after the main shock. There is a considerable correlation between the S-wave traveltime delay and the maximum horizontal dynamic strain (MDS) by the main shock motion when the strain exceeds 5 × 10- 4 on the ground surface. This correlation is not clearly observed for MDS at the borehole bottom. On the contrary, VP and shear wave splitting parameters do not show systematic changes after the Tohoku earthquake. These results indicate that the time-lapse change is concentrated near the ground surface, especially in loosely packed soil layers. We conclude that the behaviour of VP, VS and shear wave splitting parameters are explained by the generation of omnidirectional cracks near the ground surface and by the diffusion of water in the porous subsurface. Recovery of VS should be related to healing of the crack which is proportional to the logarithm of the lapse time after the main shock and/or to decompaction after shaking.

  18. Numerical studies of shear damped composite beams using a constrained damping layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, R.F.; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2008-01-01

    Composite beams containing one or more damping layers are studied numerically. The work is based on a semi-analytical model using a Timoshenko beam theory and a full 2D finite element model. The material system analysed, is inspired by a train wagon suspension system used in a EUREKA project Sigma......!1841. For the material system, the study shows that the effect of the damping layer is strongly influenced by the presence of a stiff constraining layer, that enforces large shear strain amplitudes. The thickness of the damping rubber layer itself has only a minor influence on the overall damping....... In addition, a large influence of ill positioned cuts in the damping layer is observed....

  19. Magnetic Field Generation, Particle Energization and Radiation at Relativistic Shear Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Spisak, Jake; Boettcher, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Recent large scale Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations have demonstrated that in unmagnetized relativistic shear flows, strong transverse d.c. magnetic fields are generated and sustained by ion-dominated currents on the opposite sides of the shear interface. Instead of dissipating the shear flow free energy via turbulence formation and mixing as it is usually found in MHD simulations, the kinetic results show that the relativistic boundary layer stabilizes itself via the formation of a robust vacuum gap supported by a strong magnetic field, which effectively separates the opposing shear flows, as in a maglev train. Our new PIC simulations have extended the runs to many tens of light crossing times of the simulation box. Both the vacuum gap and supporting magnetic field remain intact. The electrons are energized to reach energy equipartition with the ions, with 10% of the total energy in electromagnetic fields. The dominant radiation mechanism is similar to that of a wiggler, due to oscillating electron orbits around the boundary layer.

  20. Analytical determination of low velocity layer in 4-D hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, Seismic reflection surveys are done in the oil sectors to determine commercially viable hydrocarbon reservoirs but in most cases reflection records are obscured by wave behaviours in weathering layer. Hence, Up-hole refraction surveys are carried out in 3-D and 4-D prospects with a view to delineating the ...

  1. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography of the kidneys: is shear wave velocity affected by tissue fibrosis or renal blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kenichiro; Ogata, Ai; Tanaka, Keiko; Ide, Yoko; Sankoda, Akiko; Kawakita, Chieko; Nishikawa, Mana; Ohmori, Kazuyoshi; Kinomura, Masaru; Shimada, Noriaki; Fukushima, Masaki

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the main influencing factor of the shear wave velocity (SWV) of the kidneys measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. The SWV was measured in the kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers and 319 patients with chronic kidney disease. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated by the serum creatinine concentration and age. As an indicator of arteriosclerosis of large vessels, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured in 183 patients. Compared to the degree of interobserver and intraobserver deviation, a large variance of SWV values was observed in the kidneys of the patients with chronic kidney disease. Shear wave velocity values in the right and left kidneys of each patient correlated well, with high correlation coefficients (r = 0.580-0.732). The SWV decreased concurrently with a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate. A low SWV was obtained in patients with a high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Despite progression of renal fibrosis in the advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, these results were in contrast to findings for chronic liver disease, in which progression of hepatic fibrosis results in an increase in the SWV. Considering that a high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity represents the progression of arteriosclerosis in the large vessels, the reduction of elasticity succeeding diminution of blood flow was suspected to be the main influencing factor of the SWV in the kidneys. This study indicates that diminution of blood flow may affect SWV values in the kidneys more than the progression of tissue fibrosis. Future studies for reducing data variance are needed for effective use of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  2. Evidence for crustal low shear-wave speed in western Saudi Arabia from multi-scale fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocity tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2018-05-15

    We investigate the crustal and upper-mantle shear-velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocity tomography and shear-wave velocity inversion. The seismic dataset is compiled using ∼140 stations of the Saudi National Seismic Network (SNSN) operated by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). We measure Rayleigh-wave group-velocities at periods of 8–40 s from regional earthquakes. After obtaining 1-D shear-wave velocity models by inverting group-velocities at each grid node, we construct a 3-D shear-velocity model for Saudi Arabia and adjacent regions by interpolating the 1-D models. Our 3-D model indicates significant lateral variations in crustal and lithospheric thickness, as well as in the shear-wave velocity over the study region. In particular, we identify zones of reduced shear-wave speed at crustal levels beneath the Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Arabian Shield. The inferred reductions of 2–5% in shear-wave speed may be interpreted as possibly indicating the presence of partial melts. However, their precise origin we can only speculate about. Our study also reveals an upper-mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) below the Arabian Shield, supporting the model of lateral mantle flow from the Afar plume. Further geophysical experiments are needed to confirm (or refute) the hypothesis that partial melts may exist below the Cenozoic volcanism in western Saudi Arabia, and to build a comprehensive geodynamic–geological model for the evolution and present state of the lithosphere of the Arabian Plate and the Red Sea.

  3. Evidence for crustal low shear-wave speed in western Saudi Arabia from multi-scale fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocity tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng; Mai, Paul Martin; Chang, Sung-Joon; Zahran, Hani

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the crustal and upper-mantle shear-velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocity tomography and shear-wave velocity inversion. The seismic dataset is compiled using ∼140 stations of the Saudi National Seismic Network (SNSN) operated by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). We measure Rayleigh-wave group-velocities at periods of 8–40 s from regional earthquakes. After obtaining 1-D shear-wave velocity models by inverting group-velocities at each grid node, we construct a 3-D shear-velocity model for Saudi Arabia and adjacent regions by interpolating the 1-D models. Our 3-D model indicates significant lateral variations in crustal and lithospheric thickness, as well as in the shear-wave velocity over the study region. In particular, we identify zones of reduced shear-wave speed at crustal levels beneath the Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Arabian Shield. The inferred reductions of 2–5% in shear-wave speed may be interpreted as possibly indicating the presence of partial melts. However, their precise origin we can only speculate about. Our study also reveals an upper-mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) below the Arabian Shield, supporting the model of lateral mantle flow from the Afar plume. Further geophysical experiments are needed to confirm (or refute) the hypothesis that partial melts may exist below the Cenozoic volcanism in western Saudi Arabia, and to build a comprehensive geodynamic–geological model for the evolution and present state of the lithosphere of the Arabian Plate and the Red Sea.

  4. Gas Near a Wall: Shortened Mean Free Path, Reduced Viscosity, and the Manifestation of the Knudsen Layer in the Navier-Stokes Solution of a Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Rafail V.

    2018-06-01

    For the gas near a solid planar wall, we propose a scaling formula for the mean free path of a molecule as a function of the distance from the wall, under the assumption of a uniform distribution of the incident directions of the molecular free flight. We subsequently impose the same scaling onto the viscosity of the gas near the wall and compute the Navier-Stokes solution of the velocity of a shear flow parallel to the wall. Under the simplifying assumption of constant temperature of the gas, the velocity profile becomes an explicit nonlinear function of the distance from the wall and exhibits a Knudsen boundary layer near the wall. To verify the validity of the obtained formula, we perform the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computations for the shear flow of argon and nitrogen at normal density and temperature. We find excellent agreement between our velocity approximation and the computed DSMC velocity profiles both within the Knudsen boundary layer and away from it.

  5. Blob sizes and velocities in the Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kube, R.; Garcia, O.E.; LaBombard, B.

    A new blob-tracking algorithm for the GPI diagnostic installed in the outboard-midplane of Alcator C-Mod is developed. I t tracks large-amplitude fluctuations propagating through the scrape-off layer and calculates blob sizes and velocities. We compare the results of this method to a blob velocity...

  6. Comparison of shear wave velocity measurements assessed with two different ultrasound systems in an ex-vivo tendon strain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskopf, Andrea B; Bachmann, Elias; Snedeker, Jess G; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Buck, Florian M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the reliability of SW velocity measurements of two different ultrasound systems and their correlation with the tangent traction modulus in a non-static tendon strain model. A bovine tendon was fixed in a custom-made stretching device. Force was applied increasing from 0 up to 18 Newton. During each strain state the tangent traction modulus was determined by the stretcher device, and SW velocity (m/s) measurements using a Siemens S3000 and a Supersonic Aixplorer US machine were done for shear modulus (kPa) calculation. A strong significant positive correlation was found between SW velocity assessed by the two ultrasound systems and the tangent traction modulus (r = 0.827-0.954, p Aixplorer 0.25 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.034). Mean difference of SW velocity between the two US-systems was 0.37 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.012). In conclusion, SW velocities are highly dependent on mechanical forces in the tendon tissue, but for controlled mechanical loads appear to yield reproducible and comparable measurements using different US systems.

  7. Scaling results for the magnetic field line trajectories in the stochastic layer near the separatrix in divertor tokamaks with high magnetic shear using the higher shear map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima; Farhat, Hamidullah

    2009-01-01

    Extra terms are added to the generating function of the simple map (Punjabi et al 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 3322) to adjust shear of magnetic field lines in divertor tokamaks. From this new generating function, a higher shear map is derived from a canonical transformation. A continuous analog of the higher shear map is also derived. The method of maps (Punjabi et al 1994 J. Plasma Phys. 52 91) is used to calculate the average shear, stochastic broadening of the ideal separatrix near the X-point in the principal plane of the tokamak, loss of poloidal magnetic flux from inside the ideal separatrix, magnetic footprint on the collector plate, and its area, and the radial diffusion coefficient of magnetic field lines near the X-point. It is found that the width of the stochastic layer near the X-point and the loss of poloidal flux from inside the ideal separatrix scale linearly with average shear. The area of magnetic footprints scales roughly linearly with average shear. Linear scaling of the area is quite good when the average shear is greater than or equal to 1.25. When the average shear is in the range 1.1-1.25, the area of the footprint fluctuates (as a function of average shear) and scales faster than linear scaling. Radial diffusion of field lines near the X-point increases very rapidly by about four orders of magnitude as average shear increases from about 1.15 to 1.5. For higher values of average shear, diffusion increases linearly, and comparatively very slowly. The very slow scaling of the radial diffusion of the field can flatten the plasma pressure gradient near the separatrix, and lead to the elimination of type-I edge localized modes.

  8. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number up to 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  9. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially

  10. Modeling a Propagating Sawtooth Flare Ribbon Structure as a Tearing Mode in the Presence of Velocity Shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Jacob; Longcope, Dana [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    On 2014 April 18 (SOL2014-04-18T13:03), an M-class flare was observed by IRIS. The associated flare ribbon contained a quasi-periodic sawtooth pattern that was observed to propagate along the ribbon, perpendicular to the IRIS spectral slit, with a phase velocity of ∼15 km s{sup −1}. This motion resulted in periodicities in both intensity and Doppler velocity along the slit. These periodicities were reported by Brannon et al. to be approximately ±0.″5 in position and ±20 km s{sup −1} in velocity and were measured to be ∼180° out of phase with one another. This quasi-periodic behavior has been attributed by others to bursty or patchy reconnection and slipping occurring during three-dimensional magnetic reconnection. Though able to account for periodicities in both intensity and Doppler velocity, these suggestions do not explicitly account for the phase velocity of the entire sawtooth structure or the relative phasing of the oscillations. Here we propose that the observations can be explained by a tearing mode (TM) instability occurring at a current sheet across which there is also a velocity shear. Using a linear model of this instability, we reproduce the relative phase of the oscillations, as well as the phase velocity of the sawtooth structure. We suggest a geometry and local plasma parameters for the April 18 flare that would support our hypothesis. Under this proposal, the combined spectral and spatial IRIS observations of this flare may provide the most compelling evidence to date of a TM occurring in the solar magnetic field.

  11. Shear wave velocity measurements for differential diagnosis of solid breast masses: a comparison between virtual touch quantification and virtual touch IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Masahiro; Benson, John; Fan, Liexiang; Isobe, Sachiko

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the diagnostic performance of two shear wave speed measurement techniques in 81 patients with 83 solid breast lesions. Virtual Touch Quantification, which provides single-point shear wave speed measurement capability (SP-SWS), was compared with Virtual Touch IQ, a new 2-D shear wave imaging technique with multi-point shear wave speed measurement capability (2D-SWS). With SP-SWS, shear wave velocity was measured within the lesion ("internal" value) and the marginal areas ("marginal" value). With 2D-SWS, the highest velocity was measured. The marginal values obtained with the SP-SWS and 2D-SWS methods were significantly higher for malignant lesions and benign lesions, respectively (p breast masses. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A joint inversion for shear velocity and anisotropy: the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.

    2016-08-01

    Trade-offs between velocity and anisotropy heterogeneity complicate the interpretation of differential traveltime data and have the potential to bias isotropic tomographic models. By constructing a simple parametrisation to describe an elastic tensor with hexagonal symmetry, we find analytic solutions to the Christoffel equations in terms of fast and slow horizontal velocities that allow us to simultaneously invert differential traveltime data and splitting data from teleseismic S arrivals to recover 3-D velocity and anisotropy structure. This technique provides a constraint on the depth-extent of shallow anisotropy, otherwise absent from interpretations based on SKS splitting alone. This approach is well suited to the young Woodlark Rift, where previous studies have found strong velocity variation and substantial SKS splitting in a continental rift with relatively simple geometry. This study images a low-velocity rift axis with ≤4 per cent spreading-parallel anisotropy at 50-100 km depth that separates regions of pre-existing lithospheric fabric, indicating the synchronous development of extensional crystallographic preferred orientation and lithospheric thinning. A high-velocity slab fragment north of the rift axis is associated with strike-parallel anisotropic fast axes, similar to that seen in the shallow mantle of some subduction zones. In addition to the insights provided by the anisotropy structure, the improvement in fit to the differential traveltime data demonstrates the merit to a joint inversion that accounts for anisotropy.

  13. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  14. Subsurface structure of the Nojima fault from dipole shear velocity/anisotropy and borehole Stoneley wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yamamoto, H; Brie, A

    1996-10-01

    Fracture and permeability in the fault zone of the active fault drilling at the Nojima fault were evaluated from acoustic waveforms. There were several permeable intervals in the fault zone. There was strong Stoneley wave attenuation, very large S-Se below the fault and in the interval above the fault. In the fault zone, there were also several short intervals where S-Se was very large; 667 m-674 m and 706 m-710 m. In these intervals, the Stoneley attenuation was large, but there was no Stoneley reflection from within the interval. Reflections were observed at the upper and lower boundaries, going away from the bed up above, and down below. In this well, the shear wave was very strongly attenuated at and below the fault zone. The fast shear azimuth changed at the fault. The slowness anisotropy was fairly strong above the fault from 602 m to 612 m, but smaller below the fault. The changes in fast shear azimuth were much more pronounced near the fault, which suggested a strong influence of the fault. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Mean shear flow in recirculating turbulent urban convection and the plume-puff eddy structure below stably stratified inversion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifan; Hunt, Julian; Yin, Shi; Li, Yuguo

    2018-03-01

    The mean and random components of the velocity field at very low wind speeds in a convective boundary layer (CBL) over a wide urban area are dominated by large eddy structures—either turbulent plumes or puffs. In the mixed layer at either side of the edges of urban areas, local mean recirculating flows are generated by sharp horizontal temperature gradients. These recirculation regions also control the mean shear profile and the bent-over plumes across the mixed layer, extending from the edge to the center of the urban area. A simplified physical model was proposed to calculate the mean flow speed at the edges of urban areas. Water tank experiments were carried out to study the mean recirculating flow and turbulent plume structures. The mean speed at urban edges was measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the plume structures were visualized by the thermalchromic liquid crystal (TLC) sheets. The horizontal velocity calculated by the physical model at the urban edge agrees well with that measured in the water tank experiments, with a root mean square of 0.03. The experiments also show that the pattern of the mean flow over the urban area changes significantly if the shape of the heated area changes or if the form of the heated urban area becomes sub-divided, for example by the creation of nearby but separated "satellite cities." The convective flow over the square urban area is characterized as the diagonal inflow at the lower level and the side outflow at the upper level. The outflow of the small city can be drawn into the inflow region of the large city in the "satellite city" case. A conceptual analysis shows how these changes significantly affect the patterns of dispersion of pollutants in different types of urban areas.

  16. Effect of Coulomb friction on orientational correlation and velocity distribution functions in a sheared dilute granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Alam, Meheboob

    2011-08-01

    From particle simulations of a sheared frictional granular gas, we show that the Coulomb friction can have dramatic effects on orientational correlation as well as on both the translational and angular velocity distribution functions even in the Boltzmann (dilute) limit. The dependence of orientational correlation on friction coefficient (μ) is found to be nonmonotonic, and the Coulomb friction plays a dual role of enhancing or diminishing the orientational correlation, depending on the value of the tangential restitution coefficient (which characterizes the roughness of particles). From the sticking limit (i.e., with no sliding contact) of rough particles, decreasing the Coulomb friction is found to reduce the density and spatial velocity correlations which, together with diminished orientational correlation for small enough μ, are responsible for the transition from non-gaussian to gaussian distribution functions in the double limit of small friction (μ→0) and nearly elastic particles (e→1). This double limit in fact corresponds to perfectly smooth particles, and hence the maxwellian (gaussian) is indeed a solution of the Boltzmann equation for a frictional granular gas in the limit of elastic collisions and zero Coulomb friction at any roughness. The high-velocity tails of both distribution functions seem to follow stretched exponentials even in the presence of Coulomb friction, and the related velocity exponents deviate strongly from a gaussian with increasing friction.

  17. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  18. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  19. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  20. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  1. Shear wave velocities in the upper mantle of the Western Alps: new constraints using array analysis of seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Chao; Pedersen, Helle A.; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang; Solarino, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    It remains challenging to obtain absolute shear wave velocities of heterogeneities of small lateral extension in the uppermost mantle. This study presents a cross-section of Vs across the strongly heterogeneous 3-D structure of the western European Alps, based on array analysis of data from 92 broad-band seismic stations from the CIFALPS experiment and from permanent networks in France and Italy. Half of the stations were located along a dense sublinear array. Using a combination of these stations and off-profile stations, fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were calculated using a combined frequency-time beamforming approach. We calculated dispersion curves for seven arrays of approximately 100 km aperture and 14 arrays of approximately 50 km aperture, the latter with the aim of obtaining a 2-D vertical cross-section of Vs beneath the western Alps. The dispersion curves were inverted for Vs(z), with crustal interfaces imposed from a previous receiver function study. The array approach proved feasible, as Vs(z) from independent arrays vary smoothly across the profile length. Results from the seven large arrays show that the shear velocity of the upper mantle beneath the European plate is overall low compared to AK135 with the lowest velocities in the internal part of the western Alps, and higher velocities east of the Alps beneath the Po plain. The 2-D Vs model is coherent with (i) a ∼100 km thick eastward-dipping European lithosphere west of the Alps, (ii) very high velocities beneath the Po plain, coherent with the presence of the Alpine (European) slab and (iii) a narrow low-velocity anomaly beneath the core of the western Alps (from the Briançonnais to the Dora Maira massif), and approximately colocated with a similar anomaly observed in a recent teleseismic P-wave tomography. This intriguing anomaly is also supported by traveltime variations of subvertically propagating body waves from two teleseismic events that are approximately located on

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  3. Orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers. II. An improved wall shear stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpresa, Paola; Sherwin, Spencer; Weinberg, Peter; van Reeuwijk, Maarten

    2018-03-01

    A new model for the analytical prediction of wall shear stress distributions at the base of orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers is developed. This model is a generalisation of the classical extended Stokes solution and will be referred to as the potential theory-Stokes model. The model is validated using a large set of numerical simulations covering a wide range of flow regimes representative of those used in laboratory experiments. It is demonstrated that the model is in much better agreement with the simulation data than the classical Stokes solution, improving the prediction in 63% of the studied cases. The central assumption of the model—which is to link the wall shear stress with the surface velocity—is shown to hold remarkably well over all regimes covered.

  4. Prediction of Compressional, Shear, and Stoneley Wave Velocities from Conventional Well Log Data Using a Committee Machine with Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoodeh, Mojtaba; Bagheripour, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of compressional, shear, and Stoneley wave velocities, carried out by dipole sonic imager (DSI) logs, provides invaluable data in geophysical interpretation, geomechanical studies and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The presented study proposes an improved methodology for making a quantitative formulation between conventional well logs and sonic wave velocities. First, sonic wave velocities were predicted from conventional well logs using artificial neural network, fuzzy logic, and neuro-fuzzy algorithms. Subsequently, a committee machine with intelligent systems was constructed by virtue of hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search technique while outputs of artificial neural network, fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy models were used as inputs of the committee machine. It is capable of improving the accuracy of final prediction through integrating the outputs of aforementioned intelligent systems. The hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search tool, embodied in the structure of committee machine, assigns a weight factor to each individual intelligent system, indicating its involvement in overall prediction of DSI parameters. This methodology was implemented in Asmari formation, which is the major carbonate reservoir rock of Iranian oil field. A group of 1,640 data points was used to construct the intelligent model, and a group of 800 data points was employed to assess the reliability of the proposed model. The results showed that the committee machine with intelligent systems performed more effectively compared with individual intelligent systems performing alone.

  5. Seismic Wave Propagation from Underground Chemical Explosions: Sensitivity to Velocity and Thickness of a Weathered Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, E. T.; Ezzedine, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recorded motions from underground chemical explosions are complicated by long duration seismic coda as well as motion in the tangential direction. The inability to distinguish the origins of these complexities as either source or path effects comprises a limitation to effective monitoring of underground chemical explosions. With numerical models, it is possible to conduct rigorous sensitivity analyses for chemical explosive sources and their resulting ground motions under the influence of many attributes, including but not limited to complex velocity structure, topography, and non-linear source characteristics. Previously we found that topography can cause significant scattering in the direct wave but leads to relatively little motion in the coda. Here, we aim to investigate the contribution from the low-velocity weathered layer that exists in the shallow subsurface apart from and in combination with surface topography. We use SW4, an anelastic anisotropic fourth order finite difference code to simulate chemical explosive source in a 1D velocity structure consisting of a single weathered layer over a half space. A range of velocity magnitudes are used for the upper weathered layer with the velocities always being lower than that of the granitic underlaying layer. We find that for lower weathered layer velocities, the wave train is highly dispersed and causes a large percentage of energy to be contained in the coda in relation to the entire time series. The percentage of energy contained in the coda grows with distance from the source but saturates at a certain distance that depends on weathered layer velocity and thickness. The saturation onset distance increases with decreasing layer thickness and increasing velocity of the upper layer. Measurements of relative coda energy and coda saturation onset distance from real recordings can provide an additional constraint on the properties of the weathered layer in remote sites as well as test sites like the Nevada

  6. Influence of the tilt angle of Percutaneous Aortic Prosthesis on Velocity and Shear Stress Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alvares de Azevedo Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Due to the nature of the percutaneous prosthesis deployment process, a variation in its final position is expected. Prosthetic valve placement will define the spatial location of its effective orifice in relation to the aortic annulus. The blood flow pattern in the ascending aorta is related to the aortic remodeling process, and depends on the spatial location of the effective orifice. The hemodynamic effect of small variations in the angle of inclination of the effective orifice has not been studied in detail. Objective: To implement an in vitro simulation to characterize the hydrodynamic blood flow pattern associated with small variations in the effective orifice inclination. Methods: A three-dimensional aortic phantom was constructed, reproducing the anatomy of one patient submitted to percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Flow analysis was performed by use of the Particle Image Velocimetry technique. The flow pattern in the ascending aorta was characterized for six flow rate levels. In addition, six angles of inclination of the effective orifice were assessed. Results: The effective orifice at the -4° and -2° angles directed the main flow towards the anterior wall of the aortic model, inducing asymmetric and high shear stress in that region. However, the effective orifice at the +3° and +5° angles mimics the physiological pattern, centralizing the main flow and promoting a symmetric distribution of shear stress. Conclusion: The measurements performed suggest that small changes in the angle of inclination of the percutaneous prosthesis aid in the generation of a physiological hemodynamic pattern, and can contribute to reduce aortic remodeling.

  7. Pitfalls in velocity analysis for strongly contrasting, layered media - Example from the Chalk Group, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh; Uldall, Anette; Moreau, Julien; Nielsen, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the velocity structure of the subsurface is critical in key seismic processing sequences, for instance, migration, depth conversion, and construction of initial P- and S-wave velocity models for full-waveform inversion. Therefore, the quality of subsurface imaging is highly dependent upon the quality of the seismic velocity analysis. Based on a case study from the Danish part of the North Sea, we show how interference caused by multiples, converted waves, and thin-layer effects may lead to incorrect velocity estimation, if such effects are not accounted for. Seismic wave propagation inside finely layered reservoir rocks dominated by chalk is described by two-dimensional finite-difference wave field simulation. The rock physical properties used for the modeling are based on an exploration well from the Halfdan field in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The modeling results are compared to seismic data from the study area. The modeling shows that interference of primaries with multiples, converted waves and thin-bed effects can give rise to strong anomalies in standard velocity analysis plots. Consequently, root-mean-square (RMS) velocity profiles may be erroneously picked. In our study area, such mis-picking can introduce errors in, for example, the thickness estimation of the layers near the base of the studied sedimentary strata by 11% to 26%. Tests show that front muting and bandpass filtering cannot significantly improve the quality of velocity analysis in our study. However, we notice that spiking deconvolution applied before velocity analysis may to some extent reduce the impact of interference and, therefore, reduce the risk of erroneous picking of the velocity function.

  8. Sheared Layers in the Continental Crust: Nonlinear and Linearized inversion for Ps receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Sheared Layers in the Continental Crust: Nonlinear and Linearized inversion for Ps receiver functions Jeffrey Park, Yale University The interpretation of seismic receiver functions (RFs) in terms of isotropic and anisotropic layered structure can be complex. The relationship between structure and body-wave scattering is nonlinear. The anisotropy can involve more parameters than the observations can readily constrain. Finally, reflectivity-predicted layer reverberations are often not prominent in data, so that nonlinear waveform inversion can search in vain to match ghost signals. Multiple-taper correlation (MTC) receiver functions have uncertainties in the frequency domain that follow Gaussian statistics [Park and Levin, 2016a], so grid-searches for the best-fitting collections of interfaces can be performed rapidly to minimize weighted misfit variance. Tests for layer-reverberations can be performed in the frequency domain without reflectivity calculations, allowing flexible modelling of weak, but nonzero, reverberations. Park and Levin [2016b] linearized the hybridization of P and S body waves in an anisotropic layer to predict first-order Ps conversion amplitudes at crust and mantle interfaces. In an anisotropic layer, the P wave acquires small SV and SH components. To ensure continuity of displacement and traction at the top and bottom boundaries of the layer, shear waves are generated. Assuming hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary symmetry axis, theory confirms the empirical stacking trick of phase-shifting transverse RFs by 90 degrees in back-azimuth [Shiomi and Park, 2008; Schulte-Pelkum and Mahan, 2014] to enhance 2-lobed and 4-lobed harmonic variation. Ps scattering is generated by sharp interfaces, so that RFs resemble the first derivative of the model. MTC RFs in the frequency domain can be manipulated to obtain a first-order reconstruction of the layered anisotropy, under the above modeling constraints and neglecting reverberations. Examples from long

  9. Turbulent transport and shear at the E x B velocity in wall plasma of the TF-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulence of near-the-wall plasma and potentialities of affecting the turbulence and periphery transport of the TF-2 tokamak by inducing radial electric fields and ergodization of periphery magnetic structure have been investigated, the results are presented. Essential role of the E x B velocity shear in suppression of the turbulence and turbulent transport in periphery has been pointed out. Decrease in transport losses stemming from effect of radial electric fields is brought about suppression of turbulence amplitude, decrease in correlations and decrease in the width of the wave numbers spectrum. Profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, turbulence level, electric fields over entire periphery of discharge change as a result. Ergodization of magnetic structure also results in the change of properties of periphery turbulence and turbulent transport [ru

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar, E-mail: chandrasekhar.shukla@gmail.com; Das, Amita, E-mail: amita@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Patel, Kartik [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  11. Metaheuristic optimization approaches to predict shear-wave velocity from conventional well logs in sandstone and carbonate case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami Niri, Mohammad; Amiri Kolajoobi, Rasool; Khodaiy Arbat, Mohammad; Shahbazi Raz, Mahdi

    2018-06-01

    Seismic wave velocities, along with petrophysical data, provide valuable information during the exploration and development stages of oil and gas fields. The compressional-wave velocity (VP ) is acquired using conventional acoustic logging tools in many drilled wells. But the shear-wave velocity (VS ) is recorded using advanced logging tools only in a limited number of wells, mainly because of the high operational costs. In addition, laboratory measurements of seismic velocities on core samples are expensive and time consuming. So, alternative methods are often used to estimate VS . Heretofore, several empirical correlations that predict VS by using well logging measurements and petrophysical data such as VP , porosity and density are proposed. However, these empirical relations can only be used in limited cases. The use of intelligent systems and optimization algorithms are inexpensive, fast and efficient approaches for predicting VS. In this study, in addition to the widely used Greenberg–Castagna empirical method, we implement three relatively recently developed metaheuristic algorithms to construct linear and nonlinear models for predicting VS : teaching–learning based optimization, imperialist competitive and artificial bee colony algorithms. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of these algorithms to predict Vs using conventional well logs in two field data examples, a sandstone formation from an offshore oil field and a carbonate formation from an onshore oil field. We compared the estimated VS using each of the employed metaheuristic approaches with observed VS and also with those predicted by Greenberg–Castagna relations. The results indicate that, for both sandstone and carbonate case studies, all three implemented metaheuristic algorithms are more efficient and reliable than the empirical correlation to predict VS . The results also demonstrate that in both sandstone and carbonate case studies, the performance of an artificial bee

  12. How can we describe the entrainment processes in sheared convective boundary layers?: a large-eddy simulation and mixed-layer theory/model comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Kim, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    Dry convective boundary layers characterized by a significant wind shear on the surface and at the inversion zone are studied by means of the mixed layer theory. Two different representations of the entrainment zone, each of which has a different closure of the entrainment heat flux, are considered.

  13. Representing Sheared Convective Boundary Layer by Zeroth- and First-Order-Jump Mixed-Layer Models: Large-Eddy Simulation Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Kim, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    Dry convective boundary layers characterized by a significant wind shear on the surface and at the inversion are studied by means of the mixed-layer theory. Two different representations of the entrainment zone, each of which has a different closure of the entrainment heat flux, are considered. The

  14. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  15. Simultaneous inversion for hypocenters and lateral velocity variation: An iterative solution with a layered model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, B.W.; Zandt, G.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-08-10

    An iterative inversion technique has been developed that uses the direct P and S wave arrival times from local earthquakes to compute simultaneously a three-dimensional velocity structure and relocated hypocenters. Crustal structure is modeled by subdiving flat layers into rectangular blocks. An interpolation function is used to smoothly vary velocities between blocks, allowing ray trace calculations of travel times in a three-dimensional medium. Tests using synthetic data from known models show that solutions are reasonably independent of block size and spatial distribution but are sensitive to the choice of layer thicknesses. Application of the technique to observed earthquake data from north-central Utah shown the following: (1) lateral velcoity variations in the crust as large as 7% occur over 30-km distance, (2) earthquake epicenters computed with the three-dimensional velocity structure were shifted an average of 3.0 km from location determined assuming homogeneous flat layered models, and (3) the laterally varying velocity structure correlates with anomalous variations in the local gravity and aeromagnetic fields, suggesting that the new velocity information can be valuable in acquiring a better understanding of crustal structure.

