WorldWideScience

Sample records for vehicle lightning protection

  1. NASA Manned Launch Vehicle Lightning Protection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Matthew B.; Jones, Steven R.; Mack, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) relied heavily on lightning avoidance to protect launch vehicles and crew from lightning effects. As NASA transitions from the Space Shuttle to the new Constellation family of launch vehicles and spacecraft, NASA engineers are imposing design and construction standards on the spacecraft and launch vehicles to withstand both the direct and indirect effects of lightning. A review of current Space Shuttle lightning constraints and protection methodology will be presented, as well as a historical review of Space Shuttle lightning requirements and design. The Space Shuttle lightning requirements document, NSTS 07636, Lightning Protection, Test and Analysis Requirements, (originally published as document number JSC 07636, Lightning Protection Criteria Document) was developed in response to the Apollo 12 lightning event and other experiences with NASA and the Department of Defense launch vehicles. This document defined the lightning environment, vehicle protection requirements, and design guidelines for meeting the requirements. The criteria developed in JSC 07636 were a precursor to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) lightning standards. These SAE standards, along with Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) DO-160, Environmental Conditions and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment, are the basis for the current Constellation lightning design requirements. The development and derivation of these requirements will be presented. As budget and schedule constraints hampered lightning protection design and verification efforts, the Space Shuttle elements waived the design requirements and relied on lightning avoidance in the form of launch commit criteria (LCC) constraints and a catenary wire system for lightning protection at the launch pads. A better understanding of the lightning environment has highlighted the vulnerability of the protection schemes and associated risk to the vehicle

  2. Lightning Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Kit-built airplanes are more affordable because they are assembled by the owner and do not require Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. The Glasair III, is an advanced technology homebuilt, constructed of a fiberglass and graphite fiber composite material, and equipped with digital instruments. Both technologies make the airplane more susceptible to lightning effects. When Glasair manufacturer, Stoddard-Hamilton, decided that lightning protection would enable more extensive instrument flight and make the plane more marketable, they proposed a joint development program to NASA Langley Research Center (LAR). Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Langley contractors designed and tested a lightning protection system, and the Glasair III-LP became the first kit-built composite aircraft to be lightning tested and protection-verified under FAA guidelines for general aviation aircraft.

  3. Faraday Cage Protects Against Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafferis, W.; Hasbrouck, R. T.; Johnson, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Faraday cage protects electronic and electronically actuated equipment from lightning. Follows standard lightning-protection principles. Whether lightning strikes cage or cables running to equipment, current canceled or minimized in equipment and discharged into ground. Applicable to protection of scientific instruments, computers, radio transmitters and receivers, and power-switching equipment.

  4. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prior to an electrical storm. (4) Testing and inspection. Lightning protection systems shall be visually... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning...

  5. Lightning protection of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, T.; Brask, M.H. [DEFU (Denmark); Jensen, F.V.; Raben, N. [SEAS (Denmark); Saxov, J. [Nordjyllandsvaerket (Denmark); Nielsen, L. [Vestkraft (Denmark); Soerensen, P.E. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Lightning damage to wind turbines is a serious problem for Danish power companies, who have experienced some cases with very costly lightning damage and a large number of cases with minor damage. The most costly cases include one catastrophic damage to an entire wind turbine, and several cases of destruction of blades, main bearings, generators and control systems. Over the years there have been several hundreds of cases with minor damage - typically damage and interruptions of the control and communication systems, or the power systems. The Danish power companies anticipate that the lightning threat will be even bigger for the large off-shore wind turbine installations that are currently being planned in Denmark. Furthermore, it is known from the off-shore wind turbines at Vindeby in Denmark that the costs of inspection and particularly repair work must be expected to be much higher off-shore as compared to wind turbines on land. These considerations was the background for a two year project concerned with investigation of lighting damages and with the formulation of a DEFU Recommendation for lightning protection of wind turbines, which was published in January 1999. The project was funded by the Danish power companies Elsam, Eltra, Elkraft and by DEFU. (au)

  6. Launch pad lightning protection effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmann, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Using the striking distance theory that lightning leaders will strike the nearest grounded point on their last jump to earth corresponding to the striking distance, the probability of striking a point on a structure in the presence of other points can be estimated. The lightning strokes are divided into deciles having an average peak current and striking distance. The striking distances are used as radii from the points to generate windows of approach through which the leader must pass to reach a designated point. The projections of the windows on a horizontal plane as they are rotated through all possible angles of approach define an area that can be multiplied by the decile stroke density to arrive at the probability of strokes with the window average striking distance. The sum of all decile probabilities gives the cumulative probability for all strokes. The techniques can be applied to NASA-Kennedy launch pad structures to estimate the lightning protection effectiveness for the crane, gaseous oxygen vent arm, and other points. Streamers from sharp points on the structure provide protection for surfaces having large radii of curvature. The effects of nearby structures can also be estimated.

  7. Lightning Protection and Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Szatkowski, George N. (Inventor); Woodard, Marie (Inventor); Nguyen, Truong X. (Inventor); Ely, Jay J. (Inventor); Wang, Chuantong (Inventor); Mielnik, John J. (Inventor); Koppen, Sandra V. (Inventor); Smith, Laura J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A lightning protection and detection system includes a non-conductive substrate material of an apparatus; a sensor formed of a conductive material and deposited on the non-conductive substrate material of the apparatus. The sensor includes a conductive trace formed in a continuous spiral winding starting at a first end at a center region of the sensor and ending at a second end at an outer corner region of the sensor, the first and second ends being open and unconnected. An electrical measurement system is in communication with the sensor and receives a resonant response from the sensor, to perform detection, in real-time, of lightning strike occurrences and damage therefrom to the sensor and the non-conductive substrate material.

  8. Electrical Characterizations of Lightning Strike Protection Techniques for Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Mielnik, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The growing application of composite materials in commercial aircraft manufacturing has significantly increased the risk of aircraft damage from lightning strikes. Composite aircraft designs require new mitigation strategies and engineering practices to maintain the same level of safety and protection as achieved by conductive aluminum skinned aircraft. Researchers working under the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project are investigating lightning damage on composite materials to support the development of new mitigation, diagnosis & prognosis techniques to overcome the increased challenges associated with lightning protection on composite aircraft. This paper provides an overview of the electrical characterizations being performed to support IVHM lightning damage diagnosis research on composite materials at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Daniel P [Chelsea, VT; Petter, Jeffrey K [Williston, VT

    2008-05-27

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  10. ASSESSMENT TO EFFECTIVENESS OF THE NEW EARLY STREAMER EMISSION LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chen, Yen-Hong; Lin, Kai-Jan; M. Li, Yu-Chu

    2017-01-01

    A novel early streamer emission (ESE) lightning air terminal system is designed and fabricated. By comparing the intercepted artificial lightning striking numbers of the new ESE lightning protection device and the conventional lightning rod (CLR) lightning protection device in laboratory, the effectiveness of intercepting the artificial lightning strokes by the new ESE lightning protection device is superior to that by the conventional lightning rod lightning protection device. A modified Tes...

  11. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  12. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  13. Electrostatic protection of the solar power satellite and rectenna. Part 2: Lightning protection of the rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations and laboratory tests were used to evaluate the hazard posed by lightning flashes to ground on the Solar Power Satellite rectenna and to make recommendations on a lightning protection system for the rectenna. The distribution of lightning over the lower 48 of the continental United States was determined, as were the interactions of lightning with the rectenna and the modes in which those interactions could damage the rectenna. Lightning protection was both required and feasible. Several systems of lightning protection were considered and evaluated. These included two systems that employed lightning rods of different lengths and placed on top of the rectenna's billboards and a third, distribution companies; it consists of short lightning rods all along the length of each billboard that are connected by a horizontal wire above the billboard. The distributed lightning protection system afforded greater protection than the other systems considered and was easier to integrate into the rectenna's structural design.

  14. Wind Turbine Lightning Protection Project: 1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiff, B.

    2002-05-01

    A lightning protection research and support program was instituted by NREL to help minimize lightning damage to wind turbines in the United States. This paper provides the results of a field test program, an evaluation of protection on selected turbines, and a literature search as well as the dissemination of the accumulated information.

  15. Properties of Lightning Strike Protection Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Martin

    Composite materials are being increasingly used by many industries. In the case of aerospace companies, those materials are installed on their aircraft to save weight, and thus, fuel costs. These aircraft are lighter, but the loss of electrical conductivity makes aircraft vulnerable to lightning strikes, which hit commercial aircrafts on average once per year. This makes lightning strike protection very important, and while current metallic expanded copper foils offer good protection, they increase the weight of composites. Therefore, under the CRIAQ COMP-502 project, a team of industrial partners and academic researchers are investigating new conductive coatings with the following characteristics: High electromagnetic protection, high mechanical resistance, good environmental protection, manufacturability and moderate cost. The main objectives of this thesis, as part of this project, was to determine the main characteristics, such as electrical and tribomechanical properties, of conductive coatings on composite panels. Their properties were also to be tested after destructive tests such as current injection and environmental testing. Bombardier Aerospace provided the substrate, a composite of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix, and the current commercial product, a surfacing film that includes an expanded copper foil used to compare with the other coatings. The conductive coatings fabricated by the students are: silver nanoparticles inside a binding matrix (PEDOT:PSS or a mix of Epoxy and PEDOT:PSS), silvered carbon nanofibers embedded in the surfacing film, cold sprayed tin, graphene oxide functionalized with silver nanowires, and electroless plated silver. Additionally as part of the project and thesis, magnetron sputtered aluminum coated samples were fabricated. There are three main types of tests to characterize the conductive coatings: electrical, mechanical and environmental. Electrical tests consist of finding the sheet resistance and specific resistivity

  16. Lightning Protection System to the Indian Satellite Launch Pad

    OpenAIRE

    Nagabushana, GR; Thomas, Joy; Kumar, Udaya; Rao, Venkateshwara D; Rao, Panduranga PV

    1999-01-01

    Any satellite launch mission forms a complex and expensive process. Intensive care and precautions are to be taken for a safe and successful launch. Also, the satellite launch system forms a tall structure standing on a plane terrain. As a result, a lightning strike rate to it becomes more probable. Therefore, extensive care needs to be taken in shielding the launch system against natural lightning. Lightning protection systems built with differing principles have been in use at different lau...

  17. Characteristics of Winter Lightning that Occurred on a Windmill and its Lightning Protection Tower in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daohong; Takagi, Nobuyuki

    We have observed lightning that struck a wind turbine and its neighboring lightning-protection tower during the past six winter seasons (2005 to 2010) using various lightning observation instruments. Our results show that the upward lightning from high structures can be classified into self-initiated and other-triggered types according to whether there is a discharge activity prior to the upward lightning. Furthermore, we found that although other-triggered upward lightning can start at a relatively low wind speed, self-initiated upward lightning always started either from the stationary tower under a larger wind speeds or from a rotating wind turbine blade. It appears that the wind does have considerable effect in assisting the initiation of an upward leader. In addition, we found that the self-initiated upward positive leaders from structures with different effective heights exhibited remarkably different initial speeds. Higher structures tend to initiate faster upward leaders. Finally, we discussed the pulse discharges observed in the very initial stages of positive upward leaders and how to protect structures from upward lightning as well.

  18. Direct Write Lightning Protection and Damage Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to improve conventional lightning strike protection in composite aircraft and proposes a novel method to monitor structures for damage upon...

  19. Electromagnetic computation methods for lightning surge protection studies

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first to consolidate current research and to examine the theories of electromagnetic computation methods in relation to lightning surge protection. The authors introduce and compare existing electromagnetic computation methods such as the method of moments (MOM), the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC), the finite element method (FEM), the transmission-line modeling (TLM) method, and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The application of FDTD method to lightning protection studies is a topic that has matured through many practical applications in the past decade, and the authors explain the derivation of Maxwell's equations required by the FDTD, and modeling of various electrical components needed in computing lightning electromagnetic fields and surges with the FDTD method. The book describes the application of FDTD method to current and emerging problems of lightning surge protection of continuously more complex installations, particularly in critical infrastructures of e...

  20. Lightning protection for wind turbines in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuan Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy has become increasingly important in the total electrical energy supply mix in Vietnam over the last few years. Small, kW turbines were installed in isolated areas a decade ago, while wind farms of several MW to few hundred MW are now being connected directly to national grid, with many additional projects in planning or under construction to fulfill an objective of 6% of the total installed capacity by 2030 (approximately 6200 MW of wind energy component. The increase in wind farm generation results in increased damage from lightning. In this paper, the annual frequency of lightning strikes to wind turbines in Vietnam is calculated using electrogeometric model. Reported lightning incidents to three major wind farms in Vietnam are summarized. Possible causes of failure are discussed, and an EMTP simulation for each incident was performed accordingly. The simulations suggest the failure mechanisms as well the potential of improved grounding to reduce lightning induced damage in future windfarms.

  1. Protecting Electronic Equipment in Composite Structures against Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Blaj, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Damage resulting from an interaction with lightning current in a military naval vessel, especially in a conflict zone and at the time of a conflict, which leads to the incapacitation of vital activities on the ship, is unacceptable. Because many potential conflict zones are in littoral areas, and because of the increase in lightning activity, both now and expected in the years to come, the provision of protection for naval vessels sailing in those waters should be a high priority. The fact th...

  2. Synthesis and testing of a conducting polymeric composite material for lightning strike protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, A.; Krukiewicz, K.; Turczyn, R.; Sul, P.; Łasica, A.; Catalanotti, G.; Bilewicz, M.

    2017-02-01

    Lightning strike protection is one of the important issues in the modern maintenance problems of aircraft. This is due to a fact that the most of exterior elements of modern aircraft is manufactured from polymeric composites which are characterized by isolating electrical properties, and thus cannot carry the giant electrical charge when the lightning strikes. This causes serious damage of an aircraft structure and necessity of repairs and tests before returning a vehicle to operation. In order to overcome this problem, usually metallic meshes are immersed in the polymeric elements. This approach is quite effective, but increases a mass of an aircraft and significantly complicates the manufacturing process. The approach proposed by the authors is based on a mixture of conducting and dielectric polymers. Numerous modeling studies which are based on percolation clustering using kinetic Monte Carlo methods, finite element modeling of electrical and mechanical properties, and preliminary experimental studies, allow achieving an optimal content of conducting particles in a dielectric matrix in order to achieve possibly the best electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, simultaneously. After manufacturing the samples with optimal content of a conducting polymer, mechanical and electrical characterization as well as high-voltage testing was performed. The application of such a material simplifies manufacturing process and ensures unique properties of aircraft structures, which allows for minimizing damage after lightning strike, as well as provide electrical bounding and grounding, interference shielding, etc. The proposed solution can minimize costs of repair, testing and certification of aircraft structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  3. Numerical tools for lightning protection of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Mieritz, Casper Falkenstrøm; Candela Garolera, Anna

    2013-01-01

    (LPC) is introduced. When these two tools have been used to place air terminations on blades and defining the necessary insulation levels of interior parts, the voltage and current distribution along the blade structure can be calculated. This will put restrictions on the blade design, and define...... locations and requirements to insulation levels, equipotential bondings, indirect effects protection etc. Finally the lightning current arrives to the nacelle, where the principles of modelling magnetic fields, induced voltages, required shielding of panels etc. will be discussed....

  4. National Renewable Energy Laboratory program on lightning risk and wind turbine generator protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); McNiff, B. [McNiff Light Industry, Blue Hill, ME (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the early development of wind turbine generators (WTG) in the United States, wind farms were primarily located in California where lightning activity is the lowest in the United States. As such, lightning protection for wind turbines was not considered to be a major issue for designers or wind farm operators. However, wind turbine installations are expanding into the Midwest, Southwest and other regions of the United States where lightning activity is significantly more intense and lightning damage to wind turbines is more common. There is a growing need, therefore, to better understand lightning activity on wind farms and to improve wind turbine lightning protection systems. In support of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE/EPRI) Utility Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has recently begun to take steps to determine the extent of damage due to lightning and the effectiveness of various lightning protection techniques for wind power plants. Working through the TVP program, NREL will also perform outreach and education to (1) help manufacturers to provide equipment that is adequately designed to survive lightning, (2) make sure that operators are aware of effective safety procedures, and (3) help site designers and wind farm developers take the risk of lightning into account as effectively as possible.

  5. 75 FR 16676 - Airworthiness Standards; Electrical and Electronic System Lightning Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ...; Federal Register #0; #0; #0;This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains notices to the public of #0;the... Airworthiness Standards; Electrical and Electronic System Lightning Protection AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Administration (FAA) proposes to amend the lightning protection airworthiness standards by establishing new...

  6. 30 CFR 56.12069 - Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning protection for telephone wires and... NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12069 Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors... medium on the surface and shall be separated from neutral grounds by a distance of not less than 25 feet. ...

  7. 30 CFR 57.12069 - Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning protection for telephone wires and... AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12069 Lightning protection for telephone wires and... resistance grounding medium on the surface and shall be separated from neutral grounds by a distance of not...

  8. 14 CFR 23.867 - Electrical bonding and protection against lightning and static electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electrical bonding and protection against lightning and static electricity. 23.867 Section 23.867 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Electrical bonding and protection against lightning and static electricity. (a) The airplane must be...

  9. Cyclic hygrothermal aging of aircraft lightning protections: Phenomenological overview

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2012-04-23

    The recent transition to full composite fuselages is a major breakthrough in aeronautical design. To ensure satisfactory lightning protection, the electrical properties of the primary composite structure need to be improved and a design solution lies on bonding a metallic fishnet to the fuselage. An important issue is the prediction of the aging behavior of this top layer when exposed to severe aging conditions representative of flight environment. Multiple aging mechanisms affect this top layer made of thermoset resin and metallic fishnet with complex geometry and a first modeling strategy is a necessary starting point to better understand its evolution. This paper describes the overall phenomenology and the different mechanisms that can be expected in such a structure.

  10. Lightning protection for the process canyons at the Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAfee, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has performed Lightning Studies for the existing Process Canyons at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These studies were initiated to verify the lightning protection systems for the facilities and to compare the installations to the National Fire Protection (NFPA) Standard 780, Lighting Protection Code, 1992. The original study of the F-Canyon was initiated to develop answers to concerns raised by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB). Once this study was completed it was determined that a similar study for H-Canyon would be prudent; followed by an evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Vitrification Building (S-Canyon). This paper will provide an overview of the nature of lightning and the principals of lightning protection. This will provide the reader with a basic understanding of the phenomena of lighting and its potential for damaging structures, components, and injuring personnel in or near the structure.

  11. Lightning protection of flap system for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Madsen, Søren Find

    of insulating, semi-conductive and conductive materials in their structure. For this reason, the installation of a CRTEF in a blade requires a careful assessment of risks related to lightning strikes. The study of the lightning effects in the CRTEF system comprised the analysis of the discharge attachment...... was subjected to high voltage tests with satisfactory results. Aging tests were also applied to the flap rubber material, revealing that the material is expected to have at least the same capability as the fiberglass materials to withstand the high electric fields caused by lightning. This PhD is part...

  12. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  13. Lightning Protection Performance Assessment of Transmission Line Based on ATP model Automatic Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hanwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to solve the initial lightning breakdown current by combing ATP and MATLAB simulation software effectively, with the aims to evaluate the lightning protection performance of transmission line. Firstly, the executable ATP simulation model is generated automatically according to the required information such as power source parameters, tower parameters, overhead line parameters, grounding resistance and lightning current parameters, etc. through an interface program coded by MATLAB. Then, the data are extracted from the generated LIS files which can be obtained by executing the ATP simulation model, the occurrence of transmission lie breakdown can be determined by the relative data in LIS file. The lightning current amplitude should be reduced when the breakdown occurs, and vice the verse. Thus the initial lightning breakdown current of a transmission line with given parameters can be determined accurately by continuously changing the lightning current amplitude, which is realized by a loop computing algorithm that is coded by MATLAB software. The method proposed in this paper can generate the ATP simulation program automatically, and facilitates the lightning protection performance assessment of transmission line.

  14. The Impact of Active Conductors on Czech and Hungarian Lightning Protection Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mikeš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the developmental conditions for the emergence of protection against lightning. It reviews the legislation especially in the Czech Republic over the last 15 years, and its application for active lightning conductors. The paper presents examples of the damage caused bylightning strikes on buildings protected by ESE lightning rods constructed using the French nationalstandard NFC 17-102 [1] and STN 34 1391 [2]. Installation of lightning conductors based on thesestandards is not, however, in accordance with the valid legislation in the Czech Republic and Hungary.In response to a growing number of ESE installations in the Czech Republic, it is vital to inform boththe broader professional publc and the lay public of cases involving failures of this type of lightningconductor.

  15. Electrically conductive carbon fibre-reinforced composite for aircraft lightning strike protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, Andrzej; Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Turczyn, Roman; Sul, Przemysław; Bilewicz, Marcin

    2017-05-01

    Aircraft elements, especially elements of exterior fuselage, are subjected to damage caused by lightning strikes. Due to the fact that these elements are manufactured from polymeric composites in modern aircraft, and thus, they cannot conduct electrical charges, the lightning strikes cause burnouts in composite structures. Therefore, the effective lightning strike protection for such structures is highly desired. The solution presented in this paper is based on application of organic conductive fillers in the form of intrinsically conducting polymers and carbon fabric in order to ensure electrical conductivity of whole composite and simultaneously retain superior mechanical properties. The presented studies cover synthesis and manufacturing of the electrically conductive composite as well as its characterization with respect to mechanical and electrical properties. The performed studies indicate that the proposed material can be potentially considered as a constructional material for aircraft industry, which characterizes by good operational properties and low cost of manufacturing with respect to current lightning strike protection materials solutions.

  16. 75 FR 71346 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank Structure To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... for the conditional probability of environmental or operational conditions occurring is normally..., Alternative Fuel Tank Structural Lightning Protection Requirements, either have the common dictionary meaning...

  17. NASA Studies Lightning Storms Using High-Flying, Uninhabited Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA team studying the causes of electrical storms and their effects on our home planet achieved a milestone on August 21, 2002, completing the study's longest-duration research flight and monitoring four thunderstorms in succession. Based at the Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, researchers with the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) used the Altus II remotely-piloted aircraft to study thunderstorms in the Atlantic Ocean off Key West and the west of the Everglades. Data obtained through sensors mounted to the aircraft will allow researchers in ACES to gauge elements such as lightning activity and the electrical environment in and around storms. By learning more about individual storms, scientists hope to better understand the global water and energy cycle, as well as climate variability. Contained in one portion of the aircraft is a three-axis magnetic search coil, which measures the AC magnetic field; a three-axis electric field change sensor; an accelerometer; and a three-axis magnetometer, which measures the DC magnetic field. With dual goals of gathering weather data safely and testing the adaptability of the uninhabited aircraft, the ACES study is a collaboration among the Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Pernsylvania State University in University Park, and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

  18. Lightning protection design and testing of an all composite wet wing for the Egrett

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, B. J. C.; Haigh, S. J.; Chessum, C.; Dunkley, V. P.

    1991-01-01

    The Egrett aircraft has an all composite wing comprising CFC(carbon fiber composite)/Nomex sandwich skins, full length CFC main spar caps, and GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastics) main and auxiliary spar webs. It also has short inboard CFC auxiliary spar caps. It has fine aluminum wires woven into the surface for protection. It has an integral fuel tank using the CFC/Nomex skins as the upper and lower tank walls, and lies between the forward auxiliary spar and the forward of the two main spar webs. The fuel tank is not bagged, i.e., it is in effect a wet wing tank. It has conventional capacitive type fuel gauging. The aircraft was cleared to IFR standards and so required full lightning protection and demonstration that it would survive the lightning environment. The lightning protection was designed for the wing (and also for the remainder of the aircraft). An inner wing test samples (which included a part of the fuel tank) were tested as part of the proving program. The protection design and the testing process are described. The intrinsic structural features are indicated that improve lightning protection design and which therefore minimize the weight and cost of any added lightning protection components.

  19. a review and an update on the winter lightning that occurred on a rotating windmill and its standalone lightning protection tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Takagi, N.

    2012-12-01

    We have observed the lightning occurred on a 100 m high windmill and its 105 m high standalone lightning-protection tower about 45 m separated from the windmill in the Hokuriku area of Japan for 7 consecutive winter seasons from 2005 to 2012. Our main observation items include: (1) Lightning current at the bottom of both the windmill and the tower. (2) Thunderstorm electric fields and the electric field changes caused by lightning at multiple sites. (3) Optical images by both low and high speed imaging systems. During the 7 winter seasons, over 100 lightning have hit either the tower or the windmill or both. All the lightning but two observed are of upward lightning. Those upward lightning can be sub-classified into self-initiated types and other-triggered types according to whether there is a discharge activity prior to the upward leaders or not. Self-initiated and other-triggered upward lightning tend to have biased percentages in terms of striking locations (windmill versus tower) and thunderstorm types (active versus weak). All the upward lightning but one contained only initial continuous current stages. In the presentation, we will first give a review on those results we have reported before [1-3]. As an update, we will report the following results. (1) The electric field change required for triggering a negative upward leader is usually more than twice bigger than that for triggering a positive upward leader. (2) An electric current pulse with an amplitude of several tens of Amperes along a high structure has been observed to occur in response to a rapid electric change generated by either a nearby return stroke or K-change. References [1] D.Wang, N.Takagi, T.Watanebe, H. Sakurano, M. Hashimoto, Observed characteristics of upward leaders that are initiated from a windmill and its lightning protection tower, Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol.35, L02803, doi:10.1029/2007GL032136, 2008. [2] W. Lu, D.Wang, Y. Zhang and N. Takagi, Two associated upward lightning flashes

  20. Protecting Electronic Equipment in Composite Structures against Lightning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Damage resulting from an interaction with lightning current in a military naval vessel, especially in a conflict zone and at the time of a conflict, which leads to the incapacitation of vital activities on the ship, is unacceptable. Because many potential conflict zones are in littoral areas, and

  1. 76 FR 33129 - Airworthiness Standards; Electrical and Electronic System Lightning Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ..., Garmin International, and an individual commenter asked that the FAA delete paragraph (b)(1). The SAE AE... acceptable under the current regulatory scheme. Garmin further commented that, if adopted, the proposed paragraph (b)(1) would have the unintended effect of requiring excessive lightning protection. Garmin...

