WorldWideScience

Sample records for vela seismological center

  1. Seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) has in 1979 worked mainly on reports and investigations for the seismological expert group established in 1976 by the UN Disarmament Committee in Geneva. One of NORSAR's staff is scientific secretary for the group. Reports published by the group in 1978 and 1979 proposed a global surveillance system for nuclear explosions and NORSAR as one of the largest stations will play a central role in the proposed network. A number of other tasks have been performed by NORSAR in connection with the seismology and tectonics of the Norwegian continental shelf, a projected dam in Tanzania, a dam in S.W.Norway, seismic activityin Spitzbergen and ore prospecting in N.Norway. (JIW)

  2. Real Time Data for Seismology at the IRIS Data Management Center, AN Nsf-Sponsored Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. B.; Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C.; Weertman, B. R.; Casey, R.; Stromme, S.; Karstens, R.

    2012-12-01

    When IRIS was incorporated in 1984, it committed to provide long-term support for the science of seismology. It first upgraded analog networks by installing observatory grade digital seismic recording equipment (by constructing the Global Seismic Network to upgrade the World Wide Standardized Seismographic Network) that became the backbone of the International Federation of Digital Seismic Networks (FDSN), and in 1990 constructed a state-of-the-art data center that would allow free and open access to data to everyone. For the first decade, IRIS leveraged a complicated system of telemetry which laid the foundation for delivering (relatively) high rate and continuous seismic time series data to the IRIS Data Management Center, which was designed to accept data that arrived with highly variable latencies and on many media formats. This meant that science had to often wait until data became complete, which at the time was primarily related to studying earthquakes or similar events. During the 1990's, numerous incremental but small improvements were made to get data into the hands of users with less latency, leveraging dialup, satellite telemetry, and a variety of Internet protocols. But beginning in 2000, the IRIS Data Management Center began the process of accumulating data comprehensively in real time. It was first justified because it eliminated the time-consuming transcription and manual data handling on various media formats, like magnetic tapes, CD's and DVD's. However, the switch to real-time telemetry proved to be a major improvement technologically because it not only simplified data transfer, it opened access to a large volume of previously inaccessible data (local resource limitations), and many networks began willingly providing their geophysical data to the broad research community. It also enabled researchers the ability to process data in different and streamlined ways, by incorporating data directly into workflows and processing packages. Any network on

  3. Extraterrestrial seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Vincent C H

    2015-01-01

    Seismology is a highly effective tool for investigating the internal structure of the Earth. Similar techniques have also successfully been used to study other planetary bodies (planetary seismology), the Sun (helioseismology), and other stars (asteroseismology). Despite obvious differences between stars and planetary bodies, these disciplines share many similarities and together form a coherent field of scientific research. This unique book takes a transdisciplinary approach to seismology and seismic imaging, reviewing the most recent developments in these extraterrestrial contexts. With contributions from leading scientists, this timely volume systematically outlines the techniques used in observation, data processing, and modelling for asteroseismology, helioseismology, and planetary seismology, drawing comparisons with seismic methods used in geophysics. Important recent discoveries in each discipline are presented. With an emphasis on transcending the traditional boundaries of astronomy, solar, planetary...

  4. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  5. Seismological Imaging of Melt Production Regions Beneath the Backarc Spreading Center and Volcanic Arc, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Douglas; Pozgay, Sara; Barklage, Mitchell; Pyle, Moira; Shiobara, Hajime; Sugioka, Hiroko

    2010-05-01

    We image the seismic velocity and attenuation structure of the mantle melt production regions associated with the Mariana Backarc Spreading Center and Mariana Volcanic Arc using data from the Mariana Subduction Factory Imaging Experiment. The passive component of this experiment consisted of 20 broadband seismographs deployed on the island chain and 58 ocean-bottom seismographs from June, 2003 until April, 2004. We obtained the 3D P and S wave velocity structure of the Mariana mantle wedge from a tomographic inversion of body wave arrivals from local earthquakes as well as P and S arrival times from large teleseismic earthquakes determined by multi-channel cross correlation. We also determine the 2-D attenuation structure of the mantle wedge using attenuation tomography based on local and regional earthquake spectra, and a broader-scale, lower resolution 3-D shear velocity structure from inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocities using a two plane wave array analysis approach. We observe low velocity, high attenuation anomalies in the upper mantle beneath both the arc and backarc spreading center. These anomalies are separated by a higher velocity, lower attenuation region at shallow depths (< 80 km), implying distinct magma production regions for the arc and backarc in the uppermost mantle. The largest magnitude anomaly beneath the backarc spreading center is found at shallower depth (25-50 km) compared to the arc (50-100 km), consistent with melting depths estimated from the geochemistry of arc and backarc basalts (K. Kelley, pers. communication). The velocity and attenuation signature of the backarc spreading center is narrower than the corresponding anomaly found beneath the East Pacific Rise by the MELT experiment, perhaps implying a component of focused upwelling beneath the spreading center. The strong velocity and attenuation anomaly beneath the spreading center contrasts strongly with preliminary MT inversion results showing no conductivity anomaly in the

  6. On the velocity of the Vela pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that if the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is responsible for nearly all the scattering of the Vela pulsar, then the scintillation and proper motion velocities of the pulsar can only be reconciled with each other in the case of nonzero transverse velocity of the scattering material. A possible origin of large-scale transverse motions in the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is discussed.

  7. On the velocity of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that if the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is responsible for nearly all the scattering of the Vela pulsar, then the scintillation and proper motion velocities of the pulsar can only be reconciled with each other in the case of nonzero transverse velocity of the scattering material. A possible origin of large-scale transverse motions in the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is discussed.

  8. Citizen Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Rémy; Gilles, Sébastien; Mazet-Roux, Gilles; Kamb, Linus; Frobert, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In science, projects which involve volunteers for observations, measurements, computation are grouped under the term, Citizen Science. They range from bird or planet census to distributing computing on volonteers's computer. Over the last five years, the EMSC has been developing tools and strategy to collect information on earthquake's impact from the first persons to be informed, i.e. the witnesses. By extension, it is named Citizen Seismology. The European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC), a scientific not-for-profit NGO, benefits from the high visibility of its rapid earthquake information services (www.emsc-csem.org) which attract an average of more than half a million visits a month from 160 countries. Witnesses converge to its site within a couple of minutes of earthquake's occurrence to find out information about the cause of the shaking they have just been through. The convergence generates brutal increases of hit rate which can be automatically detected. They are often the first indication about the occurrence of a felt event. Witnesses' locations are determined from their IP addresses. Localities exhibiting statistically significant increase of traffic are mapped to produce the "felt map". This map available within 5 to 8 minutes of the earthquake's occurrence represents the area where the event was felt. It is the fastest way to collect in-situ information on the consequences of an earthquake. Widespread damage region are expected to be mapped through a significant lack or absence of visitors. A second tool involving the visitors is an online macroseismic questionnaire available in 21 languages. It complements the felt maps as it can describes the level of shaking or damage, but is only available in 90 to 120 minutes. Witnesses can also share their pictures of damage. They used it also to provide us exceptional pictures of transient phenomena. With the University of Edinburgh, we are finalising a prototype named ShakemApple, linking Apple

  9. Volcano seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  10. A Model of the Vela Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    2000-10-01

    A model of the Vela supernova remnant (SNR) based on a cavity explosion of a supernova (SN) star is proposed. It is suggested that the general structure of the remnant is determined by the interaction of the SN blast wave with a massive shell created by the SN progenitor (15-20 M_solar) star. A possible origin of the nebula of hard X-ray emission detected around the Vela pulsar is discussed.

  11. The Colombia Seismological Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Chia, J. F.; Poveda, E.; Pedraza, P.

    2013-05-01

    The latest seismological equipment and data processing instrumentation installed at the Colombia Seismological Network (RSNC) are described. System configuration, network operation, and data management are discussed. The data quality and the new seismological products are analyzed. The main purpose of the network is to monitor local seismicity with a special emphasis on seismic activity surrounding the Colombian Pacific and Caribbean oceans, for early warning in case a Tsunami is produced by an earthquake. The Colombian territory is located at the South America northwestern corner, here three tectonic plates converge: Nazca, Caribbean and the South American. The dynamics of these plates, when resulting in earthquakes, is continuously monitored by the network. In 2012, the RSNC registered in 2012 an average of 67 events per day; from this number, a mean of 36 earthquakes were possible to be located well. In 2010 the network was also able to register an average of 67 events, but it was only possible to locate a mean of 28 earthquakes daily. This difference is due to the expansion of the network. The network is made up of 84 stations equipped with different kind of broadband 40s, 120s seismometers, accelerometers and short period 1s sensors. The signal is transmitted continuously in real-time to the Central Recording Center located at Bogotá, using satellite, telemetry, and Internet. Moreover, there are some other stations which are required to collect the information in situ. Data is recorded and processed digitally using two different systems, EARTHWORM and SEISAN, which are able to process and share the information between them. The RSNC has designed and implemented a web system to share the seismological data. This innovative system uses tools like Java Script, Oracle and programming languages like PHP to allow the users to access the seismicity registered by the network almost in real time as well as to download the waveform and technical details. The coverage

  12. Modelling interstellar structures around Vela X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Katushkina, O. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2018-03-01

    We report the discovery of filamentary structures stretched behind the bow-shock-producing high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey and present the results of optical spectroscopy of the bow shock carried out with the Southern African Large Telescope. The geometry of the detected structures suggests that Vela X-1 has encountered a wedge-like layer of enhanced density on its way and that the shocked material of the layer partially outlines a wake downstream of Vela X-1. To substantiate this suggestion, we carried out 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of interaction between Vela X-1 and the layer for three limiting cases. Namely, we run simulations in which (i) the stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM) were treated as pure hydrodynamic flows, (ii) a homogeneous magnetic field was added to the ISM, while the stellar wind was assumed to be unmagnetized, and (iii) the stellar wind was assumed to possess a helical magnetic field, while there was no magnetic field in the ISM. We found that although the first two simulations can provide a rough agreement with the observations, only the third one allowed us to reproduce not only the wake behind Vela X-1, but also the general geometry of the bow shock ahead of it.

  13. Bucharest urban seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, Stefan Florin; Ritter, Joachim R.R.

    2005-01-01

    An important project was carried out in Bucharest area by the National Institute of Research-Development for Earth Physics and Collaborative Research Center 461 (CRC 461) Geophysical Institute from the University of Karlsruhe (Germany) in the period October 2003 - August 2004. The project consists of an array of 33 stations, uniformly arranged in the city of Bucharest and in the outskirts (Magurele, Voluntari, Otopeni, Buftea, etc). The station functioned 24 h/day for a period of 10 months. The number of functioning stations had a little variation in time, some of them had to be moved because some sites became improper in time. The sensors used by the stations were of the type: STS - 2, LE - 3D, 4OT, 3ESP and KS2000. The performance of continuous recording was possible by using on each station a hard disk drive of 120 Gb, which gives independence of 3 month. For preventing some accidental electric power stops a rechargeable battery on each station was used . A service was performed for each station every month to avoid accidental stops, which consisted usually of mechanical bumps. All the recorded data by the stations was saved on DVSs, the final number being around 140. This project helped gathering a large number of seismological data for the city of Bucharest and outskirts from seismic events of magnitude of 4, 3, 2 and ambient noise. (authors)

  14. Seismology of the Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, S.V.; Gudkova, T.V.; Zharkov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and diagnostic properties of the spectrum of free oscillations of the models of the Jupiter are discussed. The spectrum is very sensitive to the properties of the inner core and density discontinuities in the interior of the planet. It is shown that in seismology of the Jupiter unlike to solar seismology, it is not possible to use the asymptotic theory for investigation of the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum

  15. Web Based Seismological Monitoring (wbsm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, F.; Meglio, V.; Romano, S. P.; de Cesare, W.; Ventre, G.; Martini, M.

    Over the last few decades the seismological monitoring systems have dramatically improved tanks to the technological advancements and to the scientific progresses of the seismological studies. The most modern processing systems use the network tech- nologies to realize high quality performances in data transmission and remote controls. Their architecture is designed to favor the real-time signals analysis. This is, usually, realized by adopting a modular structure that allow to easy integrate any new cal- culation algorithm, without affecting the other system functionalities. A further step in the seismic processing systems evolution is the large use of the web based appli- cations. The web technologies can be an useful support for the monitoring activities allowing to automatically publishing the results of signals processing and favoring the remote access to data, software systems and instrumentation. An application of the web technologies to the seismological monitoring has been developed at the "Os- servatorio Vesuviano" monitoring center (INGV) in collaboration with the "Diparti- mento di Informatica e Sistemistica" of the Naples University. A system named Web Based Seismological Monitoring (WBSM) has been developed. Its main objective is to automatically publish the seismic events processing results and to allow displaying, analyzing and downloading seismic data via Internet. WBSM uses the XML tech- nology for hypocentral and picking parameters representation and creates a seismic events data base containing parametric data and wave-forms. In order to give tools for the evaluation of the quality and reliability of the published locations, WBSM also supplies all the quality parameters calculated by the locating program and allow to interactively display the wave-forms and the related parameters. WBSM is a modular system in which the interface function to the data sources is performed by two spe- cific modules so that to make it working in conjunction with a

  16. Jesuits in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, D.

    1984-01-01

    Jesuits have been involved with scientific endeavors since the 16th century, although their association with seismology is more recent. What impelled Jesuit priests to also become seismologists is am matter of conjecture. Certainly the migration of missionaries to various parts of the world must have resulted in queries to their fellow Jesuits in Europe. What caused earthquakes? Could they be predicted? Were they connected with the weather?

  17. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  18. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  19. Simuladores para el aprendizaje y entrenamiento en vela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Renom Pinsach

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es revisar y proporcionar una clasificación general de los simuladores empleados para la enseñanza y entrenamiento en Vela. Los simuladores de navegación son una manera útil e interactiva para solucionar muchos problemas en el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje de la Vela. Ayudan a comprender los principios de la navegación empleando diferentes materiales y maneras de reproducir los efectos técnicos a bordo de un velero o una tabla a Vela. Diversos países y organizaciones de Vela acostumbran a aplicar estos recursos como un importante medio didáctico en actividades de interior. No obstante, este tipo de dispositivos son menos frecuentes en las escuelas de vela españolas. Desde los artefactos simples en tierra hasta los modernos simuladores virtuales de navegación este trabajo revisa una muestra representativa de los principales tipos de simuladores a fin de destacar sus utilidades en entornos de enseñanza aplicados.

  20. Geology and seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.F.; Blanc, B.

    1980-01-01

    For the construction of nuclear power stations, comprehensive site investigations are required to assure the adequacy and suitability of the site under consideration, as well as to establish the basic design data for designing and building the plant. The site investigations cover mainly the following matters: geology, seismology, hydrology, meteorology. Site investigations for nuclear power stations are carried out in stages in increasing detail and to an appreciable depth in order to assure the soundness of the project, and, in particular, to determine all measures required to assure the safety of the nuclear power station and the protection of the population against radiation exposure. The aim of seismological investigations is to determine the strength of the vibratory ground motion caused by an expected strong earthquake in order to design the plant resistant enough to take up these vibrations. In addition, secondary effects of earthquakes, such as landslides, liquefaction, surface faulting, etc. must be studied. For seashore sites, the tsunami risk must be evaluated. (orig.)

  1. Ten years of Vela x-ray observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.; Priedhorsky, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Vela spacecraft, particularly Vela 5B, produced all-sky X-ray data of unprecedented length and completeness. The data led to the discovery of X-ray bursts and numerous transient outbursts. Recent re-analysis has put the data in the form of 10-day skymaps covering a 7-year period, which have led to the discovery or confirmation of a number of long-term periodicities, and have made possible a time-lapse movie of the X-ray sky

  2. The nature of the Vela X-ray "jet"

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    1999-01-01

    The nature of the Vela X-ray "jet", recently discovered by Markwardt & \\"Ogelman (1995), is examined. It is suggested that the "jet" arises along the interface of domelike deformations of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable shell of the Vela supernova remnant; thereby the "jet" is interpreted as a part of the general shell of the remnant. The origin of deformations as well as the general structure of the remnant are discussed in the framework of a model based on a cavity explosion of a supernova sta...

  3. THE ROTATION PERIOD OF HD-77581 (VELA X-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZUIDERWIJK, EJ

    The rotation period of HD 77581, supergiant primary in the X-ray binary Vela X-1, is determined from an analysis of selected absorption line profiles. The rotation rate determined from He I line profiles is 0.67 +/- 0.04 times that of the binary angular velocity, corresponding to a rotation velocity

  4. Vela X: A plerion or part of a shell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    1998-03-01

    An analysis of the radio, optical, and X-ray observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) in Vela has led us to conclude that the radio source Vela X is part of the SNR shell. The high brightness of this radio source is assumed to be a result of the interaction of dome-shaped deformations (bubbles) on the SNR shell, which gives rise to bright radio filaments. The deformations could be produced by Richtmaier-Meshkov's instability, which develops during the impulsive acceleration of a shell of gas (swept up from the interstellar medium by the wind from a presupernova) by a shock wave (generated by a supernova explosion). The brightest radio filament and the X-ray jet extending along it are shown to be located in the region of interaction of two prominent bubbles on the SNR shell. We conclude that the X-ray jet, like Vela X, is part of the shell, and that it has its origin in the Mach reflection of two semispherical shock waves. Our estimate of the plasma temperature behind the front of the Mach wave matches the jet temperature. We also show that the large spread in the estimates of the spectral index for Vela X could be caused by the instrumental effect which arises during observations of extended radio sources with a nonuniform surface-brightness distribution.

  5. Forensic seismology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A.

    2007-01-01

    contrast simple, comprising one or two cycles of large amplitude followed by a low-amplitude coda. Earthquake signals on the other hand were often complex with numerous arrivals of similar amplitude spread over 35 s or more. It therefore appeared that earthquakes could be recognised on complexity. Later however, complex explosion signals were observed which reduced the apparent effectiveness of complexity as a criterion for identifying earthquakes. Nevertheless, the AWE Group concluded that for many paths to teleseismic distances, Earth is transparent for P signals and this provides a window through which source differences will be most clearly seen. Much of the research by the Group has focused on understanding the influence of source type on P seismograms recorded at teleseismic distances. Consequently the paper concentrates on teleseismic methods of distinguishing between explosions and earthquakes. One of the most robust criteria for discriminating between earthquakes and explosions is the m b : M s criterion which compares the amplitudes of the SP P waves as measured by the body-wave magnitude m b, and the long-period (LP: ˜0.05 Hz) Rayleigh-wave amplitude as measured by the surface-wave magnitude M s; the P and Rayleigh waves being the main wave types used in forensic seismology. For a given M s, the m b for explosions is larger than for most earthquakes. The criterion is difficult to apply however, at low magnitude (say m b fail. Consequently the AWE Group in cooperation with the University of Cambridge used seismogram modelling to try and understand what controls complexity of SP P seismograms, and to put the m b : M s criterion on a theoretical basis. The results of this work show that the m b : M s criterion is robust because several factors contribute to the separation of earthquakes and explosions. The principal reason for the separation however, is that for many orientations of the earthquake source there is at least one P nodal plane in the teleseismic

  6. Seismology Outreach in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite residing in a state with 75% of North American earthquakes and three of the top 15 ever recorded, most Alaskans have limited knowledge about the science of earthquakes. To many, earthquakes are just part of everyday life, and to others, they are barely noticed until a large event happens, and often ignored even then. Alaskans are rugged, resilient people with both strong independence and tight community bonds. Rural villages in Alaska, most of which are inaccessible by road, are underrepresented in outreach efforts. Their remote locations and difficulty of access make outreach fiscally challenging. Teacher retention and small student bodies limit exposure to science and hinder student success in college. The arrival of EarthScope's Transportable Array, the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, targeted projects with large outreach components, and increased community interest in earthquake knowledge have provided opportunities to spread information across Alaska. We have found that performing hands-on demonstrations, identifying seismological relevance toward career opportunities in Alaska (such as natural resource exploration), and engaging residents through place-based experience have increased the public's interest and awareness of our active home.

  7. Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L.; Solakov, D.; Nikolova, S.; Stoyanov, S.; Simeonova, S.; Zimakov, L. G.; Khaikin, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) consists of a National Data Center (NDC), 13 stations equipped with RefTek High Resolution Broadband Seismic Recorders - model DAS 130-01/3, 1 station equipped with Quanterra 680 and broadband sensors and accelerometers. Real-time data transfer from seismic stations to NDC is realized via Virtual Private Network of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. The communication interruptions don't cause any data loss at the NDC. The data are backed up in the field station recorder's 4Mb RAM memory and are retransmitted to the NDC immediately after the communication link is re-established. The recorders are equipped with 2 compact flash disks able to save more than 1 month long data. The data from the flash disks can be downloaded remotely using FTP. The data acquisition and processing hardware redundancy at the NDC is achieved by two clustered SUN servers and two Blade Workstations. To secure the acquisition, processing and data storage processes a three layer local network is designed at the NDC. Real-time data acquisition is performed using REFTEK's full duplex error-correction protocol RTPD. Data from the Quanterra recorder and foreign stations are fed into RTPD in real-time via SeisComP/SeedLink protocol. Using SeisComP/SeedLink software the NDC transfers real-time data to INGV-Roma, NEIC-USA, ORFEUS Data Center. Regional real-time data exchange with Romania, Macedonia, Serbia and Greece is established at the NDC also. Data processing is performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package running on the both Servers. SNDP includes subsystems: Real-time subsystem (RTS_SNDP) - for signal detection; evaluation of the signal parameters; phase identification and association; source estimation; Seismic analysis subsystem (SAS_SNDP) - for interactive data processing; Early warning subsystem (EWS_SNDP) - based on the first arrived P-phases. The signal detection process is performed by

  8. SUBMILLIMETER POLARIZATION SPECTRUM IN THE VELA C MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandilo, Natalie N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Pascale, Enzo [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Galitzki, Nicholas; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Ashton, Peter; Fissel, Laura M.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Benton, Steven J. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI, 02912 (United States); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Martin, Peter G. [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Moncelsi, Lorenzo [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Netterfield, Calvin B., E-mail: ngandil1@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2016-06-20

    Polarization maps of the Vela C molecular cloud were obtained at 250, 350, and 500 μ m during the 2012 flight of the balloon-borne telescope BLASTPol. These measurements are used in conjunction with 850 μ m data from Planck to study the submillimeter spectrum of the polarization fraction for this cloud. The spectrum is relatively flat and does not exhibit a pronounced minimum at λ ∼ 350 μ m as suggested by previous measurements of other molecular clouds. The shape of the spectrum does not depend strongly on the radiative environment of the dust, as quantified by the column density or the dust temperature obtained from Herschel data. The polarization ratios observed in Vela C are consistent with a model of a porous clumpy molecular cloud being uniformly heated by the interstellar radiation field.

  9. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE VELA PULSAR’S PULSE PROFILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palfreyman, J. L.; Dickey, J. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Jones, I. R. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Hotan, A. W., E-mail: jim77742@gmail.com [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, 26 Dick Perry Avenue, Technology Park, Kensington WA 6151 (Australia)

    2016-03-20

    The mechanisms of emission and changes in rotation frequency (“glitching”) of the Vela pulsar (J0835−4510) are not well understood. Further insight into these mechanisms can be achieved by long-term studies of integrated pulse width, timing residuals, and bright-pulse rates. We have undertaken an intensive observing campaign of Vela and collected over 6000 hr of single-pulse data. The data shows that the pulse width changes with time, including marked jumps in width after micro-glitches (frequency changes). The abundance of bright pulses also changes after some micro-glitches, but not all. The secular changes in pulse width have three possible cyclic periods that match with X-ray periodicities of a helical jet that are interpreted as free precession.

  10. The Vela pulsar with an active fallback disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özsükan, Gökçe; Ekşi, K. Yavuz [Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Physics, İstanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, İstanbul (Turkey); Hambaryan, Valeri; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Hohle, Markus M.; Ginski, Christian [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitäts-Sternwarte, Universität Jena, Schillergäßchen 2-3, 07745 Jena (Germany); Werner, Klaus, E-mail: eksi@itu.edu.tr [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    Fallback disks are expected to form around young neutron stars. The presence of these disks can be revealed by their blackbody spectrum in the infrared, optical, and UV bands. We present a re-reduction of the archival optical and infrared data of the Vela pulsar, together with the existing infrared and UV spectrum of Vela, and model their unpulsed components with the blackbody spectrum of a supernova debris disk. We invoke the quiescent disk solution of Sunyaev and Shakura for the description of the disk in the propeller stage and find the inner radius of the disk to be inside the light cylinder radius. We perform a high-resolution X-ray analysis with XMM-Newton and find a narrow absorption feature at 0.57 keV that can be interpreted as the K {sub α} line of He-like oxygen (O VII). The strength of the line indicates an element over-abundance in our line of sight exceeding the amounts that would be expected from interstellar medium. The spectral feature may originate from the pulsar wind nebula and may be partly caused by the reprocessed X-ray radiation by the fallback disk. We discuss the lower-than-three braking index of Vela as partially due to the contribution of the propeller torques. Our results suggest that the pulsar mechanism can work simultaneously with the propeller processes and that the debris disks can survive the radiation pressure for at least ∼10{sup 4} yr. As Vela is a relatively close object, and a prototypical pulsar, the presence of a disk, if confirmed, may indicate the ubiquity of debris disks around young neutron stars.

  11. First Epigravettian Ceramic Figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbstein, Rebecca; Radić, Dinko; Brajković, Dejana; Miracle, Preston T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent finds of 36 ceramic artifacts from the archaeological site of Vela Spila, Croatia, offer the first evidence of ceramic figurative art in late Upper Palaeolithic Europe, c. 17,500–15,000 years before present (BP). The size and diversity of this artistic ceramic assemblage indicate the emergence of a social tradition, rather than more ephemeral experimentation with a new material. Vela Spila ceramics offer compelling technological and stylistic comparisons with the only other evidence of a developed Palaeolithic ceramic tradition found at the sites of Pavlov I and Dolní Věstonice I, in the Czech Republic, c. 31,000–27,000 cal BP. Because of the 10,000-year gap between the two assemblages, the Vela Spila ceramics are interpreted as evidence of an independent invention of this technology. Consequently, these artifacts provide evidence of a new social context in which ceramics developed and were used to make art in the Upper Palaeolithic. PMID:22848495

  12. Seismological Constraints on Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2004-12-01

    Earth is an open thermodynamic system radiating heat energy into space. A transition from geostatic earth models such as PREM to geodynamical models is needed. We discuss possible thermodynamic constraints on the variables that govern the distribution of forces and flows in the deep Earth. In this paper we assume that the temperature distribution is time-invariant, so that all flows vanish at steady state except for the heat flow Jq per unit area (Kuiken, 1994). Superscript 0 will refer to the steady state while x denotes the excited state of the system. We may write σ 0=(J{q}0ṡX{q}0)/T where Xq is the conjugate force corresponding to Jq, and σ is the rate of entropy production per unit volume. Consider now what happens after the occurrence of an earthquake at time t=0 and location (0,0,0). The earthquake introduces a stress drop Δ P(x,y,z) at all points of the system. Response flows are directed along the gradients toward the epicentral area, and the entropy production will increase with time as (Prigogine, 1947) σ x(t)=σ 0+α {1}/(t+β )+α {2}/(t+β )2+etc A seismological constraint on the parameters may be obtained from Omori's empirical relation N(t)=p/(t+q) where N(t) is the number of aftershocks at time t following the main shock. It may be assumed that p/q\\sim\\alpha_{1}/\\beta times a constant. Another useful constraint is the Mexican-hat geometry of the seismic transient as obtained e.g. from InSAR radar interferometry. For strike-slip events such as Landers the distribution of \\DeltaP is quadrantal, and an oval-shaped seismicity gap develops about the epicenter. A weak outer triggering maxiμm is found at a distance of about 17 fault lengths. Such patterns may be extracted from earthquake catalogs by statistical analysis (Lomnitz, 1996). Finally, the energy of the perturbation must be at least equal to the recovery energy. The total energy expended in an aftershock sequence can be found approximately by integrating the local contribution over

  13. THE BLAST SURVEY OF THE VELA MOLECULAR CLOUD: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE DENSE CORES IN VELA-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, Luca; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; De Luca, Massimo; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Elia, Davide; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Marengo, Massimo; Giannini, Teresa; Lorenzetti, Dario; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) carried out a 250, 350, and 500 μm survey of the galactic plane encompassing the Vela Molecular Ridge, with the primary goal of identifying the coldest dense cores possibly associated with the earliest stages of star formation. Here, we present the results from observations of the Vela-D region, covering about 4 deg 2 , in which we find 141 BLAST cores. We exploit existing data taken with the Spitzer MIPS, IRAC, and SEST-SIMBA instruments to constrain their (single-temperature) spectral energy distributions, assuming a dust emissivity index β = 2.0. This combination of data allows us to determine the temperature, luminosity, and mass of each BLAST core, and also enables us to separate starless from protostellar sources. We also analyze the effects that the uncertainties on the derived physical parameters of the individual sources have on the overall physical properties of starless and protostellar cores, and we find that there appear to be a smooth transition from the pre- to the protostellar phase. In particular, for protostellar cores we find a correlation between the MIPS24 flux, associated with the central protostar, and the temperature of the dust envelope. We also find that the core mass function of the Vela-D cores has a slope consistent with other similar (sub)millimeter surveys.

  14. Mathematical treatment of seismologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, C.A.J.V.D. da

    The principle methods of seismologic data treatment with application in engineering design, emphasizing the need for the utilization of reliable data, appropriate algorithims and rigorous calculations so that correct results and valid conclusions be achieved, are examined. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Seismological programs in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, W.; Spall, Henry

    1983-01-01

    At the beginning of the 1970's, a series of programs in seismology were initiated by different Costa Rican institutions, and some of these programs are still in the process of development. The institutions are Insituto Costaricense de Electricidad (ICE)- The Costa Rica Institute of Electricity

  16. The nature of the Vela X-ray ``jet". The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the origin of filamentary structures in the Vela supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    1999-12-01

    The nature of the Vela X-ray ``jet", recently discovered by Markwardt & Ögelman (1995), is examined. It is suggested that the ``jet" arises along the interface of domelike deformations of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable shell of the Vela supernova remnant; thereby the ``jet" is interpreted as a part of the general shell of the remnant. The origin of deformations as well as the general structure of the remnant are discussed in the framework of a model based on a cavity explosion of a supernova star. It is suggested that the shell deformations viewed at various angles appear as filamentary structures visible throughout the Vela supernova remnant at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. A possible origin of the nebula of hard X-ray emission detected by Willmore et al. (1992) around the Vela pulsar is proposed.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Atwood, W. B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bisello, D.; Baughman, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new γ-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E ≥ 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of Γ = 1.51 +0.05 -0.04 with an exponential cutoff at E c = 2.9 ± 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e -(E/E c ) b require b ≤ 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  18. Hard X-ray Vela supernova observation on rocket experiment WRX-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlikova, V.; Urban, M.; Nentvich, O.; Daniel, V.; Sieger, L.; Tutt, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a hard X-ray telescope for the Vela nebula observation during a sounding rocket flight. The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) experiment is organised by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA with a primary payload of a soft X-ray spectroscope. The Czech team developed a hard X-ray Lobster-eye telescope as a secondary payload. The Czech experiment’s astrophysical object of study is the Vela pulsar in the centre of the Vela nebula.

  19. Urban Seismology: on the origin of earth vibrations within a city

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Jordi; Ruiz, Mario; Sánchez-Pastor, Pilar S.; Romero, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Urban seismology has become an active research field in the recent years, both with seismological objectives, as obtaining better microzonation maps in highly populated areas, and with engineering objectives, as the monitoring of traffic or the surveying of historical buildings. We analyze here the seismic records obtained by a broad-band seismic station installed in the ICTJA-CSIC institute, located near the center of Barcelona city. Although this station was installed to introdu...

  20. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  1. Global teaching of global seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, S.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Our recent textbook, Introduction to Seismology, Earthquakes, & Earth Structure (Blackwell, 2003) is used in many countries. Part of the reason for this may be our deliberate attempt to write the book for an international audience. This effort appears in several ways. We stress seismology's long tradition of global data interchange. Our brief discussions of the science's history illustrate the contributions of scientists around the world. Perhaps most importantly, our discussions of earthquakes, tectonics, and seismic hazards take a global view. Many examples are from North America, whereas others are from other areas. Our view is that non-North American students should be exposed to North American examples that are type examples, and that North American students should be similarly exposed to examples elsewhere. For example, we illustrate how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence using both the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska and the Eurasia-Africa boundary from the Azores to the Mediterranean. We illustrate diffuse plate boundary zones using western North America, the Andes, the Himalayas, the Mediterranean, and the East Africa Rift. The subduction zone discussions examine Japan, Tonga, and Chile. We discuss significant earthquakes both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and explore hazard mitigation issues in different contexts. Both comments from foreign colleagues and our experience lecturing overseas indicate that this approach works well. Beyond the specifics of our text, we believe that such a global approach is facilitated by the international traditions of the earth sciences and the world youth culture that gives students worldwide common culture. For example, a video of the scene in New Madrid, Missouri that arose from a nonsensical earthquake prediction in 1990 elicits similar responses from American and European students.

  2. ObsPy: A Python Toolbox for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Lion; Megies, Tobias; Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Barsch, Robert; MacCarthy, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    In recent years the Python ecosystem evolved into one of the most powerful and productive scientific environments across disciplines. ObsPy (https://www.obspy.org) is a fully community-driven, open-source project dedicated to providing a bridge for seismology into that ecosystem. It does so by offering Read and write support for essentially every commonly used data format in seismology with a unified interface and automatic format detection. This includes waveform data (MiniSEED, SAC, SEG-Y, Reftek, …) as well as station (SEED, StationXML, …) and event meta information (QuakeML, ZMAP, …). Integrated access to the largest data centers, web services, and real-time data streams (FDSNWS, ArcLink, SeedLink, ...). A powerful signal processing toolbox tuned to the specific needs of seismologists. Utility functionality like travel time calculations with the TauP method, geodetic functions, and data visualizations. ObsPy has been in constant development for more than seven years and is developed and used by scientists around the world with successful applications in all branches of seismology. Additionally it nowadays serves as the foundation for a large number of more specialized packages. This presentation will give a short overview of the capabilities of ObsPy and point out several representative or new use cases. Additionally we will discuss the road ahead as well as the long-term sustainability of open-source scientific software.

  3. Seismology and space-based geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralli, David M.; Tajima, Fumiko

    1993-01-01

    The potential of space-based geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in the context of seismology is explored. The achievements of seismological source theory and data analyses, mechanical modeling of fault zone behavior, and advances in space-based geodesy are reviewed, with emphasis on realizable contributions of space-based geodetic measurements specifically to seismology. The fundamental relationships between crustal deformation associated with an earthquake and the geodetically observable data are summarized. The response and spatial and temporal resolution of the geodetic data necessary to understand deformation at various phases of the earthquake cycle is stressed. The use of VLBI, SLR, and GPS measurements for studying global geodynamics properties that can be investigated to some extent with seismic data is discussed. The potential contributions of continuously operating strain monitoring networks and globally distributed geodetic observatories to existing worldwide modern digital seismographic networks are evaluated in reference to mutually addressable problems in seismology, geophysics, and tectonics.

  4. RXTE observations of the Vela Pulsar: The pulsar rosetta stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickman, M.S.; Harding, A.K.; Gwinn, C.; McCulloch, P.; Moffett, D.

    2001-01-01

    We report on our analysis of a 274 ks observation of the Vela Pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The double-peaked, pulsed emission at 2-30 keV, which we had previously detected during a 93 ks observation, is confirmed with much improved statistics. There is now clear evidence, both in the spectrum and the light curve, that the emission in the RXTE band is a blend of two separate components. The spectrum of the harder component connects smoothly with the OSSE, COMPTEL and EGRET spectra and the peaks in the light curve are in phase coincidence with those of the high-energy light curve. The spectrum of the softer component is consistent with an extrapolation to the pulsed optical flux and the soft component of the second RXTE peak is in phase coincidence with the second optical peak. In addition, we see a peak in the 2-8 keV RXTE light curve at the radio peak phase

  5. History of x-ray transients as seen by Vela, 1969-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Belian, R.D.; Conner, J.P.; Evans, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    Vela spacecraft 5A and 5B, launched into orbit in May 1969, were among the first to be capable of x-ray astronomy. The x-ray counters aboard Vela 5B operated for an unprecedented length of time, observing the entire x-ray sky for 10 years, until June 1979. These spacecraft, monitoring for nuclear tests in space with various detectors, were put into very high orbits at 118,000 km radius. Collimated NaI detectors, sensitive to 3-12 keV x-rays, scanned the sky at 90 0 to the earth-spacecraft axis over a 6.1 0 FWHM (full width at half-maximum) square field of view. Any given source, when in view, was scanned every 64 s as the spacecraft rotated, with 1-second count accumulations in two energy channels. The entire sky was observed every 56 hours, half of the orbital period. During the 10-year lifetime of the x-ray detectors, the Vela spacecraft provided data on many new types of sources. Cen X-4, an exceedingly bright x-ray transient, was observed in the summer of 1969, shortly after launch, and did not return to the x-ray sky until May 1979, when it was again observed by Vela 5B. This source also produced the first of many x-ray bursts detected by Vela, the bright, hard, precursor observed on 7 July 1969. The Vela gamma-ray detectors revealed the new phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. It has recently been found that at least two gamma-ray bursts were also detected by the x-ray counters. 11 references

  6. MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE VELA C MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tamura, Motohide [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama-city, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yohinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Sato, Shuji, E-mail: t_kusune@nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-10-20

    We have performed extensive near-infrared ( JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ∼70–310 μ G in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  7. MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE VELA C MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tamura, Motohide; Watanabe, Makoto; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We have performed extensive near-infrared ( JHK s ) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ∼70–310 μ G in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  8. X-ray transients as seen by Vela, 1969-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Belian, R.D.; Conner, J.P.; Evans, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    Vela spacecraft 5A and 5B were launched into orbit in May 1969, to monitor for nuclear tests in space. These spacecraft were among the first to be capable of x-ray astronomy. One of these, Vela 5B, monitored the entire x-ray sky for the unprecedented period of 10 years, from May 1969 to June 1979. Over the last several years the data produced have been re-analyzed to produce a series of skymaps. These have now been made into a movie, in color, showing the changes in the x-ray sky over the period 1969-1976

  9. High-performance computing in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The scientific, technical, and economic importance of the issues discussed here presents a clear agenda for future research in computational seismology. In this way these problems will drive advances in high-performance computing in the field of seismology. There is a broad community that will benefit from this work, including the petroleum industry, research geophysicists, engineers concerned with seismic hazard mitigation, and governments charged with enforcing a comprehensive test ban treaty. These advances may also lead to new applications for seismological research. The recent application of high-resolution seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface for the environmental remediation industry is an example of this activity. This report makes the following recommendations: (1) focused efforts to develop validated documented software for seismological computations should be supported, with special emphasis on scalable algorithms for parallel processors; (2) the education of seismologists in high-performance computing technologies and methodologies should be improved; (3) collaborations between seismologists and computational scientists and engineers should be increased; (4) the infrastructure for archiving, disseminating, and processing large volumes of seismological data should be improved.

  10. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  11. Impact of Geomorphological Changes to Harbor Resonance During Meteotsunamis: The Vela Luka Bay Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denamiel, Cléa; Šepić, Jadranka; Vilibić, Ivica

    2018-05-01

    In engineering studies, harbor resonance, including quality and amplification factors, is typically computed for swell and waves with periods shorter than 10 min. However, in various locations around the world, such as Vela Luka Bay in Croatia, meteotsunami waves of periods greater than 10 min can excite the bay or harbor natural modes and produce substantial structural damages. In this theoretical study, the impact of some geomorphological changes of Vela Luka Bay—i.e. deepening of the bay, dredging the harbor, adding a pier or a marina—to the amplification of the meteotsunami waves are presented for a set of 6401 idealized pressure wave field forcing used to derive robust statistics. The most substantial increase in maximum elevation is found when the Vela Luka harbor is dredged to a 5 m depth, which is in contradiction with the calculation of the quality factor showing a decrease of the harbor natural resonance. It has been shown that the forcing energy content at different frequency bands should also be taken into account when estimating the quality and amplification factors, as their typical definitions derived from the peak frequency of the sea level spectrum fail to represent the harbor response during meteotsunami events. New definitions of these factors are proposed in this study and are shown to be in good agreement with the results of the statistical analysis of the Vela Luka Bay maximum elevation results. In addition, the presented methodology can easily be applicable to any other location in the world where meteotsunamis occur.

  12. Herbig-haro objects and mid-infrared outflows in the VELA C molecular cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Hongchi; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a deep [S II] λλ6717/6731 wide field Herbig-Haro (HH) object survey toward the Vela C molecular cloud with a sky coverage of about 2 deg 2 . In total, 18 new HH objects, HH 1090-1107, are discovered and the two previously known HH objects, HH 73-74, are also detected in our [S II] images. We also present an investigation of mid-infrared outflows in the Vela C molecular cloud using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer images taken from AllWISE data release. Using the method suggested by Zhang and Wang, 11 extended green objects (EGOs) are identified to be the mid-infrared outflows, including 6 new mid-infrared outflows that have not been detected previously at other wavelengths and 5 mid-infrared counterparts of the HH objects detected in this work. Using the AllWISE Source Catalog and the source classification scheme suggested by Koenig et al., we have identified 56 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Vela C molecular cloud. The possible driving sources of the HH objects and EGOs are discussed based on the morphology of HH objects and EGOs and the locations of HH objects, EGOs and YSO candidates. Finally we associate 12 HH objects and 5 EGOs with 10 YSOs and YSO candidates. The median length of the outflows in Vela C is 0.35 pc and the outflows seem to be oriented randomly.

  13. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Central and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Reports the state-of-the-art in seismology and earthquake engineering that is being advanced in Central and South America. Provides basic information on seismological station locations in Latin America and some of the programmes in strong-motion seismology, as well as some of the organizations involved in these activities.-from Author

  14. Satellite Remote Sensing in Seismology. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Tronin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of satellite methods is applied now in seismology. The first applications of satellite data for earthquake exploration were initiated in the ‘70s, when active faults were mapped on satellite images. It was a pure and simple extrapolation of airphoto geological interpretation methods into space. The modern embodiment of this method is alignment analysis. Time series of alignments on the Earth's surface are investigated before and after the earthquake. A further application of satellite data in seismology is related with geophysical methods. Electromagnetic methods have about the same long history of application for seismology. Stable statistical estimations of ionosphere-lithosphere relation were obtained based on satellite ionozonds. The most successful current project "DEMETER" shows impressive results. Satellite thermal infra-red data were applied for earthquake research in the next step. Numerous results have confirmed previous observations of thermal anomalies on the Earth's surface prior to earthquakes. A modern trend is the application of the outgoing long-wave radiation for earthquake research. In ‘80s a new technology—satellite radar interferometry—opened a new page. Spectacular pictures of co-seismic deformations were presented. Current researches are moving in the direction of pre-earthquake deformation detection. GPS technology is also widely used in seismology both for ionosphere sounding and for ground movement detection. Satellite gravimetry has demonstrated its first very impressive results on the example of the catastrophic Indonesian earthquake in 2004. Relatively new applications of remote sensing for seismology as atmospheric sounding, gas observations, and cloud analysis are considered as possible candidates for applications.

  15. A Look at the Future of Controlled-Source Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, G. R.; Klemperer, S.; Hole, J.; Snelson, C.

    2008-12-01

    Facilities like EarthScope and IRIS/PASSCAL offer a framework in which to re-assess the role of our highest- resolution geophysical tool, controlled-source seismology. This tool is effective in near surface studies that focus on the upper 100 m of the crust to studies that focus on Moho structure and the lithospheric mantle. IRIS has now existed for over two decades and has transformed the way in which passive-source seismology in particular is carried out. Progress over these two decades has led to major discoveries about continental architecture and evolution through the development of three-dimensional images of the upper mantle and lithosphere. Simultaneously the hydrocarbon exploration industry has mapped increasingly large fractions of our sedimentary basins in three-dimensions and at unprecedented resolution and fidelity. Thanks to the additional instruments in the EarthScope facility, a clear scientific need and opportunity exists to map, at similar resolution, all of the crust - the igneous/metamorphic basement, the non-petroliferous basins that contain the record of continental evolution, and the seismogenic faults and active volcanoes that are the principal natural hazards we face. Controlled-source seismology remains the fundamental technology behind exploration for all fossil fuels and many water resources, and as such is a multi-billion-dollar industry centered in the USA. Academic scientists are leaders in developing the algorithms to process the most advanced industry data, but lack the academic data sets to which to apply this technology. University and government controlled-source seismologists, and their students who will populate the exploration industry, are increasingly divorced from that industry by their reliance on sparse spatial recording of usually only a single-component of the wavefield, generated by even sparser seismic sources. However, if we can find the resources, the technology now exists to provide seismic images of immense

  16. ObsPy: A Python toolbox for seismology - Sustainability, New Features, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, L.; Megies, T.; Sales de Andrade, E.; Barsch, R.; MacCarthy, J.

    2016-12-01

    ObsPy (https://www.obspy.org) is a community-driven, open-source project dedicated to offer a bridge for seismology into the scientific Python ecosystem. Amongst other things, it provides Read and write support for essentially every commonly used data format in seismology with a unified interface. This includes waveform data as well as station and event meta information. A signal processing toolbox tuned to the specific needs of seismologists. Integrated access to the largest data centers, web services, and databases. Wrappers around third party codes like libmseed and evalresp. Using ObsPy enables users to take advantage of the vast scientific ecosystem that has developed around Python. In contrast to many other programming languages and tools, Python is simple enough to enable an exploratory and interactive coding style desired by many scientists. At the same time it is a full-fledged programming language usable by software engineers to build complex and large programs. This combination makes it very suitable for use in seismology where research code often must be translated to stable and production ready environments, especially in the age of big data. ObsPy has seen constant development for more than six years and enjoys a large rate of adoption in the seismological community with thousands of users. Successful applications include time-dependent and rotational seismology, big data processing, event relocations, and synthetic studies about attenuation kernels and full-waveform inversions to name a few examples. Additionally it sparked the development of several more specialized packages slowly building a modern seismological ecosystem around it. We will present a short overview of the capabilities of ObsPy and point out several representative use cases and more specialized software built around ObsPy. Additionally we will discuss new and upcoming features, as well as the sustainability of open-source scientific software.

  17. Seismology software: state of the practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. Spencer; Zeng, Zheng; Carette, Jacques

    2018-05-01

    We analyzed the state of practice for software development in the seismology domain by comparing 30 software packages on four aspects: product, implementation, design, and process. We found room for improvement in most seismology software packages. The principal areas of concern include a lack of adequate requirements and design specification documents, a lack of test data to assess reliability, a lack of examples to get new users started, and a lack of technological tools to assist with managing the development process. To assist going forward, we provide recommendations for a document-driven development process that includes a problem statement, development plan, requirement specification, verification and validation (V&V) plan, design specification, code, V&V report, and a user manual. We also provide advice on tool use, including issue tracking, version control, code documentation, and testing tools.

  18. Seismology software: state of the practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. Spencer; Zeng, Zheng; Carette, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    We analyzed the state of practice for software development in the seismology domain by comparing 30 software packages on four aspects: product, implementation, design, and process. We found room for improvement in most seismology software packages. The principal areas of concern include a lack of adequate requirements and design specification documents, a lack of test data to assess reliability, a lack of examples to get new users started, and a lack of technological tools to assist with managing the development process. To assist going forward, we provide recommendations for a document-driven development process that includes a problem statement, development plan, requirement specification, verification and validation (V&V) plan, design specification, code, V&V report, and a user manual. We also provide advice on tool use, including issue tracking, version control, code documentation, and testing tools.

  19. Strategic decision analysis applied to borehole seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, M.M.; Paulsson, B.N.P.