  16. Shear flow beneath oceanic plates: Local nonsimilarity boundary layers for olivine rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, D.A.; Tovish, A.; Schubert, G.

    1978-01-01

    The principle of local similarity, which has been used to model the two-dimensional boundary layers in the oceanic upper mantle, permits calculation of the temperature, velocity, and stress fields with essentially analytic techniques. Finite difference numerical methods are hard pressed to resolve the detail required by the large variation of viscosity between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. In this paper the local similarity approximation has been justified by quantitatively evaluating the effect of nonsimilarity due to viscous heating, nonlinear temperature- and pressure-dependent rheology, buoyancy, adiabatic cooling, etc. Nonsimilar effects produce only small modifications of the locally similar boundary layers; important geophysical observables such as surface heat flux and ocean floor topography are given to better than 10% by the locally similar solution. A posteriori evaluations of the term neglected in the boundary layer simplification of the complete equations have been conducted on the locally similar temperature and velocity profiles close to the spreading ridge. The boundary layer models are valid to depths of 100 km at 3 m.y. and 10 km at 0.3 m.y

  17. 3-D Upper-Mantle Shear Velocity Model Beneath the Contiguous United States Based on Broadband Surface Wave from Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Chu, Risheng; Yang, Yingjie

    2018-05-01

    Ambient noise seismic tomography has been widely used to study crustal and upper-mantle shear velocity structures. Most studies, however, concentrate on short period (structure on a continental scale. We use broadband Rayleigh wave phase velocities to obtain a 3-D V S structures beneath the contiguous United States at period band of 10-150 s. During the inversion, 1-D shear wave velocity profile is parameterized using B-spline at each grid point and is inverted with nonlinear Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Then, a 3-D shear velocity model is constructed by assembling all the 1-D shear velocity profiles. Our model is overall consistent with existing models which are based on multiple datasets or data from earthquakes. Our model along with the other post-USArray models reveal lithosphere structures in the upper mantle, which are consistent with the geological tectonic background (e.g., the craton root and regional upwelling provinces). The model has comparable resolution on lithosphere structures compared with many published results and can be used for future detailed regional or continental studies and analysis.

  18. One kind of atmosphere-ocean three layer model for calculating the velocity of ocean current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Z; Xi, P

    1979-10-01

    A three-layer atmosphere-ocean model is given in this paper to calcuate the velocity of ocean current, particularly the function of the vertical coordinate, taking into consideratiln (1) the atmospheric effect on the generation of ocean current, (2) a calculated coefficient of the eddy viscosity instead of an assumed one, and (3) the sea which actually varies in depth.

  19. Shear deformation and relaxed lattice constant of (Ga,Mn)As layers on GaAs(113)A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, Lukas; Daeubler, Joachim; Glunk, Michael; Schoch, Wladimir; Limmer, Wolfgang; Sauer, Rolf [Institut fuer Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The shear deformation and the relaxed lattice constant of compressively strained (Ga,Mn)As layers with Mn concentrations of up to 5%, pseudomorphically grown on GaAs(113)A and GaAs(001) substrates by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy, have been studied by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. Rocking curves reveal a triclinic distortion of the (113)A layers with a shear direction towards the [001] crystallographic axis, whereas the (001) layers are tetragonally distorted along [001]. The relaxed lattice constants were derived from {omega}-2{theta} scans for the symmetric (113) and (004) Bragg reflections, taking the elastic anisotropy of the cubic system into account. The increase of the lattice constant with Mn content has been found to be smaller for the (113)A layers than for the (001) layers, presumably due to the enhanced amount of excess As in the (113)A layers.

  20. Avalanche weak layer shear fracture parameters from the cohesive crack model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, David

    2014-05-01

    Dry slab avalanches release by mode II shear fracture within thin weak layers under cohesive snow slabs. The important fracture parameters include: nominal shear strength, mode II fracture toughness and mode II fracture energy. Alpine snow is not an elastic material unless the rate of deformation is very high. For natural avalanche release, it would not be possible that the fracture parameters can be considered as from classical fracture mechanics from an elastic framework. The strong rate dependence of alpine snow implies that it is a quasi-brittle material (Bažant et al., 2003) with an important size effect on nominal shear strength. Further, the rate of deformation for release of an avalanche is unknown, so it is not possible to calculate the fracture parameters for avalanche release from any model which requires the effective elastic modulus. The cohesive crack model does not require the modulus to be known to estimate the fracture energy. In this paper, the cohesive crack model was used to calculate the mode II fracture energy as a function of a brittleness number and nominal shear strength values calculated from slab avalanche fracture line data (60 with natural triggers; 191 with a mix of triggers). The brittleness number models the ratio of the approximate peak value of shear strength to nominal shear strength. A high brittleness number (> 10) represents large size relative to fracture process zone (FPZ) size and the implications of LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics). A low brittleness number (e.g. 0.1) represents small sample size and primarily plastic response. An intermediate value (e.g. 5) implies non-linear fracture mechanics with intermediate relative size. The calculations also implied effective values for the modulus and the critical shear fracture toughness as functions of the brittleness number. The results showed that the effective mode II fracture energy may vary by two orders of magnitude for alpine snow with median values ranging from 0

  1. Composition of the low seismic velocity E' layer at the top of Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Evidence for a layer (E') at the top of the outer core has been available since the '90s and while different studies suggest slightly different velocity contrasts and thicknesses, the common observation is that the layer has lower velocities than the bulk outer core (PREM). Although there are no direct measurements on the density of this layer, dynamic stability requires it to be less dense than the bulk outer core under those same pressure and temperature conditions. Using ab initio simulations on Fe-Ni-S-C-O-Si liquids we constrain the origin and composition of the low-velocity layer E' at the top of Earth's outer core. We find that increasing the concentration of any light-element always increases velocity and so a low-velocity and low-density layer (for stability) cannot be made by simply increasing light element concentration. This rules out barodiffusion or upwards sedimentation of a light phase for its origin. However, exchanging elements can—depending on the elements exchanged—produce such a layer. We evaluate three possibilities. Firstly, crystallization of a light phase from a core containing more than one light element may make such a layer, but only if the crystalizing phase is very Fe-rich, which is at odds with available phase diagrams at CMB conditions. Secondly, the E' layer may result from incomplete mixing of an early Earth core with a late impactor, depending on the light element compositions of the impactor and Earth's core, but such a primordial stratification is neither supported by dynamical models of the core nor thermodynamic models of core merger after the giant impact. The last and most plausible scenario is core-mantle chemical interaction; using thermodynamic models for metal-silicate partitioning of silicon and oxygen at CMB conditions, we show that a reaction between the core and an FeO-rich basal magma ocean can enrich the core in oxygen while depleting it in silicon, in relative amounts that produce a light and slow layer

  2. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite layering material and feldspathic porcelain-coated zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Ryosuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Koizuka, Mai; Taguchi, Kohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of both feldspathic porcelain coating of zirconia frameworks and priming agents on shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconia frameworks. A total of 462 airborne-particle-abraded zirconia disks were divided into three groups: untreated disks (ZR-AB), airborne-particle-abraded zirconia disks coated with feldspathic porcelain, (ZR-PO-AB), and hydrofluoric acid-etched zirconia disks coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-HF). Indirect composite (Estenia C&B) was bonded to zirconia specimens with no (CON) or one of four priming agents--Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB + activator), Estenia Opaque primer, or Porcelain Liner M Liquid B (PLB)--with or without an opaque material (Estenia C&B Opaque). All specimens were tested for shear bond strength before and after 20,000 thermocycles. The Steel-Dwass test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare shear bond strength. In ZR-AB specimens, the initial bond strength of the CPB and CPB + Activator groups was significantly higher as compared with the other three groups (P material, bond strength was significantly lower in ZR-AB specimens than in ZR-PO-AB and ZR-PO-HF specimens (P composite to zirconia independent of surface treatment. The use of a silane coupling agent and opaque material yields durable bond strength between the indirect composite and feldspathic-porcelain-coated zirconia. The results of the present study suggest that feldspathic porcelain coating of zirconia frameworks is an effective method to obtain clinically acceptable bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a zirconia framework.

  3. Computed and experimental interactions between eddy structure and dispersed particles in developing free shear layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Keller, J.O.; Ellzey, J.; Hubbard, G.; Daily, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    We are investigating the interactive process between turbulent flow and dispersed phase particles. We are focusing on the mechanisms that appear to result in a reduction of local turbulent intensity and a corresponding reduction in wall heat transfer and subsequent wall erosion in turbulent solid propellant combustion flow. We apply computational simulations and physical experiments specialized to a developing free shear layer over a rearward facing step and over a parallel splitter plate. The flow configuration evolves in a two-dimensional, steady, combustion and non-combustion turbulent free shear mixing region, with and without particle additives. The computational simulations combine three basic components: gas phase Navier-Stokes solutions, Lagrange particle field solutions and a Monte Carlo technique for the random encounters, forces and accelerations between the two fields. We concentrate here on relatively large sized additive particles (of the order of tens of microns to 100 microns mean diameter). We examine their apparent influence in breaking up the larger, energy bearing eddy structures into smaller structures which are more readily dissipated

  4. Investigation of a transonic separating/reattaching shear layer by means of PIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scharnowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The separating/reattaching flow over an axisymmetric backward-facing step is analyzed experimentally by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV. The main purpose of the measurements is the investigation of the mean flow field as well as of the Reynolds stress distributions at a Mach number of 0.7 and at a Reynolds number of 3.3×105 based on the step height. Due to the strong progress of optical flow measurements in the last years it was possible to resolve all flow scales down to 180μm (≈1% of the step height with high precision. Thanks to the high spatial resolution it was found for the first time that the Reynolds stress distribution features a local minimum between the first part of the shear layer and a region inside the recirculation region. This implies a more complex wake dynamics than assumed before.

  5. Age-related changes in aortic 3D blood flow velocities and wall shear stress: Implications for the identification of altered hemodynamics in patients with aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pim; Garcia, Julio; Potters, Wouter V.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate age-related changes in peak systolic aortic 3D velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) in healthy controls and to investigate the importance of age-matching for 3D mapping of abnormal aortic hemodynamics in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV). 4D flow MRI (fields strengths = 1.5-3T;

  6. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  7. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  8. Upper mantle structure of shear-waves velocities and stratification of anisotropy in the Afar Hotspot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.-P.; Cara, M.; Stutzmann, E.; Debayle, E.; Lépine, J.-C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Beucler, E.; Sebai, A.; Roult, G.; Ayele, A.; Sholan, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar area is one of the biggest continental hotspots active since about 30 Ma. It may be the surface expression of a mantle "plume" related to the African Superswell. Central Africa is also characterized by extensive intraplate volcanism. Around the same time (30 Ma), volcanic activity re-started in several regions of the African plate and hotspots such as Darfur, Tibesti, Hoggar and Mount Cameroon, characterized by a significant though modest volcanic production. The interactions of mantle upwelling with asthenosphere, lithosphere and crust remain unclear and seismic anisotropy might help in investigating these complex interactions. We used data from the global seismological permanent FDSN networks (GEOSCOPE, IRIS, MedNet, GEO- FON, etc.), from the temporary PASSCAL experiments in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia and a French deployment of 5 portable broadband stations surrounding the Afar Hotspot. A classical two-step tomographic inversion from surface waves performed in the Horn of Africa with selected Rayleigh wave and Love wave seismograms leads to a 3D-model of both S V velocities and azimuthal anisotropy, as well as radial SH/ SV anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of 500 km. The region is characterized by low shear-wave velocities beneath the Afar Hotspot, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and East of the Tanzania Craton to 400 km depth. High velocities are present in the Eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The results of this study enable us to rule out a possible feeding of the Central Africa hotspots from the "Afar plume" above 150-200 km. The azimuthal anisotropy displays a complex pattern near the Afar Hotspot. Radial anisotropy, although poorly resolved laterally, exhibits S H slower than S V waves down to about 150 km depth, and a reverse pattern below. Both azimuthal and radial anisotropies show a stratification of anisotropy at depth, corresponding to different physical processes. These results suggest that the Afar hotspot has a different and

  9. Modelling Velocity Spectra in the Lower Part of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.R.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    of the planetary boundary layer. Knowledge of the variation with stability of the (reduced) frequency f, for the spectral maximum is utilized in this modelling. Stable spectra may be normalized so that they adhere to one curve only, irrespective of stability, and unstable w-spectra may also be normalized to fit...... one curve. The problem of using filtered velocity variances when modelling spectra is discussed. A simplified procedure to provide a first estimate of the filter effect is given. In stable, horizontal velocity spectra, there is often a ‘gap’ at low frequencies. Using dimensional considerations...... and the spectral model previously derived, an expression for the gap frequency is found....

  10. Evaluation of interlayer interfacial stiffness and layer wave velocity of multilayered structures by ultrasonic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro

    2014-07-01

    An ultrasonic evaluation procedure for the interlayer interfacial normal stiffness and the intralayer longitudinal wave velocity of multilayered plate-like structures is proposed. Based on the characteristics of the amplitude reflection spectrum of ultrasonic wave at normal incidence to a layered structure with spring-type interlayer interfaces, it is shown that the interfacial normal stiffness and the longitudinal wave velocity in the layers can be simultaneously evaluated from the frequencies of local maxima and minima of the spectrum provided that all interfaces and layers have the same properties. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is investigated from the perspective of the sensitivity of local extremal frequencies of the reflection spectrum. The feasibility of the proposed procedure is also investigated when the stiffness of each interface is subjected to small random fluctuations about a certain average value. The proposed procedure is applied to a 16-layered cross-ply carbon-fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The normal stiffness of resin-rich interfaces and the longitudinal wave velocity of plies in the thickness direction evaluated from the experimental reflection spectrum are shown to be consistent with simple theoretical estimations.

  11. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  12. Acoustic and Shear-Wave Velocities in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan: Tomography, Converted Waves Analysis and Reverse-Time Migration of OBS Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Schnurle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5-D combined seismic reflection and refraction survey has been conducted in the accretionary complex offshore of southwestern Taiwan where BSRs (Bottom Simulating Reflectors are highly concentrated and geochemical signals for the presence of gas hydrate are strong. In this study, we perform velocity analysis of the 6 4-component OBS (Ocean-Bottom Seismometer records along the southernmost transect of this seismic experiment. We utilize 3 independent methods in order to accurately determine the acoustic and shear-wave velocities of the sediments: 1-D Root Mean Square (RMS analysis of the P-P and P-S reflected events on individual datumed components, 2-D inversion of the P-P and P-S reflected and refracted events along the in-line transect, and 3-D acoustic inversion of the first arrivals. The principal sources of bias in the determination of the velocities are the 3-dimentional nature of the topography and the complexity of the underlying structures. The three methods result in consistent velocity profiles. Rapid lateral and vertical variations of the velocities are observed. We then investigate the large scale gas hydrate content through rock physic modeling: at the vertical of each OBS, shear-waves velocities are utilized to estimate the water-filled porosities, and the acoustic velocities predicted for a set of gas hydrate, quartz and clay contents are compared to the observed profiles.

  13. Velocity-independent layer stripping of PP and PS reflection traveltimes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Tsvankin, I.

    The principle of the PP + PS = SS method can be used to carry out exact layer stripping for both pure and mode-converted waves in anisotropic media. The main assumptions of the algorithm intro- duced here are that the overburden is laterally homogeneous and has... horizontal and dipping interfaces in each layer H20849Alkhalifah and Tsvankin, 1995; Tsvankin, 2005H20850. This requirement, which is often difficult to satisfy in practice, is no long- er needed if the interval moveout is computed by the velocity...

  14. Time-Series Analysis of Intermittent Velocity Fluctuations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayernouri, Mohsen; Samiee, Mehdi; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Classical turbulence theory is modified under the inhomogeneities produced by the presence of a wall. In this regard, we propose a new time series model for the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial sub-layer of turbulent boundary layers. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus and seamlessly extends the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov in the inertial subrange to the whole spectrum from large to small scales. Moreover, the proposed time-series model allows the quantification of data uncertainties in the underlying stochastic cascade of turbulent kinetic energy. The model is tested using well-resolved streamwise velocity measurements up to friction Reynolds numbers of about 20,000. The physics of the energy cascade are briefly described within the context of the determined model parameters. This work was supported by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) award (FA9550-17-1-0150) and partially by MURI/ARO (W911NF-15-1-0562).

  15. Study on of Seepage Flow Velocity in Sand Layer Profile as Affected by Water Depth and Slope Gradience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Chen, X.

    2017-12-01

    BACKGROUND: The subsurface water flow velocity is of great significance in understanding the hydrodynamic characteristics of soil seepage and the influence of interaction between seepage flow and surface runoff on the soil erosion and sediment transport process. OBJECTIVE: To propose a visualized method and equipment for determining the seepage flow velocity and measuring the actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity as well as the relationship between them.METHOD: A transparent organic glass tank is used as the test soil tank, the white river sand is used as the seepage test material and the fluorescent dye is used as the indicator for tracing water flow, so as to determine the thickness and velocity of water flow in a visualized way. Water is supplied at the same flow rate (0.84 L h-1) to the three parts with an interval of 1m at the bottom of the soil tank and the pore water velocity and the thickness of each water layer are determined under four gradient conditions. The Darcy velocity of each layer is calculated according to the water supply flow and the discharge section area. The effective discharge flow pore is estimated according to the moisture content and porosity and then the relationship between Darcy velocity and the measured velocity is calculated based on the water supply flow and the water layer thickness, and finally the correctness of the calculation results is verified. RESULTS: According to the velocity calculation results, Darcy velocity increases significantly with the increase of gradient; in the sand layer profile, the flow velocity of pore water at different depths increases with the increase of gradient; under the condition of the same gradient, the lower sand layer has the maximum flow velocity of pore water. The air-filled porosity of sand layer determines the proportional relationship between Darcy velocity and pore flow velocity. CONCLUSIONS: The actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity can be measured by a visualized method and the

  16. Impact of Fibrotic Tissue on Shear Wave Velocity in Thyroid: An Ex Vivo Study with Fresh Thyroid Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to elucidate the correlation between shear wave velocity (SWV and fibrosis in thyroid by precisely assessing pathological structures inside 5 × 5 mm2 regions of interest (ROIs of resected specimens, under conditions that excluded physical artifacts. The materials were unselected thyroid and lymph node specimens resected during thyroid surgery. Immediately after surgery, fresh unfixed thyroid and metastatic lymph node specimens were suspended in gel phantoms, and SWV was measured. Upon pathological examination of each specimen, the extent of fibrosis was graded as none, moderate, or severe. A total of 109 specimens were evaluated: 15 normal thyroid, 16 autoimmune thyroiditis, 40 malignant nodules, 19 benign thyroid nodules, and 19 metastatic lymph nodes. When all specimens were classified according to the degree of fibrosis determined by pathological imaging, the mean SWV was 1.49±0.39 m/s for no fibrosis, 2.13±0.66 m/s for moderate fibrosis, and 2.68±0.82 m/s for severe fibrosis. The SWVs of samples with moderate and severe fibrosis were significantly higher than those of samples without fibrosis. The results of this study demonstrate that fibrosis plays an important role in determining stiffness, as measured by SWV in thyroid.

  17. On the wall-normal velocity of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, C. David

    1991-01-01

    Numerical methods for the compressible boundary-layer equations are facilitated by transformation from the physical (x,y) plane to a computational (xi,eta) plane in which the evolution of the flow is 'slow' in the time-like xi direction. The commonly used Levy-Lees transformation results in a computationally well-behaved problem for a wide class of non-similar boundary-layer flows, but it complicates interpretation of the solution in physical space. Specifically, the transformation is inherently nonlinear, and the physical wall-normal velocity is transformed out of the problem and is not readily recovered. In light of recent research which shows mean-flow non-parallelism to significantly influence the stability of high-speed compressible flows, the contribution of the wall-normal velocity in the analysis of stability should not be routinely neglected. Conventional methods extract the wall-normal velocity in physical space from the continuity equation, using finite-difference techniques and interpolation procedures. The present spectrally-accurate method extracts the wall-normal velocity directly from the transformation itself, without interpolation, leaving the continuity equation free as a check on the quality of the solution. The present method for recovering wall-normal velocity, when used in conjunction with a highly-accurate spectral collocation method for solving the compressible boundary-layer equations, results in a discrete solution which is extraordinarily smooth and accurate, and which satisfies the continuity equation nearly to machine precision. These qualities make the method well suited to the computation of the non-parallel mean flows needed by spatial direct numerical simulations (DNS) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) approaches to the analysis of stability.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in astrophysics. 3. Hydrodynamic flows with shear layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany, F.R.)); Massaglia, S [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Trussoni, E [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1982-03-01

    In this paper a discussion is presented on Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in pressure-confined two-dimensional flows (slabs) delimited by boundary layers with velocity and density gradients. It is found that the fastest growing modes in supersonic flows are produced by perturbations reflecting at the boundaries and have wavelengths of the order of the slab width; this peak of instability is even more evident than in the case of vortex-sheet cylindrical flows, discussed in a previous paper. From a comparison of the results for the two-dimensional slab and three-dimensional cylinder it is concluded that a two-dimensional treatment provides an adequate description of instabilities in fluid flows. In this analogy, symmetric and antisymmetric modes in the slab correspond to pinching and helical modes in the cylinder. In the final section a comparison is attempted of the results obtained with morphologies in collimated jets in extragalactic radio sources; general characteristics appear to be classifiable in terms of scale-lengths of the velocity and density gradients in the boundary layers.

  19. A multi-layer bioinspired design with evolution of shish-kebab structures induced by controlled periodical shear field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization of polymers, caused by flow fields in the melt, has been the subject of extensive studies for many years. In this study, we use periodical shear to induce polypropylene to form multi-layer structure, which is usually observed in plants. Two interesting points were found: firstly, the quest of mimicking natural structures was achieved by controlled periodical shear field; secondly, the evolution from nano to shish-kebab-like cylindrite structure was obtained in the multi-layer structure, which can be clarified by nuclei competition model. This study can be used to better understand the shear-induced crystallization of polymer. Here our intention is to place this new observation on the map, leaving a fuller presentation and discussion of the work to a future publication.

  20. Flame structure of methane/oxygen shear coaxial jet with velocity ratio using high-speed imaging and OH*, CH* chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Myungbo; Noh, Kwanyoung; Yoon, Woongsup

    2018-06-01

    In this study, the effects of gaseous methane/oxygen injection velocity ratio on the shear coaxial jet flame structure are analyzed using high-speed imaging along with OH* and CH* chemiluminescence. The images show that, as the velocity ratio is increased, the visual flame length increases and wrinkles of the flame front are developed further downstream. The region near the equivalence ratio 1 condition in the flame could be identified by the maximum OH* position, and this region is located further downstream as the velocity ratio is increased. The dominant CH* chemiluminescence is found in the near-injector region. As the velocity ratio is decreased, the signal intensity is higher at the same downstream distance in each flame. From the results, as the velocity ratio is decreased, there is increased entrainment of the external jet, the mixing of the two jets is enhanced, the region near the stoichiometric mixture condition is located further upstream, and consequently, the flame length decreases.

  1. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, R. M. R.; da Silva, C. B.; Pereira, J. C. F.

    2011-12-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ("nibbling") motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Reλ = 120 to Reλ = 160 (da Silva & Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the "scalar interface" and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by langlerangleI, in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface and boosting them as far as

  2. The Dynamics of Turbulent Scalar Mixing near the Edge of a Shear Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taveira, R M R; Silva, C B da; Pereira, J C F

    2011-01-01

    In free shear flows a sharp and convoluted turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separates the outer fluid region, where the flow is essentially irrotational, from the shear layer turbulent region. It was found recently that the entrainment mechanism is mainly caused by small scale ('nibbling') motions (Westerweel et al. (2005)). The dynamics of this interface is crucial to understand important exchanges of enstrophy and scalars that can be conceived as a three-stage process of entrainment, dispersion and diffusion (Dimotakis (2005)). A thorough understanding of scalar mixing and transport is of indisputable relevance to control turbulent combustion, propulsion and contaminant dispersion (Stanley et al. (2002)). The present work uses several DNS of turbulent jets at Reynolds number ranging from Re λ = 120 to Re λ = 160 (da Silva and Taveira (2010)) and a Schmidt number Sc = 0.7 to analyze the 'scalar interface' and turbulent mixing of a passive scalar. Specifically, we employ conditional statistics, denoted by I , in order to eliminate the intermittency that affects statistics close to the jet edge. The physical mechanisms behind scalar mixing near the T/NT interfaces, their scales and topology are investigated detail. Analysis of the instantaneous fields showed intense scalar gradient sheet-like structures along regions of persistent strain, in particular at the T/NT interface. The scalar gradient transport equation, at the jet edge, showed that almost all mixing mechanisms are taking place in a confined region, beyond which they become reduced to an almost in perfect balance between production and dissipation of scalar variance. At the T/NT interface transport mechanisms are the ones responsible for the growth in the scalar fluctuations to the entrained fluid, where convection plays a dominant role, smoothing scalar gradients inside the interface 0.1y I /λ to 1y I /λand boosting them as far as -2.5y I /η θ C .

  3. Multi-scale mantle structure underneath the Americas from a new tomographic model of seismic shear velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, R. W.; Becker, T. W.; Auer, L.; Boschi, L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a whole-mantle, variable resolution, shear-wave tomography model based on newly available and existing seismological datasets including regional body-wave delay times and multi-mode Rayleigh and Love wave phase delays. Our body wave dataset includes 160,000 S wave delays used in the DNA13 regional tomographic model focused on the western and central US, 86,000 S and SKS delays measured on stations in western South America (Porritt et al., in prep), and 3,900,000 S+ phases measured by correlation between data observed at stations in the IRIS global networks (IU, II) and stations in the continuous US, against synthetic data generated with IRIS Syngine. The surface wave dataset includes fundamental mode and overtone Rayleigh wave data from Schaeffer and Levedev (2014), ambient noise derived Rayleigh wave and Love wave measurements from Ekstrom (2013), newly computed fundamental mode ambient noise Rayleigh wave phase delays for the continuous US up to July 2017, and other, previously published, measurements. These datasets, along with a data-adaptive parameterization utilized for the SAVANI model (Auer et al., 2014), should allow significantly finer-scale imaging than previous global models, rivaling that of regional-scale approaches, under the USArray footprint in the continuous US, while seamlessly integrating into a global model. We parameterize the model for both vertically (vSV) and horizontally (vSH) polarized shear velocities by accounting for the different sensitivities of the various phases and wave types. The resulting, radially anisotropic model should allow for a range of new geodynamic analysis, including estimates of mantle flow induced topography or seismic anisotropy, without generating artifacts due to edge effects, or requiring assumptions about the structure of the region outside the well resolved model space. Our model shows a number of features, including indications of the effects of edge-driven convection in the Cordillera and along

  4. Application of the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method for Shear-Wave Velocity Studies Using Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asten, M. W.; Hayashi, K.

    2018-05-01

    ideal regular array. We find that sparse nested triangular arrays are generally sufficient, and the use of high-density circular arrays is unlikely to be cost-effective in routine applications. We recommend that passive seismic arrays should be the method of first choice when characterizing average S-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (V s30) and deeper, with active seismic methods such as multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) being a complementary method for use if and when conditions so require. The use of computer inversion methodology allows estimation of not only the S-wave velocity profile but also parameter uncertainties in terms of layer thickness and velocity. The coupling of SPAC methods with horizontal/vertical particle motion spectral ratio analysis generally allows use of lower frequency data, with consequent resolution of deeper layers than is possible with SPAC alone. Considering its non-invasive methodology, logistical flexibility, simplicity, applicability, and stability, the SPAC method and its various modified extensions will play an increasingly important role in site effect evaluation. The paper summarizes the fundamental theory of the SPAC method, reviews recent developments, and offers recommendations for future blind studies.

  5. Roughness Effects on Organized Motions in a Wall Shear Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigermoser, Christian; Vesely, Lukas; Lapolla, Massimillano; Onorato, Michele

    2006-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layer measurements on a zero-pressure gradient flat plate with two different roughness, a 2D and a 3D roughness, were carried out. The main object of the study was to investigate the impact of the wall roughness on the turbulent flow structures. The momentum thickness Reynolds number for the smooth wall was Reθ˜ 1900. PIV measurements were taken in the streamwise wall-normal plane. The PIV images covered the whole logarithmic region and the major part of the outer layer. The instant flow images for the two roughness show features similar to the one expected in a smooth wall turbulent boundary layer, as described by Adrian et al. (JFM 2000). Statistical analysis was performed to enlighten quantitative differences between the different flow fields. For instance, two point streamwise velocity correlations show that the major effect of the roughness is to tilt the inclination of the hairpin vortex packets towards the wall normal direction; being the 3D roughness more effective in producing this displacement. Full results will be shown and discussed during the presentation.

  6. Wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations (u) are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer at Reτ = 1000 . We identify the structures of u, which are extended close to the wall. Their height (ly) ranges from the near-wall region to the edge of turbulent boundary layer. They are geometrically self-similar in a sense that the length and width of the structures are proportional to the distance from the wall. The population density of the attached structures shows that the tall attached structures (290 wall. The wall-attached structures of u identified in the present work are a proper candidate for Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis and these structures exist in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and supported by the Supercomputing Center (KISTI).

  7. Comprehensive Die Shear Test of Silicon Packages Bonded by Thermocompression of Al Layers with Thin Sn Capping or Insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Satoh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermocompression bonding for wafer-level hermetic packaging was demonstrated at the lowest temperature of 370 to 390 °C ever reported using Al films with thin Sn capping or insertions as bonding layer. For shrinking the chip size of MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems, a smaller size of wafer-level packaging and MEMS–ASIC (application specific integrated circuit integration are of great importance. Metal-based bonding under the temperature of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor backend process is a key technology, and Al is one of the best candidates for bonding metal in terms of CMOS compatibility. In this study, after the thermocompression bonding of two substrates, the shear fracture strength of dies was measured by a bonding tester, and the shear-fractured surfaces were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and a surface profiler to clarify where the shear fracture took place. We confirmed two kinds of fracture mode. One mode is Si bulk fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 41.6 to 209 MPa, proportionally depending on the area of Si fracture. The other mode is bonding interface fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 32.8 to 97.4 MPa. Regardless of the fracture modes, the minimum die shear strength is practical for wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  8. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  9. Non-unique turbulent boundary layer flows having a moderately large velocity defect: a rational extension of the classical asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheichl, B.; Kluwick, A.

    2013-11-01

    The classical analysis of turbulent boundary layers in the limit of large Reynolds number Re is characterised by an asymptotically small velocity defect with respect to the external irrotational flow. As an extension of the classical theory, it is shown in the present work that the defect may become moderately large and, in the most general case, independent of Re but still remain small compared to the external streamwise velocity for non-zero pressure gradient boundary layers. That wake-type flow turns out to be characterised by large values of the Rotta-Clauser parameter, serving as an appropriate measure for the defect and hence as a second perturbation parameter besides Re. Most important, it is demonstrated that also this case can be addressed by rigorous asymptotic analysis, which is essentially independent of the choice of a specific Reynolds stress closure. As a salient result of this procedure, transition from the classical small defect to a pronounced wake flow is found to be accompanied by quasi-equilibrium flow, described by a distinguished limit that involves the wall shear stress. This situation is associated with double-valued solutions of the boundary layer equations and an unconventional weak Re-dependence of the external bulk flow—a phenomenon seen to agree well with previous semi-empirical studies and early experimental observations. Numerical computations of the boundary layer flow for various values of Re reproduce these analytical findings with satisfactory agreement.