  2. Evaluation of lightning performance of transmission lines protected by metal oxide surge arresters using artificial intelligence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, C.A.; Perantzakis, G. [Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Lamia, Department of Electrical Engineering, Lamia (Greece); Spanakis, G.E. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Karampelas, P. [Hellenic American University, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Lightning and switching overvoltages are the main causes for faults in electrical networks. In the last decades, several different conventional methodologies have been used for the adjustment of the lightning performance of high voltage transmission lines, which are protected against lightning using overhead ground wires and surge arresters. The current paper proposes a new developed Artificial Neural Network (ANN), based on the Q-learning algorithm, in order to estimate the lightning failure rate of lines of the Hellenic system. The results obtained by the ANN model exhibit a satisfactory correlation in comparison with the real recorded data or the simulations results taken from a conventional method. (orig.)

  3. Protection against lightning and surges in photovoltaic installations; Protecao contra descargas atmosfericas e surtos em instalacoes fotovoltaicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Brigitte [Siemens AG (Germany); Wettingfeld, Juergen [W. Wettingfeld GmbH (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Besides damaging in the photovoltaic panels, lightning can also involve electronic equipment through cables that penetrate in buildings. A supplement for photovoltaic systems located on the roof of buildings was published by the German standardization committees in order to integrate them into lightning protection. In this paper, it is analyzed the requirements of the standards and application case studies.

  4. How to verify lightning protection efficiency for electrical systems? Testing procedures and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkl, Josef; Zahlmann, Peter [DEHN and SOEHNE, Neumarkt (Germany)], Emails: Josef.Birkl@technik.dehn.de, Peter.Zahlmann@technik.dehn.de

    2007-07-01

    There are increasing numbers of applications, installing Surge Protective Devices (SPDs), through which partial lightning currents flow, and highly sensitive, electronic devices to be protected closely next to each other due to the design of electric distribution systems and switchgear installations which is getting more and more compact. In these cases, the protective function of the SPDs has to be co-ordinated with the individual immunity of the equipment against energetic, conductive impulse voltages and impulse currents. In order to verify the immunity against partial lightning currents of the complete system laboratory tests on a system level are a suitable approach. The proposed test schemes for complete systems have been successfully performed on various applications. Examples will be presented. (author)

  5. An assessment of tailoring of lightning protection design requirements for a composite wing structure on a metallic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Navy A-6E aircraft is presently being modified with a new wing which uses graphite/epoxy structures and substructures around a titanium load-bearing structure. The ability of composites to conduct electricity is less than that of aluminum. This is cause for concern when the wing may be required to conduct large lightning currents. The manufacturer attempted to solve lightning protection issues by performing a risk assessment based on a statistical approach which allows relaxation of the wing lightning protection design levels over certain locations of the composite wing. A sensitivity study is presented designed to define the total risk of relaxation of the design levels.

  6. 2006 motor vehicle occupant protection facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has produced this booklet to explain the need for legislation, enforcement, education, and public awareness campaigns about protecting children, youth, and young adults in motor vehicles. collectivel...

  7. Corona discharges from a windmill and its lightning protection tower in winter thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Daohong; Rison, William; Thomas, Ronald J.; Edens, Harald E.; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Krehbiel, Paul R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents lightning mapping array (LMA) observations of corona discharges from a windmill and its lightning protection tower in winter thunderstorms in Japan. Corona discharges from the windmill, called windmill coronas, and those from the tower, called tower coronas, are distinctly different. Windmill coronas occur with periodic bursts, generally radiate larger power, and possibly develop to higher altitudes than tower coronas do. A strong negative electric field is necessary for the frequent production of tower coronas but is not apparently related with windmill coronas. These differences are due to the periodic rotation of the windmill and the moving blades which can escape space charges produced by corona discharges and sustain a large local electric field. The production period of windmill coronas is related with the rotation period of the windmill. Surprisingly, for one rotation of the windmill, only two out of the three blades produce detectable discharges and source powers of discharges from these two blades are different. The reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. For tower coronas, the source rate can get very high only when there is a strong negative electric field, and the source power can get very high only when the source rate is very low. The relationship between corona discharges and lightning flashes is investigated. There is no direct evidence that corona discharges can increase the chance of upward leader initiation, but nearby lightning flashes can increase the source rate of corona discharges right after the flashes. The peak of the source height distribution of corona discharges is about 100 m higher than the top of the windmill and the top of the tower. Possible reasons for this result are discussed.

  8. Reduction of the visual impact of overhead transmission line systems through utilisation of line surge arresters as lightning protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Kjærsgaard; Holbøll, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The main reason for the increasing public resistance to overhead transmission line systems in Denmark is the impact on the environment with emphasis on the visual aspect. Therefore the Danish Transmission System Operator Energinet.dk is currently carrying out a research project, in cooperation...... in line performance and lightning protection of the nearest substations requires thorough modelling of the new line including all electrical parameters necessary for performance evaluation under all conditions. In this paper, explicit use of line surge arresters as lightning protection on the line...

  9. Fabrication and assessment of a thin flexible surface coating made of pristine graphene for lightning strike protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount St., Wichita, KS 67260-0133 (United States); Soltani, S.A. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount St., Wichita, KS 67260-0133 (United States); Le, L.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount St., Wichita, KS 67260-0133 (United States); Asmatulu, R., E-mail: ramazan.asmatulu@wichita.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount St., Wichita, KS 67260-0133 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    A thin flexible coating made of pristine graphene was fabricated and applied on the surface of a commercial carbon fiber epoxy prepreg laminate to protect it against the lightning strike. To assess the coating’s effectiveness, the coated laminate was subjected to the simulated lightning strike as well as the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) testing. It was observed that the damaged area and volume in the coated laminate were reduced by 94% and 96%, respectively, as compared to the laminate without the coating. Moreover, the coated laminate had an average EMI SE of 51 dB over 100–2000 MHz range, 55 dB over 8–12 GHz range, and 60 dB over 12–18 GHz range marking 22%, 44%, and 49% improvement in EMI SE for each frequency range, respectively. The results indicate a great potential for the developed coating to protect the commercially available prepreg composites against the lightning strike.

  10. Feasibility study of a CO2-laser based lightning-protection system realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, Victor V.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a continuous laser spark (CLS) with low resistance by focusing radiation from a CO2 laser with a conic mirror is demonstrated. The laser energy input per unit length required for this is experimentally found to be equal to ≈200 J/m. The possibility to efficiently control the trajectory of an electric discharge by means of a CLS is demonstrated. The effect of polarity in the electric breakdown of the air gaps between the CLS plasma channel and a metal rod is discovered and interpreted. The transverse structure of CLS conductivity is investigated. The possibility of producing a long laser spark (LLS) with much higher resistance by focusing radiation from a CO2 laser with a spherical mirror used to protect objects against lightning is studied. The conditions under which the electric discharges from clouds can be guided reproducibly along a LLS are determined. Experiments reveal that the interaction between the LLS and the discharge from an electrode (lightning rod) leads to a decrease in the lifetime of the streamer corona burst, as well as to an increase in the current of the developing leader and its velocity compared to the case without the LLS.

  11. Lightning protection guidelines and test data for adhesively bonded aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryzby, J. E.; Plumer, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The highly competitive marketplace and increasing cost of energy has motivated manufacturers of general aviation aircraft to utilize composite materials and metal-to-metal bonding in place of conventional fasteners and rivets to reduce weight, obtain smoother outside surfaces and reduce drag. The purpose of this program is protection of these new structures from hazardous lightning effects. The program began with a survey of advance-technology materials and fabrication methods under consideration for future designs. Sub-element specimens were subjected to simulated lightning voltages and currents. Measurements of bond line voltages, electrical sparking, and mechanical strength degradation were made to comprise a data base of electrical properties for new technology materials and basic structural configurations. The second hase of the program involved tests on full scale wing structures which contained integral fuel tanks and which were representative of examples of new technology structures and fuel systems. The purpose of these tests was to provide a comparison between full scale structural measurements and those obtained from the sub-element specimens.

  12. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  13. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  14. Analysis of lightning fault detection, location and protection on short and long transmission lines using Real Time Digital Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Andre Luiz Pereira de [Siemens Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: andreluiz.oliveira@siemens.com

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of lightning fault detection, location and protection using numeric distance relays applied in high voltage transmission lines, more specifically in the 500 kV transmission lines of CEMIG (Brazilian Energy Utility) between the Vespasiano 2 - Neves 1 (short line - 23.9 km) and Vespasiano 2 - Mesquita (long line - 148.6 km) substations. The analysis was based on the simulations results of numeric distance protective relays on power transmission lines, realized in September 02 to 06, 2002, at Siemens AG's facilities (Erlangen - Germany), using Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS{sup TM}). Several lightning faults simulations were accomplished, in several conditions of the electrical power system where the protective relays would be installed. The results are presented not only with the times of lightning faults elimination, but also all the functionality of a protection system, including the correct detection, location and other advantages that these modern protection devices make possible to the power system. (author)

  15. Improved approach for electric vehicle rapid charging station placement and sizing using Google maps and binary lightning search algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mainul Islam

    Full Text Available The electric vehicle (EV is considered a premium solution to global warming and various types of pollution. Nonetheless, a key concern is the recharging of EV batteries. Therefore, this study proposes a novel approach that considers the costs of transportation loss, buildup, and substation energy loss and that incorporates harmonic power loss into optimal rapid charging station (RCS planning. A novel optimization technique, called binary lightning search algorithm (BLSA, is proposed to solve the optimization problem. BLSA is also applied to a conventional RCS planning method. A comprehensive analysis is conducted to assess the performance of the two RCS planning methods by using the IEEE 34-bus test system as the power grid. The comparative studies show that the proposed BLSA is better than other optimization techniques. The daily total cost in RCS planning of the proposed method, including harmonic power loss, decreases by 10% compared with that of the conventional method.

  16. Improved approach for electric vehicle rapid charging station placement and sizing using Google maps and binary lightning search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mainul; Shareef, Hussain; Mohamed, Azah

    2017-01-01

    The electric vehicle (EV) is considered a premium solution to global warming and various types of pollution. Nonetheless, a key concern is the recharging of EV batteries. Therefore, this study proposes a novel approach that considers the costs of transportation loss, buildup, and substation energy loss and that incorporates harmonic power loss into optimal rapid charging station (RCS) planning. A novel optimization technique, called binary lightning search algorithm (BLSA), is proposed to solve the optimization problem. BLSA is also applied to a conventional RCS planning method. A comprehensive analysis is conducted to assess the performance of the two RCS planning methods by using the IEEE 34-bus test system as the power grid. The comparative studies show that the proposed BLSA is better than other optimization techniques. The daily total cost in RCS planning of the proposed method, including harmonic power loss, decreases by 10% compared with that of the conventional method.

  17. Improved approach for electric vehicle rapid charging station placement and sizing using Google maps and binary lightning search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Hussain; Mohamed, Azah

    2017-01-01

    The electric vehicle (EV) is considered a premium solution to global warming and various types of pollution. Nonetheless, a key concern is the recharging of EV batteries. Therefore, this study proposes a novel approach that considers the costs of transportation loss, buildup, and substation energy loss and that incorporates harmonic power loss into optimal rapid charging station (RCS) planning. A novel optimization technique, called binary lightning search algorithm (BLSA), is proposed to solve the optimization problem. BLSA is also applied to a conventional RCS planning method. A comprehensive analysis is conducted to assess the performance of the two RCS planning methods by using the IEEE 34-bus test system as the power grid. The comparative studies show that the proposed BLSA is better than other optimization techniques. The daily total cost in RCS planning of the proposed method, including harmonic power loss, decreases by 10% compared with that of the conventional method. PMID:29220396

  18. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Creation of NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate database of meteorological data is essential for designing any aerospace vehicle and for preparing launch commit criteria. Meteorological instrumentation were recently placed on the three Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B), which provide a unique meteorological dataset existing at the launch complex over an extensive altitude range. Data records of temperature, dew point, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction are produced at 40, 78, 116, and 139 m at each tower. The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) received an archive that consists of one-minute averaged measurements for the period of record of January 2011 - April 2015. However, before the received database could be used EV44 needed to remove any erroneous data from within the database through a comprehensive quality control (QC) process. The QC process applied to the LPS towers' meteorological data is similar to other QC processes developed by EV44, which were used in the creation of meteorological databases for other towers at KSC. The QC process utilized in this study has been modified specifically for use with the LPS tower database. The QC process first includes a check of each individual sensor. This check includes removing any unrealistic data and checking the temporal consistency of each variable. Next, data from all three sensors at each height are checked against each other, checked against climatology, and checked for sensors that erroneously report a constant value. Then, a vertical consistency check of each variable at each tower is completed. Last, the upwind sensor at each level is selected to minimize the influence of the towers and other structures at LC-39B on the measurements. The selection process for the upwind sensor implemented a study of tower-induced turbulence. This paper describes in detail the QC process, QC results, and the attributes of the LPS towers meteorological

  19. Lightning Strike Protection of Aircraft Composite Structures: Analysis and Comparative Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrzej Katunin

    2016-01-01

    Lightning strikes are a serious problem during operation of aircraft due to the increasing applicability of polymeric composites in aircraft structures and the weak electrical conducting properties of such structures...

  20. Simulation of Lightning-Induced Delamination in Un-protected CFRP Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. The most significant failure mode induced by lightning is delamination, which might extend well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage zone induced from a lightning strike to minimize costly repair acreage and supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Herein, a detailed numerical study consisting of a multidirectional composite with user-defined, temperature-dependent, interlaminar elements subjected to a lightning strike is designed, and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions. It is observed both the size and shape of the delamination zone are strongly dependent on the assumed temperature-dependent fracture toughness; the primary parameter controlling lightning-induced delamination propagation. An accurate estimation of the fracture toughness profile is crucial in order to have a reliable prediction of the delamination zone and avoid sub-critical structural failures.

  1. Comparison of the KSC-ER Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Krider, E. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Air Force Eastern Range (ER) are located in a region of Florida that experiences the highest area density of lightning strikes to ground in the United States, with values approaching 16 fl/km 2/yr when accumulated in 10x10 km (100 sq km) grids (see Figure 1). Consequently, the KSC-ER use data derived from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks to detect hazardous weather, the "Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System" (CGLSS) that is owned and operated by the Air Force and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) that is owned and operated by Vaisala, Inc. These systems are used to provide lightning warnings for ground operations and to insure mission safety during space launches at the KSC-ER. In order to protect the rocket and shuttle fleets, NASA and the Air Force follow a set of lightning safety guidelines that are called the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC). These rules are designed to insure that vehicles are not exposed to the hazards of natural or triggered lightning that would in any way jeopardize a mission or cause harm to the shuttle astronauts. Also, if any CG lightning strikes too close to a vehicle on a launch pad, it can cause time-consuming mission delays due to the extensive retests that are often required for vehicles and/or payloads when this occurs. If any CG lightning strike is missed or mis-located by even a small amount, the result could have significant safety implications, require expensive retests, or create unnecessary delays or scrubs in launches. Therefore, it is important to understand the performance of each lightning detection system in considerable detail.

  2. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

    2012-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

  3. Tool geometry optimization for drilling CFRP/Al-Li stacks with a lightning strike protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouami, Souhail; Habak, Malek; Velasco, Raphaël; Santos, Baptise Dos; Franz, Gérald; Vantomme, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    One-shot drilling of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer materials with a Lightning Strike Protection (LSP)/metal stacks is a challenging task due to the inherent difference physical and mechanical properties and processing mechanisms of each component. The objective of the present work is to optimize tool geometry width in drilling of CFRP/Al-Li with a LSP. Firstly, a set of conventional uncoated carbide drills which are commercially available for the drilling of aeronautic composites was used to study the effect of tool geometry on drilled-hole quality. The set encompasses a twist drill bit, a step drill bit and a point spur drill bit. Based on references and cutting conditions recommended by drill manufacturers, the drilling tests performed are based on full-factorial experimental design using three cutting speeds and two feed rates. Results showed that, on the one hand, spur drill gave the best results causing small damage extension in the hole perimeter but we noticed a rapid tool wear at the spur which increases with feed. On the other hand, step drill presented higher LSP delamination located at the hole entrance but reduces the level of thrust force. The choice of tool geometry process should be a compromise in drilling aluminium as well as drilling carbon fiber with LSP. In the second phase of the current work, three different new uncoated carbide geometries were developed: a Spur Step Drill, a Three Steps Drill and a Square Step Drill. Same cutting conditions were used for the three drills. Results showed a rapid tool wear for the Spur Step Drill at the spur. In terms of LSP delamination, burr and drill wear, the drill adapted to drilling CFRP/Al-Li with LSP stacks is the three steps drill.

  4. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Process of Creating the NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The methodology and the results of the quality control (QC) process of the meteorological data from the Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B) are documented in this paper. Meteorological data are used to design a launch vehicle, determine operational constraints, and to apply defined constraints on day-of-launch (DOL). In order to properly accomplish these tasks, a representative climatological database of meteorological records is needed because the database needs to represent the climate the vehicle will encounter. Numerous meteorological measurement towers exist at KSC; however, the engineering tasks need measurements at specific heights, some of which can only be provided by a few towers. Other than the LPS towers, Tower 313 is the only tower that provides observations up to 150 m. This tower is located approximately 3.5 km from LC-39B. In addition, data need to be QC'ed to remove erroneous reports that could pollute the results of an engineering analysis, mislead the development of operational constraints, or provide a false image of the atmosphere at the tower's location.

  5. 76 FR 33139 - Launch Safety: Lightning Criteria for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... satellites to orbit. ELVs carry large amounts of fuel and, due to the explosive nature of the fuel, may not... and is an inverted circular cone centered on the radar antenna. A cone of silence consists of all... vehicle's planned flight trajectory, including the trajectory's vertical and horizontal uncertainties...

  6. Total lightning observations to wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Montañá Puig, Juan; Van der Velde, Oscar Arnoud; Romero Durán, David; March Nomen, Víctor; Solà de Las Fuentes, Gloria; Pineda Ruegg, Nicolau; Hermoso Alameda, Blas; Senosiáin Miquélez, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    In summer 2011 a new VHF Lightning Mapping Array was installed at the northeast of Spain. In that area a VHF interferometer and a VLFILF lightning detection networks are also operative. The close presence of wind farms in the area of the Lightning Mapping Array showed some lightning activity not reported before. This paper describes the observations and discusses the possible effects to the wind turbine lightning protection

  7. Lightning transient analysis in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2013-01-01

    The transient behavior of lightning surges in the lightning protection system of wind turbine blades has been investigated in this paper. The study is based on PSCAD models consisting of electric equivalent circuits with lumped and distributed parameters involving different lightning current...... and other internal conductive elements of the blade is studied. Finally, several methods to prevent internal arcing are discussed in order to improve the lightning protection of the blade....

  8. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

    2011-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

  9. Lightning Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Lightning causes an estimated $50 million annually in damages to power lines, transformers and other electric utility equipment. Lightning strikes are not yet predictable, but U.S. East Coast Lightning Detection Network (LDN) is providing utilities and other clients data on lightning characteristics, flash frequency and location, and the general direction in which lightning associated storms are heading. Monitoring stations are equipped with direction finding antennas that detect lightning strikes reaching the ground by measuring fluctuations in the magnetic field. Stations relay strike information to SUNY-Albany-LDN operations center which is manned around the clock. Computers process data, count strikes, spot their locations, and note other characteristics of lightning, LDN's data is beamed to a satellite for broadcast to client's receiving stations. By utilizing real-time lightning strike information, managers are now more able to effectively manage their resources. This reduces outage time for utility customers.

  10. Safe and secure South Africa. Vehicle landmine protection validation testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reinecke, JD

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of vehicle landmine protection validation testing in South Africa. A short history of validation test standards is given, followed by a summary of current open test standards in general use...

  11. Mastering the lightning related risks: an important stake. For a better lightning protection. Improvements require leaders modeling. Gimelec militates for a better regulation; Maitriser les risques lies a la foudre: un enjeu d'importance. Pour une meilleure protection foudre. Les progres doivent passer par la modelisation des leaders. Le Gimelec milite pour une meilleure reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charroy, A. [AEMC, (France); Laroche, P. [ONERA, 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2000-06-01

    The increase of sensible electrical and electronic equipments increases the need for lightning protection means. This short dossier comprises 3 articles. The first article provides some useful information concerning the proper rules for the wiring of installations. The second article deals with todays trends in the domain of lightning 'leaders' modeling. The third paper concerns the actions carried out by the French pooling of electrical equipment industries and the associated industrial electronics (Gimelec) for the standardization of equipment protection systems. (J.S.)

  12. Lightning interaction with launch facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Lightning is a major threat to launch facilities. In 2008 and 2009 there have been a significant number of strikes within 5 nautical miles of Launch Complexes 39A and 39B at the Kennedy Space Center. On several occasions, the Shuttle Space Vehicle (SSV) was at the pad. Fortunately, no accidents or damage to the flight hardware occurred, but these events resulted in many launch delays, one launch scrub, and many hours of retesting. For complex structures, such as launch facilities, the design of the lightning protection system (LPS) cannot be done using the lightning protection standard guidelines. As a result, there are some “unprotected” or “exposed” areas. In order to quantify the lightning threat to these areas, a Monte Carlo statistical tool has been developed. This statistical tool uses two random number generators: a uniform distribution to generate origins of downward propagating leaders and a lognormal distribution to generate returns stroke peak currents. Downward leaders propagate vertically downward and their striking distances are defined by the polarity and peak current. Following the electrogeometrical concept, we assume that the leader attaches to the closest object within its striking distance. The statistical analysis is run for a large number of years using a long term ground flash density that corresponds to the geographical region where the structures being analyzed are located or will be installed. The output of the program is the probability of direct attachment to objects of interest with its corresponding peak current distribution. This tool was used in designing the lightning protection system of Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, for NASA’s Constellation program. The tool allowed the designers to select the position of the towers and to design the catenary wire system to minimize the probability of direct strikes to the spacecraft and associated ground support equipment. This tool can be used to evaluate

  13. Z-M in lightning forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Machina, Alexia J.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Frozen hydrometeors are required for a storm to produce lightning. Previous research has made strong correlations between ice mass and lightning flash rate and lightning flash density. This study attempted to correlate ice mass to lightning potential Operational interest is centered at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station/Kennedy Space Center where accurate weather forecasting is vital to mission requirements, resource protection, and pe...

  14. Occupant Protection during Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Jones, J. A.; Granderson, B. K.; Somers, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    The constellation program is evaluating current vehicle design capabilities for nominal water landings and contingency land landings of the Orion Crew Exploration vehicle. The Orion Landing Strategy tiger team was formed to lead the technical effort for which associated activities include the current vehicle design, susceptibility to roll control and tip over, reviewing methods for assessing occupant injury during ascent / aborts /landings, developing an alternate seat/attenuation design solution which improves occupant protection and operability, and testing the seat/attenuation system designs to ensure valid results. The EVA physiology, systems and Performance (EPSP) project is leading the effort under the authority of the Tiger Team Steering committee to develop, verify, validate and accredit biodynamics models using a variety of crash and injury databases including NASCAR, Indy Car and military aircraft. The validated biodynamics models will be used by the Constellation program to evaluate a variety of vehicle, seat and restraint designs in the context of multiple nominal and off-nominal landing scenarios. The models will be used in conjunction with Acceptable Injury Risk definitions to provide new occupant protection requirements for the Constellation Program.

  15. A Study of Parameters of the Counterpropagating Leader and its Influence on the Lightning Protection of Objects Using Large-Scale Laboratory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syssoev, V. S.; Kostinskiy, A. Yu.; Makalskiy, L. M.; Rakov, A. V.; Andreev, M. G.; Bulatov, M. U.; Sukharevsky, D. I.; Naumova, M. U.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, the results of experiments on initiating the upward and descending leaders during the development of a long spark when studying lightning protection of objects with the help of large-scale models are shown. The influence of the counterpropagating leaders on the process of the lightning strike of ground-based and insulated objects is discussed. In the first case, the upward negative leader is initiated by the positive downward leader, which propagates from the high-voltage electrode of the "rod-rod"-type Marx generator (the rod is located on the plane and is 3-m high) in the gap with a length of 9-12 m. The positive-voltage pulse with a duration of 7500 μs had an amplitude of up to 3 MV. In the second case, initiation of the positive upward leader was performed in the electric field created by a cloud of negatively charged aerosol, which simulates the charged thunderstorm cell. In this case, all the phases characteristic of the ascending lightnings initiated by the tall ground-based objects and the triggered lightnings during the experiments with an actual thunderstorm cloud were observed in the forming spark discharge with a length of 1.5-2.0 m. The main parameters of the counterpropagating leader, which is initiated by the objects during the large-scale model experiments with a long spark, are shown.

  16. Composite flexible insulation for thermal protection of space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Tran, Huy K.; Chiu, S. Amanda

    1992-01-01

    A composite flexible blanket insulation (CFBI) system considered for use as a thermal protection system for space vehicles is described. This flexible composite insulation system consists of an outer layer of silicon carbide fabric, followed by alumina mat insulation, and alternating layers of aluminized polyimide film and aluminoborosilicate scrim fabric. A potential application of this composite insulation would be as a thermal protection system for the aerobrake of the Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV). It would also apply to other space vehicles subject to high convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The thermal performance of this composite insulation as exposed to a simulated atmospheric entry environment in a plasma arc test facility is described. Other thermophysical properties which affect the thermal response of this system are also described. Analytical modeling describing the thermal performance of this composite insulation is included. It shows that this composite insulation is effective as a thermal protection system at total heating rates up to 30.6 W/sq cm.

  17. Ball lightning.

    OpenAIRE

    Stenhoff, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Ball lightning is alleged by some to be a rare atmospheric phenomenon usually associated with thunderstorms, while others hold that it does not exist. This controversy has continued for centuries. This study comprises a critical evaluation of evidence for the existence of ball lightning. An historical review of the controversy is first presented, giving a chronological account of developments in ball lightning theories and of important observations alleged to be of the phenomenon. Other pheno...