    1994-01-01

    Strategic Decision Analysis (SDA) is the evolving body of knowledge on how to achieve high quality in the decision that shapes an organization's future. SDA comprises philosophy, process concepts, methodology, and tools for making good decisions. It specifically incorporates many concepts and tools from economic evaluation and risk analysis. Chevron Petroleum Technology Company (CPTC) has applied SDA to evaluate and prioritize a number of its most important and most uncertain R and D projects, including borehole seismology. Before SDA, there were significant issues and concerns about the value to CPTC of continuing to work on borehole seismology. The SDA process created a cross-functional team of experts to structure and evaluate this project. A credible economic model was developed, discrete risks and continuous uncertainties were assessed, and an extensive sensitivity analysis was performed. The results, even applied to a very restricted drilling program for a few years, were good enough to demonstrate the value of continuing the project. This paper explains the SDA philosophy concepts, and process and demonstrates the methodology and tools using the borehole seismology project example. SDA is useful in the upstream industry not just in the R and D/technology decisions, but also in major exploration and production decisions. Since a major challenge for upstream companies today is to create and realize value, the SDA approach should have a very broad applicability

  20. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern

    2014-01-01

    of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of Lx ~ 3x10^36 erg/s. Besides the prominent...... of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable...

  1. On the Origin of Hard X-ray Structures in the VELA Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    1998-12-01

    We propose an alternative explanation for the origin of two hard X-ray structures recently discovered in the central part of the Vela supernova remnant (SNR) by Willmore et al. (1992, MNRAS, 254, 139) and Markwardt & Ogelman (1995, Nature, 375, 40; 1997, ApJ, 480, L13), and interpreted as a plerion and a pulsar jet respectively. We suggest that the first structure is a dense material shed by the supernova progenitor star during the red supergiant stage, and reheated after the supernova exploded, while the "jet" is simply a dense filament in the Vela SNR's general shell, whose origin is connected with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the (main-sequence) wind-driven shell reaccelerated by the supernova blast wave.

  2. The great Imagist in Vela ao crucificado: a study of the language of cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Carvalho Fonseca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinematographic language is recognized for its capacity for expression and creativity. Through the creation of the camera, in the exhibition, and of the assembly, in the narration, the narrative of the cinema is constructed. In Vela ao Crucificado, a study of the point of view is able to perceive how the great imagist mobilizes language mechanisms, present in the short film of Frederico Machado, in the construction of a discourse that reveals itself paradoxical.

  3. The Vela Cloud: A Giant H I Anomaly in the NGC 3256 GROUP

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Jayanne; Koribalski, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; McCain, Claudia F.

    2010-01-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of a galaxy-sized intergalactic H I cloud ("the Vela Cloud") in the NGC 3256 galaxy group. The group contains the prominent merging galaxy NGC 3256, which is surrounded by a number of H I fragments, the tidally disturbed galaxy NGC 3263, and several other peculiar galaxies. The Vela Cloud, with an H I mass of 3-5 × 10^9 M_{⊙}, resides southeast of NGC 3256 and west of NGC 3263, within an area of 9' × 16' (100 kpc × 175 kpc for an adopted distance of 38 Mpc). In our ATCA data the Vela Cloud appears as three diffuse components and contains four density enhancements. The Vela Cloud's properties, together with its group environment, suggest that it has a tidal origin. Each density enhancement contains ˜ 10^{8} M_{⊙} of H I gas, which is sufficient material for the formation of globular cluster progenitors. However, if we represent the enhancements as Bonnor-Ebert spheres, then the pressure of the surrounding H I would need to increase by at least a factor of 9 in order to cause the collapse of an enhancement. Thus we do not expect them to form massive bound stellar systems like super star clusters or tidal dwarf galaxies. Since the H I density enhancements have some properties in common with high-velocity clouds, we explore whether they may evolve to be identified with these starless clouds instead. Original plate material is copyright © the Royal Observatory Edinburgh and the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The plates were processed into the present compressed digital form with their permission. The Digitized Sky Survey was produced at the Space Telescope Science Institute under US Government grant NAG W-2166.

  4. Probing Gamma-ray Emission of Geminga & Vela with Non-stationary Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Chai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that the high energy emissions from isolated pulsars are emitted from relativistic electrons/positrons accelerated in outer magnetospheric accelerators (outergaps via a curvature radiation mechanism, which has a simple exponential cut-off spectrum. However, many gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi LAT (Large Area Telescope cannot be fitted by simple exponential cut-off spectrum, and instead a sub-exponential is more appropriate. It is proposed that the realistic outergaps are non-stationary, and that the observed spectrum is a superposition of different stationary states that are controlled by the currents injected from the inner and outer boundaries. The Vela and Geminga pulsars have the largest fluxes among all targets observed, which allows us to carry out very detailed phase-resolved spectral analysis. We have divided the Vela and Geminga pulsars into 19 (the off pulse of Vela was not included and 33 phase bins, respectively. We find that most phase resolved spectra still cannot be fitted by a simple exponential spectrum: in fact, a sub-exponential spectrum is necessary. We conclude that non-stationary states exist even down to the very fine phase bins.

  5. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA-X PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We report on gamma-ray observations in the off-pulse window of the Vela pulsar PSR B0833-45 using 11 months of survey data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This pulsar is located in the 8 deg. diameter Vela supernova remnant, which contains several regions of non-thermal emission detected in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The gamma-ray emission detected by the LAT lies within one of these regions, the 2 deg. x 3 deg. area south of the pulsar known as Vela-X. The LAT flux is significantly spatially extended with a best-fit radius of 0. 0 88 ± 0. 0 12 for an assumed radially symmetric uniform disk. The 200 MeV to 20 GeV LAT spectrum of this source is well described by a power law with a spectral index of 2.41 ± 0.09 ± 0.15 and integral flux above 100 MeV of (4.73 ± 0.63 ± 1.32) x 10 -7 cm -2 s -1 . The first errors represent the statistical error on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. Detailed morphological and spectral analyses give strong constraints on the energetics and magnetic field of the pulsar wind nebula system and favor a scenario with two distinct electron populations.

  6. El cambio de clase en vela infantil y juvenil: estudios desde 2003 hasta 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Renom Pinsach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta las principales conclusiones del Programa de tutorización para el cambio de clase (PTCC iniciado por la Federación Catalana de Vela (FCV en el 2001. Se trata de un proyecto inédito a nivel internacional, que pretende conocer e incidir en la mejora continua del paso de los regatistas infantiles a las clases juveniles. En vela de competición, el tiempo final en la clase Optimist, la elección de una nueva clase y las primeras experiencias en la escogida son momentos clave de la vida deportiva de los regatistas. Después de un periodo piloto, en el 2003 se inició un proceso de 10 años durante el que se han llevado a cabo tres estudios (2003, 2008 y 2013 de seguimiento e intervención de las flotas infantiles y juveniles de la FCV. Mediante cuestionarios creados para este proyecto se han recogido impresiones de 370 regatistas infantiles, 231 juveniles y de 170 padres y madres. Vista la extensión de los resultados, el artículo se centra en las tendencias que más informan sobre la evolución de los regatistas, especialmente en el estudio de 2013, a la vez que presenta el PTCC como un posible modelo para el seguimiento de flotas aplicable a otras organizaciones relacionadas con la vela de competición.

  7. The origin of X-ray protrusions in the VELA supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    We propose a possible explanation for the formation of X-ray protrusions in the Vela SNR, recently observed by the ROSAT X-ray telescope (Aschenbach, Egger & Trumper, 1995, Nature, 373, 587). We suggest that the highly asymmetric shape of the Vela SNR is the result of the interaction of the SN ejecta/shock with the pre-existing wind-driven shell blown-up in a medium with a density gradient (perpendicular to the Galactic plane). The interaction of the radiative (north-east) half of the remnant, approaching towards the Galactic plane, with dense obstacles (cloudlets or wind zones of stars) can produce X-ray "bullets" radially moving beyond the SNR boundary. These "bullets" originate due to the cooling and condensation of a gas swept-up by converging conical shocks arising behind the dense obstacles overtaken by the SN shock. The X-ray protrusions observed in the western part of the remnant might be explained by outflows of hot gas of the SNR's interior emanating through the gaps in the shell. The origin of the X-ray "jet" (Markwardt & Ogelman, 1995, Nature, 375, 40) in the central part of the Vela SNR is also discussed.

  8. Jueces y oficiales de regatas a vela; motivaciones, percepciones y formación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Renom Pinsach

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este es un primer estudio exploratorio sobre las percepciones y creencias de los Jueces y Oficiales de regatas españoles. Todas las modalidades de regatas a vela son actividades complejas que requieren un elevado nivel de organización y preparación por parte de quienes integran los Comités de Regata y de Protestas. Con este fin la mayoría de programas de formación para jueces y oficiales están enfocados al conocimiento técnico, y correcta aplicación, del Reglamento de Regatas a Vela. No obstante, la organización de una regata también requiere de otras habilidades personales necesarias para gestionar y solucionar, normalmente bajo presión, situaciones producidas tanto a bordo como en tierra. Mediante un cuestionario cualitativo el objetivo de este trabajo consiste en extraer información a cerca de las motivaciones, sentimientos y creencias de 170 jueces y oficiales acreditados por la Real Federación Española de Vela. Esto permite identificar necesidades y nuevos contenidos para un futuro programa de preparación que implique también habilidades psicológicas.

  9. Rotational Seismology Workshop of February 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R.; Cochard, A.; Graizer, Vladimir; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hutt, Charles R.; Igel, H.; Lee, William H.K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; Majewski, Eugeniusz; Nigbor, Robert; Safak, Erdal; Savage, William U.; Schreiber, U.; Teisseyre, Roman; Trifunac, Mihailo; Wassermann, J.; Wu, Chien-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A successful workshop titled 'Measuring the Rotation Effects of Strong Ground Motion' was held simultaneously in Menlo Park and Pasadena via video conference on 16 February 2006. The purpose of the Workshop and this Report are to summarize existing data and theory and to explore future challenges for rotational seismology, including free-field strong motion, structural strong motion, and teleseismic motions. We also forged a consensus on the plan of work to be pursued by this international group in the near term. At this first workshop were 16 participants in Menlo Park, 13 in Pasadena, and a few on the telephone. It was organized by William H. K. Lee and John R. Evans and chaired by William U. Savage in Menlo Park and by Kenneth W. Hudnut in Pasadena. Its agenda is given in the Appendix. This workshop and efforts in Europe led to the creation of the International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS), an international volunteer group providing forums for exchange of ideas and data as well as hosting a series of Workshops and Special Sessions. IWGoRS created a Web site, backed by an FTP site, for distribution of materials related to rotational seismology. At present, the FTP site contains the 2006 Workshop agenda (also given in the Appendix below) and its PowerPoint presentations, as well as many papers (reasonable-only basis with permission of their authors), a comprehensive citations list, and related information. Eventually, the Web site will become the sole authoritative source for IWGoRS and shared information: http://www.rotational-seismology.org ftp://ehzftp.wr.usgs.gov/jrevans/IWGoRS_FTPsite/ With contributions from various authors during and after the 2006 Workshop, this Report proceeds from the theoretical bases for making rotational measurements (Graizer, Safak, Trifunac) through the available observations (Huang, Lee, Liu, Nigbor), proposed suites of measurements (Hudnut), a discussion of broadband teleseismic rotational

  10. ObsPy - A Python Toolbox for Seismology - and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, L.; Megies, T.; Barsch, R.; MacCarthy, J.; Lecocq, T.; Koymans, M. R.; Carothers, L.; Eulenfeld, T.; Reyes, C. G.; Falco, N.; Sales de Andrade, E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent years witnessed the evolution of Python's ecosystem into one of the most powerful and productive scientific environments across disciplines. ObsPy (https://www.obspy.org) is a fully community driven, open-source project dedicated to provide a bridge for seismology into that ecosystem. It is a Python toolbox offering: Read and write support for essentially every commonly used data format in seismology with a unified interface and automatic format detection. This includes waveform data (MiniSEED, SAC, SEG-Y, Reftek, …) as well as station (SEED, StationXML, SC3ML, …) and event meta information (QuakeML, ZMAP, …). Integrated access to the largest data centers, web services, and real-time data streams (FDSNWS, ArcLink, SeedLink, ...). A powerful signal processing toolbox tuned to the specific needs of seismologists. Utility functionality like travel time calculations with the TauP method, geodetic functions, and data visualizations. ObsPy has been in constant development for more than eight years and is developed and used by scientists around the world with successful applications in all branches of seismology. Additionally it nowadays serves as the foundation for a large number of more specialized packages. Newest features include: Full interoperability of SEED and StationXML/Inventory objects Access to the Nominal Response Library (NRL) for easy and quick creation of station metadata from scratch Support for the IRIS Federated Catalog Service Improved performance of the EarthWorm client Several improvements to MiniSEED read/write module Improved plotting capabilities for PPSD (spectrograms, PSD of discrete frequencies over time, ..) Support for.. Reading ArcLink Inventory XML Reading Reftek data format Writing SeisComp3 ML (SC3ML) Writing StationTXT format This presentation will give a short overview of the capabilities of ObsPy and point out several representative or new use cases and show-case some projects that are based on ObsPy, e.g.: seismo

  11. EPOS Seismology services and their users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Florian; Dupont, Aurelien; Michelini, Alberto; Rietbrock, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Wiemer, Stefan; Basili, Roberto; Bossu, Rémy; Cakti, Eser; Cotton, Fabrice; Crawford, Wayne; Crowley, Helen; Danciu, Laurentiu; Diaz, Jordi; Garth, Tom; Locati, Mario; Luzi, Lucia; Pitilakis, Kyriazis; Roumelioti, Zafeiria; Strollo, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    The construction of seismological community services for the European Plate Observing System Research Infrastructure (EPOS) is by now well under way. A significant number of services are already operational, largely based on those existing at established institutions or collaborations like ORFEUS, EMSC, AHEAD and EFEHR, and more are being added to be ready for internal validation by late 2017. In this presentation we focus on a number of issues related to the interaction of the community of users with the services provided by the seismological part of the EPOS research infrastructure. How users interact with a service (and how satisfied they are with this interaction) is viewed as one important component of the validation of a service within EPOS, and certainly is key to the uptake of a service and from that also it's attributed value. Within EPOS Seismology, the following aspects of user interaction have already surfaced: - user identification (and potential tracking) versus ease-of-access and openness Requesting users to identify themselves when accessing a service provides various advantages to providers and users (e.g. quantifying & qualifying the service use, customization of services and interfaces, handling access rights and quotas), but may impact the ease of access and also shy away users who don't wish to be identified for whatever reason. - service availability versus cost There is a clear and prominent connection between the availability of a service, both regarding uptime and capacity, and its operational cost (IT systems and personnel), and it is often not clear where to draw the line (and based on which considerations). In connection to that, how to best utilize third-party IT infrastructures (either commercial or public), and what the long-term cost implications of that might be, is equally open. - licensing and attribution The issue of intellectual property and associated licensing policies for data, products and services is only recently gaining

  12. EPOS-Seismology: building the Thematic Core Service for Seismology during the EPOS Implementation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Florian; EPOS Seismology Consortium, the

    2015-04-01

    After the successful completion of the EPOS Preparatory Phase, the community of European Research Infrastructures in Seismology is now moving ahead with the build-up of the Thematic Core Service (TCS) for Seismology in EPOS, EPOS-Seismology. Seismology is a domain where European-level infrastructures have been developed since decades, often supported by large-scale EU projects. Today these infrastructures provide services to access earthquake waveforms (ORFEUS), parameters (EMSC) and hazard data and products (EFEHR). The existing organizations constitute the backbone of infrastructures that also in future will continue to manage and host the services of the TCS EPOS-Seismology. While the governance and internal structure of these organizations will remain active, and continue to provide direct interaction with the community, EPOS-Seismology will provide the integration of these within EPOS. The main challenge in the build-up of the TCS EPOS-Seismology is to improve and extend these existing services, producing a single framework which is technically, organizationally and financially integrated with the EPOS architecture, and to further engage various kinds of end users (e.g. scientists, engineers, public managers, citizen scientists). On the technical side the focus lies on four major tasks: - the construction of the next generation software architecture for the European Integrated (waveform) Data Archive EIDA, developing advanced metadata and station information services, fully integrate strong motion waveforms and derived parametric engineering-domain data, and advancing the integration of mobile (temporary) networks and OBS deployments in EIDA; - the further development and expansion of services to access seismological products of scientific interest as provided by the community by implementing a common collection and development (IT) platform, improvements in the earthquake information services e.g. by introducing more robust quality indicators and diversifying

  13. Promoting seismology education and research via the IRIS Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J. J.; Bravo, T. K.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; McQuillan, P.; Sumy, D. F.; Welti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology's Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program is committed to advancing awareness and understanding of seismology and geophysics, while inspiring careers in the Earth sciences. To achieve this mission, IRIS EPO combines content and research expertise of consortium membership with educational and outreach expertise of IRIS staff to create a portfolio of programs, products, and services that target a range of audiences, including grades 6-12 students and teachers, undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and the general public. IRIS also partners with UNAVCO and other organizations in support of EarthScope where the facilities are well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences. Examples of research-related EPO products and services include the following resources. Tools developed in collaboration with IRIS Data Services provide public and educational access to data, and to a suite of data products. Teachers can stream seismic data from educational or research sensors into their classroom, and the Active Earth Monitor display, designed for visitor centers, universities and small museums, provides views of recent data along with animations that explain seismology concepts, and stories about recent research. Teachable Moment slide sets, created in collaboration with the University of Portland within 24 hours of major earthquakes, provide interpreted USGS tectonic maps and summaries, animations, visualizations, and other event-specific information so educators can explore newsworthy earthquakes with their students. Intro undergraduate classroom activities have been designed to introduce students to some grand challenges in seismological research, while our Research Experiences for Undergraduates program pairs students with seismology researchers throughout the Consortium and provides the opportunity for the students to present their research at a national meeting. EPO activities are evaluated via a

  14. WFCatalog: A catalogue for seismological waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Luca; Koymans, Mathijs; Atkinson, Malcolm; Sleeman, Reinoud; Filgueira, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports advances in seismic waveform description and discovery leading to a new seismological service and presents the key steps in its design, implementation and adoption. This service, named WFCatalog, which stands for waveform catalogue, accommodates features of seismological waveform data. Therefore, it meets the need for seismologists to be able to select waveform data based on seismic waveform features as well as sensor geolocations and temporal specifications. We describe the collaborative design methods and the technical solution showing the central role of seismic feature catalogues in framing the technical and operational delivery of the new service. Also, we provide an overview of the complex environment wherein this endeavour is scoped and the related challenges discussed. As multi-disciplinary, multi-organisational and global collaboration is necessary to address today's challenges, canonical representations can provide a focus for collaboration and conceptual tools for agreeing directions. Such collaborations can be fostered and formalised by rallying intellectual effort into the design of novel scientific catalogues and the services that support them. This work offers an example of the benefits generated by involving cross-disciplinary skills (e.g. data and domain expertise) from the early stages of design, and by sustaining the engagement with the target community throughout the delivery and deployment process.

  15. Vital Signs: Seismology of Icy Ocean Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven D; Kedar, Sharon; Panning, Mark P; Stähler, Simon C; Bills, Bruce G; Lorenz, Ralph D; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Pike, W T; Castillo, Julie C; Lognonné, Philippe; Tsai, Victor C; Rhoden, Alyssa R

    2018-01-01

    Ice-covered ocean worlds possess diverse energy sources and associated mechanisms that are capable of driving significant seismic activity, but to date no measurements of their seismic activity have been obtained. Such investigations could reveal the transport properties and radial structures, with possibilities for locating and characterizing trapped liquids that may host life and yielding critical constraints on redox fluxes and thus on habitability. Modeling efforts have examined seismic sources from tectonic fracturing and impacts. Here, we describe other possible seismic sources, their associations with science questions constraining habitability, and the feasibility of implementing such investigations. We argue, by analogy with the Moon, that detectable seismic activity should occur frequently on tidally flexed ocean worlds. Their ices fracture more easily than rocks and dissipate more tidal energy than the worlds also should create less thermal noise due to their greater distance and consequently smaller diurnal temperature variations. They also lack substantial atmospheres (except in the case of Titan) that would create additional noise. Thus, seismic experiments could be less complex and less susceptible to noise than prior or planned planetary seismology investigations of the Moon or Mars. Key Words: Seismology-Redox-Ocean worlds-Europa-Ice-Hydrothermal. Astrobiology 18, 37-53.

  16. Macroalgae fouling community as quality element for the evaluation of the ecological status in Vela Luka Bay, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorana Jelic Mrcelic

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available One year qualitative and quantitative study of communities of three major taxonomic groups has been carried out at test panles placed in the upper infarlittoral zone of coastal area of Vela Luka Bay, Croatia. A list of 44 taxa was recorded. Chaetomorpha sp., Ulva sp., Fosliella farinosa, Sphacelaria cirrosa, Polysiphonia scopulorum were the most frequent dominant taxa. Among 27 algal taxa with noticeable presence only three were classified as ESG (Ecological State Groups I. Low diversity and species richness together with massive presence of the green algae (as Ulva sp. and negligible presence of ESG I taxa, may lead to erroneous conclusion that Vela Luka Bay is eutrophicated area. Low values of biomass and R/P (Rhodophyceae by Phaeophyceae ratio Index together with dominance of Phaeophyta also support conclusion that there is no negative impact of nutrient enrichment on macrophyta fouling community in Vela Luka Bay.

  17. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present NuSTAR observations of Vela X-1, a persistent, yet highly variable, neutron star high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). Two observations were taken at similar orbital phases but separated by nearly a year. They show very different 3-79 keV flux levels as well as strong variability during each observation, covering almost one order of magnitude in flux. These observations allow, for the first time ever, investigations on kilo-second time-scales of how the centroid energies of cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) depend on flux for a persistent HMXB. We find that the line energy of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of L {sub x} ∼ 3 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. Besides the prominent harmonic line at 55 keV the fundamental line around 25 keV is clearly detected. We find that the strengths of the two CRSFs are anti-correlated, which we explain by photon spawning. This anti-correlation is a possible explanation for the debate about the existence of the fundamental line. The ratio of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable. It is likely that the source switched to a different accretion regime at these low mass accretion rates, explaining the drastic change in spectral shape.

  18. STRUCTURES OF THE VELA PULSAR AND THE GLITCH CRISIS FROM THE BRUECKNER THEORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.; Dong, J. M.; Wang, J. B.; Xu, R. X.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed structures of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45, with a period of 89.33 ms) are predicted by adopting a recently constructed unified treatment of all parts of neutron stars: the outer crust, the inner crust, and the core based on modern microscopic Brueckner–Hartree–Fock calculations. Taking a pulsar mass in the range from 1.0 to 2.0 M ⊙ , we calculate the central density, the core/crust radii, the core/crustal mass, the core/crustal thickness, the moment of inertia, and the crustal moment of inertia. Among them, the crustal moment of inertia could be effectively constrained from the accumulated glitch observations, which has been a great debate recently, known as the “glitch crisis.” Namely, superfluid neutrons contained in the inner crust, which are regarded as the origin of the glitch in the standard two-component model, could be largely entrained in the nuclei lattices, and then there may not be enough superfluid neutrons (∼4/5 less than the previous value) to trigger the large glitches (Δν/ν 0  ∼ 10 −6 ) in the Vela pulsar. By confronting the glitch observations with the theoretical calculations for the crustal moment of inertia, we find that despite some recent opposition to the crisis argument, the glitch crisis is still present, which means that besides the crustal superfluid neutrons, core neutrons might be necessary for explaining the large glitches of the Vela pulsar

  19. STRUCTURES OF THE VELA PULSAR AND THE GLITCH CRISIS FROM THE BRUECKNER THEORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, A. [Department of Astronomy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Dong, J. M. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, J. B. [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Xu, R. X., E-mail: liang@xmu.edu.cn [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Detailed structures of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45, with a period of 89.33 ms) are predicted by adopting a recently constructed unified treatment of all parts of neutron stars: the outer crust, the inner crust, and the core based on modern microscopic Brueckner–Hartree–Fock calculations. Taking a pulsar mass in the range from 1.0 to 2.0 M{sub ⊙}, we calculate the central density, the core/crust radii, the core/crustal mass, the core/crustal thickness, the moment of inertia, and the crustal moment of inertia. Among them, the crustal moment of inertia could be effectively constrained from the accumulated glitch observations, which has been a great debate recently, known as the “glitch crisis.” Namely, superfluid neutrons contained in the inner crust, which are regarded as the origin of the glitch in the standard two-component model, could be largely entrained in the nuclei lattices, and then there may not be enough superfluid neutrons (∼4/5 less than the previous value) to trigger the large glitches (Δν/ν{sub 0} ∼ 10{sup −6}) in the Vela pulsar. By confronting the glitch observations with the theoretical calculations for the crustal moment of inertia, we find that despite some recent opposition to the crisis argument, the glitch crisis is still present, which means that besides the crustal superfluid neutrons, core neutrons might be necessary for explaining the large glitches of the Vela pulsar.

  20. Understanding and Observing Subglacial Friction Using Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, V. C.

    2017-12-01

    Glaciology began with a focus on understanding basic mechanical processes and producing physical models that could explain the principal observations. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to the wealth of recent observations, with many modeling efforts relying on data assimilation and empirical scalings, rather than being based on first-principles physics. Notably, ice sheet models commonly assume that subglacial friction is characterized by a "slipperiness" coefficient that is determined by inverting surface velocity observations. Predictions are usually then made by assuming these slipperiness coefficients are spatially and temporally fixed. However, this is only valid if slipperiness is an unchanging material property of the bed and, despite decades of work on subglacial friction, it has remained unclear how to best account for such subglacial physics in ice sheet models. Here, we describe how basic seismological concepts and observations can be used to improve our understanding and determination of subglacial friction. First, we discuss how standard models of granular friction can and should be used in basal friction laws for marine ice sheets, where very low effective pressures exist. We show that under realistic West Antarctic Ice Sheet conditions, standard Coulomb friction should apply in a relatively narrow zone near the grounding line and that this should transition abruptly as one moves inland to a different, perhaps Weertman-style, dependence of subglacial stress on velocity. We show that this subglacial friction law predicts significantly different ice sheet behavior even as compared with other friction laws that include effective pressure. Secondly, we explain how seismological observations of water flow noise and basal icequakes constrain subglacial physics in important ways. Seismically observed water flow noise can provide constraints on water pressures and channel sizes and geometry, leading to important data on subglacial friction

  1. Análise de risco ecológico na Lagoa da Vela

    OpenAIRE

    Abrantes, Nelson José Cabaços

    2007-01-01

    A Análise de Risco Ecológico (ARE) é um processo sistemático de avaliação da probabilidade de efeitos adversos ocorrerem em resultado da exposição a um ou mais agentes de stress ambiental. No contexto da tomada de decisão relativa aos problemas ambientais, a ARE tem-se mostrado como uma ferramenta fundamental e eficaz, sendo cada vez mais utilizada nos países desenvolvidos. Contudo, em Portugal, o seu uso continua muito limitado e incipiente. A Lagoa da Vela, localizada n...

  2. La navegación con vela adaptada y la rehabilitación motriz

    OpenAIRE

    Penas, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Esta investigación trata de la navegación con vela adaptada como complemento de la rehabilitación motriz de lesionados medulares bajos. Se aborda esta práctica deportiva desde el punto de vista del beneficio físico que implica, y de los aportes que le brinda la kinesiología. En la actualidad, la política de inclusión social del discapacitado se está relacionando cada vez más con el deporte adaptado, buscando más opciones para abarcar las discapacidades neuromotrices. Objetiv...

  3. Seismology, 1983, nuclear test ban verification earthquake and earth resource investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    This progress report for 1983 is the fourth yearly report summarizing the activities of the Division of Applied Seismology of the National Defence Research Institute (FOA) in Sweden. This division of the Institute is mainly involved in seismic discrimination and nuclear explosion monitoring. Special attention is paid in this report to the development of International Data Centers as a component of a global monitoring system. The division is also conducting a project on seismic risk estimation at nuclear power plants in Sweden. This project includes operating a network of local seismic stations in Sweden. Two seismic exploration projects are also currently being conducted. One project involves the further development of seismic methods for oil exploration, and the other the investigation of crystalline rock using seismic cross hole measurement. Finally the Division of Applied Seismology is conducting a project where seismic sensor in military applications are studied.

  4. The Nature of the Vela Supernova Remnant as Revealed by O VI and C IV Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Nichols J.; Slavin, J.; Anderson, C.

    2001-01-01

    Highly ionized gas, in particular C IV and O VI, is produced in the interstellar medium in regions with hot (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) X-ray emitting gas and at the boundaries where hot gas and cooler (T approx. 10(exp 4) K) gas interact. Supernova remnant shocks produce most of the hot gas in the ISM and, if they are in the correct range of speeds, should produce observable quantities of C IV and O VI absorption. In turn, the column densities of these ions are potentially powerful diagnostics of the shock speed and interstellar environment in which the SNR is evolving. With the advent of FUSE, the power of this diagnostic technique is now available. We have FUSE data toward 8 stars behind the Vela SNR, and have developed a data reduction and analysis method that produces reasonably reliable O VI column densities, in spite of the complexities of the FUSE spectra in this region. In order to gain insight into the observational results, the Vela SNR evolution was modelled using Piecewise Parabolic Method numerical hydrodynamics code. The code is 1-D and incorporates non-equilibrium ionization, radiative cooling, thermal conduction and magnetic pressure.

  5. Hard x ray observations of Vela X-1 and A0535+26 with HEXE: Discovery of cyclotron lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziorra, E.; Mony, B.; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.; Reppin, C.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    The X ray pulsars Vela X-1 (4U 0900-40) and A0535+26) were observed with the High Energy X ray Experiment (HEXE) onboard the Mir space station at energies above 20 keV. The pulse profiles of Vela X-1 (P = 283.22 s for JD 244 7486) and A0535+26 (P = 103.27 s for JD 244 7626) were measured up to at least 100 keV. The time averaged pulse profiles of the two sources both show a clear double peak structure with an asymmetric main pulse and a more symmetric secondary pulse. The spectrum of the main pulse is significantly harder than that of the secondary. Pulse phase resolved spectra show absorption features at 54 keV and possibly 27 keV for Vela X-1 and around 100 keV for A0535+26. If these features are interpreted as second and first harmonic (fundamental) cyclotron absorption lines, lower limits are derived of 2.6 x 10(exp 12) and 4.3 x 10(exp 12) Gauss for the magnetic fields of the neutron stars in Vela X-1 and A0535+26, respectively.

  6. The VELA-X-Pulsar Wind Nebula Revisited with Four Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, M. -H.; Romani, R. W.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, Alice K.; Reposeur, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is the closest SNR to Earth containing an active pulsar, the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45). This pulsar is an archetype of the middle-aged pulsar class and powers a bright pulsar wind nebula (PWN), Vela-X, spanning a region of 2deg × 3deg south of the pulsar and observed in the radio, X-ray, and very high energy ?-ray domains. The detection of the Vela-X PWN by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) was reported in the first year of the mission. Subsequently, we have reinvestigated this complex region and performed a detailed morphological and spectral analysis of this source using 4 yr of Fermi-LAT observations. This study lowers the threshold for morphological analysis of the nebula from 0.8 GeV to 0.3 GeV, allowing for the inspection of distinct energy bands by the LAT for the first time. We describe the recent results obtained on this PWN and discuss the origin of the newly detected spatial features.

  7. a Collaborative Cyberinfrastructure for Earthquake Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, R.; Roussel, F.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Lefebvre, S.; Steed, R.

    2013-12-01

    One of the challenges in real time seismology is the prediction of earthquake's impact. It is particularly true for moderate earthquake (around magnitude 6) located close to urbanised areas, where the slightest uncertainty in event location, depth, magnitude estimates, and/or misevaluation of propagation characteristics, site effects and buildings vulnerability can dramatically change impact scenario. The Euro-Med Seismological Centre (EMSC) has developed a cyberinfrastructure to collect observations from eyewitnesses in order to provide in-situ constraints on actual damages. This cyberinfrastructure takes benefit of the natural convergence of earthquake's eyewitnesses on EMSC website (www.emsc-csem.org), the second global earthquake information website within tens of seconds of the occurrence of a felt event. It includes classical crowdsourcing tools such as online questionnaires available in 39 languages, and tools to collect geolocated pics. It also comprises information derived from the real time analysis of the traffic on EMSC website, a method named flashsourcing; In case of a felt earthquake, eyewitnesses reach EMSC website within tens of seconds to find out the cause of the shaking they have just been through. By analysing their geographical origin through their IP address, we automatically detect felt earthquakes and in some cases map the damaged areas through the loss of Internet visitors. We recently implemented a Quake Catcher Network (QCN) server in collaboration with Stanford University and the USGS, to collect ground motion records performed by volunteers and are also involved in a project to detect earthquakes from ground motions sensors from smartphones. Strategies have been developed for several social media (Facebook, Twitter...) not only to distribute earthquake information, but also to engage with the Citizens and optimise data collection. A smartphone application is currently under development. We will present an overview of this

  8. ASDF - A Modern Data Format for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Lion; Smith, James; Lei, Wenjie; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Ruan, Youyi; Sales de Andrade, Elliot; Podhorszki, Norbert; Bozdag, Ebru; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    Seismology as a science is driven by observing and understanding data and it is thus vital to make this as easy and accessible as possible. The growing volume of freely available data coupled with ever expanding computational power enables scientists to take on new and bigger problems. This evolution is to some part hindered as existing data formats have not been designed with it in mind. We present ASDF (http://seismic-data.org), the Adaptable Seismic Data Format, a novel, modern, and especially practical data format for all branches of seismology with particular focus on how it is incorporated into seismic full waveform inversion workflows. The format aims to solve five key issues: Efficiency: Fast I/O operations especially in high performance computing environments, especially limiting the total number of files. Data organization: Different types of data are needed for a variety of tasks. This results in ad hoc data organization and formats that are hard to maintain, integrate, reproduce, and exchange. Data exchange: We want to exchange complex and complete data sets. Reproducibility: Oftentimes just not existing but crucial to advance our science. Mining, visualization, and understanding of data: As data volumes grow, more complex, new techniques to query and visualize large datasets are needed. ASDF tackles these by defining a structure on top of HDF5 reusing as many existing standards (QuakeML, StationXML, PROV) as possible. An essential trait of ASDF is that it empowers the construction of completely self-describing data sets including waveform, station, and event data together with non-waveform data and a provenance description of everything. This for example for the first time enables the proper archival and exchange of processed or synthetic waveforms. To aid community adoption we developed mature tools in Python as well as in C and Fortran. Additionally we provide a formal definition of the format, a validation tool, and integration into widely used

  9. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  10. Refining Southern California Geotherms Using Seismologic, Geologic, and Petrologic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Chapman, D. S.; Allam, A. A.; Williams, C. F.

    2017-12-01

    Lithospheric deformation in tectonically active regions depends on the 3D distribution of rheology, which is in turn critically controlled by temperature. Under the auspices of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) we are developing a 3D Community Thermal Model (CTM) to constrain rheology and so better understand deformation processes within this complex but densely monitored and relatively well-understood region. The San Andreas transform system has sliced southern California into distinct blocks, each with characteristic lithologies, seismic velocities and thermal structures. Guided by the geometry of these blocks we use more than 250 surface heat-flow measurements to define 13 geographically distinct heat flow regions (HFRs). Model geotherms within each HFR are constrained by averages and variances of surface heat flow q0 and the 1D depth distribution of thermal conductivity (k) and radiogenic heat production (A), which are strongly dependent on rock type. Crustal lithologies are not always well known and we turn to seismic imaging for help. We interrogate the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM) to determine averages and variances of Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs versus depth within each HFR. We bound (A, k) versus depth by relying on empirical relations between seismic wave speed and rock type and laboratory and modeling methods relating (A, k) to rock type. Many 1D conductive geotherms for each HFR are allowed by the variances in surface heat flow and subsurface (A, k). An additional constraint on the lithosphere temperature field is provided by comparing lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depths identified seismologically with those defined thermally as the depth of onset of partial melting. Receiver function studies in Southern California indicate LAB depths that range from 40 km to 90 km. Shallow LAB depths are correlated with high surface heat flow and deep LAB with low heat flow. The much-restricted families of geotherms that intersect peridotite

  11. Detection of gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar wind nebula with AGILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, A; Trois, A; Tavani, M; Pilia, M; Giuliani, A; Pucella, G; Esposito, P; Sabatini, S; Piano, G; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Bulgarelli, A; Burgay, M; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A W; Cocco, V; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Hotan, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Palfreyman, J; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pittori, C; Possenti, A; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Santolamazza, P; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Trifoglio, M; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Verrecchia, F; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Antonelli, A; Salotti, L; D'Amico, N; Bignami, G F

    2010-02-05

    Pulsars are known to power winds of relativistic particles that can produce bright nebulae by interacting with the surrounding medium. These pulsar wind nebulae are observed by their radio, optical, and x-ray emissions, and in some cases also at TeV (teraelectron volt) energies, but the lack of information in the gamma-ray band precludes drawing a comprehensive multiwavelength picture of their phenomenology and emission mechanisms. Using data from the AGILE satellite, we detected the Vela pulsar wind nebula in the energy range from 100 MeV to 3 GeV. This result constrains the particle population responsible for the GeV emission and establishes a class of gamma-ray emitters that could account for a fraction of the unidentified galactic gamma-ray sources.

  12. Complete plasma dropouts at Vela satellites during thinning of the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Venkatesan, D.; Akasofu, S.; Bame, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    Five satellite years of Vela data are examined for plasma sheet thinnings. Complete proton disappearances (plasma dropouts) are the main subject here. During such times, the Vela satellite is temporarily in the high-latitude tail lobe. The distribution of such plasma dropouts within the magnetotail suggests that the semithickness of the plasma sheet near midnight seldom reaches less than 1 R/sub E/ during substorms and that the dawn and dusk portions of the plasma sheet remain thicker than the midnight portion. But it is also shown that the plasma sheet occasionally becomes very thin near the dusk magnetopause. No such severe thinnings of the plasma sheet are found near the dawn magnetopause. Plasma dropouts can occur regardless of the sign of the Z component of the IMF, but their frequency of occurrence seems to be greater when the Z component is negative.Three plasma dropouts which occurred in the midnight sector at unusually large distances from the estimated position of the neutral sheet were observed during geomagnetic storms. It is likely that the midnight sector of the plasma sheet can become very thick (approx.18 R/sub E/) at certain times during the main phase of storms. Detailed measurements in the plasma sheet were obtained near the beginning of a geomagnetic storm whose sc triggered a substorm. A compression of the plasma sheet at X/sub SM/approx. =-15 R/sub E/ occurred about 10 min after the sc onset at the earth and about 5 min after the start of plasma sheet thinning associated with the sc-related substorm. If compression-thinning of the plasma sheet initiated this substorm, the triggering action must have occurred earthward of X/sub SM/approx. =-15 R/sub E/

  13. Developing Federated Services within Seismology: IRIS' involvement in the CoopEUS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C. M.; Stults, M.

    2014-12-01

    As a founding member of the CoopEUS initiative, IRIS Data Services has partnered with five data centers in Europe and the UC Berkeley (NCEDC) in the US to implement internationally standardized web services to access seismological data using identical methodologies. The International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) holds commission status within IASPEI/IUGG and as such is the international body that governs data exchange formats and access protocols within seismology. The CoopEUS project involves IRIS and UNAVCO as part of the EarthScope project and the European collaborators are all members of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). CoopEUS includes one work package that attempts to coordinate data access between EarthScope and EPOS facilities. IRIS has worked with its partners in the FDSN to develop and adopt three key international service standards within seismology. These include 1) fdsn-dataselect, a service that returns time series data in a variety of standard formats, 2) fdsn-station, a service that returns related metadata about a seismic station in stationXML format, and 3) fdsn-event, a service that returns information about earthquakes and other seismic events in QuakeML format. Currently the 5 European data centers supporting these services include the ORFEUS Data Centre in the Netherlands, the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany, ETH Zurich in Switzerland, INGV in Rome, Italy, and the RESIF Data Centre in Grenoble France. Presently these seven centres can all be accessed using standardized web services with identical service calls and returns results in standardized ways. IRIS is developing an IRIS federator that will allow a client to seamlessly access information across the federated centers. Details and current status of the IRIS Federator will be presented.

  14. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Saul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2 is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments provided by a broad international user community. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, ground motion, seismic inventory, and resource metadata has been started, but is at an early stage. Several applications based on the QuakeML data model have been created so far. Among these are earthquake catalog web services at the European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC, GNS Science, and the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC, and QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit. Furthermore, QuakeML is being used in the SeisComP3 system from GFZ Potsdam, and in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP testing center installations, developed by Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. QuakeML is still under active and dynamic development. Further contributions from the community are crucial to its success and are highly welcome.

  15. ObspyDMT: a Python toolbox for retrieving and processing large seismological data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hosseini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present obspyDMT, a free, open-source software toolbox for the query, retrieval, processing and management of seismological data sets, including very large, heterogeneous and/or dynamically growing ones. ObspyDMT simplifies and speeds up user interaction with data centers, in more versatile ways than existing tools. The user is shielded from the complexities of interacting with different data centers and data exchange protocols and is provided with powerful diagnostic and plotting tools to check the retrieved data and metadata. While primarily a productivity tool for research seismologists and observatories, easy-to-use syntax and plotting functionality also make obspyDMT an effective teaching aid. Written in the Python programming language, it can be used as a stand-alone command-line tool (requiring no knowledge of Python or can be integrated as a module with other Python codes. It facilitates data archiving, preprocessing, instrument correction and quality control – routine but nontrivial tasks that can consume much user time. We describe obspyDMT's functionality, design and technical implementation, accompanied by an overview of its use cases. As an example of a typical problem encountered in seismogram preprocessing, we show how to check for inconsistencies in response files of two example stations. We also demonstrate the fully automated request, remote computation and retrieval of synthetic seismograms from the Synthetics Engine (Syngine web service of the Data Management Center (DMC at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS.

  16. ObspyDMT: a Python toolbox for retrieving and processing large seismological data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin

    2017-10-01

    We present obspyDMT, a free, open-source software toolbox for the query, retrieval, processing and management of seismological data sets, including very large, heterogeneous and/or dynamically growing ones. ObspyDMT simplifies and speeds up user interaction with data centers, in more versatile ways than existing tools. The user is shielded from the complexities of interacting with different data centers and data exchange protocols and is provided with powerful diagnostic and plotting tools to check the retrieved data and metadata. While primarily a productivity tool for research seismologists and observatories, easy-to-use syntax and plotting functionality also make obspyDMT an effective teaching aid. Written in the Python programming language, it can be used as a stand-alone command-line tool (requiring no knowledge of Python) or can be integrated as a module with other Python codes. It facilitates data archiving, preprocessing, instrument correction and quality control - routine but nontrivial tasks that can consume much user time. We describe obspyDMT's functionality, design and technical implementation, accompanied by an overview of its use cases. As an example of a typical problem encountered in seismogram preprocessing, we show how to check for inconsistencies in response files of two example stations. We also demonstrate the fully automated request, remote computation and retrieval of synthetic seismograms from the Synthetics Engine (Syngine) web service of the Data Management Center (DMC) at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS).

  17. The VELA Program. A Twenty-Five Year Review of Basic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Number 4 is the source of much of the money that was for support of seismological community for a better understanding of detection and identification...path 40.0 1 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 Shear velocity in km/sec NTS Area Crustal Velocity and Q Structure from Broadband Surface Waves Fig. 3. NTS Lauders

  18. Seismological and Geodynamic Monitoring Network in the "javakheti" Test Zone in the Southern Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, A.; Babayan, H.; Karakhanyan, A.; Durgaryan, R.; Basilaia, G.; Sokhadze, G.; Bidzinashvili, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Javakheti Highland located in the border region between Armenia and Georgia (sharing a border with Turkey) is an area in the Southern Caucasus of young Holocene-Quaternary volcanism and a region with convergence of a number of active faults. Issues related to the geometry, kinematics and slip-rate of these faults and assessment of their seismic hazard remain unclear in part due to the fragmentary nature of the studies carried out soley within the borders of each of the countries as opposed to region wide. In the frame of the ISTC A-1418 Project "Open network of scientific Centers for mitigation risk of natural hazards in the Southern Caucasus and Central Asia" the Javakheti Highland was selected as a trans-border test-zone. This designation allowed for the expansion and upgrading of the seismological and geodynamic monitoring networks under the auspices of several international projects (ISTC CSP-053 Project "Development of Communication System for seismic hazard situations in the Southern Caucasus and Central Asia", NATO SfP- 983284 Project "Caucasus Seismic Emergency Response") as well as through joint research programs with the National Taiwan University and Institute of Earth Sciences (IES, Taiwan), Universite Montpellier II (France) and Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre-Université de Strasbourg (France). Studies of geodynamic processes, and seismicity of the region and their interaction have been carried out utilizing the newly established seismological and geodynamic monitoring networks and have served as a basis for the study of the geologic and tectonic structure . Upgrading and expansion of seismological and geodynamic networks required urgent solutions to the following tasks: Introduction of efficient online systems for information acquisition, accumulation and transmission (including sattelite systems) from permanent and temporary installed stations, Adoption of international standards for organization and management of databases in GIS

  19. Bringing Seismological Research into the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    One of the primary goals of educational seismology programs is to bring inquiry-based research to the middle- and high-school classroom setting. Although it is often stated as a long-term goal of science outreach programs, in practice there are many barriers to research in the school setting, among them increasing emphasis on test-oriented training, decreasing interest and participation in science fairs, limited teacher confidence and experience for mentoring research, insufficient student preparedness for research projects, and the short term of university involvement (typically limited to brief one-day encounters). For the past three+ years we have tried to address these issues through a focused outreach program we have called the PEPP Research Fellows Program. This is treated as an honors program in which high school teachers in our group nominate students with interests in science careers. These students are invited to participate in the program, and those who elect to take part participate in a one-day education and training session in the fall. Rather than leave research projects completely open, we direct the students at toward one of two specific, group-oriented projects (in our case, one focusing on local recordings of mining explosions, and a second on teleseismic body-wave analysis), but we encourage them to act as independent researchers and follow topics of interest. The students then work on seismic data from the local educational network or from the IRIS facilities. Following several months of informal interaction with teachers and students (email, web conferencing, etc.), we bring the students and teachers to our university for a weekend research symposium in the spring. Students present their work in oral or poster form and prizes are given for the best papers. Projects range from highly local projects (records of seismic noise at school X) to larger-scale regional projects (analysis of teleseismic P-wave delays at PEPP network stations) From 20 to

  20. Tsunami Ionospheric warning and Ionospheric seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Rolland, Lucie; Rakoto, Virgile; Coisson, Pierdavide; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Larmat, Carene; Walwer, Damien; Astafyeva, Elvira; Hebert, Helene; Okal, Emile; Makela, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The last decade demonstrated that seismic waves and tsunamis are coupled to the ionosphere. Observations of Total Electron Content (TEC) and airglow perturbations of unique quality and amplitude were made during the Tohoku, 2011 giant Japan quake, and observations of much lower tsunamis down to a few cm in sea uplift are now routinely done, including for the Kuril 2006, Samoa 2009, Chili 2010, Haida Gwai 2012 tsunamis. This new branch of seismology is now mature enough to tackle the new challenge associated to the inversion of these data, with either the goal to provide from these data maps or profile of the earth surface vertical displacement (and therefore crucial information for tsunami warning system) or inversion, with ground and ionospheric data set, of the various parameters (atmospheric sound speed, viscosity, collision frequencies) controlling the coupling between the surface, lower atmosphere and the ionosphere. We first present the state of the art in the modeling of the tsunami-atmospheric coupling, including in terms of slight perturbation in the tsunami phase and group velocity and dependance of the coupling strength with local time, ocean depth and season. We then show the confrontation of modelled signals with observations. For tsunami, this is made with the different type of measurement having proven ionospheric tsunami detection over the last 5 years (ground and space GPS, Airglow), while we focus on GPS and GOCE observation for seismic waves. These observation systems allowed to track the propagation of the signal from the ground (with GPS and seismometers) to the neutral atmosphere (with infrasound sensors and GOCE drag measurement) to the ionosphere (with GPS TEC and airglow among other ionospheric sounding techniques). Modelling with different techniques (normal modes, spectral element methods, finite differences) are used and shown. While the fits of the waveform are generally very good, we analyse the differences and draw direction of future

  1. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Data Quality Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, A. T.; Hagerty, M.; Holland, J.; Gee, L. S.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has several efforts underway to improve data quality at its stations. The Data Quality Analyzer (DQA) is one such development. The DQA is designed to characterize station data quality in a quantitative and automated manner. Station quality is based on the evaluation of various metrics, such as timing quality, noise levels, sensor coherence, and so on. These metrics are aggregated into a measurable grade for each station. The DQA consists of a website, a metric calculator (Seedscan), and a PostgreSQL database. The website allows the user to make requests for various time periods, review specific networks and stations, adjust weighting of the station's grade, and plot metrics as a function of time. The website dynamically loads all station data from a PostgreSQL database. The database is central to the application; it acts as a hub where metric values and limited station descriptions are stored. Data is stored at the level of one sensor's channel per day. The database is populated by Seedscan. Seedscan reads and processes miniSEED data, to generate metric values. Seedscan, written in Java, compares hashes of metadata and data to detect changes and perform subsequent recalculations. This ensures that the metric values are up to date and accurate. Seedscan can be run in a scheduled task or on demand by way of a config file. It will compute metrics specified in its configuration file. While many metrics are currently in development, some are completed and being actively used. These include: availability, timing quality, gap count, deviation from the New Low Noise Model, deviation from a station's noise baseline, inter-sensor coherence, and data-synthetic fits. In all, 20 metrics are planned, but any number could be added. ASL is actively using the DQA on a daily basis for station diagnostics and evaluation. As Seedscan is scheduled to run every night, data quality analysts are able to then use the

  2. Long-term studies with the Ariel 5 ASM. I - Hercules X-1, Vela X-1, and Centaurus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve hundred days of 3-6 keV X-ray data from Her X-1, Vela X-1, and Cen X-3 accumulated with the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor are interrogated. The binary periodicities of all three can be clearly observed, as can the 35 day variation of Her X-1, for which we can refine the period to 34.875 plus or minus 0.030 days. No such longer-term periodicity less than 200 days is observed from Vela X-1. The 26.6 days low-state recurrence period for Cen X-3 is not observed, but a 43.0 day candidate periodicity is found which may be consistent with the precession of an accretion disk in that system. The present results are illustrative of the long-term studies which can be performed on approximately 50 sources over a temporal base which will ultimately extend to at least 1800 days.