  10. The stability of internal transport barriers to MHD ballooning modes and drift waves: A formalism for low magnetic shear and for velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) provide improved confinement, so it is important to understand their stability properties. The stability to an important class of modes with high wave-numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field, is usually studied with the standard ballooning transformation and eikonal approach. However, ITBs are often characterised by radial q profiles that have regions of negative or low magnetic shear and by radially sheared electric fields. Both these features affect the validity of the standard method. A new approach to calculating stability in these circumstances is developed and applied to ideal MHD ballooning modes and to micro-instabilities responsible for anomalous transport. (author)

  11. Liver shear-wave velocity and serum fibrosis markers to diagnose hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian Xue; Ji, Yong Hao; Zhao Junzhi; Zhang, Yao Ren; Dun, Guo Liang; Ning, Bo [Dept. of Ultrasonography, Baoji Central Hospital, Baoji (China); Ai, Hong [Dept. of Ultrasonography, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-06-15

    To compare several noninvasive indices of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis B, including liver shear-wave velocity (SWV), hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen type IV (CIV), procollagen type III (PCIII), and laminin (LN). Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) was performed in 157 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and in 30 healthy volunteers to measure hepatic SWV (m/s) in a prospective study. Serum markers were acquired on the morning of the same day of the ARFI evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the accuracies of SWV and serum markers using METAVIR scoring from liver biopsy as a reference standard. The most accurate test for diagnosing fibrosis F ≥ 1 was SWV with the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.913, followed by LN (0.744), HA (0.701), CIV (0.690), and PCIII (0.524). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 2 was SWV (AUC of 0.851), followed by CIV (0.671), HA (0.668), LN (0.562), and PCIII (0.550). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 3 was SWV (0.854), followed by CIV (0.693), HA (0.675), PCIII (0.591), and LN (0.548). The best test for diagnosing F = 4 was SWV (0.965), followed by CIV (0.804), PCIII (0.752), HA (0.744), and LN (0.662). SWV combined with HA and CIV did not improve diagnostic accuracy (AUC = 0.931 for F ≥ 1, 0.863 for F ≥ 2, 0.855 for F ≥ 3, 0.960 for F = 4). The performance of SWV in diagnosing liver fibrosis is superior to that of serum markers. However, the combination of SWV, HA, and CIV does not increase the accuracy of diagnosing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  12. Liver shear-wave velocity and serum fibrosis markers to diagnose hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian Xue; Ji, Yong Hao; Zhao Junzhi; Zhang, Yao Ren; Dun, Guo Liang; Ning, Bo; Ai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To compare several noninvasive indices of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis B, including liver shear-wave velocity (SWV), hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen type IV (CIV), procollagen type III (PCIII), and laminin (LN). Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) was performed in 157 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and in 30 healthy volunteers to measure hepatic SWV (m/s) in a prospective study. Serum markers were acquired on the morning of the same day of the ARFI evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the accuracies of SWV and serum markers using METAVIR scoring from liver biopsy as a reference standard. The most accurate test for diagnosing fibrosis F ≥ 1 was SWV with the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.913, followed by LN (0.744), HA (0.701), CIV (0.690), and PCIII (0.524). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 2 was SWV (AUC of 0.851), followed by CIV (0.671), HA (0.668), LN (0.562), and PCIII (0.550). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 3 was SWV (0.854), followed by CIV (0.693), HA (0.675), PCIII (0.591), and LN (0.548). The best test for diagnosing F = 4 was SWV (0.965), followed by CIV (0.804), PCIII (0.752), HA (0.744), and LN (0.662). SWV combined with HA and CIV did not improve diagnostic accuracy (AUC = 0.931 for F ≥ 1, 0.863 for F ≥ 2, 0.855 for F ≥ 3, 0.960 for F = 4). The performance of SWV in diagnosing liver fibrosis is superior to that of serum markers. However, the combination of SWV, HA, and CIV does not increase the accuracy of diagnosing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis

  13. Shear wave velocity measurements using acoustic radiation force impulse in young children with normal kidneys versus hydronephrotic kidneys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, Beom Seok; Kim, Myung Joon; Han, Sang Won; Im, Young Jae; Lee, Mi Jung [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To measure shear wave velocities (SWVs) by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound elastography in normal kidneys and in hydronephrotic kidneys in young children and to compare SWVs between the hydronephrosis grades. This study was approved by an institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the children included. Children under the age of 24 months were prospectively enrolled. Hydronephrosis grade was evaluated on ultrasonography, and three valid ARFI measurements were attempted using a high-frequency transducer for both kidneys. Hydronephrosis was graded from 0 to 4, and high-grade hydronephrosis was defined as grades 3 and 4. Fifty-one children underwent ARFI measurements, and three valid measurements for both kidneys were obtained in 96% (49/51) of the patients. Nineteen children (38.8%) had no hydronephrosis. Twenty-three children (46.9%) had unilateral hydronephrosis, and seven children (14.3%) had bilateral hydronephrosis. Seven children had ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Median SWVs in kidneys with high-grade hydronephrosis (2.02 m/sec) were higher than those in normal kidneys (1.75 m/sec; P=0.027). However, the presence of UPJO did not influence the median SWVs in hydronephrotic kidneys (P=0.362). Obtaining ARFI measurements of the kidney is feasible in young children with median SWVs of 1.75 m/sec in normal kidneys. Median SWVs increased in high-grade hydronephrotic kidneys but were not different between hydronephrotic kidneys with and without UPJO.

  14. Shear wave velocity measurements using acoustic radiation force impulse in young children with normal kidneys versus hydronephrotic kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Beom Seok; Kim, Myung Joon; Han, Sang Won; Im, Young Jae; Lee, Mi Jung

    2014-01-01

    To measure shear wave velocities (SWVs) by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound elastography in normal kidneys and in hydronephrotic kidneys in young children and to compare SWVs between the hydronephrosis grades. This study was approved by an institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the children included. Children under the age of 24 months were prospectively enrolled. Hydronephrosis grade was evaluated on ultrasonography, and three valid ARFI measurements were attempted using a high-frequency transducer for both kidneys. Hydronephrosis was graded from 0 to 4, and high-grade hydronephrosis was defined as grades 3 and 4. Fifty-one children underwent ARFI measurements, and three valid measurements for both kidneys were obtained in 96% (49/51) of the patients. Nineteen children (38.8%) had no hydronephrosis. Twenty-three children (46.9%) had unilateral hydronephrosis, and seven children (14.3%) had bilateral hydronephrosis. Seven children had ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Median SWVs in kidneys with high-grade hydronephrosis (2.02 m/sec) were higher than those in normal kidneys (1.75 m/sec; P=0.027). However, the presence of UPJO did not influence the median SWVs in hydronephrotic kidneys (P=0.362). Obtaining ARFI measurements of the kidney is feasible in young children with median SWVs of 1.75 m/sec in normal kidneys. Median SWVs increased in high-grade hydronephrotic kidneys but were not different between hydronephrotic kidneys with and without UPJO.

  15. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging with Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification: mean shear wave velocity of malignant and benign breast masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Brandhorst, Kathrin; Sadigh, Gelareh; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) with Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification (VTTQ) enables the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV) in meters per second (m/s). The aim of our study was to describe the mean SWV in normal breast tissue and various breast masses. We performed measurements of SWV with ARFI VTTQ in 145 breast masses (57 malignant, 88 benign) and in the adjacent breast parenchyma and adipose tissue. The mean SWV as well as the rate of successful measurements were analyzed. The difference between adipose tissue and parenchyma was statistically significant (3.05 versus 3.65 m/s) (P breast masses, numerous measurements exceeded the upper limit of possible measurement (≥9.10 m/s, indicated as "X.XX m/s"). Nevertheless, the difference between the malignant and benign masses was statistically significant (8.38 ± 1.99 m/s versus 5.39 ± 2.95 m/s) (P < 0.001). The best diagnostic accuracy (75.9%) was achieved when the cutoff point for malignancy was set to 9.10 m/s in ARFI VTTQ. This implies that the SWV was regarded as suspicious when the upper limit of possible measurement was exceeded and the machine returned the value X.XX m/s. In conclusion, ARFI VTTQ is a feasible method for measurement of SWV in a region of interest. Furthermore, we propose the event of a highly elevated SWV as a significant criterion for malignancy. However, the method is technically not yet fully developed, and the problem of unsuccessful measurements must still be solved.

  16. Acoustic excitation of diffusion flames with coherent structure in a plane shear layer.; Effects of acoustic excitation on combustion properties; Soshiki kozo wo tomonau sendan kakusan kaen no onkyo reiki.; Onkyo reiki ni yoru nensho tokusei no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Y.; Kojima, T.; Oiwa, N.; Yamaguchi, S. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1993-10-25

    This paper reports on experiments for acoustic excitation of plane shear structured flame. Flows of air separated into the higher velocity side and the lower velocity side by a partition on the center of a flow path merge at the measuring point to form a mixed layer with coherent structure. Fuel is supplied to this mixed layer with the flows so adjusted that the generated flame will attach to the partition on the lower velocity side. Acoustic excitation (at a sound pressure level of 100 dB to 120 dB) is performed in a speaker fitted on a wall on the higher velocity side. The paper mentions the results of the experiments as follows: the acoustic excitation produces such changes to diffusion flame in the plane shear layer as shorter flame and blue flame combustion and clarification of flame structures; as seen from spectral characteristics of temperature change in the flames, a flame acoustically excited strongly presents remarkable improvements in periodicity of the structure; as seen from sound pressure distribution in the flow direction at the measuring point, the flame zone of the flame acoustically excited strongly is positioned at the middle of the node and loop of a standing wave. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. New Models for Velocity/Pressure-Gradient Correlations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroseva, Svetlana; Murman, Scott

    2014-11-01

    To improve the performance of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, one has to improve the accuracy of models for three physical processes: turbulent diffusion, interaction of turbulent pressure and velocity fluctuation fields, and dissipative processes. The accuracy of modeling the turbulent diffusion depends on the order of a statistical closure chosen as a basis for a RANS model. When the Gram-Charlier series expansions for the velocity correlations are used to close the set of RANS equations, no assumption on Gaussian turbulence is invoked and no unknown model coefficients are introduced into the modeled equations. In such a way, this closure procedure reduces the modeling uncertainty of fourth-order RANS (FORANS) closures. Experimental and direct numerical simulation data confirmed the validity of using the Gram-Charlier series expansions in various flows including boundary layers. We will address modeling the velocity/pressure-gradient correlations. New linear models will be introduced for the second- and higher-order correlations applicable to two-dimensional incompressible wall-bounded flows. Results of models' validation with DNS data in a channel flow and in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer over a flat plate will be demonstrated. A part of the material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  18. On the Impact of Collisions on Particle Dispersion in a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soteriou, Marios; Mosley, John

    1999-11-01

    In this numerical study the impact of collisions on the evolution of a dispersed phase in a gaseous shear layer flow is investigated. The disperse phase consists of spherical particles which may experience two modes of collision: In the first, the collision has no effect on the particles themselves and is simply registered for accounting purposes. In the second, the particles coalesce upon impact into a larger spherical particle. The two phase mixture is assumed to be dilute and hence the impact of the disperse phase on the carrier phase is disabled. The unaveraged evolution of the carrier phase is simulated by using the Lagrangian Vortex Element Method while that of the dispersed phase by computing the trajectories of individual particles. Thus the numerical model is totally Lagrangian and grid-free. Numerical results indicate that collisions are maximized at intermediate Stokes numbers and that for a given volume fraction they increase as the particles get smaller. Coalescence of particles tends to reduce the overall number of collisions in the flow and alters their locus, shifting them predominately upstream. It also has a dramatic impact on dispersion increasing it substantially for the cases that experience even moderate number of collisions.

  19. Diurnal Dynamics of Standard Deviations of Three Wind Velocity Components in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2018-04-01

    Diurnal dynamics of the standard deviation (SD) of three wind velocity components measured with a minisodar in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed. Statistical analysis of measurement data demonstrates that the SDs for x- and y-components σx and σy lie in the range from 0.2 to 4 m/s, and σz = 0.1-1.2 m/s. The increase of σx and σy with the altitude is described sufficiently well by a power law with exponent changing from 0.22 to 1.3 depending on time of day, and σz increases by a linear law. Approximation constants are determined and errors of their application are estimated. It is found that the maximal diurnal spread of SD values is 56% for σx and σy and 94% for σz. The established physical laws and the obtained approximation constants allow the diurnal dynamics of the SDs for three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer to be determined and can be recommended for application in models of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  20. Controlling the formation of wrinkles in a single layer graphene sheet subjected to in-plane shear

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Wen Hui

    2011-08-01

    The initiation and development of wrinkles in a single layer graphene sheet subjected to in-plane shear displacements are investigated. The dependence of the wavelength and amplitude of wrinkles on the applied shear displacements is explicitly obtained with molecular mechanics simulations. A continuum model is developed for the characteristics of the wrinkles which show that the wrinkle wavelength decreases with an increase in shear loading, while the amplitude of the wrinkles is found to initially increase and then become stable. The propagation and growth process of the wrinkles in the sheet is elucidated. It is expected that the research could promote applications of graphenes in the transportation of biological systems, separation science, and the development of the fluidic electronics. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mapping Shear-wave Velocity Structures of the "African Anomaly" Along a Northwest to Southeast Arc From New Zealand to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodsham, A. E.; Wen, L.

    2006-12-01

    A previous study [Wang and Wen, 2006] investigated the geometry and shear velocity structure of the "African Anomaly" along a great circle arc from the East Pacific Rise to the Japan Sea, and concluded the anomaly extends 1300 km above the core-mantle boundary, that the sides of the anomaly slope towards the apex and has velocity deviations of -5% in the base and -2% to -3% in the mid-lower mantle. Wang and Wen [2004] also reported on the very low velocity province that forms the base of the "African Anomaly" and its lateral extent, but the northern edge of the anomaly was poorly constrained because of the nature of the seismic data. In this presentation we focus on the nature of the anomaly in a cross-section of the mantle along a great arc, from New Zealand, to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge off the coast of Newfoundland, centered over the anomaly. In particular, we focus on the northern edge of the "African Anomaly" where a paucity of large, deep focus earthquakes makes seismic arrivals from the northwest difficult to analyze. We map the lateral extent, thickness, and shear velocity structures of the "African Anomaly" on the basis of forward travel time and waveform modeling of direct S, ScS, and SKS waves. Seismic data used in this study were collected from PASSCAL arrays: KAAPVAAL seismic array (operating years 1997-1999), Tanzania seismic array (1994- 1995), Ethiopia/Kenya seismic array (2000-2002), and the Global Seismographic Network (1994-2002). We minimize uncertainty from earthquake mislocation by relocation of the earthquakes using a global tomographic shear wave velocity model and also correct for heterogeneities outside the anomaly. We explore various methods of data processing, such as frequency filtration, low fold stacking, and cross correlation, to best interpret the arrival times of the various seismic phases and constrain the nature of the "African Anomaly" along a northwest to southeast cross-section.

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Source Wavelet and Velocity Profile Using Impulsive Point-Source Reflections from a Layered Fluid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bube, K; Lailly, P; Sacks, P; Santosa, F; Symes, W. W

    1987-01-01

    .... We show that a quasi-impulsive, isotropic point source may be recovered simultaneously with the velocity profile from reflection data over a layered fluid, in linear (perturbation) approximation...

  3. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging with Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification: mean shear wave velocity of malignant and benign breast masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcinski S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Wojcinski,1 Kathrin Brandhorst,2 Gelareh Sadigh,3 Peter Hillemanns,1 Friedrich Degenhardt2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld, Germany; 3Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI with Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification (VTTQ enables the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV in meters per second (m/s. The aim of our study was to describe the mean SWV in normal breast tissue and various breast masses. We performed measurements of SWV with ARFI VTTQ in 145 breast masses (57 malignant, 88 benign and in the adjacent breast parenchyma and adipose tissue. The mean SWV as well as the rate of successful measurements were analyzed. The difference between adipose tissue and parenchyma was statistically significant (3.05 versus 3.65 m/s (P < 0.001. Focusing on breast masses, numerous measurements exceeded the upper limit of possible measurement (≥9.10 m/s, indicated as "X.XX m/s". Nevertheless, the difference between the malignant and benign masses was statistically significant (8.38 ± 1.99 m/s versus 5.39 ± 2.95 m/s (P < 0.001. The best diagnostic accuracy (75.9% was achieved when the cutoff point for malignancy was set to 9.10 m/s in ARFI VTTQ. This implies that the SWV was regarded as suspicious when the upper limit of possible measurement was exceeded and the machine returned the value X.XX m/s. In conclusion, ARFI VTTQ is a feasible method for measurement of SWV in a region of interest. Furthermore, we propose the event of a highly elevated SWV as a significant criterion for malignancy. However, the method is technically not yet fully developed, and the problem of unsuccessful measurements must still be solved. Keywords: ARFI VTTQ, elastography, ultrasound, breast imaging

  4. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer using the CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Wang, Xiao Y.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work, the generation and radiation of acoustic waves from a 2-D shear layer problem is considered. An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer, resulting in sound Mach radiation. The numerical solution is obtained by solving the Euler equations using the space time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Linearization is achieved through choosing a small acoustic source amplitude. The Euler equations are nondimensionalized as instructed in the problem statement. All other conditions are the same except that the Crocco's relation has a slightly different form. In the following, after a brief sketch of the CE/SE method, the numerical results for this problem are presented.

  5. Blanking Clearance and Punch Velocity Effects on The Sheared Edge Characteristic in Micro-Blanking of Commercially Pure Copper Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Didin Zakaria Lubis; Ichsan Ristiawan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the influences between clearance and punch velocity on the part edge quality of blanked parts. Experiments have been conducted using material copper, punch-die clearance and punch velocity variations. In order to determine the reachable punch-die clearance and punch velocity required for blanking. The quality of the part-edge characteristics shows that higher punch velocity and decreases clearance value can improve the part-edge quality, resulting in smaller burr h...

  6. Altered stiffness of microchamber and macrochamber layers in the aged heel pad: Shear wave ultrasound elastography evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh-Hung Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: To compare shear modulus of heel pad microchamber and macrochamber layers between young and elderly people using shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE, with the intent to clarify age-related changes. Methods: This single-center prospective cross-sectional study was conducted between March, 2014 and March, 2016. Shear modulus of entire heel pad (Gentire, macrochamber layer (Gmac, and microchamber layer (Gmic were measured with SWUE. Results: Elderly participants (15 men, 15 women; age = 66.9 ± 6.2 years had significantly higher Gmic (103.8 ± 20.7 vs. 60.1 ± 9.8 kPa; p < 0.001 and Gentire (39.4 ± 10.5 vs. 34.1 ± 5.4 kPa; p = 0.005, but a significantly lower Gmac (21.7 ± 7.5 vs. 27.9 ± 4.9 kPa; p < 0.001 compared with those of young participants (15 men, 15 women; age = 26.4 ± 2.9 years. Positive correlations were observed between age and Gmic (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 and between age and Gentire (r = 0.28, p = 0.03, and negative correlation between age and Gmac (r = −0.46, p = 0.001. Conclusion: SWUE revealed that the heel pad macrochamber layer was slightly softer but the microchamber layer was exaggeratedly stiffer, making the entire heel pad stiffer in the elderly group than in the younger group, implying age-related compensation in heel pad layers to retain foot function. Keywords: Age, Elastography, Heel pad, Ultrasound

  7. Shear wave velocity model beneath CBJI station West Java, Indonesia from joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanungkalit, R. H.; Anggono, T.; Syuhada; Amran, A.; Supriyanto

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake signal observations around the world allow seismologists to obtain the information of internal structure of the Earth especially the Earth’s crust. In this study, we used joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure beneath CBJI station in West Java, Indonesia. Receiver function were calculated from earthquakes with magnitude more than 5 and at distance 30°-90°. Surface wave group velocities were calculated using frequency time analysis from earthquakes at distance of 30°- 40°. We inverted shear wave velocity model beneath the station by conducting joint inversion from receiver functions and surface wave dispersions. We suggest that the crustal thickness beneath CBJI station, West Java, Indonesia is about 35 km.

  8. Classification of Rotor Induced Shearing Events in the Near Wake of a Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Viggiano, Bianca; Ali, Naseem; Cal, Raul Bayoan

    2017-11-01

    Flow perturbation induced by a turbine rotor imposes considerable turbulence and shearing effects in the near wake of a turbine, altering the efficiency of subsequent units within a wind farm array. Previous methods have characterized near wake vorticity of a turbine and recovery distance of various turbine array configurations. This study aims to build on previous analysis with respect to a turbine rotor within an array and develop a model to examine stress events and energy contribution in the near wake due to rotational effects. Hot wire anemometry was employed downstream of a turbine centrally located in the third row of a 3x3 array. Data considered points planar to the rotor and included simultaneous streamwise and wall-normal velocities as well as concurrent streamwise and transverse velocities. Conditional analysis of Reynolds stresses induced by the rotor agree with former near wake research, and examination of stresses in terms of streamwise and transverse velocity components depicts areas of significant rotational effects. Continued analysis includes spectral decomposition and conditional statistics to further characterize shearing events at various points considering the swept area of the rotor.

  9. Dispersion Energy Analysis of Rayleigh and Love Waves in the Presence of Low-Velocity Layers in Near-Surface Seismic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Binbin; Xia, Jianghai; Shen, Chao; Wang, Limin

    2018-03-01

    High-frequency surface-wave analysis methods have been effectively and widely used to determine near-surface shear (S) wave velocity. To image the dispersion energy and identify different dispersive modes of surface waves accurately is one of key steps of using surface-wave methods. We analyzed the dispersion energy characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves in near-surface layered models based on numerical simulations. It has been found that if there is a low-velocity layer (LVL) in the half-space, the dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves is discontinuous and ``jumping'' appears from the fundamental mode to higher modes on dispersive images. We introduce the guided waves generated in an LVL (LVL-guided waves, a trapped wave mode) to clarify the complexity of the dispersion energy. We confirm the LVL-guided waves by analyzing the snapshots of SH and P-SV wavefield and comparing the dispersive energy with theoretical values of phase velocities. Results demonstrate that LVL-guided waves possess energy on dispersive images, which can interfere with the normal dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves. Each mode of LVL-guided waves having lack of energy at the free surface in some high frequency range causes the discontinuity of dispersive energy on dispersive images, which is because shorter wavelengths (generally with lower phase velocities and higher frequencies) of LVL-guided waves cannot penetrate to the free surface. If the S wave velocity of the LVL is higher than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves only contaminates higher mode energy of surface waves and there is no interlacement with the fundamental mode of surface waves, while if the S wave velocity of the LVL is lower than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves may interlace with the fundamental mode of surface waves. Both of the interlacements with the fundamental mode or higher mode energy may cause misidentification for the dispersion curves of surface

  10. Review article "Remarks on factors influencing shear wave velocities and their role in evaluating susceptibilities to earthquake-triggered slope instability: case study for the Campania area (Italy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Paoletti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocities have a fundamental role in connection with the mitigation of seismic hazards, as their low values are the main causes of site amplification phenomena and can significantly influence the susceptibility of a territory to seismic-induced landslides. The shear wave velocity (Vs and modulus (G of each lithological unit are influenced by factors such as the degree of fracturing and faulting, the porosity, the clay amount and the precipitation, with the latter two influencing the unit water content. In this paper we discuss how these factors can affect the Vs values and report the results of different analyses that quantify the reduction in the rock Vs and shear modulus values connected to the presence of clay and water. We also show that significant results in assessing seismic-induced slope failure susceptibility for land planning targets could be achieved through a careful evaluation, based only on literature studies, of the geo-lithological and geo-seismic features of the study area.

  11. Study on the application of shear-wave elastography to thin-layered media and tubular structure: Finite-element analysis and experiment verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-keun; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) enables the noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of human soft tissue. Generally, shear-wave velocity (C S) can be estimated using the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Young’s modulus is then calculated directly from the estimated C S. However, because shear waves in thin-layered media propagate as guided waves, C S cannot be accurately estimated using the conventional TOF method. Leaky Lamb dispersion analysis (LLDA) has recently been proposed to overcome this problem. In this study, we performed both experimental and finite-element (FE) analyses to evaluate the advantages of LLDA over TOF. In FE analysis, we investigated why the conventional TOF is ineffective for thin-layered media. In phantom experiments, C S results estimated using the two methods were compared for 1.5 and 2% agar plates and tube phantoms. Furthermore, it was shown that Lamb waves can be applied to tubular structures by extracting lateral waves traveling in the long axis direction of the tube using a two-dimensional window. Also, the effects of the inner radius and stiffness (or shear wavelength) of the tube on the estimation performance of LLDA were experimentally discussed. In phantom experiments, the results indicated good agreement between LLDA (plate phantoms of 2 mm thickness: 5.0 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.2 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 2 mm inner radius: 5.1 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.0 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 4 mm inner radius: 5.3 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s for 2% agar) and SWE measurements (bulk phantoms: 5.3 m/s ± 0.27 for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s ± 0.54 for 2% agar).

  12. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description

  13. Parallel and perpendicular velocity sheared flows driven tripolar vortices in an inhomogeneous electron-ion quantum magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of finite amplitude drift-ion acoustic-waves are derived by taking into account sheared ion flows parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in a quantum magnetoplasma comprised of electrons and ions. It is shown that stationary solution of the nonlinear equations can be represented in the form of a tripolar vortex for specific profiles of the equilibrium sheared flows. The tripolar vortices are, however, observed to form on very short scales in dense quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  14. Parallel and perpendicular velocity sheared flows driven tripolar vortices in an inhomogeneous electron-ion quantum magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of finite amplitude drift-ion acoustic-waves are derived by taking into account sheared ion flows parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in a quantum magnetoplasma comprised of electrons and ions. It is shown that stationary solution of the nonlinear equations can be represented in the form of a tripolar vortex for specific profiles of the equilibrium sheared flows. The tripolar vortices are, however, observed to form on very short scales in dense quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  15. Parallel and perpendicular velocity sheared flows driven tripolar vortices in an inhomogeneous electron-ion quantum magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [TPPD, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan) and National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-12-15

    Nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of finite amplitude drift-ion acoustic-waves are derived by taking into account sheared ion flows parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in a quantum magnetoplasma comprised of electrons and ions. It is shown that stationary solution of the nonlinear equations can be represented in the form of a tripolar vortex for specific profiles of the equilibrium sheared flows. The tripolar vortices are, however, observed to form on very short scales in dense quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  16. Shear bond strengths of an indirect composite layering material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Taro; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kubochi, Kei; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated shear bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a zirconia framework material treated with tribochemical silica coating. Zirconia disks were divided into two groups: ZR-PRE (airborne-particle abrasion) and ZR-PLU (tribochemical silica coating). Indirect composite was bonded to zirconia treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP), Clearfil Mega Bond Primer with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (MGP+Act), ESPE-Sil (SIL), Estenia Opaque Primer, MR. Bond, Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid A with Liquid B (PZA+PZB), and Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid B (PZB), or no treatment. Shear bond testing was performed at 0 and 20,000 thermocycles. Post-thermocycling shear bond strengths of ZR-PLU were higher than those of ZR-PRE in CCP, MGP+Act, SIL, PZA+PZB, and PZB groups. Application of silane yielded better durable bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material.

  17. A large-scale layered stationary convection of a incompressible viscous fluid under the action of shear stresses at the upper boundary. Temperature and presure field investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal'ya V. Burmasheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new exact solution of an overdetermined system of Oberbeck–Boussinesq equations that describes a stationary shear flow of a viscous incompressible fluid in an infinite layer is under study. The given exact solution is a generalization of the Ostroumov–Birich class for a layered unidirectional flow. In the proposed solution, the horizontal velocities depend only on the transverse coordinate z. The temperature field and the pressure field are three-dimensional. In contradistinction to the Ostroumov–Birich solution, in the solution presented in the paper the horizontal temperature gradients are linear functions of the $z$ coordinate. This structure of the exact solution allows us to find a nontrivial solution of the Oberbeck–Boussinesq equations by means of the identity zero of the incompressibility equation. This exact solution is suitable for investigating large-scale flows of a viscous incompressible fluid by quasi-two-dimensional equations. Convective fluid motion is caused by the setting of tangential stresses on the free boundary of the layer. Inhomogeneous thermal sources are given on both boundaries. The pressure in the fluid at the upper boundary coincides with the atmospheric pressure. The paper focuses on the study of temperature and pressure fields, which are described by polynomials of three variables. The features of the distribution of the temperature and pressure profiles, which are polynomials of the seventh and eighth degree, respectively, are discussed in detail. To analyze the properties of temperature and pressure, algebraic methods are used to study the number of roots on a segment. It is shown that the background temperature and the background pressure are nonmonotonic functions. The temperature field is stratified into zones that form the thermocline and the thermal boundary layer near the boundaries of the fluid layer. Investigation of the properties of the pressure field showed that it is stratified

  18. High-flow-velocity and shear-rate imaging by use of color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, T. G.; Kulkarni, M. D.; Yazdanfar, S.; Rollins, A. M.; Izatt, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is capable of precise velocity mapping in turbid media. Previous CDOCT systems based on the short-time Fourier transform have been limited to maximum flow velocities of the order of tens of millimeters per second. We describe a technique, based on

  19. Determination of anisotropic velocity model by reflection tomography of compression and shear modes; Determination de modele de vitesse anisotrope par tomographie de reflexion des modes de compression et de cisaillement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopin, A.

    2001-12-01

    As the jump from 2D to 3D, seismic exploration lives a new revolution with the use of converted PS waves. Indeed PS converted waves are proving their potential as a tool for imaging through gas; lithology discrimination; structural confirmation; and more. Nevertheless, processing converted shear data and in particular determining accurate P and S velocity models for depth imaging of these data is still a challenging problem, especially when the subsurface is anisotropic. To solve this velocity model determination problem we propose to use reflection travel time tomography. In a first step, we derive a new approximation of the exact phase velocity equation of the SV wave in anisotropic (TI) media. This new approximation is valid for non-weak anisotropy and is mathematically simpler to handle than the exact equation. Then, starting from an isotropic reflection tomography tool developed at Lt-'P, we extend the isotropic bending ray tracing method to the anisotropic case and we implement the quantities necessary for the determination of the anisotropy parameters from the travel time data. Using synthetic data we then study the influence of the different anisotropy parameters on the travel times. From this analysis we propose a methodology to determine a complete anisotropic subsurface model (P and S layer velocities, interface geometries, anisotropy parameters). Finally, on a real data set from the Gulf of Mexico we demonstrate that this new anisotropic reflection tomography tool allows us to obtain a reliable subsurface model yielding kinematically correct and mutually coherent PP and PS images in depth; such a result could not be obtained with an isotropic velocity model. Similar results are obtained on a North Sea data set. (author)

  20. Determination of anisotropic velocity model by reflection tomography of compression and shear modes; Determination de modele de vitesse anisotrope par tomographie de reflexion des modes de compression et de cisaillement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopin, A

    2001-12-01

    As the jump from 2D to 3D, seismic exploration lives a new revolution with the use of converted PS waves. Indeed PS converted waves are proving their potential as a tool for imaging through gas; lithology discrimination; structural confirmation; and more. Nevertheless, processing converted shear data and in particular determining accurate P and S velocity models for depth imaging of these data is still a challenging problem, especially when the subsurface is anisotropic. To solve this velocity model determination problem we propose to use reflection travel time tomography. In a first step, we derive a new approximation of the exact phase velocity equation of the SV wave in anisotropic (TI) media. This new approximation is valid for non-weak anisotropy and is mathematically simpler to handle than the exact equation. Then, starting from an isotropic reflection tomography tool developed at Lt-'P, we extend the isotropic bending ray tracing method to the anisotropic case and we implement the quantities necessary for the determination of the anisotropy parameters from the travel time data. Using synthetic data we then study the influence of the different anisotropy parameters on the travel times. From this analysis we propose a methodology to determine a complete anisotropic subsurface model (P and S layer velocities, interface geometries, anisotropy parameters). Finally, on a real data set from the Gulf of Mexico we demonstrate that this new anisotropic reflection tomography tool allows us to obtain a reliable subsurface model yielding kinematically correct and mutually coherent PP and PS images in depth; such a result could not be obtained with an isotropic velocity model. Similar results are obtained on a North Sea data set. (author)

  1. Crustal structure of the Transantarctic Mountains, Ellsworth Mountains and Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica: constraints on shear wave velocities, Poisson's ratios and Moho depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Emry, E. L.; Julià, J.; Sun, X.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Wiens, D. A.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Winberry, P.; Wilson, T.