  18. Saving energy and protecting environment of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lina; Chen, Huajun; Gong, Jing

    2017-05-01

    With the concept of low carbon economy, saving energy, and protecting environment spread, the development of the electric promotes the research pace of wireless charging electronic vehicles, which will become the best choice of energy supply in the future. To generalize and exploit the corresponding alternative fuels and the research and development, and promotion of electric vehicles, becomes the effective means to directly reduce the consumption of fuel, effectively relieves the problem of nervous energy and environmental pollution, and really conforms to the requirements of the national strategy of sustainable development in China. This paper introduces the status of electronic cars and wireless charging, expounds the principle of wireless charging, and concludes the full text.

  19. Vision-based pedestrian protection systems for intelligent vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Geronimo, David

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian Protection Systems (PPSs) are on-board systems aimed at detecting and tracking people in the surroundings of a vehicle in order to avoid potentially dangerous situations. These systems, together with other Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) such as lane departure warning or adaptive cruise control, are one of the most promising ways to improve traffic safety. By the use of computer vision, cameras working either in the visible or infra-red spectra have been demonstrated as a reliable sensor to perform this task. Nevertheless, the variability of human's appearance, not only in

  20. Protection Method of Biological Lightning Safety around Power Grid Based on Grounding Electrode Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixiang, Chen; Daopin, Chen; Ming, Zhang; Xiao, Huang; Jian, He; Zhijie, He

    2017-05-01

    Aimed at the actual situation of fish death in fish ponds near the power transmission line towers after the thunderstorm happened in Guangdong Province in China, this paper studied the influence of the ground current on fish in the pond. Firstly, This paper studied the current density of the fish without protection. On this basis, paper studied the horizontal pole with full-shielded, the vertical pole with half-shielded, the horizontal pole with extension three kinds of protective measures and effects. Finally an effective protection scheme was put forward according to the engineering practice. The results can provide some engineering guidance and quantitative basis for the design and modification of grounding devices when the tower is adjacent to the fish ponds in southern China.

  1. A Field Study of Lightning Surges Propagating through Low-voltage Electric Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tsunayoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshiki; Oguchi, Shuichi; Okabe, Shigemitsu

    In today's highly information-based society, lightning damage has a significant impact on an increasing number of electric appliances such as personal computers and facsimile machines. Lightning surge protection devices for electric appliances are on the market and concern for lightning protection has been increasing, but there are still many unknown aspects of lightning surges that propagate into residences. To provide effective lightning protection measures, clarification of surge propagation patterns is needed. The Tokyo Electric Power Company has observed the patterns of lightning surge propagation into houses using lightning surge waveform detectors installed at ordinary residences and obtained data on 30 lightning surge current waveforms between 2008 and 2009. This paper discusses various aspects of lightning surge currents propagating into low-voltage appliances, including home electric appliances, based on the lightning surge current waveform data obtained from lightning observations. The result revealed the patterns of lightning surge currents propagating into the ground and lines of low-voltage appliances.

  2. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  3. Heat Transfer Analysis of Thermal Protection Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Wang, Zhijin; Hou, Tianjiao

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to develop an analytical approach to study the heat transfer problem of thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic vehicles. Laplace transform and integral method are used to describe the temperature distribution through the TPS subject to aerodynamic heating during flight. Time-dependent incident heat flux is also taken into account. Two different cases with heat flux and radiation boundary conditions are studied and discussed. The results are compared with those obtained by finite element analyses and show a good agreement. Although temperature profiles of such problems can be readily accessed via numerical simulations, analytical solutions give a greater insight into the physical essence of the heat transfer problem. Furthermore, with the analytical approach, rapid thermal analyses and even thermal optimization can be achieved during the preliminary TPS design.

  4. Flight envelope protection system for unmanned aerial vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Claudel, Christian G.

    2016-04-28

    Systems and methods to protect the flight envelope in both manual flight and flight by a commercial autopilot are provided. A system can comprise: an inertial measurement unit (IMU); a computing device in data communication with the IMU; an application executable by the computing device comprising: logic that estimates an angle of attack; a slip angle; and a speed of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based at least in part on data received from the UAV. A method can comprise estimating, via a computing device, flight data of a UAV based at least in part on data received from an IMU; comparing the estimated flight data with measured flight data; and triggering an error indication in response to a determination that the measured flight data exceeds a predefined deviation of the estimated flight data. The estimated speed can comprise an estimated airspeed, vertical speed and/or ground velocity.

  5. Lightning attachment process to common buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, M. M. F.; Paiva, A. R.; Schumann, C.; Ferro, M. A. S.; Naccarato, K. P.; Silva, J. C. O.; Siqueira, F. V. C.; Custódio, D. M.

    2017-05-01

    The physical mechanism of lightning attachment to grounded structures is one of the most important issues in lightning physics research, and it is the basis for the design of the lightning protection systems. Most of what is known about the attachment process comes from leader propagation models that are mostly based on laboratory observations of long electrical discharges or from observations of lightning attachment to tall structures. In this paper we use high-speed videos to analyze the attachment process of downward lightning flashes to an ordinary residential building. For the first time, we present characteristics of the attachment process to common structures that are present in almost every city (in this case, two buildings under 60 m in São Paulo City, Brazil). Parameters like striking distance and connecting leaders speed, largely used in lightning attachment models and in lightning protection standards, are revealed in this work.Plain Language SummarySince the time of Benjamin Franklin, no one has ever recorded high-speed video images of a lightning connection to a common building. It is very difficult to do it. Cameras need to be very close to the structure chosen to be observed, and long observation time is required to register one lightning strike to that particular structure. Models and theories used to determine the zone of protection of a lightning rod have been developed, but they all suffer from the lack of field data. The submitted manuscript provides results from high-speed video observations of lightning attachment to low buildings that are commonly found in almost every populated area around the world. The proximity of the camera and the high frame rate allowed us to see interesting details that will improve the understanding of the attachment process and, consequently, the models and theories used by lightning protection standards. This paper also presents spectacular images and videos of lightning flashes connecting lightning rods that

  6. Lightning Detection in a Flash

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In a joint project with NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Global Atmospherics, Inc. (GAI), participated in the upgrade and commercialization of the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System. Under a Space Act Agreement, GAI and Kennedy agreed to the joint development of a new LDAR system that meets the needs of both NASA and private industry. The resulting development was a volumetric lightning mapping system. NASA operates a three- dimensional LDAR system capable of determining the exact location and altitude of in-cloud and cloud-to-cloud lightning. Under the Space Act Agreement, GAI contributed its wealth of experience and resources to update and improve the current lightning mapping system used by NASA. Previously, commercial systems were only capable of locating cloud-to-ground lightning. The resulting innovations allowed GAI to position the LDAR system for commercial applications. The upgraded product has the ability to measure in-cloud and cloud-to-cloud lightning. Notable improvements have also been made in the system's location accuracy and signal detection. The new product, known as LDAR II, is targeted for use by utility providers, aviation companies, airports, and commercial space vehicle launch facilities. Presently, forecasting services, research facilities, and a utility company are using the system.

  7. Aircraft Lightning Protection Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    10"A/s at t = 0+. The waveform is defined tems or devices. For this purpose, the following multi- mathematically as pie stroke flash has been defined...the airframe. The use of multi- of those bays intended for ease of access. As a rule pie fasteners resulted in many paths on which current of thumb, it...provided’with therinal liaks which cavo -s the . circuit to be permanently shorted if current Pows for an excessively long tulnie. Such thermal lirks iire

  8. 75 FR 12123 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Side Impact Protection; Fuel System Integrity; Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AK48 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Side Impact Protection; Fuel System Integrity; Electric-Powered Vehicles: Electrolyte Spillage and Electrical Shock Protection AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA...

  9. Método de superficies Ionizantes: nuevo enfoque para la protección contra descargas atmosféricas; Surface lonizing method: New Approach for Lightning Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soiram Ernesto Silva Artígas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En Los métodos clásicos de protección contra descargas atmosféricas se basan en la experiencia empírica.Esta observación conduce a la aplicación de un conjunto de reglas, las cuales se aplican con cierto grado deseguridad. En ellas se establece que la zona de protección dada por un elemento captador como una puntaFranklin es un cono que brinda un ángulo de apantallamiento de 45º. La protección no es total y tiene unacierta probabilidad de falla ante una descarga de cualquier magnitud. Como alternativa a los métodosclásicos se encuentra el modelo electrogeométrico. Éste estudia la física del rayo en su último paso deavance, denominado Distancia de Descarga, y establece que su longitud, depende de la magnitud pico delrayo. De su aplicación a la protección contra descargas atmosféricas nace el método de las Esferas Rodantescomo herramienta en el diseño de sistemas de protección con elementos pasivos aceptado en normas de laIEC e IEEE. El problema que presenta este método es la dificultad para obtener un arreglo protector con elmínimo de elementos captadores. Como respuesta a esto, se presenta un nuevo método de diseñodenominado de superficies Ionizantes, aplicable a estructuras de cualquier tipo, el cual utiliza el conceptode superficie Ionizante de un arreglo protector, la estructura, y su entorno, para el diseño de sistemas deprotección contra descargas atmosféricas. Para su aplicación se propone una metodología que establece losdatos necesarios y pasos a seguir en el diseño del sistema de protección.  Traditional methods of lightning protection are based on empirical experience. This observation leads tothe implementation of a set of rules that apply with some degree of safety. They state that the zone ofprotection afforded by an air terminal as a Franklin rod is like a cone that provides a shielding angle of45 º. The protection is not complete and has a certain probability of failure on discharges of any

  10. Influence of line isolation overlappings on formation of lightning overvoltages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antropov I. M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The model of substation protection against lightning waves with considered multiple overlappings of line isolation has been presented. Influence of multiple overlapping of isolation on line support on formation of lightning overvoltages has been shown. Ambiguity of determination of lightning current dangerous parameters at the fixed length of its front has been revealed

  11. Lightning Bugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 9. Lightning Bugs. B Gajendra Babu M Kannan. General Article Volume 7 Issue 9 September 2002 pp 49-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/09/0049-0055. Keywords.

  12. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  13. Climate analysis of lightning launch commit criteria for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited We have conducted climate analyses of natural lightning activity at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (KSC/CCAFS). These analyses were conducted to improve forecasts of lightning related hazards for, and the planning of, space vehicle launches at KSC/CCAFS. If a space vehicle is hit by lightning during launch, the vehicle and payload may sustain irreparable damage. Lightning-based rules for conducting launch a...

  14. Protecting You/Protecting Me: Effects of an Alcohol Prevention and Vehicle Safety Program on Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary Lou; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Rider, Raamses; Ringwalt, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of Protecting You/Protecting Me (PY/PM), a classroom-based, alcohol-use prevention and vehicle safety program for elementary students in first through fifth grades developed by Mothers Against Drunk Driving. PY/PM lessons and activities focus on teaching children about (1) their brains (why their brain is…

  15. Development of Design Standards and Guidelines for Electromagnetic Compatibility and Lightning Protection for Spacecraft Utilizing Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    This final report presents information concerning technical accomplishments by Tec-Masters, Inc. (TMI) for this contract effort. This effort included the accomplishment and/or submission by TMI of the following items: (1) Literature Survey Report, Electrical Properties of Non-Metallic Composites by Mr. Hugh W. Denny; (2) Interim Report, Composite Materials - Conductivity, Shielding Effectiveness, and Current Carrying Capability by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (3) Fault Current Test Plan by Mr. Ross W. Evans (4) Fault Current Test Procedure by Mr. Ross W. Evans (5) Test Report, Fault Current Through Graphite Filament Reinforced Plastic, NASA CR-4774, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, September 1996, by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (6) Test Plan, Lightning Effects on Composite Materials by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (7) Test Report, Lightning Effects on Composite Materials, NASA CR-4783, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, February 1997, by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (8) Design Guidelines for Shielding Effectiveness, Current Carrying Capability, and the Enhancement of Conductivity of Composite Materials, NASA CR-4784, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, September 1996, by Mr. Ross W. Evans. These items are not attached but are considered to be a part of this final report. Efforts on two additional items were accomplished at no increase in cost to NASA/MSFC. These items consisted of updating the 'MSFC EMC Design and Interference Control Handbook,' and revising the 'Design Guidelines for Shielding Effectiveness, Current Carrying Capability, and the Enhancement of Conductivity of Composite Materials.'

  16. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  17. Localized Fire Protection Assessment for Vehicle Compressed Hydrogen Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Industry has identified localized flame impingement on high pressure composite storage cylinders as an area requiring research due to several catastrophic failures in recent years involving compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. Current standards and...

  18. Intrusion protection of in-vehicle network: study and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Asvestopoulos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    Modern vehicles include several electronic control units (ECUs), organized in a controller area network (CAN), and interact with external networks for reasons such as comfort, infotainment, and autonomy. The security risks from this increasing external interaction are alarming for the safety-critical vehicle systems, since possible attackers have more options for intrusion. For example, an attack might result in malfunctioning braking system and put lives in danger. This thesis examines the t...

  19. 75 FR 6338 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: New Substitute in the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... to use conditions as a substitute for CFC-12 in motor vehicle air conditioning. The proposed... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: New Substitute in the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector Under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program AGENCY: Environmental...

  20. Mitigation Systems for Confined Blast Loading - Crew Protection in Armored Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    sword . While mitigation materials provide critical protection, the mitigation mechanism itself adds weight, thereby decreasing vehicle mobility and...Effects of Tungsten Alloy Property Variations on Penetrator Performance for Spaced Armors.” Advances in Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials

  1. Modeling of the Lightning Plasma Channel Stroke to a Spacecraft during Ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Alfonso; Norgard, John

    2009-11-01

    Lightning protection is an important aspect of modern aerospace design: the increased use of composite materials (vs. metals) reduces the shielding and robustness of the conducting path that the outer shell of a vehicle can present to a lightning discharge. A spacecraft during ascent becomes vulnerable to lightning strokes immediately after leaving the launch pad: in addition to natural lightning conditions, there is the possibility of triggered lightning events, caused by a perturbation of the atmospheric electric field [1]. The purpose of this study, in support of the NASA Constellation program, is to determine the evolution of the plasma current and its distribution on the spacecraft surface. Following earlier ``gas dynamic'' approaches [2], the model considers a plasma channel attached to the ascending spacecraft after a return stroke is established. The conductive exhaust plume [3] is an integral part of the model. The NIMROD 3D plasma fluid code [4] is used to model the plasma channel, reproducing the full transient due to the self-consistent magnetic field and the possibility of sweeping of the attachment point along the moving structure [5]. References: [1] M.A. Uman, Proc. IEEE, 76, 1548 (1988). [2] V. A. Rakov, M. A. Uman, IEEE Trans. EMC, EMC-2940, 403 (1998). [3] J. D. Norgard, G.S. Smith, IEEE Trans. EMC, EMC-29, 157 (1987) [4] C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004). [5] Larsson et al., J. Phys. D, 33, 1876 (2000)

  2. Fire Extinguishing Agents for Protection of Occupied Spaces in Military Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-14

    U.S. ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Fire Extinguishing Agents for Protection of Occupied Spaces in Military...platforms, including Automatic Fire Extinguishing Systems (AFES). • Legacy vehicles use Halon 1301 or HFC-227BC to protect the crew. 1301 has high...not comprehensive. Agents used in US Ground Vehicle Automatic Fire Extinguishing Systems (AFES) Current Applications UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution

  3. Harmful effects of lightning surge discharge on communications terminal equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sisi; Xu, Xiaoying; Tao, Zhigang; Dai, Yanling

    2013-03-01

    The interference problem of lightning surges on electronic and telecommunication products were examined, and a series of experiments were conducted to analyze the failure situations to find out the mechanisms of failures caused by the lightning surge. In addition, the ways in which lightning surges damaged equipment were deduced. It was found that failure positions were scattered and appeared in groups, and most of them were ground discharge. Internet access transformer had high withstand-voltage under the lightning pulse, and the lightning surge seldom passed through the internet access transformer. The lightning current can release to the ground via the computer network adapter of the terminal user. The study will help to improve the performance of lightning surge protection circuit and protection level.

  4. Lightning Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    R R + 2 *( ’ - r +-* (3.10) 1 E identity dyad - -). A. r r-r- I - - for r’ iir ’r -r where the delta function is introduced so that the...cloud processes that produce lightning, hail, and rain. The laboratory is located 3.2 km feet above sea level near South Baldy Peak in the Magdalena ... Magdalena , New Mexico, with the central facility at the New Mexico Tech campus. SYSTEM COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE To determine the radial coverage of

  5. Lightning at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, W. C.; Boyd, B. F.; Jafferis, W.

    1986-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is situated in an area that experiences one of the world's highest rates of cloud-ground lightning strikes, about 600-2000 strikes per summer. Two lightning detection systems have been implemented, the Launch Pad Lightning Warning System (LPLWS) and the Lightning Location and Protection system (LLP). The LPLWS consists of field mills of eight vertically oriented stator sections mounted 10 in. above ground and alternately covered and uncovered as the rotor turns. Differential voltages between covered and uncovered sections furnish electric field amplitude and polarity data. Ten samples per second are telemetered to a central processing facility. The system is used during launch and landing. The LLP has high and low gain components, the former being two direction finder antennas with 100 m strike position finding accuracy, the latter featuring medium gain antennas for 500 m accuracy in locating strikes. The LLP system is used primarily to warn personnel of strike conditions and to lift warnings to avoid lost work time. Several experimental programs have been initiated for triggering lightning strikes and controlling their locations.

  6. NEW APPROACH OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS OF THE LIGHTNING DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Dib Djalel; Mordjaoui Mourad; Hocine Labar

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significant developments in the protection means of electrical and electronic systems against the lightning and its effects. With its unpredictability and aggress if character, the lightning is the most dangerous phenomenon for electrical systems, which requires more interest and greater effort by researchers and designers means of protection. We present in this study a new analytic model of transient electromagnetic fields radiated by the lightning channel. To better estimate our...

  7. Procurement and Delivery of Joint Service Armor Protected Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-29

    iremcnts Oversight Coun cil. The increase of 2,678 MR" P vehicles was based on Mar ine orps Centro I Command ’s need to sllpport surging troop levels...on so lc-source contract pri ce dato 1𔃻� the May 2006 c ntract with PPII fo r the Joint Explos ive Ordnance Disposa l Rap id Response Vchiclc

  8. Rationales for the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, John C. (Editor); Merceret, Francis J. (Editor); Krider, E. Philip; O'Brien, T. Paul; Dye, James E.; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Cummins, Kenneth; Christian, Hugh J.; Madura, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Since natural and triggered lightning are demonstrated hazards to launch vehicles, payloads, and spacecraft, NASA and the Department of Defense (DoD) follow the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) for launches from Federal Ranges. The LLCC were developed to prevent future instances of a rocket intercepting natural lightning or triggering a lightning flash during launch from a Federal Range. NASA and DoD utilize the Lightning Advisory Panel (LAP) to establish and develop robust rationale from which the criteria originate. The rationale document also contains appendices that provide additional scientific background, including detailed descriptions of the theory and observations behind the rationales. The LLCC in whole or part are used across the globe due to the rigor of the documented criteria and associated rationale. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) adopted the LLCC in 2006 for commercial space transportation and the criteria were codified in the FAA's Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for Safety of an Expendable Launch Vehicle (Appendix G to 14 CFR Part 417, (G417)) and renamed Lightning Flight Commit Criteria in G417.

  9. The Unit of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Boeck, William L.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    For the past century, scientists have made quantitative measurements of lightning discharges. In the process, they refined the definition of a lightning unit, or basic quantum of lightning, in order to base it on observable parameters. Although many components of a lightning discharge have been identified, lightning usually occur in groups of discharges or pulses that, although complex, can be organized into units of flashes. This unit definition is based mainly on measurements of lightning from electric field, video, and ground flash lightning locating networks. More recent instrumentation with various combinations of high sensitivity, high temporal, or high spatial resolution often measure signals produced by lightning that do not cleanly divide into flashes. The data from these systems indicate the need or a more fundamental unit for lightning. Such a unit would be of benefit for both basic understanding of lightning and comparing lightning information between instruments. Without a common lightning unit definition, intercomparisons are difficult. For an example, the Lightning Detection And Ranging system (LDAR) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have detected ,flash' rates as high as 600 per minute while analysis based on the Advanced Ground Based Field Mill network (AGBFM) detect only 33 "flashes" per minute in the same area and time periods. The satellite based Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) sometimes see single "flashes" that last longer than 10 seconds. Such long duration flashes are not found in electric field records or ground strike location system data sets. The unit of lightning should be based on the fundamental components of the lightning discharge. This should make the unit as generally applicable as possible. For example, studies of NO(x) production by lightning depend on parameters of the individual lightning channels and not the summary flash characteristics. For such studies, the best unit of lightning may be

  10. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and Hot Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this paper is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components. The two primary technical challenges impacting the use of CMC TPS and hot structures for hypersonic vehicles are environmental durability and fabrication, and will be discussed briefly.

  11. Interior Head Impact Protective Components and Materials for Use in US Army Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    MODELING & SIMULATION, TESTING AND VALIDATION (MSTV) TECHNICAL SESSION AUGUST 4-6, 2015 – NOVI, MICHIGAN INTERIOR HEAD IMPACT PROTECTIVE COMPONENTS...rollover and blast events. TARDEC used the knowledge gained from this project to create performance specification requirements for interior head impact...displacement of the underside of the vehicle. U.S. Army vehicle interior structures are typically made of rigid, thick armor and angular

  12. 78 FR 76775 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    .... Appropriate credit for the conditional probability of environmental or operational conditions occurring is... Protection Requirements, either have the common dictionary meaning or are defined in Advisory Circular 25...

  13. Crew Exploration Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Fire Protection Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard; Tuan, George C.

    2007-01-01

    As part of preparing for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) worked on developing the requirements to manage the fire risk. The new CEV poses unique challenges to current fire protection systems. The size and configuration of the vehicle resembles the Apollo capsule instead of the current Space Shuttle or the International Space Station. The smaller free air volume and fully cold plated avionic bays of the CEV requires a different approach in fire protection than the ones currently utilized. The fire protection approach discussed in this paper incorporates historical lessons learned and fire detection and suppression system design philosophy spanning from Apollo to the International Space Station. Working with NASA fire and materials experts, this approach outlines the best requirements for both the closed out area of the vehicle, such as the avionics bay, and the crew cabin area to address the unique challenges due to the size and configuration of the CEV.

  14. Protection of Space Vehicles from Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    As the environment that puts space vehicles at risk can never be eliminated, space vehicles must implement protection against the MMOD environment. In general, this protection has been implemented on a risk estimate basis, largely focused on estimates of impactor size and estimated flux. However, there is some uncertainty in applying these methods from data gathered in earth orbit to excursions outside. This paper discusses different past thresholds and processes of the past and suggests additional refinement or methods that could be used for future space endeavors.

  15. The lightning flash

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Vernon

    2014-01-01

    With contributions from today's leading lightning engineers and researchers, this updated 2nd edition of Vernon Cooray's classic text, The Lightning Flash provides the reader with an essential introduction to lightning and its impact on electrical and electronic equipment. Providing the reader with a thorough background into almost every aspect of lightning and its impact on electrical and electronic equipment, this new edition is updated throughout and features eight new chapters that bring the science up to date.

  16. Fire and lightning: what are the risks and how to be protected?; Incendie et foudre: Quel sont les risques et comment se proteger?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigal, F.

    2011-04-15

    This article reviews the risks of fire and lightning on photovoltaic panels installed on roofs. It appears that the risk of lighting must be taken into account since the direct impact of lightning on photovoltaic panels can be disastrous. The installation of lightning rods or lightning protector is recommended. Concerning fire risks, technical failures or the presence of electric arcs can put fire on solar panels but their occurrence is very low (only about 20 cases reported in Europe for the last 10 years). Tests have shown that standard photovoltaic panels play a low part in the progressing of a fire. There is an electrocution hazard for firemen intervening on a roof bearing solar panels. A device cutting the continuous current generating by the panels is being studied. (A.C.)

  17. 49 CFR 571.305 - Standard No. 305; Electric-powered vehicles: electrolyte spillage and electrical shock protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard No. 305; Electric-powered vehicles... No. 305; Electric-powered vehicles: electrolyte spillage and electrical shock protection. Link to an... Electrical isolation. Electrical isolation between the battery system and the vehicle electricity-conducting...

  18. Catalysis study for space shuttle vehicle thermal protection systems. [for vehicle surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Delgass, W. N.; Nordine, P. C.; Cibrian, R.; Krishnan, N. G.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results on the problem of reducing aerodynamic heating on space shuttle orbiter surfaces are presented. Data include: (1) development of a laboratory flow reactor technique for measuring gamma sub O and gamma sub N on candidate materials at surfaces, T sub w, in the nominal range 1000 to 2000, (2) measurements of gamma sub O and gamma sub N above 1000 K for both the glass coating of a reusable surface insulation material and the siliconized surface of a reinforced pyrolyzed plastic material, (3) measurement of the ablation behavior of the coated RPP material at T sub w is greater than or equal to 2150 K, (4) X-ray photoelectron spectral studies of the chemical constituents on these surfaces before and after dissociated gas exposure, (5) scanning electron micrograph examination of as-received and reacted specimens, and (6) development and exploitation of a method of predicting the aerodynamic heating consquences of these gamma sub O(T sub w) and gamma sub N(T sub w) measurements for critical locations on a radiation cooled orbiter vehicle.