  3. Recent achievements in real-time computational seismology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Real-time computational seismology is currently possible to be achieved which needs highly connection between seismic database and high performance computing. We have developed a real-time moment tensor monitoring system (RMT) by using continuous BATS records and moment tensor inversion (CMT) technique. The real-time online earthquake simulation service is also ready to open for researchers and public earthquake science education (ROS). Combine RMT with ROS, the earthquake report based on computational seismology can provide within 5 minutes after an earthquake occurred (RMT obtains point source information ROS completes a 3D simulation real-time now. For more information, welcome to visit real-time computational seismology earthquake report webpage (RCS).

  4. FERMI-LAT DETECTION OF PULSED GAMMA-RAYS ABOVE 50 GeV FROM THE VELA PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y., E-mail: gene930@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: takata@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    The first Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog of sources above 10 GeV reported evidence of pulsed emission above 25 GeV from 12 pulsars, including the Vela pulsar, which showed evidence of pulsation at >37 GeV energy bands. Using 62 months of Fermi-LAT data, we analyzed the gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar and searched for pulsed emission above 50 GeV. Having confirmed the significance of the pulsation in 30-50 GeV with the H test (p-value ∼10{sup –77}), we extracted its pulse profile using the Bayesian block algorithm and compared it with the distribution of the five observed photons above 50 GeV using the likelihood ratio test. Pulsation was significantly detected for photons above 50 GeV with a p-value of =3 × 10{sup –5} (4.2σ). The detection of pulsation is significant above 4σ at >79 GeV and above 3σ at >90 GeV energy bands, making this the highest energy pulsation significantly detected by the LAT. We explore the non-stationary outer gap scenario of the very high-energy emissions from the Vela pulsar.

  5. A Serviced-based Approach to Connect Seismological Infrastructures: Current Efforts at the IRIS DMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Tim; Trabant, Chad

    2014-05-01

    As part of the COOPEUS initiative to build infrastructure that connects European and US research infrastructures, IRIS has advocated for the development of Federated services based upon internationally recognized standards using web services. By deploying International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) endorsed web services at multiple data centers in the US and Europe, we have shown that integration within seismological domain can be realized. By deploying identical methods to invoke the web services at multiple centers this approach can significantly ease the methods through which a scientist can access seismic data (time series, metadata, and earthquake catalogs) from distributed federated centers. IRIS has developed an IRIS federator that helps a user identify where seismic data from global seismic networks can be accessed. The web services based federator can build the appropriate URLs and return them to client software running on the scientists own computer. These URLs are then used to directly pull data from the distributed center in a very peer-based fashion. IRIS is also involved in deploying web services across horizontal domains. As part of the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) EarthCube effort, an IRIS led EarthCube Building Block's project is underway. When completed this project will aid in the discovery, access, and usability of data across multiple geoscienece domains. This presentation will summarize current IRIS efforts in building vertical integration infrastructure within seismology working closely with 5 centers in Europe and 2 centers in the US, as well as how we are taking first steps toward horizontal integration of data from 14 different domains in the US, in Europe, and around the world.

  6. Factores determinantes del rendimiento en vela deportiva: revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Manzanares Serrano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos del presente estudio han sido revisar, identificar y analizar las investigaciones que han indagado acerca de los factores influyentes en el rendimiento deportivo en vela y determinar cuáles de éstos son los de mayor relevancia. Se presentan los datos obtenidos a partir del análisis realizado sobre diez bases de datos, empleando como descriptores de búsqueda de artículos científicos las palabras "sail", "sailing" y "sailor". Se acotó la búsqueda a los trabajos que contenían dichas palabras clave en el título o el abstract, restringiendo la pesquisa al periodo comprendido entre 1950 y 2011. Los artículos analizados en esta revisión han sido todos los referentes a las características físicas, tácticas, técnicas, psicológicas y de toma de decisiones de los regatistas, que influirían directamente en el rendimiento. De los artículos analizados en el presente estudio, el 54% se refieren a características físicas, siendo éste el factor de rendimiento más estudiado, seguido de la técnica con un 22% y de la toma de decisiones con el 14%. La táctica (5% y la psicología (3% son los dos aspectos menos investigados. Como conclusión, se considera que los regatistas de cada clase de navegación requieren unas características físicas y/o fisiológicas diferentes. Dentro de la vela deportiva existen diferentes tipos de embarcaciones, que requieren diversos esfuerzos por parte del regatista, cuestión que obliga al conocimiento de sus características físicas y fisiológicas de manera específica para cada clase de embarcación. Además de las diferencias en las capacidades físicas condicionales requeridas en cada clase, otros factores determinantes para el rendimiento en este deporte como son la capacidad de percepción de estímulos y la toma de decisiones, son consideradas en menor medida en los estudios analizados.

  7. Vertically Integrated Seismological Analysis II : Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, N. S.; Russell, S.; Sudderth, E.

    2009-12-01

    accepting such complex moves need not be hand-designed. Instead, they are automatically determined by the underlying probabilistic model, which is in turn calibrated via historical data and scientific knowledge. Consider a small seismic event which generates weak signals at several different stations, which might independently be mistaken for noise. A birth move may nevertheless hypothesize an event jointly explaining these detections. If the corresponding waveform data then aligns with the seismological knowledge encoded in the probabilistic model, the event may be detected even though no single station observes it unambiguously. Alternatively, if a large outlier reading is produced at a single station, moves which instantiate a corresponding (false) event would be rejected because of the absence of plausible detections at other sensors. More broadly, one of the main advantages of our MCMC approach is its consistent handling of the relative uncertainties in different information sources. By avoiding low-level thresholds, we expect to improve accuracy and robustness. At the conference, we will present results quantitatively validating our approach, using ground-truth associations and locations provided either by simulation or human analysts.

  8. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Mexico and Central and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The results from seismological studies that are used by the engineering community are just one of the benefits obtained from research aimed at mitigating the earthquake hazard. In this issue of Earthquake Information Bulletin current programs in seismology and earthquake engineering, seismic networks, future plans and some of the cooperative programs with different internation organizations are described by Latin-American seismologists. The article describes the development of seismology in Latin America and the seismological interest of the OAS. -P.N.Chroston

  9. COST Action ES1401 TIDES: a European network on TIme DEpendent Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Using the full-length records of seismic events and background ambient noise, today seismology is going beyond still-life snapshots of the interior of the Earth, and look into time-dependent changes of its properties. Data availability has grown dramatically with the expansion of seismographic networks and data centers, so as to enable much more detailed and accurate analyses. COST Action ES1401 TIDES (TIme DEpendent Seismology; http://tides-cost.eu) aims at structuring the EU seismological community to enable development of data-intensive, time-dependent techniques for monitoring Earth active processes (e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, glacial earthquakes) as well as oil/gas reservoirs. The main structure of TIDES is organised around working groups on: Workflow integration of data and computing resources; Seismic interferometry and ambient noise; Forward problems and High-performance computing applications; Seismic tomography, full waveform inversion and uncertainties; Applications in the natural environment and industry. TIDES is an open network of European laboratories with complementary skills, and is organising a series of events - workshops and advanced training schools - as well as supporting short-duration scientific stays. The first advanced training school was held in Bertinoro (Italy) on June 2015, with attendance of about 100 participants from 20 European countries, was devoted to how to manage and model seismic data with modern tools. The next school, devoted to ambient noise, will be held in 2016 Portugal: the program will be announced at the time of this conference. TIDES will strengthen Europe's role in a critical field for natural hazards and natural resource management.

  10. Research and development activities of the seismology section for the period January 1986 to December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, T.K.; Murty, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    This report sumarises the R and D in Seismology during the period from January 1986 to December 1987. Major topics of current study are (1) Forensic Seismology, (2) Seismicity and Seismic Risk estimates, (3) Reservoir induced seismicity and (4) Rockburst monitoring. Considerable effort is devoted to development of seismic data acquisition systems and theoretical aspects of seismology. (author)

  11. Seismo-Live: Training in Seismology with Jupyter Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Lion; Tape, Carl; Igel, Heiner

    2016-04-01

    Seismological training tends to occur within the isolation of a particular institution with a limited set of tools (codes, libraries) that are often not transferrable outside. Here, we propose to overcome these limitations with a community-driven library of Jupyter notebooks dedicated to training on any aspect of seismology for purposes of education and outreach, on-site or archived tutorials for codes, classroom instruction, and research. A Jupyter notebook (jupyter.org) is an open-source interactive computational environment that allows combining code execution, rich text, mathematics, and plotting. It can be considered a platform that supports reproducible research, as all inputs and outputs may be stored. Text, external graphics, equations can be handled using Markdown (incl. LaTeX) format. Jupyter notebooks are driven by standard web browsers, can be easily exchanged in text format, or converted to other documents (e.g. PDF, slide shows). They provide an ideal format for practical training in seismology. A pilot-platform was setup with a dedicated server such that the Jupyter notebooks can be run in any browser (PC, notepad, smartphone). We show the functionalities of the Seismo-Live platform with examples from computational seismology, seismic data access and processing using the ObsPy library, seismic inverse problems, and others. The current examples are all using the Python programming language but any free language can be used. Potentially, such community platforms could be integrated with the EPOS-IT infrastructure and extended to other fields of Earth sciences.

  12. The 21 August 2017 Ischia (Italy) Earthquake Source Model Inferred From Seismological, GPS, and DInSAR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Novellis, V.; Carlino, S.; Castaldo, R.; Tramelli, A.; De Luca, C.; Pino, N. A.; Pepe, S.; Convertito, V.; Zinno, I.; De Martino, P.; Bonano, M.; Giudicepietro, F.; Casu, F.; Macedonio, G.; Manunta, M.; Cardaci, C.; Manzo, M.; Di Bucci, D.; Solaro, G.; Zeni, G.; Lanari, R.; Bianco, F.; Tizzani, P.

    2018-03-01

    The causative source of the first damaging earthquake instrumentally recorded in the Island of Ischia, occurred on 21 August 2017, has been studied through a multiparametric geophysical approach. In order to investigate the source geometry and kinematics we exploit seismological, Global Positioning System, and Sentinel-1 and COSMO-SkyMed differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar coseismic measurements. Our results indicate that the retrieved solutions from the geodetic data modeling and the seismological data are plausible; in particular, the best fit solution consists of an E-W striking, south dipping normal fault, with its center located at a depth of 800 m. Moreover, the retrieved causative fault is consistent with the rheological stratification of the crust in this zone. This study allows us to improve the knowledge of the volcano-tectonic processes occurring on the Island, which is crucial for a better assessment of the seismic risk in the area.

  13. Light curve and pulse profile of the x-ray pulsar Vela X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumiaki; Hayakawa, Satio; Makino, Fumiyoshi; Sato, Naohisa; Makishima, Kazuo.

    1983-01-01

    The following properties of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 are presented by reference to its observations in March 1980. The light curve shows a high state and a low state in the first and second halves of an orbital period, respectively, but they may rather be defined as a soft state and hard state, respectively, since the intensity above 9 keV does not appreciably change between these two states. The energy spectra in these states indicate the presence of circumstellar absorption. The pulse profiles at high (9-22 keV) and low (1-9 keV) energies are different, indicating the absorption by cold matter which is probably in the accretion column. The absorber which is responsible for the soft and hard states is attributed to the stellar wind whose flow pattern is consistent with that obtained from optical absorption spectra. The orbital period is obtained by a combined analysis of X-ray data since 1972. No appreciable change of the period gives a constraint on the dynamical behavior of the binary system. (author)

  14. Search for gravitational waves associated with the August 2006 timing glitch of the Vela pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chatterji, S.

    2011-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasinormal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational-wave emission. In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two colocated Hanford gravitational-wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational-wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational-wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6.3x10 -21 to 1.4x10 -20 on the peak intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational-wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0x10 44 to 1.3x10 45 erg.

  15. Urban Seismology: on the origin of earth vibrations within a city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jordi; Ruiz, Mario; Sánchez-Pastor, Pilar S; Romero, Paula

    2017-11-10

    Urban seismology has become an active research field in the recent years, both with seismological objectives, as obtaining better microzonation maps in highly populated areas, and with engineering objectives, as the monitoring of traffic or the surveying of historical buildings. We analyze here the seismic records obtained by a broad-band seismic station installed in the ICTJA-CSIC institute, located near the center of Barcelona city. Although this station was installed to introduce visitors to earth science during science fairs and other dissemination events, the analysis of the data has allowed to infer results of interest for the scientific community. The main results include the evidence that urban seismometers can be used as a easy-to-use, robust monitoring tool for road traffic and subway activity inside the city. Seismic signals generated by different cultural activities, including rock concerts, fireworks or football games, can be detected and discriminated from its seismic properties. Beside the interest to understand the propagation of seismic waves generated by those rather particular sources, those earth shaking records provide a powerful tool to gain visibility in the mass media and hence have the opportunity to present earth sciences to a wider audience.

  16. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Although effects of rotational motions due to earthquakes have long been observed (e. g., Mallet, 1862), nevertheless Richter (1958, p. 213) stated that: 'Perfectly general motion would also involve rotations about three perpendicular axes, and three more instruments for these. Theory indicates, and observation confirms, that such rotations are negligible.' However, Richter provided no references for this claim. Seismology is based primarily on the observation and modeling of three-component translational ground motions. Nevertheless, theoretical seismologists (e.g., Aki and Richards, 1980, 2002) have argued for decades that the rotational part of ground motions should also be recorded. It is well known that standard seismometers are quite sensitive to rotations and therefore subject to rotation-induced errors. The paucity of observations of rotational motions is mainly the result of a lack, until recently, of affordable rotational sensors of sufficient resolution. Nevertheless, in the past decade, a number of authors have reported direct observations of rotational motions and rotations inferred from rigid-body rotations in short baseline accelerometer arrays, creating a burgeoning library of rotational data. For example, ring laser gyros in Germany and New Zealand have led to the first significant and consistent observations of rotational motions from distant earthquakes (Igel et al., 2005, 2007). A monograph on Earthquake Source Asymmetry, Structural Media and Rotation Effects was published recently as well by Teisseyre et al. (2006). Measurement of rotational motions has implications for: (1) recovering the complete ground-displacement history from seismometer recordings; (2) further constraining earthquake rupture properties; (3) extracting information about subsurface properties; and (4) providing additional ground motion information to earthquake engineers for seismic design. A special session on Rotational Motions in Seismology was convened by H

  17. Broad band seismology in the Scotia region. The base Esperanza seismological observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russi, M.; Costa, G.; Febrer, J.

    1995-08-01

    The lithospheric study and the identification of relevant lateral heterogeneities in the Antarctic continent and borderlands, is essential to understand the geodynamic evolution both of the continental and oceanic bordering regions. The complexity of the geological evolution and the structural properties of the lithosphere in the Scotia area have been stressed by many authors. The present setting of the area is the result of the mutual interaction among the Antarctic, South American and several minor plants whose geodynamic history and actual boundaries are still partially unknown. The intense seismic activity that characterizes the region encourages the use of the seismological approach to investigate the lithospheric structure of the area. Since January 1992 a broad band three components station is operating at the Antarctic base Esperanza in the NE area of Antarctic Peninsula. The station has been installed with financial support of the Italian Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Antartide (PNRA) by Osservatorio Geofisico Sperimentale (OGS) and Instituto Antartico Argentino (IAA). Russi et al. (1994) have analyzed selected recordings using the frequency-time analysis (FTAN) method obtaining some relevant information on the large scale structure of the lithosphere in the Scotia region even if data recorded by a single station were available. The extension of our analysis to further events and to horizontal component records is here presented. Within the framework of the international co-operation to the Antarctic Seismographic Network, the OGS and the IAA are upgrading the Esperanza station and installing an additional broad band station near the town of Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) with the financial support of PNRA. The inversion of the dispersion curves through the FTAN of the signals recorded by an increased number of stations and generated by events with source-station paths spanning the region will allow us to extract the elastic and anelastic

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Vela Junior (RX J0852.0-4622) HESS image (HESS+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Anguener, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernloehr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Boettcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Buechele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chretien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Foerster, A.; Funk, S.; Fuessling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khelifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluzniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krueger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiere, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; Lopez-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Mora, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Oettl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Puehlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schuessler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der, Walt D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Voelk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Woernlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zywucka, N.

    2018-03-01

    skymap.fit: H.E.S.S. excess skymap in FITS format of the region comprising Vela Junior and its surroundings. The excess map has been corrected for the gradient of exposure and smoothed with a Gaussian function of width 0.08° to match the analysis point spread function, matching the procedure applied to derive the maps in Fig. 1. sp_stat.txt: H.E.S.S. spectral points and fit parameters for Vela Junior (H.E.S.S. data points in Fig. 3 and Tab. A.2 and H.E.S.S. spectral fit parameters in Tab. 4). The errors in this file represent statistical uncertainties at 1 sigma confidence level. The covariance matrix of the fit is also included in the format: c11 c12 c_13 c21 c22 c_23 c31 c32 c_33 where the subindices represent the following parameters of the power-law with exponential cut-off (ECPL) formula in Tab. 2: 1: flux normalization (Phi0) 2: spectral index (Gamma) 3: inverse of the cutoff energy (lambda=1/Ecut) The units for the covariance matrix are the same as for the fit parameters. Notice that, while the fit parameters section of the file shows E_cut as parameter, the fit was done in lambda=1/Ecut; hence the covariance matrix shows the values for lambda in TeV-1. sp_syst.txt: H.E.S.S. spectral points and fit parameters for Vela Junior (H.E.S.S. data points in Fig. 3 and Tab. A.2 and H.E.S.S. spectral fit parameters in Tab. 4). The errors in this file represent systematic uncertainties at 1 sigma confidence level. The integral fluxes for several energy ranges are also included. (4 data files).

  19. Alteration of the magnetosphere of the Vela pulsar during a glitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfreyman, Jim; Dickey, John M; Hotan, Aidan; Ellingsen, Simon; van Straten, Willem

    2018-04-01

    As pulsars lose energy, primarily in the form of magnetic dipole radiation, their rotation slows down accordingly. For some pulsars, this spin-down is interrupted by occasional abrupt spin-up events known as glitches 1 . A glitch is hypothesized to be a catastrophic release of pinned vorticity 2 that provides an exchange of angular momentum between the superfluid outer core and the crust. This is manifested by a minute alteration in the rotation rate of the neutron star and its co-rotating magnetosphere, which is revealed by an abrupt change in the timing of observed radio pulses. Measurement of the flux density, polarization and single-pulse arrival times of the glitch with high time resolution may reveal the equation of state of the crustal superfluid, its drag-to-lift ratio and the parameters that describe its friction with the crust 3 . This has not hitherto been possible because glitch events happen unpredictably. Here we report single-pulse radio observations of a glitch in the Vela pulsar, which has a rotation frequency of 11.2 hertz. The glitch was detected on 2016 December 12 at 11:36 universal time, during continuous observations of the pulsar over a period of three years. We detected sudden changes in the pulse shape coincident with the glitch event: one pulse was unusually broad, the next pulse was missing (a 'null') and the following two pulses had unexpectedly low linear polarization. This sequence was followed by a 2.6-second interval during which pulses arrived later than usual, indicating that the glitch affects the magnetosphere.

  20. QuakeML - An XML Schema for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, A.; Schorlemmer, D.; Maraini, S.; Baer, M.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    We propose an extensible format-definition for seismic data (QuakeML). Sharing data and seismic information efficiently is one of the most important issues for research and observational seismology in the future. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is playing an increasingly important role in the exchange of a variety of data. Due to its extensible definition capabilities, its wide acceptance and the existing large number of utilities and libraries for XML, a structured representation of various types of seismological data should in our opinion be developed by defining a 'QuakeML' standard. Here we present the QuakeML definitions for parameter databases and further efforts, e.g. a central QuakeML catalog database and a web portal for exchanging codes and stylesheets.

  1. Benefits of rotational ground motions for planetary seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S.; Joshi, R.; Hadziioannou, C.; Nunn, C.; van Driel, M.; Schmelzbach, C.; Wassermann, J. M.; Igel, H.

    2017-12-01

    Exploring the internal structure of planetary objects is fundamental to understand the evolution of our solar system. In contrast to Earth, planetary seismology is hampered by the limited number of stations available, often just a single one. Classic seismology is based on the measurement of three components of translational ground motion. Its methods are mainly developed for a larger number of available stations. Therefore, the application of classical seismological methods to other planets is very limited. Here, we show that the additional measurement of three components of rotational ground motion could substantially improve the situation. From sparse or single station networks measuring translational and rotational ground motions it is possible to obtain additional information on structure and source. This includes direct information on local subsurface seismic velocities, separation of seismic phases, propagation direction of seismic energy, crustal scattering properties, as well as moment tensor source parameters for regional sources. The potential of this methodology will be highlighted through synthetic forward and inverse modeling experiments.

  2. Trends and opportunities in seismology. [Asilomar, California, January 3--9, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five experts in the fields of geology, geophysics, and engineering, from academia, government, and industry, were invited to participate in a workshop and address the many problems of national and global concern that require seismological expertise for their solutions. This report reviews the history, accomplishments, and status of seismology; assesses changing trends in seismological research and applications; and recommends future directions in the light of these changes and of the growing needs of society in areas in which seismology can make significant contributions. The first part of the volume discusses areas of opportunity (understanding earthquakes and reducing their hazards; exploration, energy, and resources; understanding the earth and planets) and realizing the benefits (the roles of Federal, state, and local governments, industry, and universities). The second part, Background and Progress, briefly considers each of the following topics: the birth and early growth of seismology, nuclear test monitoring and its scientific ramifications, instrumentation and data processing, geodynamics and plate tectonics, theoretical seismology, structure and composition of the earth, exploration seismology, seismic exploration for minerals, earthquake source mechanism studies, engineering seismology, strong ground motion and related earthquake hazards, volcanoes, tsunamis, planetary seismology, and international aspects of seismology. 26 figures. (RWR)

  3. Seismology of the Oso-Steelhead landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibert, C.; Stark, C. P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out a combined analysis of the short- and long-period seismic signals generated by the devastating Oso-Steelhead landslide that occurred on 22 March 2014. The seismic records show that the Oso-Steelhead landslide was not a single slope failure, but a succession of multiple failures distinguished by two major collapses that occurred approximately three minutes apart. The first generated long-period surface waves that were recorded at several proximal stations. We invert these long-period signals for the forces acting at the source, and obtain estimates of the first failure runout and kinematics, as well as its mass after calibration against the mass-center displacement estimated from remote-sensing imagery. Short-period analysis of both events suggests that the source dynamics of the second are more complex than the first. No distinct long-period surface waves were recorded for the second failure, which prevents inversion for its source parameters. However, by comparing the seismic energy of the short-period waves generated by both events we are able to estimate the volume of the second. Our analysis suggests that the volume of the second failure is about 15-30% of the total landslide volume, which is in agreement with ground observations.

  4. Large earthquake rates from geologic, geodetic, and seismological perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake rate and recurrence information comes primarily from geology, geodesy, and seismology. Geology gives the longest temporal perspective, but it reveals only surface deformation, relatable to earthquakes only with many assumptions. Geodesy is also limited to surface observations, but it detects evidence of the processes leading to earthquakes, again subject to important assumptions. Seismology reveals actual earthquakes, but its history is too short to capture important properties of very large ones. Unfortunately, the ranges of these observation types barely overlap, so that integrating them into a consistent picture adequate to infer future prospects requires a great deal of trust. Perhaps the most important boundary is the temporal one at the beginning of the instrumental seismic era, about a century ago. We have virtually no seismological or geodetic information on large earthquakes before then, and little geological information after. Virtually all-modern forecasts of large earthquakes assume some form of equivalence between tectonic- and seismic moment rates as functions of location, time, and magnitude threshold. That assumption links geology, geodesy, and seismology, but it invokes a host of other assumptions and incurs very significant uncertainties. Questions include temporal behavior of seismic and tectonic moment rates; shape of the earthquake magnitude distribution; upper magnitude limit; scaling between rupture length, width, and displacement; depth dependence of stress coupling; value of crustal rigidity; and relation between faults at depth and their surface fault traces, to name just a few. In this report I'll estimate the quantitative implications for estimating large earthquake rate. Global studies like the GEAR1 project suggest that surface deformation from geology and geodesy best show the geography of very large, rare earthquakes in the long term, while seismological observations of small earthquakes best forecasts moderate earthquakes

  5. ObsPy: A Python Toolbox for Seismology - Recent Developments and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megies, T.; Krischer, L.; Barsch, R.; Sales de Andrade, E.; Beyreuther, M.

    2014-12-01

    ObsPy (http://www.obspy.org) is a community-driven, open-source project dedicated to building a bridge for seismology into the scientific Python ecosystem. It offersa) read and write support for essentially all commonly used waveform, station, and event metadata file formats with a unified interface,b) a comprehensive signal processing toolbox tuned to the needs of seismologists,c) integrated access to all large data centers, web services and databases, andd) convenient wrappers to legacy codes like libtau and evalresp.Python, currently the most popular language for teaching introductory computer science courses at top-ranked U.S. departments, is a full-blown programming language with the flexibility of an interactive scripting language. Its extensive standard library and large variety of freely available high quality scientific modules cover most needs in developing scientific processing workflows. Together with packages like NumPy, SciPy, Matplotlib, IPython, Pandas, lxml, and PyQt, ObsPy enables the construction of complete workflows in Python. These vary from reading locally stored data or requesting data from one or more different data centers through to signal analysis and data processing and on to visualizations in GUI and web applications, output of modified/derived data and the creation of publication-quality figures.ObsPy enjoys a large world-wide rate of adoption in the community. Applications successfully using it include time-dependent and rotational seismology, big data processing, event relocations, and synthetic studies about attenuation kernels and full-waveform inversions to name a few examples. All functionality is extensively documented and the ObsPy tutorial and gallery give a good impression of the wide range of possible use cases.We will present the basic features of ObsPy, new developments and applications, and a roadmap for the near future and discuss the sustainability of our open-source development model.

  6. Sustainable access to data, products, services and software from the European seismological Research Infrastructures: the EPOS TCS Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Florian; Dupont, Aurelien; Michelini, Alberto; Rietbrock, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Wiemer, Stefan; Basili, Roberto; Bossu, Rémy; Cakti, Eser; Cotton, Fabrice; Crawford, Wayne; Diaz, Jordi; Garth, Tom; Locati, Mario; Luzi, Lucia; Pinho, Rui; Pitilakis, Kyriazis; Strollo, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Easy, efficient and comprehensive access to data, data products, scientific services and scientific software is a key ingredient in enabling research at the frontiers of science. Organizing this access across the European Research Infrastructures in the field of seismology, so that it best serves user needs, takes advantage of state-of-the-art ICT solutions, provides cross-domain interoperability, and is organizationally and financially sustainable in the long term, is the core challenge of the implementation phase of the Thematic Core Service (TCS) Seismology within the EPOS-IP project. Building upon the existing European-level infrastructures ORFEUS for seismological waveforms, EMSC for seismological products, and EFEHR for seismological hazard and risk information, and implementing a pilot Computational Earth Science service starting from the results of the VERCE project, the work within the EPOS-IP project focuses on improving and extending the existing services, aligning them with global developments, to at the end produce a well coordinated framework that is technically, organizationally, and financially integrated with the EPOS architecture. This framework needs to respect the roles and responsibilities of the underlying national research infrastructures that are the data owners and main providers of data and products, and allow for active input and feedback from the (scientific) user community. At the same time, it needs to remain flexible enough to cope with unavoidable challenges in the availability of resources and dynamics of contributors. The technical work during the next years is organized in four areas: - constructing the next generation software architecture for the European Integrated (waveform) Data Archive EIDA, developing advanced metadata and station information services, fully integrate strong motion waveforms and derived parametric engineering-domain data, and advancing the integration of mobile (temporary) networks and OBS deployments in

  7. Bringing Seismology's Grand Challenges to the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. H.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The "Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems," a community-written long-range science plan for the next decade, poses 10 questions to guide fundamental seismological research. Written in an approachable fashion suitable for policymakers, the broad questions and supporting discussion contained in this document offer an ideal framework for the development of undergraduate curricular materials. Leveraging this document, we have created a collection of inquiry-based classroom modules that utilize authentic data to modernize seismological instruction in 100 and 200 level undergraduate courses. The modules not only introduce undergraduates to the broad questions that the seismological community seeks to answer in the future but also showcase the numerous areas where modern seismological research is actively contributing to our understanding of fundamental Earth processes. To date 6 in-depth explorations that correspond to the Grand Challenges document have been developed. The specific topics for each exploration were selected to showcase modern seismological research while also covering topics commonly included in the curriculum of these introductory classes. Examples of activities that have been created and their corresponding Grand Challenge include: -A guided inquiry that introduces students to episodic tremor and slip and compares the GPS and seismic signatures of ETS with those produced from standard tectonic earthquakes (Grand Challenge "How do faults slip?"). - A laboratory exercise where students engage in b-value mapping of volcanic earthquakes to assess potential eruption hazards (How do magmas ascend and erupt?). - A module that introduce students to glacial earthquakes in Greenland and compares their frequency and spatial distribution to tectonic earthquakes (How do processes in the ocean and atmosphere interact with the solid Earth?). What is the relationship between stress and strain in the lithosphere? - An activity that

  8. Thirty Years of Innovation in Seismology with the IRIS Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Ahern, T. K.; Anderson, K. R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Evers, B.; Frassetto, A.; Hafner, K.; Simpson, D. W.; Sweet, J. R.; Taber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States academic seismology community, through the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium, has promoted and encouraged a rich environment of innovation and experimentation in areas such as seismic instrumentation, data processing and analysis, teaching and curriculum development, and academic science. As the science continually evolves, IRIS helps drive the market for new research tools that enable science by establishing a variety of standards and goals. This has often involved working directly with manufacturers to better define the technology required, co-funding key development work or early production prototypes, and purchasing initial production runs. IRIS activities have helped establish de-facto international standards and impacted the commercial sector in areas such as seismic instrumentation, open-access data management, and professional development. Key institutional practices, conducted and refined over IRIS' thirty-year history of operations, have focused on open-access data availability, full retention of maximum-bandwidth, continuous data, and direct community access to state-of-the-art seismological instrumentation and software. These practices have helped to cultivate and support a thriving commercial ecosystem, and have been a key element in the professional development of multiple generations of seismologists who now work in both industry and academia. Looking toward the future, IRIS is increasing its engagement with industry to better enable bi-directional exchange of techniques and technology, and enhancing the development of tomorrow's workforce. In this presentation, we will illustrate how IRIS has promoted innovations grown out of the academic community and spurred technological advances in both academia and industry.

  9. Inge Lehmann’s work materials and seismological epistolary archive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hjortenberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

     

    The Inge Lehmann archive contains thousands of seismological work documents from Inge Lehmann’s private home. For a long time the author thought that the main concern was to keep the documents for posterity. There is now a renewed interest in Inge Lehmann, and some documents were presented in a poster at ESC Potsdam 2004, and the collection of documents were scanned and catalogued 2005-2006 at Storia Geofisica Ambiente in Bologna. Inge Lehmann (1888-1993 is famous for her discovery in 1936 of the earth’s inner core and for work on the upper mantle. A short biography is given. After her retirement in 1953 she worked at home in Denmark, and abroad in USA and in Canada. She took part in the creation of the European Seismological Commission in 1951, and in the creation of the International Seismological Centre in 1964. Inge Lehmann received many awards. Some letters from her early correspondence with Harold Jeffreys are discussed, they show how the inner core was discussed already in 1932. A few of the author’s reminiscences of Inge Lehmann are given.


  10. SEIS-PROV: Practical Provenance for Seismological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, L.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely recognized that reproducibility is crucial to advance science, but at the same time it is very hard to actually achieve. This results in it being recognized but also mostly ignored by a large fraction of the community. A key ingredient towards full reproducibility is to capture and describe the history of data, an issue known as provenance. We present SEIS-PROV, a practical format and data model to store provenance information for seismological data. In a seismological context, provenance can be seen as information about the processes that generated and modified a particular piece of data. For synthetic waveforms the provenance information describes which solver and settings therein were used to generate it. When looking at processed seismograms, the provenance conveys information about the different time series analysis steps that led to it. Additional uses include the description of derived data types, such as cross-correlations and adjoint sources, enabling their proper storage and exchange. SEIS-PROV is based on W3C PROV (http://www.w3.org/TR/prov-overview/), a standard for generic provenance information. It then applies an additional set of constraints to make it suitable for seismology. We present a definition of the SEIS-PROV format, a way to check if any given file is a valid SEIS-PROV document, and two sample implementations: One in SPECFEM3D GLOBE (https://geodynamics.org/cig/software/specfem3d_globe/) to store the provenance information of synthetic seismograms and another one as part of the ObsPy (http://obspy.org) framework enabling automatic tracking of provenance information during a series of analysis and transformation stages. This, along with tools to visualize and interpret provenance graphs, offers a description of data history that can be readily tracked, stored, and exchanged.

  11. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  12. The experimental operation of a seismological data centre at Blacknest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, F.H.

    1978-10-01

    A short account is given of the development and operation of a unit within Blacknest which acts as a centre for handling data received from overseas seismological array stations and stations in the British Isles and also exchanges data with other centres. The work has been carried out as a long-term experiment to assess the capability of small networks of existing research and development stations to participate in the monitoring of a possible future Comprehensive Test Ban treaty (CTB) and to gain experience of the operational requirements for Data Centres. A preliminary assessment of a UK National Technical Means (NTM) for verifying a CTB is obtained inter alia. (author)

  13. The relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Angilè, F. E.; Ashton, P.; Benton, S. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Fissel, L. M.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hennebelle, P.; Klein, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Korotkov, A. L.; Martin, P. G.; Matthews, T. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Santos, F. P.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2017-07-01

    We statistically evaluated the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) at 250, 350, and 500 μm, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.´0 that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondencebetween (a) the trends in relative orientation between the column density structures and the projected magnetic field; and (b) the shape of the column density probability distribution functions (PDFs). In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", where the high-column density tails of the PDFs are flatter, we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", where the maximum values of the column density are smaller than in the ridge-like sub-regions and the high-column density

  14. seismo-live: Training in Seismology using Jupyter Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, Heiner; Krischer, Lion; van Driel, Martin; Tape, Carl

    2017-04-01

    Practical training in computational methodologies is still underrepresented in Earth science curriculae despite the increasing use of sometimes highly sophisticated simulation and data processing technologies in research projects. At the same time well-engineered community codes make it easy to return results yet with the danger that the inherent traps of black-box solutions are not well understood. For this purpose we have initiated a community platform (www.seismo-live.org) where Python-based Jupyter notebooks can be accessed and run without necessary downloads or local software installations. The increasingly popular Jupyter notebooks allow combining markup language, graphics, equations, with interactive, executable python codes. The platform already includes general Python training, introduction to the ObsPy library for seismology as well as seismic data processing, noise analysis, and a variety of forward solvers for seismic wave propagation. In addition, an example is shown how Jupyter notebooks can be used to increase reproducibility of published results. Submission of Jupyter notebooks for general seismology are encouraged. The platform can be used for complementary teaching in Earth Science courses on compute-intensive research areas. We present recent developments and new features.

  15. seismo-live: Training in Computational Seismology using Jupyter Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, H.; Krischer, L.; van Driel, M.; Tape, C.

    2016-12-01

    Practical training in computational methodologies is still underrepresented in Earth science curriculae despite the increasing use of sometimes highly sophisticated simulation technologies in research projects. At the same time well-engineered community codes make it easy to return simulation-based results yet with the danger that the inherent traps of numerical solutions are not well understood. It is our belief that training with highly simplified numerical solutions (here to the equations describing elastic wave propagation) with carefully chosen elementary ingredients of simulation technologies (e.g., finite-differencing, function interpolation, spectral derivatives, numerical integration) could substantially improve this situation. For this purpose we have initiated a community platform (www.seismo-live.org) where Python-based Jupyter notebooks can be accessed and run without and necessary downloads or local software installations. The increasingly popular Jupyter notebooks allow combining markup language, graphics, equations with interactive, executable python codes. We demonstrate the potential with training notebooks for the finite-difference method, pseudospectral methods, finite/spectral element methods, the finite-volume and the discontinuous Galerkin method. The platform already includes general Python training, introduction to the ObsPy library for seismology as well as seismic data processing and noise analysis. Submission of Jupyter notebooks for general seismology are encouraged. The platform can be used for complementary teaching in Earth Science courses on compute-intensive research areas.

  16. Seismologically determined bedload flux during the typhoon season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-An; Wu, Yih-Min; Zhao, Li; Tsai, Victor C; Chen, Chi-Hsuan

    2015-02-05

    Continuous seismic records near river channels can be used to quantify the energy induced by river sediment transport. During the 2011 typhoon season, we deployed a seismic array along the Chishan River in the mountain area of southern Taiwan, where there is strong variability in water discharge and high sedimentation rates. We observe hysteresis in the high-frequency (5-15 Hz) seismic noise level relative to the associated hydrological parameters. In addition, our seismic noise analysis reveals an asymmetry and a high coherence in noise cross-correlation functions for several station pairs during the typhoon passage, which corresponds to sediment particles and turbulent flows impacting along the riverbed where the river bends sharply. Based on spectral characteristics of the seismic records, we also detected 20 landslide/debris flow events, which we use to estimate the sediment supply. Comparison of sediment flux between seismologically determined bedload and derived suspended load indicates temporal changes in the sediment flux ratio, which imply a complex transition process from the bedload regime to the suspension regime between typhoon passage and off-typhoon periods. Our study demonstrates the possibility of seismologically monitoring river bedload transport, thus providing valuable additional information for studying fluvial bedrock erosion and mountain landscape evolution.

  17. 10 CFR 72.102 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications before October 16, 2003 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for... WASTE Siting Evaluation Factors § 72.102 Geological and seismological characteristics for applications..., sites will be acceptable if the results from onsite foundation and geological investigation, literature...

  18. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  19. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  20. Using a Web Site to Support a Seismology Course Textbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.; Stein, S.

    2004-12-01

    We present a course in seismology that consists of a textbook with an accompanying web site (http://epscx.wustl.edu/seismology/book). The web site serves many different functions, and is of great importance as a companion to the curriculum in several different ways: (1) All of the more than 600 figures from the book are available on the web site. Geophysics is a very visually-oriented discipline, and many concepts are more easily taught with appropriate visual tools. In addition, many instructors are now using computer-based lecture programs such as PowerPoint. To aid in this, all of the figures are displayed in a common JPG format, both with and without titles. They are available to be used in a seismology course, or any kind of Earth Science course. This way, an instructor can easily grab a figure from the web site and drop it into a PowerPoint format. The figures are listed by number, but are also obtainable from menus of thumbnail sketches. If an instructor would like all of the figures, they can be obtained as large zip files, which can be unzipped after downloading. In addition, sample PowerPoint lectures using the figures as well the equations from the text will be available on the course web site. (2) Solutions to all of the homework problems are available in PDF format on the course website. Homework is a vital component of any quantitative course, but it is often a significant time commitment for instructors to derive all of the homework problems. In addition, it is much easier to select which homework problems are desired to be assigned if the solutions can be seen. The 64 pages of homework solutions are on a secure web site that requires a user ID and password that can be obtained from the authors. (3) Any errors found in the textbook are immediately posted on an "Errata" web page. Many of these errors are found by instructors who are using the curriculum (and they are given credit for finding the errors!). The text becomes an interactive process

  1. Solving some problems of engineering seismology by structural method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishtev, K.G.; Hadjikov, L.M.; Dineva, P.S.; Jordanov, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The work suggests a method for solving the direct and inverse problems of the engineer seismology by means of the structural approach of the systems theory. This approach gives a possibility for a simultaneous accounting of the two basic types of damping of the seismic signals in the earth foundation-geometrical damping and a damping in consequence of a dissipative energy loss. By the structural scheme an automatic account is made of the geometric damping of the signals. The damping from a dissipative energy loss on the other hand is accounted for through a choice of the type of frequency characteristics or the transmission functions of the different layers. With a few examples the advantages of the model including the two types of attenuation of the seismic signal are illustrated. An integral coefficient of damping is calculated which analogously to the frequency functions represents a generalized characteristic of is the whole earth foundation. (orig./HP)

  2. Can mobile phones used in strong motion seismology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers are electromechanical devices able to measure static or dynamic accelerations. In the 1990s MEMS accelerometers revolutionized the automotive-airbag system industry and are currently widely used in laptops, game controllers and mobile phones. Nowadays MEMS accelerometers seems provide adequate sensitivity, noise level and dynamic range to be applicable to earthquake strong motion acquisition. The current use of 3 axes MEMS accelerometers in mobile phone maybe provide a new means to easy increase the number of observations when a strong earthquake occurs. However, before utilize the signals recorded by a mobile phone equipped with a 3 axes MEMS accelerometer for any scientific porpoise, it is fundamental to verify that the signal collected provide reliable records of ground motion. For this reason we have investigated the suitability of the iPhone 5 mobile phone (one of the most popular mobile phone in the world) for strong motion acquisition. It is provided by several MEMS devise like a three-axis gyroscope, a three-axis electronic compass and a the LIS331DLH three-axis accelerometer. The LIS331DLH sensor is a low-cost high performance three axes linear accelerometer, with 16 bit digital output, produced by STMicroelectronics Inc. We have tested the LIS331DLH MEMS accelerometer using a vibrating table and the EpiSensor FBA ES-T as reference sensor. In our experiments the reference sensor was rigidly co-mounted with the LIS331DHL MEMS sensor on the vibrating table. We assessment the MEMS accelerometer in the frequency range 0.2-20 Hz, typical range of interesting in strong motion seismology and earthquake engineering. We generate both constant and damped sine waves with central frequency starting from 0.2 Hz until 20 Hz with step of 0.2 Hz. For each frequency analyzed we generate sine waves with mean amplitude 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg0. For damped sine waves we generate waveforms with initial amplitude

  3. Pulse periods and the long-term variations of the X-ray pulsars VELA X-1 and Centaurus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    The paper reports recent determinations of the pulse period for two X-ray pulsars, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3, made in 1987 with the All Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Ginga satellite. The heliocentric pulse periods are 283.09 + or - 0.01 s and 4.8229 + or - 0.0001 s, respectively. These are the longest and shortest values in their respective observational histories. The random walk model for the Vela X-1 pulsar can explain this result as well as those obtained previously. It is also noted that the pulse-period change for the Cen X-3 system shows a 9-yr periodicity. This is probably due to the activity of the companion star rather than to Doppler-shift variations due to a third body or the precession of the neutron star.

  4. Determination of the Integral/SPI instrumental response and his application to the observation of gamma ray lines in the Vela region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attie, D.

    2005-01-01

    The INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer was designed to observe the sky in the energy band of 20 keV to 8 MeV. The specificity of instrument SPI rests on the excellent spectral resolution (2.3 keV with 1 MeV) of its detecting plan, composed of 19 cooled germanium crystals; covering an effective area of 508 cm 2 . The use of a coded mask, located at 1.7 m above the detection plan ensures to it a resolving power of 2.5 degrees. The aim of this thesis, begun before the INTEGRAL launch, is made up of two parts. The first part relates to the analysis of the spectrometer calibration data. The objective was to measure and check the performances of the telescope, in particular to validate simulations of the INTEGRAL/SPI instrument response. This objective was successfully achieved. This analysis also highlights the presence of a significant instrumental background noise. Whereas, the second part concentrates on the data analysis of the Vela region observations. I have approached two astrophysical topics dealing with: - the search for radioactive decays lines of titanium-44, which is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis, in the supernova remnant of Vela Junior and, - the search of cyclotron resonance scattering features expected towards 25 keV and 52 keV in the accreting pulsar spectrum of the x-ray binary star Vela X-1. Putting forward the hypothesis that the result obtained previously by COMPTEL is correct and considering the no-detection of the titanium-44 lines by SPI, we give a lower limit at 4500 km s -1 for the ejecta velocity from Vela Junior. The analysis on the research of the cyclotron lines have shown that the results are very sensitive to the instrumental background. Thorough studies will be necessary to guarantee an unambiguous detection of these lines. (author)

  5. High blood pressure, overweight and obesity among rural scholars from the Vela Project: a population-based study from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringler, Matías; Rodriguez, Edgardo M; Aguera, Darío; Molina, John D; Canziani, Gabriela A; Diaz, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Many studies have shown that high blood pressure and overweight begins in childhood. Consequently, it is useful to know blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) values from an early age. There are few data about blood pressure control in children and adolescents from rural populations in South America. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure and its association with sedentary habits and overweight/obesity in scholars from a rural population in Argentina. The study population for this cross-sectional study was composed of rural children and adolescent scholars from Maria Ignacia Vela. Pre-hypertension and hypertension were defined on the basis of percentiles from the average of three blood pressure measurements taken on a single occasion. In patients with three blood pressure measurements above the 90th percentile, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed to confirm hypertension or pre-hypertension. BMI was categorized by using the 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. We studied 334 scholars (aged 5-18 years). Mean age was 11.4 years. In 70% of the subjects, blood pressure had never been measured. The prevalence of high blood pressure was 4.4%. Students with sedentary habits were 3.67-fold more likely to develop high blood pressure than their physically active counterparts (odds ratio [OR] 3.67; 95% CI 1.08, 12.46; p = 0.037). Obese students were more likely to develop hypertension than the students with normal weight (OR = 5.17; 95% CI 1.52, 17.60; p = 0.02). Male students had a 3.4-fold higher risk of developing high blood pressure than females. In our rural population, the evaluation of blood pressure in children and adolescents is not a routine measure. Our data indicate a low prevalence of high blood pressure. These data could argue differences between rural and urban scholars. Our data demonstrate a close relationship between increased overweight, obesity and sedentary lifestyle

  6. RCW 36 in the Vela Molecular Ridge: Evidence for high-mass star-cluster formation triggered by cloud-cloud collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hidetoshi; Enokiya, Rei; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Saeki, Shun; Okawa, Kazuki; Tsuge, Kisetsu; Tsutsumi, Daichi; Kohno, Mikito; Hattori, Yusuke; Yoshiike, Satoshi; Fujita, Shinji; Nishimura, Atsushi; Ohama, Akio; Tachihara, Kengo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Kimura, Kimihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Wong, Graeme F.; Braiding, Catherine; Rowell, Gavin; Burton, Michael G.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    A collision between two molecular clouds is one possible candidate for high-mass star formation. The H II region RCW 36, located in the Vela molecular ridge, contains a young star cluster (˜ 1 Myr old) and two O-type stars. We present new CO observations of RCW 36 made with NANTEN2, Mopra, and ASTE using 12CO(J = 1-0, 2-1, 3-2) and 13CO(J = 2-1) emission lines. We have discovered two molecular clouds lying at the velocities VLSR ˜ 5.5 and 9 km s-1. Both clouds are likely to be physically associated with the star cluster, as verified by the good spatial correspondence among the two clouds, infrared filaments, and the star cluster. We also found a high intensity ratio of ˜ 0.6-1.2 for CO J = 3-2/1-0 toward both clouds, indicating that the gas temperature has been increased due to heating by the O-type stars. We propose that the O-type stars in RCW 36 were formed by a collision between the two clouds, with a relative velocity separation of 5 km s-1. The complementary spatial distributions and the velocity separation of the two clouds are in good agreement with observational signatures expected for O-type star formation triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. We also found a displacement between the complementary spatial distributions of the two clouds, which we estimate to be 0.3 pc assuming the collision angle to be 45° relative to the line-of-sight. We estimate the collision timescale to be ˜ 105 yr. It is probable that the cluster age found by Ellerbroek et al. (2013b, A&A, 558, A102) is dominated by the low-mass members which were not formed under the triggering by cloud-cloud collision, and that the O-type stars in the center of the cluster are explained by the collisional triggering independently from the low-mass star formation.