    2017-12-01

    A uniform set of crustal parameters for seismic stations deployed on rock in West Antarctica and the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) has been obtained to help elucidate similarities and differences in crustal structure within and between several tectonic blocks that make up these regions. P-wave receiver functions have been analysed using the H-κ stacking method to develop estimates of thickness and bulk Poisson's ratio for the crust, and jointly inverted with surface wave dispersion measurements to obtain depth-dependent shear wave velocity models for the crust and uppermost mantle. The results from 33 stations are reported, including three stations for which no previous results were available. The average crustal thickness is 30 ± 5 km along the TAM front, and 38 ± 2 km in the interior of the mountain range. The average Poisson's ratios for these two regions are 0.25 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.02, respectively, and they have similar average crustal Vs of 3.7 ± 0.1 km s-1. At multiple stations within the TAM, we observe evidence for mafic layering within or at the base of the crust, which may have resulted from the Ferrar magmatic event. The Ellsworth Mountains have an average crustal thickness of 37 ± 2 km, a Poisson's ratio of 0.27, and average crustal Vs of 3.7 ± 0.1 km s-1, similar to the TAM. This similarity is consistent with interpretations of the Ellsworth Mountains as a tectonically rotated TAM block. The Ross Island region has an average Moho depth of 25 ± 1 km, an average crustal Vs of 3.6 ± 0.1 km s-1 and Poisson's ratio of 0.30, consistent with the mafic Cenozoic volcanism found there and its proximity to the Terror Rift. Marie Byrd Land has an average crustal thickness of 30 ± 2 km, Poisson's ratio of 0.25 ± 0.04 and crustal Vs of 3.7 ± 0.1 km s-1. One station (SILY) in Marie Byrd Land is near an area of recent volcanism and deep (25-40 km) seismicity, and has a high Poisson's ratio, consistent with the presence of partial melt in the crust.

  2. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  3. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Mingshan; Ma Chaochen; Li Minghua; Danish, S N

    2006-01-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value

  4. Crustal and upper mantle shear velocities of Iberia, the Alboran Sea, and North Africa from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; mimoun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic Alpine deformation in the western Mediterranean extends from the Pyrenees in northern Spain to the Atlas Mountains in southern Morocco. The Iberian plate was accreted to the European plate in late Cretaceous, resulting in the formation of the Pyrenees. Cenozoic African-European convergence resulted in subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate beneath Europe. Rapid Oligocene slab rollback from eastern Iberia spread eastward and southward, with the trench breaking into three segments by the time it reached the African coast. One trench segment moved southwestward and westward creating the Alboran Sea, floored by highly extended continental crust, and building the encircling Betics Rif mountains comprising the Gibraltar arc, and the Atlas mountains, which formed as the inversion of a Jurassic rift. A number of recent experiments have instrumented this region with broad-band arrays (the US PICASSO array, Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the University of Munster array), which, including the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan permanent networks, provide a combined array of 350 stations having an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. Taking advantage of this dense deployment, we have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). Approximately 50,000 stations pairs were used to measure the phase velocity from ambient noise and more than 160 teleseismic events to measure phase velocity for longer periods. The inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves provides a 3D shear velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show differences between the various tectonic regions that extend to upper mantle depths (~200 km). In Iberia we obtain, on average, higher upper mantle shear velocities in the western Variscan region than in the younger eastern part. We map high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) beneath the

  5. Evaluating winds and vertical wind shear from Weather Research and Forecasting model forecasts using seven planetary boundary layer schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draxl, Caroline; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    with different PBL parameterizations at one coastal site over western Denmark. The evaluation focuses on determining which PBL parameterization performs best for wind energy forecasting, and presenting a validation methodology that takes into account wind speed at different heights. Winds speeds at heights...... regarding wind energy at these levels partly depends on the formulation and implementation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations in these models. This study evaluates wind speeds and vertical wind shears simulated by theWeather Research and Forecasting model using seven sets of simulations...

  6. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns therein is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients, i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field, and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares

  7. A new paradigm for intensity modification of tropical cyclones: thermodynamic impact of vertical wind shear on the inflow layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riemer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An important roadblock to improved intensity forecasts for tropical cyclones (TCs is our incomplete understanding of the interaction of a TC with the environmental flow. In this paper we re-visit the canonical problem of a TC in vertical wind shear on an f-plane. A suite of numerical experiments is performed with intense TCs in moderate to strong vertical shear. We employ a set of simplified model physics – a simple bulk aerodynamic boundary layer scheme and "warm rain" microphysics – to foster better understanding of the dynamics and thermodynamics that govern the modification of TC intensity. In all experiments the TC is resilient to shear but significant differences in the intensity evolution occur.

    The ventilation of the TC core with dry environmental air at mid-levels and the dilution of the upper-level warm core are two prevailing hypotheses for the adverse effect of vertical shear on storm intensity. Here we propose an alternative and arguably more effective mechanism how cooler and drier (lower θe air – "anti-fuel" for the TC power machine – can enter the core region of the TC. Strong and persistent, shear-induced downdrafts flux low θe air into the boundary layer from above, significantly depressing the θe values in the storm's inflow layer. Air with lower θe values enters the eyewall updrafts, considerably reducing eyewall θe values in the azimuthal mean. When viewed from the perspective of an idealised Carnot-cycle heat engine a decrease of storm intensity can thus be expected. Although the Carnot cycle model is – if at all – only valid for stationary and axisymmetric TCs, a close association of the downward transport of low θe into the boundary layer and the intensity evolution offers further evidence in support of our hypothesis.

    The downdrafts that flush the boundary layer with low

  8. Possible Different Rifting Mechanisms Between South and North Part of the Fenhe-Weihe Rift Zone Revealed by Shear Velocity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, S.; Zheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    location varies as depth changes. Associated with previous geochemistry studies, we propose an on-going asthenosphere upwelling near Datong volcanic field. Overall, the shear wave velocity structures between north and south part of the FWR is different,and imply the different rifting mechanisms between the two sides of FWR.

  9. Tomography of core-mantle boundary and lowermost mantle coupled by geodynamics: joint models of shear and compressional velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Soldati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We conduct joint tomographic inversions of P and S travel time observations to obtain models of delta v_P  and delta v_S in the entire mantle. We adopt a recently published method which takes into account the geodynamic coupling between mantle heterogeneity and core-mantle boundary (CMB topography by viscous flow, where sensitivity of the seismic travel times to the CMB is accounted for implicitly in the inversion (i.e. the CMB topography is not explicitly inverted for. The seismic maps of the Earth's mantle and CMB topography that we derive can explain the inverted seismic data while being physically consistent with each other. The approach involved scaling P-wave velocity (more sensitive to the CMB to density anomalies, in the assumption that mantle heterogeneity has a purely thermal origin, so that velocity and density heterogeneity are proportional to one another. On the other hand, it has sometimes been suggested that S-wave velocity might be more directly sensitive to temperature, while P heterogeneity is more strongly influenced by chemical composition. In the present study, we use only S-, and not P-velocity, to estimate density heterogeneity through linear scaling, and hence the sensitivity of core-reflected P phases to mantle structure. Regardless of whether density is more closely related to P- or S-velocity, we think it is worthwhile to explore both scaling approaches in our efforts to explain seismic data. The similarity of the results presented in this study to those obtained by scaling P-velocity to density suggests that compositional anomaly has a limited impact on viscous flow in the deep mantle.

  10. Shear-Velocity Structure and Azimuthal and Radial Anisotropy Beneath the Kaapvaal Craton From Bayesian Inversion of Surface-Wave Data: Inferences for the Architecture and Early Evolution of Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Ravenna, M.; Adam, J.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides essential information on the deformation of the lithosphere. Knowledge of anisotropy also allows us to isolate the isotropic-average seismic velocities, relatable to the lithospheric temperature and composition. We use Rayleigh and Love-wave phase velocities and their azimuthal anisotropy measured in broad period ranges across the footprint of the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE), from the Kaapvaal Craton to the Limpopo Belt. We invert the data using our recently developed, fully non-linear Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and determine, for the first time, both the isotropic-average S velocity and its radial and azimuthal anisotropy as a function of depth from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere. The probabilistic inversion provides a way to quantify non-uniqueness, using direct parameter-space sampling, and assess model uncertainties. The high-velocity anomaly indicative of the cold cratonic lithosphere bottoms at 200-250 km beneath the central and western Kaapvaal Craton, underlain by a low-velocity zone. Beneath northern Kaapvaal and Limpopo, by contrast, high velocities extend down to 300-350 km. Although this does not require a lithosphere that has maintained this thickness over a geologically long time, the data does require the mantle to be anomalously cold down to 300-350 km. Interestingly, topography correlates with the thickness of this high-velocity layer, with lower elevations where the lid is thicker. Radial shear-wave anisotropy is in the 2-5 percent range (Vsh > Vsv) from the lower crust down to 200 km, below which depth it decreases gradually. Radial variations in the amplitude of radial anisotropy show no clear relationship with those in the amplitude of azimuthal anisotropy or isotropic-average Vs anomalies. Azimuthal anisotropy changes the fast-propagation direction near the base of the lithosphere (200-300 km depth), from the laterally varying fast azimuths in the lower lithosphere to a spatially

  11. Issue of Changes in Adhesion of Bitumen Sheet to Primary Layer over the Course of Time in Multilayer Waterproofing during Shear Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, Jan; Vysoká, Jana; Vejmelka, Radek; Horský, Jan; Vacek, Vítězslav

    2017-10-01

    This paper is based on research dealing with defects that appear on concrete bridge decks with an insulating layer from asphalt strips on the interface between the asphalt strip and its basis. The durability and lifespan of the bearing structure of concrete bridge is determined by insulating layer that constitutes, together with the primary layer and a protective layer, the insulation system of the concrete bridge deck. Paints based on low viscosity epoxy resigns are one of the possibilities of primary layer implementation. These paints may be performed as anchoring-impregnation paints that usually represent single layer paint on the bridge deck surface. Sealing layer is another variant. Sealing layer is a multilayer consisting of anchoring- impregnation paint and sealing paint. The primary layers mainly provide vapour closing of the concrete surface, and partly, through roughening the surface, contribute to adhesion of bitumen (asphalt) insulation (waterproofing) layer. Application of the primary layer has been spreading in the Czech Republic since the 1990s. Now, after approximately 30 years of use defects in these epoxy based sealing layers at the interface between primary layer and waterproofing layer of reinforced bitumen sheets (RBS) are being solved in the Czech Republic. After performance of the first test focusing on breaking-strength, it was found that the strength between the asphalt and the primary belt layer in some types of low-viscosity resin-epoxy decreases and after a certain period of time again increases, depending on the time. Tensile strength test is carried out on a sample of asphalt strip, which is fused onto the substrate with a primer coat. It was therefore proceeded to test the shear adhesion. Testing of the shear adhesion is conducted on the entire concrete deck waterproofing system. It was supposed that the decrease of adhesion at this test become evident in higher extent. Adhesion tests in shear were performed on the primary layer

  12. Box Tomography: first application to the imaging of upper-mantle shear velocity and radial anisotropy structure beneath the North American continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouzet, P.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2018-06-01

    The EarthScope Transpotable Array (TA) deployment provides dense array coverage throughout the continental United States and with it, the opportunity for high-resolution 3-D seismic velocity imaging of the stable part of the North American (NA) upper mantle. Building upon our previous long-period waveform tomographic modeling, we present a higher resolution 3-D isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave velocity model of the NA lithosphere and asthenosphere. The model is constructed using a combination of teleseismic and regional waveforms down to 40 s period and wavefield computations are performed using the spectral element method both for regional and teleseismic data. Our study is the first tomographic application of `Box Tomography', which allows us to include teleseismic events in our inversion, while computing the teleseismic wavefield only once, thus significantly reducing the numerical computational cost of several iterations of the regional inversion. We confirm the presence of high-velocity roots beneath the Archean part of the continent, reaching 200-250 km in some areas, however the thickness of these roots is not everywhere correlated to the crustal age of the corresponding cratonic province. In particular, the lithosphere is thick (˜250 km) in the western part of the Superior craton, while it is much thinner (˜150 km) in its eastern part. This may be related to a thermomechanical erosion of the cratonic root due to the passage of the NA plate over the Great Meteor hotspot during the opening of the Atlantic ocean 200-110 Ma. Below the lithosphere, an upper-mantle low-velocity zone (LVZ) is present everywhere under the NA continent, even under the thickest parts of the craton, although it is less developed there. The depth of the minimum in shear velocity has strong lateral variations, whereas the bottom of the LVZ is everywhere relatively flat around 270-300 km depth, with minor undulations of maximum 30 km that show upwarping under the thickest

  13. Velocity Field of the McMurdo Shear Zone from Annual Three-Dimensional Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging and Crevasse Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L.; Jordan, M.; Arcone, S. A.; Kaluzienski, L. M.; Koons, P. O.; Lever, J.; Walker, B.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    The McMurdo Shear Zone (MSZ) is a narrow, intensely crevassed strip tens of km long separating the Ross and McMurdo ice shelves (RIS and MIS) and an important pinning feature for the RIS. We derive local velocity fields within the MSZ from two consecutive annual ground penetrating radar (GPR) datasets that reveal complex firn and marine ice crevassing; no englacial features are evident. The datasets were acquired in 2014 and 2015 using robot-towed 400 MHz and 200 MHz GPR over a 5 km x 5.7 km grid. 100 west-to-east transects at 50 m spacing provide three-dimensional maps that reveal the length of many firn crevasses, and their year-to-year structural evolution. Hand labeling of crevasse cross sections near the MSZ western and eastern boundaries reveal matching firn and marine ice crevasses, and more complex and chaotic features between these boundaries. By matching crevasse features from year to year both on the eastern and western boundaries and within the chaotic region, marine ice crevasses along the western and eastern boundaries are shown to align directly with firn crevasses, and the local velocity field is estimated and compared with data from strain rate surveys and remote sensing. While remote sensing provides global velocity fields, crevasse matching indicates greater local complexity attributed to faulting, folding, and rotation.

  14. Relation between psi-splitting and microscopic residual shear stresses in x-ray stress measurement on uni-directionally deformed layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanabusa, Takao; Fujiwara, Haruo

    1982-01-01

    The psi-splitting behaviors were investigated for the ground and the milled surface layers of both iron and high speed steel in order to find out the relation among microscopic residual shear stresses. For the high speed steel, the X-ray elastic constants and the residual strains were measured on the carbide phase as well as on the matrix phase. It was clarified that the psi-splitting was caused by a combination of the selective nature of X-ray diffractions and the microscopic residual shear stresses within the interior of cells and the carbide particles. The volume fraction occupied by the cell walls and the residual shear stresses sustained by them were estimated from the equilibrium condition of the microscopic residual shear stresses. The distributions of residual stresses over the deformed layers indicate that the thermal effect is dominant in grinding and the mechanical effect is dominant in milling for forming residual stresses. (author)

  15. Cross-shore velocity shear, eddies and heterogeneity in water column properties over fringing coral reefs: West Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; McManus, M.A.; Logan, J.B.; McLaughlin, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-day hydrographic survey cruise was conducted to acquire spatially extensive, but temporally limited, high-resolution, three-dimensional measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity off West Maui in the summer of 2003 to better understand coastal dynamics along a complex island shoreline with coral reefs. These data complement long-term, high-resolution tide, wave, current, temperature, salinity and turbidity measurements made at a number of fixed locations in the study area starting in 2001. Analyses of these hydrographic data, in conjunction with numerous field observations, evoke the following conceptual model of water and turbidity flux along West Maui. Wave- and wind-driven flows appear to be the primary control on flow over shallower portions of the reefs while tidal and subtidal currents dominate flow over the outer portions of the reefs and insular shelf. When the direction of these flows counter one another, which is quite common, they cause a zone of cross-shore horizontal shear and often form a front, with turbid, lower-salinity water inshore of the front and clear, higher-salinity water offshore of the front. It is not clear whether these zones of high shear and fronts are the cause or the result of the location of the fore reef, but they appear to be correlated alongshore over relatively large horizontal distances (orders of kilometers). When two flows converge or when a single flow is bathymetrically steered, eddies can be generated that, in the absence of large ocean surface waves, tend to accumulate material. Areas of higher turbidity and lower salinity tend to correlate with regions of poor coral health or the absence of well-developed reefs, suggesting that the oceanographic processes that concentrate and/or transport nutrients, contaminants, low-salinity water or suspended sediment might strongly influence coral reef ecosystem health and sustainability.

  16. On the possibility of wave-induced chaos in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Zimmermann

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear flow in a stable stratification provides a waveguide for internal gravity waves. In the inviscid approximation, internal gravity waves are known to be unstable below a threshold in Richardson number. However, in a viscous fluid, at low enough Reynolds number, this threshold recedes to Ri = 0. Nevertheless, even the slightest viscosity strongly damps internal gravity waves when the Richardson number is small (shear forces dominate buoyant forces. In this paper we address the dynamics that approximately govern wave propagation when the Richardson number is small and the fluid is viscous. When Ri ξ = λ1A + λ2Aξξ + λ3Aξξξ + λ4AAξ + b(ξ where ξ is the coordinate of the rest frame of the passing temperature wave whose horizontal profile is b(ξ. The parameters λi are constants that depend on the Reynolds number. The above dynamical system is know to have limit cycle and chaotic attrators when forcing is sinusoidal and wave attenuation negligible.

  17. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  18. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges

  19. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassam, Adil [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  20. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgaswane, EM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available locations are shown with solid triangles, and event locations are shown with white circles. Most of the events are located outside of the area shown in the map. B12304 KGASWANE ET AL.: CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA 6 of 19 B12304 velocity profiles... supergroup (white line) taken from van der Westhuizen et al. [2006] and the location of lower crust xenoliths obtained from Pretorius and Barton [2003] and Schmitz and Bowring [2003a]. The number labels 1–15 represent the names of the kimberlites: 1...

  1. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An experimental investigation of the shear-layer and acoustic sources produced by a leading edge slat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Richard, Patrick; Hall, Joseph; Turbulence; Flow Noise Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Leading edge slats are a common addition to airfoils as part of a high lift configuration employed during take-off and landing; the unsteady flow caused by these slats is a major contributor to the overal airframe noise. As the next generation of aircraft seeks to reduce these noise concerns, a better understanding of the sources of aeroacoustic noise generation is sought. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and simultaneous multipoint measurements of the unsteady surface pressure are used herein to investigate the unsteady flow around a leading edge slat coupled with an airfoil for several different configurations and a range of Reynolds numbers (Re = 156 , 000 to Re = 1 . 2 million based on the wing chord). Shear-layer development off the slat cusp and the related unsteady vortex structures are examined in detail to better establish and understand the mechanisms responsible for the generation of aeroacoustic slat noise. The authors are grateful for the support provided by GARDN.

  3. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  4. The effect of small streamwise velocity distortion on the boundary layer flow over a thin flat plate with application to boundary layer stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.; Cowley, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers show how an initially linear spanwise disturbance in the free stream velocity field is amplified by leading edge bluntness effects and ultimately leads to a small amplitude but linear spanwise motion far downstream from the edge. This spanwise motion is imposed on the boundary layer flow and ultimately causes an order-one change in its profile shape. The modified profiles are highly unstable and can support Tollmein-Schlichting wave growth well upstream of the theoretical lower branch of the neutral stability curve for a Blasius boundary layer.

  5. Scratch test induced shear banding in high power laser remelted metallic glass layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Laser remelted surface layers of a Cu-based metallic glass forming alloy have been produced with fully amorphous depths up to 350 mu m for single track widths of around 1.3 mm and have been checked by transmission of synchrotron radiation. They have been subjected to indentation hardness and scratch

  6. Effect of the yarn pull-out velocity of shear thickening fluid-impregnated Kevlar fabric on the coefficient of friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikarami, Sh [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kordani, N. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mazandaran, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadough, Vanini A. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri, H. [Technical Campus, Tehran South Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran(Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    This study explains the yarn pull-out process behavior of woven fabrics in relation to their mechanical properties. Empirical research on the relationship between the yarn pull-out behavior and fabric properties are evaluated, along with a detailed comparison of friction between the fabric fibers in static and dynamic modes. Samples are tested in three modes, namely, neat, dissolved liquid, and silica particle- based Shear thickening fluid (STF)-treated fabric. Accordingly, the presence of STF increases friction between the fabrics and the warp and weft yarns, as well as prevents the displacement of the yarns. Increased friction also leads to an increase in the energy absorption of the yarn pull-out process. In this research, the pull-out test has been performed at three different velocities: 50, 250 and 500 mm/min. Results show that increases in the pull-out velocity increase the pull-out force of the neat and dissolved liquid samples. By contrast, the behavior is completely opposite in the STF-treated sample. Comparing the yarn pull-out values indicates that the STF-treated samples have the highest value, which is approximately three times higher than that of the neat sample.

  7. Effect of the yarn pull-out velocity of shear thickening fluid-impregnated Kevlar fabric on the coefficient of friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikarami, Sh; Kordani, N.; Sadough, Vanini A.; Amiri, H.

    2016-01-01

    This study explains the yarn pull-out process behavior of woven fabrics in relation to their mechanical properties. Empirical research on the relationship between the yarn pull-out behavior and fabric properties are evaluated, along with a detailed comparison of friction between the fabric fibers in static and dynamic modes. Samples are tested in three modes, namely, neat, dissolved liquid, and silica particle- based Shear thickening fluid (STF)-treated fabric. Accordingly, the presence of STF increases friction between the fabrics and the warp and weft yarns, as well as prevents the displacement of the yarns. Increased friction also leads to an increase in the energy absorption of the yarn pull-out process. In this research, the pull-out test has been performed at three different velocities: 50, 250 and 500 mm/min. Results show that increases in the pull-out velocity increase the pull-out force of the neat and dissolved liquid samples. By contrast, the behavior is completely opposite in the STF-treated sample. Comparing the yarn pull-out values indicates that the STF-treated samples have the highest value, which is approximately three times higher than that of the neat sample

  8. An assimilation test of Doppler radar reflectivity and radial velocity from different height layers in improving the WRF rainfall forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiyang; Liu, Jia; Yan, Denghua; Li, Chuanzhe; Chu, Zhigang; Yu, Fuliang

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological forecasts require high-resolution and accurate rainfall information, which is one of the most difficult variables to be captured by the mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems. Radar data assimilation is an effective method for improving rainfall forecasts by correcting the initial and lateral boundary conditions of the NWP system. The aim of this study is to explore an efficient way of utilizing the Doppler radar observations for data assimilation, which is implemented by exploring the effect of assimilating radar data from different height layers on the improvement of the NWP rainfall accuracy. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used for numerical rainfall forecast in the Zijingguan catchment located in the ;Jing-Jin-Ji; (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei) Region of Northern China, and the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3-DVar) technique is adopted to assimilate the radar data. Radar reflectivity and radial velocity are assimilated separately and jointly. Each type of radar data is divided into seven data sets according to the height layers: (1) 2000 m, and (7) all layers. The results show that radar reflectivity assimilation leads to better results than radial velocity assimilation. The accuracy of the forecasted rainfall deteriorates with the rise of the height of the assimilated radar reflectivity. The same results can be found when assimilating radar reflectivity and radial velocity at the same time. The conclusions of this study provide a reference for efficient assimilation of the radar data in improving the NWP rainfall products.

  9. Crack wave propagation along fracture with an induced low-velocity layer; Teisokudo no chika kiretsu zone wo denpasuru kiretsuha no bunsan tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    A study has been performed on underground cracks working as a geothermy reservoir layer, with respect to characteristics of elastic waves propagating with their energy concentrated on a boundary between rocks around the cracks and fluid in the underground cracks, or `crack waves`. The study has modeled a multi-crack reservoir layer according to the three-layer structure of the fluid layer and low-velocity solid layers around the former layer, whereas crack waves propagating therein were discussed for their dispersion characteristics. As a result of discussions, a guideline to the crack wave measurement at actual fields was put together as follows: because the low-velocity layer affects the dispersion characteristics of the crack waves, the structure and characteristics of the multi-crack reservoir layer may possibly be evaluated by measuring the velocity of the crack waves; evaluating the low-velocity layers requires proper selection of frequency of the crack wave to be measured; for example, at the Higashi Hachimantai field, a crack wave of several hundred hertz must be analyzed; and thickness of the low-velocity layers around main cracks, which can be estimated from the velocity of the crack wave is two meters at the greatest. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Boundary layer and fundamental problems of hydrodynamics (compatibility of a logarithmic velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer with the experience values)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaryankin, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    The compatibility of the semiempirical turbulence theory of L. Prandtl with the actual flow pattern in a turbulent boundary layer is considered in this article, and the final calculation results of the boundary layer is analyzed based on the mentioned theory. It shows that accepted additional conditions and relationships, which integrate the differential equation of L. Prandtl, associating the turbulent stresses in the boundary layer with the transverse velocity gradient, are fulfilled only in the near-wall region where the mentioned equation loses meaning and are inconsistent with the physical meaning on the main part of integration. It is noted that an introduced concept about the presence of a laminar sublayer between the wall and the turbulent boundary layer is the way of making of a physical meaning to the logarithmic velocity profile, and can be defined as adjustment of the actual flow to the formula that is inconsistent with the actual boundary conditions. It shows that coincidence of the experimental data with the actual logarithmic profile is obtained as a result of the use of not particular physical value, as an argument, but function of this value.

  11. The effect of non-uniform mass loading on the linear, temporal development of particle-laden shear layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senatore, Giacomo [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Universita di Pisa, Pisa 56122 (Italy); Davis, Sean; Jacobs, Gustaaf, E-mail: gjacobs@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, San Diego State University, San Diego, 92182 California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The effect of non-uniformity in bulk particle mass loading on the linear development of a particle-laden shear layer is analyzed by means of a stochastic Eulerian-Eulerian model. From the set of governing equations of the two-fluid model, a modified Rayleigh equation is derived that governs the linear growth of a spatially periodic disturbance. Eigenvalues for this Rayleigh equation are determined numerically using proper conditions at the co-flowing gas and particle interface locations. For the first time, it is shown that non-uniform loading of small-inertia particles (Stokes number (St) <0.2) may destabilize the inviscid mixing layer development as compared to the pure-gas flow. The destabilization is triggered by an energy transfer rate that globally flows from the particle phase to the gas phase. For intermediate St (1 < St < 10), a maximum stabilizing effect is computed, while at larger St, two unstable modes may coexist. The growth rate computations from linear stability analysis are verified numerically through simulations based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) model based on the inviscid Euler equations and a point particle model. The growth rates found in numerical experiments using the EL method are in very good agreement with growth rates from the linear stability analysis and validate the destabilizing effect induced by the presence of particles with low St.

  12. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array near a Highway for Traffic Monitoring and Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Lancelle, C.; Ak, E. Ms; Lord, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring traffic is important for many technical reasons. It allows for better design of future roads and assessment of the state of current roads. The number, size, weight, and speed of vehicles control deterioration rate. Also, real-time information supplies data to intelligent information systems to help control traffic. Recently there have been studies looking at monitoring traffic seismically as vibrations from traffic are not sensitive to weather and poor visibility. Furthermore, traffic noise can be used to image S-wave velocity distribution in the near surface by capturing and interpreting Rayleigh and Love waves (Nakata, 2016; Zeng et al. 2016). The capability of DAS for high spatial sampling (1 m), temporal sampling (up to 10 kHz), and distributed nature (tens of kilometers) allows for a closer look at the traffic as it passes and how the speed of the vehicle may change over the length of the array. The potential and difficulties of using DAS for these objectives were studied using two DAS arrays. One at Garner Valley in Southern California (a 700-meter array adjacent to CA Highway 74) and another in Brady Hot Springs, Nevada (an 8700-meter array adjacent to Interstate 80). These studies experimentally evaluated the use of DAS data for monitoring traffic and assessing the use of traffic vibration as non-localized sources for seismic imaging. DAS arrays should also be resilient to issues with lighting conditions that are problematic for video monitoring and it may be sensitive to the weight of a vehicle. This study along a major interstate provides a basis for examining DAS' potential and limitations as a key component of intelligent highway systems.

  13. Incompressible Modes Excited by Supersonic Shear in Boundary Layers: Acoustic CFS Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A., E-mail: mbelyaev@berkeley.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present an instability for exciting incompressible modes (e.g., gravity or Rossby modes) at the surface of a star accreting through a boundary layer. The instability excites a stellar mode by sourcing an acoustic wave in the disk at the boundary layer, which carries a flux of energy and angular momentum with the opposite sign as the energy and angular momentum density of the stellar mode. We call this instability the acoustic Chandrasekhar–Friedman–Schutz (CFS) instability, because of the direct analogy to the CFS instability for exciting modes on a rotating star by emission of energy in the form of gravitational waves. However, the acoustic CFS instability differs from its gravitational wave counterpart in that the fluid medium in which the acoustic wave propagates (i.e., the accretion disk) typically rotates faster than the star in which the incompressible mode is sourced. For this reason, the instability can operate even for a non-rotating star in the presence of an accretion disk. We discuss applications of our results to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting black hole and neutron star systems and dwarf nova oscillations in cataclysmic variables.

  14. Dynamic Site Characterization and Correlation of Shear Wave Velocity with Standard Penetration Test ` N' Values for the City of Agartala, Tripura State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Arjun; Sitharam, T. G.