  19. Patterns of Facial Fractures and Protective Device Use in Motor Vehicle Collisions From 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, David A; Saha, Sandeep; Nayar, Harry S; Doyle, John F; Agarwal, Suresh K; Chaiet, Scott R

    2016-12-01

    Facial fractures after motor vehicle collisions are a significant source of facial trauma in patients seen at trauma centers. With recent changes in use of seat belts and advances in airbag technology, new patterns in the incidence of facial fractures after motor vehicle collisions have yet to be quantified. To evaluate the incidence of facial fractures and assess the influence of protective device use in motor vehicle collisions in patients treated at trauma centers in the United States. Using a data set from the National Trauma Data Bank, we retrospectively assessed facial fractures in motor vehicle collisions occurring from 2007 through 2012, reported by level I, II, III, and IV trauma centers. Data analysis was performed from March 13 to September 22, 2015. We characterized the data set by subsite of facial injury using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes including mandible, midface, and nasal fractures. We assessed the influence of variables such as age, sex, race/ethnicity, crash occupant (driver or passenger), use of protective device, and presence or suspicion of alcohol use. A total of 518 106 patients required assessment at a trauma center after a motor vehicle collision, with 56 422 (10.9%) experiencing at least 1 facial fracture. Nasal fracture was the most common facial fracture (5.6%), followed by midface (3.8%), other (3.2%), orbital (2.6%), mandible (2.2%), and panfacial fractures (0.8%). Of the subset sustaining at least 1 facial fracture, 5.8% had airbag protection only, 26.9% used a seat belt only, and 9.3% used both protective devices, while 57.6% used no protective device. Compared with no protective device, the use of an airbag alone significantly reduced the likelihood of facial fracture after a motor vehicle collision (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.79-0.86); use of a seat belt alone had a greater effect (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.56-0.58) and use of both devices provided the greatest odds reduction (odds ratio

  20. Studies on an Electromagnetic Transient Model of Offshore Wind Turbines and Lightning Transient Overvoltage Considering Lightning Channel Wave Impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of offshore wind turbines (WTs, the problem of lightning strikes has become more and more prominent. In order to reduce the failure rate caused by the transient overvoltage of lightning struck offshore WTs, the influencing factors and the response rules of transient overvoltage are analyzed. In this paper, a new integrated electromagnetic transient model of offshore WTs is established by using the numerical calculation method of the electromagnetic field first. Then, based on the lightning model and considering the impedance of the lightning channel, the transient overvoltage of lightning is analyzed. Last, the electromagnetic transient model of offshore WTs is simulated and analyzed by using the alternative transients program electro-magnetic transient program (ATP-EMTP software. The influence factors of lightning transient overvoltage are studied. The main influencing factors include the sea depth, the blade length, the tower height, the lightning flow parameters, the lightning strike point, and the blade rotation position. The simulation results show that the influencing factors mentioned above have different effects on the lightning transient overvoltage. The results of the study have some guiding significance for the design of the lightning protection of the engine room.

  1. Lightning current tests on radars and similar structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2010-01-01

    A lightning stroke presents a real challenge due to its potential to cause irreversible damage on electronics. Future systems are packaged in composite shielding materials, which give little or no protection with respect to the electromagnetic fields caused by a nearby strike. A direct lightning

  2. A Field Observation on Lightning Performance Improvement of Overhead Distribution Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Zoro, Reynaldo; Mefiardhi, Ryan; Hidayat, Syarif; Mardiana, Redy

    2009-01-01

    Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these imp...

  3. Investigation of Lightning-Initiated Flashover Faults in Medium Voltage Overhead Lines - Modelling and Experimental Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Lightning can cause flashovers on Medium Voltage (MV) lines from both direct and nearby strikes. The work presented in this dissertation thoroughly investigates the characteristics of lightning-initiated flashover faults, expected overvoltage stress and the performance of different surge protection schemes to mitigate the lightning overvoltages. A full-scale experimental set-up is established to investigate the nature of lightning-initiated flashover faults in MV lines. The flashover volt...

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Thermal Protection Techniques for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, John R.; Cowart, Kris

    2001-01-01

    A method for integrating Aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle RLV design is presented in this thesis. This process allows for faster turn-around time to converge a RLV design through the advent of designing an optimized thermal protection system (TPS). It consists of the coupling and automation of four computer software packages: MINIVER, TPSX, TCAT and ADS. MINIVER is an Aeroheating code that produces centerline radiation equilibrium temperatures, convective heating rates, and heat loads over simplified vehicle geometries. These include flat plates and swept cylinders that model wings and leading edges, respectively. TPSX is a NASA Ames material properties database that is available on the World Wide Web. The newly developed Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT) uses finite difference methods to carry out a transient in-depth I-D conduction analysis over the center mold line of the vehicle. This is used along with the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) code to correctly size the vehicle's thermal protection system JPS). The numerical optimizer ADS uses algorithms that solve constrained and unconstrained design problems. The resulting outputs for this process are TPS material types, unit thicknesses, and acreage percentages. TCAT was developed for several purposes. First, it provides a means to calculate the transient in-depth conduction seen by the surface of the TPS material that protects a vehicle during ascent and reentry. Along with the in-depth conduction, radiation from the surface of the material is calculated along with the temperatures at the backface and interior parts of the TPS material. Secondly, TCAT contributes added speed and automation to the overall design process. Another motivation in the development of TCAT is optimization.

  5. Lightweight Ablative and Ceramic Thermal Protection System Materials for NASA Exploration Systems Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gubert, Michael K.; Milos, Frank S.; Kiser, James D.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Koenig, John R.

    2006-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among NASA Centers, the "Lightweight Nonmetallic Thermal Protection Materials Technology" Project was set up to assist mission/vehicle design trade studies, to support risk reduction in thermal protection system (TPS) material selections, to facilitate vehicle mass optimization, and to aid development of human-rated TPS qualification and certification plans. Missions performing aerocapture, aerobraking, or direct aeroentry rely on advanced heatshields that allow reductions in spacecraft mass by minimizing propellant requirements. Information will be presented on candidate materials for such reentry approaches and on screening tests conducted (material property and space environmental effects tests) to evaluate viable candidates. Seventeen materials, in three classes (ablatives, tiles, and ceramic matrix composites), were studied. In additional to physical, mechanical, and thermal property tests, high heat flux laser tests and simulated-reentry oxidation tests were performed. Space environmental effects testing, which included exposures to electrons, atomic oxygen, and hypervelocity impacts, was also conducted.

  6. International Space Station (ISS) Soyuz Vehicle Descent Module Evaluation of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Penetration Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The descent module (DM) of the ISS Soyuz vehicle is covered by thermal protection system (TPS) materials that provide protection from heating conditions experienced during reentry. Damage and penetration of these materials by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts could result in loss of vehicle during return phases of the mission. The descent module heat shield has relatively thick TPS and is protected by the instrument-service module. The TPS materials on the conical sides of the descent module (referred to as backshell in this test plan) are exposed to more MMOD impacts and are relatively thin compared to the heat shield. This test program provides hypervelocity impact (HVI) data on materials similar in composition and density to the Soyuz TPS on the backshell of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz TPS penetration risk assessments. The impact testing was coordinated by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) Group [1] in Houston, Texas. The HVI testing was conducted at the NASA-JSC White Sands Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Figure

  7. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Thermal Protection Systems for Single Stage to Orbit Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Reginald A.; Stanley, Thomas Troy

    1999-01-01

    Presented is a design tool and process that connects several disciplines which are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system and in the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); the thermal protection system (TPS) is linked directly to almost every major system. The propulsion system pushes the vehicle to velocities on the order of 15 times the speed of sound in the atmosphere before pulling up to go to orbit which results high temperatures on the external surfaces of the vehicle. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. To adequately determine insulation masses for a vehicle such as the one described above, the aeroheating loads must be calculated and the TPS thicknesses must be calculated for the entire vehicle. To accomplish this an ascent or reentry trajectory is obtained using the computer code Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST). The trajectory is then used to calculate the convective heat rates on several locations on the vehicles using the Miniature Version of the JA70 Aerodynamic Heating Computer Program (MINIVER). Once the heat rates are defined for each body point on the vehicle, then insulation thicknesses that are required to maintain the vehicle within structural limits are calculated using Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) models. If the TPS masses are too heavy for the performance of the vehicle the process may be repeated altering the trajectory or some other input to

  8. Nowcasting of Lightning-Related Accidents in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrlich, Laura; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Tropical Africa is the world capital of thunderstorm activity with the highest density of strikes per square kilometer per year. As a result it is also the continent with perhaps the highest casualties and injuries from direct lightning strikes. This region of the globe also has little lightning protection of rural homes and schools, while many casualties occur during outdoor activities (e.g. farming, fishing, sports, etc.) In this study we investigated two lightning-caused accidents that got wide press coverage: A lightning strike to a Cheetah Center in Namibia which caused a huge fire and great destruction (16 October 2013), and a plane crash in Mali where 116 people died (24 July 2014). Using data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) we show that the lightning data alone can provide important early warning information that can be used to reduce risks and damages and loss of life from lightning strikes. We have developed a now-casting scheme that allows for early warnings across Africa with a relatively low false alarm rate. To verify the accuracy of our now-cast, we have performed some statistical analysis showing relatively high skill at providing early warnings (lead time of a few hours) based on lightning alone. Furthermore, our analysis can be used in forensic meteorology for determining if such accidents are caused by lightning strikes.

  9. Lightning and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E.

    2012-12-01

    Lightning is of interest in the domain of climate change for several reasons: (1) thunderstorms are extreme forms of moist convection, and lightning flash rate is a sensitive measure of that extremity, (2) thunderstorms are deep conduits for delivering water substance from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and stratosphere, and (3) global lightning can be monitored continuously and inexpensively within a natural framework (the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and Schumann resonances). Lightning and temperature, and lightning and upper tropospheric water vapor, are positively correlated on weather-related time scales (diurnal, semiannual, and annual) with a lightning temperature sensitivity of order 10% per oC. Lightning also follows temperature variations on the ENSO time scale, both locally and globally. The response of lightning in some of its extreme forms (exceptional flash rates and the prevalence of sprite-producing mesoscale lightning, for example) to temperature variations will be addressed. Consistently obtained records of lightning activity on longer time scales are scarce as stable detection networks are uncommon. As a consequence, thunder day data have been used to extend the lightning record for climate studies, with evidence for increases over decades in urban areas. Global records of lightning following Schumann resonance intensity and from space-based optical sensors (OTD and LIS) are consistent with the record of ionospheric potential representing the global electrical circuit in showing flat behavior over the few decades. This flatness is not well understood, though the majority of all lightning flashes are found in the tropics, the most closely regulated portion of the atmosphere. Other analysis of frequency variations of Schumann resonances in recent decades shows increased lightning in the northern hemisphere, where the global warming is most pronounced. The quantity more fundamental than temperature for lightning control is cloud buoyancy

  10. Birth of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  11. Chemical Safety Alert: Lightning Hazard to Facilities Handling Flammable Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raises awareness about lightning strikes, which cause more death/injury and damage than all other environmental elements combined, so industry can take proper precautions to protect equipment and storage or process vessels containing flammable materials.

  12. A Method of Integrating Aeroheating into Conceptual Reusable Launch Vehicle Design: Evaluation of Advanced Thermal Protection Techniques for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, John R.; Cowart, Kris

    2001-01-01

    A method for integrating Aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle (RLV) design is presented in this thesis. This process allows for faster turn-around time to converge a RLV design through the advent of designing an optimized thermal protection system (TPS). It consists of the coupling and automation of four computer software packages: MINIVER, TPSX, TCAT, and ADS. MINIVER is an Aeroheating code that produces centerline radiation equilibrium temperatures, convective heating rates, and heat loads over simplified vehicle geometries. These include flat plates and swept cylinders that model wings and leading edges, respectively. TPSX is a NASA Ames material properties database that is available on the World Wide Web. The newly developed Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT) uses finite difference methods to carry out a transient in-depth 1-D conduction analysis over the center mold line of the vehicle. This is used along with the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) code to correctly size the vehicle's thermal protection system (TPS). The numerical optimizer ADS uses algorithms that solve constrained and unconstrained design problems. The resulting outputs for this process are TPS material types, unit thicknesses, and acreage percentages. TCAT was developed for several purposes. First, it provides a means to calculate the transient in-depth conduction seen by the surface of the TPS material that protects a vehicle during ascent and reentry. Along with the in-depth conduction, radiation from the surface of the material is calculated along with the temperatures at the backface and interior parts of the TPS material. Secondly, TCAT contributes added speed and automation to the overall design process. Another motivation in the development of TCAT is optimization. In some vehicles, the TPS accounts for a high percentage of the overall vehicle dry weight. Optimizing the weight of the TPS will thereby lower the percentage of the dry weight accounted for by

  13. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    facility, when the facility is struck by lightning. In the following examples we will use Dr. Merewether's calculations from a poor quality Faraday cage as the input for the RF coupling analysis. coupling of radio frequency (RF) energy to explosive components is an indirect effect of currents [1]. If HE is adequately separated from the walls of the facility that is struck by disassembled have been turned into Faraday-cage structures to protect against lightning is initiation of the HE. last couple of decades, DOE facilities where HE is manufactured, assembled, stored or lightning. The most sensitive component is typically a detonator, and the safety concern lightning, electrons discharged from the clouds should not reach the HE components. radio receiver, the metal cable of a detonator can extract energy from the EM fields. This to the earth will create electromagnetic (EM) fields in the facility. Like an antenna in a

  14. Rear seat safety: Variation in protection by occupant, crash and vehicle characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Dennis R; Jermakian, Jessica S; Kallan, Michael J; McCartt, Anne T; Arbogast, Kristy B; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Myers, Rachel K

    2015-07-01

    front seat (RR=0.27, 95% CI 0.12-0.58 for 0-3 years, RR=0.55, 95% CI 0.30-0.98 for 4-8 years) but was higher for restrained 9-12-year-old children (RR=1.83, 95% CI 1.18-2.84). There was no evidence for a difference in risk of death in the rear vs. front seat for occupants ages 13-54, but there was some evidence for an increased relative risk of death for adults age 55 and older in the rear vs. passengers in the right front seat (RR=1.41, 95% CI 0.94-2.13), though we could not exclude the possibility of no difference. After controlling for occupant age and gender, the relative risk of death for restrained rear row occupants was significantly higher than that of front seat occupants in model year 2007 and newer vehicles and significantly higher in rear and right side impact crashes. Results of this study extend prior research on the relative safety of the rear seat compared with the front by examining a more contemporary fleet of vehicles. The rear row is primarily occupied by children and adolescents, but the variable relative risk of death in the rear compared with the front seat for occupants of different age groups highlights the challenges in providing optimal protection to a wide range of rear seat occupants. Findings of an elevated risk of death for rear row occupants, as compared with front row passengers, in the newest model year vehicles provides further evidence that rear seat safety is not keeping pace with advances in the front seat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Transient Phenomena Due to a Direct Lightning Strike on a Wind Energy System

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael B. Rodrigues; Victor M. F. Mendes; João P. S. Catalão

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the protection of wind energy systems against the direct effects of lightning. As wind power generation undergoes rapid growth, lightning damages involving wind turbines have come to be regarded as a serious problem. Nevertheless, very few studies exist yet in Portugal regarding lightning protection of wind energy systems using numerical codes. A new case study is presented in this paper, based on a wind turbine with an interconnecting transformer, for the analysi...

  16. Discussions on a long gap discharge to an EHV transmission tower by a rocket triggered lightning experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Koichi; Wada, Atsushi; Horii, Kenji

    1991-01-01

    The triggered lightning experiments using a rocket have been carried out on a winter mountain in Japan since 1986. For the four years from 1986 to 1989, 39 rockets were launched and 19 of them triggered lightning strikes. The emphasis here is on the methodology for triggering lightning to the transmission system. Completed experiments are discussed. The failure of lightning protection and the striking distance are noted.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of protective countermeasures in underride motor vehicle accidents - biomed 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sri; Enz, Bruce; Ponder, Perry L; Anderson, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Traffic safety has been significantly improved over the past several decades reducing injury and fatality rates. However, there is a paucity of research effort to address the safety issues in underride accidents, specifically the side underride crashes. It is well known that the compromise of occupant space in the vehicle leads to a higher probability of serious or fatal injuries. A better understanding of occupant protection and mechanism of injuries involved in side underride accidents assists in the advancement of safety measures. The present work evaluates the injury potential to occupants during side underride crashes using the car-to-trailer crash methodology. Four crash tests were conducted into the side of a stationary trailer fitted with the side underride guard system (SURG). The SURG used in these tests is 25% lighter than the previous design. A 5th percentile hybrid III female dummy was placed in the driver seat and restrained with the three-point lap and shoulder harness. The anthropometric dummy was instrumented with a head triaxial accelerometer, a chest triaxal accelerometer, a load cell to measure neck force and moment, and a load cell to measure the femur force. The vehicle acceleration was measured using a traxial accelerometer in the rear center tunnel. High speed, standard video and still photos were taken. In all tests, the intrusion was limited to the front structure of the vehicle without any significant compromise to the occupant space. Results indicate that the resultant head and chest accelerations, head injury criterion (HIC), neck force and moment, and femur force were well below the injury tolerance. The present findings support the hypothesis that the SURG not only limits or eliminates the intrusion into the occupant space but also results in biomechanical injury values well below the tolerance limit in motor vehicle crashes.

  18. Upward Lightning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, C.; Saba, M. M.; Alves, J.; Warner, T. A.; Albrecht, R. I.; Bie, L. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of upward lightning from tall objects have been reported since 1939. Interest in this subject has grown recently, some of it because of the rapid expansion of wind power generation. Also, with the increasing number of tall buildings and towers, there will be a corresponding increase in the number of upward lightning flashes from these structures. Reports from recent field observations are beginning to address the nature of upward lightning initiation, but much still needs to be learned. Examples are studies of upward lightning from towers in winter thunderstorms in Japan (Wang and Takagi, 2010; and Lu et al., 2009) and summer thunderstorms in Europe (Miki et al., 2005; Flache et al., 2008; and Diendorfer et al., 2009; Zhou et al., 2011) and in North America (Mazur and Ruhnke, 2011; Hussein et al., 2011; Warner, 2011, and Warner et al., 2011). Up to January 2012, no upward flash had ever been registered in Brazil. With the help of some video cameras, we recorded 15 upward lightning which started from one of the towers located on Peak Jaraguá in the city of São Paulo. This paper describes the first results of this field campaign. A combination of high-speed video and standard definition video were used to record upward lightning flashes from multiple towers in Sao Paulo, Brazil, a city located in southeastern Brazil with a population over 10 million people, an average elevation of around 800 meters above sea level, and a flash density of 15 flashes/km2/year. Observations of 15 upward flashes made with these assets were analyzed along with BrasilDAT Lightning Detection Network and a lightning mapping array (LMA) and electric field sensors.

  19. Lightning Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    resuscitation [9]. The primary cause of death following lightning strike is asystolic cardiac arrest or ventricular fibrillation [6,34,38,39]. Lightning causes a...who do not arrest) by hypertension, tachycardia , non-specific EKG changes, and contraction-band myocardial necrosis. Myocardial infarction, however, is...steady improvement of the cool extremity, with subsequent return of pulses , is the more likely outcome. Although extensive muscle damage following light

  20. Situational Lightning Climatologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. It was believed there were two flow systems, but it has been discovered that actually there are seven distinct flow regimes. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has recalculated the lightning climatologies for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and the eight airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) County Warning Area (CWA) using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The software determines the location of each CG lightning strike with 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-nmi (.9.3-, 18.5-, 37-, 55.6-km) radii from each airfield. Each CG lightning strike is binned at 1-, 3-, and 6-hour intervals at each specified radius. The software merges the CG lightning strike time intervals and distance with each wind flow regime and creates probability statistics for each time interval, radii, and flow regime, and stratifies them by month and warm season. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface (GUI) with the new data.

  1. The physics of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Uman, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being one of the most familiar and widely recognized natural phenomena, lightning remains relatively poorly understood. Even the most basic questions of how lightning is initiated inside thunderclouds and how it then propagates for many tens of kilometers have only begun to be addressed. In the past, progress was hampered by the unpredictable and transient nature of lightning and the difficulties in making direct measurements inside thunderstorms, but advances in instrumentation, remote sensing methods, and rocket-triggered lightning experiments are now providing new insights into the physics of lightning. Furthermore, the recent discoveries of intense bursts of X-rays and gamma-rays associated with thunderstorms and lightning illustrate that new and interesting physics is still being discovered in our atmosphere. The study of lightning and related phenomena involves the synthesis of many branches of physics, from atmospheric physics to plasma physics to quantum electrodynamics, and provides a plethora of challenging unsolved problems. In this review, we provide an introduction to the physics of lightning with the goal of providing interested researchers a useful resource for starting work in this fascinating field. By what physical mechanism or mechanisms is lightning initiated in the thundercloud? What is the maximum cloud electric field magnitude and over what volume of the cloud? What, if any, high energy processes (runaway electrons, X-rays, gamma rays) are involved in lightning initiation and how? What is the role of various forms of ice and water in lightning initiation? What physical mechanisms govern the propagation of the different types of lightning leaders (negative stepped, first positive, negative dart, negative dart-stepped, negative dart-chaotic) between cloud and ground and the leaders inside the cloud? What is the physical mechanism of leader attachment to elevated objects on the ground and to the flat ground? What are the characteristics

  2. Ball lightning burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications.

  3. Lightning testing of a linear optical position transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Jon

    1994-10-01

    An advantage to using a Fly-By-Light system with fiberoptic transducers and interconnects is immunity to disrupts and/or failure due to lightning strikes. The most vulnerable area of any flight control system on a helicopter is the swashplate region, where linear optical position transducers (LOPTs) would measure mean rotor actuator ram position. On the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter, LOPTs would be mounted inside the cylinders of these rams, providing protection from a direct lightning attachment to the ram. Lightning survivability testing was conducted at the Boeing Developmental Center's Lightning Facility the week of December 14 - 18, 1992. A time-division multiplexed LOPT was tested in a protected, aircraft-similar installation as well as unprotected. Transducer data during the strikes were compared to the results of similar tests performed on a linear variable differential transformer.

  4. Laboratory demonstration of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Anton I; Stepanov, Sergei I; Shabanov, Gennadii D [B.P. Konstantinov St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Leningrad region, Rusian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2004-01-31

    A common laboratory facility for creating glowing flying plasmoids akin to a natural ball lightning, allowing a number of experiments to be performed to investigate the main properties of ball lightning, is described. (methodological notes)

  5. Wireless Subsurface Sensors for Health Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems on Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) in order to reduce life cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to develop inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and industry partners to develop "wireless" devices that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor temperature or other quantities of interest. These devices are sensors integrated with radio-frequency identification (RFID) microchips to enable non-contact communication of sensor data to an external reader that may be a hand-held scanner or a large portal. Both passive and active prototype devices have been developed. The passive device uses a thermal fuse to indicate the occurrence of excessive temperature. This device has a diameter under 0.13 cm. (suitable for placement in gaps between ceramic TPS tiles on an RLV) and can withstand 370 C for 15 minutes. The active device contains a small battery to provide power to a thermocouple for recording a temperature history during flight. The bulk of the device must be placed beneath the TPS for protection from high temperature, but the thermocouple can be placed in a hot location such as near the external surface.

  6. Experimental studies of the dilution of vehicle exhaust pollutants by environment-protecting pervious pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Ming; Chen, Jui-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Hui; Lin, Wei-Shian; Yen, M-T; Chen, Ting-Hao

    2012-01-01

    This study determines whether environment-protecting pervious pavement can dilute pollutants immediately after emissions from vehicle. The turbulence-driven dry-deposition process is too slow to be considered in this aspect. The pavement used is the JW pavement (according to its inventors name), a high-load-bearing water-permeable pavement with patents in over 100 countries, which has already been used for more than 8 years in Taiwan and is well suited to replacing conventional road pavement, making the potential implementation of the study results feasible. The design of this study included two sets of experiments. Variation of the air pollutant concentrations within a fenced area over the JW pavement with one vehicle discharging emissions into was monitored and compared with results over a non-JW pavement. The ambient wind speed was low during the first experiment, and the results obtained were highly credible. It was found that the JW pavement diluted vehicle pollutant emissions near the ground surface by 40%-87% within 5 min of emission; whereas the data at 2 m height suggested that about 58%-97% of pollutants were trapped underneath the pavement 20 min after emission. Those quantitative estimations may be off by +/- 10%, if errors in emissions and measurements were considered. SO2 and CO2 underwent the most significant reduction. Very likely, pollutants were forced to move underneath due to the special design of the pavement. During the second experiment, ambient wind speeds were high and the results obtained had less credibility, but they did not disprove the pollutant dilution capacity of the JW pavement. In order to track the fate of pollutants, parts of the pavement were removed to reveal a micro version of wetland underneath, which could possibly hold the responsibility of absorbing and decomposing pollutants to forms harmless to the environment and human health.

  7. CMC thermal protection system for future reusable launch vehicles: Generic shingle technological maturation and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, T.; Barreteau, R.; Soyris, P.; Foucault, A.; Parenteau, J. M.; Prel, Y.; Guedron, S.

    2009-07-01

    Experimental re-entry demonstrators are currently being developed in Europe, with the objective of increasing the technology readiness level (TRL) of technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. Among these are the Pre-X programme, currently funded by CNES, the French Space Agency, and which is about to enter into development phase B, and the IXV, within the future launcher preparatory programme (FLPP) funded by ESA. One of the major technologies necessary for such vehicles is the thermal protection system (TPS), and in particular the ceramic matrix composites (CMC) based windward TPS. In support of this goal, technology maturation activities named "generic shingle" were initiated beginning of 2003 by SPS, under a CNES contract, with the objective of performing a test campaign of a complete shingle of generic design, in preparation of the development of a re-entry experimental vehicle decided in Europe. The activities performed to date include: the design, manufacturing of two C/SiC panels, finite element model (FEM) calculation of the design, testing of technological samples extracted from a dedicated panel, mechanical pressure testing of a panel, and a complete study of the attachment system. Additional testing is currently under preparation on the panel equipped with its insulation, seal, attachment device, and representative portion of cold structure, to further assess its behaviour in environments relevant to its application The paper will present the activities that will have been performed in 2006 on the prediction and preparation of these modal characterization, dynamic, acoustic as well as thermal and thermo-mechanical tests. Results of these tests will be presented and the lessons learned will be discussed.

  8. Lightning detection in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen L.; Fischer, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Lightning in planetary atmospheres is now a well-established concept. Here we discuss the available detection techniques for, and observations of, planetary lightning by spacecraft, planetary landers and, increasingly, sophisticated terrestrial radio telescopes. Future space missions carrying lightning-related instrumentation are also summarised, specifically the European ExoMars mission and Japanese Akatsuki mission to Venus, which could both yield lightning observations in 2016.