  7. Moving towards persistent identification in the seismological community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, Javier; Evans, Peter; Strollo, Angelo; Ulbricht, Damian; Elger, Kirsten; Bertelmann, Roland

    2016-04-01

    The GEOFON data centre and others in the seismological community have been archiving seismic waveforms for many years. The amount of seismic data available continuously increases due to the use of higher sampling rates and the growing number of stations. In recent years, there is a trend towards standardization of the protocols and formats to improve and homogenise access to these data [FDSN, 2013]. The seismological community has begun assigning a particular persistent identifier (PID), the Digital Object Identifier (DOI), to seismic networks as a first step for properly and consistently attributing the use of data from seismic networks in scientific articles [Evans et al., 2015]. This was codified in a recommendation by the international Federation of Digital Seismic Networks [FDSN, 2014]; DOIs for networks now appear in community web pages. However, our community, in common with other fields of science, still struggles with issues such as: supporting reproducibility of results; providing proper attribution (data citation) for data sets; and measuring the impact (by tracking their use) of, those data sets. Seismological data sets used for research are frequently created "on-the-fly" based on particular user requirements such as location or time period; users prepare requests to select subsets of the data held in seismic networks; the data actually provided may even be held at many different data centres [EIDA, 2016]. These subsets also require careful citation. For persistency, a request must receive exactly the same data when repeated at a later time. However, if data are curated between requests, the data set delivered may differ, severely complicating the ability to reproduce a result. Transmission problems or configuration problems may also inadvertently modify the response to a request. With this in mind, our next step is the assignment of additional EPIC-PIDs to daily data files (currently over 28 million in the GEOFON archive) for use within the data

  8. Towards a single seismological service infrastructure in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Trani, L.; Frobert, L.; Van Eck, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the last five year services and data providers, within the seismological community in Europe, focused their efforts in migrating the way of opening their archives towards a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). This process tries to follow pragmatically the technological trends and available solutions aiming at effectively improving all the data stewardship activities. These advancements are possible thanks to the cooperation and the follow-ups of several EC infrastructural projects that, by looking at general purpose techniques, combine their developments envisioning a multidisciplinary platform for the earth observation as the final common objective (EPOS, Earth Plate Observation System) One of the first results of this effort is the Earthquake Data Portal (http://www.seismicportal.eu), which provides a collection of tools to discover, visualize and access a variety of seismological data sets like seismic waveform, accelerometric data, earthquake catalogs and parameters. The Portal offers a cohesive distributed search environment, linking data search and access across multiple data providers through interactive web-services, map-based tools and diverse command-line clients. Our work continues under other EU FP7 projects. Here we will address initiatives in two of those projects. The NERA, (Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation) project will implement a Common Services Architecture based on OGC services APIs, in order to provide Resource-Oriented common interfaces across the data access and processing services. This will improve interoperability between tools and across projects, enabling the development of higher-level applications that can uniformly access the data and processing services of all participants. This effort will be conducted jointly with the VERCE project (Virtual Earthquake and Seismology Research Community for Europe). VERCE aims to enable seismologists to exploit the wealth of seismic data

  9. Creating a Facebook Page for the Seismological Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    In August, 2009 I created a Facebook “fan” page for the Seismological Society of America. We had been exploring cost-effective options for providing forums for two-way communication for some months. We knew that a number of larger technical societies had invested significant sums of money to create customized social networking sites but that a small society would need to use existing low-cost software options. The first thing I discovered when I began to set up the fan page was that an unofficial SSA Facebook group already existed, established by Steven J. Gibbons, a member in Norway. Steven had done an excellent job of posting material about SSA. Partly because of the existing group, the official SSA fan page gained fans rapidly. We began by posting information about our own activities and then added links to activities in the broader geoscience community. While much of this material also appeared on our website and in our publication, Seismological Research Letters (SRL), the tone on the FB page is different. It is less formal with more emphasis on photos and links to other sites, including our own. Fans who are active on FB see the posts as part of their social network and do not need to take the initiative to go to the SSA site. Although the goal was to provide a forum for two-way communication, our initial experience was that people were clearly reading the page but not contributing content. This appears to be case with fan pages of sister geoscience societies. FB offers some demographic information to fan site administrators. In an initial review of the demographics it appeared that fans were younger than the overall demographics of the Society. It appeared that a few of the fans are not members or even scientists. Open questions are: what content will be most useful to fans? How will the existence of the page benefit the membership as a whole? Will the page ultimately encourage two-way communication as hoped? Web 2.0 is generating a series of new

  10. Regional geology, tectonic, geomorphology and seismology studies to interest to nuclear power plants at Itaorna beach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasui, Y.; Almeida, F.F.M. de; Mioto, J.A.; Melo, M.S. de.

    1982-01-01

    The study prepared for the nuclear power plants to be located at Itaorna comprised, the analysis and integration of Geologic, tectonic, geomorphologic and seismologic information and satisfactory results of regional stability were obtained. (L.H.L.L.) [pt

  11. Recent research in earth structure, earthquake and mine seismology, and seismic hazard evaluation in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, C

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available of earthquakes, earthquake hazard and earth structure in South Africa was prepared for the centennial handbook of the Interna- tional Association of Seismology and the Physics of the Earth?s Interior(IASPEI).3 Referencestothesescompletedinthelastfour...

  12. Mobile and modular. BGR develops seismological monitoring stations for universal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, Erwin; Hanneken, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BGR seismologists often set up monitoring stations for testing purposes. The engineers from the Central Seismological Observatory have now developed a new type of mobile monitoring station which can be remotely controlled.

  13. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Saul; Philipp Kästli; Fabian Euchner; Danijel Schorlemmer

    2011-01-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments...

  14. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1988-December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Murty, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarises the research and development activities of the Seismology Section during the periods from January 1988 to December 1989. Apart from the ongoing work on forensic seismology, seismicity studies, rock burst monitoring, elastic wave propagation, a new field system became operational at Bhatsa, located about 100 km from Bombay, comprising 11 station radio-telemetered seismic network with a central recording laboratory to study the reservoir induced seismicity. (author). figs., tabs

  15. State-of-the-art of the historical seismology in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Salcedo Hurtado

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia are available a discreet number of historical seismology investigations, dating back 50 years. This paper reviews basic information about earthquakes studies in Colombia, such as primary sources, compilation of descriptive catalogues and parametric catalogues. Father Jesús Emilio Ramírez made the main systematic study before 1975. During the last 20 years, great earthquakes hit Colombia and, as consequence, historical seismology investigation was developed in the frame of seismic hazard projects.

  16. Effects of magnitude, depth, and time on cellular seismology forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Steven Wolf

    This study finds that, in most cases analyzed to date, past seismicity tends to delineate zones where future earthquakes are likely to occur. Network seismicity catalogs for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), Australia (AUS), California (CA), and Alaska (AK) are analyzed using modified versions of the Cellular Seismology (CS) method of Kafka (2002, 2007). The percentage of later occurring earthquakes located near earlier occurring earthquakes typically exceeds the expected percentage for randomly distributed later occurring earthquakes, and the specific percentage is influenced by several variables, including magnitude, depth, time, and tectonic setting. At 33% map area coverage, hit percents are typically 85-95% in the NMSZ, 50-60% in AUS, 75-85% in CA, and 75-85% in AK. Statistical significance testing is performed on trials analyzing the same variables so that the overall regions can be compared, although some tests are inconclusive due to the small number of earthquake sample sizes. These results offer useful insights into understanding the capabilities and limits of CS studies, which can provide guidance for improving the seismicity-based components of seismic hazard assessments.

  17. Ambient seismic noise tomography for exploration seismology at Valhall

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ridder, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Permanent ocean-bottom cables installed at the Valhall field can repeatedly record high quality active seismic surveys. But in the absence of active seismic shooting, passive data can be recorded and streamed to the platform in real time. Here I studied 29 hours of data using seismic interferometry. I generate omni-directional Scholte-wave virtual-sources at frequencies considered very-low in the exploration seismology community (0.4-1.75 Hz). Scholte-wave group arrival times are inverted using both eikonal tomography and straight-ray tomography. The top 100 m near-surface at Valhall contains buried channels about 100 m wide that have been imaged with active seismic. Images obtained by ASNT using eikonal tomography or straight-ray tomography both contain anomalies that match these channels. When continuous recordings are made in real-time, tomography images of the shallow subsurface can be formed or updated on a daily basis, forming a very low cost near-surface monitoring system using seismic noise.

  18. Jovian seismology: preliminary results of the SYMPA instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulme, P.; Schmider, F. X.; Gay, J.; Jacob, C.; Jeanneaux, F.; Alvarez, M.; Reyes, M.; Valtier, J. C.; Fossat, E.; Palle, P. L.; Belmonte, J. C.; Gelly, B.

    2006-06-01

    Jupiter's internal structure is poorly known (Guillot et al. 2004). Seismology is a powerful tool to investigate the internal structure of planets and stars, by analyzing how acoustic waves propagate. Mosser (1997) and Gudkova & Zarkhov (1999) showed that the detection and the identification of non-radial modes up to degree ℓ=25 can constrain strongly the internal structure. SYMPA is a ground-based network project dedicated to the Jovian oscillations (Schmider et al. 2002). The instrument is composed of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer producing four interferograms of the planetary spectrum. The combination of the four images in phase quadrature allows the reconstruction of the incident light phase, which is related to the Doppler shift generated by the oscillations. Two SYMPA instruments were built at the Nice university and were used simultaneously during two observation campaigns, in 2004 and 2005, at the San Pedro Martir observatory (Mexico) and the Teide observatory (Las Canarias). We will present for the first time the data processing and the preliminary results of the experiment.

  19. Waves and rays in seismology answers to unasked questions

    CERN Document Server

    Slawinski, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The author dedicates this book to readers who are concerned with finding out the status of concepts, statements and hypotheses, and with clarifying and rearranging them in a logical order. It is thus not intended to teach tools and techniques of the trade, but to discuss the foundations on which seismology — and in a larger sense, the theory of wave propagation in solids — is built. A key question is: why and to what degree can a theory developed for an elastic continuum be used to investigate the propagation of waves in the Earth, which is neither a continuum nor fully elastic. But the scrutiny of the foundations goes much deeper: material symmetry, effective tensors, equivalent media; the influence (or, rather, the lack thereof) of gravitational and thermal effects and the rotation of the Earth, are discussed ab initio. The variational principles of Fermat and Hamilton and their consequences for the propagation of elastic waves, causality, Noether's theorem and its consequences on conservation of energy...

  20. STSHV a teleinformatic system for historic seismology in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, J. E.; Palme, C.; Altez, R.; Aranguren, R.; Guada, C.; Silva, J.

    2013-05-01

    From 1997 on, when the first "Jornadas Venezolanas de Sismicidad Historica" took place, a big interest awoke in Venezuela to organize the available information related to historic earthquakes. At that moment only existed one published historic earthquake catalogue, that from Centeno Grau published the first time in 1949. That catalogue had no references about the sources of information. Other catalogues existed but they were internal reports for the petroleum companies and therefore difficult to access. In 2000 Grases et al reedited the Centeno-Grau catalogue, it ended up in a new, very complete catalogue with all the sources well referenced and updated. The next step to organize historic seismicity data was, from 2004 to 2008, the creation of the STSHV (Sistema de teleinformacion de Sismologia Historica Venezolana, http://sismicidad.hacer.ula.ve ). The idea was to bring together all information about destructive historic earthquakes in Venezuela in one place in the internet so it could be accessed easily by a widespread public. There are two ways to access the system. The first one, selecting an earthquake or a list of earthquakes, and the second one, selecting an information source or a list of sources. For each earthquake there is a summary of general information and additional materials: a list with the source parameters published by different authors, a list with intensities assessed by different authors, a list of information sources, a short text summarizing the historic situation at the time of the earthquake and a list of pictures if available. There are searching facilities for the seismic events and dynamic maps can be created. The information sources are classified in: books, handwritten documents, transcription of handwritten documents, documents published in books, journals and congress memories, newspapers, seismologic catalogues and electronic sources. There are facilities to find specific documents or lists of documents with common characteristics

  1. Regional dependence in earthquake early warning and real time seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprio, M.

    2013-01-01

    An effective earthquake prediction method is still a Chimera. What we can do at the moment, after the occurrence of a seismic event, is to provide the maximum available information as soon as possible. This can help in reducing the impact of the quake on population or and better organize the rescue operations in case of post-event actions. This study strives to improve the evaluation of earthquake parameters shortly after the occurrence of a major earthquake, and the characterization of regional dependencies in Real-Time Seismology. The recent earthquake experience from Tohoku (M 9.0, 11.03.2011) showed how an efficient EEW systems can inform numerous people and thus potentially reduce the economic and human losses by distributing warning messages several seconds before the arrival of seismic waves. In the case of devastating earthquakes, usually, in the first minutes to days after the main shock, the common communications channels can be overloaded or broken. In such cases, a precise knowledge of the macroseismic intensity distribution will represent a decisive contribution in help management and in the valuation of losses. In this work, I focused on improving the adaptability of EEW systems (chapters 1 and 2) and in deriving a global relationship for converting peak ground motion into macroseismic intensity and vice versa (chapter 3). For EEW applications, in chapter 1 we present an evolutionary approach for magnitude estimation for earthquake early warning based on real-time inversion of displacement spectra. The Spectrum Inversion (SI) method estimates magnitude and its uncertainty by inferring the shape of the entire displacement spectral curve based on the part of the spectra constrained by available data. Our method can be applied in any region without the need for calibration. SI magnitude and uncertainty estimates are updated each second following the initial P detection and potentially stabilize within 10 seconds from the initial earthquake detection

  2. Regional dependence in earthquake early warning and real time seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprio, M.

    2013-07-01

    An effective earthquake prediction method is still a Chimera. What we can do at the moment, after the occurrence of a seismic event, is to provide the maximum available information as soon as possible. This can help in reducing the impact of the quake on population or and better organize the rescue operations in case of post-event actions. This study strives to improve the evaluation of earthquake parameters shortly after the occurrence of a major earthquake, and the characterization of regional dependencies in Real-Time Seismology. The recent earthquake experience from Tohoku (M 9.0, 11.03.2011) showed how an efficient EEW systems can inform numerous people and thus potentially reduce the economic and human losses by distributing warning messages several seconds before the arrival of seismic waves. In the case of devastating earthquakes, usually, in the first minutes to days after the main shock, the common communications channels can be overloaded or broken. In such cases, a precise knowledge of the macroseismic intensity distribution will represent a decisive contribution in help management and in the valuation of losses. In this work, I focused on improving the adaptability of EEW systems (chapters 1 and 2) and in deriving a global relationship for converting peak ground motion into macroseismic intensity and vice versa (chapter 3). For EEW applications, in chapter 1 we present an evolutionary approach for magnitude estimation for earthquake early warning based on real-time inversion of displacement spectra. The Spectrum Inversion (SI) method estimates magnitude and its uncertainty by inferring the shape of the entire displacement spectral curve based on the part of the spectra constrained by available data. Our method can be applied in any region without the need for calibration. SI magnitude and uncertainty estimates are updated each second following the initial P detection and potentially stabilize within 10 seconds from the initial earthquake detection

  3. A uniform seismological bulletin for the European - Mediterranean region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossu, R.; Piedfroid, O.; Riviere, F.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this EU funded project is to develop means and tools to produce a homogeneous European-Mediterranean seismic bulletin that could serve as a reference. The 3 main objectives are 1) the definition of a unified magnitude scale for M > 3, 2) an improved location of events especially in border regions, 3) Improving rapid and regular data exchange within the European-Mediterranean region. The first step is to define an homogeneous and accurate magnitude estimation for the whole region of interest. Experience shows that the differences in the magnitudes reported by several institutes for a given event may vary up to 1.5 units. Three different magnitude computations are applied on a reference data set of well known events: a Lg waves coda magnitude, a Richter local magnitude and a moment magnitude scale. The comparison of the results is currently carried out. The algorithm associated to the selected magnitude will be implemented locally on a set of stations. New velocity models for border regions are developed from the analysis of the residuals of events recorded by permanent and temporary networks. The robustness and reliability of the 3D models versus 1D model have been evaluated. EMSC gathers via e-mail manually picked seismic phase arrival times with or without associated locations from about 50 seismological institutes of the European- Mediterranean region in a database. These bulletins are automatically merged by unique software. The number of processed events is about 2000 / month and should grow significantly with larger input from Middle East and Northern Africa. Events are then submitted to an automatic analysis of the location reliability, and, for dubious events, to a manual reprocessing. In order to improve data exchange, the installation of autoDRM systems is promoted. (authors)

  4. Monitoring the englacial fracture state using virtual-reflector seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F.; Weemstra, C.; Walter, F.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Fracturing and changes in the englacial macroscopic water content change the elastic bulk properties of ice bodies. Small seismic velocity variations, resulting from such changes, can be measured using a technique called coda-wave interferometry. Here, coda refers to the later-arriving, multiply scattered waves. Often, this technique is applied to so-called virtual-source responses, which can be obtained using seismic interferometry (a simple crosscorrelation process). Compared to other media (e.g., the Earth's crust), however, ice bodies exhibit relatively little scattering. This complicates the application of coda-wave interferometry to the retrieved virtual-source responses. In this work, we therefore investigate the applicability of coda-wave interferometry to virtual-source responses obtained using two alternative seismic interferometric techniques, namely, seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (SI by MDD), and virtual-reflector seismology (VRS). To that end, we use synthetic data, as well as active-source glacier data acquired on Glacier de la Plaine Morte, Switzerland. Both SI by MDD and VRS allow the retrieval of more accurate virtual-source responses. In particular, the dependence of the retrieved virtual-source responses on the illumination pattern is reduced. We find that this results in more accurate glacial phase-velocity estimates. In addition, VRS introduces virtual reflections from a receiver contour (partly) enclosing the medium of interest. By acting as a sort of virtual reverberation, the coda resulting from the application of VRS significantly increases seismic monitoring capabilities, in particular in cases where natural scattering coda is not available.

  5. Accuracy assessment of high-rate GPS measurements for seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui, P.; Davis, J. L.; Ekström, G.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of GPS measurements with a controlled laboratory system, built to simulate the ground motions caused by tectonic earthquakes and other transient geophysical signals such as glacial earthquakes, enables us to assess the technique of high-rate GPS. The root-mean-square (rms) position error of this system when undergoing realistic simulated seismic motions is 0.05~mm, with maximum position errors of 0.1~mm, thus providing "ground truth" GPS displacements. We have acquired an extensive set of high-rate GPS measurements while inducing seismic motions on a GPS antenna mounted on this system with a temporal spectrum similar to real seismic events. We found that, for a particular 15-min-long test event, the rms error of the 1-Hz GPS position estimates was 2.5~mm, with maximum position errors of 10~mm, and the error spectrum of the GPS estimates was approximately flicker noise. These results may however represent a best-case scenario since they were obtained over a short (~10~m) baseline, thereby greatly mitigating baseline-dependent errors, and when the number and distribution of satellites on the sky was good. For example, we have determined that the rms error can increase by a factor of 2--3 as the GPS constellation changes throughout the day, with an average value of 3.5~mm for eight identical, hourly-spaced, consecutive test events. The rms error also increases with increasing baseline, as one would expect, with an average rms error for a ~1400~km baseline of 9~mm. We will present an assessment of the accuracy of high-rate GPS based on these measurements, discuss the implications of this study for seismology, and describe new applications in glaciology.

  6. Expanding Horizons in Mitigating Earthquake Related Disasters in Urban Areas: Global Development of Real-Time Seismology

    OpenAIRE

    Utkucu, Murat; Küyük, Hüseyin Serdar; Demir, İsmail Hakkı

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Real-time seismology is a newly developing alternative approach in seismology to mitigate earthquake hazard. It exploits up-to-date advances in seismic instrument technology, data acquisition, digital communications and computer systems for quickly transforming data into earthquake information in real-time to reduce earthquake losses and its impact on social and economic life in the earthquake prone densely populated urban and industrial areas.  Real-time seismology systems are not o...

  7. Provenance for Runtime Workflow Steering and Validation in Computational Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Krischer, L.; Krause, A.; Filgueira, R.; Magnoni, F.; Muraleedharan, V.; David, M.

    2014-12-01

    Provenance systems may be offered by modern workflow engines to collect metadata about the data transformations at runtime. If combined with effective visualisation and monitoring interfaces, these provenance recordings can speed up the validation process of an experiment, suggesting interactive or automated interventions with immediate effects on the lifecycle of a workflow run. For instance, in the field of computational seismology, if we consider research applications performing long lasting cross correlation analysis and high resolution simulations, the immediate notification of logical errors and the rapid access to intermediate results, can produce reactions which foster a more efficient progress of the research. These applications are often executed in secured and sophisticated HPC and HTC infrastructures, highlighting the need for a comprehensive framework that facilitates the extraction of fine grained provenance and the development of provenance aware components, leveraging the scalability characteristics of the adopted workflow engines, whose enactment can be mapped to different technologies (MPI, Storm clusters, etc). This work looks at the adoption of W3C-PROV concepts and data model within a user driven processing and validation framework for seismic data, supporting also computational and data management steering. Validation needs to balance automation with user intervention, considering the scientist as part of the archiving process. Therefore, the provenance data is enriched with community-specific metadata vocabularies and control messages, making an experiment reproducible and its description consistent with the community understandings. Moreover, it can contain user defined terms and annotations. The current implementation of the system is supported by the EU-Funded VERCE (http://verce.eu). It provides, as well as the provenance generation mechanisms, a prototypal browser-based user interface and a web API built on top of a NoSQL storage

  8. Big Data and High-Performance Computing in Global Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    Much of our knowledge of Earth's interior is based on seismic observations and measurements. Adjoint methods provide an efficient way of incorporating 3D full wave propagation in iterative seismic inversions to enhance tomographic images and thus our understanding of processes taking place inside the Earth. Our aim is to take adjoint tomography, which has been successfully applied to regional and continental scale problems, further to image the entire planet. This is one of the extreme imaging challenges in seismology, mainly due to the intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated. We have started low-resolution inversions (T > 30 s and T > 60 s for body and surface waves, respectively) with a limited data set (253 carefully selected earthquakes and seismic data from permanent and temporary networks) on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D global wave propagation solvers, such as a GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will enable us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves, thereby improving imbalanced ray coverage as a result of the uneven global distribution of sources and receivers. Our ultimate goal is to use all earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue within the magnitude range of our interest and data from all available seismic networks. To take the full advantage of computational resources, we need a solid framework to manage big data sets during numerical simulations, pre-processing (i.e., data requests and quality checks, processing data, window selection, etc.) and post-processing (i.e., pre-conditioning and smoothing kernels, etc.). We address the bottlenecks in our global seismic workflow, which are mainly coming from heavy I/O traffic during simulations and the pre- and post-processing stages, by defining new data

  9. Twitter Seismology: Earthquake Monitoring and Response in a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Smoczyk, G.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The potential uses of Twitter for earthquake response include broadcasting earthquake alerts, rapidly detecting widely felt events, qualitatively assessing earthquake damage effects, communicating with the public, and participating in post-event collaboration. Several seismic networks and agencies are currently distributing Twitter earthquake alerts including the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (@LastQuake), Natural Resources Canada (@CANADAquakes), and the Indonesian meteorological agency (@infogempabmg); the USGS will soon distribute alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts. Beyond broadcasting alerts, the USGS is investigating how to use tweets that originate near the epicenter to detect and characterize shaking events. This is possible because people begin tweeting immediately after feeling an earthquake, and their short narratives and exclamations are available for analysis within 10's of seconds of the origin time. Using five months of tweets that contain the word "earthquake" and its equivalent in other languages, we generate a tweet-frequency time series. The time series clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a simple Short-Term-Average / Long-Term-Average algorithm similar to that commonly used to detect seismic phases. As with most auto-detection algorithms, the parameters can be tuned to catch more or less events at the cost of more or less false triggers. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector found 48 globally-distributed, confirmed seismic events with only 2 false triggers. A space-shuttle landing and "The Great California ShakeOut" caused the false triggers. This number of

  10. QuakeML: Recent Development and First Applications of the Community-Created Seismological Data Exchange Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Kästli, P.; Quakeml Group, T

    2008-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based exchange format for seismological data which is being developed using a community-driven approach. It covers basic event description, including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Contributions have been made from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, and ISTI. The current release (Version 1.1, Proposed Recommendation) reflects the results of a public Request for Comments process which has been documented online at http://quakeml.org/RFC_BED_1.0. QuakeML has recently been adopted as a distribution format for earthquake catalogs by GNS Science, New Zealand, and the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC). These institutions provide prototype QuakeML web services. Furthermore, integration of the QuakeML data model in the CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability, http://www.cseptesting.org) testing center software developed by SCEC is under way. QuakePy is a Python- based seismicity analysis toolkit which is based on the QuakeML data model. Recently, QuakePy has been used to implement the PMC method for calculating network recording completeness (Schorlemmer and Woessner 2008, in press). Completeness results for seismic networks in Southern California and Japan can be retrieved through the CompletenessWeb (http://completenessweb.org). Future QuakeML development will include an extension for macroseismic information. Furthermore, development on seismic inventory information, resource identifiers, and resource metadata is under way. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  11. QuakeML: Status of the XML-based Seismological Data Exchange Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, Fabian; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Kästli, Philipp; Quakeml Working Group

    2010-05-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process that included contributions from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, Nanometrics, and ISTI. QuakeML has mainly been funded through the EC FP6 infrastructure project NERIES, in which it was endorsed as the preferred data exchange format. Currently, QuakeML services are being installed at several institutions around the globe, including EMSC, ORFEUS, ETH, Geoazur (Europe), NEIC, ANSS, SCEC/SCSN (USA), and GNS Science (New Zealand). Some of these institutions already provide QuakeML earthquake catalog web services. Several implementations of the QuakeML data model have been made. QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit using the QuakeML data model, is being developed at ETH. QuakePy is part of the software stack used in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) testing center installations, developed by SCEC. Furthermore, the QuakeML data model is part of the SeisComP3 package from GFZ Potsdam. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, seismic inventory, and resource metadata) has been started, but is at an early stage. Contributions from the community that help to widen the thematic coverage of QuakeML are highly welcome. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  12. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)-Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Trani, L.; Rives, S.; Thomy, P.; Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Saul, J.; Heinloo, A.; Bossu, R.; van Eck, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach based on the concept of an internet service oriented architecture (SOA) to establish a cyberinfrastructure for distributed and heterogeneous data streams and services. Moreover, one of the goals of NERIES is to design and develop a Web portal that acts as the uppermost layer of the infrastructure and provides rendering capabilities for the underlying sets of data The Web services that are currently being designed and implemented will deliver data that has been adopted to appropriate formats. The parametric information about a seismic event is delivered using a seismology-specific Extensible mark-up Language(XML) format called QuakeML (https://quake.ethz.ch/quakeml), which has been formalized and implemented in coordination with global earthquake-information agencies. Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) are used to assign identifiers to (1) seismic-event parameters described by QuakeML, and (2) generic resources, for example, authorities, locations providers, location methods, software adopted, and so on, described by use of a data model constructed with the resource description framework (RDF) and accessible as a service. The European-Mediterranean Seismological Center (EMSC) has implemented a unique event identifier (UNID) that will create the seismic event URI used by the QuakeML data model. Access to data such as broadband waveform, accelerometric data and stations inventories will be also provided through a set of Web services that will wrap the middleware used by the

  13. Montessus de Ballore, a pioneer of seismology: The man and his work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisternas, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Ferdinand de Montessus de Ballore was one of the founders of scientific seismology. He was a pioneer in seismology at the same level as Perrey, Mallet, Milne and Omori. He became familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in Central America (1881-1885). After his experience in El Salvador his interest for understanding earthquakes and volcanoes oriented all of his life. Back in France he worked out a most complete world catalogue of earthquakes with 170.000 events (1885-1907), and completed his career being the head of the Chilean Seismological Service (1907-1923). Many of his ideas were in advance of later discoveries. He was an exceptional writer and published more than 30 books and hundreds of papers.

  14. Long-term studies with the Ariel-5 asm. 1: Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. [periodic variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve hundred days of 3-6 keV X-ray data from Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 accumulated with the Ariel-5 all-sky monitor are interrogated. The binary periodicities of all three can be clearly observed, as can the approximately 35-d variation of Her X-1, for which we can refine the period to 34.875 plus or minus .030-d. No such longer-term periodicity less than 200-d is observed from Vela X-1. The 26.6-d low-state recurrence period for Cen X-3 previously suggested is not observed, but a 43.0-d candidate periodicity is found which may be consistent with the precession of an accretion disk in that system. The present results are illustrative of the long-term studies which can be performed on approximately 50 sources over a temporal base which will ultimately extend to at least 1800 days.

  15. Detailed CO(J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2) observations toward an H II region RCW 32 in the Vela Molecular Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokiya, Rei; Sano, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Torii, Kazufumi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ohama, Akio; Kimura, Kimihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    We performed CO(J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2) observations toward an H II region RCW 32 in the Vela Molecular Ridge. The CO gas distribution associated with the H II region was revealed for the first time at a high resolution of 22″. The results revealed three distinct velocity components which show correspondence with the optical dark lanes and/or Hα distribution. Two of the components show complementary spatial distribution which suggests collisional interaction between them at a relative velocity of ˜ 4 km s-1. Based on these results, we present a hypothesis that a cloud-cloud collision determined the cloud distribution and triggered formation of the exciting star ionizing RCW 32. The collision time scale is estimated from the cloud size and the velocity separation to be ˜2 Myr and the collision terminated ˜1 Myr ago, which is consistent with the age of the exciting star and the associated cluster. By combing the previous works on the H II regions in the Vela Molecular Ridge, we argue that the majority (at least four) of the H II regions in the Ridge were formed by triggering of cloud-cloud collision.

  16. 10 CFR 72.103 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for... § 72.103 Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on... foundation and geological investigation, literature review, and regional geological reconnaissance show no...

  17. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  18. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  19. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  20. Significant breakthroughs in monitoring networks of the volcanological and seismological French observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    lemarchand, A.; Francois, B.; Bouin, M.; Brenguier, F.; Clouard, V.; Di Muro, A.; Ferrazzini, V.; Shapiro, N.; Staudacher, T.; Kowalski, P.; Agrinier, P.

    2013-12-01

    Others authors: S. Tait (1), D. Amorese (4,1), JB de Chabalier (1), A. Anglade (4,1), P. Kowalski (5,1),the teams in the IPGP Volcanological and Seismological observatories In the last few years, French West Indies observatories, in collaboration with the Seismic Research Center (University of West Indies-Trinidad), have modernized the Lesser Antilles Arc seismic and deformation monitoring network. 16 new permanent stations have been installed to strengthen and expand its detection capabilities. The global network of the IPGP-SRC consortium is now composed of 21 modernized stations, all equipped with broadband seismometers, strong motion sensors, GNSS sensors and satellite communication for real-time data transfer to the observatories of Trinidad (SRC), Guadeloupe (OVSG), Martinique (OVSM). To improve the sensitivity and reduce ambient noise, special efforts were made to enhance the design of the seismic vault and the original Stuttgart shielding (D. Kurrle R. Widmer-Schnidrig, 2005) of the broadband seismometers (240 and 120 sec). This renewed network feeds the Caribbean Tsunami Warning System supported by UNESCO and establishes a monitoring tool that produces high quality data for studying subduction and volcanism interactions in the Lesser Antilles arc. Since 2010, the UnderVolc research program has been an opportunity to reinforce the existing volcanic seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise on La Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). 20 broadband seismometers, 20 short-period sensors, and 26 GNSS receivers now cover the volcano. The program successfully developed many new data treatment tools. They have proven to be well-adapted for monitoring volcanic activity such as the tracking of seismic velocity changes inferred from seismic noise, or the injection of dike and the resulting deformations. This upgrade has now established the monitoring network of La Réunion hot spot to high quality standards which will foster the scientific attractiveness of OVPF-IPGP. During

  1. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)—Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    OpenAIRE

    A. Spinuso; L. Trani; S. Rives; P. Thomy; F. Euchner; Danijel Schorlemmer; Joachim Saul; Andres Heinloo; R. Bossu; T. van Eck

    2009-01-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach bas...

  2. Seismology and Research in Schools: One School's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedd, Joe; Tedd, Bernie

    2018-01-01

    The UK School Seismology Project started in 2007. King Edward VI High School for Girls was one of the fortunate schools to obtain a school seismometer system, free of charge, as an early adopter of the resource. This report outlines our experiences with the system over the past 10 years and describes our recent research on the relationship between…

  3. The establishment of the Blacknest seismological database on the Rutherford Laboratory system 360/195 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blamey, C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to assess the problems which might arise from monitoring a comprehensive test ban treaty by seismological methods, an experimental monitoring operation is being conducted. This work has involved the establishment of a database on the Rutherford Laboratory 360/195 system computer. The database can be accessed in the UK over the public telephone network and in the USA via ARPANET. (author)

  4. Solving seismological problems using SGRAPH program: I-source parameters and hypocentral location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-01-01

    SGRAPH program is considered one of the seismological programs that maintain seismic data. SGRAPH is considered unique for being able to read a wide range of data formats and manipulate complementary tools in different seismological subjects in a stand-alone Windows-based application. SGRAPH efficiently performs the basic waveform analysis and solves advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows facilities such as, dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars simplified the user interaction with data. SGRAPH supported the common data formats like, SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and others. It provides the facilities to solve many seismological problems with the built-in inversion and modeling tools. In this paper, I discuss some of the inversion tools built-in SGRAPH related to source parameters and hypocentral location estimation. Firstly, a description of the SGRAPH program is given discussing some of its features. Secondly, the inversion tools are applied to some selected events of the Dahshour earthquakes as an example of estimating the spectral and source parameters of local earthquakes. In addition, the hypocentral location of these events are estimated using the Hypoinverse 2000 program operated by SGRAPH.

  5. Jupyter Notebooks for Earth Sciences: An Interactive Training Platform for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, H.; Chow, B.; Donner, S.; Krischer, L.; van Driel, M.; Tape, C.

    2017-12-01

    We have initiated a community platform (http://www.seismo-live.org) where Python-based Jupyter notebooks (https://jupyter.org) can be accessed and run without necessary downloads or local software installations. The increasingly popular Jupyter notebooks allow the combination of markup language, graphics, and equations with interactive, executable Python code examples. Jupyter notebooks are a powerful and easy-to-grasp tool for students to develop entire projects, scientists to collaborate and efficiently interchange evolving workflows, and trainers to develop efficient practical material. Utilizing the tmpnb project (https://github.com/jupyter/tmpnb), we link the power of Jupyter notebooks with an underlying server, such that notebooks can be run from anywhere, even on smart phones. We demonstrate the potential with notebooks for 1) learning the programming language Python, 2) basic signal processing, 3) an introduction to the ObsPy library (https://obspy.org) for seismology, 4) seismic noise analysis, 5) an entire suite of notebooks for computational seismology (the finite-difference method, pseudospectral methods, finite/spectral element methods, the finite-volume and the discontinuous Galerkin methods, Instaseis), 6) rotational seismology, 7) making results in papers fully reproducible, 8) a rate-and-state friction toolkit, 9) glacial seismology. The platform is run as a community project using Github. Submission of complementary Jupyter notebooks is encouraged. Extension in the near future include linear(-ized) and nonlinear inverse problems.

  6. The EGU Seismology Division Early Career Scientist Representative team and its initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Laura; Ermert, Laura; Gualtieri, Lucia; Spieker, Kathrin; Van Noten, Koen; Agius, Matthew R.; Mai, P. Martin

    2017-04-01

    Since 2014, the Seismology Division (SM) of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) has its Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative to reach out to its numerous 'younger' members. In April 2016, a new team of representatives joined the Division. We are a vivid team of early career scientists, representing both (either) PhD students and post-doctoral researchers working in different seismological disciplines and different countries. The initiatives of the SM ECS-rep team have various aims: (1) to motivate the ECSs to get involved in activities and initiatives of the EGU and the Seismology Division, (2) to promote the research of ECSs, (3) to discuss issues concerning seismologists during this particular stage of their career, (4) to share ideas on how to promote equality between scientists and (5) to improve on the public dissemination of scientific knowledge. In an effort to reach out to experienced and ECS seismologists more effectively and to continuously encourage to voice their ideas by contributing and following our initiatives, a blog and social media pages dedicated to seismology and earthquake trivia are run by the team. Weekly posts are published on the blog and shared on the social media regarding scientific and social aspects of seismology. One of the major contributions recently introduced to the blog is the "Paper of the Month" series where experienced seismologists write about recent or classical - must read - seismology articles. We also aim to organise and promote social and scientific events. During the EGU General Assembly 2016 a social event was held in Vienna allowing ECS to network with peers in an informal environment. Given the success of this event, a similar event will be organized during the General Assembly 2017. Also, similar to previous years, a short course on basic seismology for non seismologists will be requested and offered to all ECSs attending the General Assembly. Finally, a workshop dedicated entirely to ECSs seismologists

  7. SGRAPH (SeismoGRAPHer): Seismic waveform analysis and integrated tools in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-03-01

    Although numerous seismological programs are currently available, most of them suffer from the inability to manipulate different data formats and the lack of embedded seismological tools. SeismoGRAPHer, or simply SGRAPH, is a new system for maintaining and analyzing seismic waveform data in a stand-alone, Windows-based application that manipulates a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was intended to be a tool sufficient for performing basic waveform analysis and solving advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows functionalities, such as dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars, simplify the user interaction with the data. SGRAPH supports common data formats, such as SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and provides the ability to solve many seismological problems with built-in inversion tools. Loaded traces are maintained, processed, plotted, and saved as SAC, ASCII, or PS (post script) file formats. SGRAPH includes Generalized Ray Theory (GRT), genetic algorithm (GA), least-square fitting, auto-picking, fast Fourier transforms (FFT), and many additional tools. This program provides rapid estimation of earthquake source parameters, location, attenuation, and focal mechanisms. Advanced waveform modeling techniques are provided for crustal structure and focal mechanism estimation. SGRAPH has been employed in the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) as a tool assisting with routine work and data analysis. More than 30 users have been using previous versions of SGRAPH in their research for more than 3 years. The main features of this application are ease of use, speed, small disk space requirements, and the absence of third-party developed components. Because of its architectural structure, SGRAPH can be interfaced with newly developed methods or applications in seismology. A complete setup file, including the SGRAPH package with the online user guide, is available.

  8. Recent activities of the Seismology Division Early Career Representative(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Matthew; Van Noten, Koen; Ermert, Laura; Mai, P. Martin; Krawczyk, CharLotte

    2016-04-01

    The European Geosciences Union is a bottom-up-organisation, in which its members are represented by their respective scientific divisions, committees and council. In recent years, EGU has embarked on a mission to reach out for its numerous 'younger' members by giving awards to outstanding young scientists and the setting up of Early Career Scientists (ECS) representatives. The division representative's role is to engage in discussions that concern students and early career scientists. Several meetings between all the division representatives are held throughout the year to discuss ideas and Union-wide issues. One important impact ECS representatives have had on EGU is the increased number of short courses and workshops run by ECS during the annual General Assembly. Another important contribution of ECS representatives was redefining 'Young Scientist' to 'Early Career Scientist', which avoids discrimination due to age. Since 2014, the Seismology Division has its own ECS representative. In an effort to more effectively reach out for young seismologists, a blog and a social media page dedicated to seismology have been set up online. With this dedicated blog, we'd like to give more depth to the average browsing experience by enabling young researchers to explore various seismology topics in one place while making the field more exciting and accessible to the broader community. These pages are used to promote the latest research especially of young seismologists and to share interesting seismo-news. Over the months the pages proved to be popular, with hundreds of views every week and an increased number of followers. An online survey was conducted to learn more about the activities and needs of early career seismologists. We present the results from this survey, and the work that has been carried out over the last two years, including detail of what has been achieved so far, and what we would like the ECS representation for Seismology to achieve. Young seismologists are

  9. Control social en el asentamiento colonial Nuestra Señora Santa María de los Remedios del Cabo de la Vela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Bernal Arévalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El asentamiento colonial para la extracción de perlas Nuestra Señora Santa María de los Remedios del Cabo de la Vela fue fundado durante la primera mitad del siglo XVI. Su estudio se ha enfocado en determinar si se presentaron prácticas segregacionistas en - tre los grupos que estuvieron en contacto en este enclave español. Pese a que la Co - rona española impuso políticas de división espacial y control de los diferentes grupos socioculturales dentro de la colonia, los re - sultados preliminares sugieren que no siem - pre se hicieron efectivas.

  10. Structure of the la VELA Offshore Basin, Western Venezuela: AN Obliquely-Opening Rift Basin Within the South America-Caribbean Strike-Slip Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, J. M.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic maps show that the east-west trend of the Cretaceous Great Arc of the Caribbean in the Leeward Antilles islands is transected by an en echelon series of obliquely-sheared rift basins that show right-lateral offsets ranging from 20 to 40 km. The basins are 75-100 km in length and 20-30 km in width and are composed of sub-parallel, oblique slip normal faults that define deep, bathymetric channels that bound the larger islands of the Leeward Antilles including Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire. A single basin of similar orientation and structure, the Urumaco basin, is present to the southwest in the Gulf of Venezuela. We mapped structures and sedimentation in the La Vela rift basin using a 3D seismic data volume recorded down to 6 seconds TWT. The basin can be mapped from the Falcon coast where it is correlative with the right-lateral Adicora fault mapped onshore, and its submarine extension. To the southeast of the 3D survey area, previous workers have mapped a 70-km-wide zone of northeast-striking, oblique, right-lateral faults, some with apparent right-lateral offsets of the coastline. On seismic data, the faults vary in dip from 45 to 60 degrees and exhibit maximum vertical offsets of 600 m. The La Vela and other obliquely-opening rifts accommodate right-lateral shear with linkages to intervening, east-west-striking right-lateral faults like the Adicora. The zone of oblique rifts is restricted to the trend of the Great Arc of the Caribbean and may reflect the susceptiblity of this granitic basement to active shearing. The age of onset for the basins known from previous studies on the Leeward Antilles is early Miocene. As most of these faults occur offshore their potential to generate damaging earthquakes in the densely populated Leeward Antilles is not known.

  11. Mobile and modular. BGR develops seismological monitoring stations for universal applications; Mobil und modular. BGR entwickelt universell einsetzbare seismologische Messstationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, Erwin; Hanneken, Mark [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany). Fachbereich ' ' Seismologisches Zentralobservatorium, Kernwaffenteststopp' '

    2016-05-15

    BGR seismologists often set up monitoring stations for testing purposes. The engineers from the Central Seismological Observatory have now developed a new type of mobile monitoring station which can be remotely controlled.

  12. Study of seismological evasion. Part III. Evaluation of evasion possibilities using codas of large earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evernden, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The seismological aspects of various proposed means of obscuring or hiding the seismic signatures of explosions from a surveillance network are discussed. These so-called evasion schemes are discussed from the points of view of both the evader and the monitor. The analysis will be conducted in terms of the USSR solely because that country is so vast and the geological/geophysical complexities of the country are so great that the complete spectrum of hypothesized evasion schemes requires discussion. Techniques appropriate for use when the seismic noise problem is interference due to codas of P and surface waves from earthquakes are described, and the capabilities of several seismological networks to restrain use of such codas for effective evasion are analyzed

  13. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1984 - December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, C.A.; Murty, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Research and Development (R and D) activities during 1984-1985 of the Seismology Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay are reported in the form of individual summaries. The R and D activities of the Section are directed towards development of seismological instruments and methods of analysis of the seismic field data with the main objective of detecting underground nuclear explosions and assessing seismicity and seismic risk of sites considered for nuclear power stations. The Section has two field stations - one at Gauribidanur in the Southern part of the country and another at Delhi i.e. in the northern part of the country. During the report period, a total of 62 events out of the detected ones were identified as underground explosions. The expertise of the Section is also made available for outside organisations. (M.G.B.)

  14. In Jules Verne's Footsteps: Seismology in the source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Bill; Ito, Hisao; Malin, Peter; Abercrombie, Rachel

    When Professor Otto Lidenbrock led his little band to the center of the Earth in Jules Verne's 1864 classic novel, the intrepid adventurers needed little more than practical 19th century clothes to provide them with comfort and protection. How different the science of earthquakes would be if conditions in the Earth were really so friendly to the would-be observer. Even the operation of seismic sensors at the relatively modest depth of 2-3 km, roughly the depth of the shallowest crustal earthquakes, requires careful precautions against the effects of unstable materials, temperature, pressure, and water for successful long-term observations to be made. Indeed, the handful of successful deep borehole experiments that have been conducted to date have depended on simple sensors with limited bandwidth and dynamic range, and have yielded data that were not ideally suited to investigating the details of the earthquake source.

  15. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.B.; Nguyen, B.

    1993-08-01

    Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone had been monitored by regional seismic networks since 1975. During this time period, over 3,700 earthquakes have been located within the region bounded by latitudes 35 degrees--39 degrees N and longitudes 87 degrees--92 degrees W. Most of these earthquakes occur within a 1.5 degrees x 2 degrees zone centered on the Missouri Bootheel. Source parameters of larger earthquakes in the zone and in eastern North America are determined using surface-wave spectral amplitudes and broadband waveforms for the purpose of determining the focal mechanism, source depth and seismic moment. Waveform modeling of broadband data is shown to be a powerful tool in defining these source parameters when used complementary with regional seismic network data, and in addition, in verifying the correctness of previously published focal mechanism solutions

  16. Seismology: Ways and means for regional cooperation. Transparencies used during the presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzhi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Within the frame of international cooperation in the field of CTBT, this paper describes the first seismologic station established in Morocco in 1934, and in sixties and seventies another 15 stations after the earthquake in Agadir. In 1982, a system for seismic detection was installed having as main objectives he following: coordination and correlation of activities concerned with evaluation of seismic risks in the Mediterranean region, and integration of geophysical data needed for seismic risk assessment

  17. Reflections from the interface between seismological research and earthquake risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Scientific understanding of earthquakes and their attendant hazards is vital for the development of effective earthquake risk reduction strategies. Within the global disaster reduction policy framework (the Hyogo Framework for Action, overseen by the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction), the anticipated role of science and scientists is clear, with respect to risk assessment, loss estimation, space-based observation, early warning and forecasting. The importance of information sharing and cooperation, cross-disciplinary networks and developing technical and institutional capacity for effective disaster management is also highlighted. In practice, the degree to which seismological information is successfully delivered to and applied by individuals, groups or organisations working to manage or reduce the risk from earthquakes is variable. The challenge for scientists is to provide fit-for-purpose information that can be integrated simply into decision-making and risk reduction activities at all levels of governance and at different geographic scales, often by a non-technical audience (i.e. people without any seismological/earthquake engineering training). The interface between seismological research and earthquake risk reduction (defined here in terms of both the relationship between the science and its application, and the scientist and other risk stakeholders) is complex. This complexity is a function of a range issues that arise relating to communication, multidisciplinary working, politics, organisational practices, inter-organisational collaboration, working practices, sectoral cultures, individual and organisational values, worldviews and expectations. These factors can present significant obstacles to scientific information being incorporated into the decision-making process. The purpose of this paper is to present some personal reflections on the nature of the interface between the worlds of seismological research and risk reduction, and the

  18. SeisCode: A seismological software repository for discovery and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C.; Reyes, C. G.; Clark, A.; Karstens, R.