    2014-08-01

    Seismic site characterization is the basic requirement for seismic microzonation and site response studies of an area. Site characterization helps to gauge the average dynamic properties of soil deposits and thus helps to evaluate the surface level response. This paper presents a seismic site characterization of Agartala city, the capital of Tripura state, in the northeast of India. Seismically, Agartala city is situated in the Bengal Basin zone which is classified as a highly active seismic zone, assigned by Indian seismic code BIS-1893, Indian Standard Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Part-1 General Provisions and Buildings. According to the Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi (2002), it is the highest seismic level (zone-V) in the country. The city is very close to the Sylhet fault (Bangladesh) where two major earthquakes ( M w > 7) have occurred in the past and affected severely this city and the whole of northeast India. In order to perform site response evaluation, a series of geophysical tests at 27 locations were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique, which is an advanced method for obtaining shear wave velocity ( V s) profiles from in situ measurements. Similarly, standard penetration test (SPT-N) bore log data sets have been obtained from the Urban Development Department, Govt. of Tripura. In the collected data sets, out of 50 bore logs, 27 were selected which are close to the MASW test locations and used for further study. Both the data sets ( V s profiles with depth and SPT-N bore log profiles) have been used to calculate the average shear wave velocity ( V s30) and average SPT-N values for the upper 30 m depth of the subsurface soil profiles. These were used for site classification of the study area recommended by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) manual. The average V s30 and SPT-N classified the study area as seismic site class D and E categories, indicating that

  15. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  16. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keylock, Christopher J [Sheffield Fluid Mechanics Group and Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Nishimura, Kouichi, E-mail: c.keylock@sheffield.ac.uk [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with the action of low speed streaks and hairpin vortices near the wall, with large scale motions further from the wall, the effect of which penetrates to smaller scales. Hence, a measure of phase coupling, when combined with a scale-by-scale decomposition of perpendicular velocity components, is a useful tool for investigating boundary-layer structure and inferring process from single-point measurements. (paper)

  17. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keylock, Christopher J; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with the action of low speed streaks and hairpin vortices near the wall, with large scale motions further from the wall, the effect of which penetrates to smaller scales. Hence, a measure of phase coupling, when combined with a scale-by-scale decomposition of perpendicular velocity components, is a useful tool for investigating boundary-layer structure and inferring process from single-point measurements. (paper)

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  19. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  20. Development of a NEHRP site classification map of Chiang Mai city, Thailand, based on shear-wave velocity using the MASW technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitimakorn, Thanop

    2013-08-01

    To account for site amplification and seismic hazard mapping, the shear-wave velocity (Vs) profile to a depth of 30 m (Vs (30)) is an important parameter and can be used to calculate the ground motion for specific site conditions. In this study, the near-surface Vs profiles of soils were collected at 44 sites in Chiang Mai city using the multi-channel analysis of surface-wave technique. The Vs of each tested location was average weighted to Vs (30) based on the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) criteria. The average Vs (30) value of the alluvium soils was about 362 m s-1, which falls between NEHRP site classes C and D. The average Vs (30) values of flood plain, fluvial clay and natural levee soils (at 300, 299 and 311 m s-1, respectively) all equated to NEHRP class D. The colluvial deposits in the north-western part of the city were mainly composed of gravel, coarse sand and rock fragments, and were assigned to class C (average Vs (30) of 412 m s-1). Soils with lower Vs values will experience higher earthquake ground shaking than those of the bedrock. Accordingly the major part of Chiang Mai city may experience substantial ground shaking due to the amplification in the soft soils.

  1. Length and time scales of the near-surface axial velocity in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, M.

    2006-01-01

    Reynolds number effects on relevant length and time scales in the near-wall region of a canonical turbulent boundary layer are investigated. Well resolved measurements in the atmospheric surface layer are compared with existing laboratory data to give a composite Reynolds number range spanning over three orders of magnitude. In the field experiments, a vertical rake of twenty single element hot-wires was used to measure the axial velocity, u, characteristics in the lower log layer region of the atmospheric surface layer that flows over Utah's western desert. Only data acquired under conditions of near-neutral thermal stability are analyzed. The shape of the power spectra of u as a function of distance from the wall, y, and Reynolds number is investigated, with emphasis on the appropriate scaling parameters valid across different wavenumber, k, bands. In particular, distance from the wall is found to scale the region of the u spectra around ky = 1. The presence of a k -1 slope in the spectra is also found to correlate with the Reynolds number dependence in the peak of the root mean square u profile. In addition, Reynolds number trends in the profiles of the Taylor microscales, which represent intermediate length and time scales in the boundary layer, are shown to deviate from classical scaling

  2. Characteristics of the scrape-off layer in DIII-D high-performance negative central magnetic shear discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C.J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Maingi, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Allen, S.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Buchenauer, D.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Burrell, K.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Casper, T.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cuthbertson, J.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fenstermacher, M.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hill, D.N. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jong, R.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lao, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazarus, E.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Moyer, R.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Petrie, T.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Porter, G.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Rice, B.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Stallard, B.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Taylor, T.S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we present measurements of the global power and particle balance in the high-performance phase of negative central magnetic shear (NCS) discharges and compare with reference VH-mode discharges. The principal differences observed are that NCS has a much lower fraction of the total input power flowing into the boundary, less core radiation, and larger rate of stored energy increase as a fraction of total power. Scrape-off layer (SOL) temperature and divertor heat flux profiles, and radiation profiles at the midplane, are similar to VH-mode. Due to the good core particle confinement and efficient fueling by neutral beam injection (NBI), with little gas puffing, the gas load on the walls and the recycling are very low during the NCS discharges. This results in a rate of density rise relative to beam fueling at the L to H transition time which is 1/3 of the value for VH transitions, which is in turn 1/2 that for L-to-ELMing-H-mode transitions. (orig.).

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Emad H., E-mail: efarag@uj.edu.sa [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Sayed, Hamed M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Taibah University, Yanbu (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer. - Highlights: • A comparative study for four nanoparticles with MHD and thermal radiation effects was studied. • The effective electrical conductivity is mandatory; otherwise a spurious physical sight will be gained. • The investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluids' flow. • The flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced by the slip model. • Lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  4. Spectral assessment of the turbulent convection velocity in a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Reynolds numbers up to Re θ = 13000

    OpenAIRE

    Renard , N.; Deck , S.; Sagaut , P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A method inspired by del Alamo et al. [1] is derived to assess the wavelength-dependent convection velocity in a zero pressure gradient spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Retheta = 13 000 for all wavelengths and all wall distances, using only estimates of the time power spectral density of the streamwise velocity and of its local spatial derivative. The resulting global convection velocity has a least-squares interpretation and is easily relate...

  5. The plane mixing layer between parallel streams of different velocities and different densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, H.E.; Lummer, M.; Nottmeyer, K.

    1990-01-01

    The problem investigated is often encountered in technical applications. For its most basic configuration, the plane turbulent mixing layer, we use the notation as sketched in fig. 1. The influence of density inhomogeneities is twofold: (a) via buoyancy effects and (b) via inertia effects. The investigation described were aimed at studying the latter, while the former -- by appropriate choice of parameters - was essentially suppressed. (authors)

  6. Relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yin1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity (SWV with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents. Methods: 100 patients with primary liver cancer who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between March 2014 and September 2016 were collected as observation group, and 50 healthy subjects who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were collected as normal control group. The ultrasonic SWV levels of two groups of subjects were measured before the operation, and the observation groups were further divided into high SWV group and low SWV group, 50 cases in each group. Intraoperative tumor tissue samples were kept and fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum contents of angiogenesis factors in observation group before operation. Results: Hepatic ultrasonic SWV level in observation group was significantly higher than that in normal control group; proto-oncogene CK, Ki67, Gly-3, Survivin and Pokemon mRNA expression in tumor tissue of high SWV group were higher than those of low SWV group while tumor suppressor genes Tg737, p16, p27, PTEN and runx3 mRNA expression were lower than those of low SWV group; serum angiogenesis factors VEGF, MMP-9 and IGF-1R contents were higher than those in low SWV group. Conclusion: The hepatic ultrasonic SWV level increases in patients with primary liver cancer, and the SWV level is directly correlated with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression as well as angiogenesis factor contents.

  7. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ivan G.; Stokoe, Kenneth; Cox, Brady R.; Yuan, Jiabei; Knudsen, Keith L.; Terra, Fabia; Okubo, Paul G.; Lin, Yin-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical ground-motion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  8. Shear wave velocity investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the Tangshan, China M7.8 earthquake of 1976 using active and passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E; Tao, Xiaxin; Shi, Lijing; Shi, Hailiang

    2008-01-01

    An initial investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the July, 28 1976 Tangshan M7.8 earthquake was conducted between 1976 and 1978 by the National Ministry of Railways, China. These data are the basis of the ‘Chinese Method’ for assessment of liquefaction potential of silty-sand deposits, and are an important component of the worldwide data set for modern probabilistic methods for assessment of soil liquefaction using Bayesian updating and system reliability tools. We revisited 26 sites identified in the maps and published 198 report of the Ministry of Railways in order to investigate these locations with a suite of active- and passive-array surface wave methods. These sites are clustered along the north coast of the Bo Hai Sea in three areas: Lutai, Tianjin; Tangshan City and outlying village, Hebei; and Luannan county, Hebei. First, we gathered and evaluated the Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristics of the ground by comparing dispersion curves from the active source harmonic wave-spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method and the passive array Spatial Auto-Correlation method (SPAC). The dispersive properties of the liquefied ground as measured by these two methods were found to be almost identical. These tests were hybridized and the data sets merged in order to invert of shear wave velocities for analysis of liquefaction potential using a probabilistic framework. The data from high-values of seismic intensity near Tangshan city to low-intensities distant of the event in Luannan County segregate out into clusters of liquefied and non liquefied points clearly separated by liquefaction boundary curves developed from a large global data set of 310 sites

  9. Quantitative Shear Wave Velocity Measurement on Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Differential Diagnosis between Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Ji; Li, Dan-Dan; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Guo, Le-Hang; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Chang; Liu, Lin-Na; Li, Xiao-Long; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of quantitative shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement on acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules using meta-analysis. The databases of PubMed and the Web of Science were searched. Studies published in English on assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of ARFI elastography for the differentiation of thyroid nodules were collected. The quantitative measurement of ARFI elastography was evaluated by SWV (m/s). Meta-Disc Version 1.4 software was used to describe and calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio and summary receiver operating characteristic curves. We analyzed a total of 13 studies, which included 1,854 thyroid nodules (including 1,339 benign nodules and 515 malignant nodules) from 1,641 patients. The summary sensitivity and specificity for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules by SWV were 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77-0.84) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.81-0.86), respectively. The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.21 (95% CI: 3.56-7.62) and 0.23 (95% CI: 0.17-0.32), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 27.53 (95% CI: 14.58-52.01), and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.91 (Q* = 0.84). In conclusion, SWV measurement on ARFI elastography has high sensitivity and specificity for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid nodules and can be used in combination with conventional ultrasound. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Multi-layer Insulation Effect on Damage of Stuffed Shield by High-velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUAN Gong-shun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stuffed shield with multi-layer insulation(MLI was designed by improving on Al Whipple shield, and a series of high-velocity impact tests were practiced with a two-stage light gas gun facility at vacuum environment. The damage model of the stuffed shield with different MLI location by Al-sphere projectile impacting was obtained. The effect of MLI on damage of the stuffed shield by high-velocity impact was studied. The results indicate when the MLI is located at front side of the first Al-plate, the protection performance of the stuffed shield is improved with the larger perforation diameter of the first Al-plate and more impact kinetic energy dissipation of the projectile. When MLI is arranged at back side of the first Al-plate, the expansion of the secondary debris cloud from projectile impacting the first Al-plate is restrained, it is not good to improve the protection performance of the stuffed shield. When MLI is arranged at front side of the stuffed wall, the perforation size of the stuffed wall increases; when MLI is arranged at front side of the rear wall, the distribution range of crater on the rear wall decreases.

  11. Protein Adsorption and Layer Formation at the Stainless Steel-Solution Interface Mediates Shear-Induced Particle Formation for an IgG1 Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan K; Heinrich, Frank; Curtis, Joseph E; Raman, Sid; Miller, Maria A; Hudson, Steven D

    2018-03-05

    Passage of specific protein solutions through certain pumps, tubing, and/or filling nozzles can result in the production of unwanted subvisible protein particles (SVPs). In this work, surface-mediated SVP formation was investigated. Specifically, the effects of different solid interface materials, interfacial shear rates, and protein concentrations on SVP formation were measured for the National Institute of Standards and Technology monoclonal antibody (NISTmAb), a reference IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). A stainless steel rotary piston pump was used to identify formulation and process parameters that affect aggregation, and a flow cell (alumina or stainless steel interface) was used to further investigate the effect of different interface materials and/or interfacial shear rates. SVP particles produced were monitored using flow microscopy or flow cytometry. Neutron reflectometry and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were used to characterize adsorption and properties of NISTmAb at the stainless steel interface. Pump/shear cell experiments showed that the NISTmAb concentration and interface material had a significant effect on SVP formation, while the effects of interfacial shear rate and passage number were less important. At the higher NISTmAb concentrations, the adsorbed protein became structurally altered at the stainless steel interface. The primary adsorbed layer remained largely undisturbed during flow, suggesting that SVP formation at high NISTmAb concentration was caused by the disruption of patches and/or secondary interactions.

  12. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  13. The influence of interstitial water velocity on the migration of 85Sr and 137Cs in an aerated sandy soil layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takebe, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1983-01-01

    The influence of interstitial water velocity on the migration of Sr-85 and Cs-137 in an aerated sandy soil layer was studied at different feed water velocities and feed times. As well known, it was found that Sr-85 migrated with interstitial water, but Cs-137 little migrated with interstitial water. The apparent migration velocity for each fraction corresponding to three concentrations (2 x 10 -2 , 1 x 10 -2 and 5 x 10 -3 μCi/g) of Sr-85 was further investigated. At constant interstitial water velocity (1cm/ min), different values were given for the apparent migration velocity of three fractions, and the fraction with thin concentration migrated faster. At constant feeding time (100hr), there was a linear relationship between apparent migration velocity of three fractions and interstitial water velocity, in the range of slow water velocity ( -2 and 5 x 10 -3 μCi/g) and interstitial water velocity, in the range of fast water velocity (> 1cm/min). (author)

  14. Shear flow in smectic A liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W; Stewart, F

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the onset of a shear-induced instability in a sample of smectic A liquid crystal. Unlike many previous models, the usual director n need not necessarily coincide with the local smectic layer normal a; the traditional Oseen constraint (∇xa=0) is not imposed when flow is present. A recent dynamic theory for smectic A (Stewart 2007 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 18 343-60) will be used to examine a stationary instability in a simple model when the director reorientation and smectic layer distortions are, firstly, assumed not to be coupled to the velocity and, secondly, are supposed coupled to the velocity. A critical shear rate at which the onset of the instability occurs will be identified, together with an accompanying critical director tilt angle and critical wavenumber for the associated smectic layer undulations. Despite some critical phenomena being largely unaffected by any coupling to the flow, it will be shown that the influence of some material parameters, especially the smectic layer compression constant B 0 and the coupling constant B 1 , upon the critical shear rate and critical tilt angle can be greatly affected by flow.

  15. Confocal microscopy of colloidal dispersions in shear flow using a counter-rotating cone-plate shear cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derks, Didi; Wisman, Hans; Blaaderen, Alfons van; Imhof, Arnout

    2004-01-01

    We report on novel possibilities for studying colloidal suspensions in a steady shear field in real space. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is combined with the use of a counter-rotating cone-plate shear cell. This allows imaging of individual particles in the bulk of a sheared suspension in a stationary plane. Moreover, this plane of zero velocity can be moved in the velocity gradient direction while keeping the shear rate constant. The colloidal system under study consists of rhodamine labelled PMMA spheres in a nearly density and refractive index matched mixture of cyclohexylbromide and cis-decalin. We show measured flow profiles in both the fluid and the crystalline phase and find indications for shear banding in the case of a sheared crystal. Furthermore, we show that, thanks to the counter-rotating principle of the cone-plate shear cell, a layer of particles in the bulk of a sheared crystalline suspension can be imaged for a prolonged time, with the result that their positions can be tracked

  16. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  17. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. Estimates of Shear Stress and Measurements of Water Levels in the Lower Fox River near Green Bay, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer of a natural river system largely controls the deposition and resuspension of sediment, as well as the longevity and effectiveness of granular-material caps used to cover and isolate contaminated sediments. This report documents measurements and calculations made in order to estimate shear stress and shear velocity on the Lower Fox River, Wisconsin. Velocity profiles were generated using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on a moored vessel. This method of data collection yielded 158 velocity profiles on the Lower Fox River between June 2003 and November 2004. Of these profiles, 109 were classified as valid and were used to estimate the bottom shear stress and velocity using log-profile and turbulent kinetic energy methods. Estimated shear stress ranged from 0.09 to 10.8 dynes per centimeter squared. Estimated coefficients of friction ranged from 0.001 to 0.025. This report describes both the field and data-analysis methods used to estimate shear-stress parameters for the Lower Fox River. Summaries of the estimated values for bottom shear stress, shear velocity, and coefficient of friction are presented. Confidence intervals about the shear-stress estimates are provided.

  19. The Effect of Veneer Layers on the Bending Shear Strength and Delamination of Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) from Oil Palm Trunk (OPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, M. A.; Nordin, K.; Bahari, S. A.; Ahmad, M.

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the number of veneer layers on the bending shear strength and delamination of Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) from oil palm trunk (OPT). Five (5), Six (6) and Seven (7) veneer layers of OPT LVL were manufactured. The dimension of the boards was 45 cm by 45 cm by 1.9 cm. The boards were hot pressed for 13 minutes at a pressure of 31 kgf per m2. Urea formaldehyde (UF) supplied by a local adhesive manufacturer was used as the binder for the boards. The bending shear tests consisted of the edgewise and flatwise tests, whereas the delamination test consisted of the cold and hot water boil tests. The preparation of the test specimens and tests set-up was in accordance to the Japanese Standards, JAS-1991 [1]. Six replications were used for each test. The results were analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) using the Duncan's Multiple Range Test to test for significant differences. The results indicated that as the number of layers increased the strength also increased. All the boards passed the standard. The difference in strength between the different types of samples was significant at 95 percent confidence level. Bending shear failures were primarily in the veneers. It is possible to use the boards as light weight interior building and furniture components. Over the years, the supply of quality timber resources from the natural forest has decrease as the wood-based industry experienced rapid growth. The supply of rubberwood for the furniture industry is also decreasing as a result of increase latex price. Accordingly, OPT LVL can be an alternative or supplementary raw material for the wood-based industry.

  20. Velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in resulting stokes layer by acoustic standing wave in a duct; Kannai kichi shindo ni okeru stokes sonai onkyoryu ryusoku bunpu no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, M; Kawahashi, M [Saitama University, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-07-25

    Acoustic streaming is generated by Reynolds stress in the sense of mean acoustic momentum flux in a sound field. In the case of an acoustic standing wave produced by an air column oscillation in a closed duct, the friction and the Reynolds stress in the resulting Stokes layer are the essentials of acoustic streaming generation in the vicinity of the duct wall. The thickness of the Stokes layer decreases with the oscillatory Reynolds number. The plane wave propagation in the duct is assumed for the case of high Reynolds number except for the thin Stokes layer adjacent to the duct wall. The velocity profiles of the streaming are estimated theoretically from the steady component of the second-order term of a perturbation expansion in which the first-order approximation is a sinusoidal oscillation of the air column with plane waves. The present paper describes theoretical analysis of the velocity profiles of the acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer by means of the matched asymptotic expansion method. The results obtained show the existence of reverse streaming in a very thin layer adjacent to the wall and the effects of thermal boundary conditions at the wall on the velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  1. High-velocity DC-VPS for diffusion and protecting barrier layers in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, R. H.; Franco, T.; Ruckdäschel, R.

    2006-12-01

    High-temperature fuel cells of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) type as direct converter of chemical into electrical energy show a high potential for reducing considerably the specific energy consumption in different application fields. Of particular interest are advanced lightweight planar cells for electricity supply units in cars and other mobile systems. Such cells, in one new design, consist mainly of metallic parts, for example, of ferrite steels. These cells shall operate in the temperature range of 700 to 800 °C where oxidation and diffusion processes can be of detrimental effect on cell performance for long-term operation. Problems arise in particular by diffusion of chromium species from the interconnect or the cell containment into the electrolyte/cathode interface forming insulating phases and by the mutual diffusion of substrate and anode material, for example, iron and chromium from the ferrite into the anode and nickel from the anode into the ferrite, which in both cases reduces performance and system lifetime. Additional intermediate layers of perovskite-type material, (e.g., doped LaCrO3) applied with high-velocity direct-current vacuum plasma spraying (DC-VPS) can reduce such effects considerably if they are stable and of high electronic conductivity.

  2. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Akira; Hayasaka, Ryo; Majima, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction

  3. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  4. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars

    Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below....... In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise normal block faults and one reverse block fault showing the complexity of the fault zone. The observed faults appear to affect both the Danian...

  5. Shear machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  6. Generation of sheared poloidal flows via Reynolds stress and transport barrier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, E.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Milligen, B. van; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Riccardi, C.; Carrozza, R.; Fontanesi, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.

    2000-01-01

    A view of the latest experimental results and progress in the understanding of the role of poloidal flows driven by fluctuations via Reynolds stress is given. Reynolds stress shows a radial gradient close to the velocity shear layer location in tokamaks and stellarators, indicating that this mechanism may drive significant poloidal flows in the plasma boundary. Observation of the generation of ExB sheared flows via Reynolds stress at the ion Bernstein resonance layer has been noticed in toroidal magnetized plasmas. The experimental evidence of sheared ExB flows linked to the location of rational surfaces in stellarator plasmas might be interpreted in terms of Reynolds stress sheared driven flows. These results show that ExB sheared flows driven by fluctuations can play an important role in the generation of transport barriers. (author)

  7. Turbulent shear control with oscillatory bubble injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi; Takeda, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    It is known that injecting bubbles into shear flow can reduce the frictional drag. This method has advantages in comparison to others in simplicity of installation and also in environment. The amount of drag reduction by bubbles depends on the void fraction provided in the boundary layer. It means, however, that certain power must be consumed to generate bubbles in water, worsening the total power-saving performance. We propose oscillatory bubble injection technique to improve the performance in this study. In order to prove this idea of new type of drag reduction, velocity vector field and shear stress profile in a horizontal channel flow are measured by ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) and shear stress transducer, respectively. We measure the gas-liquid interface from the UVP signal, as well. This compound measurement with different principles leads to deeper understanding of bubble-originated drag reduction phenomena, in particular for unsteady process of boundary layer alternation. At these experiments, the results have demonstrated that the intermittency promotes the drag reduction more than normal continuous injection for the same void fraction supplied.

  8. Influence of foundation layering on soil-structure system motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with effects on structural motion due to layering of the foundation. Impedance functions for foundations which consist of a layer resting on a viscoelastic half-space are used on a simple 3-dof SSI system and transfer functions are generated. It is shown that the layering of the foundation effects the motion of the SSI system. These effects are more pronounced for shallow layers with large difference in shear wave velocity from the underlying half-space. (orig.)

  9. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The proper forecasting of the occurrence of radiation fog is still one of the challenging topics in boundary-layer meteorology, despite its high societal importance like for aviation and road traffic. In fact radiation fog depends on many processes that all critically interact on relatively short

  10. The role of vertical shear on the horizontal oceanic dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Lanotte; R. Corrado; G. Lacorata; L. Palatella; C. Pizzigalli; I. Schipa; R. Santoleri

    2015-01-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observative and model data. In-situ current measurements reveal that vertical velocity gradients in the upper mixed layer decorrelate quite fast (∼ 1 day), whereas basin-scale ocean circulation models tend to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispers...

  11. Interfacial Shear Rheology of β-Lactoglobulin - Bovine Submaxillary Mucin Layers Adsorbed at Air/Water Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hilal Yilmaz; Kmiecik-Palczewska, Joanna; Lee, Seunghwan

    2017-01-01

    The interfacial rheological properties of solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG), as a model food compound, mixed with bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM), a major salivary protein, have been investigated. Time, frequency, stress sweep and flow measurements have been performed at different pHs (7.4, 5.......0 and 3.0), to investigate the air/water interfacial properties. All protein layers (BLG, BSM, and BLG-BSM mixtures) formed an elastic network at the air/water interface with low frequency dependence of the interfacial modulus. The results indicated that BLG moves faster as smaller molecule than mucin...

  12. Low-Frequency Shear and Layer-Breathing Modes in Raman Scattering of Two-Dimensional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liangbo; Zhang, Jun; Sumpter, Bobby G; Tan, Qing-Hai; Tan, Ping-Heng; Meunier, Vincent

    2017-12-26

    Ever since the isolation of single-layer graphene in 2004, two-dimensional layered structures have been among the most extensively studied classes of materials. To date, the pool of two-dimensional materials (2DMs) continues to grow at an accelerated pace and already covers an extensive range of fascinating and technologically relevant properties. An array of experimental techniques have been developed and used to characterize and understand these properties. In particular, Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a key experimental technique, thanks to its capability to identify minute structural and electronic effects in nondestructive measurements. While high-frequency (HF) intralayer Raman modes have been extensively employed for 2DMs, recent experimental and theoretical progress has demonstrated that low-frequency (LF) interlayer Raman modes are more effective at determining layer numbers and stacking configurations and provide a unique opportunity to study interlayer coupling. These advantages are due to 2DMs' unique interlayer vibration patterns where each layer behaves as an almost rigidly moving object with restoring forces corresponding to weak interlayer interactions. Compared to HF Raman modes, the relatively small attention originally devoted to LF Raman modes is largely due to their weaker signal and their proximity to the strong Rayleigh line background, which previously made their detection challenging. Recent progress in Raman spectroscopy with technical and hardware upgrades now makes it possible to probe LF modes with a standard single-stage Raman system and has proven crucial to characterize and understand properties of 2DMs. Here, we present a comprehensive and forward-looking review on the current status of exploiting LF Raman modes of 2DMs from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, revealing the fundamental physics and technological significance of LF Raman modes in advancing the field of 2DMs. We review a broad array of materials, with

  13. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiNx films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN x ) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH 3 molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN x /P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN x passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN x films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN x /P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  14. The velocity of the expanding by-products and soil layer on top of a buried landmine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snyman, I.M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses high-speed video images of the PHOTRON APX-RS high-speed camera to determine the velocity of the expanding volume of by-products of a buried landmine. The study analyses three experiments done with the Scientifically Instrumented...

  15. Horizontal structures of velocity and temperature boundary layers in two-dimensional numerical turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Quan; Sugiyama, K.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Xia, K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structures of the near-plate velocity and temperature profiles at different horizontal positions along the conducting bottom (and top) plate of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell, using two-dimensional (2D) numerical data obtained at the Rayleigh number Ra = 108 and the Prandtl

  16. Non-contact evaluation of mechanical properties of electroplated wear resistant Ni-P layer from the velocity dispersion of laser SAW; Laser reiki Rayleigh ha no sokudo bunsan wo mochiita taimamo Ni-P mekkiso tokusei no hisesshoku hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Y.; Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakayama, T. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    We developed a new laser surface acoustic wave (SAW) system and applied this to estimate the mechanical properties of the wear-resistant Ni-P layer electroplated on a stainless steel. The velocity dispersions of Rayleigh wave of the as -plated and heat-treated Ni-P layer were obtained by the one point time domain signal processing. The Ni-P layers with excellent wear resistance produced by the heated treatment higher than 725K were found to show higher Rayleigh velocities than that of the substrate steel, while the Ni-P layer with poor wear resistance showed lower velocities. Young`s moduli of the Ni-P layer, estimated so as the computed velocity dispersion agreed with the measured one, increased with the increase of wear resistance. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Jelle T. C.; Karanasos, Antonios; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Aben, Jean-Paul; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression. Materials Methods Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography. Results The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area. Discussion This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the

  18. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle T C Schrauwen

    Full Text Available Wall shear stress (WSS plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression.Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography.The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area.This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the low WSS regions directly distal to

  19. The influence of the Al stabilizer layer thickness on the normal zone propagation velocity in high current superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I.; Langeslag, S.A.E.; Martins, L.P.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2015-06-19

    The stability of high-current superconductors is challenging in the design of superconducting magnets. When the stability requirements are fulfilled, the protection against a quench must still be considered. A main factor in the design of quench protection systems is the resistance growth rate in the magnet following a quench. The usual method for determining the resistance growth in impregnated coils is to calculate the longitudinal velocity with which the normal zone propagates in the conductor along the coil windings. Here, we present a 2D numerical model for predicting the normal zone propagation velocity in Al stabilized Rutherford NbTi cables with large cross section. By solving two coupled differential equations under adiabatic conditions, the model takes into account the thermal diffusion and the current redistribution process following a quench. Both the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the superconductor and the metal cladding materials properties are included. Unlike common normal zon...

  20. Estimation of S-wave velocity structure of deep sedimentary layers using geophysical data and earthquake ground motion records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    The preliminary results with an outline of array observation for micro-tremor and natural earthquakes around the NIIT site were explained. Phase velocity estimated from a horizontal array of strong motion observation agrees with that from the micro-tremor survey. Estimation results are consistent with other literature, such as PS-logging data and gravity maps. Further improvement of the three-dimensional modeling by using micro-tremor surveys and horizontal array observation is planned for the future. (author)

  1. A comparison of statistically optimized near field acoustic holography using single layer pressure velocity measurements and using double layer pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Chen, Xinyi; Jaud, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    recently been suggested. An alternative method uses a double layer array of pressure transducers. Both methods make it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of extraneous noise and reflections coming from the “wrong” side. This letter compares...

  2. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part I: Evaluation of the scheme through large-eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    The entrainment flux ratio A e and the inversion layer (IL) thickness are two key parameters in a mixed layer model. A e is defined as the ratio of the entrainment heat flux at the mixed layer top to the surface heat flux. The IL is the layer between the mixed layer and the free atmosphere. In this study, a parameterization of A e is derived from the TKE budget in the firstorder model for a well-developed CBL under the condition of linearly sheared geostrophic velocity with a zero value at the surface. It is also appropriate for a CBL under the condition of geostrophic velocity remaining constant with height. LESs are conducted under the above two conditions to determine the coefficients in the parameterization scheme. Results suggest that about 43% of the shear-produced TKE in the IL is available for entrainment, while the shear-produced TKE in the mixed layer and surface layer have little effect on entrainment. Based on this scheme, a new scale of convective turbulence velocity is proposed and applied to parameterize the IL thickness. The LES outputs for the CBLs under the condition of linearly sheared geostrophic velocity with a non-zero surface value are used to verify the performance of the parameterization scheme. It is found that the parameterized A e and IL thickness agree well with the LES outputs.

  3. Measurements of velocity-fields and temperature-fields in laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1975-02-01

    This work deals with the hydrodynamics of laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers on a vertical flat isothermal plate. Both for the laminar and turbulent region there is a good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations. From these experiments one can draw important conclusions to the growth of instabilities in the transition region which lead to turbulence. (orig.) [de

  4. SPIV investigations of correlation between streamwise vorticity and velocity in the wake of a vortex generator in a boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2013-01-01

    The current work describes the experimental parametric study of streamwise vortices generated in a boundary layer by a rectangular vane (commonly named vortex generator) mounted perpendicularly to the wall and at an angle to the oncoming flow. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements ...