  9. Lightning detection in planetary atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Aplin, Karen L; Fischer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Lightning in planetary atmospheres is now a well-established concept. Here we discuss the available detection techniques for, and observations of, planetary lightning by spacecraft, planetary landers and, increasingly, sophisticated terrestrial radio telescopes. Future space missions carrying lightning-related instrumentation are also summarised, specifically the European ExoMars mission and Japanese Akatsuki mission to Venus, which could both yield lightning observations in 2016.

  10. Laboratory demonstration of lightning strike pattern on different roof tops installed with Franklin Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Irshad; Baharom, MNR; Ahmed, H.; Luqman, HM.; Zainal, Zainab

    2017-11-01

    Protection against lightning is always a challenging job for the researcher. The consequences due to lightning on different building shapes needs a comprehensive knowledge in order to provide the information to the common man. This paper is mainly concern with lightning pattern when it strikes on the building with different shape. The work is based on the practical experimental work in high voltage laboratory. Different shapes of the scaled structures have been selected in order to investigate the equal distribution of lightning voltage. The equal distribution of lightning voltage will provide the maximum probability of lightning strike on air terminal of the selected shapes. Building shapes have a very important role in lightning protection. The shapes of the roof tops have different geometry and the Franklin rod installation is also varies with changing the shape of the roof top. According to the ambient weather condition of Malaysia high voltage impulse is applied on the lightning rod installed on different geometrical shape. The equal distribution of high voltage impulse is obtained as the geometry of the scaled structure is identical and the air gap for all the tested object is kept the same. This equal distribution of the lightning voltage also proves that the probability of lightning strike is on the corner and the edges of the building structure.

  11. SECRET OF A BALL LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Savich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A ball lightning is a natural phenomenon that occurs at a streak lightning stroke with its action by thermal and magnetic energy releasing around the streak lightning channel and transforming, in the end, the surrounding air into a steam cloud that transits into ferroelectric state under the magnetic field action.

  12. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  13. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  14. 75 FR 15621 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AK38 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety... Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 114 that certain motor vehicles with an automatic transmission..., or ``Act'') was signed into law.\\1\\ This Act relates to several aspects of motor vehicle safety...

  15. From an electron avalanche to the lightning discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalikhanov, B. Zh.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to describe qualitatively the physics of processes which begin with an electron avalanche and finish in a lightning discharge. A streamer model is considered that is based on studies of the recently discovered processes occurring in the prestreamer region. The investigation and analysis of these processes enabled making the conclusion that they are, in essence, the attendant processes, which ensure the electron avalanche-to-streamer transition, and may be interpreted as a manifestation of properties of a double charge layer exposed to the external electric field. The pressing problems of physical processes which form a lightning discharge are considered from the standpoint of new ideas about the mechanism of the streamer formation and growth. Causes of the emergence of coherent super-high-frequency radiation of a leader and the neutron production in a lightning discharge are revealed that have not been explained so far in the theory of gas discharge. Based also on new ideas about the lightning discharge, a simple ball-lightning model, providing answers to almost allquestions formulated from numerous observations on the behavior of ball lightning, is offered, and the need of a new design of lightning protection instead of the traditional rod is discussed.

  16. Formation of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberg, P.A. (2833 Lawton Drive, Amarillo, Texas (USA))

    A plasma continuum model for the formation of ball lightning is developed based on a substantial number of reports that the ball is often in the discharge column of a previous lightning stroke. The usual method of setting up the plasma equation for a one-component electron plasma is used. An approximate equation for the plasma is derived from the describing equation which is then solved exactly in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. The formation of the ball is based on a nonlinearity of the plasma equation which under certain circumstances permits the field to collapse into a small region. This collapse is interpreted to be ball lightning. The approximate equation derived for the plasma has the same form as a previous equation used to describe the formation of the fireball plasma.

  17. Produce documents and media information. [on lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzmann, Melanie A.; Miller, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lightning data and information were collected from the United States, Germany, France, Brazil, China, and Australia for the dual purposes of compiling a global lightning data base and producing publications on the Marshall Space Flight Center's lightning program. Research covers the history of lightning, the characteristics of a storm, types of lightningdischarges, observations from airplanes and spacecraft, the future fole of planes and spacecraft in lightning studies, lightning detection networks, and the relationships between lightning and rainfall. Descriptions of the Optical Transient Dectector, the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and the Lightning Mapper Sensor are included.

  18. Lightning Imaging with LOFAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that LOFAR can be used as a lightning mapping array with a resolution that is orders of magnitude better than existing arrays. In addition the polarization of the radiation can be used to track the direction of the stepping discharges.

  19. Lightning imaging with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Scholten; S. Buitink; R. Dina (Roxana); Q. Dorosti Hasankiadeh (Qader); W. Frieswijk; F. Hendriks (Freddie); J. Muller (Jeroen); D. Sardjan (Danny); T.N.G. Trinh (Gia); Bonardi (A.); A. Corstanje; U. Ebert (Ute); H. Falcke; J.R. Hörandel; P. Mitra; K. Mulrey; A. Nelles; J.P. Rachen; L. Rossetto; C. Rutjes (Casper); P. Schellart; S. Thoudam; S. ter Veen (Sander); T. Winchen

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe show that LOFAR can be used as a lightning mapping array with a resolution that is orders of magnitude better than existing arrays. In addition the polarization of the radiation can be used to track the direction of the stepping discharges.

  20. Lightning: SED Fitting Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.

    2017-11-01

    Lightning is a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting procedure that quickly and reliably recovers star formation history (SFH) and extinction parameters. The SFH is modeled as discrete steps in time. The code consists of a fully vectorized inversion algorithm to determine SFH step intensities and combines this with a grid-based approach to determine three extinction parameters.

  1. Lightning Damage to Wind Turbine Blades From Wind Farms in the U.S

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Madsen, Søren Find; Nissim, Maya

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents statistical data about lightning damage on wind turbine blades reported at different wind farms in the U.S. The analysis is based on 304 cases of damage due to direct lightning attachment on the blade surface. This study includes a large variety of blades with different lengths......, laminate structure, and lightning protection systems. The statistics consist of the distribution of lightning damage along the blade and classify the damage by severity. In addition, the frequency of lightning damage to more than one blade of a wind turbine after a thunderstorm is assessed. The results...... of the analysis show that the majority of lightning damage is concentrated at the tip of the blade. Furthermore, all of the blades involved in the study show great similarity in the distribution of damage along the blade and the characteristics of the damages, even concerning the significant differences...

  2. Rationales for the Lightning Flight-Commit Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, John C. (Editor); Merceret, Francis J.; Krider, E. Philip; Dye, James E.; OBrien, T. Paul; Rust, W. David; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Madura, John T.; Christian, Hugh J.

    2010-01-01

    Since natural and artificially-initiated (or "triggered") lightning are demonstrated hazards to the launch of space vehicles, the American space program has responded by establishing a set of Lightning Flight Commit Criteria (LFCC), also known as Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC), and associated Definitions to mitigate the risk. The LLCC apply to all Federal Government ranges and similar LFCC have been adopted by the Federal Aviation Administration for application at state-operated and private spaceports. The LLCC and Definitions have been developed, reviewed, and approved over the years of the American space program, progressing from relatively simple rules in the mid-twentieth century (that were inadequate) to a complex suite for launch operations in the early 21st century. During this evolutionary process, a "Lightning Advisory Panel (LAP)" of top American scientists in the field of atmospheric electricity was established to guide it. Details of this process are provided in a companion document entitled "A History of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and the Lightning Advisory Panel for America s Space program" which is available as NASA Special Publication 2010-216283. As new knowledge and additional operational experience have been gained, the LFCC/LLCC have been updated to preserve or increase their safety and to increase launch availability. All launches of both manned and unmanned vehicles at all Federal Government ranges now use the same rules. This simplifies their application and minimizes the cost of the weather infrastructure to support them. Vehicle operators and Range safety personnel have requested that the LAP provide a detailed written rationale for each of the LFCC so that they may better understand and appreciate the scientific and operational justifications for them. This document provides the requested rationales

  3. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  4. Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning Calculations show that high-energy ball lightning may consist of a ball of plasma containing a large circular electric current arising as an eddy current generated by lightning. Synthetic ball lightning might serve as a method of plasma confinement for purposes of nuclear fusion. In this paper, three articles concerning ball lightning and the related phenomenon of large ball lightning are combined to provide insight into this rarely glimpsed occurrence.

  5. Incentives for environmentally friendly vehicles. A report from the Environment and Health Protection Administration in Stockholm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksson, Cecilia; Paedam, S. [Inregia AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    This report deals with incentives for environmentally friendly vehicles. The report includes a description of the current status of these vehicles in Sweden, Stockholm County Council, and the City of Stockholm. A forecast of possible development of zero and low emission vehicles is carried out. The major obstacles which currently hinder a market for these vehicles are noted. In order to determine market readiness and factors which affect these firms' purchase of vehicles, interviews were carried out with private firms. This analysis indicates that institutional barriers in Sweden hinder zero and low emission vehicles, with laws and tax policies which offer conflicting signals. To follow international developments, these obstacles must be reduced. Therefore, it is important that Stockholm works to create a positive climate for environmentally friendly vehicles. This means that it is important that the policies recommended in this report are implemented with adequate intensity. Because knowledge about zero and low emission vehicles is limited, there is a need to produce factual information. Information can be spread to a larger group, but it is more cost effective to reach a group which is most likely to accept environmentally friendly vehicles. This could include companies with environmental profiles, or those who drive and use company cars. To increase the effectiveness of this information campaign, we suggest that the City also maintain a demonstration fleet with loaner cars for companies who wish to test these vehicles in daily operation before deciding whether or not to purchase them. The incentive package recommended for Stockholm includes offering parking rebates to various groups who park in the city centre; residents , commercial vehicles, and temporary visitors. For equity reasons, all groups should in practice be offered the rebate. To increase the positive effect of the incentive, environmentally friendly vehicles should also be allowed to drive in

  6. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  7. FNAS lightning detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George P.; Alzmann, Melanie A.

    1993-01-01

    A review of past and future investigations into lightning detection from space was incorporated into a brochure. Following the collection of background information, a meeting was held to discuss the format and contents of the proposed documentation. An initial outline was produced and decided upon. Photographs to be included in the brochure were selected. Quotations with respect to printing the document were requested. In the period between 28 March and June 1993, work continued on compiling the text. Towards the end of this contract, a review of the brochure was undertaken by the technical monitor. Photographs were being revised and additional areas of lightning research were being considered for inclusion into the brochure. Included is a copy of the draft (and photographs) which is still being edited by the technical monitor at the time of this report.

  8. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  9. Ball Lightning Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitin, A. I.; Dijkhuis, G. C.

    Ball lightning (BL) researches' review and theoretical models of three different authors are presented. The general review covers investigations from 1838 until the present day, and includes a discussion on observation data, experimental modeling, and theoretical approaches. Section 6.1 is written by Bychkov and Nikitin; authors of the sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 are, respectively, Bychkov, Nikitin and Dijkhuis.

  10. 76 FR 77183 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... and bystanders can hear when the vehicle is not in ``park'' and the driver exits the vehicle. Add a... controls, combined with the new alerts, will have the same effect. We believe these new requirements are... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  11. 75 FR 37343 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    .... As Volvo started introducing rear SBRSs in the U.S. in 2009, NHTSA expanded its data collection..., Volvo remains the only vehicle manufacturer that offers rear SBRSs; furthermore, they have become standard equipment in the majority of Volvo's 2010 model year vehicles.\\17\\ \\17\\ The Volvo models with rear...

  12. FD-TD numerical simulation of an entire lightning strike on the C160 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliot, J. C.; Grando, J.; Muller, J. D.; Ferrieres, X.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental transient electromagnetic field measurements were performed on a Transall C160 aircraft during in-flight lightning strikes. The data allow a test of the predictive capabilities of a three dimensional time domain finite difference code (ALICE) developed at ONERA in order to investigate lightning-aircraft interactions. Using a transfer function technique in the 3D code, it is shown that a bi-leader attached to an aircraft can be simulated by a linear model, and so the electromagnetic fields can be calculated anywhere on the vehicle. Comparison of experimental and numerical results were made for several lightning strikes. Skin current density and electromagnetic field distributions are discussed in detail.

  13. Early Intervention for Alcohol Use Prevention and Vehicle Safety Skills: Evaluating the "Protecting You/Protecting Me" Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Thomas M.; Barker, Edward D.; Bell, Mary Lou; Lewis, Carol M.; Holleran, Lori; Pomeroy, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    The present study reports the evaluation results of the "Protecting You/Protecting Me" (PY/PM) alcohol use prevention and safety curriculum for third, fourth, and fifth graders when taught by high school peer leaders. The primary goal of the PY/PM prevention program, developed by Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), is to prevent injury…

  14. Lightning injuries during snowy conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherington, M; Breed, D W; Yarnell, P R; Smith, W E

    1998-12-01

    Skiers and other snow sports enthusiasts can become lightning casualties. Two such accidents are reported, one being fatal. There are fewer warning signals of impending lightning strikes in winter-like conditions. However, outdoor activists should be aware of at least two suspicious clues: the appearance of convective clouds, and the presence of graupel (snow pellets) during precipitation.

  15. Optical Lightning Detection From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Hugh J., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1995 we have had one or more optical lightning sensors in low earth orbit (LEO) providing near continuous lightning observations of the earth. The resulting data sets have enabled scientists to study global lighting distributions and their variable. Diurnal, seasonal and interannual variabilities are clearly revealed. In addition, because of the exceptionally high detection efficiency of the optical sensing technique and the high spatial resolution, it is possible to study individual clouds and cloud system despite a viewing time that is often as short as 80 seconds. These case studies have demonstrated the importance of total lightning measurements in the study of severe weather. Results from these space-based lightning measurements will be presented as well as the next logical concept - optical observations from geostationary orbit (GEO). With a Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) in GEO, it will be possible to monitor severe weather on a continuous basis and to disseminate the data in less than 60 seconds.

  16. 78 FR 53386 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Occupant Crash Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... meetings with key automobile manufacturers and suppliers, and reviewed the results of the in-depth... allowing manufacturers the design freedom to create innovative lightweight vehicle concepts. The agency...

  17. Cambridge Safer Truck Initiative : Vehicle-Based Strategies to Protect Pedestrians and Bicyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes Volpe, The National Transportation Systems Centers (Volpes) research and recommendations for the City of Cambridge for implementing a number of proven vehicle safety strategies, including truck side guards, blind spot mir...

  18. Protecting Public Health: Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging and the Healthcare Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryder, Carrie; Lommele, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    In 2014, the U.S. transportation sector consumed more than 13 million barrels of petroleum a day, approximately 70% of all domestic petroleum consumption. Internal combustion engine vehicles are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), smog-forming compounds, particulate matter, and other air pollutants. Widespread use of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, including plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), can reduce our national dependence on petroleum and decrease the emissions that impact our air quality and public health. Healthcare organizations are major employers and community leaders that are committed to public well-being and are often early adopters of employer best practices. A growing number of hospitals are offering PEV charging stations for employees to help promote driving electric vehicles, reduce their carbon footprint, and improve local air quality.

  19. Damage to ITS, traffic control and roadway lighting equipment from transient surge and lightning strikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this project was to collect the knowledge needed for the FDOT to either confirm or : improve the adequacy of the FDOTs existing minimum standards for lightning/surge protection, : including devices used and installation procedures. The...

  20. Lightning Initiation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-22

    lightning. The geometric means oftotal pulse duration, width of initial half-cycle, and ratio of initial electric field peak to opposite polarity ...RS 5 18 -5.7 Y - Five stroke flash; first high speed Photron video; E/B field, dE/dt, X- ray, and Incident Current data acquired UF 08-09 7/12/08’ 17...disconnected from the launcher and broke, no trigger UF 08-11 7/12/08 17:52:49 IS&RS 3 17 -5.9 Y - Three stroke flash; Photron video, E/B field, X-ray

  1. Stochastic Models of Lightning and Lightning Observation on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-09-01

    Many observations regarding lightning on Venus are mutually discrepant, with widely varying rates and intensities and many negative reports. A model of lightning as a purely random process with a uniform rate appears to be incompatible with the observation set. While a plausible thesis is that one or more observations are 'wrong' in asserting an interpretation, here I explore models of possible temporal and/or spatial variability of lightning in an attempt to maximize agreement with observations while minimizing the number of model parameters.

  2. 77 FR 15351 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Standards; Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical issues: Ms. Gayle Dalrymple, Office of Crash Avoidance... (FMVSS) No. 114, Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention. In the NPRM, the agency addressed safety...

  3. The lightning climatology of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morné Gijben

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, the South African Weather Service installed a state-of-the-art cloud-to-ground lightning detection network across the country. The data recorded by this network in 2006 was utilised in the development of an initial lightning climatology of South Africa. Until 2010, this climatology was based on data from a single year. This paper updates this climatology with the lightning data for the 2006–2010 period, which is the first actual lightning climatology by the South African Weather Service based on data covering 5 years. A number of different maps were created from these lightning data. These were lightning ground flash density, median peak kiloampere, percentage positive and average flash multiplicity maps. These four maps were in turn used to develop lightning intensity risk, positive lightning risk and total lightning risk maps. Analysis of the maps showed that the highest concentrations of lightning are found over the central to northern interior of the country, with areas along the northern parts of the eastern escarpment experiencing the highest flash densities and falling within the extreme risk category. Both the positive and total lightning risks are severe for almost the entire country. Only towards the west of the country does the lightning risk decrease. This lightning climatology can now be used throughout South Africa for various disciplines. It will be especially useful for setting lightning safety standards and identifying priority areas for installing lightning conductors and conducting public awareness campaigns.

  4. Lightning casualty demographics in Brazil and their implications for safety rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, I.; Pinto, O.; Pinto, I. R. C. A.; Holle, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year study of lightning fatalities in Brazil is presented. It is the most complete study undertaken in South America. The study indicates the death rates in the country sorted by season, state, city, type of region, age, gender and circumstances. Ten years of data were collected from the Federal Civil Defense Agency, the Ministry of Health and the media press. The circumstances of lightning fatalities in Brazil were compared with other countries that have this information available. It also includes an analysis of the differences involved in lightning deaths in each region of Brazil. The results suggest that specific actions should be adopted in terms of lightning protection to minimize risks. Finally, this study provides useful information in order to identify the most important lightning safety rules for the country.

  5. Using Total Lightning Observations to Enhance Lightning Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning is often the underrated threat faced by the public when it comes to dangerous weather phenomena. Typically, larger scale events such as floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes receive the vast majority of attention by both the general population and the media. This comes from the fact that these phenomena are large, longer lasting, can impact a large swath of society at one time, and are dangerous events. The threat of lightning is far more isolated on a case by case basis, although millions of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes hit this United States each year. While attention is given to larger meteorological events, lightning is the second leading cause of weather related deaths in the United States. This information raises the question of what steps can be taken to improve lightning safety. Already, the meteorological community s understanding of lightning has increased over the last 20 years. Lightning safety is now better addressed with the National Weather Service s access to the National Lightning Detection Network data and enhanced wording in their severe weather warnings. Also, local groups and organizations are working to improve public awareness of lightning safety with easy phrases to remember, such as "When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors." The impacts can be seen in the greater array of contingency plans, from airports to sports stadiums, addressing the threat of lightning. Improvements can still be made and newer technologies may offer new tools as we look towards the future. One of these tools is a network of sensors called a lightning mapping array (LMA). Several of these networks exist across the United States. NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT), part of the Marshall Spaceflight Center, has access to three of these networks from Huntsville, Alabama, the Kennedy Space Center, and Washington D.C. The SPoRT program s mission is to help transition unique products and observations into the operational forecast environment

  6. The Effects of Foam Thermal Protection System on the Damage Tolerance Characteristics of Composite Sandwich Structures for Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hodge, A. J.; Jackson, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    For any structure composed of laminated composite materials, impact damage is one of the greatest risks and therefore most widely tested responses. Typically, impact damage testing and analysis assumes that a solid object comes into contact with the bare surface of the laminate (the outer ply). However, most launch vehicle structures will have a thermal protection system (TPS) covering the structure for the majority of its life. Thus, the impact response of the material with the TPS covering is the impact scenario of interest. In this study, laminates representative of the composite interstage structure for the Ares I launch vehicle were impact tested with and without the planned TPS covering, which consists of polyurethane foam. Response variables examined include maximum load of impact, damage size as detected by nondestructive evaluation techniques, and damage morphology and compression after impact strength. Results show that there is little difference between TPS covered and bare specimens, except the residual strength data is higher for TPS covered specimens.

  7. Expanding the Operational Use of Total Lightning Ahead of GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Wood, Lance; Garner, Tim; Nunez, Roland; Kann, Deirdre; Reynolds, James; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Rob; Bobb, William R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) has been transitioning real-time total lightning observations from ground-based lightning mapping arrays since 2003. This initial effort was with the local Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) that could use the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). These early collaborations established a strong interest in the use of total lightning for WFO operations. In particular the focus started with warning decision support, but has since expanded to include impact-based decision support and lightning safety. SPoRT has used its experience to establish connections with new lightning mapping arrays as they become available. The GOES-R / JPSS Visiting Scientist Program has enabled SPoRT to conduct visits to new partners and expand the number of operational users with access to total lightning observations. In early 2014, SPoRT conducted the most recent visiting scientist trips to meet with forecast offices that will used the Colorado, Houston, and Langmuir Lab (New Mexico) lightning mapping arrays. In addition, SPoRT met with the corresponding Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs) to expand collaborations with the aviation community. These visits were an opportunity to learn about the forecast needs of each office visited as well as to provide on-site training for the use of total lightning, setting the stage for a real-time assessment during May-July 2014. With five lightning mapping arrays covering multiple geographic locations, the 2014 assessment has demonstrated numerous uses of total lightning in varying situations. Several highlights include a much broader use of total lightning for impact-based decision support ranging from airport weather warnings, supporting fire crews, and protecting large outdoor events. The inclusion of the CWSUs has broadened the operational scope of total lightning, demonstrating how these data can support air traffic management, particularly in the Terminal Radar Approach

  8. Unsolved Mystery of Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. L.

    Ball lightning is an unusual phenomenon always drawing attention of people. There are still questions about its origination, features, interaction with environment, and phenomena related to it. On a way of studying this phenomenon, there are a lot of difficulties, the basic of them is insufficiency of authentic, scientific data. The chapter sets as the purpose to interest the reader in the problem, to describe conditions of ball lightning occurrence, theories, and its hypotheses explanation, to include readers in a circle of experimental searches in creation of a ball lightning and its analogues, and to describe fascination of a problem and difficulty of its solution.

  9. Induction and Conduction Electromagnetic Waves Caused by Lightning Strike on the Low Voltage Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect lightning strikes can disturb and induce low voltage overheadlines and it can produced overvoltage due to traveling waves along the lines. This overvoltage can damage the equipments connected to it. It was recorded that there were already a lot of damages of electronic equipments and arrestesr located inside the building of Lightning Measurement Station at Mnt. Tangkuban Perahu. Most of the overvoltage which was developed on the low voltage lines were coming from indirect lightning strike nearby due to the fact that most of the lines were covered by trees. Research was carried out to study and evaluate the induction and conduction of the lightning strikes to the LV lines that can lead to the cause of equipment and arrester damages inside the building. Local lightning data for the analysis were derived from measurement system installed at the stations and historical lightning data from lightning detection network called Jadpen (National Lightning Detection Network. The data was used for calculating and evaluating the voltage elevation, induction voltage profiles and conduction in the form of traveling waves using Rusck Model. Two damaged arresters were evaluated and compared and it give the better understanding on how the protection system work.Keywords: 

  10. A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wei; Zhang, Li [School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Li, Qingmin, E-mail: lqmeee@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Lab of HV and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-09-14

    The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

  11. 76 FR 14014 - Public Roundtables: Protecting Consumers in the Sale and Leasing of Motor Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... their local bank or credit union, as well as from the dealer selling the vehicle. Financing obtained at... Dealers Association Report and CNW Marketing Research), and NADA DATA 2010, at 2, respectively (2009 data... Social Security number; date of birth; driver's license number or other state identification number, or...

  12. Attempts to Create Ball Lightning with Triggered Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    mechanisms by which ball lightning is generated. The most commonly reported observation is of an orange-to- grapefruit -size sphere (the range for the vast...glow above a pine tree trunk resting in a swimming pool filled with salt water 6/10/08: UF 08-02 The first successful triggered lightning flash...height reference. A piece of braided wire connected the bottom metal rod electrode to a freshly cut pine tree trunk resting in the swimming pool

  13. 2017 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abeywardhana, Jayalath AMM [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Colin Mackenzie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carter, Austin Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ducru, Pablo Philippe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duignan, Thomas John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gifford, Brendan Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hills, Benjamin Hale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoffman, Kentaro Jack [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Khair, Adnan Ibne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kochanski, Kelly Anne Pribble [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ledwith, Patrick John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leveillee, Joshua Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Sina Genevieve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merians, Hugh Drake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Bryan Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nijjar, Parmeet Kaur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oles, Vladyslav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olszewski, Maciej W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Philipbar, Brad Montgomery [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, David Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rufa, Dominic Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sifain, Andrew E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Justin Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Lauren Taylor Wisbey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svolos, Lampros [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thibault, Joshua Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ushijima-Mwesigwa, Hayato Montezuma [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Claire Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Witzen, Wyatt Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zentgraf, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alred, John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    All members of the T Division Community, students, staff members, group leaders, division management, and other interested individuals are invited to come and support the following student(s) as they present their Lightning Talks.