    2012-12-01

    SeisCode is a community repository for software used in seismological and related fields. The repository is intended to increase discoverability of such software and to provide a long-term home for software projects. Other places exist where seismological software may be found, but none meet the requirements necessary for an always current, easy to search, well documented, and citable resource for projects. Organizations such as IRIS, ORFEUS, and the USGS have websites with lists of available or contributed seismological software. Since the authors themselves do often not maintain these lists, the documentation often consists of a sentence or paragraph, and the available software may be outdated. Repositories such as GoogleCode and SourceForge, which are directly maintained by the authors, provide version control and issue tracking but do not provide a unified way of locating geophysical software scattered in and among countless unrelated projects. Additionally, projects are hosted at language-specific sites such as Mathworks and PyPI, in FTP directories, and in websites strewn across the Web. Search engines are only partially effective discovery tools, as the desired software is often hidden deep within the results. SeisCode provides software authors a place to present their software, codes, scripts, tutorials, and examples to the seismological community. Authors can choose their own level of involvement. At one end of the spectrum, the author might simply create a web page that points to an existing site. At the other extreme, an author may choose to leverage the many tools provided by SeisCode, such as a source code management tool with integrated issue tracking, forums, news feeds, downloads, wikis, and more. For software development projects with multiple authors, SeisCode can also be used as a central site for collaboration. SeisCode provides the community with an easy way to discover software, while providing authors a way to build a community around their

  19. The art of communicating seismology to broad audiences: the exhibition which changed the perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma-Danila, Dragos; Tataru, Dragos; Nastase, Eduard; Muntean, Alexandra; Partheniu, Raluca

    2017-04-01

    Seismology is a geoscience often perceived by uninstructed broad audiences as unreliable or inconsistent, since it cannot predict future earthquakes or warn about them effectively; this criticism disregards important achievements that seismology has offered during its more than 100 years of history - such as evidence of Earth's inner structure, knowledge regarding plate tectonics, mineral resource identification, contributions to risk mitigation, monitoring of explosions etc. Moreover, seismology is a field of study with significant advances, which make (or could make) living much safer, in areas with high seismic hazard. We mentioned "could make" since people often fail to understand an important aspect: seismology offers consistent knowledge regarding how to prepare, construct or behave - but it's up to people and authorities to implement the effective measures. In all this story, the effective communication between scientists and the general public plays a major role, making the leap from misconception to relevant impact. As scientists, we wanted to show the true meaning and purpose of seismology to all categories of people. We are in the final stage of the MOBEE (MOBile Earthquake Exhibition) Project implementation, an innovative initiative in a highly seismic country (Romania), where major Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes source have the potential to generate a significant amount of damage over large areas; however, unlike countries like Japan, the medium to long period between felt or significant events (20-40 years) is long enough to make the newer generation in Romania disregardful of the hazard, and older generations skeptical about the role of seismology. MOBEE intended to freshen up things, raise awareness and change the overall perception - through new approaches involving a blend of digital content (interactive apps, responsive and continuously updated website), 3D models achieved through new technologies (3D printing, fiber optics), non

  20. Beyond space and time: advanced selection for seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C. M.; Van Fossen, M.; Ahern, T. K.; Casey, R. E.; Weertman, B.; Sharer, G.; Benson, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Separating the available raw data from that useful for any given study is often a tedious step in a research project, particularly for first-order data quality problems such as broken sensors, incorrect response information, and non-continuous time series. With the ever increasing amounts of data available to researchers, this chore becomes more and more time consuming. To assist users in this pre-processing of data, the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) has created a system called Research Ready Data Sets (RRDS). The RRDS system allows researchers to apply filters that constrain their data request using criteria related to signal quality, response correctness, and high resolution data availability. In addition to the traditional selection methods of stations at a geographic location for given time spans, RRDS will provide enhanced criteria for data selection based on many of the measurements available in the DMC's MUSTANG quality control system. This means that data may be selected based on background noise (tolerance relative to high and low noise Earth models), signal-to-noise ratio for earthquake arrivals, signal RMS, instrument response corrected signal correlation with Earth tides, time tear (gaps/overlaps) counts, timing quality (when reported in the raw data by the datalogger) and more. The new RRDS system is available as a web service designed to operate as a request filter. A request is submitted containing the traditional station and time constraints as well as data quality constraints. The request is then filtered and a report is returned that indicates 1) the request that would subsequently be submitted to a data access service, 2) a record of the quality criteria specified and 3) a record of the data rejected based on those criteria, including the relevant values. This service can be used to either filter a request prior to requesting the actual data or to explore which data match a set of enhanced criteria without downloading the data. We are

  1. Infrasound research at Kola Regional Seismological Centre, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asming, Vladimir; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A small-aperture infrasound array has been installed in Kola Peninsula, Russia 17 km far from the town of Apatity in the year 2000. It comprises 3 Chaparral V microbarographs placed closely to the APA seismic array sensors and equipped with pipe wind reducing filters. The data are digitized at the array site and transmitted in real time to a processing center in Apatity. To search for infrasound events (arrivals of coherent signals) a beamforming-style detector has been developed. Now it works in near real time. We analyzed the detecting statistics for different frequency bands. Most man-made events are detected in 1-5 Hz band, microbaromes are typically detected in 0.2-1 Hz band. In lower frequencies we record mostly a wind noise. A data base of samples of infrasound signals of different natures has been collected. It contains recordings of microbaromes, industrial and military explosions, airplane shock waves, infrasound of airplanes, thunders, rocket launches and reentries, bolides etc. The most distant signals we have detected are associated with Kursk Magnetic Anomaly explosions (1700 km far from Apatity). We implemented an algorithm for association of infrasound signals and preliminary location of infrasound events by several arrays. It was tested with Apatity data together with data of Sweden - Finnish infrasound network operated by the Institute of Space Physics in Umea (Sweden). By agreement with NORSAR we have a real-time access to the data of Norwegian experimental infrasound installation situated in Karasjok (North Norway). Currently our detection and location programs work both with Apatity and Norwegian data. The results are available in Internet. Finnish militaries routinely destroy out-of-date weapon in autumns at the same compact site in North Finland. This is a great source of repeating infrasound signals of the same magnitude and origin. We recorded several hundreds of such explosions. The signals have been used for testing our location routines

  2. Two stage melt-rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust of the Parece Vela basin (Philippine sea), evidence from the primitive troctolites from the Godzilla Megamullion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Dick, H. J.; Ohara, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Godzilla Megamullion is a giant oceanic core complex exposed in an extinct slow- to intermediate-spreading segment of the Parece Vela Basin (Philippine sea) [1; 2]. It exposes lower crust and mantle rocks on the sea-floor, offering a unique opportunity to unravel the architecture and the composition of the lower oceanic lithosphere of an extinct back arc basin. Here we present data on primitive troctolites and associated olivine-gabbros from the breakaway area of the Godzilla Megamullion. On the basis of the olivine/plagioclase volume ratio, the troctolites are subdivided into Ol-troctolites (Ol/Pl >1) and Pl-troctolites (Ol/Plthe olivine and a melt crystallizing plagioclase and clinopyroxene. We interpret these rocks as reaction products of a dunite matrix with transient basaltic melts [e.g. 3; 4]. Pl-troctolites have euhedral plagioclase and poikilitic olivine and clinopyroxene. Irregular shapes and inverse zoning of the plagioclase chadacrysts within the olivine indicate disequilibrium between existing plagioclase and an olivine-clinopyroxene saturated melt. The occurrence of plagioclase chadacrysts within clinopyroxene ranging from irregular to euhedral in shape suggests crystallization of new lower-Na plagioclase with the clinopyroxene. Olivine oikocrysts in the Pl-troctolites have low-NiO olivine in equilibrium with a high-MgO melt. The Pl-troctolites, then, may be the product of reaction between a plagioclase cumulate and a basaltic melt produced by mixing the high-MgO melt residual to the formation of the Ol-troctolites with new magma. The effect of melt-rock reaction in the Pl- and Ol- troctolites explains the sharp decrease in plagioclase An with respect to Mg# in clinopyroxene and olivine. Furthermore, the melt is shifted towards lower Na, which is consistent with the low Na8 values of the associated MORB glasses (2.4-2.7 wt %). Our results, then, show that melt-rock interaction was a process active in the lower oceanic crust of the Parece Vela basin and

  3. ON THE EXPANSION RATE, AGE, AND DISTANCE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G266.2–1.2 (Vela Jr.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, G. E. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, NE83-557, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chow, K. [Weston High School, 444 Wellesley Street, Weston, MA 02493 (United States); DeLaney, T. [Department of Physics and Engineering, West Virginia Wesleyan College, Box 112, 59 College Avenue, Buckhannon, WV 26201 (United States); Filipović, M. D. [University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797 (Australia); Houck, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pannuti, T. G. [Space Science Center, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Morehead State University, 235 Martindale Drive, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States); Stage, M. D., E-mail: gea@space.mit.edu, E-mail: kc71135@gmail.com, E-mail: delaney_t@wvwc.edu, E-mail: m.filipovic@uws.edu.au, E-mail: jhouck@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: t.pannuti@moreheadstate.edu, E-mail: mikstage@astro.umass.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    An analysis of Chandra ACIS data for two relatively bright and narrow portions of the northwestern rim of G266.2–1.2 (a.k.a. RX J0852.0-4622 or Vela Jr.) reveal evidence of a radial displacement of 2.40 ± 0.56 arcsec between 2003 and 2008. The corresponding expansion rate (0.42 ± 0.10 arcsec yr{sup –1} or 13.6% ± 4.2% kyr{sup –1}) is about half the rate reported for an analysis of XMM-Newton data from a similar, but not identical, portion of the rim over a similar, but not identical, time interval (0.84 ± 0.23 arcsec yr{sup –1}). If the Chandra rate is representative of the remnant as a whole, then the results of a hydrodynamic analysis suggest that G266.2–1.2 is between 2.4 and 5.1 kyr old if it is expanding into a uniform ambient medium (whether or not it was produced by a Type Ia or Type II event). If the remnant is expanding into the material shed by a steady stellar wind, then the age could be as much as 50% higher. The Chandra expansion rate and a requirement that the shock speed be greater than or equal to 1000 km s{sup –1} yields a lower limit on the distance of 0.5 kpc. An analysis of previously published distance estimates and constraints suggests G266.2–1.2 is no further than 1.0 kpc. This range of distances is consistent with the distance to the nearer of two groups of material in the Vela Molecular Ridge (0.7 ± 0.2 kpc) and to the Vel OB1 association (0.8 kpc)

  4. Facilitating open global data use in earthquake source modelling to improve geodetic and seismological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhaus, Henriette; Heimann, Sebastian; Steinberg, Andreas; Isken, Marius; Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    In the last few years impressive achievements have been made in improving inferences about earthquake sources by using InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) data. Several factors aided these developments. The open data basis of earthquake observations has expanded vastly with the two powerful Sentinel-1 SAR sensors up in space. Increasing computer power allows processing of large data sets for more detailed source models. Moreover, data inversion approaches for earthquake source inferences are becoming more advanced. By now data error propagation is widely implemented and the estimation of model uncertainties is a regular feature of reported optimum earthquake source models. Also, more regularly InSAR-derived surface displacements and seismological waveforms are combined, which requires finite rupture models instead of point-source approximations and layered medium models instead of homogeneous half-spaces. In other words the disciplinary differences in geodetic and seismological earthquake source modelling shrink towards common source-medium descriptions and a source near-field/far-field data point of view. We explore and facilitate the combination of InSAR-derived near-field static surface displacement maps and dynamic far-field seismological waveform data for global earthquake source inferences. We join in the community efforts with the particular goal to improve crustal earthquake source inferences in generally not well instrumented areas, where often only the global backbone observations of earthquakes are available provided by seismological broadband sensor networks and, since recently, by Sentinel-1 SAR acquisitions. We present our work on modelling standards for the combination of static and dynamic surface displacements in the source's near-field and far-field, e.g. on data and prediction error estimations as well as model uncertainty estimation. Rectangular dislocations and moment-tensor point sources are exchanged by simple planar finite

  5. How citizen seismology is transforming rapid public earthquake information and interactions between seismologists and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Rémy; Steed, Robert; Mazet-Roux, Gilles; Roussel, Fréderic; Caroline, Etivant

    2015-04-01

    Historical earthquakes are only known to us through written recollections and so seismologists have a long experience of interpreting the reports of eyewitnesses, explaining probably why seismology has been a pioneer in crowdsourcing and citizen science. Today, Internet has been transforming this situation; It can be considered as the digital nervous system comprising of digital veins and intertwined sensors that capture the pulse of our planet in near real-time. How can both seismology and public could benefit from this new monitoring system? This paper will present the strategy implemented at Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) to leverage this new nervous system to detect and diagnose the impact of earthquakes within minutes rather than hours and how it transformed information systems and interactions with the public. We will show how social network monitoring and flashcrowds (massive website traffic increases on EMSC website) are used to automatically detect felt earthquakes before seismic detections, how damaged areas can me mapped through concomitant loss of Internet sessions (visitors being disconnected) and the benefit of collecting felt reports and geolocated pictures to further constrain rapid impact assessment of global earthquakes. We will also describe how public expectations within tens of seconds of ground shaking are at the basis of improved diversified information tools which integrate this user generated contents. A special attention will be given to LastQuake, the most complex and sophisticated Twitter QuakeBot, smartphone application and browser add-on, which deals with the only earthquakes that matter for the public: the felt and damaging earthquakes. In conclusion we will demonstrate that eyewitnesses are today real time earthquake sensors and active actors of rapid earthquake information.

  6. QuakeML: XML for Seismological Data Exchange and Resource Metadata Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Becker, J.; Heinloo, A.; Kästli, P.; Saul, J.; Weber, B.; QuakeML Working Group

    2007-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange format for seismology that is under development. Current collaborators are from ETH, GFZ, USC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, and ISTI. QuakeML development was motivated by the lack of a widely accepted and well-documented data format that is applicable to a broad range of fields in seismology. The development team brings together expertise from communities dealing with analysis and creation of earthquake catalogs, distribution of seismic bulletins, and real-time processing of seismic data. Efforts to merge QuakeML with existing XML dialects are under way. The first release of QuakeML will cover a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Further extensions are in progress or planned, e.g., for macroseismic information, location probability density functions, slip distributions, and ground motion information. The QuakeML language definition is supplemented by a concept to provide resource metadata and facilitate metadata exchange between distributed data providers. For that purpose, we introduce unique, location-independent identifiers of seismological resources. As an application of QuakeML, ETH Zurich currently develops a Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit as a contribution to CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability). We follow a collaborative and transparent development approach along the lines of the procedures of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). QuakeML currently is in working draft status. The standard description will be subjected to a public Request for Comments (RFC) process and eventually reach the status of a recommendation. QuakeML can be found at http://www.quakeml.org.

  7. 20 year IRIS: impact on seismological research at home and abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hilst, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    : The positive impact of IRIS, through its programs (GSN, PASSCAL, DMS, EO) and its workshops, on seismological research and community building can hardly be overestimated. The Data Management System has been very successful in bringing data to users for research and education anywhere in the world; it enables routine, and in many cases real time, analysis of massive amounts of waveform data for a spectacularly diverse range of studies. (I will give examples of surface wave tomography and inverse scattering studies of the core mantle boundary.) The support that PASSCAL provides for the planning and execution of field campaigns allows seismologists to shift attention from operational issues to exciting science, and the required data dissemination through DMS does not only result in tremendously valuable data sets but also contributes to community building through (international) collaboration. Europe, Australia, and Asia also have rich histories of network and portable array seismometry, and in many areas the cumulative station density exceeds that of North America (even, perhaps, with USArray). Moreover, in some cases, such as the use of temporary, roving arrays of broad band seismometers, activities overseas may have preceded and inspired developments in the US. However, the absence of effective central systems for management and dissemination of quality-controlled data has left many unique historical and regional data sets underutilized. This situation is changing, however. As an example I will mention the NERIES initiative to build a better infrastructure for seismological research and education in Europe. Apart from providing an example, through international collaboration IRIS can continue to play an important role in the improvement of the global seismological infrastructure.

  8. A short history of Japanese historical seismology: past and the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu'ura, Ritsuko S.

    2017-12-01

    Since seismicity in Japan is fairly high, Japanese interest in historical seismicity can be traced back to the nineth century, only a few centuries after the formation of the ancient ruling state. A 1000 years later, 2 years earlier than the modern seismological society was founded, the research on historical seismology started in Japan in 1878. By the accumulation for the recent 140 years, the present Japanese seismologists can read many historical materials without reading cursive scripts. We have a convenient access to the historical information related to earthquakes, in the modern characters of 27,759 pages. We now have 214 epicenters of historical earthquakes from 599 ad to 1872. Among them, 134 events in the early modern period were assigned hypocentral depths and proper magnitudes. The intensity data of 8700 places by those events were estimated. These precise intensity data enabled us to compare the detailed source areas of pairs of repeated historical earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake with the 1923 Kanto earthquake, and the 1707 Hoei earthquake with the summation of the 1854 Ansei Tokai and Ansei Nankai earthquakes. It is revealed that the focal area of the former larger event cannot completely include those of the latter smaller earthquakes, although those were believed to be typical sets of characteristic interplate earthquakes at the Sagami trough and at the Nankai trough. Research on historical earthquakes is very important to assess the seismic hazard in the future. We still have one-fifth events of the early modern period to be analyzed in detail. The compilation of places experienced high intensities in the modern events is also necessary. For the ancient and medieval periods, many equivocal events are still left. The further advance of the interdisciplinary research on historical seismology is necessary.

  9. Prediction of the area affected by earthquake-induced landsliding based on seismological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Odin; Meunier, Patrick; Hovius, Niels

    2017-07-01

    We present an analytical, seismologically consistent expression for the surface area of the region within which most landslides triggered by an earthquake are located (landslide distribution area). This expression is based on scaling laws relating seismic moment, source depth, and focal mechanism with ground shaking and fault rupture length and assumes a globally constant threshold of acceleration for onset of systematic mass wasting. The seismological assumptions are identical to those recently used to propose a seismologically consistent expression for the total volume and area of landslides triggered by an earthquake. To test the accuracy of the model we gathered geophysical information and estimates of the landslide distribution area for 83 earthquakes. To reduce uncertainties and inconsistencies in the estimation of the landslide distribution area, we propose an objective definition based on the shortest distance from the seismic wave emission line containing 95 % of the total landslide area. Without any empirical calibration the model explains 56 % of the variance in our dataset, and predicts 35 to 49 out of 83 cases within a factor of 2, depending on how we account for uncertainties on the seismic source depth. For most cases with comprehensive landslide inventories we show that our prediction compares well with the smallest region around the fault containing 95 % of the total landslide area. Aspects ignored by the model that could explain the residuals include local variations of the threshold of acceleration and processes modulating the surface ground shaking, such as the distribution of seismic energy release on the fault plane, the dynamic stress drop, and rupture directivity. Nevertheless, its simplicity and first-order accuracy suggest that the model can yield plausible and useful estimates of the landslide distribution area in near-real time, with earthquake parameters issued by standard detection routines.

  10. Recent advance in polar seismology: Global impact of the International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Masaki; Zhao, Dapeng; Wiens, Douglas A.; Stutzmann, Éléonore

    2015-03-01

    The most exciting initiative for the recent polar studies was the International Polar Year (IPY) in 2007-2008. The IPY has witnessed a growing community of seismologists who have made considerable efforts to acquire high-quality data in polar regions. It also provided an excellent opportunity to make significant advances in seismic instrumentation of the polar regions to achieve scientific targets involving global issues. Taking these aspects into account, we organize and publish a special issue in Polar Science on the recent advance in polar seismology and cryoseismology as fruitful achievements of the IPY.

  11. European seismological data exchange, access and processing: current status of the Research Infrastructure project NERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, D.; van Eck, T.; Bossu, R.; Wiemer, S.

    2009-04-01

    The EC Research infrastructure project NERIES, an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative in seismology for 2006-2010 has passed its mid-term point. We will present a short concise overview of the current state of the project, established cooperation with other European and global projects and the planning for the last year of the project. Earthquake data archiving and access within Europe has dramatically improved during the last two years. This concerns earthquake parameters, digital broadband and acceleration waveforms and historical data. The Virtual European Broadband Seismic Network (VEBSN) consists currently of more then 300 stations. A new distributed data archive concept, the European Integrated Waveform Data Archive (EIDA), has been implemented in Europe connecting the larger European seismological waveform data. Global standards for earthquake parameter data (QuakeML) and tomography models have been developed and are being established. Web application technology has been and is being developed to make a jump start to the next generation data services. A NERIES data portal provides a number of services testing the potential capacities of new open-source web technologies. Data application tools like shakemaps, lossmaps, site response estimation and tools for data processing and visualisation are currently available, although some of these tools are still in an alpha version. A European tomography reference model will be discussed at a special workshop in June 2009. Shakemaps, coherent with the NEIC application, are implemented in, among others, Turkey, Italy, Romania, Switzerland, several countries. The comprehensive site response software is being distributed and used both inside and outside the project. NERIES organises several workshops inviting both consortium and non-consortium participants and covering a wide range of subjects: ‘Seismological observatory operation tools', ‘Tomography', ‘Ocean bottom observatories', 'Site response software training

  12. Effects of Seismological and Soil Parameters on Earthquake Energy demand in Level Ground Sand Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    nabili, sara; shahbazi majd, nafiseh

    2013-04-01

    Liquefaction has been a source of major damages during severe earthquakes. To evaluate this phenomenon there are several stress, strain and energy based approaches. Use of the energy method has been more focused by researchers due to its advantages with respect to other approaches. The use of the energy concept to define the liquefaction potential is validated through laboratory element and centrifuge tests as well as field studies. This approach is based on the hypothesis that pore pressure buildup is directly related to the dissipated energy in sands which is the accumulated areas between the stress-strain loops. Numerous investigations were performed to find a relationship which correlates the dissipated energy to the soil parameters, but there are not sufficient studies to relate this dissipated energy, known as demand energy, concurrently, to the seismological and the soil parameters. The aim of this paper is to investigate the dependency of the demand energy in sands to seismological and the soil parameters. To perform this task, an effective stress analysis has been executed using FLAC finite difference program. Finn model, which is a built-in constitutive model implemented in FLAC program, was utilized. Since an important stage to predict the liquefaction is the prediction of excess pore water pressure at a given point, a simple numerical framework is presented to assess its generation during a cyclic loading in a given centrifuge test. According to the results, predicted excess pore water pressures did not closely match to the measured excess pore water pressure values in the centrifuge test but they can be used in the numerical assessment of excess pore water pressure with an acceptable degree of preciseness. Subsequently, the centrifuge model was reanalyzed using several real earthquake acceleration records with different seismological parameters such as earthquake magnitude and Hypocentral distance. The accumulated energies (demand energy) dissipated in

  13. Seismological database for Banat seismic region (Romania) - Part 1: The parametric earthquake catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oros, E.; Popa, M.; Moldovan, I. A.

    2008-01-01

    The most comprehensive seismological database for Banat seismic region (Romania) has been achieved. This paper refers to the essential characteristics of the first component of this database, namely the Parametric Earthquakes Catalogue for the Banat Seismic Region (PECBSR). PECBSR comprises 7783 crustal earthquakes (3 ≤ h ≤ 25 km) with 0.4 ≤ M i ≥ 5.6 (M i is M L , M D , M S , M W , Mm and/or mb from compiled sources) occurred in the Banat region and its surroundings between years 1443 and 2006. Different magnitude scales were converted into moment magnitude scale, Mw. The completeness of PECBSR strongly depends on the time. (authors)

  14. Evaluation results after seven years of operation for the permanent Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, F.; Hloupis, G.; Papadopoulos, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic arc and the adjacent areas of the Greek mainland are the most active in western Eurasia and some of the most seismically active zones of the world. The seismicity of South Aegean is extremely high and is characterised by the frequent occurrence of large shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes. Until 2004, the installed seismological stations from several providers (NOA, GEOFON, MEDNET) provide average interstation distance around 130km resulting to catalogues with minimum magnitude of completeness (Mc) equals to 3.7. Towards to the direction of providing dense and state of the art instrumental coverage of seismicity in the South Aegean, HSNC begun its operation in 2004. Today it consists of (12) permanent seismological stations equipped with short period and broadband seismographs coupled with 3rd generation 24bit data loggers as well as from (2) accelerographs . The addition of HSNC along with combined use of all the active networks in South Aegean area (NOA, GEOFON, AUTH) decrease the average interstation distance to 60km and provide catalogues with Mc≥3.2. Data transmission and telemetry is implemented by a hybrid network consisting of dedicated wired ADSL links as well as VSAT links by using a unique private satellite hub. Real time data spread over collaborating networks (AUTH) and laboratories (Department of Earth Science - UCL) while at the same time, events are appended automatically and manually to EMSC database. Additional value to the network is provided by means of prototype systems which deployed in-situ for the purposes of: a) Acquiring aftershock data in the minimum time after main event. This is a mobile seismological network called RaDeSeis (Rapid Deployment Seismological network) which consists of a central station acting also as the central communication hub and wifi coupled mobile stations. b) The development of dedicated hardware and software solutions for rapid installation times (around 1 hour for each station) leading to

  15. 25 Years of Research in Earth Physics and One Century of Seismology in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmureanu, Gh.

    2002-01-01

    The conference '25 Years of Research in Earth Physics and One Century of Seismology in Romania' held at Bucharest, Romania on September 27-29, 2002 was structured as follows: 1. Keynote lectures (4 papers); Section 1 - Exchange of data and improvement of earthquake monitoring during the last 25 years (6 papers); Section 2 - Study of the seismic source (5 papers); Section 3 - Seismotectonics and geodynamics of the Carphato - Balkan area (16 papers); Section 4 - Seismic hazard assesment (14 papers); Section 5 - Earthquake prediction research (7 papers); Section 6 - Lessons from earthquake damage and policies for seismic risk mitigation (3 papers)

  16. Seismological and geological investigation for earthquake hazard in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doku, M. S.

    2013-07-01

    A seismological and geological investigation for earthquake hazard in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area was undertaken. The research was aimed at employing a methematical model to estimate the seismic stress for the study area by generating a complete, unified and harmonized earthquake catalogue spanning 1615 to 2012. Seismic events were souced from Leydecker, G. and P. Amponsah, (1986), Ambraseys and Adams, (1986), Amponsah (2008), Geological Survey Department, Accra, Ghana, Amponsah (2002), National Earthquake Information Service, United States Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 80225, USA, the International Seismological Centre and the National Data Centre of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. Events occurring in the study area were used to create and Epicentral Intensity Map and a seismicity map of the study area after interpolation of missing seismic magnitudes. The least square method and the maximum likelihood estimation method were employed to evaluate b-values of 0.6 and 0.9 respectively for the study area. A thematic map of epicentral intensity superimposed on the geology of the study area was also developed to help understand the relationship between the virtually fractured, jointed and sheared geology and the seismic events. The results obtained are indicative of the fact that the stress level of GAMA has a telling effect on its seismicity and also the events are prevalents at fractured, jointed and sheared zones. (au)

  17. The CTBTO Link to the database of the International Seismological Centre (ISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, I.; Storchak, D. A.; Dando, B.; Harris, J.; Di Giacomo, D.

    2011-12-01

    The CTBTO Link to the database of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a project to provide access to seismological data sets maintained by the ISC using specially designed interactive tools. The Link is open to National Data Centres and to the CTBTO. By means of graphical interfaces and database queries tailored to the needs of the monitoring community, the users are given access to a multitude of products. These include the ISC and ISS bulletins, covering the seismicity of the Earth since 1904; nuclear and chemical explosions; the EHB bulletin; the IASPEI Reference Event list (ground truth database); and the IDC Reviewed Event Bulletin. The searches are divided into three main categories: The Area Based Search (a spatio-temporal search based on the ISC Bulletin), the REB search (a spatio-temporal search based on specific events in the REB) and the IMS Station Based Search (a search for historical patterns in the reports of seismic stations close to a particular IMS seismic station). The outputs are HTML based web-pages with a simplified version of the ISC Bulletin showing the most relevant parameters with access to ISC, GT, EHB and REB Bulletins in IMS1.0 format for single or multiple events. The CTBTO Link offers a tool to view REB events in context within the historical seismicity, look at observations reported by non-IMS networks, and investigate station histories and residual patterns for stations registered in the International Seismographic Station Registry.

  18. The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope, seismological observations at one year from the first light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Andreino; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; De Luca, Gaetano; Saccorotti, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope (RLG) is a new large observatory-class RLG located in Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), one national laboratory of the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The GINGERino apparatus funded by INFN in the context of a larger project of fundamental physics is intended as a pathfinder instrument to reach the high sensitivity needed to observe general relativity effects; more details are found at the URL (https://web2.infn.it/GINGER/index.php/it/). The sensitivity reached by our instrument in the first year after the set up permitted us to acquire important seismological data of ground rotations during the transit of seismic waves generated by seisms at different epicentral distances. RLGs are in fact the best sensors for capturing the rotational motions associated with the transit of seismic waves, thanks to the optical measurement principle, these instruments are in fact insensitive to translations. Ground translations are recorded by two seismometers: a Nanometrics Trillium 240 s and Guralp CMG 3T 360 s, the first instrument is part of the national earthquake monitoring program of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and provides the ground translation data to be compared to the RLG rotational data. We report the waveforms and the seismological analysis of some seismic events recorded during our first year of activity inside the LNGS laboratory.

  19. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  20. Citizen seismology in Taiwan: what went wrong and what is the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. H.; Liang, W. T.; Wu, Y. F.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen seismology encourages the public involvement to data collection, analysis, and reporting, and has the potential to greatly improve the emergency response to seismic hazard. This of course, is important for scientific achievement due to the dense network. We believed the value of citizen seismology and started with distributing Quake-Catcher-Network (QCN) sensor at schools in Taiwan. While working with teachers, we hoped to motivate the learning of how to read seismograms, what to see in the data, and what to teach in the class. Through lots of workshops and activities, even with near-real time earthquake game competition and board game (quake-nopoly) developed along the way, we came to realize the huge gap between what people need and what we do. And to bridge the gap, a new generation of citizen seismic network is needed. Imagine at work, you receive the alarm from sensors at home that tells you the location, size, and type of anomalous shaking events in the neighborhood. Can this future "warning" system happen, allowing citizen to do emergence response? This is a story about facing the challenge, transforming the doubt of "why do I care" to a future IoT world.

  1. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk'yanov, D P; Vinogradov, V I; Shreiber, K U

    2014-01-01

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  2. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk' yanov, D P [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' ' LETI' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V I [OJSC Tambov factory Elektropribor (Russian Federation); Shreiber, K U [Forschungseinrichtung Satellitengeodaesie, Technosche Universitaet Muenchen, Geodaetisches Observatorium Wettzell, Sackenrieder str. 25, 93444 Bad Koetzting (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  3. Real-time GPS seismology using a single receiver: method comparison, error analysis and precision validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing

    2014-05-01

    Earthquake monitoring and early warning system for hazard assessment and mitigation has traditional been based on seismic instruments. However, for large seismic events, it is difficult for traditional seismic instruments to produce accurate and reliable displacements because of the saturation of broadband seismometers and problematic integration of strong-motion data. Compared with the traditional seismic instruments, GPS can measure arbitrarily large dynamic displacements without saturation, making them particularly valuable in case of large earthquakes and tsunamis. GPS relative positioning approach is usually adopted to estimate seismic displacements since centimeter-level accuracy can be achieved in real-time by processing double-differenced carrier-phase observables. However, relative positioning method requires a local reference station, which might itself be displaced during a large seismic event, resulting in misleading GPS analysis results. Meanwhile, the relative/network approach is time-consuming, particularly difficult for the simultaneous and real-time analysis of GPS data from hundreds or thousands of ground stations. In recent years, several single-receiver approaches for real-time GPS seismology, which can overcome the reference station problem of the relative positioning approach, have been successfully developed and applied to GPS seismology. One available method is real-time precise point positioning (PPP) relied on precise satellite orbit and clock products. However, real-time PPP needs a long (re)convergence period, of about thirty minutes, to resolve integer phase ambiguities and achieve centimeter-level accuracy. In comparison with PPP, Colosimo et al. (2011) proposed a variometric approach to determine the change of position between two adjacent epochs, and then displacements are obtained by a single integration of the delta positions. This approach does not suffer from convergence process, but the single integration from delta positions to

  4. Modelo espacialmente explícito de la migración estacional del pez vela (Istiophorus platypterus) en el Pacífico mexicano Spatial explicit model for seasonal migration of sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) in the Mexican Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    René Macías-Zamora; Aramis Olivos-Ortiz; Ana Luisa Vidaurri-Sotelo; Miguel Ángel Carrasco-Águila; Ernesto Torres-Orozco

    2011-01-01

    Utilizando los datos de captura y esfuerzo registrados en la pesca deportiva realizada en los puertos de Mazatlán, Sinaloa y Buena Vista, Baja California Sur, México, durante los periodos 1979-2005 y 1985-2006 respectivamente, se construyó un año "tipo" o promedio, y se elaboró un modelo espacial determinístico en tiempo discreto para simular los movimientos masivos estacionales que realiza el pez vela (Istiophorus platypterus) en la Zona Económica Exclusiva del Pacífico mexicano. Los parámet...

  5. Crustal Models Assessment in Western Part of Romania Employing Active Seismic and Seismologic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Andrei; Toma-Danila, Dragos; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan

    2017-12-01

    In the years 1999 - 2000 two regional seismic refraction lines were performed within a close cooperation with German partners from University of Karlsruhe. One of these lines is Vrancea 2001, with 420 km in length, almost half of them recorded in Transylvanian Basin. The structure of the crust along the seismic line revealed a very complicated crustal structure beginning with Eastern Carpathians and continuing in the Transylvanian Basin until Medias. As a result of the development of the National Seismic Network in the last ten years, more than 100 permanent broadband stations are now continuously operating in Romania. Complementary to this national dataset, maintained and developed in the National Institute for Earth Physics, new data emerged from the temporary seismologic networks established during the joint projects with European partners in the last decades. The data gathered so far is valuable both for seismology purposes and crustal structure studies, especially for the western part of the country, where this kind of data were sparse until now. Between 2009 and 2011, a new reference model for the Earth’s crust and mantle of the European Plate was defined through the NERIES project from existing data and models. The database gathered from different kind of measurements in Transylvanian Basin and eastern Pannonian Basin were included in this NERIES model and an improved and upgraded model of the Earth crust emerged for western part of Romania. Although the dataset has its origins in several periods over the last 50 years, the results are homogeneous and they improve and strengthen our image about the depth of the principal boundaries in the crust. In the last chapter two maps regarding these boundaries are constructed, one for mid-crustal boundary and one for Moho. They were build considering all the punctual information available from different sources in active seismic and seismology which are introduced in the general maps from the NERIES project for

  6. Adapting Controlled-source Coherence Analysis to Dense Array Data in Earthquake Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, B.; Sigloch, K.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2017-12-01

    Exploration seismology deals with highly coherent wave fields generated by repeatable controlled sources and recorded by dense receiver arrays, whose geometry is tailored to back-scattered energy normally neglected in earthquake seismology. Owing to these favorable conditions, stacking and coherence analysis are routinely employed to suppress incoherent noise and regularize the data, thereby strongly contributing to the success of subsequent processing steps, including migration for the imaging of back-scattering interfaces or waveform tomography for the inversion of velocity structure. Attempts have been made to utilize wave field coherence on the length scales of passive-source seismology, e.g. for the imaging of transition-zone discontinuities or the core-mantle-boundary using reflected precursors. Results are however often deteriorated due to the sparse station coverage and interference of faint back-scattered with transmitted phases. USArray sampled wave fields generated by earthquake sources at an unprecedented density and similar array deployments are ongoing or planned in Alaska, the Alps and Canada. This makes the local coherence of earthquake data an increasingly valuable resource to exploit.Building on the experience in controlled-source surveys, we aim to extend the well-established concept of beam-forming to the richer toolbox that is nowadays used in seismic exploration. We suggest adapted strategies for local data coherence analysis, where summation is performed with operators that extract the local slope and curvature of wave fronts emerging at the receiver array. Besides estimating wave front properties, we demonstrate that the inherent data summation can also be used to generate virtual station responses at intermediate locations where no actual deployment was performed. Owing to the fact that stacking acts as a directional filter, interfering coherent wave fields can be efficiently separated from each other by means of coherent subtraction. We

  7. Laboratory-based Interpretation of Seismological Models: Dealing with Incomplete or Incompatible Experimental Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, I.; Kennett, B. L.; Faul, U. H.

    2009-12-01

    In parallel with cooperative developments in seismology during the past 25 years, there have been phenomenal advances in mineral/rock physics making laboratory-based interpretation of seismological models increasingly useful. However, the assimilation of diverse experimental data into a physically sound framework for seismological application is not without its challenges as demonstrated by two examples. In the first example, that of equation-of-state and elasticity data, an appropriate, thermodynamically consistent framework involves finite-strain expansion of the Helmholz free energy incorporating the Debye approximation to the lattice vibrational energy, as advocated by Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni. Within this context, pressure, specific heat and entropy, thermal expansion, elastic constants and their adiabatic and isothermal pressure derivatives are all calculable without further approximation in an internally consistent manner. The opportunities and challenges of assimilating a wide range of sometimes marginally incompatible experimental data into a single model of this type will be demonstrated with reference to MgO, unquestionably the most thoroughly studied mantle mineral. A neighbourhood-algorithm inversion has identified a broadly satisfactory model, but uncertainties in key parameters associated particularly with pressure calibration remain sufficiently large as to preclude definitive conclusions concerning lower-mantle chemical composition and departures from adiabaticity. The second example is the much less complete dataset concerning seismic-wave dispersion and attenuation emerging from low-frequency forced-oscillation experiments. Significant progress has been made during the past decade towards an understanding of high-temperature, micro-strain viscoelastic relaxation in upper-mantle materials, especially as regards the roles of oscillation period, temperature, grain size and melt fraction. However, the influence of other potentially important

  8. Seismology of Giant Planets: General Overview and Results from the Kepler K2 Observations of Neptune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaulme Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For this invited contribution, I was asked to give an overview about the application of helio and aster-oseismic techniques to study the interior of giant planets, and to specifically present the recent observations of Neptune by Kepler K2. Seismology applied to giant planets could drastically change our understanding of their deep interiors, as it has happened with the Earth, the Sun, and many main-sequence and evolved stars. The study of giant planets' composition is important for understanding both the mechanisms enabling their formation and the origins of planetary systems, in particular our own. Unfortunately, its determination is complicated by the fact that their interior is thought not to be homogeneous, so that spectroscopic determinations of atmospheric abundances are probably not representative of the planet as a whole. Instead, the determination of their composition and structure must rely on indirect measurements and interior models. Giant planets are mostly fluid and convective, which makes their seismology much closer to that of solar-like stars than that of terrestrial planets. Hence, helioseismology techniques naturally transfer to giant planets. In addition, two alternative methods can be used: photometry of the solar light reflected by planetary atmospheres, and ring seismology in the specific case of Saturn. The current decade has been promising thanks to the detection of Jupiter's acoustic oscillations with the ground-based imaging-spectrometer SYMPA and indirect detection of Saturn's f-modes in its rings by the NASA Cassini orbiter. This has motivated new projects of ground-based and space-borne instruments that are under development. The K2 observations represented the first opportunity to search for planetary oscillations with visible photometry. Despite the excellent quality of K2 data, the noise level of the power spectrum of the light curve was not low enough to detect Neptune's oscillations. The main results from the

  9. Seismology of Giant Planets: General Overview and Results from the Kepler K2 Observations of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulme, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    For this invited contribution, I was asked to give an overview about the application of helio and aster-oseismic techniques to study the interior of giant planets, and to specifically present the recent observations of Neptune by Kepler K2. Seismology applied to giant planets could drastically change our understanding of their deep interiors, as it has happened with the Earth, the Sun, and many main-sequence and evolved stars. The study of giant planets' composition is important for understanding both the mechanisms enabling their formation and the origins of planetary systems, in particular our own. Unfortunately, its determination is complicated by the fact that their interior is thought not to be homogeneous, so that spectroscopic determinations of atmospheric abundances are probably not representative of the planet as a whole. Instead, the determination of their composition and structure must rely on indirect measurements and interior models. Giant planets are mostly fluid and convective, which makes their seismology much closer to that of solar-like stars than that of terrestrial planets. Hence, helioseismology techniques naturally transfer to giant planets. In addition, two alternative methods can be used: photometry of the solar light reflected by planetary atmospheres, and ring seismology in the specific case of Saturn. The current decade has been promising thanks to the detection of Jupiter's acoustic oscillations with the ground-based imaging-spectrometer SYMPA and indirect detection of Saturn's f-modes in its rings by the NASA Cassini orbiter. This has motivated new projects of ground-based and space-borne instruments that are under development. The K2 observations represented the first opportunity to search for planetary oscillations with visible photometry. Despite the excellent quality of K2 data, the noise level of the power spectrum of the light curve was not low enough to detect Neptune's oscillations. The main results from the K2 observations are

  10. The Hellenic Seismological Network Of Crete (HSNC): Validation and results of the 2013 aftershock sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Ilias; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2015-04-01

    The number and quality of seismological networks in Europe has increased in the past decades. Nevertheless, the need for localized networks monitoring areas of great seismic and scientific interest is constant. Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC) covers this need for the vicinity of the South Aegean Sea and Crete Island. In the present work with the use of Z-map software (www.seismo.ethz.ch) the spatial variability of Magnitude of Completeness (Mc) is calculated from HSNC's manual analysis catalogue of events for the period 2011 until today, proving the good coverage of HSNC in the areas. Furthermore the 2013, South Aegean seismicity where two large shallow earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Crete Island, is discussed. The first event takes place on 15th June 2013 in the front of the Hellenic Arc, south from central Crete, while the second one on 12th October, 2013 on the western part of Crete. The two main shocks and their aftershock sequences have been relocated with the use of hypoinverse earthquake location software and an appropriate crust model. The HSNC identified more than 500 and 300 aftershocks respectively followed after the main events. The detailed construction of aftershocks catalogue permits the applicability of modern theories based on complexity sciences as described recently in the frame of non extensive statistical physics. In addition site effects in the stations locations are presented using event and noise recordings. This work was implemented through the project IMPACT-ARC in the framework of action "ARCHIMEDES III-Support of Research Teams at TEI of Crete" (MIS380353) of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds References A. Tzanis and F. Vallianatos, "Distributed power-law seismicity changes and crustal deformation in the EW Hellenic Arc", Natural Hazards and Earth Systems Sciences, 3, 179-195, 2003 F. Vallianatos, G

  11. Promoting seismology education through collaboration between university research scientists and school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, M. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Boyd, D.; Mote, A. S.; Pulliam, J.; Frohlich, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Participation in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution teacher professional development project paved the way for several teachers to receive educational seismometers and join the IRIS Seismograph in Schools program. This, in turn, has led to secondary school teachers working with university seismologists on research projects. Examples are the NSF-EarthScope SIEDCAR (Seismic Investigation of Edge Driven Convection Associated with the Rio Grande Rift) project; field studies to compile felt-reports for Texas earthquakes, some which may have been induced by human activities; and a seismic study of the Texas Gulf Coast to investigate ocean-continent transition processes along a passive margin. Such collaborations are mutually beneficial in nature. They help scientists to accomplish their research objectives, involve teachers and their students in the authentic, inquiry-based science, promote public awareness of such projects, and open the doors to advancement opportunities for those teachers involved. In some cases, bringing together research scientists and teachers results in collaborations that produce publishable research. In order to effectively integrate seismology research into 7-12 grade education, one of us (Brunt) established the Eagle Pass Junior High Seismology Team in connection with IRIS Seismograph in Schools, station EPTX (AS-1 seismograph), to teach students about earthquakes using authentic real-time data. The concept has sparked interest among other secondary teachers, leading to the creation of two similarly organized seismology teams: WPTX (Boyd, Williams Preparatory School, Dallas) and THTX (Mote, Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, Austin). Although the educational seismometers are basic instruments, they are effective educational tools. Seismographs in schools offer students opportunities to learn how earthquakes are recorded and how modern seismometers work, to collect and interpret seismic data, and to

  12. The "Tsunami Earthquake" of 13 April 1923 in Northern Kamchatka: Seismological and Hydrodynamic Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaree, Amir; Okal, Emile A.

    2018-04-01

    We present a seismological and hydrodynamic investigation of the earthquake of 13 April 1923 at Ust'-Kamchatsk, Northern Kamchatka, which generated a more powerful and damaging tsunami than the larger event of 03 February 1923, thus qualifying as a so-called "tsunami earthquake". On the basis of modern relocations, we suggest that it took place outside the fault area of the mainshock, across the oblique Pacific-North America plate boundary, a model confirmed by a limited dataset of mantle waves, which also confirms the slow nature of the source, characteristic of tsunami earthquakes. However, numerical simulations for a number of legitimate seismic models fail to reproduce the sharply peaked distribution of tsunami wave amplitudes reported in the literature. By contrast, we can reproduce the distribution of reported wave amplitudes using an underwater landslide as a source of the tsunami, itself triggered by the earthquake inside the Kamchatskiy Bight.

  13. The West-African craton margin in eastern Senegal: a seismological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorbath, Catherine; Dorbath, Louis; Gaulon, Roland; Le Page, Alain

    1983-01-01

    A vertical short period seismological array was operated for six months in earstern Senegal. Large P wave travel-time anomalies are in fairly good relation with the gravity and geological features. Two-dimensional inversion of the data shows the existence of a major vertical discontinuity extending from the surface to 150-200 km depth. The other heterogeneities are mainly located in the crust and related to specific segments of the regional geology: craton, Mauritanides and Senegalo-Mauritanian basin. The main discontinuity dipping to the east is interpreted as the trace of an old subduction slab. We propose the following geodynamical process to explain the formation of the Mauritanides orogenic belt: continental collision after opening of a back-arc marginal basin in late Precambrian and its closure until Devonian

  14. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1982-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Falguni

    1984-01-01

    The research and development activities of the Seismology Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) at Bombay are reported for the period January 1982-December 1983 in the form of summaries. The Section's activities are mainly directed towards detection of underground nuclear explosions. During the report period 64 signals out of about 12000 seismograms which were examined were identified as the signals due to underground nuclear explosions. The instrumentation work for Kolar rockburst research was almost completed under the collaboration programme of BARC with Bharat Gold Mines Ltd. Analytical methods have been developed for interpreting the frequency-magnitude relation of earthquake. These methods will be useful in the seismic estimation of risk in case only restricted data involving events of low magnitude are available. A list of publications of the staff-members of the Section during the report period is given. (M.G.B.)

  15. Hanford Nuclear Energy Center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, H.

    1976-01-01

    Studies of a Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) at Hanford have not revealed any insurmountable technical problems, but problems have been identified that appear to be more difficult to resolve than for dispersed siting. Major technical developments in meteorology, and probably in seismology, are needed before an environmental report or safety analysis report could be prepared for an NEC. It would be helpful in further NEC studies if licensing requirements (and related criteria) were defined for them. An NEC will likely cause a step change in the amount of planning and involvement of regional groups in the energy picture compared to dispersed siting. The tools that must be developed for analysis of NECs will probably be used for evaluating dispersed siting in greater detail. NECs will probably bring about the use of dry or wet/dry cooling before it is required in equivalent amount for dispersed plants

  16. Hanford Nuclear Energy Center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, H.

    1976-03-16

    Studies of a Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) at Hanford have not revealed any insurmountable technical problems, but problems have been identified that appear to be more difficult to resolve than for dispersed siting. Major technical developments in meteorology, and probably in seismology, are needed before an environmental report or safety analysis report could be prepared for an NEC. It would be helpful in further NEC studies if licensing requirements (and related criteria) were defined for them. An NEC will likely cause a step change in the amount of planning and involvement of regional groups in the energy picture compared to dispersed siting. The tools that must be developed for analysis of NECs will probably be used for evaluating dispersed siting in greater detail. NECs will probably bring about the use of dry or wet/dry cooling before it is required in equivalent amount for dispersed plants.