  5. Planar time-resolved PIV for velocity and pressure retrieval in atmospheric boundary layer over surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Bopp, Maximilian; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling in general is important for weather, climate, fluxes. Wind wave source is crucially important for surface waves' modeling. But the wind-wave growth rate is strongly uncertain. Using direct measurements of pressure by wave-following Elliott probe [1] showed, weak and indefinite dependence of wind-wave growth rate on the wave steepness, while Grare et.al. [2] discuss the limitations of direct measurements of pressure associated with the inability to measure the pressure close to the surface by contact methods. Recently non-invasive methods for determining the pressure on the basis of technology of time-resolved PIV are actively developed [3]. Retrieving air flow velocities by 2D PIV techniques was started from Reul et al [4]. The first attempt for retrieving wind pressure field of waves in the laboratory tank from the time-resolved PIV measurements was done in [5]. The experiments were performed at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m). For 18 regimes with wind speed up to 14 m/s including presence of puddle waves, a combination of time resolved PIV technique and optical measurements of water surface form was applied to detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. Ammonium chloride smoke was used for flow visualization illuminated by two 6 Wt blue diode lasers combined into a vertical laser plane. Particle movement was captured with high-speed camera using Scheimpflug technique (up to 20 kHz frame rate with 4-frame bursts, spatial resolution about 190 μm, field of view 314x12 mm). Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave form. The resulting time resolved instantaneous velocity fields on regular grid allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from measured air velocity fluctuations. The average wind velocity patterns were

  6. Calibration of silicone rubber rods as passive samplers for pesticides at two different flow velocities: Modeling of sampling rates under water boundary layer and polymer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexis; Margoum, Christelle; Jolivet, Antoine; Assoumani, Azziz; El Moujahid, Bachir; Randon, Jérôme; Coquery, Marina

    2018-04-01

    There is a need to determine time-weighted average concentrations of polar contaminants such as pesticides by passive sampling in environmental waters. Calibration data for silicone rubber-based passive samplers are lacking for this class of compounds. The calibration data, sampling rate (R s ), and partition coefficient between silicone rubber and water (K sw ) were precisely determined for 23 pesticides and 13 candidate performance reference compounds (PRCs) in a laboratory calibration system over 14 d for 2 water flow velocities, 5 and 20 cm s -1 . The results showed that an in situ exposure duration of 7 d left a silicone rubber rod passive sampler configuration in the linear or curvilinear uptake period for 19 of the pesticides studied. A change in the transport mechanism from polymer control to water boundary layer control was observed for pesticides with a log K sw of approximately 3.3. The PRC candidates were not fully relevant to correct the impact of water flow velocity on R s . We therefore propose an alternative method based on an overall resistance to mass transfer model to adjust R s from laboratory experiments to in situ hydrodynamic conditions. We estimated diffusion coefficients (D s ) and thickness of water boundary layer (δ w ) as adjustable model parameters. Log D s values ranged from -12.13 to -10.07 m 2  s -1 . The estimated δ w value showed a power function correlation with water flow velocity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1208-1218. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  7. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part I: Velocity and Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nironi, Chiara; Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Mejean, Patrick; Grosjean, Nathalie; Soulhac, Lionel

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the probability density function (PDF) of a pollutant concentration within atmospheric flows is of primary importance in estimating the hazard related to accidental releases of toxic or flammable substances and their effects on human health. This need motivates studies devoted to the characterization of concentration statistics of pollutants dispersion in the lower atmosphere, and their dependence on the parameters controlling their emissions. As is known from previous experimental results, concentration fluctuations are significantly influenced by the diameter of the source and its elevation. In this study, we aim to further investigate the dependence of the dispersion process on the source configuration, including source size, elevation and emission velocity. To that end we study experimentally the influence of these parameters on the statistics of the concentration of a passive scalar, measured at several distances downwind of the source. We analyze the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration PDFs, with a focus on the variance, its dissipation and production and its spectral density. The information provided by the dataset, completed by estimates of the intermittency factors, allow us to discuss the role of the main mechanisms controlling the scalar dispersion and their link to the form of the PDF. The latter is shown to be very well approximated by a Gamma distribution, irrespective of the emission conditions and the distance from the source. Concentration measurements are complemented by a detailed description of the velocity statistics, including direct estimates of the Eulerian integral length scales from two-point correlations, a measurement that has been rarely presented to date.

  8. Shear Evaluation by Quantitative Flow Visualization Near the Casing Surface of a Centrifugal Blood Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Yuki; Ito, Kazuyuki; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Masuzawa, Toru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Endo, Seiko; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    To clarify the correlation between high-shear flow and hemolysis in blood pumps, detail shear velocity distribution was quantified by an experimental method with a model centrifugal blood pump that has a series data of hemolysis tests and computational fluid dynamic analyses. Particular attention was paid to the shear velocity near the casing surface in the volute where the high shear causes in circumferentially wide region that is considerable to cause high hemolysis. Three pump models were compared concern with the radial gap width between the impeller and casing (the radial volute width) also with the outlet position whereas the impeller geometry was identical. These casing geometries were as follows: model 1-the gap width is standard 3mm and the outlet locates to make a smooth geometrical connection with the volute, model 2-the gap width is small 0.5mm and the outlet locates to make the smooth geometrical connection with the volute, and model 3-the gap width is small 0.5mm and the outlet locates to hardly make the smooth geometrical connection with the volute but be similar radial position with that of model 1. Velocity was quantified with a particle tracking velocimetry that is one of the quantitative flow visualization techniques, and the shear velocity was calculated. Results showed that all large shear velocity existed within the layers of about 0.1mm from the casing surface and that those layers were hardly affected by a vane passage even if the gap width is 0.5mm. They also showed that the maximum shear velocity appeared on the casing surface, and the shear velocities of models 2 and 3 were almost twice as large as that of model 1. This finding is in full corresponding with the results of hemolysis tests which showed that the hemolysis levels of both models 2 and 3 were 1.5 times higher than that of model 1. These results suggest that detailed high-shear evaluation near the casing surface in the volute is one of the most important keys in estimating the

  9. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  10. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  11. Blind comparisons of shear-wave velocities at closely-spaced sites in San Jose, California: Proceedings of a Workshop held at the US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, May 3, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asten, Michael W.; Boore, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities within several hundred meters of Earth's surface are important in specifying earthquake ground motions for engineering design. Not only are the shearwave velocities used in classifying sites for use of modern building codes, but they are also used in site-specific studies of particularly significant structures. Many are the methods for estimating sub-surface shear-wave velocities, but few are the blind comparisons of a number of the methods at a single site. The word "blind" is important here and means that the measurements and interpretations are done completely independent of one another. Stephen Hartzell of the USGS office on Golden, Colorado realized that such an experiment would be very useful for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods, and he and Jack Boatwright of the USGS office in Menlo Park, California, in cooperation with Carl Wentworth of the Menlo Park USGS office found a convenient site in the city of San Jose, California. The site had good access and space for conducting experiments, and a borehole drilled to several hundred meters by the Santa Clara Valley Water District was made available for downhole logging. Jack Boatwright asked David Boore to coordinate the experiment. In turn, David Boore persuaded several teams to make measurements, helped with the local logistics, collected the results, and organized and conducted an International Workshop in May, 2004. At this meeting the participants in the experiment gathered in Menlo Park to describe their measurements and interpretations, and to see the results of the comparisons of the various methods for the first time. This Open-File Report describes the results of that workshop. One of the participants, Michael Asten, offered to help the coordinator prepare this report. Because of his lead role in pulling the report together, Dr. Asten is the lead author of the paper to follow and is also the lead Compiler for the Open-File Report.It is important to

  12. Flow and bed shear stresses in scour protections around a pile in a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Liu, Xiaofeng; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    on it in an unfavourable manner. Using physical models and 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) numerical simulations, the velocity and bed shear stresses are investigated in complex scour protections around mono piles in steady current. In the physical model the scour protections consisted of an upper cover layer...... simulations are capable of calculating the flow velocities when the scour protection is represented by regular arranged spheres, while the turbulence in general is underestimated. The velocity can also be calculated using porous media flow approach, but the accuracy is not as good as for spheres...

  13. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  14. Shear-induced aggregation or disaggregation in edible oils: Models, computer simulation, and USAXS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, B.; Peyronel, F.; Callaghan-Patrachar, N.; Quinn, B.; Marangoni, A. G.; Pink, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of shear upon the aggregation of solid objects formed from solid triacylglycerols (TAGs) immersed in liquid TAG oils were modeled using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) and the predictions compared to experimental data using Ultra-Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The solid components were represented by spheres interacting via attractive van der Waals forces and short range repulsive forces. A velocity was applied to the liquid particles nearest to the boundary, and Lees-Edwards boundary conditions were used to transmit this motion to non-boundary layers via dissipative interactions. The shear was created through the dissipative forces acting between liquid particles. Translational diffusion was simulated, and the Stokes-Einstein equation was used to relate DPD length and time scales to SI units for comparison with USAXS results. The SI values depended on how large the spherical particles were (250 nm vs. 25 nm). Aggregation was studied by (a) computing the Structure Function and (b) quantifying the number of pairs of solid spheres formed. Solid aggregation was found to be enhanced by low shear rates. As the shear rate was increased, a transition shear region was manifested in which aggregation was inhibited and shear banding was observed. Aggregation was inhibited, and eventually eliminated, by further increases in the shear rate. The magnitude of the transition region shear, γ˙ t, depended on the size of the solid particles, which was confirmed experimentally.

  15. Comparison of a simulated velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer with measurements obtained by Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    New-Tolley, Matthew; Zhang, Yibin; Shneider, Mikhail; Miles, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Accurate velocimetry measurements of turbulent flows are essential for improving our understanding of turbulent phenomena and validating numerical approaches. Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) is an unseeded molecular tagging method for velocimetry measurements in flows which contain nitrogen. A femtosecond laser pulse is used to ionize and dissociate nitrogen molecules within its focal zone. The decaying plasma fluoresces in the visible and infrared spectrum over a period of microseconds which allows the displacement of the tagged region to be photographed to determine velocity. This study compares the experimental and numerical advection of the tagged region in a turbulent boundary layer generated by a supersonic flow over a flat plate. The tagged region in the simulation is approximated as an infinitely thin cylinder while the flow field is generated using the steady state boundary layer equations with an algebraic turbulence model. This approximation is justified by previous computational analyses, using an unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver, which indicate that the radial perturbations of the tagged region are negligible compared to its translation. This research was conducted with government support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Dr. Ivett Leyva and the Army Research Office under Dr. Matthew Munson.

  16. Estimates of bottom roughness length and bottom shear stress in South San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Ling, C.-H.; Gartner, J.W.; Wang, P.-F.

    1999-01-01

    A field investigation of the hydrodynamics and the resuspension and transport of participate matter in a bottom boundary layer was carried out in South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, during March-April 1995. Using broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers, detailed measurements of turbulent mean velocity distribution within 1.5 m above bed have been obtained. A global method of data analysis was used for estimating bottom roughness length zo and bottom shear stress (or friction velocities u*). Field data have been examined by dividing the time series of velocity profiles into 24-hour periods and independently analyzing the velocity profile time series by flooding and ebbing periods. The global method of solution gives consistent properties of bottom roughness length zo and bottom shear stress values (or friction velocities u*) in South Bay. Estimated mean values of zo and u* for flooding and ebbing cycles are different. The differences in mean zo and u* are shown to be caused by tidal current flood-ebb inequality, rather than the flooding or ebbing of tidal currents. The bed shear stress correlates well with a reference velocity; the slope of the correlation defines a drag coefficient. Forty-three days of field data in South Bay show two regimes of zo (and drag coefficient) as a function of a reference velocity. When the mean velocity is >25-30 cm s-1, the ln zo (and thus the drag coefficient) is inversely proportional to the reference velocity. The cause for the reduction of roughness length is hypothesized as sediment erosion due to intensifying tidal currents thereby reducing bed roughness. When the mean velocity is <25-30 cm s-1, the correlation between zo and the reference velocity is less clear. A plausible explanation of scattered values of zo under this condition may be sediment deposition. Measured sediment data were inadequate to support this hypothesis, but the proposed hypothesis warrants further field investigation.

  17. Properties of Love waves in a piezoelectric layered structure with a viscoelastic guiding layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Lijun; Lu, Yanyan; He, Shitang

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical method is developed for analyzing Love waves in a structure with a viscoelastic guiding layer bounded on a piezoelectric substrate. The dispersion equation previously derived for piezoelectric Love waves propagating in the layered structure with an elastic layer is adopted for analyzing a structure with a viscoelastic layer. A Maxwell–Weichert model is introduced to describe the shear stiffness of a polymeric material. Newton’s method is employed for the numerical calculation. The dispersion equation for piezoelectric–elastic Love waves is proved suitable for solving a structure with a viscoelastic layer on a piezoelectric substrate. The theoretical results indicate that the propagation velocity of the Love wave is mainly decided by the shear stiffness of the guiding layer, whereas the propagation loss is approximately proportional to its viscosity. A detailed experimental study was conducted on a Love wave delay line fabricated on an ST-90° X quartz substrate and overlaid with various thicknesses of SU-8 guiding layers. A tail-raising caused by the viscosity of the guiding layer existed in both the calculated and the measured propagation velocities. The calculated insertion loss of the Love wave delay lines was in good agreement with the measured results. The method and the results presented in this paper are beneficial to the design of Love wave sensors with a viscoelastic guiding layer. (paper)

  18. Numerical calculation of velocity distribution near a vertical flat plate immersed in bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Horihata, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Setsuro; Aragaki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Ikuho; Isoda, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid and gas velocity distributions for bubble flow near a vertical flat plate were calculated numerically by using the SIMPLER method, where the flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, and at steady state. The two-fluid flow model was used in the numerical analysis. To calculate the drag force on a small bubble, Stokes' law for a rigid sphere is applicable. The dimensionless velocity distributions which were arranged with characteristic boundary layer thickness and maximum liquid velocity were adjusted with a single line and their forms were similar to that for single-phase wall-jet flow. The average wall shear stress derived from the velocity gradient at the plate wall was strongly affected by bubble diameter but not by inlet liquid velocity. The present dimensionless velocity distributions obtained numerically agreed well with previous experimental results, and the proposed numerical algorithm was validated. (author)

  19. Modification of the mean near-wall velocity profile of a high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer with the injection of drag-reducing polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian R.; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2013-08-01

    The current study explores the influence of polymer drag reduction on the near-wall velocity distribution in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and its dependence on Reynolds number. Recent moderate Reynolds number direct numerical simulation and experimental studies presented in White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862 have challenged the classical representation of the logarithmic dependence of the velocity profile for drag-reduced flows, especially at drag reduction levels above 40%. In the present study, high Reynolds number data from a drag reduced TBL is presented and compared to the observations of White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862. Data presented here were acquired in the TBL flow on a 12.9-m-long flat plate at speeds to 20.3 m s-1, achieving momentum thickness based Reynolds number to 1.5 × 105, which is an order of magnitude greater than that available in the literature. Polyethylene oxide solutions with an average molecular weight of 3.9 × 106 g mol-1 were injected into the flow at various concentrations and volumetric fluxes to achieve a particular level of drag reduction. The resulting mean near-wall velocity profiles show distinctly different behavior depending on whether they fall in the low drag reduction (LDR) or the high drag reduction (HDR) regimes, which are nominally divided at 40% drag reduction. In the LDR regime, the classical view that the logarithmic slope remains constant at the Newtonian value and the intercept constant increases with increasing drag reduction appears to be valid. However, in the HDR regime the behavior is no longer universal. The intercept constant continues to increase linearly in proportion to the drag reduction level until a Reynolds-number-dependent threshold is achieved, at which point the intercept constant rapidly decreases to that predicted by the ultimate profile. The rapid decrease in the intercept constant is due to the corresponding increase in the

  20. On changing the size of the atmosphere of a vortex pair embedded in a periodic external shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhov, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fluid particles in the vicinity of a self-propagating vortex pair, embedded in a nonstationary shear flow, is studied. When the shear flow is steady, the vicinity of the pair, which is called as a vortex atmosphere, consists of closed stream-lines, which coincide with fluid particles' trajectories. When the shear flow is nonstationary, the trajectories' behaviour changes drastically, then chaotic advection occurs. It is shown in the Letter that the vortex pair propagation velocity varies with the parameters (amplitude, and frequency) of the nonstationary shear flow. It is demonstrated, that changing of the mean velocity leads to changing of the size of the atmosphere. -- Highlights: → A three-layered model of an inviscid incompressible geophysical flow is formulated. → A vortex pair is studied in the middle layer when a periodic shear flow is superimposed. → Dynamics of fluid particles inside the vortex atmosphere of the pair on it is studied. → When the external flow is nonstationary, then chaotic advection of fluid particles emerges. → Vortex pair's mean velocity of self-propelling changes depending on amplitude and frequency.

  1. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia: Effect of surface treatment by CNC-milling and composite layer deposition on zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R L P; Silva, F S; Nascimento, R M; Souza, J C M; Motta, F V; Carvalho, O; Henriques, B

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of veneering feldspathic porcelain to zirconia substrates modified by CNC-milling process or by coating zirconia with a composite interlayer. Four types of zirconia-porcelain interface configurations were tested: RZ - porcelain bonded to rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZ - porcelain bonded to zirconia substrate with surface holes (n=16); RZI - application of a composite interlayer between the veneering porcelain and the rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZI - application of a composite interlayer between the porcelain and the zirconia substrate treated by CNC-milling (n=16). The composite interlayer was composed of zirconia particles reinforced porcelain (30%, vol%). The mechanical properties of the ceramic composite have been determined. The shear bond strength test was performed at 0.5mm/min using a universal testing machine. The interfaces of fractured and untested specimens were examined by FEG-SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results (α=0.05). The shear bond strength of PZ (100±15MPa) and RZI (96±11MPa) specimens were higher than that recorded for RZ (control group) specimens (89±15MPa), although not significantly (p>0.05). The highest shear bond strength values were recorded for PZI specimens (138±19MPa), yielding a significant improvement of 55% relative to RZ specimens (p<0.05). This study shows that it is possible to highly enhance the zirconia-porcelain bond strength - even by ~55% - by combining surface holes in zirconia frameworks and the application of a proper ceramic composite interlayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effects of Shear Strain, Fabric, and Porosity Evolution on Elastic and Mechanical Properties of Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic/seismic waves are widely used for probing fault zone elastic and mechanical properties (gouge composition, frictional strength, density) and elastic properties (Vp, Vs, bulk and shear moduli), as it can provide insight into key processes and fault properties during shearing. These include fabric and force chain formation, porosity evolution, and fault zone stiffness, which are in turn factors in fault slip, damage, and healing. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments on synthetic fault gouge composed of 50% smectite /50% quartz at a normal stress of 25 MPa, in which we use ultrasonic wave transmission to continuously monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs) up to shear strains of 25, while simultaneously measuring friction and monitoring the evolution of density and porosity. We find that wavespeeds vary with shear strain, due to fabric development and the evolution of density and porosity. The coefficient of friction peaks at μ .47 at a shear strain of .5 - 1, decreases to a steady state value of μ .43 by shear strains of 4.5- 6 and then remains rather constant to shear strains of 6 - 25, consistent with previous work. Density increases rapidly from 1.78 g/cm3 to 1.83 g/cm3 at shear strains from 0-2 (porosity decreases from 33% to 25% over that range), and then more gradually increases to a density of 2.08 g/cm3 (porosity of 21%) at a shear strain of 25. Vp increases from 2400 m/s to 2900 m/s during the onset of shear until a shear strain of 3, and then decreases to 2400-2500 by shear strain of 7-9. At shear strains above 9, Vp slowly increases as the layer becomes denser and less porous. We interpret the co-evolving changes in friction, porosity, and elastic moduli/wavespeed to reflect fabric development and alignment of clay particles as a function of shearing. More specifically, the decrease in Vp at a shear strain of 3 reflects the clay particles gradually aligning. Once the particles are aligned, the gradual increase of

  3. Statistics on Near Wall Structures and Shear Stress Distribution from 3D Holographic Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2007-11-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy performs 3D velocity measurement in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a square channel over a smooth wall at Reτ=1,400. Resolution of ˜1μm over a sample volume of 1.5x2x1.5mm (x^+=50, y^+=60, z^+=50) is sufficient for resolving buffer layer and lower log layer structures, and for measuring instantaneous wall shear stress distributions from velocity gradients in the viscous sublayer. Results, based on 700 instantaneous realizations, provide detailed statistics on the spatial distribution of both wall stress components along with characteristic flow structures. Conditional sampling based on maxima and minima of wall shear stresses, as well as examination of instantaneous flow structures, lead to development of a conceptual model for a characteristic flow phenomenon that seems to generating extreme stress events. This structure develops as an initially spanwise vortex element rises away from the surface, due to local disturbance, causing a local stress minimum. Due to increasing velocity with elevation, this element bends downstream, forming a pair of inclined streamwise vortices, aligned at 45^0 to freestream, with ejection-like flow between them. Entrainment of high streamwise momentum on the outer sides of this vortex pair generates streamwise shear stress maxima, 70 δν downstream, which are displaced laterally by 35 δν from the local minimum.

  4. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953......-dimensional simulations of standing waves have also been made by application of a general purpose Navier-Stokes solver. The results agree well with those obtained by the boundary layer analysis. Wave reflection from a plane sloping wall is also investigated by using the same numerical model and by physical laboratory...

  5. High-Power Characteristics of Thickness Shear Mode for Textured SrBi2Nb2O9 Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hirozumi; Kawada, Shinichiro; Kimura, Masahiko; Higuchi, Yukio; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    The high-power piezoelectric characteristics of the thickness shear mode for oriented ceramics of bismuth layer structured ferroelectrics (BLSF), SrBi2Nb2O9 (SBN), were studied by the constant current driving method. These textured ceramics were fabricated by the templated grain growth (TGG) method, and the Lotgering factor was 95%. The vibration of the thickness shear mode in the textured SBN ceramics was stable at the vibration velocity of 2.0 m/s. The resonant frequency was almost constant with increasing vibration velocity in the textured SBN ceramics, however, it decreased with increasing vibration velocity in the randomly oriented SBN ceramics. In the case of Pb(Mn,Nb)O3-Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramics, the vibration velocity of the thickness shear mode was saturated at more than 0.3 m/s, and the resonant frequency decreased at lower vibration velocity than in the case of SBN ceramics. The dissipation power density of the textured SBN ceramics was the lowest among those of the randomly oriented SBN and Pb(Mn,Nb)O3-PZT ceramics. The thickness shear mode of textured SBN ceramics is a good candidate for high-power piezoelectric applications.

  6. A new tribological experimental setup to study confined and sheared monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L; Favier, D; Charitat, T; Gauthier, C; Rubin, A

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an original experimental setup, coupling tribology, and velocimetry experiments together with a direct visualization of the contact. The significant interest of the setup is to measure simultaneously the apparent friction coefficient and the velocity of confined layers down to molecular scale. The major challenge of this experimental coupling is to catch information on a nanometer-thick sheared zone confined between a rigid spherical indenter of millimetric radius sliding on a flat surface at constant speed. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of this setup to investigate nanometer-scale sliding layers, we studied a model lipid monolayer deposited on glass slides. It shows that our experimental setup will, therefore, help to highlight the hydrodynamic of such sheared confined layers in lubrication, biolubrication, or friction on solid polymer.

  7. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  8. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  9. Boundary layer on a flat plate with suction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, A.; Dumas, R.; Verollet, E.

    1961-01-01

    This research done in wind tunnel concerns the turbulent boundary layer of a porous flat plate with suction. The porous wall is 1 m long and begins 1 m downstream of the leading edge. The Reynolds number based on the boundary layer thickness is of the order of 16.300. The suction rate defined as the ratio of the velocity perpendicular to the wall to the external flow velocity ranges from 0 to 2 per cent. The pressure gradient can be controlled. The mean velocity profiles have been determined for various positions and suction rates by means of total pressure probes together with the intensities of the turbulent velocity fluctuations components, energy spectra and correlations by means of hot wire anemometers, spectral analyser and correlator. The stream lines, the values of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses, of the local wall friction, of the turbulent energy production term, with some information on the dissipation of the energy have been derived from these measurements. For these data the integral of equation of continuity in boundary layer have been drawn. The suction effects on the boundary layer are important. The suction thoroughly alters the mean velocity profiles by increasing the viscous shear stresses near the wall and decreasing them far from the wall, it diminishes the longitudinal and transversal turbulence intensities, the turbulent shear stresses, and the production of energy of turbulence. These effects are much stressed in the inner part of the boundary layer. On the other hand the energy spectra show that the turbulence scale is little modified, the boundary layer thickness being not much diminished by the suction. The suction effects can be appreciated by comparing twice the suction rate to the wall friction coefficient (assumed airtight), quite noticeable as soon as the rate is about unity, they become very important when it reaches ten. (author) [fr

  10. Impact of finite rate chemistry on the hydrodynamic stability of shear flows in turbulent lean premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Yuval; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Recent experimental observations show that the dynamic response of a reactive flow is strongly impacted by the fuel chemistry. In order to gain insight into some of the underlying mechanisms we formulate a new linear stability model that incorporates the impact of finite rate chemistry on the hydrodynamic stability of shear flows. Contrary to previous studies which typically assume that the velocity field is independent of the kinetic rates, the velocity field in our study is coupled with the temperature field. Using this formulation, we reproduce previous results, e.g., most unstable global modes, obtained for non-reacting shear flow. Moreover, we show that these modes are significantly altered in frequency and gain by the presence of a reaction region within the shear layer. This qualitatively agrees with results of our recent experimental and numerical studies, which show that the flame surface location relative to the shear layer influences the stability characteristics in combustion tunnels. This study suggests a physical explanation for the observed impact of finite rate chemistry on shear flow stability.

  11. Shear flow effect on ion temperature gradient vortices in plasmas with sheared magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of velocity shear on ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven vortices in a nonuniform plasma in a curved, sheared magnetic field is investigated. In absence of parallel ion dynamics, vortex solutions for the ITG mode are studied analytically. It is shown that under certain conditions...... and ultimately lead to a dominating monopolar form. The effects of magnetic shear indicate it may destroy these structures. (C) 1999 American Institute of Physics....

  12. Observation of the L-H confinement bifurcation triggered by a turbulence-driven shear flow in a tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; McKee, G R; Fonck, R; Gohil, P; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H

    2014-03-28

    Comprehensive 2D turbulence and eddy flow velocity measurements on DIII-D demonstrate a rapidly increasing turbulence-driven shear flow that develops ∼100  μs prior to the low-confinement (L mode) to high-confinement (H mode) transition and appears to trigger it. These changes are localized to a narrow layer 1-2 cm inside the magnetic boundary. Increasing heating power increases the Reynolds stress, the energy transfer from turbulence to the poloidal flow, and the edge flow shearing rate that then exceeds the decorrelation rate, suppressing turbulence and triggering the transition.

  13. Detailed experimental study of a highly compressible supersonic turbulent plane mixing layer and comparison with most recent DNS results: “Towards an accurate description of compressibility effects in supersonic free shear flows”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, S.; Bonnet, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed a careful experiment on a highly compressible mixing layer. • We validated the most recent DNS with the present results. • We discuss some aspects of the thermodynamics of the turbulent flow. • We performed a comparison between a computed and a measured turbulent kinetic energy budget. - Abstract: A compressible supersonic mixing layer at convective Mach number (Mc) equal to 1 has been studied experimentally in a dual stream supersonic/subsonic wind-tunnel. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (L.D.V.) measurements were performed making possible a full estimation of the mean and turbulent 3D velocity fields in the mixing layer. The Reynolds stress tensor was described. In particular, some anisotropy coefficients were obtained. It appears that the structure of the Reynolds tensor is almost not affected by compressibility at least up to Mc = 1. The turbulent kinetic energy budget was also experimentally estimated. Reynolds analogies assumptions were used to obtain density/velocity correlations in order to build the turbulent kinetic energy budget from LDV measurements. Results have been compared to other experimental and numerical results. Compressibility effects on the turbulent kinetic energy budget have been detected and commented. A study about thermodynamics flow properties was also performed using most recent DNS results experimentally validated by the present data. A non-dimensional number is then introduced in order to quantify the real effect of pressure fluctuations on the thermodynamics quantities fluctuations

  14. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2017-11-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity exceeds the so called critical velocity for splashing. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it and finally breaks into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outwards, provoking the splash. Here, the tangential deceleration experienced by the fluid entering the thin liquid sheet is investigated making use of boundary layer theory. The velocity component tangent to the solid, computed using potential flow theory provides the far field boundary condition as well as the pressure gradient for the boundary layer equations. The structure of the flow permits to find a self similar solution of the boundary layer equations. This solution is then used to calculate the boundary layer thickness at the root of the lamella as well as the shear stress at the wall. The splash model presented in, which is slightly modified to account for the results obtained from the boundary layer analysis, provides a very good agreement between the measurements and the predicted values of the critical velocity for the splash.

  15. Investigation of sinkhole areas in Germany using 2D shear wave reflection seismics and zero-offset VSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschache, Saskia; Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes pose a serious geohazard for humans and infrastructure in populated areas. The Junior Research Group Subrosion within the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics and the joint project SIMULTAN work on the multi-scale investigation of subrosion processes in the subsurface, which cause natural sinkholes. In two case studies in sinkhole areas of Thuringia in Germany, we applied 2D shear wave reflection seismics using SH-waves with the aim to detect suitable parameters for the characterisation of critical zones. This method has the potential to image near-surface collapse and faulting structures in improved resolution compared to P-wave surveys resulting from the shorter wavelength of shear waves. Additionally, the shear wave velocity field derived by NMO velocity analysis is a basis to calculate further physical parameters, as e.g. the dynamic shear modulus. In both investigation areas, vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired by generating P- and SH-waves (6 component VSP) directly next to a borehole equipped with a 3C downhole sensor. They provide shear and compressional wave velocity profiles, which are used to improve the 2D shear wave velocity field from surface seismics, to perform a depth calibration of the seismic image and to calculate the Vp/Vs ratio. The signals in the VSP data are analysed with respect to changes in polarisation and attenuation with depth and/or azimuth. The VSP data reveal low shear wave velocities of 200-300 m/s in rock layers known to be heavily affected by subrosion and confirm the low velocities calculated from the surface seismic data. A discrepancy of the shear wave velocities is observed in other intervals probably due to unsymmetrical travel paths in the surface seismics. In some VSP data dominant conversion of the direct SH-wave to P-wave is observed that is assumed to be caused by an increased presence of cavities. A potential fault distorting the vertical travel paths was detected by abnormal P-wave first

  16. Propagation characteristics of SH wave in an mm2 piezoelectric layer on an elastic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Kong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the propagation characteristics of shear horizontal (SH waves in a structure consisting of an elastic substrate and an mm2 piezoelectric layer with different cut orientations. The dispersion equations are derived for electrically open and shorted conditions on the free surface of the piezoelectric layer. The phase velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient are calculated for a layered structure with a KNbO3 layer perfectly bonded to a diamond substrate. The dispersion curves for the electrically shorted boundary condition indicate that for a given cut orientation, the phase velocity of the first mode approaches the B-G wave velocity of the KNbO3 layer, while the phase velocities of the higher modes tend towards the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. For the electrically open boundary condition, the asymptotic phase velocities of all modes are the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. In addition, it is found that the electromechanical coupling coefficient strongly depends on the cut orientation of the KNbO3 crystal. The obtained results are useful in device applications.

  17. Suppression of plasma turbulence during optimised shear configurations in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, G.D.; Borba, D.N.; Alper, B.