  14. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ferre, Gregoire Robing [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Grantcharov, Vesselin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Krishnapriyan, Aditi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Le Thien, Minh Quan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lim, Jonathan Ng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Low, Thaddeus Song En [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lystrom, Levi Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Nguyen, Hong T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Pogue, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Revard, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Roy, Julien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Sandor, Csanad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Slavkova, Kalina Polet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Weichman, Kathleen Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Wu, Fei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Yang, Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  15. Fatal lightning strikes in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, O P; Kian, Chong Kah; Ari Husin, Mohammed Husrul; Nanta Kumar, Ranjeev Kumar; Mohammed Yusuf, Wan Yuhana W

    2009-09-01

    Lightning strike is a natural phenomenon with potentially devastating effects and represents one of the important causes of deaths from environmental phenomena. Almost every organ system may be affected as lightning current passes through the human body taking the shortest pathways between the contact points. A 10 years retrospective study (1996-2005) was conducted at University Hospital Kuala Lumpur (20 cases) also including cases during last 3 years from Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah, Klang (7 cases) from the autopsy reports at Forensic Pathology Units of these 2 hospitals. Both these hospitals are attached to University of Malaya. There were 27 fatal cases of lightning strike with male preponderance(92.59%) and male to female ratio of 12.5:1. Majority of victims of lightning strike were from the age group between 30 and 39 years old. Most of the victims were foreign workers. Indonesians workers contributed to 59.26% of overall cases. Majority of them were construction workers who attributed i.e.11 of 27 cases (40.74%). Most of the victims were brought in dead (37.04%). In majority of the cases the lightning incidence occurred in the evenings, with the frequency of 15 of 27 cases (62.5%). The month of December represented with the highest number of cases (5 cases of 23 cases); 2004 had the highest incidence of lightning strike which was 5 (19.23%). Lightning strike incidence occurred when victims had taken shelter (25.9%) under trees or shades. Lightning strike in open areas occurred in 10 of 27 cases (37.0%). Head and neck were the most commonly affected sites with the incidence of 77.78% and 74% respectively in all the victims. Only 29.63% of the cases presented with ear bleeding.

  16. A LIGHTNING CONDUCTOR MONITORING SYSTEM BASED ON A WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mikeš

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated heating, lighting and irrigation systems are nowadays standard features of industrial and commercial buildings, and are also increasingly found in ordinary housing. In addition to the benefits of user comfort, automated technology for buildings saves energy and, above all, it provides enhanced protection against leakage of water and hazardous gases, and against fire hazards. Lightning strikes are a natural phenomenon that poses a significant threat to the safety of buildings. The statistics of the Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech Republic show that buildings are in many cases inadequately protected against lightning strikes, or that systems have been damaged by previous strikes. A subsequent strike can occur within the period between regular inspections, which are normally made at intervals of 2–4 years. Over the whole of Europe, thousands of buildings are subjected to the effects of direct lightning strikes each year. This paper presents ways to carry out wireless monitoring of lightning strikes on buildings and to deal with their impact on lightning conductors. By intervening promptly (disconnecting the power supply, disconnecting the gas supply, sending an engineer to inspect the structure, submitting a report to ARC, etc. we can prevent many downstream effects of direct lightning strikes on buildings (fires, electric shocks, etc. This paper introduces a way to enhance contemporary home automation systems for monitoring lightning strikes based on wireless sensor networks technology.

  17. Prevention of Injury in Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicle Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    outcome. h. Road hazard: Anything on the road affecting the driver’s decisions (e.g., barriers, potholes ). i. Unit activity: Any group...following: a. Collision: Any instance when a vehicle made contact with something other than the road itself (e.g., a barrier, pothole , another...swerved to miss a pothole and collided with a barrier”) is sequenced and parsed into its element categories as follows: (1) pothole ( road hazard), (2

  18. Preliminary tests for an intelligent thermal protection system for space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, Antonio; Felli, Ferdinando; Valente, Teodore; Caponero, Michele A.; Tului, Mario

    2001-04-01

    Re-entry in planetary atmospheres is one of the most challenging environments to be faced by an aerospace structure. Presently space agencies are studying and developing programs to reduce launch costs by developing a new generation reusable launch vehicles. In fact a significant portion of the launch cost, for those vehicles, is represented by maintenance, non destructive testing and personnel involved in ground operations. For instance NASA and Lockeed Martin are leading the VentureStar program, where the real time health monitoring is considered an important aspect, while ESA has now finished a preliminary analysis for different reusable launch vehicle configurations. Fiber optic sensors which can be embedded into structural components can provide an efficient means for fast and reliable structural health monitoring. In this paper the possibility of embedding fiber optic sensors into materials subjected to particularly critical thermal treatments is verified. Several specimens of metal alloys and carbide based powders with embedded optical fibers have been prepared by the high pressure high velocity oxy fuel technique. The tests have proven the feasibility of the embedding with the above mentioned technology which exposes the fibers to quite a severe environment during the deposition. Micrographic analysis and optical transmission tests have been carried out on the sprayed specimens.

  19. Lightning Surge Analysis for 500-kV Transmission Lines using Grounding Model with Dynamic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yoh; Kondo, Shuhei; Hara, Takehisa; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sonoi, Yasuo; Furuoka, Yoshihiro

    It is well known that grounding resistance under huge lightning current injection has current-dependent characteristics, whose mathematical model was already proposed by Liew and Darveniza in 1974. In this paper, where our final goal is reasonable design for lightning protection of 500-kV transmission tower, we adopt the dynamic grounding-resistance model to MODELS-ATP simulation. The effect of the model for the lightning surge analysis on 500-kV transmission line systems is discussed in detail.

  20. The communications industry's requirements and interests. [thunderstorm and lightning data useful to telephone operating companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanaselja, O.

    1979-01-01

    Of interest to the communications industry are the amplitude, waveshape, duration and frequency of lightning-originated voltage surges and transients on the communications network, including the distribution system and AC power supply circuits. The cloud-to-ground lightning discharge and its characteristics are thought to be most meaningful. Of specific interest are peak current, waveshape, number of flashes, strokes per flash, and zone of influence. Accurate and meaningful lightning data at the local level (telephone district office) is necessary for a decision on the appropriate protection level. In addition to lightning, the protection engineer must consider other factors such as: AC induction, switching surges, ground potential rise, soil resistivity, bonding and grounding techniques, shielding and isolation, and exposure of the telephone loop.

  1. Analysis of Transient Phenomena Due to a Direct Lightning Strike on a Wind Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. S. Catalão

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the protection of wind energy systems against the direct effects of lightning. As wind power generation undergoes rapid growth, lightning damages involving wind turbines have come to be regarded as a serious problem. Nevertheless, very few studies exist yet in Portugal regarding lightning protection of wind energy systems using numerical codes. A new case study is presented in this paper, based on a wind turbine with an interconnecting transformer, for the analysis of transient phenomena due to a direct lightning strike to the blade. Comprehensive simulation results are provided by using models of the Restructured Version of the Electro-Magnetic Transients Program (EMTP, and conclusions are duly drawn.

  2. Development and validation of purged thermal protection systems for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenbrook, R. D.; Colt, J. Z.

    1977-01-01

    An economical, lightweight, safe, efficient, reliable, and reusable insulation system was developed for hypersonic cruise vehicle hydrogen fuel tanks. Results indicate that, a nitrogen purged, layered insulation system with nonpermeable closed-cell insulation next to the cryogenic tank and a high service temperature fibrous insulation surrounding it, is potentially an attractive solution to the insulation problem. For the postulated hypersonic flight the average unit weight of the purged insulation system (including insulation, condensate and fuel boil off) is 6.31 kg/sq m (1.29 psf). Limited cyclic tests of large specimens of closed cell polymethacrylimide foam indicate it will withstand the expected thermal cycle.

  3. GAI LIGHTNING GROUND STRIKES V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is restricted to EOS affiliated researchers. The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by...

  4. NAMMA LIGHTNING ZEUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Lightning ZEUS data is provided by World-ZEUS Long Range Lightning Monitoring Network Data obtained from radio atmospheric signals located at thirteen...

  5. GAI LONG RANGE LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The US National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial network that records the time, polarity, signal strength, and number of cloud-to-ground lightning flashes...

  6. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field...

  7. NAMMA ATD LIGHTNING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA ATD Lightning data provided by the UK Meterological Office from multiple outstations contains lightning stroke data, latitude and longitude, accuracy and...

  8. NAMMA LIGHTNING ZEUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Lightning ZEUS data is provided by World-ZEUS Long Range Lightning Monitoring Network Data obtained from sferics located at thirteen ground stations spread...

  9. Selection of wires and circuit protective devices for STS Orbiter vehicle payload electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Darilyn M.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical designers of Orbiter payloads face the challenge of determining proper circuit protection/wire size parameters to satisfy Orbiter engineering and safety requirements. This document is the result of a program undertaken to review test data from all available aerospace sources and perform additional testing to eliminate extrapolation errors. The resulting compilation of data was used to develop guidelines for the selection of wire sizes and circuit protection ratings. The purpose is to provide guidance to the engineering to ensure a design which meets Orbiter standards and which should be applicable to any aerospace design.

  10. Attempts to create ball lightning with triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan D.; Uman, Martin A.; Stapleton, Michael; Jordan, Douglas M.; Chebaro, Alexander M.; Biagi, Christopher J.

    2010-08-01

    We describe attempts to create ball lightning by directing lightning, triggered from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique, through a variety of materials. Some of the observed phenomena have features in common with natural ball lightning or with laboratory attempts to create it: flame-like luminosity for up to 0.5 s above salt water; constant-luminosity silicon fragments falling for about 1 s under the influence of gravity; a 0.7 m region of stationary luminosity whose bottom was 0.3 m above a stainless steel surface to which arcing had occurred; and a glow for about 0.5 s above pine tree sections.

  11. Overriding Mandatory Rules as a Vehicle for Weaker Party Protection in European Private International Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. van Bochove (Laura)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The Rome I Regulation on the law applicable to contractual obligations contains several provisions aimed explicitly at the protection of ‘weaker’ contracting parties, such as consumers and employees. However, in addition to this, the interests of weaker parties are

  12. Tropic lightning: myth or menace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2014-11-01

    Lightning is one of the leading causes of death related to environmental disaster. Of all lightning fatalities documented between 2006 and 2012, leisure activities contributed the largest proportion of deaths, with water-associated, sports, and camping being the most common. Despite the prevalence of these activities throughout the islands, Hawai'i has had zero documented lightning fatalities since weather data tracking was initiated in 1959. There is a common misconception that lightning does not strike the ground in Hawai'i. This myth may contribute to a potentially dangerous false sense of security, and recognition of warning signs and risk factor modification remain the most important prevention strategies. Lightning damage occurs on a spectrum, from minor burns to multi-organ dysfunction. After injury, initial treatment should focus on "reverse triage" and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation when indicated, followed by transfer to a healthcare facility. Definitive treatment entails monitoring and management of potential sequelae, to include cardiovascular, neurologic, dermatologic, ophthalmologic, audiovestibular, and psychiatric complications.

  13. Procurement Policy for Armored Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jolliffe, Richard B; Burton, Bruce A; Carros, Deborah L; Schaefer, Beth K; Truong, Linh; Palmer, Kevin A; Chun, Judy M; Smith, Jessica M; Abraham, Amanda M; Peters, Anthony R

    2007-01-01

    ...., and Armor Holdings, Inc., for armored vehicles. This report addresses armored vehicles, specifically the Buffalo Mine Protected Clearance Vehicle, the Cougar, the Joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal Rapid Response Vehicle (JERRV...

  14. Rocket-and-wire triggered lightning in 2012 tropical storm Debby in the absence of natural lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkey, J. T.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Ngin, T.; Gamerota, W. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Edens, H. E.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Hyland, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping Array source locations, channel base currents, and electric field waveforms are presented for a lightning flash triggered in the rainbands of 2012 tropical storm Debby. The National Lightning Detection Network reported no natural cloud-to-ground discharges within 60 km of the North Florida triggering site for at least 20 h before and 8 h after the triggered flash. Additionally, local electric field mill and wideband antenna networks show no close cloud or cloud-to-ground flashes. The triggering rocket was launched with negative charge overhead producing an electric field at the ground of 5 kV m-1 and in coordination with X-band, dual-polarimetric radar observations of streamers of enhanced precipitation descending from the melting level as they approached the site. The Debby flash consisted of an initial stage (IS) followed by eleven leader/return stroke sequences. The flash exhibited all the processes of normal triggered and natural cloud-to-ground lightning: leader/return stroke sequences, continuing currents, K events, and M components. Additionally, the flash exhibited several exceptional characteristics: three return stroke peak currents greater than 25 kA, one very long, 352 ms, continuing current that transferred about 35 C of charge to ground, and a relatively short, 202 ms, IS containing no initial continuous current pulses. Following a near-vertical upward positive leader attaining 2.8 km height, the IS branched and propagated horizontally at 3.5 km altitude. The flash, exhibiting strokes and continuing current, then ascended to and propagated horizontally at 5.5 km, extending about 25 km south and 15 km east. The 0°C level was near 4.5 km above sea level. It follows from the above that clouds that are not producing natural lightning can represent a triggered lightning hazard to launch vehicles and aircraft.

  15. THE EFFECT OF LIGHTNING ON HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SUBSTATIONS’ LOW VOLTAGE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fursanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of the effects of lightning on low voltage systems of high voltage electrical substations with outdoor switchgears of 110 kV. The topicality of research is associated with a wide spreading of such substations as well as with a high reliability requirements of their work and, also, with their widespread distribution and high probability of lightning strikes to the substation or around it. The highest probable and the most dangerous effects of lightning on low voltage systems of a substation are determined on the basis of critical review and special literature analysis and, also, of systematization of practical information that had been collected during the survey of operating substations. Adequate physical models were developed for the list of hazardous effects based on physical processes of lightning. A model of each effect was studied on the basis of the sensitivity theory. The accuracy and adequacy of the models were verified by means of comparison of calculation results for the models under investigation with the results of calculations fulfilled in accordance with specialized programs, as well as from practical or theoretical data obtained by other authors. The factors that had been included in the models were studied and were defined in accordance with their nature (natural or artificial, the range of possible values in a substation was determined; the coefficients of elasticity were calculated. The obtained results enable to ascertain the contribution of the factor in the effect of lightning and the ability to control the factor. The relationship between the factors and the effects of lightning are shown as graphs. For practical application the information, obtained as the result of the research, was organized in the form of checklists that can be applied when collecting baseline information to develop the lightning protection of the substation, to examine the existing lightning protection, to

  16. Recent Lightning Experiments at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing: From Ball Lightning to Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent lightning data and the instrumentation used to acquire it at the UF-FIT International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, located on about 1 square kilometer of flat ground at the Camp Blanding Army National Guard Base in north-central Florida, are discussed. The progress of several on-going studies is reviewed: (1) understanding the physics of the "classical" rocket-and-wire triggering of lightning from natural overhead thunderclouds, (2) attempting to generate ball lightning by allowing triggered-lightning to strike various materials and objects (e.g., tree-trunk sections, pools of salt water, silicon powder), (3) measuring the very close (100 m to 1 km) electric and magnetic fields of natural cloud-to-ground lightning, and (4) probing the relationship between lightning processes and the x-rays and gamma-rays associated with them.

  17. Structure of laboratory ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core.

  18. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Mishap Taxonomy for Range Safety Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    failures. 2 Robert E. Ball . The Fundamentals of Aircraft Combat Survivability Analysis and Design...for Range Safety Reviews, RCC 326-16, February 2016 2-9  Encounter with lightning , lost aileron control Scenario: Failure of a vehicle’s ground...A vehicle operator attempted to find a route between thunderstorms. The vehicle was lost after a lightning strike and apparent encounter with icing

  19. Lightning mapper development: Status and requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility for the detection and location of lightning on a continuous basis using a sensor in geostationary orbit was established. Measurements of the optical characteristics of lightning and the capabilities of solid state mosaic focal plane arrays, indicate that the question is how high a detection efficiency can be achieved. The lightning mapper development to strengthen the scientific justification for placing a lightning sensor in geostationary orbit is discussed. The U-2 and ground based lightning research, modeling, and theoretical studies are reported.

  20. Modeling Lightning Impact Thermo-Mechanical Damage on Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Delgado, Sofía; González, Carlos; López-Romano, Bernardo; Wang, De-Yi; LLorca, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers, used in primary structures for aircraft due to an excellent strength-to-weight ratio when compared with conventional aluminium alloy counterparts, may nowadays be considered as mature structural materials. Their use has been extended in recent decades, with several aircraft manufacturers delivering fuselages entirely manufactured with carbon composites and using advanced processing technologies. However, one of the main drawbacks of using such composites entails their poor electrical conductivity when compared with aluminium alloy competitors that leads to lightning strikes being considered a significant threat during the service life of the aircraft. Traditionally, this problem was overcome with the use of a protective copper/bronze mesh that added additional weight and reduced the effectiveness of use of the material. Moreover, this traditional sizing method is based on vast experimental campaigns carried out by subjecting composite panels to simulated lightning strike events. While this method has proven its validity, and is necessary for certification of the structure, it may be optimized with the aid provided by physically based numerical models. This paper presents a model based on the finite element method that includes the sources of damage observed in a lightning strike, such as thermal damage caused by Joule overheating and electromagnetic/acoustic pressures induced by the arc around the attachment points. The results of the model are compared with lightning strike experiments carried out in a carbon woven composite.

  1. Physical nature of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhanov, I.P.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is made of results obtained from the observations of ball lightning. Principal attention is given to data obtained during the last two decades. A brief critique is also offered on hypotheses about its origin. A more detailed presentation is made of the cluster hypothesis according to which ball lightning consists of complex compounds of ions and neutral molecules. The book is intended for a broad spectrum of readers, but is particularly directed toward those with a knowledge of physics and chemistry. 70 references, 24 figures, 17 tables.

  2. Lightning and Life on Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Paul; Ardaseva, Aleksandra; Hodosan, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane

    2016-07-01

    Miller and Urey performed a ground-breaking experiment, in which they discovered that electric discharges through a low redox ratio gas of methane, ammonia, water vapor and hydrogen produced a variety of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Since this experiment, there has been significant interest on the connection between lightning chemistry and the origin of life. Investigation into the atmosphere of the Early Earth has generated a serious challenge for this project, as it has been determined both that Earth's early atmosphere was likely dominated by carbon dioxide and molecular nitrogen with only small amounts of hydrogen, having a very high redox ratio, and that discharges in gases with high redox ratios fail to yield more than trace amounts of biologically relevant products. This challenge has motivated several origin of life researchers to abandon lightning chemistry, and to concentrate on other pathways for prebiotic synthesis. The discovery of over 2000 exoplanets includes a handful of rocky planets within the habitable zones around their host stars. These planets can be viewed as remote laboratories in which efficient lightning driven prebiotic synthesis may take place. This is because many of these rocky exoplanets, called super-Earths, have masses significantly greater than that of Earth. This higher mass would allow them to more retain greater amounts hydrogen within their atmosphere, reducing the redox ratio. Discharges in super-Earth atmospheres can therefore result in a significant yield of amino acids. In this talk, I will discuss new work on what lightning might look like on exoplanets, and on lightning driven chemistry on super-Earths. Using a chemical kinetics model for a super-Earth atmosphere with smaller redox ratios, I will show that in the presence of lightning, the production of the amino acid glycine is enhanced up to a certain point, but with very low redox ratios, the production of glycine is again inhibited. I will conclude

  3. The Anthropogenic/Lightning Effects Around Houston: The Houston Environmental Aerosol Thunderstorm (HEAT) Project - 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orville, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    A major field program will occur in summer 2005 to determine the sources and causes for the enhanced cloud-to-ground lightning over Houston, Texas. This program will be in association with simultaneous experiments supported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formally the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). Recent studies covering the period 1989-2002 document a 60 percent increase of cloud-to-ground lightning in the Houston area as compared to surrounding background values, which is second in flash density only to the Tampa Bay, Florida area. We suggest that the elevated flash densities could result from several factors, including 1) the convergence due to the urban heat island effect and complex sea breeze (thermal hypothesis), and 2) the increasing levels of air pollution from anthropogenic sources producing numerous small cloud droplets and thereby suppressing mean droplet size (aerosol hypothesis). The latter effect would enable more cloud water to reach the mixed phase region where it is involved in the formation of precipitation and the separation of electric charge, leading to an enhancement of lightning. The primary goals of HEAT are to examine the effects of (1) pollution, (2) the urban heat island, and (3) the complex coastline on storms and lightning characteristics in the Houston area. The transport of air pollutants by Houston thunderstorms will be investigated. In particular, the relative amounts of lightning-produced and convectively transported NOx into the upper troposphere will be determined, and a comparison of the different NOx sources in the urban area of Houston will be developed. The HEAT project is based on the observation that there is an enhancement in cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. Total lightning (intracloud (IC) and CG) will be measured using a lightning mapping system (LDAR II) to observe if there is an enhancement in intracloud lightning as well.

  4. Lightning hazard reduction at wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kithil, R. [National Lightning Safety Institute, Louisville, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The USA wind farm industry (WFI) largely is centered in low-lightning areas of the State of California. While some evidence of lightning incidents is reported here, the problem is not regarded as serious by most participants. The USA WFI now is moving eastward, into higher areas of lightning activity. The European WFI has had many years experience with lightning problems. One 1995 German study estimated that 80% of wind turbine insurance claims paid for damage compensation were caused by lightning strikes. The European and USA WFI have not adopted site criteria, design fundamentals, or certification techniques aimed at lightning safety. Sufficient evidence about lightning at wind farms is available to confirm that serious potential problems exist.

  5. A lightning multiple casualty incident in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Susanne J; Campagne, Danielle; Stroh, Geoff; Shalit, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Multiple casualty incidents (MCIs) are uncommon in remote wilderness settings. This is a case report of a lightning strike on a Boy Scout troop hiking through Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI), in which the lightning storm hindered rescue efforts. The purpose of this study was to review the response to a lightning-caused MCI in a wilderness setting, address lightning injury as it relates to field management, and discuss evacuation options in inclement weather incidents occurring in remote locations. An analysis of SEKI search and rescue data and a review of current literature were performed. A lightning strike at 10,600 feet elevation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains affected a party of 5 adults and 7 Boy Scouts (age range 12 to 17 years old). Resources mobilized for the rescue included 5 helicopters, 2 ambulances, 2 hospitals, and 15 field and 14 logistical support personnel. The incident was managed from strike to scene clearance in 4 hours and 20 minutes. There were 2 fatalities, 1 on scene and 1 in the hospital. Storm conditions complicated on-scene communication and evacuation efforts. Exposure to ongoing lightning and a remote wilderness location affected both victims and rescuers in a lightning MCI. Helicopters, the main vehicles of wilderness rescue in SEKI, can be limited by weather, daylight, and terrain. Redundancies in communication systems are vital for episodes of radio failure. Reverse triage should be implemented in lightning injury MCIs. Education of both wilderness travelers and rescuers regarding these issues should be pursued. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  7. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes of Hanford high level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-06-05

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of a lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike deposition sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  8. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes to Hanford site high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike depositing sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  9. A Methodology to Reduce the Computational Effort in the Evaluation of the Lightning Performance of Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Bendato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the lightning performance of a power distribution network is of great importance to design its protection system against lightning. An accurate evaluation of the number of lightning events that can create dangerous overvoltages requires a huge computational effort, as it implies the adoption of a Monte Carlo procedure. Such a procedure consists of generating many different random lightning events and calculating the corresponding overvoltages. The paper proposes a methodology to deal with the problem in two computationally efficient ways: (i finding out the minimum number of Monte Carlo runs that lead to reliable results; and (ii setting up a procedure that bypasses the lightning field-to-line coupling problem for each Monte Carlo run. The proposed approach is shown to provide results consistent with existing approaches while exhibiting superior Central Processing Unit (CPU time performances.

  10. Total Lightning as an Indicator of Mesocyclone Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Sarah M.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Apparent relationship between total lightning (in-cloud and cloud to ground) and severe weather suggests its operational utility. Goal of fusion of total lightning with proven tools (i.e., radar lightning algorithms. Preliminary work here investigates circulation from Weather Suveilance Radar- 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) coupled with total lightning data from Lightning Mapping Arrays.

  11. Diatomaceous earth as a protective vehicle for bacteria applied for self-healing concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Y; Belie, N De; Verstraete, W

    2012-04-01

    Crack repair is crucial since cracks are the main cause for the decreased service life of concrete structures. An original and promising way to repair cracks is to pre-incorporate healing agents inside the concrete matrix to heal cracks the moment they appear. Thus, the concrete obtains self-healing properties. The goal of our research is to apply bacterially precipitated CaCO₃ to heal cracks in concrete since the microbial calcium carbonate is more compatible with the concrete matrix and more environmentally friendly relative to the normally used polymeric materials. Diatomaceous earth (DE) was used in this study to protect bacteria from the high-pH environment of concrete. The experimental results showed that DE had a very good protective effect for bacteria. DE immobilized bacteria had much higher ureolytic activity (12-17 g/l urea was decomposed within 3 days) than that of un-immobilized bacteria (less than 1 g/l urea was decomposed within the same time span) in cement slurry. The optimal concentration of DE for immobilization was 60% (w/v, weight of DE/volume of bacterial suspension). Self-healing in cracked specimens was visualized under light microscopy. The images showed that cracks with a width ranging from 0.15 to 0.17 mm in the specimens containing DE immobilized bacteria were completely filled by the precipitation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to characterize the precipitation around the crack wall, which was confirmed to be calcium carbonate. The result from a capillary water absorption test showed that the specimens with DE immobilized bacteria had the lowest water absorption (30% of the reference ones), which indicated that the precipitation inside the cracks increased the water penetration resistance of the cracked specimens.

  12. Generation of Laboratory Ball Lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreshko, A G [Moscow Aviation Institute (State Technical University), Volokolamskoe shosse 4, 125871 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The phenomenon of energy conversion in the streams of directed electrons and ions into electromagnetic radiation was found out experimentally and proved theoretically. The direct proofs of the domain mechanism of the charged particles acceleration and mechanism of ball lightning generation were obtained and the theoretical calculations were refined.

  13. A Conjecture Concerning Ball Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Sturrock, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    There is at present no theory that can explain the curious properties of ball lightning. This suggests that we may not be using the most appropriate concepts. The concept of a 'parallel space' may point the way to a valid theory.