  17. Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, M.G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Trieste /Arecibo Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  18. "Earth, from inside and outside - school activities based on seismology and astronomy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivarean, Radu

    2016-04-01

    Through a multidisciplinary work that integrates Geography education with the other Earth Sciences, we developed an educational project to raise the students' awareness of seismic hazard and to disseminate good practices of earthquake safety. The Romanian Educational Seismic Network (ROEDUSEIS) project (started in 2012) is developed and implemented in partnership with schools from different Romanian cities, our school being one of these. In each participating school a SEP educational seismometer is installed. It is the first educational initiative in Romania in the field of seismology involving the National Institute for Earth Physics - NIEP as coordinator. The e-learning platform website (http://www.roeduseis.ro) represents a great opportunity for students to use real advanced research instruments and scientific data analysis tools in their everyday school activities and a link to observations of Earth phenomena and Earth science in general. The most important educational objectives are related to: preparing comprehensive educational materials as resources for training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, experimentation of new technologies in projecting and implementing new didactic activities, professional development and support for teachers and development of science curriculum module. The scientific objective is to introduce in schools the use of scientific instruments like seismometer and experimental methods (seismic data analysis). The educational materials entitled "Earthquakes and their effects" is organized in a guide for teachers accompanied by a booklet for students. The structure of the educational material is divided in theoretical chapters followed by sections with activities and experiments adapted to the level of understanding particular to our students. The ROEDUSEIS e-platform should be considered as a modern method for teaching and learning that integrates and completes the work in classroom. The

  19. Proceedings of the OECD/NEA workshop on the relations between seismological data and seismic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD-NEA co-ordinates the NEA activities concerning the technical aspects of design, construction and operation of nuclear installations insofar as they affect the safety of such installations. The Integrity and Ageing Working Group (IAGE WG) of the CSNI deals with the integrity of structures and components, and has three sub-groups, dealing with the integrity of metal components and structures, ageing of concrete structures, and the seismic behaviour of structures. The sub-group dealing with the seismic behaviour of structures proposed this workshop. The OECD-NEA workshop on the relations between seismological data and seismic engineering analyses was held on October 17-18, 2002. A field visits in the Izmit area where the fault scarp is still visible was organised on Wednesday October 16, 2002. The Ttirkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, TAEK (Turkish Atomic Energy Agency) in Istanbul, Turkey, hosted the workshop. A recommendation of the OECD workshop on the engineering characterisation of seismic input (hosted by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and organised by Brookhaven National Laboratory on November 15-17, 1999) was to foster the growth of interaction between 'design engineers' and 'ground motion specialists'. The objective of the Istanbul workshop is to address this recommendation. The workshop gave seismologists the opportunity to present observed damages and their related ground motions and design engineers the opportunity to present current techniques used in the evaluation of seismic hazards. Bridging the gap between these two fields was a key objective - this workshop was a forum for bringing together the two communities. In addition, the location of the workshop was particularly interesting and provided possibilities for several of the host country participants to discuss the 1999 Kocaeli earthquake. On the basis of lessons learned from large earthquakes over the last decade, the

  20. Rebuild of the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), part 1: 1964-1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storchak, Dmitry A.; Harris, James; Brown, Lonn; Lieser, Kathrin; Shumba, Blessing; Verney, Rebecca; Di Giacomo, Domenico; Korger, Edith I. M.

    2017-12-01

    The data from the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) have always been and still remain in demand for a wide range of studies in Geosciences. The unique features of the Bulletin include long-term coverage (1904-present), the most comprehensive set of included seismic data from the majority of permanent seismic networks at any given time in the history of instrumental recording (currently 150) and homogeneity of the data and their representation. In order to preserve this homogeneity, the ISC has followed its own standard seismic event processing procedures that have not substantially changed until the early 2000s. Several considerable and necessary advancements in the ISC data collection and seismic event location procedures have created a need to rebuild the data for preceding years in line with the new procedures. Thus was set up a project to rebuild the ISC Bulletin for the period from the beginning of the ISC data till the end of data year 2010. The project is known as the Rebuild of the ISC Bulletin. From data month of January 2011, the ISC data have already been processed with the fully tested and established new procedures and do not require an alteration. It was inconceivable even to think about such a project for many tens of years, but great advances in computer power and increased support by the ISC Member-Institutions and Sponsors have given us a chance to perform this project. Having obtained a lot of experience on the way, we believe that within a few years the entire period of the ISC data will be reprocessed and extended for the entire period of instrumental seismological recordings from 1904 till present. The purpose of this article is to describe the work on reprocessing the ISC Bulletin data under the Rebuild project. We also announce the release of the rebuilt ISC Bulletin for the period 1964-1979 with all seismic events reprocessed and relocated in line with the modern ISC procedures, 68,000 new events, 255 new stations

  1. It’s our Fault: Immersing Young Learners in Authentic Practices of Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Moher, T.; Wiley, J.

    2009-12-01

    The scalable RoomQuake seismology project uses a learning technology framework-embedded phenomena (Moher, 2006)—that simulates seismic phenomena mapped directly onto the physical space of classrooms. This project, aimed at the upper elementary level, situates students as the scientists engaged in an extended investigation designed to discover the spatial, temporal, and intensity distributions of a series of earthquakes. This project emulates earthquake occurrence over a condensed time and spatial span, with students mapping an earthquake fault imagined to be running through their classroom. The students learn: basic seismology terms; ability to identify seismic P- and S-waves; skills associated with trilateration; nomogram/graph reading skills; and the ability to recognize the emergence of a fault based on RoomQuake geometries. From the students’ perspectives, and similar to real-world earthquakes, RoomQuakes occur at unknown times over the course of several weeks. Multiple computers distributed around the perimeter of the classroom serve as simulated seismographs that depict continuous strip-chart seismic recordings. Most of the time the seismograms reflect background noise, but at (apparently) unpredictable times a crescendoing rumble (emanating from a subwoofer) signals a RoomQuake. Hearing this signal, students move to the seismic stations to read the strip charts. Next, the students trilaterate the RoomQuake epicenter by arcing calibrated strings of length proportional to S-P latencies from each seismic station until a common point is identified. Each RoomQuake epicenter is marked by hanging a Styrofoam ball (color-coded by magnitude) from the ceiling. The developing ‘fault’ within the classroom provides an immersive historic record of the RoomQuake’s spatial distribution. Students also maintain a temporal record of events on a large time-line on the wall (recognizing time-related phenomena like aftershocks) and a record of magnitude frequencies on

  2. Complex inner core of the Earth: The last frontier of global seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-03-01

    The days when the Earth's inner core (IC) was viewed as a homogeneous solid sphere surrounded by the liquid outer core (OC) are now behind us. Due to a limited number of data sampling the IC and a lack of experimentally controlled conditions in the deep Earth studies, it has been difficult to scrutinize competitive hypotheses in this active area of research. However, a number of new concepts linking IC structure and dynamics has been proposed lately to explain different types of seismological observations. A common denominator of recent observational work on the IC is increased complexity seen in IC physical properties such as its isotropic and anisotropic structure, attenuation, inner core boundary (ICB) topography, and its rotational dynamics. For example, small-scale features have been observed to exist as a widespread phenomenon in the uppermost inner core, probably superimposed on much longer-scale features. The characterization of small-scale features sheds light on the nature of the solidification process and helps in understanding seismologically observed hemispherical dichotomy of the IC. The existence of variations in the rate and level of solidification is a plausible physical outcome in an environment where vigorous compositional convection in the OC and variations in heat exchange across the ICB may control the process of crystal growth. However, further progress is hindered by the fact that the current traveltime data of PKIKP waves traversing the IC do not allow discriminating between variations in isotropic P wave velocity and velocity anisotropy. Future studies of attenuation in the IC might provide crucial information about IC structure, although another trade-off exists—that of the relative contribution of scattering versus viscoelastic attenuation and the connection with the material properties. Future installations of dense arrays, cross paths of waves that sample the IC, and corresponding array studies will be a powerful tool to image and

  3. Autonomous BBOBS-NX (NX-2G) for New Era of Ocean Bottom Broadband Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiobara, H.; Ito, A.; Sugioka, H.; Shinohara, M.

    2017-12-01

    The broadband ocean bottom seismometer (BBOBS) and its new generation system (BBOBS-NX) have been developed in Japan, and we performed several test and practical observations to create and establish a new category of the ocean floor broadband seismology, since 1999. Now, the data obtained by our BBOBS and BBOBS-NX is proved to be adequate for broadband seismic analyses. Especially, the BBOBS-NX can obtain the horizontal data comparable to land sites in longer periods (10 s -). Moreover, the BBOBST-NX is in practical evaluation for the mobile tilt observation that enables dense geodetic monitoring. The BBOBS-NX system is a powerful tool, although, it has intrinsic limitation of the ROV operation. If this system can be used without the ROV, like as the BBOBS, it should lead us a true breakthrough of ocean bottom seismology. Hereafter, the new autonomous BBOBS-NX is noted as NX-2G in short. The main problem to realize the NX-2G is a tilt of the sensor unit on landing, which exceed the acceptable limit (±8°) in about 50%. As we had no evidence at which moment and how this tilt occurred, we tried to observe it during the BBOBST-NX landing in 2015 by attaching a video camera and an acceleration logger. The result shows that the tilt on landing was determined by the final posture of the system at the penetration into the sediment, and the large oscillating tilt more than ±10° was observed in descending. The function of the NX-2G system is based on 3 stage operations as shown in the image. The glass float is aimed not only to obtain enough buoyancy to extract the sensor unit, but also to suppress the oscillating tilt of the system in descending. In Oct. 2016, we made the first in-situ test of the NX-2G system with a ROV. It was dropped from the sea surface with the video camera and the acceleration logger. The ROV was used to watch the operation of the system at the seafloor. The landing looked well and it was examined from the acceleration data. As the maximum tilt in

  4. Towards monitoring the englacial fracture state using virtual-reflector seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F.; Weemstra, C.; Walter, F.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2018-04-01

    In seismology, coda wave interferometry (CWI) is an effective tool to monitor time-lapse changes using later arriving, multiply scattered coda waves. Typically, CWI relies on an estimate of the medium's impulse response. The latter is retrieved through simple time-averaging of receiver-receiver cross-correlations of the ambient field, i.e. seismic interferometry (SI). In general, the coda are induced by heterogeneities in the Earth. Being comparatively homogeneous, however, ice bodies such as glaciers and ice sheets exhibit little scattering. In addition, the temporal stability of the time-averaged cross-correlations suffers from temporal variations in the distribution and amplitude of the passive seismic sources. Consequently, application of CWI to ice bodies is currently limited. Nevertheless, fracturing and changes in the englacial macroscopic water content alter the bulk elastic properties of ice bodies, which can be monitored with cryoseismological measurements. To overcome the current limited applicability of CWI to ice bodies, we therefore introduce virtual-reflector seismology (VRS). VRS relies on a so-called multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) process of the time-averaged crosscorrelations. The technique results in the retrieval of a medium response that includes virtual reflections from a contour of receivers enclosing the region of interest (i.e., the region to be monitored). The virtual reflections can be interpreted as artificial coda replacing the (lacking) natural scattered coda. Hence, this artificial coda might be exploited for the purpose of CWI. From an implementation point of view, VRS is similar to SI by MDD, which, as its name suggests, also relies on a multidimensional deconvolution process. SI by MDD, however, does not generate additional virtual reflections. Advantageously, both techniques mitigate spurious coda changes associated with temporal variations in the distribution and amplitude of the passive seismic sources. In this work, we

  5. Using Social Networks to Educate Seismology to Non-Science Audiences in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Linkimer, L.

    2013-12-01

    Costa Rica has a very high rate of seismicity with 63 damaging earthquakes in its history as a nation and 12 felt earthquakes per month on average. In Costa Rica, earthquakes are part of everyday life; hence the inhabitants are highly aware of seismic activity and geological processes. However, formal educational programs and mainstream media have not yet addressed the appropriate way of educating the public on these topics, thus myths and misconceptions are common. With the increasing influence of social networks on information diffusion, they have become a new channel to address this issue in Costa Rica. The National Seismological Network of Costa Rica (RSN) is a joint effort between the University of Costa Rica and the Costa Rican Institute of Electricity. Since 1973, the RSN studies the seismicity and volcanic activity in the country. Starting on January 2011 the RSN has an active Facebook Page, in which felt earthquakes are reported and information on Seismology, geological processes, scientific talks, and RSN activities are routinely posted. Additionally, RSN gets almost instantaneous feedback from RSN followers including people from all rural and urban areas of Costa Rica. In this study, we analyze the demographics, geographic distribution, reach of specific Facebook posts per topic, and the episodic growth of RSN followers related to specific seismic events. We observe that 70 % of the RSN users are between ages from 18 to 34. We consistently observe that certain regions of the country have more Facebook activity, although those regions are not the most populated nor have a high connectivity index. We interpret this pattern as the result of a higher awareness to geological hazards in those specific areas. We notice that educational posts are as well 'liked' as most earthquake reports. For exceptional seismic events, we observe sudden increments in the number of RSN followers in the order of tens of thousands. For example, the May 2013 Sixaola earthquake (Mw

  6. Seismology in Schools an integrated approach to funding developing and implementing a coordinated programme for teachers and high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T. A.; Jones, A. G.; Campbell, G.

    2010-12-01

    Statistics in Ireland show that physics at Advanced Level in Secondary Schools is declining in popularity and is the most likely subject to be cut first from the curriculum in a curriculum readjustment by school authorities. In an attempt to attract students to study Earth science and seismology the School of Cosmic Physics, DIAS embarked on an outreach programme in 2007 to promote Earth science, particularly seismology, in schools at both Primary and Secondary Levels. Since its inception, DIAS's Seismology in Schools programme has been very well received, with seismometers installed in over fifty schools across the State. Although this number may appear small, given that the population of Ireland is 4M this number of 1 per 80,000 compares favourably with the U.K. (70 in a population of 70M, 1 per 1M) and the U.S.A. (200 in a population of 300M, 1 per 1.5M) with an penetration of 15-20 times greater. The phenomenal success of our Seismology in Schools programme has been helped significantly by the support we have received from the British Geological Survey (BGS) and IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) in terms of hardware, software and advice. Similarly, the programme would be a pale reflection of what it is today if the Directors of the Educational Centres (ATECI, Association of Teacher's/Education Centres in Ireland) across Ireland had not become enthused and funded the purchase of 34 additional seismometers, and the Geological Survey of Ireland purchased a further six. Also, funding support from Discover Science and Engineering (DSE) was absolutely critical for us to roll out this hugely enlarged programme of 50 seismometers from the originally envisioned four. As this programme is an initiation into seismology for students, it is important to stress that the seismometer is not used in the schools as a professional recording instrument but helps students visualize what seismology and the recording of earthquakes comprises. Essential to the

  7. Separation of Stochastic and Deterministic Information from Seismological Time Series with Nonlinear Dynamics and Maximum Entropy Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Rafael M.; Useche, Gina M.; Buitrago, Elias

    2007-01-01

    We present a procedure developed to detect stochastic and deterministic information contained in empirical time series, useful to characterize and make models of different aspects of complex phenomena represented by such data. This procedure is applied to a seismological time series to obtain new information to study and understand geological phenomena. We use concepts and methods from nonlinear dynamics and maximum entropy. The mentioned method allows an optimal analysis of the available information

  8. VERCE: a productive e-Infrastructure and e-Science environment for data-intensive seismology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilotte, J. P.; Atkinson, M.; Spinuso, A.; Rietbrock, A.; Michelini, A.; Igel, H.; Frank, A.; Carpené, M.; Schwichtenberg, H.; Casarotti, E.; Filgueira, R.; Garth, T.; Germünd, A.; Klampanos, I.; Krause, A.; Krischer, L.; Leong, S. H.; Magnoni, F.; Matser, J.; Moguilny, G.

    2015-12-01

    Seismology addresses both fundamental problems in understanding the Earth's internal wave sources and structures and augmented societal applications, like earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment and risk mitigation; and puts a premium on open-data accessible by the Federated Digital Seismological Networks. The VERCE project, "Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community e-science environment in Europe", has initiated a virtual research environment to support complex orchestrated workflows combining state-of-art wave simulation codes and data analysis tools on distributed computing and data infrastructures (DCIs) along with multiple sources of observational data and new capabilities to combine simulation results with observational data. The VERCE Science Gateway provides a view of all the available resources, supporting collaboration with shared data and methods, with data access controls. The mapping to DCIs handles identity management, authority controls, transformations between representations and controls, and access to resources. The framework for computational science that provides simulation codes, like SPECFEM3D, democratizes their use by getting data from multiple sources, managing Earth models and meshes, distilling them as input data, and capturing results with meta-data. The dispel4py data-intensive framework allows for developing data-analysis applications using Python and the ObsPy library, which can be executed on different DCIs. A set of tools allows coupling with seismology and external data services. Provenance driven tools validate results and show relationships between data to facilitate method improvement. Lessons learned from VERCE training lead us to conclude that solid-Earth scientists could make significant progress by using VERCE e-science environment. VERCE has already contributed to the European Plate Observation System (EPOS), and is part of the EPOS implementation phase. Its cross-disciplinary capabilities are being extended

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Seismological and Gravimetric Crustal Thicknesses below the Andean Region with Flat Subduction of the Nazca Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario E. Gimenez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A gravimetric study was carried out in a region of the Central Andean Range between 28∘ and 32∘ south latitudes and from 72∘ and 66∘ west longitudes. The seismological and gravimetrical Moho models were compared in a sector which coincides with the seismological stations of the CHARGE project. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the gravity Moho depths and those obtained from seismological investigations (CHARGE project, the latter giving deeper values than those resulting from the gravimetric inversion. These discrepancies are attenuated when the positive gravimetric effect of the Nazca plate is considered. Nonetheless, a small residuum of about 5 km remains beneath the Cuyania terrane region, to the east of the main Andean chain. This residuum could be gravimetrically justified if the existence of a high density or eclogitized portion of the lower crust is considered. This result differed from the interpretations from Project “CHARGE” which revealed that the entire inferior crust extending from the Precordillera to the occidental “Sierras Pampeanas” could be “eclogitized”. In this same sector, we calculated the effective elastic thickness (Te of the crust. These results indicated an anomalous value of Te = 30 km below the Cuyania terrane. This is further conclusive evidence of the fact that the Cuyania terrane is allochthonous, for which also geological evidences exist.

  10. SEISMOLOGY OF A LARGE SOLAR CORONAL LOOP FROM EUVI/STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF ITS TRANSVERSE OSCILLATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwichte, E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Foullon, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Aschwanden, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    The first analysis of a transverse loop oscillation observed by both Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatories (STEREO) spacecraft is presented, for an event on the 2007 June 27 as seen by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI). The three-dimensional loop geometry is determined using a three-dimensional reconstruction with a semicircular loop model, which allows for an accurate measurement of the loop length. The plane of wave polarization is found from comparison with a simulated loop model and shows that the oscillation is a fundamental horizontally polarized fast magnetoacoustic kink mode. The oscillation is characterized using an automated method and the results from both spacecraft are found to match closely. The oscillation period is 630 ± 30 s and the damping time is 1000 ± 300 s. Also, clear intensity variations associated with the transverse loop oscillations are reported for the first time. They are shown to be caused by the effect of line-of-sight integration. The Alfven speed and coronal magnetic field derived using coronal seismology are discussed. This study shows that EUVI/STEREO observations achieve an adequate accuracy for studying long-period, large-amplitude transverse loop oscillations.

  11. USING HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER TO CONFIRM A SEISMOLOGICALLY INFERRED CORONAL TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the HINODE satellite is used to examine the loop system described in Marsh et al. by applying spectroscopic diagnostic methods. A simple isothermal mapping algorithm is applied to determine where the assumption of isothermal plasma may be valid, and the emission measure locii technique is used to determine the temperature profile along the base of the loop system. It is found that, along the base, the loop has a uniform temperature profile with a mean temperature of 0.89 ± 0.09 MK which is in agreement with the temperature determined seismologically in Marsh et al., using observations interpreted as the slow magnetoacoustic mode. The results further strengthen the slow mode interpretation, propagation at a uniform sound speed, and the analysis method applied in Marsh et al. It is found that it is not possible to discriminate between the slow mode phase speed and the sound speed within the precision of the present observations.

  12. Tidal and seasonal variations in calving flux observed with passive seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, Christopher F.; West, Michael E.; O'Neel, Shad; Pettit, Erin C.; Truffer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The seismic signatures of calving events, i.e., calving icequakes, offer an opportunity to examine calving variability with greater precision than is available with other methods. Here using observations from Yahtse Glacier, Alaska, we describe methods to detect, locate, and characterize calving icequakes. We combine these icequake records with a coincident, manually generated record of observed calving events to develop and validate a statistical model through which we can infer iceberg sizes from the properties of calving icequakes. We find that the icequake duration is the single most significant predictor of an iceberg's size. We then apply this model to 18 months of seismic recordings and find elevated iceberg calving flux during the summer and fall and a pronounced lull in calving during midwinter. Calving flux is sensitive to semidiurnal tidal stage. Large calving events are tens of percent more likely during falling and low tides than during rising and high tides, consistent with a view that deeper water has a stabilizing influence on glacier termini. Multiple factors affect the occurrence of mechanical fractures that ultimately lead to iceberg calving. At Yahtse Glacier, seismology allows us to demonstrate that variations in the rate of submarine melt are a dominant control on iceberg calving rates at seasonal timescales. On hourly to daily timescales, tidal modulation of the normal stress against the glacier terminus reveals the nonlinear glacier response to changes in the near-terminus stress field.

  13. Conception and test of Echoes, a spectro-imager dedicated to the seismology of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulat, L.; Schmider, F.-X.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Appourchaux, T.; Gaulme, P.; Bresson, Y.; Gay, J.; Daban, J.-B.; Gouvret, C.

    2017-11-01

    Echoes is a project of a spaceborne Doppler Spectro-Imager (DSI) which has been proposed as payload to the JUICE mission project selected in the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is a Fourier transform spectrometer which measures phase shifts in the interference patterns induced by Doppler shifts of spectral lines reflected at the surface of the planet. Dedicated to the seismology of Jupiter, the instrument is designed to analyze the periodic movements induced by internal acoustic modes of the planet. It will allow the knowledge of the internal structure of Jupiter, in particular of the central region, which is essential for the comprehension of the scenario of the giant planets' formation. The optical design is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating in the visible domain and takes carefully into account the sensitivity of the optical path difference to the temperature. The instrument produces simultaneously four images in quadrature which allows the measurement of the phase without being contaminated by the continuum component of the incident light. We expect a noise level less than 1 cm2s-2µHz-1 in the frequency range [0.5 -10] mHz. In this paper, we present the prototype implemented at the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in collaboration with Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) to study the real performances in laboratory and to demonstrate the capability to reach the required Technology Readiness Level 5.

  14. Reseña. Al Cabo de las Velas. Expediciones Científicas en Colombia. Siglos XVIII, XIX y XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraim Otero Ruiz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Acogemos como Miembro de la Sociedad Colombiana de Historia de la Medicina a un joven científico cuyas inquietudes investigativas, instiladas desde la casa paterna, lo han llevado a explorar desde lo infinitamente pequeño hasta lo prodigiosamente grande, desde el microcosmos hasta el macrocosmos: yen cada ocasión dejando huella de su talento, primero como graduando en Bioquímica e Inmunología de la Sorbona y del Instituto Pasteur y después como investigador del Instituto de Genética Humana de la Universidad Javeriana.

    Pero es el resultado de una de sus actividades macrocósmicas, la de la Expedición Humana, lo que nos lo trae aquí esta noche al presentarnos el libro de las grandes Expediciones en Colombia, que él ha titulado “Al Cabo de las Velas-Expediciones Científicas en Colombia, Siglos XVIII, XIX Y XX”.

    Efectivamente los viajes clásicos, tal como hoy los conocemos por los historiadores o los cronistas, se dividieron en “exploraciones” y “expediciones”, según aquellas se dedicaran a recorrer los diferentes territorios y sus accidentes geográficos y a describirlos en forma más o menos detallada para el beneficio de futuros viajeros; mientras que éstas se formaban por grupos selectos, dirigidos a lugares geográficos definidos y dotados de un fin específico, para registrar, colonizar, analizar o explotar sus recursos.

    Esa definición, sin embargo, se confunde en la práctica; tecnológicamente, los viajes marinos sólo se harán posibles cuando el diseño de voluminosas embarcaciones con quilla y timón, con suficiente velamen y capacidad para albergar un número grande de fornidos remeros les permitiera, no sólo transportar las provisiones suficientes de agua, comida, algunas armas e implementos, sino poder sortear las inconsistencias y las inclemencias del tiempo, desde las calmas chichas hasta los huracanes.

    Por eso los viajes clásicos se inician en el Mare Nostrum, en Creta y en

  15. Facilitate, Collaborate, Educate: the Role of the IRIS Consortium in Supporting National and International Research in Seismology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. W.; Beck, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Over the twenty-five years since its founding in 1984, the IRIS Consortium has contributed in fundamental ways to change the practice and culture of research in seismology in the US and worldwide. From an original founding group of twenty-two U.S. academic institutions, IRIS membership has now grown to 114 U.S. Member Institutions, 20 Educational Affiliates and 103 Foreign Affiliates. With strong support from the National Science Foundation, additional resources provided by other federal agencies, close collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and many international partners, the technical resources of the core IRIS programs - the Global Seismographic Network (GSN), the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL), the Data Management System (DMS) and Education and Outreach - have grown to become a major national and international source of experimental data for research on earthquakes and Earth structure, and a resource to support education and outreach to the public. While the primary operational focus of the Consortium is to develop and maintain facilities for the collection of seismological data for basic research, IRIS has become much more than an instrument facility. It has become a stimulus for collaboration between academic seismological programs and a focus for their interactions with national and international partners. It has helped establish the academic community as a significant contributor to the collection of data and an active participant in global research and monitoring. As a consortium of virtually all of the Earth science research institutions in the US, IRIS has helped coordinate the academic community in the development of new initiatives, such as EarthScope, to strengthen the support for science and argue for the relevance of seismology and its use in hazard mitigation. The early IRIS pioneers had the foresight to carefully define program goals and technical standards for the IRIS facilities that have stood

  16. Dispel4py: An Open-Source Python library for Data-Intensive Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Krause, Amrey; Spinuso, Alessandro; Klampanos, Iraklis; Danecek, Peter; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2015-04-01

    Scientific workflows are a necessary tool for many scientific communities as they enable easy composition and execution of applications on computing resources while scientists can focus on their research without being distracted by the computation management. Nowadays, scientific communities (e.g. Seismology) have access to a large variety of computing resources and their computational problems are best addressed using parallel computing technology. However, successful use of these technologies requires a lot of additional machinery whose use is not straightforward for non-experts: different parallel frameworks (MPI, Storm, multiprocessing, etc.) must be used depending on the computing resources (local machines, grids, clouds, clusters) where applications are run. This implies that for achieving the best applications' performance, users usually have to change their codes depending on the features of the platform selected for running them. This work presents dispel4py, a new open-source Python library for describing abstract stream-based workflows for distributed data-intensive applications. Special care has been taken to provide dispel4py with the ability to map abstract workflows to different platforms dynamically at run-time. Currently dispel4py has four mappings: Apache Storm, MPI, multi-threading and sequential. The main goal of dispel4py is to provide an easy-to-use tool to develop and test workflows in local resources by using the sequential mode with a small dataset. Later, once a workflow is ready for long runs, it can be automatically executed on different parallel resources. dispel4py takes care of the underlying mappings by performing an efficient parallelisation. Processing Elements (PE) represent the basic computational activities of any dispel4Py workflow, which can be a seismologic algorithm, or a data transformation process. For creating a dispel4py workflow, users only have to write very few lines of code to describe their PEs and how they are

  17. Insights on the lithospheric structure of the Zagros mountain belt from seismological data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.; Kaviani, A.; Vergne, J.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2003-04-01

    As part of a French-Iranian collaboration, we installed a temporary seismological network across the Zagros for 4.5 months in 2000-2001 to investigate the lithospheric structure of the mountain belt. The network included 65 stations located along a 600-km long line (average spacing of ˜10 km) from the coast of the Persian Gulf to the stable block of Central Iran. A migrated depth cross-section computed from radial receiver functions displays clear P-to-S conversions at the Moho beneath most of the profile. The average Moho depth is 45 to 50 km beneath the folded belt. It deepens rather abruptly beneath the suture zone of the MZT (Main Zagros Thrust) and the Sanandaj-Sirjan (SS) metamorphic zone. The maximum crustal thickness of ˜65 km is reached 50 km NE of the surface trace of the MZT. The region of over-thickened crust is shifted to the NE with respect to the areas of highest elevations and the strongest negative Bouguer anomaly. To the NE, the crust of the block of Central Iran is 40-km thick on average. Two patches of Ps converted energy can be seen below the Moho in the northern half of the transect that cannot be attributed to multiple reflections. Teleseismic P residual travel time curves display lateral variations as large as 1.5 s with both long (faster arrivals in the SW than in the NE) and short-scale variations (in the MZT region). They were inverted for variations of P wave velocity with the ACH technique. The crustal layer exhibits rather strong lateral variations of Vp with lower velocities under the MZT and the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage, and faster velocities under the SS zone. In the mantle, a clear difference appears between the faster P wave velocities of the Arabian craton and the relatively lower velocities of the mantle of Central Iran.

  18. Enhancing Outreach using Social Networks at the National Seismological Network of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkimer, L.; Lücke, O. H.

    2014-12-01

    Costa Rica has a very high seismicity rate and geological processes are part of everyday life. Traditionally, information about these processes has been provided by conventional mass media (television and radio). However, due to the new trends in information flow a new approach towards Science Education is necessary for transmitting knowledge from scientific research for the general public in Costa Rica. Since 1973, the National Seismological Network of Costa Rica (RSN: UCR-ICE) studies the seismicity and volcanic activity in the country. In this study, we describe the different channels to report earthquake information that the RSN is currently using: email, social networks, and a website, as well as the development of a smartphone application. Since the RSN started actively participating in Social Networks, an increase in awareness in the general public has been noticed particularly regarding felt earthquakes. Based on this trend, we have focused on enhancing public outreach through Social Media. We analyze the demographics and geographic distribution of the RSN Facebook Page, the growth of followers, and the significance of their feedback for reporting intensity data. We observe that certain regions of the country have more Facebook activity, although those regions are not the most populated nor have a high Internet connectivity index. We interpret this pattern as the result of a higher awareness to geological hazards in those specific areas. We noticed that the growth of RSN users on Facebook has a strong correlation with the seismic events as opposed to Twitter that displays a steady growth with no clear correlations with specific seismic events. We see the Social Networks as opportunities to engage non-science audiences and encourage the population to participate in reporting seismic observations, thus providing intensity data. With the increasing access to Internet from mobile phones in Costa Rica, we see this approach to science education as an opportunity

  19. Seismological studies carried out by the CEA in connection with the safety of nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.; Ferrieux, H.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1975-01-01

    In order to evaluate the seismic risk at nuclear sites, the Department of Nuclear Safety of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has been conducting a programme of seismological studies for several years past. This programme is aimed at acquiring a better knowledge of seismic phenomena, in particular the spectral distribution of the energy of earthquakes, considered to be the only correct approach to the problem of earthquake protection, as well as a better knowledge of the seismic activity of the areas surrounding nuclear sites. The authors propose defining the design spectrum of the site on the basis of the probable energy at the source, the distance from the epicentre and the transfer function of the geological formations. The need - for the purpose of defining this spectrum - to acquire data on the characteristics of French earthquakes and on regional seismicity led the Department of Nuclear Safety to set up a network of seismic stations. It now has an observatory at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre and mobile stations with automatic magnetic recording for studying aftershock sequences and the activity of faults in the vicinity of nuclear sites, and for making the measurements necessary to calculate the transfer functions. With this equipment it was possible to record six aftershocks of the Oleron earthquake on 7 September 1972 close to the epicentre, and to calculate the spectra therefrom. The latter contained a lot of high frequencies, which is in agreement with the data obtained from other sources for earthquakes of low energy. The synthetic spectra calculated on the basis of one magnitude and one distance are in good agreement with the spectra obtained experimentally

  20. Seismological investigation of September 09 2016, North Korea underground nuclear test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gaber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available On Sep. 9, 2016, a seismic event of mb 5.3 took place in North Korea. This event was reported as a nuclear test. In this study, we applied a number of discriminant techniques that facilitate the ability to distinguish between explosions and earthquakes on the Korean Peninsula. The differences between explosions and earthquakes are due to variation in source dimension, epicenter depth and source mechanism, or a collection of them. There are many seismological differences between nuclear explosions and earthquakes, but not all of them are detectable at large distances or are appropriate to each earthquake and explosion. The discrimination methods used in the current study include the seismic source location, source depth, the differences in the frequency contents, complexity versus spectral ratio and Ms-mb differences for both earthquakes and explosions. Sep. 9, 2016, event is located in the region of North Korea nuclear test site at a zero depth, which is likely to be a nuclear explosion. Comparison between the P wave spectra of the nuclear test and the Sep. 8, 2000, North Korea earthquake, mb 4.9 shows that the spectrum of both events is nearly the same. The results of applying the theoretical model of Brune to P wave spectra of both explosion and earthquake show that the explosion manifests larger corner frequency than the earthquake, reflecting the nature of the different sources. The complexity and spectral ratio were also calculated from the waveform data recorded at a number of stations in order to investigate the relation between them. The observed classification percentage of this method is about 81%. Finally, the mb:Ms method is also investigated. We calculate mb and Ms for the Sep. 9, 2016, explosion and compare the result with the mb: Ms chart obtained from the previous studies. This method is working well with the explosion. Keywords: Discrimination, Seismic source location, Brune model, Spectral parameters, Complexity method, Mb: Ms

  1. High-rate multi-GNSS: what does it mean to seismology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J.

    2017-12-01

    GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is capable of measuring centimeter-level positions epoch by epoch at a single station, and is thus treasured in tsunami/earthquake early warning where static displacements in the near field are critical to rapidly and reliably determining the magnitude of destructive events. However, most operational real-time PPP systems at present rely on only GPS data. The deficiency of such systems is that the high reliability and availability of precise displacements cannot be maintained continuously in real time, which is however a crucial requirement for disaster resistance and response. Multi-GNSS, including GLONASS, BeiDou, Galileo and QZSS other than only GPS, can be a solution to this problem because much more satellites per epoch (e.g. 30-40) will be available. In this case, positioning failure due to data loss or blunders can be minimized, and on the other hand, positioning initializations can be accelerated to a great extent since the satellite geometry for each epoch will be enhanced enormously. We established a prototype real-time multi-GNSS PPP service based on Asia-Pacific real-time network which can collect and stream high-rate data from all five navigation systems above. We estimated high-rate satellite clock corrections and enabled undifferenced ambiguity fixing for multi-GNSS, which therefore ensures high availability and reliability of precise displacement estimates in contrast to GPS-only systems. We will report how we can benefit from multi-GNSS for seismology, especially the noise characteristics of high-rate and sub-daily displacements. We will also use storm surge loading events to demonstrate the contribution of multi-GNSS to sub-daily transient signals.

  2. Young solar-type stars evolution: the lithium and seismology contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piau, Laurent Eric

    2001-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to young low-mass stars. We modeled many of them since their formation until the solar age covering the range between 0.65 and 1.4 solar masses and metallicity values ranging from -0.1 to 0.1 dex. The theoretical computations are related to observations in nearby open-clusters: Hyades, Pleiades... This comparison demonstrates that the lithium evolution is still poorly understood in such stars. In stellar interiors, this nuclide is destroyed by nuclear processes at low temperatures. Its surface abundance evolution traduces mixing phenomena between surface and deeper layers and therefore allows a direct insight into stellar structure and evolution. Both of which depend on microscopic and macroscopic physical phenomena whose effects we systematically examine. As regards microphysics we mainly concentrate upon changes in metallicity, in distribution among metals and their consequences on stellar opacity. We also address atmospheric models while the star still lies close to its Hayashi track. Accretion and convective parameters are the macroscopic phenomena we address during pre-main sequence. The rotational effects are considered along the entire evolution including the much realistic rotation laws. The last part of this PhD thesis makes use of seismology. Today this Discipline allows direct probing of the solar internal structure and motions. Its future application in the realm of stars will substantially improve their understanding. We derive here some relevant seismic variables for the understanding of stellar evolution. Then we show how this powerful tool permits to determine fundamental stellar parameters such as the mass or the helium fraction. (author) [fr

  3. Using seismology to raise science awareness in kindergarten and elementary levels, with the help of high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, F. L.; Silveira, G. M.; Moreira, G.; Afonso, I. P.; Maciel, B. A. P. C.; Melo, M. O.; Neto, R. P.; Gonçalves, M.; Marques, G.; Hartmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching students, aged from 4 up to 18 years old, is a challenging task. It continuously implies new strategies and new subjects adapted to all of them. This is even more evident, when we have to teach natural-hazards scientific aspects and safe attitudes toward risk. We often see that most of the high-school students (16 -18 years old) are not motivated for extra-curricular activities implying science and/or behaviours changes. But, they have a very positive response when we give them some responsibility. On top of that, we also realised that young children are quite receptive to the involvement of older students in the school environment Taking this into consideration, our project use the k12 students to prepare scientific activities and subjects, based in questions, which they need to answer themselves. The students need to answer those questions and, only then, adapt and teach the right answers to the different school-levels. With this approach, we challenged the students to solve three questions: How to use a SEP seismometer at school, and its data? How to set up a shaking table? How to introduce waves and vibrations contents to all ages of students? During the project they developed many science skills, and worked in straight cooperation with teachers, the parents association and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz. As a result, it was possible to reach all school students with the help of the k-12 ones. This is an outcome of the project W-Shake, a Parents-in-Science Initiative to promote the study of seismology and related subjects. This project, supported by the Portuguese "Ciência Viva" program, results from a direct cooperation between the parents association, science school-teachers and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz.

  4. Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team: Strategies for Engaging Middle School "At-Risk" Students in Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, M. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Frohlich, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, during my participation in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth & Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program, I was awarded an AS-1 seismograph through IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program. This program serves to create an international educational seismic network that allows teachers across the country and around the world to share seismic data in real-time using online tools, classroom activities, and technical support documents for seismic instruments. Soon after receiving my AS-1, I founded and began sponsoring the Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team which consists of selected 7th and 8th grade students. Eagle Pass Jr. High is a Title 1 school that serves a predominantly "at-risk" Hispanic population. We meet after school once a week to learn about earthquakes, seismic waves, analyze recorded seismic event data using computer software programming, and correspond with other students from schools around the country. This team approach has been well received by fellow TXESS Revolution teachers with AS-1 seismographs and will be implemented by David Boyd, STEM coordinator for Williams Preparatory Academy in Dallas, Texas this fall 2011. All earthquakes recorded by our seismograph station (EPTX), which has remained online and actively recording seismic data since 2008, are catalogued and then plotted on a large world map displayed on my classroom wall. A real-time seismogram image updates every five minutes and along with all earthquakes recorded since installation can be viewed on our webpage http://www.iris.edu/hq/ssn/schools/view/eptx. During the 2010-2011 school year, my seismology team and I participated in an earthquake research study led by Dr. Cliff Frohlich at the Institute for Geophysics. The study examined seismograms and felt reports for the 25 April 2010 Alice, Texas, earthquake, in order to investigate its possible connection to oil and gas production in the Stratton oil and gas field. A research paper detailing our findings

  5. ASDF: A New Adaptable Data Format for Seismology Suitable for Large-Scale Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, L.; Smith, J. A.; Spinuso, A.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the amounts of available data as well as computational power opens the possibility to tackle ever larger and more complex problems. This comes with a slew of new problems, two of which are the need for a more efficient use of available resources and a sensible organization and storage of the data. Both need to be satisfied in order to properly scale a problem and both are frequent bottlenecks in large seismic inversions using ambient noise or more traditional techniques.We present recent developments and ideas regarding a new data format, named ASDF (Adaptable Seismic Data Format), for all branches of seismology aiding with the aforementioned problems. The key idea is to store all information necessary to fully understand a set of data in a single file. This enables the construction of self-explaining and exchangeable data sets facilitating collaboration on large-scale problems. We incorporate the existing metadata standards FDSN StationXML and QuakeML together with waveform and auxiliary data into a common container based on the HDF5 standard. A further critical component of the format is the storage of provenance information as an extension of W3C PROV, meaning information about the history of the data, assisting with the general problem of reproducibility.Applications of the proposed new format are numerous. In the context of seismic tomography it enables the full description and storage of synthetic waveforms including information about the used model, the solver, the parameters, and other variables that influenced the final waveforms. Furthermore, intermediate products like adjoint sources, cross correlations, and receiver functions can be described and most importantly exchanged with others.Usability and tool support is crucial for any new format to gain acceptance and we additionally present a fully functional implementation of this format based on Python and ObsPy. It offers a convenient way to discover and analyze data sets as well as making

  6. Applications of seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotation data in exploration seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Van Renterghem, C.; Sollberger, D.; Häusler, M.; Robertsson, J. O. A.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotation data have the potential to open up new ways to address long-standing problems in land-seismic exploration such as identifying and separating P-, S-, and surface waves. Gradient-based acquisition and processing techniques could enable replacing large arrays of densely spaced receivers by sparse spatially-compact receiver layouts or even one single multicomponent station with dedicated instruments (e.g., rotational seismometers). Such approaches to maximize the information content of single-station recordings are also of significant interest for seismic measurements at sites with limited access such as boreholes, the sea bottom, and extraterrestrial seismology. Arrays of conventional three-component (3C) geophones enable measuring not only the particle velocity in three dimensions but also estimating their spatial gradients. Because the free-surface condition allows to express vertical derivatives in terms of horizontal derivatives, the full gradient tensor and, hence, curl and divergence of the wavefield can be computed. In total, three particle velocity components, three rotational components, and divergence, result seven-component (7C) seismic data. Combined particle velocity and gradient data can be used to isolate the incident P- or S-waves at the land surface or the sea bottom using filtering techniques based on the elastodynamic representation theorem. Alternatively, as only S-waves exhibit rotational motion, rotational measurements can directly be used to identify S-waves. We discuss the derivations of the gradient-based filters as well as their application to synthetic and field data, demonstrating that rotational data can be of particular interest to S-wave reflection and P-to-S-wave conversion imaging. The concept of array-derived gradient estimation can be extended to source arrays as well. Therefore, source arrays allow us to emulate rotational (curl) and dilatational (divergence) sources. Combined with 7C

  7. Engaging High School Science Teachers in Field-Based Seismology Research: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for secondary school science teachers have been shown to improve their students' test scores, and there is a substantial body of literature about the effectiveness of RET (Research Experience for Teachers) or SWEPT (Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers) programs. RET programs enjoy substantial support, and several opportunities for science teachers to engage in research currently exist. However, there are barriers to teacher participation in research projects; for example, laboratory-based projects can be time consuming and require extensive training before a participant can meaningfully engage in scientific inquiry. Field-based projects can be an effective avenue for involving teachers in research; at its best, earth science field work is a fun, highly immersive experience that meaningfully contributes to scientific research projects, and can provide a payoff that is out of proportion to a relatively small time commitment. In particular, broadband seismology deployments provide an excellent opportunity to provide teachers with field-based research experience. Such deployments are labor-intensive and require large teams, with field tasks that vary from digging holes and pouring concrete to constructing and configuring electronics systems and leveling and orienting seismometers. A recently established pilot program, known as FEST (Field Experiences for Science Teachers) is experimenting with providing one week of summer field experience for high school earth science teachers in Connecticut. Here I report on results and challenges from the first year of the program, which is funded by the NSF-CAREER program and is being run in conjunction with a temporary deployment of 15 seismometers in Connecticut, known as SEISConn (Seismic Experiment for Imaging Structure beneath Connecticut). A small group of teachers participated in a week of field work in August 2015 to deploy seismometers in northern CT; this experience followed a visit of the

  8. AlpArray - technical strategies for large-scale European co-operation in broadband seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbourne, A.; Clinton, J.; Hetenyi, G.; Pequegnat, C.; Wilde-Piorko, M.; Villasenor, A.; Comelli, P.; AlpArray Working Group

    2012-04-01

    AlpArray is a new initiative to study the greater Alpine area with a large-scale broadband seismological network. The interested parties (currently 32 institutes in 12 countries) plan to combine their existing infrastructures into an all-out transnational effort that includes data acquisition, processing, imaging and interpretation. The experiment will encompass the greater Alpine area, from the Black Forest in the north to the Northern Apennines in the south and from the Pannonian Basin in the east to the French Massif Central in the west. We aim to cover this region with high-quality broadband seismometers by combining the ~400 existing permanent stations with an additional 400+ instruments from mobile pools. In this way, we plan to achieve homogeneous and high resolution coverage while also deploying densely spaced stations along swaths across key parts of the Alpine chain. These efforts on land will be combined with deployments of ocean bottom seismometers in the Mediterranean Sea. Significant progress has already been made in outlining the scientific goals and funding strategy. A brief overview of these aspects of the initiative will be presented here. However, we will concentrate on the technical aspects: How efficient large-scale integration of existing infrastructures can be achieved. Existing permanent station coverage within the greater Alpine area has been collated and assessed for data availability, allowing strategies to be developed for network densification to ensure a robust backbone network: An anticipated deployment strategy has been drawn up to optimise array coverage and data quality. The augmented backbone network will be supplemented by more densely spaced temporary arrays targeting more specific scientific questions. For these temporary arrays, a strategy document has been produced to outline standards for station installation, data acquisition, processing, archival and dissemination. All these operations are of course vital. However, data

  9. Autonomous geodynamics of the Pamir-Tien Shan junction zone from seismology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, A. A.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Leonova, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    The geodynamics of the Tajik Depression, the junction zone of the Pamirs and Tien Shan, is typically considered in the context of plate tectonic concept, which implies intense subhorizontal compression of the zone resulting from the subduction of the Indian and Eurasian lithospheric plates. This convergence has been reliably confirmed by the GPS measurements. However, the joint analysis of the geological structure, seismicity, and geodimeter measurements conducted during a few years at the Garm geodynamical testing site of the Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, demonstrates a widening of the Tajik Depression instead of its shortening, as should be expected from the subhorizontal compression predominant in the present-day stress-state of this region. This conclusion, together with the data from the other regions, suggests that, along with the plate tectonic mechanisms, there are also other, local, autonomous drivers that contribute to the tectogenesis of this region. Besides, the probable existence of these autonomous sources within the Tajik Depression directly follows from the seismology data. Among them is the crustal spreading within the depression suggested by the seismotectonic displacements in the focal mechanisms of the earthquakes. These displacements are directed in different azimuths off the axial's most subsided part of the depression at a depth of 20-30 km. Above this region the distribution of seismotectonic deformations (STD) is chaotic. This pattern of deformation is barely accounted for by a simple model of subhorizontal compression of the Earth's crust in the region. In our opinion, these features of the seismotectonic deformation in the crust within the studied part of the Tajik Depression is probably associated with the gain in the volume of the rocks due to the inflow of the additional material, which is supplied from the bottom crust or upper mantle by the deep fluids. This increase in the rock volume

  10. Continuous catchment-scale monitoring of geomorphic processes with a 2-D seismological array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Milodowski, D.; Chen, Y.-G.; Wu, Y.-M.; Lin, C.-W.; Chen, H.

    2012-04-01

    highlights the major interest of a seismic monitoring since it allows a detailed spatial and temporal survey of events that classic approaches are not able to observe. In the future, dense two dimensional seismological arrays will assess in real-time the landscape dynamics of an entire catchment, tracking sediments from slopes to rivers.

  11. Magnitude And Distance Determination From The First Few Seconds Of One Three Components Seismological Station Signal Using Support Vector Machine Regression Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Gutierrez, L. H.; Vargas Jimenez, C. A.; Niño Vasquez, L. F.