    1999-08-01

    Density turbulence suppression is observed in the internal transport barrier (ITB) region of JET discharges with optimised magnetic shear. The suppression occurs in two stages. First, low frequency turbulence is reduced across the plasma core by a toroidal velocity shear generated by intense auxiliary heating. Then when the ITB forms, high frequency turbulence is reduced locally within the steep pressure gradient region of the ITB, consistent with the effects of enhanced E x B poloidal shear. The turbulence suppression is correlated with reduced plasma transport and improved fusion performance. Much effort has been spent in recent years in developing alternative scenarios for operating tokamak fusion reactors. One particular scenario involves reversing or reducing the central magnetic shear to form an internal transport barrier (ITB). The result is reduced plasma core energy transport and enhanced fusion performance. It is believed that ITBs may be formed through a combination of E x B velocity shear and magnetic shear stabilisation of plasma turbulence and instabilities. In this Letter we present results from JET optimised shear discharges showing that turbulence suppression during ITB formation occurs in two stages. First low frequency turbulence is reduced across the plasma core, coinciding with a region of strong toroidal velocity shear; then high frequency turbulence is locally suppressed around the ITB region, consistent with enhanced pressure gradient driven E x B poloidal shear. The measurements were made using a system of X-mode reflectometers consisting of two, dual-channel toroidal correlation reflectometers at 75 GHz (covering plasma outboard edge) and 105 GHz (core and inboard edge), and a 92-96 GHz swept frequency radial correlation reflectometer (plasma core). Reflectometry is a powerful tool for measuring density fluctuations. The highly localised reflection of the microwave beam gives excellent spatial localisation. Measurements can be made

  18. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  19. The structure of a separating turbulent boundary layer. IV - Effects of periodic free-stream unsteadiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R. L.; Shivaprasad, B. G.; Chew, Y.-T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements were obtained of the sinusoidal unsteadiness of the free stream velocity during the separation of the turbulent boundary layer. Data were gathered by single wire and cross-wire, anemometry upstream of flow detachment, by laser Doppler velocimetry to detect the movement of the flow in small increments, and by a laser anemometer in the detached zone to measure turbulence and velocities. The study was restricted to a sinusoidal instability frequency of 0.61 and a ratio of oscillation amplitude to mean velocity of 0.3. Large amplitude and phase variations were found after the detachment, with unsteady effects producing hysteresis in the relationships between flow parameters. The detached shear layer decreased in thickness with increasing free-stream velocity and increases in the Reynolds shear stress. Deceleration of the free stream velocity caused thickening in the shear layer and upstream movement of the flow reversal location. The results are useful for studies of compressor blade and helicopter rotors in transition.

  20. Dynamo action and magnetic buoyancy in convection simulations with vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, G.; Käpylä, P.

    2011-10-01

    A hypothesis for sunspot formation is the buoyant emergence of magnetic flux tubes created by the strong radial shear at the tachocline. In this scenario, the magnetic field has to exceed a threshold value before it becomes buoyant and emerges through the whole convection zone. In this work we present the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible turbulent convection that include a vertical shear layer. Like the solar tachocline, the shear is located at the interface between convective and stable layers. We follow the evolution of a random seed magnetic field with the aim of study under what conditions it is possible to excite the dynamo instability and whether the dynamo generated magnetic field becomes buoyantly unstable and emerges to the surface as expected in the flux-tube context. We find that shear and convection are able to amplify the initial magnetic field and form large-scale elongated magnetic structures. The magnetic field strength depends on several parameters such as the shear amplitude, the thickness and location of the shear layer, and the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). Models with deeper and thicker shear layers allow longer storage and are more favorable for generating a mean magnetic field. Models with higher Rm grow faster but saturate at slightly lower levels. Whenever the toroidal magnetic field reaches amplitudes greater a threshold value which is close to the equipartition value, it becomes buoyant and rises into the convection zone where it expands and forms mushroom shape structures. Some events of emergence, i.e., those with the largest amplitudes of the amplified field, are able to reach the very uppermost layers of the domain. These episodes are able to modify the convective pattern forming either broader convection cells or convective eddies elongated in the direction of the field. However, in none of these events the field preserves its initial structure. The back-reaction of the magnetic field on the fluid is also

  1. Implication of Broadband Dispersion Measurements in Constraining Upper Mantle Velocity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuponiyi, A.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Dosso, S. E.; Gosselin, J. M.; Spence, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dispersion measurements from earthquake (EQ) data are traditionally inverted to obtain 1-D shear-wave velocity models, which provide information on deep earth structures. However, in many cases, EQ-derived dispersion measurements lack short-period information, which theoretically should provide details of shallow structures. We show that in at least some cases short-period information, such as can be obtained from ambient seismic noise (ASN) processing, must be combined with EQ dispersion measurements to properly constrain deeper (e.g. upper-mantle) structures. To verify this, synthetic dispersion data are generated using hypothetical velocity models under four scenarios: EQ only (with and without deep low-velocity layers) and combined EQ and ASN data (with and without deep low-velocity layers). The now "broadband" dispersion data are inverted using a trans-dimensional Bayesian framework with the aim of recovering the initial velocity models and assessing uncertainties. Our results show that the deep low-velocity layer could only be recovered from the inversion of the combined ASN-EQ dispersion measurements. Given this result, we proceed to describe a method for obtaining reliable broadband dispersion measurements from both ASN and EQ and show examples for real data. The implication of this study in the characterization of lithospheric and upper mantle structures, such as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), is also discussed.

  2. Shear Strains, Strain Rates and Temperature Changes in Adiabatic Shear Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    X14A. It has been found that when bainitic and martensitic steels are sheared adiabatically, a layer of material within ths shear zone is altezed and...Sooiety for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio, 1978, pp. 148-0. 21 TABLE II SOLID-STATE TRANSFORMATIONS IN BAINITIC STEEL TRANSFORMATION TRANSFORMATION...shear, thermoplastic, plasticity, plastic deformation, armor, steel IL AnSRACT ( -=nba asoa.tm a naeoesM iN faity by bleak n bet/2972 Experiments

  3. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  4. The internal layering of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, from airborne radar-sounding data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Nanna Bjørnholt; Rippin, David; Vaughan, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of internal layering across Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, as measured from airborne-radar data acquired during a survey conducted by the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Texas in the 2004/05 season. Internal layering is classified according...... to type (continuous/discontinuous/missing) and the results compared with InSAR velocities. Several areas exhibit disruption of internal layers that is most likely caused by large basal shear stresses. Signs of changes in flow were identified in a few inter-tributary areas, but overall the layering...

  5. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, B T

    2010-01-01

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application.

  6. A film-based wall shear stress sensor for wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2011-07-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flows, determination of wall shear stress is an important task. The main objective of the present work is to develop a sensor which is capable of measuring surface shear stress over an extended region applicable to wall-bounded turbulent flows. This sensor, as a direct method for measuring wall shear stress, consists of mounting a thin flexible film on the solid surface. The sensor is made of a homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible material. The geometry and mechanical properties of the film are measured, and particles with the nominal size of 11 μm in diameter are embedded on the film's surface to act as markers. An optical technique is used to measure the film deformation caused by the flow. The film has typically deflection of less than 2% of the material thickness under maximum loading. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted by changing the thickness of the layer or the shear modulus of the film's material. The paper reports the sensor fabrication, static and dynamic calibration procedure, and its application to a fully developed turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers in the range of 90,000-130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel full height. The results are compared to alternative wall shear stress measurement methods.

  7. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used

  8. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  9. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  10. The composition and structure of volcanic rifted continental margins in the North Atlantic: Further insight from shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Jennifer D.; White, Robert S.; Christie, Philip A. F.

    2011-07-01

    Imaging challenges caused by highly attenuative flood basalt sequences have resulted in the understanding of volcanic rifted continental margins lagging behind that of non-volcanic rifted and convergent margins. Massive volcanism occurred during break-up at 70% of the passive margins bordering the Atlantic Ocean, the causes and dynamics of which are still debated. This paper shows results from traveltime tomography of compressional and converted shear wave arrivals recorded on 170 four-component ocean bottom seismometers along two North Atlantic continental margin profiles. This traveltime tomography was performed using two different approaches. The first, a flexible layer-based parameterisation, enables the quality control of traveltime picks and investigation of the crustal structure. The second, with a regularised grid-based parameterisation, requires correction of converted shear wave traveltimes to effective symmetric raypaths and allows exploration of the model space via Monte Carlo analyses. The velocity models indicate high lower-crustal velocities and sharp transitions in both velocity and Vp/Vs ratios across the continent-ocean transition. The velocities are consistent with established mixing trends between felsic continental crust and high magnesium mafic rock on both margins. Interpretation of the high quality seismic reflection profile on the Faroes margin confirms that this mixing is through crustal intrusion. Converted shear wave data also provide constraints on the sub-basalt lithology on the Faroes margin, which is interpreted as a pre-break-up Mesozoic to Paleocene sedimentary system intruded by sills.

  11. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Larsen, S. E.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Astrup, P.; Larsén, X. G.

    2017-12-01

    in the lowest part of the atmospheric surface layer with the form ˜ {u}* 2{k}-1, where {u}* is the surface friction velocity and k is the wavenumber. Tchen’s turbulence theory is shown to be able to predict the measured spectra of the wind velocity component parallel to the mean wind direction for eddy sizes larger than the measurement height above the ground. An amended analytical model for the near-neutral surface layer spectrum is then proposed. This model, which is applicable to the scaling of the u spectrum at all heights in the surface layer, is obtained by a combination of Kaimal’s classical spectral model for scaling the inertial subrange with Tchen’s 1953 and 1954 proposed shear production subrange theory. The shear production-amended spectral model is compared with observations of ensemble-averaged near-neutral spectra selected during a nine-month measurement period from recordings from six sonic anemometers at heights of 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 m in the meteorological tower at the test site for large wind turbines in Høvsøre, Denmark. Finally, potential applications of the new spectral model are discussed, in particular for use within the lowest one-third of the surface layer in which the production subrange component of the spectrum is most prominent. The new spectral model can supply wavenumber-resolved turbulent kinetic energies for the prediction of wind loads on buildings, bridges, and wind turbines, and its spectral parameterization can also be used for scale-dependent parameterization of, e.g., surface-released atmospheric dispersion calculations for regions close to the ground.

  12. Offshore Rayleigh Group Velocity Observations of the South Island, New Zealand, from Ambient Noise Data

    KAUST Repository

    Yeck, William L.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Stachnik, Joshua C.; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2017-01-01

    We present azimuthally anisotropic Rayleigh group velocity models from 8 - 35 s both offshore and onshore of the South Island of New Zealand. We use MOANA (Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa) broadband ocean seismic data in combination with on land data from the New Zealand National Seismography Network (NZNSN) to investigate the seismic structure of the flanks of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary. At 8 s, we observe low offshore group velocities best explained by the influence of the water layer and thick water-laden sediments. At long periods (20-30 s), group velocities are lower on the South Island relative to its offshore flanks, due to thickened crust beneath the island, with the lowest velocities primarily beneath the Southern Alps. Group velocity azimuthal anisotropy fast directions near the Alpine Fault align with the direction of relative plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. In the southern portion of the island, fast directions rotate anticlockwise, likely in response to a decrease in dextral shearing away from the plate boundary. Azimuthal anisotropy fast directions align with absolute plate motion offshore on the Pacific plate. Based on the depth sensitivity of our observations, we suggest diffuse deformation occurs throughout the crust. Our observations match trends in previous Pn anisotropy and SKS shear wave splitting observations, and therefore suggest a consistent pattern of distributed deformation throughout the lithosphere.

  13. Offshore Rayleigh Group Velocity Observations of the South Island, New Zealand, from Ambient Noise Data

    KAUST Repository

    Yeck, William L.

    2017-02-15

    We present azimuthally anisotropic Rayleigh group velocity models from 8 - 35 s both offshore and onshore of the South Island of New Zealand. We use MOANA (Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa) broadband ocean seismic data in combination with on land data from the New Zealand National Seismography Network (NZNSN) to investigate the seismic structure of the flanks of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary. At 8 s, we observe low offshore group velocities best explained by the influence of the water layer and thick water-laden sediments. At long periods (20-30 s), group velocities are lower on the South Island relative to its offshore flanks, due to thickened crust beneath the island, with the lowest velocities primarily beneath the Southern Alps. Group velocity azimuthal anisotropy fast directions near the Alpine Fault align with the direction of relative plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. In the southern portion of the island, fast directions rotate anticlockwise, likely in response to a decrease in dextral shearing away from the plate boundary. Azimuthal anisotropy fast directions align with absolute plate motion offshore on the Pacific plate. Based on the depth sensitivity of our observations, we suggest diffuse deformation occurs throughout the crust. Our observations match trends in previous Pn anisotropy and SKS shear wave splitting observations, and therefore suggest a consistent pattern of distributed deformation throughout the lithosphere.

  14. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape

  15. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  16. The turbulent mean-velocity profile: it is all in the spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Gustavo; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2010-11-01

    It has long been surmised that the mean-velocity profile (MVP) of a pipe flow is closely related to the spectrum of turbulent energy. Here we perform a spectral analysis to identify the eddies that dominate the production of shear stress via momentum transfer. This analysis allows us to express the MVP as a functional of the spectrum. Each part of the MVP relates to a specific spectral range: the buffer layer to the dissipative range, the log layer to the inertial range, and the wake to the energetic range. The parameters of the spectrum set the thickness of the viscous layer, the amplitude of the buffer layer, and the amplitude of the wake.

  17. Flow behavior at different shear rates for dry powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.; Singh, A.; Luding, Stefan; Nürnberg Messe GmbH,

    2010-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Simulations (DEM), an effort is made to study the so called “Split bottom ring shear cell” where a slow, quasi-static deformation leads to wide shear bands. Density, velocity and deformation gradients as well as structure and stress tensors, can be computed by a single

  18. Leaping shampoo glides on a 500-nm-thick lubricating air layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erqiang; Lee, Sanghyun; Marston, Jeremy; Bonito, Andrea; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer [Lee et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 061001 (2013)]. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine micro-bubbles. The resulting micro-bubble sizes suggest that the thickness of this air layer is around 500 nm. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding, with the shear stress within the thin air layer sufficient for the observed deceleration. Particle tracking within the jet shows uniform velocity, with no pronounced shear, which would be required for shear-thinning effects. The role of the surfactant may primarily be to stabilize the air film.

  19. Experimental investigation of edge sheared flow development and configuration effects in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Alonso, A.; Calderon, E.; Orozco, R. O.; Pablos, J. L. de

    2005-07-01

    It is well known the importance of the shear as a stabilizing mechanism to control plasma fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas [1]. It has been clearly established that Ex B shear stabilization mechanisms are an important piece for the improvement of confinement on fusion devices. In particular both edge and core transport barriers are related to a large increase in the Ex B sheared flow. As a consequence clarifying the driving mechanisms of sheared flow in fusion plasmas is a main issue. The existence of parallel and perpendicular sheared flows at the plasma edge, and the interplay between them in different plasma conditions has been studied in the TJ-II [2]. Recent experiments carried out by means of different approaches in the TJ-II stellarator have shown that the generation of spontaneous edge perpendicular sheared flow can be externally controlled by means of plasma density with good reproducibility and reliability [3, 4]. Although experimentally the plasma density has been used as an external control knob, it would be more appropriate to characterize experimental results in terms of edge plasma gradient (e.g. ion saturation current gradient) [3]. It has also been found that there exists a coupling between the onset of sheared flow development and an increase in the level of plasma edge turbulence; once sheared flow is fully developed the level of fluctuations and turbulent transport slightly decreases whereas edge gradients and plasma density increase. It has been experimentally established that the minimum plasma density (or/and minimum level of plasma turbulence) essential for the development of the shear layer depends on the plasma magnetic configuration [5, 6]. For some plasma magnetic configurations with high iota value a sheared flow-induced regime with characteristics resembling those of an improved confinement one has been found. The similarity in the structure of the velocity shear layer and in the turbulence characteristics [7] in different

  20. Acoustic waves in unbounded shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.; Rogava, A.D.

    1996-05-01

    The linear evolution of acoustic waves in fluid flow with constant density and uniform shear of velocity is investigated. The process of the mean flow energy extraction by the three-dimensional acoustic waves which is due to the non-normality of linear dynamics in shear flows is analyzed. The thorough examination of the dynamics of different physical quantities, specifying the wave evolution, is outlined. The revealing of the behaviour becomes possible owing to the nonmodal approach that has been extensively used in the study of the perturbations evolution in shear flows since the beginning of the nineties. In addition, a detailed analyses of the physics of shear energy gain by vortex and acoustic perturbations is presented. (author). 28 refs, 7 figs

  1. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophie Yang; Guillard, François; Marks, Benjy; Rognon, Pierre; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called "3D Stadium Shear Device" which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm) and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10-6 to 10-2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  2. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sophie Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called “3D Stadium Shear Device” which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10−6 to 10−2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  3. Derivation of Zagarola-Smits scaling in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Maciel, Yvan

    2018-01-01

    This Rapid Communication derives the Zagarola-Smits scaling directly from the governing equations for zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers (ZPG TBLs). It has long been observed that the scaling of the mean streamwise velocity in turbulent boundary layer flows differs in the near surface region and in the outer layer. In the inner region of small-velocity-defect boundary layers, it is generally accepted that the proper velocity scale is the friction velocity, uτ, and the proper length scale is the viscous length scale, ν /uτ . In the outer region, the most generally used length scale is the boundary layer thickness, δ . However, there is no consensus on velocity scales in the outer layer. Zagarola and Smits [ASME Paper No. FEDSM98-4950 (1998)] proposed a velocity scale, U ZS=(δ1/δ ) U∞ , where δ1 is the displacement thickness and U∞ is the freestream velocity. However, there are some concerns about Zagarola-Smits scaling due to the lack of a theoretical base. In this paper, the Zagarola-Smits scaling is derived directly from a combination of integral, similarity, and order-of-magnitude analysis of the mean continuity equation. The analysis also reveals that V∞, the mean wall-normal velocity at the edge of the boundary layer, is a proper scale for the mean wall-normal velocity V . Extending the analysis to the streamwise mean momentum equation, we find that the Reynolds shear stress in ZPG TBLs scales as U∞V∞ in the outer region. This paper also provides a detailed analysis of the mass and mean momentum balance in the outer region of ZPG TBLs.

  4. Semiconductor laser shearing interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Hai; Li Ming; Chen Nong; Xie Jiaping

    1988-03-01

    The application of semiconductor laser on grating shearing interferometry is studied experimentally in the present paper. The method measuring the coherence of semiconductor laser beam by ion etching double frequency grating is proposed. The experimental result of lens aberration with semiconductor laser shearing interferometer is given. Talbot shearing interferometry of semiconductor laser is also described. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs

  5. Measurements of wall-shear-stress distribution on an NACA0018 airfoil by liquid-crystal coating and near-wall particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, N; Oguma, Y; Nakano, T

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of wall-shear-stress distributions along curved surfaces are carried out using non-intrusive experimental methods, such as liquid-crystal coating and near-wall particle image velocimetry (PIV). The former method relies on the color change of the liquid-crystal coating sensitive to the wall shear stress, while the latter is based on the direct evaluation of shear stresses through the near-wall PIV measurement in combination with the image deformation technique. These experimental methods are applied to the measurement of wall-shear-stress distributions of air flow at a free-stream velocity of 15 m s −1 on a flat plate and an NACA0018 airfoil. The experiments are carried out at zero angle of attack for the flat plate and at 0° and ±6° angles of attack for the airfoil, and then the variations of shear-stress distribution along these surfaces are studied. These measurements in wall shear stresses agree with each other within their experimental uncertainties, suggesting the validity of experimental methods for non-intrusive shear-stress measurements. It is found that the wall-shear-stress distribution shows a small negative value upstream of the reattachment point on the NACA0018 airfoil, which is followed by an increase in shear stresses downstream due to laminar–turbulent transition of boundary layers. Such behavior of wall-shear-stress distribution is well correlated with the mean flow and turbulence characteristics along the airfoil surfaces, which are measured by PIV

  6. Hydrodynamical fluctuations in smooth shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    Background of hydrodynamical fluctuations in a intrinsically/stochastically forced, laminar, uniform shear flow is studied. The employment of so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis makes it possible to represent the background of fluctuations in a new light and to get more insight into the physics of its formation. The basic physical processes responsible for the formation of vortex and acoustic wave fluctuation backgrounds are analyzed. Interplay of the processes at low and moderate shear rates is described. Three-dimensional vortex fluctuations around a given macroscopic state are numerically calculated. The correlation functions of the fluctuations of physical quantities are analyzed. It is shown that there exists subspace D k in the wave-number space (k-space) that is limited externally by spherical surface with radius k ν ≡ A/ν (where A is the velocity shear parameter, ν - the kinematic viscosity) in the nonequilibrium open system under study. The spatial Fourier harmonics of vortex as well as acoustic wave fluctuations are strongly subjected by flow shear (by the open character of the system) at wave-numbers satisfying the condition k ν . Specifically it is shown that in D k : The fluctuations are non-Markovian; the spatial spectral density of energy of the vortex fluctuations by far exceeds the white-noise; the term of a new type associated to the hydrodynamical fluctuation of velocity appears in the correlation function of pressure; the fluctuation background of the acoustic waves is completely different at low and moderate shear rates (at low shear rates it is reduced in D k in comparison to the uniform (non-shear) flow; at moderate shear rates it it comparable to the background of the vortex fluctuations). The fluctuation background of both the vortex and the acoustic wave modes is anisotropic. The possible significance of the fluctuation background of vortices for the subcritical transition to turbulence and Brownian motion of small macroscopic

  7. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  8. Evidence for modified transport due to sheared E x B flows in high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Austin, M.E.

    1994-11-01

    Sheared mass flows are generated in many fluids and are often important for the dynamics of instabilities in these fluids. Similarly, large values of the E x B velocity have been observed in magnetic confinement machines and there is theoretical and experimental evidence that sufficiently large shear in this velocity may stabilize important instabilities. Two examples of this phenomenon have been observed in the DIII-D tokamak. In the first example, sufficient heating power can lead to the L-H transition, a rapid improvement in confinement in the boundary layer of the plasma. For discharges with heating power close to the threshold required to get the transition, changes in the edge radial electric field are observed to occur prior to the transition itself. In the second example, certain classes of discharges with toroidal momentum input from neutral beam injection exhibit a further improvement of confinement in the plasma core leading to a regime called the VH-mode. In both examples, the region of improved confinement is characterized by an increase of shear in the radial electric field E r , reduced levels of turbulence and increases in gradients of temperatures and densities. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the improved confinement is caused by an increase in shear of the E x B velocity which leads to a reduction of turbulence. For the VH-mode, the dominant term controlling E r is the toroidal rotation v φ , indicating that the E r profile is controlled by the source and transport of toroidal momentum

  9. On the linear stability of sheared and magnetized jets without current sheets - relativistic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    In our prior series of papers, we studied the non-relativistic and relativistic linear stability analysis of magnetized jets that do not have current sheets. In this paper, we extend our analysis to relativistic jets with a velocity shear and a similar current sheet free structure. The jets that we study are realistic because we include a velocity shear, a current sheet free magnetic structure, a relativistic velocity and a realistic thermal pressure so as to achieve overall pressure balance in the unperturbed jet. In order to parametrize the velocity shear, we apply a parabolic profile to the jets' 4-velocity. We find that the velocity shear significantly improves the stability of relativistic magnetized jets. This fact is completely consistent with our prior stability analysis of non-relativistic, sheared jets. The velocity shear mainly plays a role in stabilizing the short wavelength unstable modes for the pinch as well as the kink instability modes. In addition, it also stabilizes the long wavelength fundamental pinch instability mode. We also visualize the pressure fluctuations of each unstable mode to provide a better physical understanding of the enhanced stabilization by the velocity shear. Our overall conclusion is that combining velocity shear with a strong and realistic magnetic field makes relativistic jets even more stable.

  10. Vanishing stick-slip friction in few-layer graphenes: the thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Wang, Hui

    2011-07-15

    We report the thickness dependence of intrinsic friction in few-layer graphenes, adopting molecular dynamics simulations. The friction force drops dramatically with decreasing number of layers and finally approaches zero with two or three layers. The results, which are robust over a wide range of temperature, shear velocity, and pressure are quantitatively explained by a theoretical model with regard to lateral stiffness, slip length, and maximum lateral force, which could provide a new conceptual framework for understanding stick-slip friction. The results reveal the crucial role of the dimensional effect in nanoscale friction, and could be helpful in the design of graphene-based nanodevices.

  11. Surface Shear Rheology of Saponin Adsorption Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golemanov, K.; Tcholakova, S.; Denkov, N.; Pelan, E.; Stoyanov, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial

  12. Understanding Transition to Turbulence in Shear Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    manuscript with the S formalism, it was sidetra.ked for several years as not cor- rectly posed mathematically. At this writing, emotional preferences O... KELTNER , G. (1973): Spatial stability of incompressible two-dimensional Gaussian wake in steady viscous flow, Phys. Fluids, v 16, 1368-1370

  13. Shear Layer Dynamics in Resonating Cavity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    .... The PIV data was also combined with the surface pressure measurements through the application of the Quadratic Stochastic Estimation procedure to provide time resolved snapshots of the flow field. Examination of these results indicate the strong pumping action of the cavity regardless of whether resonance existed and was used to visualize the large scale structures interacting with the aft wall.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a density transition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, A.; Tskhakaya, D.D.; Tsintsadze, N.L.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of symmetry for the Rayleigh equation is found. For small Atwood number an analytic solution is obtained for a smoothly varying density profile. The spectra of unstable modes are defined. It is shown that a transition layer with finite width can undergo stratification, and velocity shear between new-formed sublayers forms. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Shear flow stabilization of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Douglas, M.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Ruden, E.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations have indicated that shear flow may help stabilize the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding plasma z-pinches. A simple extension to a model presented in Chandrasekhar has been developed to study the linear stability of incompressible plasma subjected to both a shear flow and acceleration. The model has been used to investigate the stability plasma implosion schemes using externally imposed velocity shear which develops from the plasma flow itself. Specific parameters were chosen to represent plasma implosions driven by the Saturn and PBFA-Z, pulsed power generators at Sandia National Laboratories. Results indicate a high shear is necessary to stabilize the z-pinch implosions studied

  16. Examining shear processes during magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Wallace, P. A.; Coats, R.; Lamur, A.; Lavallée, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions are prone to rapid shifts from effusive to explosive behaviour which reflects the rheology of magma. Magma rheology is governed by composition, porosity and crystal content, which during ascent evolves to yield a rock-like, viscous suspension in the upper conduit. Geophysical monitoring, laboratory experiments and detailed field studies offer the opportunity to explore the complexities associated with the ascent and eruption of such magmas, which rest at a pivotal position with regard to the glass transition, allowing them to either flow or fracture. Crystal interaction during flow results in strain-partitioning and shear-thinning behaviour of the suspension. In a conduit, such characteristics favour the formation of localised shear zones as strain is concentrated along conduit margins, where magma can rupture and heal in repetitive cycles. Sheared magmas often record a history of deformation in the form of: grain size reduction; anisotropic permeable fluid pathways; mineral reactions; injection features; recrystallisation; and magnetic anomalies, providing a signature of the repetitive earthquakes often observed during lava dome eruptions. The repetitive fracture of magma at ( fixed) depth in the conduit and the fault-like products exhumed at spine surfaces indicate that the last hundreds of meters of ascent may be controlled by frictional slip. Experiments on a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus indicate that shear stress on a slip plane is highly velocity dependent, and here we examine how this influences magma ascent and its characteristic geophysical signals.

  17. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myra, J.; D' Ippolito, D.; Russell, D., E-mail: jrmyra@lodestar.com [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder (United States); Davis, W. M.; Zweben, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Terry, J.; LaBombard, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A study of sheared flows in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) and their interaction with blob-filaments is presented. Edge sheared flows are believed to be important for the L-H, and H-L transitions. Blob generation and dynamics impacts both the (near-separatrix) scrape-off-layer (SOL) width critical for power handling in the divertor, and the interaction of plasma in the far SOL with plasma-facing components. These topics are critical for ITER and future devices. A fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT code is employed to study these issues. Sheared binormal flows both regulate the power flux crossing the separatrix and control the character of emitted turbulence structures such as blob-filaments. At a critical power level (depending on parameters) the laminar flows containing intermittent, but bound, structures give way to full-blown blob emissions signifying a transition from quasi-diffusive to convective transport. In order to diagnose sheared flows in experiments and assess their interaction with blobs, a blob-tracking algorithm has been developed and applied to both NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. Blob motion and ellipticity can be affected by sheared flows, and are diagnosed and compared with seeded blob simulations. A picture of the interaction of blobs and sheared flows is emerging from advances in the theory and simulation of edge turbulence, combined with ever-improving capabilities for edge diagnostics and their analysis. (author)

  18. Magnetoelastic shear wave propagation in pre-stressed anisotropic media under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Nirmala; Chattopadhyay, Amares; Singh, Abhishek K.; Sahu, Sanjeev A.

    2017-03-01

    The present study investigates the propagation of shear wave (horizontally polarized) in two initially stressed heterogeneous anisotropic (magnetoelastic transversely isotropic) layers in the crust overlying a transversely isotropic gravitating semi-infinite medium. Heterogeneities in both the anisotropic layers are caused due to exponential variation (case-I) and linear variation (case-II) in the elastic constants with respect to the space variable pointing positively downwards. The dispersion relations have been established in closed form using Whittaker's asymptotic expansion and were found to be in the well-agreement to the classical Love wave equations. The substantial effects of magnetoelastic coupling parameters, heterogeneity parameters, horizontal compressive initial stresses, Biot's gravity parameter, and wave number on the phase velocity of shear waves have been computed and depicted by means of a graph. As a special case, dispersion equations have been deduced when the two layers and half-space are isotropic and homogeneous. The comparative study for both cases of heterogeneity of the layers has been performed and also depicted by means of graphical illustrations.

  19. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    measurements for steady streaming induced by a skewed free stream velocity signal is also provided. We then simulate a series of experiments involving oscillatory flow in a convergent-divergent smooth tunnel, and a good match with respect to bed shear stresses and streaming velocities is achieved......A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model....... The streaming is conceptually explained using analogies from steady converging and diffuser flows. A parametric study is undertaken to assess both the peak and time-averaged bed shear stresses in converging and diverging half periods under rough-turbulent conditions. The results are presented as friction factor...

  20. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  1. Lower hybrid waves instability in a velocity–sheared inhomogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electrostatic linear kinetic analysis of velocity-sheared inhomogeneous charged dust streaming parallel to a magnetic field in plasma is presented. Excited mode and the growth rates are derived in the lower hybrid-like mode regime, with collisional effects included. In the case where the drift velocity u is very small the ...