  14. Aircraft Lightning Electromagnetic Environment Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a NASA project plan for demonstrating a prototype lightning strike measurement system that is suitable for installation onto research aircraft that already operate in thunderstorms. This work builds upon past data from the NASA F106, FAA CV-580, and Transall C-180 flight projects, SAE ARP5412, and the European ILDAS Program. The primary focus is to capture airframe current waveforms during attachment, but may also consider pre and post-attachment current, electric field, and radiated field phenomena. New sensor technologies are being developed for this system, including a fiber-optic Faraday polarization sensor that measures lightning current waveforms from DC to over several Megahertz, and has dynamic range covering hundreds-of-volts to tens-of-thousands-of-volts. A study of the electromagnetic emission spectrum of lightning (including radio wave, microwave, optical, X-Rays and Gamma-Rays), and a compilation of aircraft transfer-function data (including composite aircraft) are included, to aid in the development of other new lightning environment sensors, their placement on-board research aircraft, and triggering of the onboard instrumentation system. The instrumentation system will leverage recent advances in high-speed, high dynamic range, deep memory data acquisition equipment, and fiber-optic interconnect.

  15. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  16. Thermal-Mechanical Optimization of Folded Core Sandwich Panels for Thermal Protection Systems of Space Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrated thermal protection system (ITPS is a complicated system that addresses both mechanical and thermal considerations. An M-pattern folded core sandwich panel packed with low-density insulation material provides inherently low mass for a potential ITPS panel. Herein, we identify the most influential geometric parameters and establish a viable, computationally efficient optimization procedure. Variables considered for optimization are geometric dimensions of the ITPS, while temperature and deflection are taken as constraints. A one-dimensional (1D thermal model based on a modified form of the rule of mixtures was established, while a three-dimensional (3D model was adopted for linear static analyses. Parametric models were generated to facilitate a design of experiment (DOE study, and approximate models using radial basis functions were obtained to carry out the optimization process. Sensitivity studies were first conducted to investigate the effect of geometric parameters on the ITPS responses. Then optimizations were performed for both thermal and thermal-mechanical constraints. The results show that the simplified 1D thermal model is able to predict temperature through the ITPS thickness satisfactorily. The combined optimization strategy evidently improves the computational efficiency of the design process showing it can be used for initial design of folded core ITPS.

  17. TRMM-Based Lightning Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded climatologies of total lightning flash rates seen by the spaceborne Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) have been updated. OTD collected data from May 1995 to March 2000. LIS data (equatorward of about 38 deg) has been added for 1998-2010. Flash counts from each instrument are scaled by the best available estimates of detection efficiency. The long LIS record makes the merged climatology most robust in the tropics and subtropics, while the high latitude data is entirely from OTD. The mean global flash rate from the merged climatology is 46 flashes per second. The peak annual flash rate at 0.5 deg scale is 160 fl/square km/yr in eastern Congo. The peak monthly average flash rate at 2.5 scale is 18 fl/square km/mo, from early April to early May in the Brahmaputra Valley of far eastern India. Lightning decreases in this region during the monsoon season, but increases further north and west. A monthly average peak from early August to early September in northern Pakistan also exceeds any monthly averages from Africa, despite central Africa having the greatest yearly average. Most continental regions away from the equator have an annual cycle with lightning flash rates peaking in late spring or summer. The main exceptions are India and southeast Asia, with springtime peaks in April and May. For landmasses near the equator, flash rates peak near the equinoxes. For many oceanic regions, the peak flash rates occur in autumn. This is particularly noticeable for the Mediterranean and North Atlantic. Landmasses have a strong diurnal cycle of lightning, with flash rates generally peaking between 3-5 pm local solar time. The central United States flash rates peak later, in late evening or early night. Flash rates peak after midnight in northern Argentina. These regions are known for large, intense, long-lived mesoscale convective systems.

  18. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  19. US COMPOSITE LIGHTNING DAILY TOTAL FROM NATL LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Hydrology Resource Center generates a cloud-to-ground lightning product from the data collected from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network, a...

  20. US COMPOSITE LIGHTNING 15MIN TOTAL FROM NATL LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Science Computing Facility (SCF) generates a cloud-to-ground lightning product from the data collected from the U.S. National...

  1. Lightning Attachment Estimation to Wind Turbines by Utilizing Lightning Location Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Holbøll, Joachim; Lopez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    coverage with a good accuracy for downward lightning. Furthermore, advances in the technology indicate the detection of certain upward lightning events. A correlation between the size of the uncertainty ellipse and the peak current of the lightning detections is presented. Furthermore, lightning data from...... three different wind power plant locations are analyzed and the impact of varying data qualities is evaluated regarding the ability to detect upward lightning. This work provides a variety of background information which is relevant to the exposure assessment of wind turbine and includes practical......The goal of a lightning exposure assessment is to identify the number, type and characteristics of lightning discharges to a certain structure. There are various Lightning Location System (LLS) technologies available, each of them are characterized by individual performance characteristics...

  2. Electromagnetic Effects Harmonization Working Group (EEHWG) - Lightning Task Group : report on aircraft lightning strike data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In 1995, in response to the lightning community's desire to revise the zoning criteria on aircraft, the Electromagnetic Effects Harmonization Working Group (EEHWG) decided that lightning attachments to aircraft causing damage should be studied and co...

  3. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  4. Electric charge of a lightning ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, A. I.; Shiryaeva, S. O.; Petrushov, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    The electric charge of a lightning ball is found by comparing the electrohydrodynamic stabilities of a charged drop in an electrostatic suspension and a lightning ball floating in a superposition of the gravitational field and the surface electric field. It has been assumed that the electric field strength at the surface is limited by a breakdown value. For a lightning ball radius of 15 cm, its charge is estimated as several microcoulombs. Accordingly, the density of electrostatic energy accumulated in the lightning ball is on the order of one-hundredth of a joule per square centimeter. The density of the material that constitutes the lightning ball has been estimated for the case when the electric field strength at the site of its origination is several times higher than that in fine weather. The density of the lightning ball turns out to differ from that of air by only a few percents.

  5. Computational techniques for design optimization of thermal protection systems for the space shuttle vehicle. Volume 1: Final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Computational techniques were developed and assimilated for the design optimization. The resulting computer program was then used to perform initial optimization and sensitivity studies on a typical thermal protection system (TPS) to demonstrate its application to the space shuttle TPS design. The program was developed in Fortran IV for the CDC 6400 but was subsequently converted to the Fortran V language to be used on the Univac 1108. The program allows for improvement and update of the performance prediction techniques. The program logic involves subroutines which handle the following basic functions: (1) a driver which calls for input, output, and communication between program and user and between the subroutines themselves; (2) thermodynamic analysis; (3) thermal stress analysis; (4) acoustic fatigue analysis; and (5) weights/cost analysis. In addition, a system total cost is predicted based on system weight and historical cost data of similar systems. Two basic types of input are provided, both of which are based on trajectory data. These are vehicle attitude (altitude, velocity, and angles of attack and sideslip), for external heat and pressure loads calculation, and heating rates and pressure loads as a function of time.

  6. Electric-powered vehicle. New light on energy-technical features, operational behaviour, environmental protection. Elektroauto. Neue energietechnische Aspekte, Betriebsverhalten, Umweltschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, E.

    1985-01-01

    The operational behaviour of individual components and the energy, performance and environmental protection balances of electric-powered road vehicles are investigated with reference to a specific vehicle ('CitySTROMer') as an example. Problems with energy management cropped up because the battery was heated, which is important for its service life and capacity utilization, and because the passenger compartment was air-conditioned. By further development the waste heat from motor and traction battery can be used in our latitudes practically at all seasons for air-conditioning. The measuring series are presented in the form of numerous tables and diagrams. (BWI).

  7. Experimental and analytical investigation on metal damage suffered from simulated lightning currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakun, LIU; Zhengcai, FU; Quanzhen, LIU; Baoquan, LIU; Anirban, GUHA

    2017-12-01

    The damage of two typical metal materials, Al alloy 3003 and steel alloy Q235B, subjected to four representative lightning current components are investigated by laboratory and analytical studies to provide fundamental data for lightning protection. The four lightning components simulating the natural lightning consist of the first return stroke, the continuing current of interval stroke, the long continuing current, and the subsequent stroke, with amplitudes 200 kA, 8 kA, 400 A, and 100 kA, respectively. The damage depth and area suffered from different lightning components are measured by the ultrasonic scanning system. And the temperature rise is measured by the thermal imaging camera. The results show that, for both Al 3003 and steel Q235B, the first return stroke component results in the largest damage area with damage depth 0.02 mm uttermost. The long continuing current component leads to the deepest damage depth of 3.3 mm for Al 3003 and much higher temperature rise than other components. The correlation analysis between damage results and lightning parameters indicates that the damage depth has a positive correlation with charge transfer. The damage area is mainly determined by the current amplitude and the temperature rise increases linearly with the charge transfer larger.

  8. CAMEX-3 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset contains electrical field measurements of lightning within storms studied during the Convection And Moisture...

  9. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    OpenAIRE

    H.-C. Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by partic...

  10. Lightning on exoplanets and brown dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Hodosán, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Lightning is an important electrical phenomenon, known to exist in several Solar System planets. Amongst others, it carries information on convection and cloud formation, and may be important for pre-biotic chemistry. Exoplanets and brown dwarfs have been shown to host environments appropriate for the initiation of lightning discharges. In this PhD project, I aim to determine if lightning on exoplanets and brown dwarfs can be more energetic than it is known from Solar System planets, what are...

  11. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Integrated Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems, and RBCC Engine Performance for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy; Alexander, Reginald; Landrum, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Presented is a computer-based tool that connects several disciplines that are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system, as is the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by NASA. An RBCC propulsion system integrates airbreathing and rocket propulsion into a single engine assembly enclosed within a cowl or duct. A typical RBCC propulsion system operates as a ducted rocket up to approximately Mach 3. Then there is a transition to a ramjet mode for supersonic-to-hypersonic acceleration. Around Mach 8 the engine transitions to a scramjet mode. During the ramjet and scramjet modes, the integral rockets operate as fuel injectors. Around Mach 10-12 (the actual value depends on vehicle and mission requirements), the inlet is physically closed and the engine transitions to an integral rocket mode for orbit insertion. A common feature of RBCC propelled vehicles is the high degree of integration between the propulsion system and airframe. At high speeds the vehicle forebody is fundamentally part of the engine inlet, providing a compression surface for air flowing into the engine. The compressed air is mixed with fuel and burned. The combusted mixture must be expanded to an area larger than the incoming stream to provide thrust. Since a conventional nozzle would be too large, the entire lower after body of the vehicle is used as an expansion surface. Because of the high external temperatures seen during atmospheric flight, the design of an airbreathing SSTO vehicle requires delicate tradeoffs between engine design, vehicle shape, and thermal protection system (TPS) sizing in order to produce an optimum system in terms of weight (and cost) and maximum performance. To adequately determine the performance of the engine/vehicle, the Hypersonic Flight Inlet Model (HYFIM) module was designed to interface with the RBCC

  12. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Integrating Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems, and RBCC Engine Performance for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy; Alexander, Reginald

    1999-01-01

    Presented is a computer-based tool that connects several disciplines that are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system, as is the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by NASA. The deficiencies in the scramjet powered concept led to a revival of interest in Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. An RBCC propulsion system integrates airbreathing and rocket propulsion into a single engine assembly enclosed within a cowl or duct. A typical RBCC propulsion system operates as a ducted rocket up to approximately Mach 3. At this point the transitions to a ramjet mode for supersonic-to-hypersonic acceleration. Around Mach 8 the engine transitions to a scram4jet mode. During the ramjet and scramjet modes, the integral rockets operate as fuel injectors. Around Mach 10-12 (the actual value depends on vehicle and mission requirements), the inlet is physically closed and the engine transitions to an integral rocket mode for orbit insertion. A common feature of RBCC propelled vehicles is the high degree of integration between the propulsion system and airframe. At high speeds the vehicle forebody is fundamentally part of the engine inlet, providing a compression surface for air flowing into the engine. The compressed air is mixed with fuel and burned. The combusted mixture must be expanded to an area larger than the incoming stream to provide thrust. Since a conventional nozzle would be too large, the entire lower after body of the vehicle is used as an expansion surface. Because of the high external temperatures seen during atmospheric flight, the design of an airbreathing SSTO vehicle requires delicate tradeoffs between engine design, vehicle shape, and thermal protection system (TPS) sizing in order to produce an optimum system in terms of weight (and cost) and maximum performance.

  13. OLS ANALOG DERIVED LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been analyzed from the filmstrip imagery....

  14. Lightning Applications in Weather and Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin G.

    2013-11-01

    Thunderstorms, and lightning in particular, are a major natural hazard to the public, aviation, power companies, and wildfire managers. Lightning causes great damage and death every year but also tells us about the inner working of storms. Since lightning can be monitored from great distances from the storms themselves, lightning may allow us to provide early warnings for severe weather phenomena such as hail storms, flash floods, tornadoes, and even hurricanes. Lightning itself may impact the climate of the Earth by producing nitrogen oxides (NOx), a precursor of tropospheric ozone, which is a powerful greenhouse gas. Thunderstorms themselves influence the climate system by the redistribution of heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmosphere. What about future changes in lightning and thunderstorm activity? Many studies show that higher surface temperatures produce more lightning, but future changes will depend on what happens to the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere, as well as changes in water balance, and even aerosol loading of the atmosphere. Finally, lightning itself may provide a useful tool for tracking climate change in the future, due to the nonlinear link between lightning, temperature, upper tropospheric water vapor, and cloud cover.

  15. The lightning climatology of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Morné Gijben

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the South African Weather Service installed a state-of-the-art cloud-to-ground lightning detection network across the country. The data recorded by this network in 2006 was utilised in the development of an initial lightning climatology of South Africa. Until 2010, this climatology was based on data from a single year. This paper updates this climatology with the lightning data for the 2006–2010 period, which is the first actual lightning climatology by the South African Weather Serv...

  16. A three-station lightning detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    A three-station network is described which senses magnetic and electric fields of lightning. Directional and distance information derived from the data are used to redundantly determine lightning position. This redundancy is used to correct consistent propagation errors. A comparison is made of the relative accuracy of VLF direction finders with a newer method to determine distance to and location of lightning by the ratio of magnetic-to-electric field as observed at 400 Hz. It was found that VLF direction finders can determine lightning positions with only one-half the accuracy of the method that uses the ratio of magnetic-to-electric field.

  17. Geological Effects on Lightning Strike Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Berdahl, J. Scott

    2016-05-16

    Recent advances in lightning detection networks allow for detailed mapping of lightning flash locations. Longstanding rumors of geological influence on cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning distribution and recent commercial claims based on such influence can now be tested empirically. If present, such influence could represent a new, cheap and efficient geophysical tool with applications in mineral, hydrothermal and oil exploration, regional geological mapping, and infrastructure planning. This project applies statistical analysis to lightning data collected by the United States National Lightning Detection Network from 2006 through 2015 in order to assess whether the huge range in electrical conductivities of geological materials plays a role in the spatial distribution of CG lightning. CG flash densities are mapped for twelve areas in the contiguous United States and compared to elevation and geology, as well as to the locations of faults, railroads and tall towers including wind turbines. Overall spatial randomness is assessed, along with spatial correlation of attributes. Negative and positive polarity lightning are considered separately and together. Topography and tower locations show a strong influence on CG distribution patterns. Geology, faults and railroads do not. This suggests that ground conductivity is not an important factor in determining lightning strike location on scales larger than current flash location accuracies, which are generally several hundred meters. Once a lightning channel is established, however, ground properties at the contact point may play a role in determining properties of the subsequent stroke.

  18. Secondary missile injury from lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Ryan

    2012-03-01

    A 48-year-old-woman was struck dead by lightning on October 24, 2010, in Pretoria, South Africa. The cause of death was due to direct lightning strike. Examination showed secondary missile injury on her legs. This secondary missile (shrapnel) injury was caused by the lightning striking the concrete pavement next to her. Small pieces of concrete were located embedded within the shrapnel wounds. This case report represents the first documented case of secondary missile formation (shrapnel injury) due to lightning strike in the literature.

  19. Development of Algorithms and Error Analyses for the Short Baseline Lightning Detection and Ranging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Stanley O.

    1998-01-01

    NASA, at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), developed and operates a unique high-precision lightning location system to provide lightning-related weather warnings. These warnings are used to stop lightning- sensitive operations such as space vehicle launches and ground operations where equipment and personnel are at risk. The data is provided to the Range Weather Operations (45th Weather Squadron, U.S. Air Force) where it is used with other meteorological data to issue weather advisories and warnings for Cape Canaveral Air Station and KSC operations. This system, called Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR), provides users with a graphical display in three dimensions of 66 megahertz radio frequency events generated by lightning processes. The locations of these events provide a sound basis for the prediction of lightning hazards. This document provides the basis for the design approach and data analysis for a system of radio frequency receivers to provide azimuth and elevation data for lightning pulses detected simultaneously by the LDAR system. The intent is for this direction-finding system to correct and augment the data provided by LDAR and, thereby, increase the rate of valid data and to correct or discard any invalid data. This document develops the necessary equations and algorithms, identifies sources of systematic errors and means to correct them, and analyzes the algorithms for random error. This data analysis approach is not found in the existing literature and was developed to facilitate the operation of this Short Baseline LDAR (SBLDAR). These algorithms may also be useful for other direction-finding systems using radio pulses or ultrasonic pulse data.

  20. Polymer-composite ball lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    Investigations into the state of ball lightning (BL) have been made, and both theory and experiments, related to so-called "polymer-composite" ball lightning, are presented. The properties of such a polymeric BL have been described and are that of a long-lived object capable of storing high energy. Results of experiments, starting with polymeric components in erosive gas discharge experiments, are described and discussed. The model of BL as a highly charged polymer-dielectric structure is described. According to this model BL appears as the result of the aggregation of natural polymers, such as lignin and cellulose, soot, polymeric silica and other natural dust particles. Its ability to glow is explained by the appearance over its perimeter of gas discharges near the highly charged BL surface, and electrical breakdown of some regions on the surface, consisting of polymerized and aggregated threads.

  1. Saturn’s visible lightning, its radio emissions, and the structure of the 2009–2011 lightning storms

    OpenAIRE

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Fischer, Georg; Yair, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Visible lightning on Saturn was first detected by the Cassini camera in 2009 at ∼35° South latitude. We report more lightning observations at ∼35° South later in 2009, and lightning in the 2010–2011 giant lightning storm at ∼35° North. The 2009 lightning is detected on the night side of Saturn in a broadband clear filter. The 2011 lightning is detected on the day side in blue wavelengths only. In other wavelengths the 2011 images lacked sensitivity to detect lightning, which leaves the lightn...

  2. Emergency Lightning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Super Vacuum Manufacturing Company's Stem-Lite Emergency Lighting System is widely used by fire, police, ambulance and other emergency service departments. The lights -- four floodlights which provide 2,000 watts of daytime equivalent visibility and a high-intensity flashing beacon can be elevated 10 feet above the roof of an emergency vehicle by means of an extendible mast. The higher elevation expands the effective radius of the floodlights and increases the beacon's visibility to several miles affording extra warning time to approaching traffic. When not in use, the light can be retracted into the compact rooftop housing. Stem-Lite also includes a generator which can serve to power such emergency equipment as pumps and drills, and a dashboard-mounted control panel for switching the lights and extending or retracting the mast.

  3. How to create ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedures are given on how to produce ball lightning. Necessary equipment includes a transformer of 150,000 watts capable of providing approximately 10,000 amperes at 15 volts, 60 cycles; thick one inch cables of stranded wire leading into a 3 by 4 by 1 foot plastic tank; a quarter inch thick 4 by 6 inch aluminum plate to be used as one of the discharge electrodes; and another electrode of heavy copper wire with the insulation stripped back 6 inches.

  4. Slow Lightning in Water Plasmoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl; Dumas, Shelby; McMinn, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Water plasmoids are produced when a capacitor is discharged into a cathode at the surface of a weakly conducting water electrolyte. The resulting plasma jet forms a glowing spherical plasmoid which persists in air for up to 0.3 s and resembles ball lightning in some respects. This study shows that during the plasmoid's formation stage, surface discharges with unusual characteristics carry the large instantaneous discharge current. The liquid-surface discharges have some characteristics of both conventional solid-surface discharges (branching, fractal structure) and glow discharges (approximately constant current density from the discharge plasma to the water surface over a wide range of current). Dynamically, the surface discharge resembles a two-dimensional version of a lightning leader, but develops at much lower speeds: a maximum of about 0.3 m/s for the surface discharges in this study, compared to lightning leader speeds of 100 to 100,000 m/s. The low conductivity of the water used (about 20 mS/m) means that the surface discharges are interacting with a resistive barrier, which allows a significant tangential electric field on the surface. High-speed photography of the discharges is supplemented by spectroscopic and other experimental studies.

  5. The Study of the Rapid Acquisition Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicle Program and Its Impact on the Warfighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    system from cradle to grave, typically takes an average of 7–15 years to field a system. However, these systems that make it through this process...vehicles – 592 total)  Procured 125 vehicles from FPII ( CAT I & II Cougars)  Procured 90 vehicles from BAE ( CAT I & CAT II RG-33) LRIP 2: (February...2007) (180 vehicles – 772 total)  Procured 20 CAT I from GDLS for Test  Procured 100 CAT I from OTC for Test  Procured 60 CAT I from PVI for Test

  6. Development and Testing of Operational Dual-Polarimetric Radar Based Lightning Initiation Forecast Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Crystal; Carey, Lawrence D.; Petersen, Walter A.; Felix, Mariana; Roeder, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Lightning is one of Earth s natural dangers, destructive not only to life but also physical property. According to the National Weather Service, there are on average 58 lightning fatalities each year, with over 300 related injuries (NWS 2010). The ability to forecast lightning is critical to a host of activities ranging from space vehicle launch operations to recreational sporting events. For example a single lightning strike to a Space Shuttle could cause billions of dollars of damage and possible loss of life. While forecasting that provides longer lead times could provide sporting officials with more time to respond to possible threatening weather events, thus saving the lives of player and bystanders. Many researchers have developed and tested different methods and tools of first flash forecasting, however few have done so using dual-polarimetric radar variables and products on an operational basis. The purpose of this study is to improve algorithms for the short-term prediction of lightning initiation through development and testing of operational techniques that rely on parameters observed and diagnosed using C-band dual-polarimetric radar.

  7. Thermal Protection for Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle: A Grand Challenge for Design Methodology and Reliability Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Gage, Peter; Wright, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Mars Sample Return is our Grand Challenge for the coming decade. TPS (Thermal Protection System) nominal performance is not the key challenge. The main difficulty for designers is the need to verify unprecedented reliability for the entry system: current guidelines for prevention of backward contamination require that the probability of spores larger than 1 micron diameter escaping into the Earth environment be lower than 1 million for the entire system, and the allocation to TPS would be more stringent than that. For reference, the reliability allocation for Orion TPS is closer to 11000, and the demonstrated reliability for previous human Earth return systems was closer to 1100. Improving reliability by more than 3 orders of magnitude is a grand challenge indeed. The TPS community must embrace the possibility of new architectures that are focused on reliability above thermal performance and mass efficiency. MSR (Mars Sample Return) EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) will be hit with MMOD (Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris) prior to reentry. A chute-less aero-shell design which allows for self-righting shape was baselined in prior MSR studies, with the assumption that a passive system will maximize EEV robustness. Hence the aero-shell along with the TPS has to take ground impact and not break apart. System verification will require testing to establish ablative performance and thermal failure but also testing of damage from MMOD, and structural performance at ground impact. Mission requirements will demand analysis, testing and verification that are focused on establishing reliability of the design. In this proposed talk, we will focus on the grand challenge of MSR EEV TPS and the need for innovative approaches to address challenges in modeling, testing, manufacturing and verification.

  8. The lightning striking probability for offshore wind turbine blade with salt fog contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingmin; Ma, Yufei; Guo, Zixin; Ren, Hanwen; Wang, Guozheng; Arif, Waqas; Fang, Zhiyang; Siew, Wah Hoon

    2017-08-01

    The blades of an offshore wind turbine are prone to be adhered with salt fog after long-time exposure in the marine-atmosphere environment, and salt fog reduces the efficiency of the lightning protection system. In order to study the influence of salt fog on lightning striking probability (LSP), the lightning discharge process model for the wind turbine blade is adopted in this paper considering the accumulation mechanism of surface charges around the salt fog area. The distribution of potential and electric field with the development of the downward leader is calculated by COMSOL Multiphysics LiveLink for MATLAB. A quantitative characterization method is established to calculate the LSP base on the average electric field before the return stroke and the LSP distribution of the blade is shown in the form of a graphic view. The simulation results indicate that the receptor and conductor area close to the receptor area are more likely to get struck by lightning, and the LSP increases under the influence of salt fog. The validity of the model is verified by experiments. Furthermore, the receptor can protect the blade from lightning strikes effectively when the lateral distance between the rod electrode and receptor is short. The influence of salt fog on LSP is more obvious if salt fog is close to the receptor or if the scope of salt fog area increases.

  9. Phenomenon of ball lightning and its outgrowths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.ru; Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-03-28

    New physical phenomena deduced from properties of ball lightning are considered under assumption that ball lightning is a light bubble comprising of a thin spherical layer of compressed air where an intense light circulates in all possible directions. Explanation of behavior of autonomous luminous objects produced at gas discharge is presented.

  10. Analysis and Modeling of Intense Oceanic Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Cohen, M.; Said, R.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies using lightning data from geo-location networks such as GLD360 suggest that lightning strokes are more intense over the ocean than over land, even though they are less common [Said et al. 2013]. We present an investigation of the physical differences between oceanic and land lightning. We have deployed a sensitive Low Frequency (1 MHz sampling rate) radio receiver system aboard the NOAA Ronald W. Brown research vessel and have collected thousands of lightning waveforms close to deep oceanic lightning. We analyze the captured waveforms, describe our modeling efforts, and summarize our findings. We model the ground wave (gw) portion of the lightning sferics using a numerical method built on top of the Stanford Full Wave Method (FWM) [Lehtinen and Inan 2008]. The gwFWM technique accounts for propagation over a curved Earth with finite conductivity, and is used to simulate an arbitrary current profile along the lightning channel. We conduct a sensitivity analysis and study the current profiles for land and for oceanic lightning. We find that the effect of ground conductivity is minimal, and that stronger oceanic radio intensity does not result from shorter current rise-time or from faster return stroke propagation speed.