    2011-12-01

    The "Sabana de Bogota" (Bogota Savannah) is the most important social and economical center of Colombia. Almost the third of population is concentrated in this region and generates about the 40% of Colombia's Internal Brute Product (IBP). According to this, the zone presents an elevated vulnerability in case that a high destructive seismic event occurs. Historical evidences show that high magnitude events took place in the past with a huge damage caused to the city and indicate that is probable that such events can occur in the next years. This is the reason why we are working in an early warning generation system, using the first few seconds of a seismic signal registered by three components and wide band seismometers. Such system can be implemented using Computational Intelligence tools, designed and calibrated to the particular Geological, Structural and environmental conditions present in the region. The methods developed are expected to work on real time, thus suitable software and electronic tools need to be developed. We used Support Vector Machines Regression (SVMR) methods trained and tested with historic seismic events registered by "EL ROSAL" Station, located near Bogotá, calculating descriptors or attributes as the input of the model, from the first 6 seconds of signal. With this algorithm, we obtained less than 10% of mean absolute error and correlation coefficients greater than 85% in hypocentral distance and Magnitude estimation. With this results we consider that we can improve the method trying to have better accuracy with less signal time and that this can be a very useful model to be implemented directly in the seismological stations to generate a fast characterization of the event, broadcasting not only raw signal but pre-processed information that can be very useful for accurate Early Warning Generation.

  12. Determination of the Integral/SPI instrumental response and his application to the observation of gamma ray lines in the Vela region; Determination de la reponse instrumentale du spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI et application a l'observation des raies gamma de la region des Voiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attie, D

    2005-01-15

    The INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer was designed to observe the sky in the energy band of 20 keV to 8 MeV. The specificity of instrument SPI rests on the excellent spectral resolution (2.3 keV with 1 MeV) of its detecting plan, composed of 19 cooled germanium crystals; covering an effective area of 508 cm{sup 2}. The use of a coded mask, located at 1.7 m above the detection plan ensures to it a resolving power of 2.5 degrees. The aim of this thesis, begun before the INTEGRAL launch, is made up of two parts. The first part relates to the analysis of the spectrometer calibration data. The objective was to measure and check the performances of the telescope, in particular to validate simulations of the INTEGRAL/SPI instrument response. This objective was successfully achieved. This analysis also highlights the presence of a significant instrumental background noise. Whereas, the second part concentrates on the data analysis of the Vela region observations. I have approached two astrophysical topics dealing with: - the search for radioactive decays lines of titanium-44, which is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis, in the supernova remnant of Vela Junior and, - the search of cyclotron resonance scattering features expected towards 25 keV and 52 keV in the accreting pulsar spectrum of the x-ray binary star Vela X-1. Putting forward the hypothesis that the result obtained previously by COMPTEL is correct and considering the no-detection of the titanium-44 lines by SPI, we give a lower limit at 4500 km s{sup -1} for the ejecta velocity from Vela Junior. The analysis on the research of the cyclotron lines have shown that the results are very sensitive to the instrumental background. Thorough studies will be necessary to guarantee an unambiguous detection of these lines. (author)

  13. Diploma in Seismology for High-School Teachers in Mexico Through an Open-Source Learning Plataform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Campos, X.; Bello, D.; Dominguez, J.; Pérez, J.; Cruz, J. L.; Navarro Estrada, F.; Mendoza Carvajal, A. D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The high school Physics programs in Mexico do not consider the immediate application of the concepts learned by the students. According to some pedagogical theories many of the acquired knowledge are assimilated when experimenting, expressing, interacting and developing projects. It is in high school when young people are exploring and looking for experiences to decide the area in which they want to focus their studies. The areas of science and engineering are chosen, mainly motivated by technology and outer space. There is little interest in Earth science, reflected by the number of students in those areas. This may be due mainly to the lack of exposure and examples at the high school level. With this in mind, we are working on a project that seeks, through the preparation of teachers of this level, to bring their students to seismology and awaken in them their curiosity in issues related to it. Based on the above, and taking as examples the successful programs "Seismographs in Schools" from IRIS and "Geoscience Information For Teachers" from EGU, the Mexican National Seismological Service has launched a project that contemplates three stages. The first one consists of the design and delivery of a diploma addressed to high school teachers. The second contemplates the installation of short-period seismographs in each of the participating faculty facilities. Finally, the third one involves the active participation of teachers and their students in research projects based on the data collected in the instruments installed in their schools. This work presents the first phase. The diploma has been designed to offer teachers, in 170 hours, an introduction to topics related to seismology and to provide them with tools and examples that they can share with their students in their classroom. It is offered both online through Moodle, an open-source learning plataform, and in 12 classroom sessions. The first class started on June 2017 and will finish on November 2017. We

  14. Severity Classification of a Seismic Event based on the Magnitude-Distance Ratio Using Only One Seismological Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hernán Ochoa Gutiérrez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Seismic event characterization is often accomplished using algorithms based only on information received at seismological stations located closest to the particular event, while ignoring historical data received at those stations. These historical data are stored and unseen at this stage. This characterization process can delay the emergency response, costing valuable time in the mitigation of the adverse effects on the affected population. Seismological stations have recorded data during many events that have been characterized by classical methods, and these data can be used as previous "knowledge" to train such stations to recognize patterns. This knowledge can be used to make faster characterizations using only one three-component broadband station by applying bio-inspired algorithms or recently developed stochastic methods, such as kernel methods. We trained a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm with seismograph data recorded by INGEOMINAS's National Seismological Network at a three-component station located near Bogota, Colombia. As input model descriptors, we used the following: (1 the integral of the Fourier transform/power spectrum for each component, divided into 7 windows of 2 seconds and beginning at the P onset time, and (2 the ratio between the calculated logarithm of magnitude (Mb and epicentral distance. We used 986 events with magnitudes greater than 3 recorded from late 2003 to 2008. The algorithm classifies events with magnitude-distance ratios (a measure of the severity of possible damage caused by an earthquake greater than a background value. This value can be used to estimate the magnitude based on a known epicentral distance, which is calculated from the difference between P and S onset times. This rapid (< 20 seconds magnitude estimate can be used for rapid response strategies. The results obtained in this work confirm that many hypocentral parameters and a rapid location of a seismic event can be obtained using a few

  15. ObsPy – What can it do for data centers and observatories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Wassermann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Data acquisition by seismic centers relies on real-time systems, like SeisComP3, Antelope and Earthworm. However, these are complex systems that are designed for fast and precisely defined standard real-time analyses. Therefore, it is not a simple task to access or modify internal routines, and to integrate them into custom-processing workflows or to perform in-depth data analyses. Often a library is necessary that provides convenient access to data and allows easy control over all of the operations that are to be performed on the data. ObsPy is such a library, which is designed to access and process seismological waveform data and metadata. We use short and simple examples here to demonstrate how effective it is to use Python for seismological data analysis. Then, we illustrate the general capabilities of ObsPy, and highlight some of its specific aspects that are relevant for seismological data centers and observatories, through presentation of real-world examples. Finally, we demonstrate how the ObsPy library can be used to develop custom graphical user interface applications.

  16. Combining Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO2 in Sequestration Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, Peter K. [Univ. of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL (United States); Dixon, Tim [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A series of surface geophysical and geochemical techniques are tested in order to demonstrate and validate low cost approaches for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) of the integrity of deep reservoirs for CO2 storage. These techniques are (i) surface deformation by GPS; ii) surface deformation by InSAR; iii) passive source seismology via broad band seismometers; and iv) soil gas monitoring with a cavity ring down spectrometer for measurement of CO2 concentration and carbon isotope ratio. The techniques were tested at an active EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) site in Texas. Each approach has demonstrated utility. Assuming Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) activities become operational in the future, these techniques can be used to augment more expensive down-hole techniques.

  17. VERCE: a productive e-Infrastructure and e-Science environment for data-intensive seismology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Atkinson, Malcolm; Carpené, Michele; Casarotti, Emanuele; Frank, Anton; Igel, Heiner; Rietbrock, Andreas; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Spinuso, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Seismology pioneers global and open-data access -- with internationally approved data, metadata and exchange standards facilitated worldwide by the Federation of Digital Seismic Networks (FDSN) and in Europe the European Integrated Data Archives (EIDA). The growing wealth of data generated by dense observation and monitoring systems and recent advances in seismic wave simulation capabilities induces a change in paradigm. Data-intensive seismology research requires a new holistic approach combining scalable high-performance wave simulation codes and statistical data analysis methods, and integrating distributed data and computing resources. The European E-Infrastructure project "Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community e-science environment in Europe" (VERCE) pioneers the federation of autonomous organisations providing data and computing resources, together with a comprehensive, integrated and operational virtual research environment (VRE) and E-infrastructure devoted to the full path of data use in a research-driven context. VERCE delivers to a broad base of seismology researchers in Europe easily used high-performance full waveform simulations and misfit calculations, together with a data-intensive framework for the collaborative development of innovative statistical data analysis methods, all of which were previously only accessible to a small number of well-resourced groups. It balances flexibility with new integrated capabilities to provide a fluent path from research innovation to production. As such, VERCE is a major contribution to the implementation phase of the ``European Plate Observatory System'' (EPOS), the ESFRI initiative of the solid-Earth community. The VRE meets a range of seismic research needs by eliminating chores and technical difficulties to allow users to focus on their research questions. It empowers researchers to harvest the new opportunities provided by well-established and mature high-performance wave simulation codes of the

  18. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  19. Active tectonics in the Mygdonia basin (northern Greece): a combined seismological and remote-sensed geomorphology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkarlaouni, Charikleia; Andreani, Louis; Pennos, Chris; Gloaguen, Richard; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Kilias, Adamantios; Michail, Maria

    2014-05-01

    In Greek mainland, active extensional deformation resulted in the development of numerous seismogenic E- to SE-trending basins. The Mygdonia graben located in central Macedonia produced major historical earthquakes and poses a serious threat to the neighbouring city of Thessaloniki. Our aim is to determine which active seismic sources have the potential to generate strong events. Active tectonics shape the landscape, control the evolution of the fluvial network and cause the occurrence of strong and frequent earthquakes generated by fault populations. Thus, our approach combined both seismology and remote-sensed geomorphology. Seismological investigation and more especially relocation analysis was performed for recent seismicity in the area (2000-2012). Low magnitude earthquakes not exceeding 4.8 constitute the seismicity pattern for this period. Accurately determined focal parameters indicate that seismicity is not only localized along major fault zones. Smaller faults seem also to be activated. Temporal and spatial investigation show that seismicity is clustered and seismic bursts often migrate to adjacent faults. The hypocentral distribution of precisely determined microearthquake foci reveals the existence of high-angle (> 60º) normal faults dipping both south and north. This is consistent with fault plane solutions of stronger earthquakes. The largest amount of earthquakes is generated along the NW-SE sub-basin bounded from "Assiros-Analipsi" and "Lagina" fault zone, as well as in "Sochos" fault in the north which dips with approximately 70º-80º to the south. All these structures played an important role in the seismotectonic evolution of the area. We used geomorphic indices in order to analyse the landscapes of the Mygdonia region. Geomorphic indices were derived from DEM and computed using MATLAB scripts. We classified the landscapes according to their erosional stages using hypsometric integral and surface roughness. Both indices suggest stronger erosion

  20. Data Logging and Data Modelling: Using seismology and seismic data to create challenge in the academic classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbour, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    In 2012 Computing and Information Technology was disapplied from the English National Curriculum and therefore no longer has a compulsory programme of study. Data logging and data modelling are still essential components of the curriculum in the Computing and Information Technology classroom. Once the students have mastered the basics of both spreadsheet and information handling software they need to be further challenged. All too often the data used with relation to data-logging and data-handling is not realistic enough to really challenge very able students. However, using data from seismology allows students to manipulate "real" data and enhances their experience of geo-science, developing their skills and then allowing them to build on this work in both the science and geography classroom. This new scheme of work "Seismology at School" has allowed the students to work and develop skills beyond those normally expected for their age group and has allowed them to better appreciate their learning experience of "Natural Hazards" in the science and geography classroom in later years. The students undertake research to help them develop their understanding of earthquakes. This includes using materials from other nations within the European Economic Area, to also develop and challenge their use of Modern Foreign Languages. They are then challenged to create their own seismometers using simple kits and 'free' software - this "problem-solving" approach to their work is designed to enhance team-work and to extend the challenge they experience in the classroom. The students are then are asked to manipulate a "real" set of data using international earthquake data from the most recent whole year. This allows the students to make use of many of the analytical and statistical functions of both spreadsheet software and information handling software in a meaningful way. The students will need to have developed a hypothesis which their work should have provided either validation

  1. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao, E-mail: yumiao@cqu.edu.cn; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi [Key Lab for Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  2. Geoengineering and seismological aspects of the Niigata-Ken Chuetsu-Oki earthquake of 16 July 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, R.; Brandenberg, S.J.; CoIlins, B.D.; Dickenson, S.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Koumoto, H.; Abrahamson, N.; Cluff, L.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2009-01-01

    The M6.6 Niigata-Ken Chuetsu-Oki earthquake of 16 July 2007 occurred off the west coast of Japan with a focal depth of 10 km, immediately west of Kashiwazaki City and Kariwa Village in southern Niigata Prefecture. Peak horizontal ground accelerations of 0.68 g were measured in Kashiwazaki City, as well as at the reactor floor level of the world's largest nuclear reactor, located on the coast at Kariwa Village. Liquefaction of historic and modern river deposits, aeolian dune sand, and manmade fill was widespread in the coastal region nearest the epicenter and caused ground deformations that damaged bridges, embankments, roadways, buildings, ports, railways and utilities. Landslides along the coast of southern Niigata Prefecture and in mountainous regions inland of Kashiwazaki were also widespread affecting transportation infrastructure. Liquefaction and a landslide also damaged the nuclear power plant sites. This paper, along with a companion digital map database available at http://walrus.wr.usgs.gOv/infobank/n/nii07jp/html/n-ii-07-jp.sites.kmz, describes the seismological and geo-engineering aspects of the event. ?? 2009, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. Determination of the Alfvén Speed and Plasma-beta Using the Seismology of Sunspot Umbra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, I.-H.; Moon, Y.-J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Park, J.; Choi, S. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Baek, J.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Lee, J., E-mail: ihjo@khu.ac.kr [Space Science Division, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    For 478 centrally located sunspots observed in the optical continuum with Solar Dynamics Observatory /Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we perform seismological diagnostics of the physical parameters of umbral photospheres. The new technique is based on the theory of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a non-isothermally stratified photosphere with a uniform vertical magnetic field. We construct a map of the weighted frequency of three-minute oscillations inside the umbra and use it for the estimation of the Alfvén speed, plasma-beta, and mass density within the umbra. We find the umbral mean Alfvén speed ranges between 10.5 and 7.5 km s{sup −1} and is negatively correlated with magnetic field strength. The umbral mean plasma-beta is found to range approximately between 0.65 and 1.15 and does not vary significantly from pores to mature sunspots. The mean density ranges between (1–6) × 10{sup −4} kg m{sup −3} and shows a strong positive correlation with magnetic field strength.

  4. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Coronal Loops Using Seismology of Damped Kink Oscillations and Forward Modeling of EUV Intensity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2018-06-01

    The shape of the damping profile of kink oscillations in coronal loops has recently allowed the transverse density profile of the loop to be estimated. This requires accurate measurement of the damping profile that can distinguish the Gaussian and exponential damping regimes, otherwise there are more unknowns than observables. Forward modeling of the transverse intensity profile may also be used to estimate the width of the inhomogeneous layer of a loop, providing an independent estimate of one of these unknowns. We analyze an oscillating loop for which the seismological determination of the transverse structure is inconclusive except when supplemented by additional spatial information from the transverse intensity profile. Our temporal analysis describes the motion of a coronal loop as a kink oscillation damped by resonant absorption, and our spatial analysis is based on forward modeling the transverse EUV intensity profile of the loop under the isothermal and optically thin approximations. We use Bayesian analysis and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to apply our spatial and temporal models both individually and simultaneously to our data and compare the results with numerical simulations. Combining the two methods allows both the inhomogeneous layer width and density contrast to be calculated, which is not possible for the same data when each method is applied individually. We demonstrate that the assumption of an exponential damping profile leads to a significantly larger error in the inferred density contrast ratio compared with a Gaussian damping profile.

  5. Proceedings. First Assembly of the Latin-America and Caribbean Seismological Commission - LACSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Third Latin-American Congress of Seismol Third Latin-American Congress of Seismology

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Latin-American and Caribbean region is an area with a very complex tectonic setting, where stress and strain generated by the interaction of several lithospheric plates is being absorbed. Several regional fault systems, with moderate and high activity, represent a hazard for a significant part of the population (more than 500 million inhabitants. Given the recent developments in the mining and energy industries, a great deal of exploration has been focusing on this part of the world, and the potential extraction of mineral resources is going to generate important changes in vast areas of the American continent. Considering the geodynamic framework and the expectation of the extraction of economic resources, questions about the impact of human activities and the possible destabilizing of the relevant tectonic systems are raised. Many theoretical and applied geophysical studies have been developed in different regions of Latin-America and the Caribbean, mainly since the second half of the 20th century. There have been basically two motivations to carry out these studies: The evaluation of natural hazards and the exploration of economic resources. Such studies have mainly focused on the knowledge of: (a the structure of the crust and upper mantle, (b the regional tectonic evolution, (c the local and regional seismic hazards, and (d the geometry of geologic structures of economic interest. This part of the world has witnessed an excessive and disproportionate growth in the number of urban centers, evidenced by the increase in economic and social gaps. This situation puts a great portion of the population at a high level of vulnerability, which in addition to the natural hazard in the region, configures a scenario of high seismic risk. In this academic event, the relevant results associated with the seismotectonic behavior of this part of the world will be addressed, as well as the implications of active exploration of the tectonic conditions

  6. An infrastructure for data-intensive seismology using ADMIRE: laying the bricks for a new data highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, L.; Spinuso, A.; Galea, M.; Atkinson, M.; Van Eck, T.; Vilotte, J.

    2011-12-01

    primary goal was to evaluate its capabilities for large-scale integration and analysis of distributed data. A secondary goal was to gauge its potential and the added value that it might bring to the seismological community. Though still in its infant state, the architecture met the demands of our use case and promises to cater for our future requirements. We shall continue to develop its capabilities as part of an EU funded project VERCE - Virtual Earthquake and Seismology Research Community for Europe. VERCE aims to significantly advance our understanding of the Earth in order to aid society in its management of natural resources and hazards. Its strategy is to enable seismologists to fully exploit the under-utilized wealth of seismic data, and key to this is a data-intensive computation framework adapted to the scale and diversity of the community. This is a first step in building a data-intensive highway for geoscientists, smoothing their travel from the primary sources of data to new insights and rapid delivery of actionable information.

  7. Application of Adjoint Method and Spectral-Element Method to Tomographic Inversion of Regional Seismological Structure Beneath Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Obayashi, M.; Tono, Y.; Ando, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in large scale computing by using waveform modeling technique and high performance computing facility has demonstrated possibilities to perform full-waveform inversion of three dimensional (3D) seismological structure inside the Earth. We apply the adjoint method (Liu and Tromp, 2006) to obtain 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. First we implemented Spectral-Element Method to K-computer in Kobe, Japan. We have optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002) by using OpenMP so that the code fits hybrid architecture of K-computer. Now we could use 82,134 nodes of K-computer (657,072 cores) to compute synthetic waveform with about 1 sec accuracy for realistic 3D Earth model and its performance was 1.2 PFLOPS. We use this optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE code and take one chunk around Japanese Islands from global mesh and compute synthetic seismograms with accuracy of about 10 second. We use GAP-P2 mantle tomography model (Obayashi et al., 2009) as an initial 3D model and use as many broadband seismic stations available in this region as possible to perform inversion. We then use the time windows for body waves and surface waves to compute adjoint sources and calculate adjoint kernels for seismic structure. We have performed several iteration and obtained improved 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. The result demonstrates that waveform misfits between observed and theoretical seismograms improves as the iteration proceeds. We now prepare to use much shorter period in our synthetic waveform computation and try to obtain seismic structure for basin scale model, such as Kanto basin, where there are dense seismic network and high seismic activity. Acknowledgements: This research was partly supported by MEXT Strategic Program for Innovative Research. We used F-net seismograms of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention.

  8. EVIDENCE OF THERMAL CONDUCTION SUPPRESSION IN A SOLAR FLARING LOOP BY CORONAL SEISMOLOGY OF SLOW-MODE WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Sun, Xudong; Davila, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ∼12 minutes and a decay time of ∼9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s −1 matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ∼10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit

  9. Direct seismic detection of gas hydrates using multi-component seismology : a case study from the mid-Norwegian margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunz, S.; Mienert, J. [Tromso Univ., Tromso (Norway). Dept. of Geology; Chand, S. [Norwegian Geological Survey, Trondheim (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are important as a possible future energy resource, in submarine landsliding and in global climate change as they contain more carbon than any other global reservoir and are plentiful on continental margins worldwide. It is therefore necessary to identify and map the distribution of gas hydrates in a fast and basin-wide approach. Information about the distribution of gas hydrates can be obtained using multi-component seismology. In the marine environment shear waves (S-waves) can be generated by conversion from a downward-propagating compressional wave (P-wave) upon reflection at a sedimentary interface. The upward-propagating S-wave can be recorded at the ocean floor using vertical and horizontal geophones. On the mid-Norwegian margin, a combined analysis of the independently obtained parameters, P-wave velocity and Vp/Vs-ratio, of ocean-bottom cable data enables the direct detection of gas hydrates with higher certainty and assessment of their grain-scale distribution and its controlling parameters. In order to directly image gas hydrates and to directly assess their grain-scale distribution, a model was developed to evaluate the distribution of the ratio of P- and S-wave velocities, Vp/Vs, along the ocean-bottom cable line. The study also evaluated possible controlling mechanisms for the distribution of gas hydrates. The paper provided detailed information on the distribution of gas hydrates and gas within the sediments through analyses of seismic velocities, obtained from multi-channel or ocean-bottom seismic data. It was concluded that gas hydrates are distributed both with and without affecting the shear strength of the sediments. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  10. "Treatises on Earthquakes" in late Renaissance (16th-17th cent), at the roots of historical seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, P.

    2009-04-01

    It was soon after the damaging November 1570 earthquake at Ferrara, Northern Italy, that the academic Stefano Breventano from Pavia, a small town in Northern Italy as well, started to compose his "Treatise on the earthquake". Completed by September 1576, this 250-page manuscript was to remain unpublished for centuries. The critical edition recently appeared (Albini, 2007) was a due tribute to the remarkable amount of information put together by Breventano, an otherwise "obscure" literate who, before getting involved with earthquakes, had published a history of the antiquities and remarkable events at his hometown Pavia (1570). Indeed, he was not the first Renaissance author to pursue the goal of checking into the historical sources of the previous centuries in search of earthquakes and other natural phenomena. What is outstanding in his "Treatise" is that he suceeded in retrieving information on more than two hundred earthquakes, along two thousand years, between 504 B.C. and 1575 A.D., covering the whole Euro-Mediterranean region, and the West Indies in early 16th century. Breventano's essay is here presented, together with a comparison between his style and amount of information with those included in the work by the contemporary British author Stephen Batman, "The Doome warning all men to the Judgement" (1581). A later treatise is presented also, the work by Marcello Bonito (1690) "Terra Tremante [Trembling Earth]", which could easily be defined as a worldwide list of earthquakes. In structure and content, Bonito's work goes along the same lines of Breventano, and could be considered a precursor of today descriptive catalogues, because of his outstandingly modern approach that paved the way to modern historical seismology.

  11. Characterization of Material Properties at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada by Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Feigl, K. L.; Patterson, J.; Parker, L.; Reinisch, E. C.; Zeng, X.; Cardiff, M. A.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Thurber, C. H.; Robertson, M.; Miller, D. E.; Akerley, J.; Kreemer, C.; Morency, C.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    The PoroTomo project consists of poroelastic tomography by adjoint inverse modeling of data from seismology, geodesy, and hydrology. The goal of the PoroTomo project is to assess an integrated technology for characterizing and monitoring changes in the rock mechanical properties of an enhanced geothermal system in 3 dimensions with a spatial resolution better than 50 meters. In March 2016, we deployed the integrated technology in a 1500-by-500-by-400-meter volume at Brady. The 15-day deployment included 4 distinct time intervals with intentional manipulations of the pumping rates in injection and production wells. The data set includes: active seismic sources, fiber-optic cables for Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) and Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) arranged vertically in a borehole to 400 m depth and horizontally in a trench 8700 m in length and 0.5 m in depth; 244 seismometers on the surface, 3 pressure sensors in observation wells, continuous geodetic measurements at 3 GPS stations, and 7 InSAR acquisitions. To account for the mechanical behavior of both the rock and the fluids, we are developing numerical models for the 3-D distribution of the material properties. We present an overview of results, including:Tomographic images of P-wave velocity estimated from seismic body waves [Thurber et al., this meeting].Tomographic images of phase velocity estimated from ambient noise correlation functions [Zeng et al., this meeting].Models of volumetric contraction to account for subsidence observed by InSAR and GPS [Reinisch et al., this meeting].Interpretation of pressure and temperature data [Patterson et al., this meeting].Taken together, these results support a conceptual model of highly permeable conduits along faults channeling fluids from shallow aquifers to the deep geothermal reservoir tapped by the production wells. The PoroTomo project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  13. The Virtual Earthquake and Seismology Research Community e-science environment in Europe (VERCE) FP7-INFRA-2011-2 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilotte, J.-P.; Atkinson, M.; Michelini, A.; Igel, H.; van Eck, T.

    2012-04-01

    Increasingly dense seismic and geodetic networks are continuously transmitting a growing wealth of data from around the world. The multi-use of these data leaded the seismological community to pioneer globally distributed open-access data infrastructures, standard services and formats, e.g., the Federation of Digital Seismic Networks (FDSN) and the European Integrated Data Archives (EIDA). Our ability to acquire observational data outpaces our ability to manage, analyze and model them. Research in seismology is today facing a fundamental paradigm shift. Enabling advanced data-intensive analysis and modeling applications challenges conventional storage, computation and communication models and requires a new holistic approach. It is instrumental to exploit the cornucopia of data, and to guarantee optimal operation and design of the high-cost monitoring facilities. The strategy of VERCE is driven by the needs of the seismological data-intensive applications in data analysis and modeling. It aims to provide a comprehensive architecture and framework adapted to the scale and the diversity of those applications, and integrating the data infrastructures with Grid, Cloud and HPC infrastructures. It will allow prototyping solutions for new use cases as they emerge within the European Plate Observatory Systems (EPOS), the ESFRI initiative of the solid Earth community. Computational seismology, and information management, is increasingly revolving around massive amounts of data that stem from: (1) the flood of data from the observational systems; (2) the flood of data from large-scale simulations and inversions; (3) the ability to economically store petabytes of data online; (4) the evolving Internet and Data-aware computing capabilities. As data-intensive applications are rapidly increasing in scale and complexity, they require additional services-oriented architectures offering a virtualization-based flexibility for complex and re-usable workflows. Scientific information

  14. CDGP, the data center for deep geothermal data from Alsace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaming, Marc; Grunberg, Marc; Jahn, Markus; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Cuenot, Nicolas; Genter, Albert; Dalmais, Eléonore

    2016-04-01

    CDGP (Centre de données de géothermie profonde, deep geothermal data center, http://cdgp.u-strasbg.fr) is set by the LabEX G-EAU-THERMIE PROFONDE to archive the high quality data collected in the Upper Rhine Graben geothermal sites and to distribute them to the scientific community for R&D activities, taking IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) into account. Collected datasets cover the whole life of geothermal projects, from exploration to drilling, stimulation, circulation and production. They originate from the Soultz-sous-Forêts pilot plant but also include more recent projects like the ECOGI project at Rittershoffen, Alsace, France. They are historically separated in two rather independent categories: geophysical datasets mostly related to the industrial management of the geothermal reservoir and seismological data from the seismic monitoring both during stimulations and circulations. Geophysical datasets are mainly up to now from the Soultz-sous-Forêts project that were stored on office's shelves and old digital media. Some inventories have been done recently, and a first step of the integration of these reservoir data into a PostgreSQL/postGIS database (ISO 19107 compatible) has been performed. The database links depths, temperatures, pressures, flows, for periods (times) and locations (geometries). Other geophysical data are still stored in structured directories as a data bank and need to be included in the database. Seismological datasets are of two kinds: seismological waveforms and seismicity bulletins; the former are stored in a standardized way both in format (miniSEED) and in files and directories structures (SDS) following international standard of the seismological community (FDSN), and the latter in a database following the open standard QuakeML. CDGP uses a cataloging application (GeoNetwork) to manage the metadata resources. It provides metadata editing and search functions as well as a web map viewer. The metadata editor supports ISO19115

  15. Evolution of the Concordia seismological observatory station CCD (GEOSCOPE network): a new post-hole installation on Antarctica inlandsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigone, D.; Danecek, P.; Bès de Berc, M.; Maggi, A.; Thore, J. Y.; Leveque, J. J.; Vallee, M.; Bernard, A.; Sayadi, J.; Morelli, A.; Delladio, A.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Alemany, O.; Possenti, P.; Stutzmann, E.; Bonaime, S.; Pesqueira, F.; Pardo, C.; Vincent, D.

    2017-12-01

    Concordia (75°S 123°E) is a scientific base operated by French polar institute IPEV (Institut Paul-Emile Victor) and Italian Antarctic Program PNRA (Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Antartide), and is located at Dome C, on the ice sheet of the East Antarctica plateau. It hosts a seismological observatory (CCD), which is jointly operated by EOST (Strasbourg) and INGV (Roma). The highly strategic location and remoteness is the key strength of our program, which has provided observatory quality data since 2000. The station has been integrated into the GEOSCOPE network in 2008 and the data are now available in real time through GEOSCOPE and IRIS. The observatory is located at distance of 1km from the base. The current installation is placed at a depth of 12m in an artificial vault constructed from two shipping containers and buried in the snow. The vault is thermally very stable, but the relatively close proximity to the base causes increased diurnal noise ( 40 dB) at frequencies above 1Hz, especially during the summer season. The uppermost 100 m thick firn (snow) layer forms a waveguide, where anthropic noise from the base is trapped and easily picked up by the seismometers (T240 and STS2). Another limitation comes from the hydrostatic pressure of the snow which is continuously deforming the metallic structures: we record container cracking events on the seismograms, and we see visual evidence of structural deformations inside the tunnel and the vault. We propose an evolution of the CCD station towards a post-hole installation. Placing a sensor at a depth of approximately 130 meters, will reduce noise from thermal effects, from tilting and from anthropogenic activity, because it would be located below the firn layer waveguide and the ice pinch-out depth. In order to operate the borehole station for several years, we intend to keep the hole open and the sensor accessible, while ensuring good coupling between the sensor and the surrounding hard ice. To achieve these

  16. Research in Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    edge of the Persian Gulf, isolatina the Arabian continental shelf from the subduction process. Slippage along this fault is Pleistocene and probably...Fault-plane solutions for these events (Fitch, 1970; Nowroozi, 1972) confirm the mechanisms to be shallow underthrusting. The Bouguer gravity anomaly...at 40 km behind the subduction zone. A Bouguer gravity anomaly has also been calculated for this model by assuming that the structure is flat and

  17. Red giants seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  18. Seismology for rockburst prediction.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, W

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available project GAP409 presents a method (SOOTHSAY) for predicting larger mining induced seismic events in gold mines, as well as a pattern recognition algorithm (INDICATOR) for characterising the seismic response of rock to mining and inferring future... State. Defining the time series of a specific function on a catalogue as a prediction strategy, the algorithm currently has a success rate of 53% and 65%, respectively, of large events claimed as being predicted in these two cases, with uncertainties...

  19. Yugoslav seismological research threatened

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Ivo; Hamburger, Michael

    We in the Western scientific community have had the luxury, throughout most of our careers, of working in an environment insulated from the terrors of war and political violence. Well distanced from these horrors, we are often numbed by headlines reporting political turmoil elsewhere in the world—whether in Afghanistan, South Africa, or Yugoslavia. There are times, however, when personal contact with a colleague caught within one of these political wildfires reminds us of the very human tragedy that underlies these headlines.In studying a number of large earthquakes that took place in Central Asia in the 1930s and 1940s, we have been collecting seismograms from the well established European seismic observatories that recorded the events. Among them was the Zagreb Observatory, operated by the Mohorovicic Geophysical Institute of the University of Zagreb. The city of Zagreb—along with its scientific and cultural institutions—is now under siege, a result of the violent military conflict between the Yugoslav federal government and the Republic of Croatia. The following letter, which accompanied the Zagreb seismograms, provides a vivid picture of the daily hardships that our colleagues in Yugoslavia must be facing and a call to members of the international scientific community to help put an end to the rapidly escalating violence in Yugoslavia.

  20. Non-linear seismology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dzhafarov, AD

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available . These methods make use of ray theory to model waveforms from finite sources, and allow the selective modelling of propagation effects for the different body wave types in arbitrarily complex three dimensional media....

  1. Research in Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-31

    for several sandstones (Fatt and Davis, 1952), Westerly granite ( Frangos , 1967), and Ottawa sand (Zoback and Byerlee, 1976). In general, permeability...an order of magnitude ( Frangos , 1967). However, since the effect of fluid flow is negligible in all but the highly permeable rocks, we need only

  2. Seismology in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    1982-01-01

    Mexico is situated at the intersection of four major crustal Plates: the Americas Plate, the Pacific Plate, the Caribbean Plate, and the Cocos Plate. The interaction of these four plates is very complex. The pattern of earthquake risk is, therefore, among the most complicated in the world. The average release of seismic energy each is 55x1021 ergs-more than twice the figure for California. 

  3. VELA Network Evaluation and Automatic Processing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-09

    LO/LR COMMFNT NO. (DEGRRES) T=20SFr T=30SRr T^aospr PATTO 937 *>*>. 3 5.20 a. 30 3.^7 7.97 0.0 10 ? 91R 27.9 a.oo 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 20 2 qiq 70.a a...FVF^T OISTANCE HB MS US IS LQ/I.P roMMFN7" NO. (DEORF^) T=20SFC T=30SFC T-aosRc PATTO MO 50. 1 5.20 a.oi 3.8 8 1.51 1. 10 10 r, Ml 5a.a 5.00 a...DFORPP^) T=20^KC T=30SEC 7= (4 0^ FC PATTO � lift. 1 s.on «.6 0 «.29 3. 9 9 0.0 in 7 u-\\-i 73.2 i.r-o 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 7 n in 96.0 1.70 0.0

  4. 78 FR 14304 - Adrian Vela: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... was convicted of three felony counts under Federal law for conduct relating to the importation into... to commit an offense against the laws of the United States related to the importation of food. The..., Product of Malaysia,'' and ``Shrimp, Product of Indonesia''--were misbranded, marketed, and intended to be...

  5. Development of XML Schema for Broadband Digital Seismograms and Data Center Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Tsuboi, S.; Ishihara, Y.; Nagao, H.; Yamagishi, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Yanaka, H.; Yamaji, H.

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of data centers around the globe, where the digital broadband seismograms are opened to researchers. Those centers use their own user interfaces and there are no standard to access and retrieve seismograms from different data centers using unified interface. One of the emergent technologies to realize unified user interface for different data centers is the concept of WebService and WebService portal. Here we have developed a prototype of data center portal for digital broadband seismograms. This WebService portal uses WSDL (Web Services Description Language) to accommodate differences among the different data centers. By using the WSDL, alteration and addition of data center user interfaces can be easily managed. This portal, called NINJA Portal, assumes three WebServices: (1) database Query service, (2) Seismic event data request service, and (3) Seismic continuous data request service. Current system supports both station search of database Query service and seismic continuous data request service. Data centers supported by this NINJA portal will be OHP data center in ERI and Pacific21 data center in IFREE/JAMSTEC in the beginning. We have developed metadata standard for seismological data based on QuakeML for parametric data, which has been developed by ETH Zurich, and XML-SEED for waveform data, which was developed by IFREE/JAMSTEC. The prototype of NINJA portal is now released through IFREE web page (http://www.jamstec.go.jp/pacific21/).

  6. Estenoses benignas de esôfago: abordagem endoscópica com velas de Savary-Gilliard Benign strictures of the esophagus: endoscopic approach with Savary-Gilliard bougies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Novais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: As estenoses benignas de esôfago são complicações decorrentes de diversas causas. Possuem tratamentos similares, na maioria dos casos necessitando de dilatação endoscópica, no entanto a resposta terapêutica, tempo ideal de tratamento, assim como intervalo entre as sessões podem ser variáveis. OBJETIVO: Analisar, do ponto de vista endoscópico, as estenoses benignas de esôfago em 14 anos de experiência no Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, avaliando etiologia, a extensão da estenose, o número de dilatações necessário para atingir resposta terapêutica satisfatória, assim como a relação entre a extensão da estenose e a resposta terapêutica. MÉTODO: Foram analisadas 2.568 dilatações endoscópicas com uso de velas de Savary-Gilliard em 236 pacientes, durante um período de 14 anos e 10 meses, até junho de 2007. RESULTADOS: A estenose péptica foi a causa mais freqüentemente encontrada, seguida pela estenose cáustica. As estenoses longas e cáusticas necessitaram de maior número de sessões para ausência de disfagia. Estenoses pépticas e curtas responderam melhor a número menor de sessões de dilatação. CONCLUSÃO: A estenose péptica foi a causa mais comum e respondeu bem à terapia endoscópica, em concordância com a literatura. As estenoses cáusticas foram as mais refratárias, principalmente as longas. Quanto maior foi a extensão da estenose, também maior foi o número de sessões necessárias. Estenoses curtas apresentaram boa evolução na maioria dos casos. O número de dilatações necessárias dependeu diretamente da causa e da extensão da estenose.BACKGROUND: Benign esophageal strictures are complications that result from different causes. They are usually similarly approached, most of the cases needing endoscopic dilation. However the response to therapy, optimal timing for treatment and interval between sessions can vary. AIM: The

  7. Site Investigation for Detection of KIJANG Reactor Core Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun Yeon; Kim, Jeeyoung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It was planned for the end of March 2017 and extended to April 2018 according to the government budget adjustment. The KJRR project is intended for filling the self-sufficiency of RI demand including Mo-99, increasing the NTD capacity and developing technologies related to the research reactor. In project, site investigation is the first activity that defines seismologic and related geologic aspects of the site. Site investigation was carried out from Oct. 2012 to Jan. 2014 and this study is intended to describe detail procedures in locating the reactor core center. The location of the reactor core center was determined by collectively reviewing not only geological information but also information from architects engineering. EL 50m was selected as ground level by levering construction cost. Four recommended locations (R-1a - R-1d) are displayed for the reactor core center. R-1a was found optimal in consideration of medium rock contour, portion of medium rock covering reactor buildings, construction cost, physical protection and electrical resistivity. It is noted that engineering properties of the medium rock is TCR/RQD 100/53, elastic modulus 7,710 - 8,720MPa, permeability coefficient 2.92E-06cm/s, and S-wave velocity 1,380m/s, sound for foundations of reactor buildings.

  8. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  9. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  12. Lessons Learned from Creating the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G. L.; Michelle, D.; Johnston, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis opened the Public Earthquake Resource Center (PERC) in May 2004. The PERC is an interactive display area that was designed to increase awareness of seismology, Earth Science, earthquake hazards, and earthquake engineering among the general public and K-12 teachers and students. Funding for the PERC is provided by the US Geological Survey, The NSF-funded Mid America Earthquake Center, and the University of Memphis, with input from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Additional space at the facility houses local offices of the US Geological Survey. PERC exhibits are housed in a remodeled residential structure at CERI that was donated by the University of Memphis and the State of Tennessee. Exhibits were designed and built by CERI and US Geological Survey staff and faculty with the help of experienced museum display subcontractors. The 600 square foot display area interactively introduces the basic concepts of seismology, real-time seismic information, seismic network operations, paleoseismology, building response, and historical earthquakes. Display components include three 22" flat screen monitors, a touch sensitive monitor, 3 helicorder elements, oscilloscope, AS-1 seismometer, life-sized liquefaction trench, liquefaction shake table, and building response shake table. All displays include custom graphics, text, and handouts. The PERC website at www.ceri.memphis.edu/perc also provides useful information such as tour scheduling, ask a geologist, links to other institutions, and will soon include a virtual tour of the facility. Special consideration was given to address State science standards for teaching and learning in the design of the displays and handouts. We feel this consideration is pivotal to the success of any grass roots Earth Science education and outreach program and represents a valuable lesson that has been learned at CERI over the last several

  13. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  14. A seismological study of shallow weak earthquakes in the urban area of Hamburg city, Germany, and its possible relation to salt dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Torsten; Heimann, Sebastian; Bialowons, Wilhelm

    2010-05-01

    In the night from 8/9 April 2009, shortly after midnight on Maundy Thursday before Easter, several people in Gross-Flottbek, Hamburg, felt unusual strong ground shocks so that some of them left their houses in fear of earthquake shaking. Police and Fire Brigade received phone calls of worried residents, and few days later Internet pages were published where people reported their observations. On 21 April 2009 at about 8 p.m. local time a second micro-earthquake was felt. Damage to buildings or infrastructure did not occur to our knowledge. The Institute of Geophysics, University of Hamburg, installed from 22 April to 17 May 2009 three temporal seismic stations in the epicentral area. Seismological data from two close-by stations at the Deutsches Elektron-Synchrotron (DESY) in about 1 km and the Geophysical Institute in about 7 km distance were collected and integrated to the temporal network. The events occurred above the roof of the shallow Othmarschen Langenfelde salt diapir (OLD), in an area known for active sinkhole formation and previous historic ground shaking events. The analysis of the seismological data recovers that three shallow micro-earthquakes occurred from 8 to 21 April at a depth of about 100m, the largest one with a moment magnitude of about MW 0.6. Depth location of such shallow events is difficult with standard methods, and is here constrained by waveform modeling of surface waves. Earthquakes occurring in soft sediments within the uppermost 100 m are a rare phenomena and cannot be explained by standard models. Rupture process in soft sediments differ from those on faults in more competent rock. We discuss the rupture and source mechanism of the earthquakes in the context of previous historic shocks and existing sinkhole and deformation data. Although the event was so weak, the rupture duration was unusual long and possibly 0.3 s. Three possible models for the generation of repeated micro-earthquakes in Gross Flottbek are developed and discussed

  15. 2D Modelling of the Gorkha earthquake through the joint exploitation of Sentinel 1-A DInSAR measurements and geological, structural and seismological information

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Raffaele; Solaro, Giuseppe; De Luca, Claudio; Pepe, Susi; Bonano, Manuela; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    A Mw 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on 25 April 2015 at 06:11:26 UTC, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring more than 23,000 and producing extensive damages. The main seismic event, known as the Gorkha earthquake, had its epicenter localized at ~82 km NW of the Kathmandu city and the hypocenter at a depth of approximately 15 km. After the main shock event, about 100 aftershocks occurred during the following months, propagating toward the south-east direction; in particular, the most energetic shocks were the Mw 6.7 and Mw 7.3 occurred on 26 April and 12 May, respectively. In this study, we model the causative fault of the earthquake by jointly exploiting surface deformation retrieved by the DInSAR measurements collected through the Sentinel 1-A (S1A) space-borne sensor and the available geological, structural and seismological information. We first exploit the analytical solution performing a back-analysis of the ground deformation detected by the first co-seismic S1A interferogram, computed by exploiting the 17/04/2015 and 29/04/2015 SAR acquisitions and encompassing the main earthquake and some aftershocks, to search for the location and geometry of the fault plane. Starting from these findings and by benefiting from the available geological, structural and seismological data, we carry out a Finite Element (FE)-based 2D modelling of the causative fault, in order to evaluate the impact of the geological structures activated during the seismic event on the distribution of the ground deformation field. The obtained results show that the causative fault has a rather complex compressive structure, dipping northward, formed by segments with different dip angles: 6° the deep segment and 60° the shallower one. Therefore, although the hypocenters of the main shock and most of the more energetic aftershocks are located along the deeper plane, corresponding to a segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), the FE solution also indicates the contribution of the shallower

  16. Fault geometry of 2015, Mw7.2 Murghab, Tajikistan earthquake controls rupture propagation: Insights from InSAR and seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Simran; Peltzer, Gilles; Zhang, Ailin; Meng, Lingsen; Liang, Cunren; Lundgren, Paul; Fielding, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Combining space-based geodetic and array seismology observations can provide detailed information about earthquake ruptures in remote regions. Here we use Landsat-8 imagery and ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1 radar interferometry data combined with data from the European seismology network to describe the source of the December 7, 2015, Mw7.2 Murghab (Tajikistan) earthquake. The earthquake reactivated a ∼79 km-long section of the Sarez-Karakul Fault, a NE oriented sinistral, trans-tensional fault in northern Pamir. Pixel offset data delineate the geometry of the surface break and line of sight ground shifts from two descending and three ascending interferograms constrain the fault dip and slip solution. Two right-stepping, NE-striking segments connected by a more easterly oriented segment, sub-vertical or steeply dipping to the west were involved. The solution shows two main patches of slip with up to 3.5 m of left lateral slip on the southern and central fault segments. The northern segment has a left-lateral and normal oblique slip of up to a meter. Back-projection of high-frequency seismic waves recorded by the European network, processed using the Multitaper-MUSIC approach, focuses sharply along the surface break. The time progression of the high-frequency radiators shows that, after a 10 second initiation phase at slow speed, the rupture progresses in 2 phases at super-shear velocity (∼4.3-5 km/s) separated by a 3 second interval of slower propagation corresponding to the passage through the restraining bend. The intensity of the high-frequency radiation reaches maxima during the initial and middle phases of slow propagation and is reduced by ∼50% during the super-shear phases of the propagation. These findings are consistent with studies of other strike-slip earthquakes in continental domain, showing the importance of fault geometric complexities in controlling the speed of fault propagation and related spatiotemporal pattern of the high-frequency radiation.

  17. Seismological observations at the Northern Andean region of Colombia: Evidence for a shallowly subducting Caribbean Slab and an extensional regime in the upper plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, G.; Cardona, A.; Yarce, J.; Alvira, D.; Poveda, E.

    2013-05-01

    A number of seismological observations, among which we can mention teleseismic travel time residuals, P to S receiver functions and Pn velocity quantification, suggest a clear distinction between the seismic structure of the crust and uppermost mantle between the plains on the Caribbean coast of Colombia and the mountains at the Northern Andean region. Absolute and relative travel time residuals indicate the presence of a seismically fast material in the upper mantle beneath northern Colombia; preliminary results of Pn studies show a region of relatively slow Pn velocities (between 7.8 and 7.9 km/s) underneath the Caribbean coast, contrasting with values greater than 8 km/s beneath the Central and Western cordilleras of Colombia, and the Pacific coast; receiver functions suggest a significantly thinner crust beneath the Caribbean coast, with a crustal thickness between 25 and 30 km, than beneath the Northern Andean zone at the cordilleras of Colombia, where it exceeds 40 km and reaches about 57 km at the location of Bogota. Besides the obviuos discrepancies that appear in response to different topography, we think that the seismological observations are a consequence of the presence of two very distinct slab segments beneath Colombia and contrasting behaviors of the upper plate, which correspond to Caribbean and Nazca subductions. Our seismic observations can be explained by a shallowly subducting Caribbean Plate, in the absence of an asthenospheric wedge, that steepens at about the location of the Bucaramanga nest, and a thinned continental crust that reflects an extensional component linked to oblique convergence of the Caribbean, which contrasts with the crustal thickening in the Andean Cordillera linked to crustal shortening and Nazca plate subuction. These new data are consistent with the idea of of a relatively warm Nazca slab of Neogene age which seems to have a relatively frontal convergence, and a colder, more buoyant Caribbean slab which represents an

  18. NW transverse fault system in Southern Bogota, Colombia: New seismologic and structural evidences derived from focal mechanisms and stress field determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel Amaya, J.; Fierro Morales, J.; Ordoñez Potes, M.; Blanco, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new seismological, morphotectonic and structural data of the Southern Bogota area. The goals of the study were to characterize the NW transverse fault system and to evaluate its effect on seismic wave's generation and propagation. The data set included epicenters of the RSNC (Red Sismologica Nacional de Colombia) catalog over the period 1993-2012, historical description of seismic events (period 1644-1921), structural field data (scale 1:100000) and remote sensors interpretation. The methodology included the structural analysis of over 476 faults having a known sense of offset by using a least squares iterative inversion outlined by Angelier (1984) to determinate the mean deviatoric principal stress tensor. Preliminary conclusions showed that both propagation medium and direction are determined by the structural and mechanic conditions of the Southern Bogota Shear Zone (SBSZ) defined by Fierro & Angel, (2008) as a NW-SE oblique-slip fault zone within sinistral and normal regimes. Based on both data sources (focal mechanism and field structural data) we attempted to reconstruct the stress field starting with a strike slip faulting stress regime (S2 vertical), the solution yielded a ENE-WSW orientation for horizontal principal stress (S1). It is hypothesized that the NW oblique-slip fault zone may generate and/or propagate seismic waves, as a local source, implying local hazard to Bogota the capital city of Colombia with over 8 million habitants.