  2. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph F. Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s. The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed. The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France, point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France. More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  3. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Dong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  4. Fast simulated annealing inversion of surface waves on pavement using phase-velocity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional inversion of surface waves depends on modal identification of measured dispersion curves, which can be ambiguous. It is possible to avoid mode-number identification and extraction by inverting the complete phase-velocity spectrum obtained from a multichannel record. We use the fast simulated annealing (FSA) global search algorithm to minimize the difference between the measured phase-velocity spectrum and that calculated from a theoretical layer model, including the field setup geometry. Results show that this algorithm can help one avoid getting trapped in local minima while searching for the best-matching layer model. The entire procedure is demonstrated on synthetic and field data for asphalt pavement. The viscoelastic properties of the top asphalt layer are taken into account, and the inverted asphalt stiffness as a function of frequency compares well with laboratory tests on core samples. The thickness and shear-wave velocity of the deeper embedded layers are resolved within 10% deviation from those values measured separately during pavement construction. The proposed method may be equally applicable to normal soil site investigation and in the field of ultrasonic testing of materials. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  6. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  7. Viscosity, granular-temperature, and stress calculations for shearing assemblies of inelastic, frictional disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Employing nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics methods the effects of two energy loss mechanisms on viscosity, stress, and granular-temperature in assemblies of nearly rigid, inelastic frictional disks undergoing steady-state shearing are calculated. Energy introduced into the system through forced shearing is dissipated by inelastic normal forces or through frictional sliding during collisions resulting in a natural steady-state kinetic energy density (granular-temperature) that depends on the density and shear rate of the assembly and on the friction and inelasticity properties of the disks. The calculations show that both the mean deviatoric particle velocity and the effective viscosity of a system of particles with fixed friction and restitution coefficients increase almost linearly with strain rate. Particles with a velocity-dependent coefficient of restitution show a less rapid increase in both deviatoric velocity and viscosity as strain rate increases. Particles with highly dissipative interactions result in anisotropic pressure and velocity distributions in the assembly, particularly at low densities. At very high densities the pressure also becomes anisotropic due to high contact forces perpendicular to the shearing direction. The mean rotational velocity of the frictional disks is nearly equal to one-half the shear rate. The calculated ratio of shear stress to normal stress varies significantly with density while the ratio of shear stress to total pressure shows much less variation. The inclusion of surface friction (and thus particle rotation) decreases shear stress at low density but increases shear stress under steady shearing at higher densities

  8. Shallow velocity model in the area of Pozzo Pitarrone, Mt. Etna, from single station, array methods and borehole data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Zuccarello

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seismic noise recorded by a temporary array installed around Pozzo Pitarrone, NE flank of Mt. Etna, have been analysed with several techniques. Single station HVSR method and SPAC array method have been applied to stationary seismic noise to investigate the local shallow structure. The inversion of dispersion curves produced a shear wave velocity model of the area reliable down to depth of about 130 m. A comparison of such model with the stratigraphic information available for the investigated area shows a good qualitative agreement. Taking advantage of a borehole station installed at 130 m depth, we could estimate also the P-wave velocity by comparing the borehole recordings of local earthquakes with the same event recorded at surface. Further insight on the P-wave velocity in the upper 130 m layer comes from the surface reflected wave observable in some cases at the borehole station. From this analysis we obtained an average P-wave velocity of about 1.2 km/s, compatible with the shear wave velocity found from the analysis of seismic noise.

  9. The effect of gradational velocities and anisotropy on fault-zone trapped waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, A. K.; Eccles, J. D.; Kaipio, J. P.; Malin, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Synthetic fault-zone trapped wave (FZTW) dispersion curves and amplitude responses for FL (Love) and FR (Rayleigh) type phases are analysed in transversely isotropic 1-D elastic models. We explore the effects of velocity gradients, anisotropy, source location and mechanism. These experiments suggest: (i) A smooth exponentially decaying velocity model produces a significantly different dispersion curve to that of a three-layer model, with the main difference being that Airy phases are not produced. (ii) The FZTW dispersion and amplitude information of a waveguide with transverse-isotropy depends mostly on the Shear wave velocities in the direction parallel with the fault, particularly if the fault zone to country-rock velocity contrast is small. In this low velocity contrast situation, fully isotropic approximations to a transversely isotropic velocity model can be made. (iii) Fault-aligned fractures and/or bedding in the fault zone that cause transverse-isotropy enhance the amplitude and wave-train length of the FR type FZTW. (iv) Moving the source and/or receiver away from the fault zone removes the higher frequencies first, similar to attenuation. (v) In most physically realistic cases, the radial component of the FR type FZTW is significantly smaller in amplitude than the transverse.

  10. Transitional boundary layer in low-Prandtl-number convection at high Rayleigh number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Joerg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet

    2016-11-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough the boundary layer dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes and an interior region (away from side walls) that is dominated by a shear flow of varying orientation. This interior plate region is compared here to classical wall-bounded shear flows. The working fluid is liquid mercury or liquid gallium at a Prandtl number of Pr = 0 . 021 for a range of Rayleigh numbers of 3 ×105 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  11. Generation of mesoscale F layer structure and electric fields by the combined Perkins and Es layer instabilities, in simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cosgrove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The generic equilibrium configuration of the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere consists of an F layer held up against gravity by winds and/or electric fields, and a sporadic E (Es layer located by a sheared wind field, which experiences the same electric fields as the F layer. This configuration is subject to two large-scale (e.g. >10 km "layer instabilities": one of the F layer known as the Perkins instability, and another of the Es layer which has been called the Es layer instability. Electric fields on scales larger than (about 10 km map very efficiently between the Es and F layers, and the two instabilities have a similar geometry, allowing them to interact with one another. As shown through a linear growth rate analysis, the two most important parameters governing the interaction are the relative horizontal velocity between the Es and F layers, and the integrated conductivity ratio ΣH/ΣPF, where ΣH and ΣPF are the field line integrated Hall conductivity of the Es layer, and the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity of the F layer, respectively. For both large and small relative velocities the growth rate was found to be more than double that of the Perkins instability alone, when ΣHΣPF=1.8. However, the characteristic eigenmode varies considerably with relative velocity, and different nonlinear behavior is expected in these two cases. As a follow up to the linear growth rate analysis, we explore in this article the nonlinear evolution of the unstable coupled system subject to a 200 km wavelength initial perturbation of the F layer, using a two-dimensional numerical solution of the two-fluid equations, as a function of relative horizontal velocity and ΣHΣPF. We find that when ΣHΣPF⪝0.5 the Perkins instability is able to control the dynamics and modulate the F layer altitude in 2 to 3 h time. However, the electric fields remain small until the altitude modulation is extremely large, and even then they are not large enough to

  12. Experiments on mixing and combustion with low heat release in a turbulent shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungel, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    A new blowdown facility was built to study mixing and combustion in a turbulent shear layer. The system is capable of 100 m/s for three seconds in a 5 x 20 cm exit area on the high speed side, and 50 m/s in a 10 x 20 cm exit area on the low speed side. Dilute concentrations of hydrogen and fluorine, carried in an inert gas, react when both fluid streams meet at the tip of a splitter plate. The reaction is spontaneous, rapid, and highly exothermic. The resulting temperature field was studied using a rake of eight fast response thermometers placed across the width of the layer. Runs were performed for low heat release over a wide range of equivalence (concentration) ratios, at a Reynolds number of 30,800 based on velocity difference and vorticity thickness. The heat release is sufficiently low so that the overall properties of the mixing layer are not significantly changed from the cold case. The results show the presence of large, hot structures within the flow together with cool, irrotational tongues of freestream fluid that penetrate deep into the layer. Thus, it is possible for the entire width of the layer to be quite hot, owing to the passage of a large structure, or for the layer to be quite cool, owing to the presence of the cool fluid tongues. The mean temperature results from a duty cycle whereby a given point in the flow sees alternating hot and cool fluid which averages into the local mean. The results compare favorably with the recent theoretical model of Broadwell and Breidenthal for mixing and chemical reaction in a turbulent shear layer. With this model it is possible to bring the results for gases and liquids into quantitative agreement

  13. Statistical analysis of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the shear flow generation in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.; Yu, J. H.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress arising from collisional drift turbulence in a magnetized plasma column are studied and a physical picture of turbulent driven shear flow generation is discussed. The Reynolds stress peaks near the maximal density gradient region, and is governed by the turbulence amplitude and cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity fields. The amplitude probability distribution function (PDF) of the turbulent Reynolds stress is non-Gaussian and positively skewed at the density gradient maximum. The turbulent ion-saturation (Isat) current PDF shows that the region where the bursty Isat events are born coincides with the positively skewed non-Gaussian Reynolds stress PDF, which suggests that the bursts of particle transport appear to be associated with bursts of momentum transport as well. At the shear layer the density fluctuation radial correlation length has a strong minimum (∼4-6 mm∼0.5C s /Ω ci , where C s is the ion acoustic speed and Ω ci is the ion gyrofrequency), while the azimuthal turbulence correlation length is nearly constant across the shear layer. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale shear layer.

  14. Tidal variations of flow convergence, shear, and stratification at the Rio de la Plata estuary turbidity front

    Science.gov (United States)

    FramiñAn, Mariana B.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Sepúlveda, HéCtor H.; Brown, Otis B.

    2008-08-01

    Intratidal variability of density and velocity fields is investigated at the turbidity front of the Río de la Plata Estuary, South America. Current velocity and temperature-salinity profiles collected in August 1999 along a repeated transect crossing the front are analyzed. Horizontal and vertical gradients, stability of the front, convergence zones, and transverse flow associated to the frontal boundary are described. Strong horizontal convergence of the across-front velocity and build up of along-front velocity shear were observed at the front. In the proximity of the front, enhanced transverse (or along-front) flow created jet-like structures at the surface and near the bottom flowing in opposite directions. These structures persisted throughout the tidal cycle and were advected upstream (downstream) by the flood (ebb) current through a distance of ˜10 km. During peak flood, the upper layer flow reversed from its predominant downstream direction and upstreamflow occupied the entire water column; outside the peak flood, two-layer estuarine circulation dominated. Changes in density field were observed in response to tidal straining, tidal advection, and wind-induced mixing, but stratification remained throughout the tidal cycle. This work demonstrates the large spatial variability of the velocity field at the turbidity front; it provides evidence of enhanced transverse circulation along the frontal boundary; and reveals the importance of advective and frictional intratidal processes in the dynamics of the central part of the estuary.

  15. Tidal asymmetries of velocity and stratification over a bathymetric depression in a tropical inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Amy F.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Morales Pérez, Rubén A.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of current velocity, sea surface elevation and vertical profiles of density were obtained in a tropical inlet to determine the effect of a bathymetric depression (hollow) on the tidal flows. Surveys measuring velocity profiles were conducted over a diurnal tidal cycle with mixed spring tides during dry and wet seasons. Depth-averaged tidal velocities during ebb and flood tides behaved according to Bernoulli dynamics, as expected. The dynamic balance of depth-averaged quantities in the along-channel direction was governed by along-channel advection and pressure gradients with baroclinic pressure gradients only being important during the wet season. The vertical structure of the along-channel flow during flood tides exhibited a mid-depth maximum with lateral shear enhanced during the dry season as a result of decreased vertical stratification. During ebb tides, along-channel velocities in the vicinity of the hollow were vertically sheared with a weak return flow at depth due to choking of the flow on the seaward slope of the hollow. The potential energy anomaly, a measure of the amount of energy required to fully mix the water column, showed two peaks in stratification associated with ebb tide and a third peak occurring at the beginning of flood. After the first mid-ebb peak in stratification, ebb flows were constricted on the seaward slope of the hollow resulting in a bottom return flow. The sinking of surface waters and enhanced mixing on the seaward slope of the hollow reduced the potential energy anomaly after maximum ebb. The third peak in stratification during early flood occurred as a result of denser water entering the inlet at mid-depth. This dense water mixed with ambient deep waters increasing the stratification. Lateral shear in the along-channel flow across the hollow allowed trapping of less dense water in the surface layers further increasing stratification.

  16. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  17. Role of E x B Shear and Magnetic Shear in the Formation of Transport Barriers in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    Development of the E x B shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices is a major achievement of fusion research. This concept has the universality needed to explain the H-mode edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines; the broader edge transport barrier seen in VH-mode plasmas; and the core transport barriers formed in tokamaks with low or negative magnetic shear. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to reduce transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease associated with E x B velocity shear is also of great practical benefit to fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of E x B shear on the growth, radial extent, and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same basic transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number of ways to change the radial electric field E r . An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of E x B velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the E x B velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of E x B velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization. The experimental results on DIII-D and other devices are generally consistent with the basic theoretical models

  18. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AKVerma2,∗, Tanmay Kumar3 and Avi Dutt3. 1Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 056, India. 2CeRES, The Energy and Resources Institute, Darbari Seth Block, IHC Complex, Lodhi Road,.

  19. Electron Velocity Shear Instability in the Auroral Ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-25

    function of order .1 ~e y Le’ L 0, Vde - - (ve /2ae) Xn n/ax, Z is the plasma dispersion function and Z’( ) = dZ/d . The ion response X is simply...and 2 current. systems in the auroral ionosphere [lijima and Potemra, 19761 and to electron current return current regions in solar flares [Knight and... SYSTEMS (OS) -TE IS CDP:ES) or.XCCS SYSTE.. ENGLNEERING ORG DIRECTOR WASHINGTON, D.C. 20305 DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY OICY ATTN R. CRAWFORDi,.’, WASHINGTION

  20. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of FMWCNT/Water Nanofluids over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the heat transfer and flow of water/FMWCNT (functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids over a flat plate was investigated using a finite volume method. Simulations were performed for velocity ranging from 0.17 mm/s to 1.7 mm/s under laminar regime and nanotube concentrations up to 0.2%. The 2-D governing equations were solved using an in-house FORTRAN code. For a specific free stream velocity, the presented results showed that increasing the weight percentage of nanotubes increased the Nusselt number. However, an increase in the solid weight percentage had a negligible effect on the wall shear stress. The results also indicated that increasing the free stream velocity for all cases leads to thinner boundary layer thickness, while increasing the FMWCNT concentration causes an increase in the boundary layer thickness.

  1. Geckolike high shear strength by carbon nanotube fiber adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Y.; Nakayama, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube adhesives can adhere strongly to surfaces as a gecko does. The number of carbon nanotube layers is an important determinant of the contact area for adhesion. Balancing the catalyst ratio and buffer layer used for chemical vapor deposition processing controls the number of carbon nanotube layers and their distribution. The features of carbon nanotubes determine the shear strength of adhesion. Carbon nanotubes with a broad distribution of layers exhibit enhanced shear strength with equivalent adhesive capability to that of a natural Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko)

  2. Velocity and phase distribution measurements in vertical air-water annular flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Annular flow topology for three air-water conditions in a vertical duct is investigated through the use of a traversing double-sensor hot-film anemometry probe and differential pressure measurements. Near wall measurements of mean and fluctuating velocities, as well as local void fraction, are taken in the liquid film, with the highest turbulent fluctuations occurring for the flow condition with the largest pressure drop. A modified law-of-the-wall formulation for wall shear is presented which, using near wall values of mean velocity and kinetic energy, agrees reasonably well with the average stress obtained from direct pressure drop measurements. The linear profile using wall coordinates in the logarithmic layer is preserved in annular flow; however, the slope and intercept of the profile differ from the single-phase values for the annular flow condition which has a thicker, more turbulent, liquid film

  3. Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Wang Xiaogang; Dong, J. Q.

    2008-01-01

    Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes are investigated in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic model with slab geometry. It is found that intensive and thin poloidal shear flow layers are generated in the magnetic island region driven by coupled reconnection process at both rational surfaces. The structure of the flow layers keeps evolving after the merging of magnetic separatrices and forms a few narrow vortices along the open field lines in the final stage of magnetic reconnection. The effects of the distance between both rational surfaces and the initial magnetic shear on the nonlinear evolution of the plasma flows are also taken into consideration and the relevant mechanism is discussed

  4. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Shear waves in near surface 3D media-SH-wavefield separation, refraction time migration and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelz, Susanne; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Mueller, Christof

    2009-05-01

    When investigating topographically irregular layers in the near surface with shear waves, it is of particular importance to consider the 3D-nature of wave propagation. Depending on the layer geometry and on the spatial arrangement of source- and receiver-points significant lateral ray bending can occur causing side-swipe traveltime effects and complicated polarisation patterns. As an example we present a study where 3D-shear wave refraction measurements were applied in order to reconstruct the geometry of a silted ancient harbour basin at the archaeological site of Miletus (West Turkey). Seismic signals were generated with a three-component vector force and recorded with three-component geophones arranged in 2D-arrays of 1 m grid spacing. Since a correct identification of refracted S-wave arrivals is a precondition to traveltime interpretation we investigated a method to decompose these wavefields with respect to their polarisation and azimuth of propagation. Taking advantage of the 2D-geophone arrangement we applied the following processing approach: In case of general lateral heterogeneity a decomposition can be performed by applying the curl and divergence operations to the vector wavefields recorded in 2D-arrays. The separated tangential and normal components to the wavefront in a plane are finally enhanced by combining the different force components in order to eliminate the radiation characteristics of the source. The decomposed wavefield was then the basis for 3D-refractor imaging through a newly formulated map migration of the refracted traveltime field. This technique was developed to map coherent basement structure on the meter-scale. Supplemental tomographic inversion using the refractor topography model as input provided a plausible velocity model, exhibiting characteristic anomalies such as a prominent low velocity zone overlain by a high velocity layer in the refractor. The seismic velocity structure suggests that the harbour basin was locally filled

  6. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  7. Time resolved flow-field measurements of a turbulent mixing layer over a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shiyao; Driscoll, James F.; Elbing, Brian R.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2011-07-01

    High Reynolds number, low Mach number, turbulent shear flow past a rectangular, shallow cavity has been experimentally investigated with the use of dual-camera cinematographic particle image velocimetry (CPIV). The CPIV had a 3 kHz sampling rate, which was sufficient to monitor the time evolution of large-scale vortices as they formed, evolved downstream and impinged on the downstream cavity wall. The time-averaged flow properties (velocity and vorticity fields, streamwise velocity profiles and momentum and vorticity thickness) were in agreement with previous cavity flow studies under similar operating conditions. The time-resolved results show that the separated shear layer quickly rolled-up and formed eddies immediately downstream of the separation point. The vortices convect downstream at approximately half the free-stream speed. Vorticity strength intermittency as the structures approach the downstream edge suggests an increase in the three-dimensionality of the flow. Time-resolved correlations reveal that the in-plane coherence of the vortices decays within 2-3 structure diameters, and quasi-periodic flow features are present with a vortex passage frequency of ~1 kHz. The power spectra of the vertical velocity fluctuations within the shear layer revealed a peak at a non-dimensional frequency corresponding to that predicted using linear, inviscid instability theory.

  8. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a thermally stratified porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    The mixed convection boundary layer flow through a stable stratified porous medium bounded by a vertical surface is investigated. The external velocity and the surface temperature are assumed to vary as x m , where x is measured from the leading edge of the vertical surface and m is a constant. Numerical solutions for the governing Darcy and energy equations are obtained. The results indicate that the thermal stratification significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the surface heat transfer, besides delays the boundary layer separation

  9. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock.

  10. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  11. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  12. Evaluation of composite shear walls behavior (parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nikkhoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite shear walls which are made of a layer of steel plate with a concrete cover in one or both sides of the steel plate, are counted as the third generation of the shear walls. Nowadays, composite shear walls are widely utilized in building new resisting structures as well as rehabilitating of the existing structures in earthquake-prone countries. Despite of its advantages, use of the composite shear walls is not yet prevalent as it demands more detailed appropriate investigation. Serving higher strength, flexibility and better energy absorption, while being more economical are the main advantages of this system which has paved its path to be used in high-rise buildings, structural retrofit and reservoir tanks. In this research, channel shear connectors are utilized to connect the concrete cover to the steel plate. As a key parameter, variation in the distance of shear connectors and their arrangement on the behavior of composite shear walls has been scrutinized. In addition, the shear stiffness, flexibility, out of plane displacement and the energy absorption of the structural system has been explored. For this purpose, several structural models with different shear distances and arrangements have been investigated. The obtained results reveal that with increase in shear connectors’ distance, the wall stiffness would reduce while its lateral displacement increases up to eighty percent While the out of plane displacement of the steel plate will reduce up to three times.

  13. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  14. Shear weakening for different lithologies observed at different saturation stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diethart-Jauk, Elisabeth; Gegenhuber, Nina

    2018-01-01

    For this study, samples from different lithologies ("Leitha"-limestone, "Dachstein"-limestone, "Haupt"-dolomite, "Bunt"-sandstone, Grey Berea sandstone, granite, quartzite and basalt) were selected. Samples were dried at 70 °C, respectively 105 °C and were saturated with brine. Mass, porosity, permeability, compressional and shear wave velocity were determined from dry and brine saturated samples at laboratory conditions, based on an individual measurement program. Shear modulus was calculated to find out, if shear weakening exists for the dataset. Shear weakening means that shear modulus of dry samples is higher than of saturated samples, but it is assumed that shear modulus is unaffected by saturation. "Dachstein"-limestone and basalt show shear weakening, quartzite samples show both weakening and hardening. Granite samples are affected by temperature, after drying with 105 °C no change can be observed anymore. "Bunt"-sandstone samples show a change in the shear modulus in a small extent, although they may contain clay minerals. The other lithologies show no effect. Explanations for carbonate samples can be the complicated pore structure, for basalt it could be that weathering creates clay minerals which are known as causes for a change of the shear modulus. Fluid viscosity can also be an important factor.

  15. A documentation of two- and three-dimensional shock-separated turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. D.; Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1988-01-01

    A shock-related separation of a turbulent boundary layer has been studied and documented. The flow was that of an axisymmetric turbulent boundary layer over a 5.02-cm-diam cylinder that was aligned with the wind tunnel axis. The boundary layer was compressed by a 30 deg half-angle conical flare, with the cone axis inclined at an angle alpha to the cylinder axis. Nominal test conditions were P sub tau equals 1.7 atm and M sub infinity equals 2.85. Measurements were confined to the upper-symmetry, phi equals 0 deg, plane. Data are presented for the cases of alpha equal to 0. 5. and 10 deg and include mean surface pressures, streamwise and normal mean velocities, kinematic turbulent stresses and kinetic energies, as well as reverse-flow intermittencies. All data are given in tabular form; pressures, streamwise velocities, turbulent shear stresses, and kinetic energies are also presented graphically.

  16. Impedance method for measuring shear elasticity of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmaev, B. B.; Dembelova, T. S.; Damdinov, B. B.; Gulgenov, Ch. Zh.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental results of studying low-frequency (74 kHz) shear elasticity of polymer liquids by the impedance method (analogous to the Mason method) are presented. A free-volume thick liquid layer is placed on the horizontal surface of a piezoelectric quartz crystal with dimensions 34.7 × 12 × 5.5 cm. The latter performs tangential vibrations at resonance frequency. The liquid layer experiences shear strain, and shear waves should propagate in it. From the theory of the method, it follows that, with an increase in the layer thickness, both real and imaginary resonance frequency shifts should exhibit damped oscillations and tend to limiting values. For the liquids under study, the imaginary frequency shift far exceeds the real one, which testifies to the presence of bulk shear elasticity.

  17. Experimental study of boundary-layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, W.P. [Center for Turbulence and Flow Control Research Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University (Korea); Park, T.C.; Kang, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary-layer flows developing on a NACA 0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The periodic wakes are generated by rotating circular cylinders clockwise or counterclockwise around the airfoil. The time- and phase-averaged mean streamwise velocities and turbulence fluctuations are measured to investigate the phenomena of wake-induced transition. Especially, the phase-averaged wall shear stresses are evaluated using a computational Preston tube method. The passing wakes significantly change the pressure distribution on the airfoil, which has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. The orientation of the passing wake alters the pressure distribution in a different manner. Due to the passing wake, the turbulent patches are generated inside the laminar boundary layer on the airfoil, and the boundary layer becomes temporarily transitional. The patches propagate downstream at a speed smaller than the free-stream velocity and merge together further downstream. Relatively high values of phase-averaged turbulence fluctuations in the outer part of the boundary layer indicate the possibility that breakdown occurs in the outer layer away from the wall. It is confirmed that the phase-averaged mean velocity profile has two dips in the outer region of the transitional boundary layer for each passing cycle. (orig.)

  18. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength.

  19. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The s-α diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, ω A =V A /qR. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Sensor for direct measurement of the boundary shear stress in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear and normal stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear and normal stress and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, this approach is a challenging one especially for high spatial resolution and high fidelity measurements. The authors designed and fabricated a prototype miniature shear stress sensor including an EDM machined floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder. Tests were performed both in air as well as operation in water with controlled flow. The sensor sensitivity, stability and signal-to-noise level were measured and evaluated. The detailed test results and a discussion of future work will be presented in this paper.

  1. Controls on Turbulent Mixing in a Strongly Stratified and Sheared Tidal River Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisa, Joseph T.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Moum, James N.; Kilcher, Levi F.

    2016-08-01

    Considerable effort has been made to parameterize turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate ..epsilon.. and mixing in buoyant plumes and stratified shear flows. Here, a parameterization based on Kunze et al. is examined, which estimates ..epsilon.. as the amount of energy contained in an unstable shear layer (Ri < Ric) that must be dissipated to increase the Richardson number Ri = N2/S2 to a critical value Ric within a turbulent decay time scale. Observations from the tidal Columbia River plume are used to quantitatively assess the relevant parameters controlling ..epsilon.. over a range of tidal and river discharge forcings. Observed ..epsilon.. is found to be characterized by Kunze et al.'s form within a factor of 2, while exhibiting slightly decreased skill near Ri = Ric. Observed dissipation rates are compared to estimates from a constant interfacial drag formulation that neglects the direct effects of stratification. This is found to be appropriate in energetic regimes when the bulk-averaged Richardson number Rib is less than Ric/4. However, when Rib > Ric/4, the effects of stratification must be included. Similarly, ..epsilon.. scaled by the bulk velocity and density differences over the plume displays a clear dependence on Rib, decreasing as Rib approaches Ric. The Kunze et al. ..epsilon.. parameterization is modified to form an expression for the nondimensional dissipation rate that is solely a function of Rib, displaying good agreement with the observations. It is suggested that this formulation is broadly applicable for unstable to marginally unstable stratified shear flows.

  2. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2008-11-17

    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize motion of 250-300 nm. fluorescent tracer particles in entangled polymers subject to a rectilinear shear flow. Our results show linear velocity profiles in polymer solutions spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead point to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  3. Torque controlled rotary-shear experiments reveal pseudotachilites formation-dynamics and precursor events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Cordonnier, Benoit; De Siena, Luca; Lavier, Luc; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Except few cases, rotary shear tests, which are designed to study dynamic friction and strengthening/weakening mechanisms in seismogenic faults, are performed by imposing, to the specimens, a slipping velocity that is pre-defined. This approach has been adopted from engineering that typically, tests man-made objects that, when functioning, spin or slide at a pre-defined velocity under a pre-defined load. On the other hand, natural earthquakes are the effect of a rupture that nucleates, propagates and arrests in the subsurface. These three phases, and the consequent emerging fault slipping velocity, are controlled by the accumulated and released energy around the seismogenic fault before, during and after the earthquake. Thus, imposing the slipping velocity in laboratory experiments might not represent the best option to uncover many aspects of earthquake nucleation and fault slipping dynamics. Here we present some experiments performed with an innovative rotary shear apparatus that uses a clock-spring that when winded provides to the rotating sample a linearly increasing torque. Thus, the nucleation of simulated events occur spontaneously when the shear stress on the slipping surface overcomes the static friction times the normal load that is controlled by a deadweight. In addition, this method allows studying precursory seismic events resembling natural slow-slip earthquakes. We report some preliminary results for a transparent polymer that has melting point 340 K and allows observing the slipping surface (i.e., the contact between the two samples). By coupling: i) the rotary shear apparatus, ii) a video camera recording at 60 fps and a iii) laser pointer we observed the formation and evolution of a melt film that forms in the slipping surface after a phase of "dry" stick-slip. After each seismic event the melt layer solidify forming a pseudotachilite that partially welds the slipping surfaces. We also present the mechanical data that show rupture strengthening in

  4. Experiments on a smooth wall hypersonic boundary layer at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeb, Dominik; Saile, Dominik; Gülhan, Ali

    2018-04-01

    The turbulent boundary layer along the surface of high-speed vehicles drives shear stress and heat flux. Although essential to the vehicle design, the understanding of compressible turbulent boundary layers at high Mach numbers is limited due to the lack of available data. This is particularly true if the surface is rough, which is typically the case for all technical surfaces. To validate a methodological approach, as initial step, smooth wall experiments were performed. A hypersonic turbulent boundary layer at Ma = 6 (Ma_e=5.4) along a 7{}° sharp cone model at low Reynolds numbers Re_{θ } ≈ 3000 was characterized. The mean velocities in the boundary layer were acquired by means of Pitot pressure and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Furthermore, the PIV data were used to extract turbulent intensities along the profile. The mean velocities in the boundary layer agree with numerical data, independent of the measurement technique. Based on the profile data, three different approaches to extract the skin friction velocity were applied and show favorable comparison to literature and numerical data. The extracted values were used for inner and outer scaling of the van Driest transformed velocity profiles which are in good agreement to incompressible theoretical data. Morkovin scaled turbulent intensities show ambiguous results compared to literature data which may be influenced by inflow turbulence level, particle lag and other measurement uncertainties.

  5. Piezoelectric energy harvesting through shear mode operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are excellent candidates for use in energy harvesting applications due to their high electromechanical coupling properties that enable them to convert input mechanical energy into useful electric power. The electromechanical coupling coefficient of the piezoelectric material is one of the most significant parameters affecting energy conversion and is dependent on the piezoelectric mode of operation. In most piezoceramics, the d 15 piezoelectric shear coefficient is the highest coefficient compared to the commonly used axial and transverse modes that utilize the d 33 and the d 31 piezoelectric strain coefficients. However, complicated electroding methods and challenges in evaluating the performance of energy harvesting devices operating in the shear mode have slowed research in this area. The shear deformation of a piezoelectric layer can be induced in a vibrating sandwich beam with a piezoelectric core. Here, a model based on Timoshenko beam theory is developed to predict the electric power output from a cantilever piezoelectric sandwich beam under base excitations. It is shown that the energy harvester operating in the shear mode is able to generate ∼50% more power compared to the transverse mode for a numerical case study. Reduced models of both shear and transverse energy harvesters are obtained to determine the optimal load resistance in the system and perform an efficiency comparison between two models with fixed and adaptive resistances. (paper)

  6. Delayed shear enhancement in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.D. [Atmospheric Environment Service, Ontario (Canada); Pielke, R.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a much more important role on the mesoscale: horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and often dominated by vertical wind shear on these scales through the interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing. Just over 30 years ago, Pasquill suggested that this interaction need not be simultaneous and that the combination of differential horizontal advection with delayed or subsequent vertical mixing could maintain effective horizontal diffusion in spite of temporal or spatial reductions in boundary-layer turbulence intensity. This two-step mechanism has not received much attention since then, but a recent analysis of observations from and numerical simulations of two mesoscale tracer experiments suggests that delayed shear enhancement can play an important role in MAD. This paper presents an overview of this analysis, with particular emphasis on the influence of resolvable vertical shear on MAD in these two case studies and the contributions made by delayed shear enhancement.

  7. Interfacial Shear Strength and Adhesive Behavior of Silk Ionomer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghan; Geryak, Ren D; Zhang, Shuaidi; Ma, Ruilong; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2017-09-11

    The interfacial shear strength between different layers in multilayered structures of layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules is a crucial mechanical property to ensure their robustness. In this work, we investigated the interfacial shear strength of modified silk fibroin ionomers utilized in LbL shells, an ionic-cationic pair with complementary ionic pairing, (SF)-poly-l-glutamic acid (Glu) and SF-poly-l-lysine (Lys), and a complementary pair with partially screened Coulombic interactions due to the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) segments and SF-Glu/SF-Lys[PEG] pair. Shearing and adhesive behavior between these silk ionomer surfaces in the swollen state were probed at different spatial scales and pressure ranges by using functionalized atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips as well as functionalized colloidal probes. The results show that both approaches were consistent in analyzing the interfacial shear strength of LbL silk ionomers at different spatial scales from a nanoscale to a fraction of a micron. Surprisingly, the interfacial shear strength between SF-Glu and SF-Lys[PEG] pair with partially screened ionic pairing was greater than the interfacial shear strength of the SF-Glu and SF-Lys pair with a high density of complementary ionic groups. The difference in interfacial shear strength and adhesive strength is suggested to be predominantly facilitated by the interlayer hydrogen bonding of complementary amino acids and overlap of highly swollen PEG segments.