  19. Seismological comparisons of solar models with element diffusion using the MHD, OPAL, and SIREFF equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzik, J.A.; Swenson, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    We compare the thermodynamic and helioseismic properties of solar models evolved using three different equation of state (EOS) treatments: the Mihalas, Daeppen ampersand Hummer EOS tables (MHD); the latest Rogers, Swenson, ampersand Iglesias EOS tables (OPAL), and a new analytical EOS (SIREFF) developed by Swenson et al. All of the models include diffusive settling of helium and heavier elements. The models use updated OPAL opacity tables based on the 1993 Grevesse ampersand Noels solar element mixture, incorporating 21 elements instead of the 14 elements used for earlier tables. The properties of solar models that are evolved with the SIREFF EOS agree closely with those of models evolved using the OPAL or MHD tables. However, unlike the MHD or OPAL EOS tables, the SIREFF in-line EOS can readily account for variations in overall Z abundance and the element mixture resulting from nuclear processing and diffusive element settling. Accounting for Z abundance variations in the EOS has a small, but non-negligible, effect on model properties (e.g., pressure or squared sound speed), as much as 0.2% at the solar center and in the convection zone. The OPAL and SIREFF equations of state include electron exchange, which produces models requiring a slightly higher initial helium abundance, and increases the convection zone depth compared to models using the MHD EOS. However, the updated OPAL opacities are as much as 5% lower near the convection zone base, resulting in a small decrease in convection zone depth. The calculated low-degree nonadiabatic frequencies for all of the models agree with the observed frequencies to within a few microhertz (0.1%). The SIREFF analytical calibrations are intended to work over a wide range of interior conditions found in stellar models of mass greater than 0.25M circle-dot and evolutionary states from pre-main-sequence through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). It is significant that the SIREFF EOS produces solar models that both measure up

  20. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  1. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  2. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  3. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  4. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  6. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  7. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  8. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  9. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  10. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  11. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  12. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  13. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  14. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  15. Investigation of Non-Linear Dynamics of the Rock Massive,Using Seismological Catalogue data and Induction Electromagnetic Monitoring Data in a Rock Burst Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, O. Y.; Klimko, V. K.; Shipeev, O. V.

    2012-04-01

    Geological medium is an open dynamical system, which is influenced on different scales by natural and man-made impacts, which change the medium state and lead as a result to a complicated many ranked hierarchic evolution. That is the subject of geo synergetics. Paradigm of physical mesomechanics, which was advanced by academician Panin V.E. and his scientific school, which includes the synergetic approach is a constructive method for research and changing the state of heterogenic materials [1]. That result had been obtained on specimens of different materials. In our results of research of no stationary geological medium in a frame of natural experiments in real rock massifs, which are under high man-made influence it was shown, that the state dynamics can be revealed with use synergetics in hierarchic medium. Active and passive geophysical monitoring plays a very important role for research of the state of dynamical geological systems. It can be achieved by use electromagnetic and seismic fields. Our experience of that research showed the changing of the system state reveals on the space scales and times in the parameters, which are linked with the peculiarities of the medium of the second or higher ranks [2-5]. Results of seismological and electromagnetic information showed the mutual additional information on different space-time levels of rock massive state, which are energetic influenced by explosions, used in mining technology. It is revealed a change of nonlinearity degree in time of the massive state by active influence on it. The description of massive movement in a frame of linear dynamical system does not satisfy the practical situation. The received results are of great significance because for the first time we could find the coincidences with the mathematical theory of open systems and experimental natural results with very complicated structure. On that base we developed a new processing method for the seismological information which can be used in

  16. Geophysical anomalies associated with Imjin River Belt (IRB) in the middle Korean Peninsula revealed by geomagnetic depth sounding and seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Choi, H.; Noh, M.; Im, C.

    2012-12-01

    Imjin River Belt (IRB), located in the middle of the Korean Peninsula, has been one of long-standing geological issues because it is a very important tectonic link to understand a tectonic evolution of north-eastern Asia including China, Korea and Japan. Although the IRB has been considered as an extension of collision belt between the North China Block (NCB) and South China Block (SCB), there is little geophysical observation or study on this issue. In recent, we compiled a new induction arrow map for the Korean Peninsula, on the basis of long-period magneto-telluric (MT) data and the geomagnetic depth sounding data performed since the late 1990's. This newly compiled map has finer spatial resolution expecially in the middle area of the peninsula, which helps us to present the geophysical evidence that the IRB is the continuation or extension of the collision belt to the peninsula. The overall pattern of induction arrows in the peninsula appears to indicate a northwest-southeast direction, which is well-known 'sea effect' by the surrounding seas. However, the results of observations in the middle of the peninsula distinctly show an anomalous pattern around the IRB, which can not be explained only by the surrounding seas. This anomalous pattern may be attributed to enhanced conductivity associated with tectonic events that Imjin River Belt has experienced. The 3-D electromagnetic modeling results, considering both surrounding seas and enhanced conductivity of the IRB, explain well the anomalous observations around the IRB. Furthermore, recent seismological study demonstrates that focal mechanism around the IRB is mainly normal faulting event, which may be interpreted as the reactivation of paleo structures that are related to the post collisional lithospheric delamination. All the geophysical evidences convince us that the IRB is an extension of the collision belt between the NCB and SCB to the peninsula.

  17. Handbook on data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee Ullah

    2015-01-01

    This handbook offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research achievements in the field of data centers. Contributions from international, leading researchers and scholars offer topics in cloud computing, virtualization in data centers, energy efficient data centers, and next generation data center architecture.  It also comprises current research trends in emerging areas, such as data security, data protection management, and network resource management in data centers. Specific attention is devoted to industry needs associated with the challenges faced by data centers, such as various power, cooling, floor space, and associated environmental health and safety issues, while still working to support growth without disrupting quality of service. The contributions cut across various IT data technology domains as a single source to discuss the interdependencies that need to be supported to enable a virtualized, next-generation, energy efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly data cente...

  18. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    in order to relate the results to the service levels used in call centers. Furthermore, the generic nature of the approximation is demonstrated by applying it to a system incorporating a dynamic priority scheme. In the last paper Optimization of overflow policies in call centers, overflows between agent......The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...... in modern call centers allows for a high level of customization, but also induces complicated operational processes. The size of the industry together with the complex and labor intensive nature of large call centers motivates the research carried out to understand the underlying processes. The customizable...

  19. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  20. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  1. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  2. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Business with VA Acquisition, Logistics, & Construction Small & Veteran Business Programs VetBiz.gov Financial & Asset Enterprise Management Security Investigation Center/Background Clearances Freedom of Information ...

  3. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  4. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  5. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  6. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  7. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  8. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  9. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  10. Ref Tek Ultra-low Power Seismic Recorder With Low-cost High Speed Internet Telemetry U An Advanced Real-time Seismological Data Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, P.; Zimakov, L.; Rozhkov, M.

    The 3rd Generation Seismic Recorder, Model 130-01, has been designed to be easier to use - more compact, lighter in weight, lower power, and requires less maintenance than other recorders. Not only is the hardware optimized for field deployments, soft- ware tools as well have been specially developed to support both field and base station operation. The 130's case is a clamshell design, inherently waterproof, with easy access to all user features on the top of the unit. The 130 has 6 input/output connectors, an LCD display, and a removable lid on top of the case. There are two Channel input connectors on a 6-channel unit (only one on a 3-channel unit), a Terminal connector for setup and control, a Net connector combining Ethernet and Serial PPP for network access, a 12 VDC Power connector, and a GPS receiver connector. The LCD display allows the user to monitor the status of various sub systems within the 130 without having a terminal device attached. For storing large amounts of data the IBM MicrodriveTM is offered. User setup, control and status monitoring is done either with a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) (Palm OS compatible) using our Palm Field Controller (PFC) software or from a PC/workstation using our REF TEK Network Controller (RNC) GUI interface. StarBand VSAT is the premier two-way, always-on, high-speed satellite Internet ser- vice. StarBand means high-speed Internet without the constraints and congestion of land-based cable or telephone networks. StarBand uses a single satellite dish antenna for receiving and for sending dataUno telephone connection is needed. The hardware ° cost is much less than standard VSAT equipment with double or single hop transmis- sion. REF TEK protocol (RTP) provides end-to-end error-correcting data transmission and command/control. StarBandSs low cost VSAT provides two-way, always-on, high speed satellite Internet data availability. REF TEK and StarBand create the most ad- vanced real-time seismological data acquisition

  11. Disseminated Museum Displays and Participation of Students from Underrepresented Populations in Polar Research: Education and Outreach for Joint Projects in GPS and Seismology Solid Earth Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Wilson, T. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Johns, B.; Anderson, K.; Taber, J.

    2006-12-01

    Two Antarctic projects developed by solid earth scientists in the GPS and seismology communities have rich education and outreach activities focused on disseminating information gleaned from this research and on including students from underrepresented groups. Members of the UNAVCO and IRIS research consortia along with international partners from Australia, Canada, Chile, Germany, Italy, New Zealand and the U.K. aim to deploy an ambitious GPS/seismic network to observe the Antarctic glaciological and geologic system using a multidisciplinary and internationally coordinated approach. The second project supports this network. UNAVCO and IRIS are designing and building a reliable power and communication system for autonomous polar station operation which use the latest power and communication technologies for ease of deployment and reliable multi-year operation in severe polar environments. This project will disseminate research results through an IPY/POLENET web-based museum style display based on the next-generation "Museum Lite" capability primarily supported by IRIS. "Museum Lite" uses a standard PC, touch-screen monitor, and standard Internet browsers to exploit the scalability and access of the Internet and to provide customizable content in an interactive setting. The unit is suitable for research departments, public schools, and an assortment of public venues, and can provide wide access to real-time geophysical data, ongoing research, and general information. The POLENET group will work with members of the two consortia to provide content about the project and polar science in general. One unit is to be installed at Barrow's Ilisagvit College through the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium, one at McMurdo Station in Antarctica, and two at other sites to be determined (likely in New Zealand/Australia and in the U.S.). In January, 2006, Museum Lite exhibit was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Evaluation of this prototype is underway. These

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  13. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  14. From Periphery To Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2014-01-01

    the notions of Center/Periphery. As Hermans (2001) proposed, center and periphery are not fixed ‘I-positions’ of the self; in this vein, these notions are explored as relevant theoretical tools for addressing the developmental trajectories involved in the construction of scientific identities. In sum...

  15. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  16. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Danbury, CT 06810 203-748-6000 Accredited Since March 1998 Corvallis Birth & Women's Health Center Accredited 2314 NW Kings Blvd, Suite ... Washington, DC 20002 202-398-5520 Accredited Since March 2001 Flagstaff Birth and Women's Center Accredited 401 West Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ ...

  17. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.; Minor, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  18. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  19. Flare Seismology from SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Charles; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Hudson, Hugh

    2011-10-01

    Some flares release intense seismic transients into the solar interior. These transients are the sole instance we know of in which the Sun's corona exerts a conspicuous influence on the solar interior through flares. The desire to understand this phenomenon has led to ambitious efforts to model the mechanisms by which energy stored in coronal magnetic fields drives acoustic waves that penetrate deep into the Sun's interior. These mechanisms potentially involve the hydrodynamic response of the chromosphere to thick-target heating by high-energy particles, radiative exchange in the chromosphere and photosphere, and Lorentz-force transients to account for acoustic energies estimated up to at 5X10^27 erg and momenta of order 6X10^19 dyne sec. An understanding of these components of flare mechanics promises more than a powerful diagnostic for local helioseismology. It could give us fundamental new insight into flare mechanics themselves. The key is appropriate observations to match the models. Helioseismic observations have identified the compact sources of transient seismic emission at the foot points of flares. The Solar Dynamics Observatory is now giving us high quality continuum-brightness and Doppler observations of acoustically active flares from HMI concurrent with high-resolution EUV observations from AIA. Supported by HXR observations from RHESSI and a broad variety of other observational resources, the SDO promises a leading role in flare research in solar cycle 24.

  20. A discrimination problem from seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvers, E.

    1975-12-01

    Seismic discrimination between earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions is studied, utilizing magnitudes of two kinds from several seismic stations. A model is given first, where the mean values of the magnitudes are linear fuctions of a parameter describing event size. It is shown how the model parameters can be estimated after a minor restriction on their space. When the discrimination rule is derived from the model, a few different approaches are considered, and they are shown to coincide. It is found reasonabel to use a discriminant, which is linear in the magnitudes, and explicit formulas are obtained. The power of the method is expressed by a measure of separation between the alternatives, which also shows the importance of the individual magnitudes. Missing data is a frequent problem in practice, and the case is treated where there is a detection threshold for one of the magnitudes. The classicfication probabilities are computed when applying the rule to the available magnitudes, and they depend on the event size. The method is not optimal, and it is shown that it can be improved by using the technique of identification by negative evidence, i.e. by utilizing the threshold as upper bound for a missing magnitude. The model is one of general use, and the results thus have a wider applicability. (author)

  1. Computational seismology a practical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Igel, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    This volume is an introductory text to a range of numerical methods used today to simulate time-dependent processes in Earth science, physics, engineering, and many other fields. The physical problem of elastic wave propagation in 1D serves as a model system with which the various numerical methods are introduced and compared. The theoretical background is presented with substantial graphical material supporting the concepts. The results can be reproduced with the supplementary electronic material provided as Python codes embedded in Jupyter notebooks. The volume starts with a primer on the physics of elastic wave propagation, and a chapter on the fundamentals of parallel programming, computational grids, mesh generation, and hardware models. The core of the volume is the presentation of numerical solutions of the wave equation with six different methods: (1) the finite-difference method; (2) the pseudospectral method (Fourier and Chebyshev); (3) the linear finite-element method; (4) the spectral-element meth...

  2. Long Period Seismological Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-31

    in central Asia as observed at the high-gain long- period sites. Preliminary results from observations at Chiang Mai (CHG) show that the complexity...Preliminary results from observations at Chiang Mai (CHG) show that the complexity of the surface wave signals from many events in the Tadzhik-Kirgiz...and receivers. A number of Interesting features can be illustrated by examining portions of three selsmograms recorded at Chiang Mai (CHO

  3. Borehole Seismology: Fundamentals and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Because boring in itself is very expensive and instrumentation is required to endure high temperatures and pressures, deep borehole observation was accompanied by an economic risk. However, it has great advantages with respect to micro-earthquake observation, which is enriched with a short period vibration signal, because deep borehole observation greatly reduces short period noise. These kind advantages were explained by referring to the relationship between earthquake size and frequency range. Examples of seismic observation in a borehole in a geothermal field in El Salvador and a CO 2 confinement project in the western part of Canada were introduced. (authors)

  4. The reflection seismology measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecher, C.

    1987-01-01

    Even though data acquisition and data processing procedures have become more and more complex in recent decades, the end products of a reflection seismic survey have remained simple and illustrative. A seismic section resembles a geological cross-section and can be interpreted without in-depth knowledge provided that the basic principles behind the method are understood. This article attempts to convey some insight into the methodology without claiming to be scientifically exact or complete. (author)

  5. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  6. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  7. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  8. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  9. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Heon

    2008-01-01

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  10. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  11. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  12. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  13. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  14. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  16. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  17. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  18. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data Consumer Opinion Surveys About CPSC About CPSC Chairman Commissioners Contact / FAQ ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  20. Climate Prediction Center - Outlooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Web resources and services. HOME > Outreach > Publications > Climate Diagnostics Bulletin Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Tropics Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Forecast Climate Diagnostics

  1. Heart Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  2. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  3. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  4. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  5. Mobility Data Analytics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mobility Data Analytics Center aims at building a centralized data engine to efficiently manipulate : large-scale data for smart decision making. Integrating and learning the massive data are the key to : the data engine. The ultimate goal of underst...

  6. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  8. - Oklahoma Water Resources Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development Ag Business Community & Rural Development Crops Family & Consumer Sciences Gardening Family & Consumer Sciences Food & Ag Products Center Horticulture & Landscape Architecture & Landscape Architecture Natural Resource Ecology & Management Plant & Soil Sciences

  9. World data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapley, Alan H.; Hart, Pembroke J.

    One of the lasting heritages of the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) is the system of world data centers (WDC) through which there has been international exchange of a wide variety of geophysical data on a continuing basis. This voluntary exchange mechanism has been remarkably successful. The basic operating costs of the centers are provided by the host country. The international exchanges are mainly by barter. The data providers number in the thousands and the users in the tens of thousands.

  10. Easy access to geophysical data sets at the IRIS Data Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C.; Ahern, T.; Suleiman, Y.; Karstens, R.; Weertman, B.

    2012-04-01

    At the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) we primarily manage seismological data but also have other geophysical data sets for related fields including atmospheric pressure and gravity measurements and higher level data products derived from raw data. With a few exceptions all data managed by the IRIS DMC are openly available and we serve an international research audience. These data are available via a number of different mechanisms from batch requests submitted through email, web interfaces, near real time streams and more recently web services. Our initial suite of web services offer access to almost all of the raw data and associated metadata managed at the DMC. In addition, we offer services that apply processing to the data before it is sent to the user. Web service technologies are ubiquitous with support available in nearly every programming language and operating system. By their nature web services are programmatic interfaces, but by choosing a simple subset of web service methods we make our data available to a very broad user base. These interfaces will be usable by professional developers as well as non-programmers. Whenever possible we chose open and recognized standards. The data returned to the user is in a variety of formats depending on type, including FDSN SEED, QuakeML, StationXML, ASCII, PNG images and in some cases where no appropriate standard could be found a customized XML format. To promote easy access to seismological data for all researchers we are coordinating with international partners to define web service interfaces standards. Additionally we are working with key partners in Europe to complete the initial implementation of these services. Once a standard has been adopted and implemented at multiple data centers researchers will be able to use the same request tools to access data across multiple data centers. The web services that apply on-demand processing to requested data include the capability to apply instrument corrections and

  11. PACS for imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, T J

    2003-01-01

    PACS can be a difficult and confusing decision for any radiology provider, but it can be an even more dynamic question for an outpatient imaging center. Every center represents a unique situation and requires a specialized solution. Typically, most of what is said and discussed about PACS concentrates on solutions and requirements for hospital radiology facilities. Administrators of imaging centers have different problems from hospital administrators, and they need different answers. For imaging centers, the financial justification for PACS may be less immediate than for hospitals. The first thing that must be understood is that no PAC system can make a typical imaging center completely filmless, at least not for quite a while. A hospital has the ability to dictate to its internal referring physicians how a radiological study is delivered, whereas in an imaging center environment, the roles are very much reversed. Once the justification are made for the financial viability of PACS in an imaging center, the next question is how to finance the acquisition of PACS. The decision will depend on how you cost justify your PACS, as well as the shape of your business model, and it will come to a decision between capital purchase or contracting with an application service provider, or ASP. Historically, in the hospital-dominated marketplace, PAC systems have been treated as capital acquisitions. However, for most imaging center, owning the system is more of a problem than a benefit. ASPs increasingly represent a successful alternative for imaging centers. One of the biggest things to consider with PACS is how to store all of those images. There are typically two options, on-site and off-site, with a new "hybrid" option surfacing more recently. Each option has benefits for the user, but the benefits of off-site storage are increasing as the technology advances. Some of the benefits are data security and access. Other issues to address are HIPAA compliance, standardized

  12. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  13. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  14. National Earthquake Information Center Seismic Event Detections on Multiple Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J.; Yeck, W. L.; Benz, H.; Earle, P. S.; Soto-Cordero, L.; Johnson, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) monitors seismicity on local, regional, and global scales using automatic picks from more than 2,000 near-real time seismic stations. This presents unique challenges in automated event detection due to the high variability in data quality, network geometries and density, and distance-dependent variability in observed seismic signals. To lower the overall detection threshold while minimizing false detection rates, NEIC has begun to test the incorporation of new detection and picking algorithms, including multiband (Lomax et al., 2012) and kurtosis (Baillard et al., 2014) pickers, and a new bayesian associator (Glass 3.0). The Glass 3.0 associator allows for simultaneous processing of variably scaled detection grids, each with a unique set of nucleation criteria (e.g., nucleation threshold, minimum associated picks, nucleation phases) to meet specific monitoring goals. We test the efficacy of these new tools on event detection in networks of various scales and geometries, compare our results with previous catalogs, and discuss lessons learned. For example, we find that on local and regional scales, rapid nucleation of small events may require event nucleation with both P and higher-amplitude secondary phases (e.g., S or Lg). We provide examples of the implementation of a scale-independent associator for an induced seismicity sequence (local-scale), a large aftershock sequence (regional-scale), and for monitoring global seismicity. Baillard, C., Crawford, W. C., Ballu, V., Hibert, C., & Mangeney, A. (2014). An automatic kurtosis-based P-and S-phase picker designed for local seismic networks. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 104(1), 394-409. Lomax, A., Satriano, C., & Vassallo, M. (2012). Automatic picker developments and optimization: FilterPicker - a robust, broadband picker for real-time seismic monitoring and earthquake early-warning, Seism. Res. Lett. , 83, 531-540, doi: 10

  15. The USC Epigenome Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    The University of Southern California (USC, CA, USA) has a long tradition of excellence in epigenetics. With the recent explosive growth and technological maturation of the field of epigenetics, it became clear that a dedicated high-throughput epigenomic data production facility would be needed to remain at the forefront of epigenetic research. To address this need, USC launched the USC Epigenome Center as the first large-scale center in academics dedicated to epigenomic research. The Center is providing high-throughput data production for large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies, and developing novel analysis tools for epigenomic research. This unique facility promises to be a valuable resource for multidisciplinary research, education and training in genomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics, and translational medicine.

  16. International Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis Line Search Enter ... Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers ... Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  1. QUAD FAMILY CENTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PINAYEV, I.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that beam position monitors (BPM) utilizing signals from pickup electrodes (PUE) provide good resolution and relative accuracy. The absolute accuracy (i.e. position of the orbit in the vacuum chamber) is not very good due to the various reasons. To overcome the limitation it was suggested to use magnetic centers of quadrupoles for the calibration of the BPM [1]. The proposed method provides accuracy better then 200 microns for centering of the beam position monitors using modulation of the whole quadrupole family

  2. Lied Transplant Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  3. Starting an aphasia center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Roberta J

    2011-08-01

    Starting an aphasia center can be an enormous challenge. This article provides initial issues to review and consider when deciding whether starting a new organization is right for you. Determining the need for the program in your community, the best size and possible affiliation for the organization, and available resources, as well as developing a business plan, marketing the program, and building awareness in the community, are some of the factors that are discussed. Specific examples related to starting the Aphasia Center of California are provided. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ...

  5. Crib Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Department of Health (HRSA) NICHD text4baby ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  8. Distribution center consolidation games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.

    2005-01-01

    We study a location-inventory model to analyze the impact of consolidation of distribution centers on facility and inventory costs. We introduce a cooperative game and show that when demand processes are i.i.d. the core is non-empty, i.e., consolidation allows for a stable division of the minimal

  9. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  10. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  11. The Women's Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Catharine R.; And Others

    Barnard College has created a Women's Center that devotes itself to the task of reaffirming the dignity, autonomy, and equality of women. For too long society has held that women are less rational than men, less capable than men, and thus that educating women is less useful than educating men. Replacing myth with fact is the responsibility of…

  12. Climate Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Organization Enter Search Term(s): Search Search the CPC Go NCEP Quarterly Newsletter Climate Highlights U.S Climate-Weather El Niño/La Niña MJO Blocking AAO, AO, NAO, PNA Climatology Global Monsoons Expert

  13. Ocean Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Search Search For Go NWS All NOAA Weather Analysis & Forecasts of Commerce Ocean Prediction Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Analysis & Unified Surface Analysis Ocean Ocean Products Ice & Icebergs NIC Ice Products NAIS Iceberg Analysis

  14. National Pesticide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I protect my pets when using pesticides around them? More FAQs FAQ Comics Video FAQs From NPIC: Fact Sheets Videos Web Apps Podcasts Outreach Materials NPIC Professional Resources Social Media: National Pesticide Information Center Tweets by NPICatOSU Please read our ...

  15. Queering the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  16. Precision Joining Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. W.; Westphal, D. A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10-12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG&G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  17. Centering of quadrupole family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinayev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for finding the individual centers for a family of quadrupoles fed with a single power supply is described. The method is generalized for using the correctors adjacent to the quadrupoles. Theoretical background is presented as well as experimental data for the NSLS rings. The method accuracy is also discussed

  18. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  19. vCenter troubleshooting

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    The book is designed for the competent vCenter administrator or anyone who is responsible for the vSphere environment. It can be used as a guide by vSphere architects and VMware consultants for a successful vSphere solution. You should have good knowledge and an understanding of core elements and applications of the vSphere environment.

  20. Water Resources Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untitled Document  Search Welcome to the University of Hawai'i at Manoa Water Resources Research Center At WRRC we concentrate on addressing the unique water and wastewater management problems and issues elsewhere by researching water-related issues distinctive to these areas. We are Hawaii's link in a network

  1. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  2. The Precarious Question of Black Cultural Centers Versus Multicultural Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princes, Carolyn D. W.

    This paper discusses the role of black cultural centers on university campuses, focusing on whether black cultural centers or multicultural centers best meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body and society. It examines the historical role of black cultural centers as vehicles to promote educational opportunity, student retention, and…

  3. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  4. Stern-Center Potsdam; Stern-Center Potsdam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-07-01

    The ''Stern-Center Potsdam'' is a star-shaped shopping mall in the city center. [German] Das Stern-Center in Potsdam bietet als Einkaufszentrum vor den Toren Berlins Platz fuer eine Vielzahl von Geschaeften. Die sternfoermige Gebaeudestruktur des Centers bildet den Mittelpunkt des Stadtviertels 'Am Stern'. (orig.)

  5. NREL's Education Center Programs | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL's Education Center Programs NREL's Education Center Programs There are a variety of educational programs offered through NREL's education center to inspire our community to explore the science neighbors, campus and trail maps, and more. A photo of the NREL Education Center exterior. Programs for

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on

  7. Revisiting the student centered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    2018-01-01

    Has the orthodoxy of progressive pedagogy, or what praise as the student centered, become means of an overall managerial turn that erodes students’ freedom do learn? This is the main question in Bruce Macfarlane’s book Freedom to learn - The Threat to Student Academic Freedom and Why it Needs...... to be Reclaimed (2017). In eighth well-written chapters, Macfarlane explores an often-overlooked paradox in higher education teaching and learning: The idea of the student centered learning, deriving from humanist psychology and progressive pedagogy, has been hijacked by increased and continuous demands of bodily......, cognitive and emotional performance that restricts students’ freedom to develop as autonomous adults. Macfarlane’s catch 22 is, however, that his heritage from humanist psychology, i.e. the idea that we as humans are born with an inner potential that we should be free to realise though education...

  8. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  9. The Center is Everywhere

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, David H.

    2012-01-01

    "The Center is Everywhere" is a sculpture by Josiah McElheny, currently (through October 14, 2012) on exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The sculpture is based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using hundreds of glass crystals and lamps suspended from brass rods to represent the three-dimensional structure mapped by the SDSS through one of its 2000+ spectroscopic plugplates. This article describes the scientific ideas behind this sculpture, emphasizing the p...

  10. Evaluate Data Center Network Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur

    through a data center network, which is usually built with layer 2 switches and layer 3 routers. The topology of the data center network is crucial for latency in the data communication to and from the data center and between servers in the data center. Tests can be conducted to measure latency and other...... Engineering, scientists evaluate data center network topologies with an SDN-based (Software-Defined Networking) control framework measuring network performance – primarily latency. This can be used to plan data center scaling by testing how a new topology will function before changes are made. Data center...... performance parameters for different data center network topologies. It is however important that tests can be repeated and reproduced to have comparable information from the tests. There are, of course, many topologies that can be used for data center networks. At DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics...

  11. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  12. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  13. FFTF Work Control Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity

  14. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  15. Illinois Accelerator Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Cooper, Charlie A.

    The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) hosts a new accelerator development program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC provides access to Fermi's state-of-the-art facilities and technologies for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology. In addition to facilitating access to available existing Fermi infrastructure, the IARC Campus has a dedicated 36,000 ft2 Heavy Assembly Building (HAB) with all the infrastructure needed to develop, commission and operate new accelerators. Connected to the HAB is a 47,000 ft2 Office, Technology and Engineering (OTE) building, paid for by the state, that has office, meeting, and light technical space. The OTE building, which contains the Accelerator Physics Center, and nearby Accelerator and Technical divisions provide IARC collaborators with unique access to world class expertise in a wide array of accelerator technologies. At IARC scientists and engineers from Fermilab and academia work side by side with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security.

  16. Phenomenological three center model

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Gherghescu, R A; Nagame, Y; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results on ternary fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf suggest the existence of a short-lived quasi-molecular state. We present a three-center phenomenological model able to explain such a state by producing a new minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. The shape parametrization chosen by us allows to describe the essential geometry of the systems in terms of one independent coordinate, namely, the distance between the heavy fragment centers. The shell correction (also treated phenomenologically) only produces quantitative effects; qualitatively it is not essential for the new minimum. Half-lives of some quasi-molecular states which could be formed in sup 1 sup 0 B accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 sup , sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 Fm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 No, and sup 2 sup 6 sup 2 Rf are roughly estimated. (authors)

  17. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Kenneth F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  18. Rapid guiding center calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1995-04-01

    Premature loss of high energy particles, and in particular fusion alpha particles, is very deleterious in a fusion reactor. Because of this it is necessary to make long-time simulations, on the order of the alpha particle slowing down time, with a number of test particles sufficient to give predictions with reasonable statistical accuracy. Furthermore it is desirable to do this for a large number of equilibria with different characteristic magnetic field ripple, to best optimize engineering designs. In addition, modification of the particle distribution due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes such as the saw tooth mode present in the plasma can be important, and this effect requires additional simulation. Thus the large number of necessary simulations means any increase of computing speed in guiding center codes is an important improvement in predictive capability. Previous guiding center codes using numerical equilibria such as ORBIT evaluated the local field strength and ripple magnitude using Lagrangian interpolation on a grid. Evaluation of these quantities four times per time step (using a fourth order Runge-Kutta routine) constitutes the major computational effort of the code. In the present work the authors represent the field quantities through an expansion in terms of pseudo-cartesian coordinates formed from the magnetic coordinates. The simplicity of the representation gives four important advantages over previous methods

  19. Recombination luminescence from H centers and conversion of H centers into I centers in alkali iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzina, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The study is aimed at the search for H-plus-electron centers of luminescence and the investigation of the conversion of H- into I centers by the luminescence of H-plus-electron centers in alkali iodide crystals. KI, RbI and NaI crystals were studied at 12 K. H and F centers were created by irradiation with ultraviolet light corresponding to the absorption band of anion excitons. Then the excitation of electron centers by red light irradiation was followed. The spectra of stimulated recombination luminescence were studied. The luminescence of H-plus- electron centers had been observed and the conclusion was made that this center was formed on immobile H centers. In case of stable H centers the optically stimulated conversion of H centers into I centers occurs. The assumption is advanced on the spontaneous annihilation of near placed unstable F, H centers which leads to the creation of H-plus-electron luminescence centers and to the spontaneous H-I-centers conversion [ru

  20. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  1. VT Designated Growth Center Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Growth centers aim to align public infrastructure and private building investments with a local framework of policies and regulations to ensure that 20 years of...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... ADMINISTRATION Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ... Advanced Search Where to Get Help PTSD Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enter to expand a main menu option (Health, Benefits, etc). 3. To enter and activate the submenu ... Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's ... Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ...

  6. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from ... Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside ...

  8. National Center for Biotechnology Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to NCBI Sign Out NCBI National Center for Biotechnology Information Search database All Databases Assembly Biocollections BioProject ... Search Welcome to NCBI The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access ...

  9. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities

  10. Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC) is a 39,000-square-foot facility that doubles the warfare center's high-secured performance assessment capabilities. DMAC...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web ...

  13. Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As seen on the center's logo, the mission statement for FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) reads: "Protecting Human and Animal Health." To achieve this broad...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... crisis or having thoughts of suicide, visit VeteransCrisisLine.net for more resources. Close this modal

  15. VT Designated Village Centers Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This community revitalization program helps maintain or evolve small to medium-sized historic centers with existing civic and commercial buildings. The designation...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional ... Locations Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers VA » Health Care » PTSD: National Center for ...

  17. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy ... Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sports Clinic Training - Exposure - Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention ... and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s ...

  2. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Prostate Disease Research is the only free-standing prostate cancer research center in the U.S. This 20,000 square foot state-of-the-art basic science...

  3. School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care group, such as a community health center, hospital, or health department. A few are run by the school district itself. Centers often get money from charities and the government so they can give care ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis ... Rehabilitation & Employment Dependents' Educational Assistance Survivor Benefits Home Loans Life Insurance Appeals Modernization Burials & Memorials Cemetery Services ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ... Search Tips Modify Your Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  7. Web Services and Other Enhancements at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, D. S.; Zuzlewski, S.; Allen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) provides data archive and distribution services for seismological and geophysical data sets that encompass northern California. The NCEDC is enhancing its ability to deliver rapid information through Web Services. NCEDC Web Services use well-established web server and client protocols and REST software architecture to allow users to easily make queries using web browsers or simple program interfaces and to receive the requested data in real-time rather than through batch or email-based requests. Data are returned to the user in the appropriate format such as XML, RESP, or MiniSEED depending on the service, and are compatible with the equivalent IRIS DMC web services. The NCEDC is currently providing the following Web Services: (1) Station inventory and channel response information delivered in StationXML format, (2) Channel response information delivered in RESP format, (3) Time series availability delivered in text and XML formats, (4) Single channel and bulk data request delivered in MiniSEED format. The NCEDC is also developing a rich Earthquake Catalog Web Service to allow users to query earthquake catalogs based on selection parameters such as time, location or geographic region, magnitude, depth, azimuthal gap, and rms. It will return (in QuakeML format) user-specified results that can include simple earthquake parameters, as well as observations such as phase arrivals, codas, amplitudes, and computed parameters such as first motion mechanisms, moment tensors, and rupture length. The NCEDC will work with both IRIS and the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) to define a uniform set of web service specifications that can be implemented by multiple data centers to provide users with a common data interface across data centers. The NCEDC now hosts earthquake catalogs and waveforms from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) monitoring networks. These

  8. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  9. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  10. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.T. (ed.)

    1982-09-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a representative Western site. The site selected for this conceptual study, an area of about 50 square miles, is located 15 miles south of Green River, Utah. The conceptual NEC would consist of nine nuclear electric generating units, arranged on the site in three clusters of three reactors each (triads), separated by about 2 1/2 miles. Of the total electric output of 11,250 MWe that the NEC could produce, about 82% is assumed to be transmitted out of Utah to Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and California. The technical engineering issues studied included geology and seismology, plant design, low-level radioactive waste disposal, transmission, and construction schedules and costs. Socioeconomic issues included were demographics, land use, community service needs, and fiscal impacts. Environmental considerations included terrestrial and aquatic ecology, visual impact, and secondary population impacts. Radiological issues were concerned with the safety and risks of an NEC and an on-site low-level waste facility. Institutional issues included methods of ownership, taxation, implications of energy export, and water allocation. The basic finding was that an NEC would be technically feasible, but a number of socioeconomic and institutional issues would require resolution before a Western regional NEC could be considered a viable power plant siting option.

  11. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a representative Western site. The site selected for this conceptual study, an area of about 50 square miles, is located 15 miles south of Green River, Utah. The conceptual NEC would consist of nine nuclear electric generating units, arranged on the site in three clusters of three reactors each (triads), separated by about 2 1/2 miles. Of the total electric output of 11,250 MWe that the NEC could produce, about 82% is assumed to be transmitted out of Utah to Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and California. The technical engineering issues studied included geology and seismology, plant design, low-level radioactive waste disposal, transmission, and construction schedules and costs. Socioeconomic issues included were demographics, land use, community service needs, and fiscal impacts. Environmental considerations included terrestrial and aquatic ecology, visual impact, and secondary population impacts. Radiological issues were concerned with the safety and risks of an NEC and an on-site low-level waste facility. Institutional issues included methods of ownership, taxation, implications of energy export, and water allocation. The basic finding was that an NEC would be technically feasible, but a number of socioeconomic and institutional issues would require resolution before a Western regional NEC could be considered a viable power plant siting option

  12. Virtual Meteorological Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Brinzila

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A virtual meteorological center, computer based with Internet possibility transmission of the information is presented. Circumstance data is collected with logging field meteorological station. The station collects and automatically save data about the temperature in the air, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and wind direction, rain gauge, solar radiation and air quality. Also can perform sensors test, analyze historical data and evaluate statistical information. The novelty of the system is that it can publish data over the Internet using LabVIEW Web Server capabilities and deliver a video signal to the School TV network. Also the system performs redundant measurement of temperature and humidity and was improved using new sensors and an original signal conditioning module.

  13. Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingchao; Akhmanova, Anna

    2017-10-06

    The organization of microtubule networks is crucial for controlling chromosome segregation during cell division, for positioning and transport of different organelles, and for cell polarity and morphogenesis. The geometry of microtubule arrays strongly depends on the localization and activity of the sites where microtubules are nucleated and where their minus ends are anchored. Such sites are often clustered into structures known as microtubule-organizing centers, which include the centrosomes in animals and spindle pole bodies in fungi. In addition, other microtubules, as well as membrane compartments such as the cell nucleus, the Golgi apparatus, and the cell cortex, can nucleate, stabilize, and tether microtubule minus ends. These activities depend on microtubule-nucleating factors, such as γ-tubulin-containing complexes and their activators and receptors, and microtubule minus end-stabilizing proteins with their binding partners. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on how such factors work together to control microtubule organization in different systems.

  14. Interactive design center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  15. Center for dielectric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Biggers, J. V.

    1984-05-01

    This report focuses upon the parts of the Center program which have drawn most extensively upon Navy funds. In the basic study of polarization processes in high K dielectrics, major progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms in relaxor ferroelectric in the perovskite structure families. A new effort is also being mounted to obtain more precise evaluation of the internal stress effects in fine grained barium titanate. Related to reliability, studies of the effects of induced macro-defects are described, and preparation for the evaluation of space charge by internal potential distribution measurements discussed. To develop new processing methods for very thin dielectric layers, a new type of single barrier layer multilayer is discussed, and work on the thermal evaporation of oriented crystalline antimony sulphur iodide describe.

  16. The satellite situation center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, M.J.; Sawyer, D.M.; Vette, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities

  17. Citizen centered design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Mulder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Today architecture has to design for rapidly changing futures, in a citizen-centered way. That is, architecture needs to embrace meaningful design. Societal challenges ask for a new paradigm in city-making, which combines top-down public management with bottom-up social innovation to reach meaningful design. The biggest challenge is indeed to embrace a new collaborative attitude, a participatory approach, and to have the proper infrastructure that supports this social fabric. Participatory design and transition management are future-oriented, address people and institutions. Only through understanding people in context and the corresponding dynamics, one is able to design for liveable and sustainable urban environments, embracing the human scale.

  18. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Christopher M.; Ross, Larry; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  19. The IRIS Data Management Center: Enabling Access to Observational Time Series Spanning Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T.; Benson, R.; Trabant, C.

    2009-04-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to operate the facilities to generate, archive, and distribute seismological data to research communities in the United States and internationally. The IRIS Data Management System (DMS) is responsible for the ingestion, archiving, curation and distribution of these data. The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) manages data from more than 100 permanent seismic networks, hundreds of temporary seismic deployments as well as data from other geophysical observing networks such as magnetotelluric sensors, ocean bottom sensors, superconducting gravimeters, strainmeters, surface meteorological measurements, and in-situ atmospheric pressure measurements. The IRIS DMC has data from more than 20 different types of sensors. The IRIS DMC manages approximately 100 terabytes of primary observational data. These data are archived in multiple distributed storage systems that insure data availability independent of any single catastrophic failure. Storage systems include both RAID systems of greater than 100 terabytes as well as robotic tape robots of petabyte capacity. IRIS performs routine transcription of the data to new media and storage systems to insure the long-term viability of the scientific data. IRIS adheres to the OAIS Data Preservation Model in most cases. The IRIS data model requires the availability of metadata describing the characteristics and geographic location of sensors before data can be fully archived. IRIS works with the International Federation of Digital Seismographic Networks (FDSN) in the definition and evolution of the metadata. The metadata insures that the data remain useful to both current and future generations of earth scientists. Curation of the metadata and time series is one of the most important activities at the IRIS DMC. Data analysts and an automated quality assurance system monitor the quality of the incoming data. This insures data

  20. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  1. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. This paper discusses a detailed Study Plan which was prepared describing planned geochronology and field studies to assess the chronology of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center and other Quaternary volcanic centers in the region. A paper was published discussing the geomorphic and soil evidence for a late Pleistocene or Holoceno age for the main cone of the center. The purpose of this paper was to expose the ideas concerning the age of the Lathrop Wells center to scientific scrutiny. Additionally, field evidence was described suggesting the Lathrop Wells center may have formed from multiple eruptive events with significant intervals of no activity between events. This interpretation breaks with established convention in the volcanological literature that small volume basalt centers are monogenetic

  2. The ATOMKI Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Kormany, Z.; Berzi, I.; Hunyadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 a new division was established in our institute: the ATOMKI Accelerator Center (AAC). Before this time the facilities and staff of AAC belonged to other departments of the institute. The re-organization however, was necessary. It was understood that the translocation of all the accelerators into a centralized unit is advantageous in numerous fields. Here we just mention some of them. The submission of any instrumentation type proposal (EU or domestic) will be easier and has a higher chance to be supported. The organization and distribution of the beamtimes will be more equal and optimal. The usage of the maintenance and spare tools can became better and cheaper. The operating staff (cca. 20 person) can serve at more than one accelerator and the teams can help each other. The accelerator center actually became a fourth new basic unit of the institute besides the three traditional scientific divisions (see the Atomki homepage for the organization chart). The following six main facilities belong to the accelerator center: Cyclotron; VdG-5 accelerator; VdG-1 accelerator; ECR ion source; Isotope separator; Tandetron (under installation). In figure 1 the placements of these machines are shown in an artistic 3D map of the Atomki. The table 1 summarizes the main parameters of the accelerators. More detailed technical specification of the machines can be found in the new homepage of the center. In 2009 all the accelerators operated as scheduled, safely and without major breakdowns. After the experiences in the first months it can be concluded that the new center works well both for technical and human point of views. In the next sub-chapters the 2009 operation and development details of the individual accelerators are summarized. Cyclotron operation. The operation of the cyclotron in 2009 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 2009 hours; the time

  3. 'Motor control center obsolescence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A significant and growing problem within the global nuclear industry is the aging of motor control center (MCC) components. MCC's have a very important role in the safety and critical to generation requirements of a nuclear power plant. Although many OEM's MCC's such as ITE/Telemechanique, GE, Westinghouse, Cutler Hammer, Klockner Moeller, etc. have been used throughout the global nuclear industry, they all have one common aspect obsolescence. Obsolescence of various components within the MCC's such as molded case circuit breakers, starters, relays, heaters, contactors, etc. are impacting the reliability of the MCC to serve its intended function. The paper will discuss the options which the nuclear industry is faced with to increase the reliability of the MCC's while maintaining design control, qualification and meeting budget constraints. The options as listed below shall be discussed in detail with examples to enhance the readers understanding of the situation: 1) Component by component replacement: The hurdles associated with trying to find equivalent components to replace the obsolete components while still worki (mechanically and electrically) in the original cubicle will be presented. 2) Complete MCC cubicle with new internal components replacement: The process of supplying a replacement cubicle, with all new internal components and new door to replace the original cubicle will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of the advantages and dis-advantages of the two methods to bring the MCC to an as new condition with the overall goal of increasing reliability. (author)

  4. The DESY Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waloschek, P.

    1988-01-01

    On November 12, 1964, the 6 GeV electrons synchrotron and the associated utility facilities were dedicated for regular operation. Since that date, the DESY Research Center, the German Electron Synchrotron in Hamburg, has offered to scientists from all over the world unique facilities in which to study the smallest constituents of matter. At present, some 580 physicists participate in DESY's research work on particle physics and high energy physics. Most of them are university teachers, a great many come from abroad. Their home institutions make considerable contributions to setting up the measuring equipment. Another 500 physicists annually make use of the extensive synchrotron radiation facilities available at DESY. DESY is one of the thirteen national research laboratories in the Federal Republic of Germany; its annual government grants for operation and personnel (1300 staff members in 1988) amount to some DM 150 million. In addition, some DM 950 million will be invested into the construction of the new HERA facility between 1984 and 1990, of which 15% will be contributed by foreign institutions. The ordinary budget of DESY is paid 90% by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) and 10% by the city of Hamburg. (orig.)

  5. Space Operations Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  6. Energy Efficiency Center - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obryk, E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) activities have been concentrated on Energy Efficiency Network (SEGE), education and training of energy auditors. EEC has started studies related to renewable fuels (bio fuel, wastes) and other topics related to environment protection. EEC has continued close collaboration with Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway. It has been organized and conducted Seminar and Workshop on ''How to Reduce Energy and Water Cost in Higher Education Buildings'' for general and technical managers of the higher education institutions. This Seminar was proceeded by the working meeting on energy efficiency strategy in higher education at the Ministry of National Education. EEC has worked out proposal for activities of Cracow Regional Agency for Energy Efficiency and Environment and has made offer to provide services for this Agency in the field of training, education and consulting. The vast knowledge and experiences in the field of energy audits have been used by the members of EEC in lecturing at energy auditors courses authorized by the National Energy Efficiency Agency (KAPE). Altogether 20 lectures have been delivered. (author)

  7. Modeling of a historical earthquake in Erzincan, Turkey (Ms 7.8, in 1939) using regional seismological information obtained from a recent event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Shaghayegh; Askan, Aysegul

    2018-04-01

    Located within a basin structure, at the conjunction of North East Anatolian, North Anatolian and Ovacik Faults, Erzincan city center (Turkey) is one of the most hazardous regions in the world. Combination of the seismotectonic and geological settings of the region has resulted in series of significant seismic activities including the 1939 (Ms 7.8) as well as the 1992 (Mw = 6.6) earthquakes. The devastative 1939 earthquake occurred in the pre-instrumental era in the region with no available local seismograms. Thus, a limited number of studies exist on that earthquake. However, the 1992 event, despite the sparse local network at that time, has been studied extensively. This study aims to simulate the 1939 Erzincan earthquake using available regional seismic and geological parameters. Despite several uncertainties involved, such an effort to quantitatively model the 1939 earthquake is promising, given the historical reports of extensive damage and fatalities in the area. The results of this study are expressed in terms of anticipated acceleration time histories at certain locations, spatial distribution of selected ground motion parameters and felt intensity maps in the region. Simulated motions are first compared against empirical ground motion prediction equations derived with both local and global datasets. Next, anticipated intensity maps of the 1939 earthquake are obtained using local correlations between peak ground motion parameters and felt intensity values. Comparisons of the estimated intensity distributions with the corresponding observed intensities indicate a reasonable modeling of the 1939 earthquake.

  8. Satellite medical centers project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  9. Production and Distribution Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Steel, Coca Cola , Standard Oil of Ohio, and Martin Marietta have been involved in joint research with members of the Center. The number of Faculty...permitted the establishment of the Center and supports its continuing development. The Center has also received research sponsorship from the Joint...published relating to results developed within the PDRC under Offce of Naval Research sponsorship . These reports are listed in Appendix A. Many of these

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  13. Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR) was established as a research organization to promote successful return to duty and community reintegration of...

  14. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget ... Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  20. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...