  11. An automatic lightning detection and photographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Holley, L. D.; Gray, J. L.; Hoover, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Conventional 35-mm camera is activated by an electronic signal every time lightning strikes in general vicinity. Electronic circuit detects lightning by means of antenna which picks up atmospheric radio disturbances. Camera is equipped with fish-eye lense, automatic shutter advance, and small 24-hour clock to indicate time when exposures are made.

  12. Lightning Safety and Outdoor Sports Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... etc. In clear air, and especially at night, lightning can be seen from storms more than 10 miles away provided that obstructions ... threatening . Thunderstorms can develop directly overhead and some storms may develop lightning just as they move into an area. Where ...

  13. A model for lightning in littoral areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The littoral or coastal areas are different compared to the maritime or continental areas considering lightning. Only the last years some research about these areas has been carried out. The need for a model, regarding the lightning activity in these areas is much needed. And now, with the changes

  14. Lightning-caused fires in Central Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto Solana, Hector; Aguado, Inmaculada; García, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    a high occurrence. The research was conducted between May and September, which happens to be the most lightning-fire prone period in Spain, for a three year interval starting in 2002 up to 2004. A time-invariant model for lightning-caused fire occurrence was developed for each region at a spatial...

  15. The GOES-R Lightning Mapper Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Dennis; Christian, Hugh; Goodman, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Lightning Mapper Sensor on GOES-R builds on previous measurements of lightning from low earth orbit by the OTD (Optical Transient Detector) and LIS (Lightning Imaging Sensor) sensors. Unlike observations from low earth orbit, the GOES-R platform will allow continuous monitoring of lightning activity over the Continental United States and southern Canada, Central and South America, and portions of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The LMS will detect total (cloud-to-ground and intracloud) lightning at storm scale resolution (approx. 8 km) using a highly sensitive Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector array. Discrimination between lightning optical transients and a bright sunlit background scene is accomplished by employing spectral, spatial, and temporal filtering along with a background subtraction technique. The result is 24 hour detection capability of total lightning. These total lightning observations can be made available to users within about 20 seconds. Research indicates a number of ways that total lightning observations from LMS could benefit operational activities, including 1) potential increases in lead times and reduced false alarms for severe thunderstorm and tornado Warnings, 2) improved routing of &rail around thunderstorms, 3) support for spacecraft launches and landings, 4) improved ability to monitor tropical cyclone intensity, 5) ability to monitor thunderstorm intensification/weakening during radar outages or where radar coverage is poor, 6) better identification of deep convection for the initialization of numerical prediction models, 7) improved forest fire forecasts, 8) identification of convective initiation, 9) identification of heavy convective snowfall, and 10) enhanced temporal resolution of storm evolution (1 minute) than is available from radar observations. Total lightning data has been used in an operational environment since July 2003 at the Huntsville, Alabama National Weather Service office. Total lightning measurements are

  16. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  17. Lightning enhancement over major oceanic shipping lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Joel A.; Virts, Katrina S.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Mitchell, Todd P.

    2017-09-01

    Using 12 years of high-resolution global lightning stroke data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), we show that lightning density is enhanced by up to a factor of 2 directly over shipping lanes in the northeastern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea as compared to adjacent areas with similar climatological characteristics. The lightning enhancement is most prominent during the convectively active season, November-April for the Indian Ocean and April-December in the South China Sea, and has been detectable from at least 2005 to the present. We hypothesize that emissions of aerosol particles and precursors by maritime vessel traffic lead to a microphysical enhancement of convection and storm electrification in the region of the shipping lanes. These persistent localized anthropogenic perturbations to otherwise clean regions are a unique opportunity to more thoroughly understand the sensitivity of maritime deep convection and lightning to aerosol particles.

  18. Mathematical physics approaches to lightning discharge problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, A.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical physics arguments useful for lightning discharge and generation problems are pursued. A soliton Ansatz for the lightning stroke is treated including a charge generation term which is the ultimate source for the phenomena. Equations are established for a partially ionized plasma inding the effects of pressure, magnetic field, electric field, gravitation, viscosity, and temperature. From these equations is then derived the non-stationary generalized Ohm's Law essential for describing field/current density relationships in the horizon channel of the lightning stroke. The discharge initiation problem is discussed. It is argued that the ionization rate drives both the convective current and electric displacement current to increase exponentially. The statistical distributions of charge in the thundercloud preceding a lightning dischage are considered. The stability of the pre-lightning charge distributions and the use of Boltzmann relaxational equations to determine them are discussed along with a covered impedance path provided by the aircraft.

  19. The Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Status and Recent Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Khan, Maudood; Peterson, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) are discussed. Recent results from an August 2006 run of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system that employs LNOM lightning NOx (= NO + NO2) estimates are provided. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NOx. The latest LNOM estimates of (a) lightning channel length distributions, (b) lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and (c) the vertical profile of NOx are presented. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NOx on CMAQ output is discussed.

  20. Secret of a ball lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Савич, Эдуард Владимирович

    2013-01-01

    Шаровая молния – явление природы, происходящее при ударе линейной молнии с ее воздействием тепловой и магнитной энергии, возникающей вокруг канала линейной молнии и в результате образующей из окружающего воздуха облако пара, переходящего под воздействием магнитного поля сегнетоэлектрическое состояние. A ball lightning is a natural phenomenon that occurs at a streak lightning stroke with its action by thermal and magnetic energy releasing around the streak lightning channel and transforming...

  1. Effectiveness of Unmanned Surface Vehicles in Anti-submarine Warfare with the Goal of Protecting a High Value Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government . IRB Protocol number ____N/A...Communication SOA Speed of Advance SSK Diesel Electric Submarine TDZ Torpedo Danger Zone UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle USV Unmanned Surface Vehicle UUV...sensors. Agent-based models can perform non-linear behavior patterns , capture organizational dynamics, and provide valuable insights about real-world

  2. Plasma theory of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapenko, V.I.; Tolpygo, K.B.

    1984-02-01

    The high-energy density inside the ball lightning is due to existence of intense plasma oscillations and high kinetic and potential energy of electron gas which form a pulsating ball vibrating relative to the nearly stationary ionic ball. At sublight velocities of electrons one can neglect the processes of their scattering and recombination. One obtains a relation between parameters of the plasma ball from the condition of equality of excess pressure of ions and that of Madelung forces. The high lifetime of the ball lighting is connected with small Landau damping for the longest wave vibrations.

  3. Lightning in hybrid cable-overhead lines and consequent transient overvoltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Schultz Pedersen, Kasper; Bak, Claus Leth

    2017-01-01

    Whereas lines that consist entirely of underground cable are naturally protected from lightning, the phenomenon must be considered for lines that are a mix of overhead lines and underground cables. The difference between overhead lines and underground cables wave impedances may lead to transient......, Transient Overvoltages...

  4. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Lightning one of the most dangerous weather-related phenomena, especially as many jobs and activities occur outdoors, presenting risk from a lightning strike. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning represents a considerable safety threat to people at airfields, marinas, and outdoor facilities-from airfield personnel, to people attending outdoor stadium events, on beaches and golf courses, to mariners, as well as emergency personnel. Holle et al. (2005) show that 90% of lightning deaths occurred outdoors, while 10% occurred indoors despite the perception of safety when inside buildings. Curran et al. (2000) found that nearly half of fatalities due to weather were related to convective weather in the 1992-1994 timeframe, with lightning causing a large component of the fatalities, in addition to tornadoes and flash flooding. Related to the aviation industry, CG lightning represents a considerable hazard to baggage-handlers, aircraft refuelers, food caterers, and emergency personnel, who all become exposed to the risk of being struck within short time periods while convective storm clouds develop. Airport safety protocols require that ramp operations be modified or discontinued when lightning is in the vicinity (typically 16 km), which becomes very costly and disruptive to flight operations. Therefore, much focus has been paid to nowcasting the first-time initiation and extent of lightning, both of CG and of any lightning (e.g, in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud). For this project three lightning nowcasting methodologies will be combined: (1) a GOESbased 0-1 hour lightning initiation (LI) product (Harris et al. 2010; Iskenderian et al. 2012), (2) a High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) lightning probability and forecasted lightning flash density product, such that a quantitative amount of lightning (QL) can be assigned to a location of expected LI, and (3) an algorithm that relates Pseudo-GLM data (Stano et al. 2012, 2014) to the so-called "lightning jump" (LJ) methodology (Shultz et al

  5. Infrasound from lightning measured in Ivory Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, T.; Millet, C.; Matoza, R. S.

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms occur continuously around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. More than two thirds (42) of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO (Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation) are now certified and routinely measure signals due to natural activity (e.g., airflow over mountains, aurora, microbaroms, surf, volcanoes, severe weather including lightning flashes, …). Some of the IMS stations are located where worldwide lightning detection networks (e.g. WWLLN) have a weak detection capability but lightning activity is high (e.g. Africa, South America). These infrasound stations are well localised to study lightning flash activity and its disparity, which is a good proxy for global warming. Progress in infrasound array data processing over the past ten years makes such lightning studies possible. For example, Farges and Blanc (2010) show clearly that it is possible to measure lightning infrasound from thunderstorms within a range of distances from the infrasound station. Infrasound from lightning can be detected when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. The motion of the squall zone is very well measured inside this zone. Up to 25% of lightning flashes can be detected with this technique, giving better results locally than worldwide lightning detection networks. An IMS infrasound station has been installed in Ivory Coast for 9 years. The lightning rate of this region is 10-20 flashes/km2/year from space-based instrument OTD (Christian et al., 2003). Ivory Coast is therefore a good place to study infrasound data associated with lightning activity and its temporal variation. First statistical results will be presented in this paper based on 4 years of data (2005-2009). For short lightning distances (less than 20 km), up to 60 % of lightning detected by WWLLN has been one-to-one correlated

  6. Optical Detection of Lightning from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors have been developed to detect lightning from space during both day and night. These sensors have been fielded in two existing satellite missions and may be included on a third mission in 2002. Satellite-hosted, optically-based lightning detection offers three unique capabilities: (1) the ability to reliably detect lightning over large, often remote, spatial regions, (2) the ability to sample all (IC and CG) lightning, and (3) the ability to detect lightning with uniform (i.e., not range-dependent) sensitivity or detection efficiency. These represent significant departures from conventional RF-based detection techniques, which typically have strong range dependencies (biases) or range limitations in their detection capabilities. The atmospheric electricity team of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Global Hydrology and Climate Center has implemented a three-step satellite lightning research program which includes three phases: proof-of-concept/climatology, science algorithm development, and operational application. The first instrument in the program, the Optical Transient Detector (OTD), is deployed on a low-earth orbit (LEO) satellite with near-polar inclination, yielding global coverage. The sensor has a 1300 x 1300 sq km field of view (FOV), moderate detection efficiency, moderate localization accuracy, and little data bias. The OTD is a proof-of-concept instrument and its mission is primarily a global lightning climatology. The limited spatial accuracy of this instrument makes it suboptimal for use in case studies, although significant science knowledge has been gained from the instrument as deployed.

  7. Total Lightning Activity Associated with Tornadic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, Stephen; Sharp, David; Williams, Earle; Boldi, Bob; Matlin, Anne; Weber, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Severe storms often have high flash rates (in excess of one flash per second) and are dominated by intracloud lightning activity. In addition to the extraordinary flash rates, there is a second distinguishing lightning characteristic of severe storms that seems to be important. When the total lightning history is examined, one finds sudden increases in the lightning rate, which we refer to as lightning "jumps," that precede the occurrence of severe weather by ten or more minutes. These jumps are typically 30-60 flashes/min, and are easily identified as anomalously large derivatives in the flash rate. This relationship is associated with updraft intensification and updraft strength is an important factor in storm severity (through the accumulation of condensate aloft and the stretching of vorticity). In several cases, evidence for diminishment of midlevel rotation and the descent of angular momentum from aloft is present prior to the appearance of the surface tornado. Based on our experience with severe and tornadic storms in Central Florida, we believe the total lightning may augment the more traditional use of NEXRAD radars and storm spotters. However, a more rigorous relation of these jumps to storm kinematics is needed if we are to apply total lightning in a decision tree that leads to improved warning lead times and decreased false alarm rates.

  8. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  9. Lightning mapper and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    A trade-off analysis was completed that reveals how the lightning mapper detection efficiency will change as a function of interference filter bandwidth, pixel field of view, and telescope aperture. It is shown that the critical parameter on which we have minimum flexibility is filter band-width. The problem is that too narrow a filter bandwidth is incompatible with wide areal coverage. The trade-off analysis demonstrates that an 80 percent lightning detection efficiency will technically be relatively straight-forward, while a 90 percent detection efficiency will apparently be difficult to achieve. Three focal plane designs are currently under consideration. One would use a single large, solid state silicon integrating array with multiple output channels and off-the-focal-plane analog, time domain, background removing fibers. A second design would use the same technology, but the sensor would consist of up to four virtually independent focal plane arrays. This design reduces the areal coverage of each detector. Thus narrower interference filters could be utilized. Superior performance would be realized at a probable increase in cost. The final design would use a three-dimensional focal plane in order to perform background removal at the focal plane. Superior performance would be achieved along with reduced weight and power requirements. Unfortunately, this focal plane technology is still under development.

  10. Further Investigations of Slow Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl; Sheleg, Gil

    2013-09-01

    The phenomenon of ``slow lightning'' is a new type of tracking or sliding atmospheric-pressure resistive-barrier discharge on the surface of a weakly conducting electrolyte. It occurs during the production of water plasmoids (also called ``Gatchina discharges'') in which a high-voltage capacitor is discharged into an insulated cathode in limited surface contact with the electrolyte. Unlike conventional dielectric-barrier and most other resistive-barrier discharges, these novel discharges propagate on the surface relatively slowly, spreading at a speed of 1-10 meters per second. We have investigated this phenomenon in several ways, using high-speed videography, time- and space-resolved spectroscopy, and current-density profiling. The plasma produced at cathode spots forms the plasmoid, and this plasma is distinct from the plasma in the slow-lightning discharge above the electrolyte. The primary visible emission from the latter discharge is a continuum, probably due to free-bound transitions, although an N2 + band is also present as well as intense emission from OH radicals under certain conditions. Possible applications of this phenomenon include water purification and pollution control.

  11. Fleet average NOx emission performance of 2008 model year light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles[In relation to the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-12-15

    The On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations came into effect under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act in 2004. The regulations introduced more stringent emissions standards for on-road vehicles and engines, and aligned Canada's emission standards for various vehicles with those of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report summarized the fleet average nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions performance of individual companies and the overall Canadian fleet for the 2008 model year for light duty vehicles (LDV), light duty trucks (LLDT), heavy light duty trucks (HLDT) and medium duty passenger vehicles (MDPV). The report evaluated the effectiveness of the Canadian fleet average NO{sub x} emission program in achieving its stated environmental performance objectives. The report demonstrated that approximately 99 percent of the LDV and LLDT fleet, and 71 percent of the HLDT and MDPV fleet were certified to a bin at, or below, the applicable fleet average NO{sub x} standard. Average NO{sub x} values continued to decrease, in accordance with the performance objectives of the regulations. 9 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. Spatio-temporal dimension of lightning flashes based on three-dimensional Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Jesús A.; Pineda, Nicolau; Montanyà, Joan; Velde, Oscar van der; Fabró, Ferran; Romero, David

    2017-11-01

    3D mapping system like the LMA - Lightning Mapping Array - are a leap forward in lightning observation. LMA measurements has lead to an improvement on the analysis of the fine structure of lightning, allowing to characterize the duration and maximum extension of the cloud fraction of a lightning flash. During several years of operation, the first LMA deployed in Europe has been providing a large amount of data which now allows a statistical approach to compute the full duration and horizontal extension of the in-cloud phase of a lightning flash. The "Ebro Lightning Mapping Array" (ELMA) is used in the present study. Summer and winter lighting were analyzed for seasonal periods (Dec-Feb and Jun-Aug). A simple method based on an ellipse fitting technique (EFT) has been used to characterize the spatio-temporal dimensions from a set of about 29,000 lightning flashes including both summer and winter events. Results show an average lightning flash duration of 440 ms (450 ms in winter) and a horizontal maximum length of 15.0 km (18.4 km in winter). The uncertainties for summer lightning lengths were about ± 1.2 km and ± 0.7 km for the mean and median values respectively. In case of winter lightning, the level of uncertainty reaches up to 1 km and 0.7 km of mean and median value. The results of the successful correlation of CG discharges with the EFT method, represent 6.9% and 35.5% of the total LMA flashes detected in summer and winter respectively. Additionally, the median value of lightning lengths calculated through this correlative method was approximately 17 km for both seasons. On the other hand, the highest median ratios of lightning length to CG discharges in both summer and winter were reported for positive CG discharges.

  13. Utilizing Four Dimensional Lightning and Dual-Polarization Radar to Develop Lightning Initiation Forecast Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    0.20. That study utilized LDAR to detect lightning for several storms in the vicinity of KSC. The Buechler and Goodman (1990) results are very...2000) closely examined lightning -producing storms in the tropics and developed methods 27 to identify when cloud electrification was occurring based on Z... lightning based on size and composite Z alone. Since the focus was airmass thunderstorms, any days with complex areas or lines of thunder- storms

  14. The effect of grounding system modeling on lightning-related studies of transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shariatinasab

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Un-accurate modeling of power system may cause to under or over-design the insulation, which in turn, leads to increase in the investment and/or maintenance cost of the network protection against lightning overvoltages. The grounding system is an effective parameter on the magnitude of the lightning overvoltages and insulation coordination of high voltage transmission lines (TLs. This paper presents a comprehensive evaluation of the effect of grounding electrode impedance on the estimation of overvoltages caused by lightning strokes, in which both the vertical and non-vertical strokes are considered. In the presented study, static and wide-band model of the tower-footing grounding system is adopted assuming the soil electrical parameters to be either constant or frequency dependent. Also, the effect of modeling type of grounding system is considered on the TLs’ reliability indices. The study was performed on a typical 400-kV transmission line which is modeled in EMTP-RV. From the simulation results, it is found that the outage rate of TLs is markedly affected by the model of the tower footing grounding system. This effect is more pronounced when the soil electrical parameters are frequency dependent. It is also concluded that, in addition to the lightning overvoltages, the unavailability of the TLs is significantly affected by wide-band model of grounding system, non-vertical lightning strokes and soil resistivity.

  15. Sampling plans for lightning surges test program. Final report, May 1976--January 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-03-01

    Results are presented of a study undertaken to determine how to measure and evaluate lightning-induced surges on power distribution lines. The study centered on the following basic tasks: prediction of ligntning phenomena; selection and characterization of instrument placement sites; determination of appropriate number of instruments; determination of instrument storage and data collection requirements; and recommendations for future efforts. It was concluded that 400 lightning surge recorders are needed for accummulating basic test data; 250 additional instruments are recommended for obtaining supplementary data; the instruments should be placed throughout the US with careful control of site selection and instrument installation; each instrument should be able to store one year's data; and this proposed field study is only the first step in achieving an understanding of the lightning protection cost-benefit problem. (LCL)

  16. Lightning attachment to wind turbine surfaces affected by internal blade conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garolera, Anna Candela; Holboell, Joachim; Madsen, Soren Find

    2012-01-01

    on the blade surface instead of the receptor is also possible, with the risk of damages in the composite structure as a consequence. The present paper focuses on electrical fields and streamer activity in connection to conductive components inside a wind turbine blade when a downward leader is approaching...... the wind turbine. High voltage tests have been carried out to study the development of streamers in conductive components inside a fiberglass structure, and the results have been correlated with the simulations of the electric field performed using Finite Element Method. Finally, potential applications......The efficiency of the blade lightning protection system depends to a great extend on the effectiveness of the receptor to intercept the lightning discharge. When the blade is exposed to a high electric field, streamers are mainly initiated from the receptor surface, but lightning attachment...

  17. Lightning on Jupiter - Rate, energetics, and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager data on the optical and radio-frequency detection of lightning discharges in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggest a stroke rate significantly lower than on the earth. The efficiency of conversion of atmospheric convective energy flux into lightning is almost certainly less than on the earth, probably near 10 to the -7th rather than the terrestrial value of 10 to the -4th. At this level the rate of production of complex organic molecules by lightning and by thunder shock waves is negligible compared to the rates of known photochemical processes for forming colored inorganic solids.

  18. Geostationary Lightning Mapper for GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William

    2007-01-01

    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a single channel, near-IR optical detector, used to detect, locate and measure total lightning activity over the full-disk as part of a 3-axis stabilized, geostationary weather satellite system. The next generation NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2014 will carry a GLM that will provide continuous day and night observations of lightning from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. The mission objectives for the GLM are to 1) provide continuous, full-disk lightning measurements for storm warning and Nowcasting, 2) provide early warning of tornadic activity, and 3) accumulate a long-term database to track decadal changes of lightning. The GLM owes its heritage to the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (1997-Present) and the Optical Transient Detector (1995-2000), which were developed for the Earth Observing System and have produced a combined 11 year data record of global lightning activity. Instrument formulation studies begun in January 2006 will be completed in March 2007, with implementation expected to begin in September 2007. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, airborne science missions (e.g., African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis, AMMA), and regional test beds (e.g, Lightning Mapping Arrays) are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time lightning mapping data now being provided to selected forecast offices will lead to improved understanding of the application of these data in the severe storm warning process and accelerate the development of the pre-launch algorithms and Nowcasting applications. Proxy data combined with MODIS and Meteosat Second Generation SEVERI observations will also lead to new

  19. Energy transfer problems of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egely, G.

    1986-04-01

    The paper analyzes the energy transport phenomenon of ball lightnings, but momentum and charge transport phenomena are considered as well. The physical properties as energy density and transfer are investigated using several observers' accounts of interactions with different objects. It is shown that contrary to previous assumptions the ball lightning has negative electric charge, and very high internal energy density. Both internal and external energy source models are analyzed, and it is shown that regardless to the details of a given model neither of them can explain actual observations. This has been validated by a well documented case study, and by several additional observations. An entirely new, testable model is suggested, which is able to stand for all observed properties of ball lightnings, and it explains the cause of rarity of ball lightnings, and the reasons of the unsuccessful experimental efforts. It is shown that the plasma sphere is just a visible side effect of a more important phenomenon.

  20. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  1. Central hyperadrenergic state after lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Ahlskog, J Eric; Singer, Wolfgang; Gelfman, Russell; Sheldon, Seth H; Seime, Richard J; Craft, Jennifer M; Staab, Jeffrey P; Kantor, Birgit; Low, Phillip A

    2013-08-01

    To describe and review autonomic complications of lightning strike. Case report and laboratory data including autonomic function tests in a subject who was struck by lightning. A 24-year-old man was struck by lightning. Following that, he developed dysautonomia, with persistent inappropriate sinus tachycardia and autonomic storms, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functional neurologic problems. The combination of persistent sinus tachycardia and episodic exacerbations associated with hypertension, diaphoresis, and agitation was highly suggestive of a central hyperadrenergic state with superimposed autonomic storms. Whether the additional PTSD and functional neurologic deficits were due to a direct effect of the lightning strike on the central nervous system or a secondary response is open to speculation.

  2. Lightning activity during the 1999 Superior derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin G.; Murphy, Brian P.

    2002-12-01

    On 4 July 1999, a severe convective windstorm, known as a derecho, caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators of severe weather.

  3. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field sensors along with a central computer to record and monitor the instruments....

  4. Lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, D. W.; Uman, M. A.; Wilcox, C. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A commercial lightning-locating system (LLS) was employed in the study of lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. The LLS output included the time, location, number of strokes per flash, and initial peak magnetic field value of first strokes for lightning ground flashes lowering negative charge. Attention is given to the design and the operation of the LLS, and the experimental results. Measured properties of each of 111 storms are given in a number of tables. It was observed that the apparent motion associated with the lightning activity in storm systems was not due to the motion of the individual single-peak and multiple-peak storms but rather to the successive growth of new storms near previously active storms.

  5. Lightning in tornadic storms: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGorman, Donald R.

    There have been many reports of unusual lightning characteristics in tornadic storms. For example, eyewitnesses have reported scorching beneath tornado funnels, a steady or rapidly oscillating glow inside funnels, rapidly recurring small patches of light on the side of the thunderstorm, or unusually high or low flash rates [e.g., Church and Barnhart, 1979; Vaughan and Vonnegut, 1976; Vonnegut and Weyer, 1966]. It is difficult, however, to quantify relationships between lightning and tornadic storms from these eyewitness reports.

  6. The detection and location of lightning from geostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a lightning mapper sensor to detect and locate lightning over large areas of the earth's surface, mark the time of their occurrence, and measure their radiant energy is discussed. The possible applications of a mapper in geostationary orbit and previous satellite lightning experiments are reviewed. The components of a lightning mapper sensor and the operation and data processing of the sensor are described. The factors which would determine the overall performance of a lightning mapper are considered. It is expected that the proposed lightning mapper design will be completed in time to include it on the GOES M satellite.

  7. The Elusive Evidence of Volcanic Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K; Gharghabi, P; Gafford, J; Mazzola, M

    2017-11-14

    Lightning strikes are known to morphologically alter and chemically reduce geologic formations and deposits, forming fulgurites. A similar process occurs as the result of volcanic lightning discharge, when airborne volcanic ash is transformed into lightning-induced volcanic spherules (LIVS). Here, we adapt the calculations used in previous studies of lightning-induced damage to infrastructure materials to determine the effects on pseudo-ash samples of simplified composition. Using laboratory high-current impulse experiments, this research shows that within the lightning discharge channel there is an ideal melting zone that represents roughly 10% or less of the total channel radius at which temperatures are sufficient to melt the ash, regardless of peak current. The melted ash is simultaneously expelled from the channel by the heated, expanding air, permitting particles to cool during atmospheric transport before coming to rest in ash fall deposits. The limited size of this ideal melting zone explains the low number of LIVS typically observed in volcanic ash despite the frequent occurrence of lightning during explosive eruptions.

  8. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  9. 77 FR 16988 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule for Motor Vehicle Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 RIN 2060-AR20 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule... New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The revised use condition incorporates by reference a [email protected] . The published versions of notices and rulemakings under the SNAP program are available...

  10. Rocket-triggered lightning propagation paths relative to preceding natural lightning activity and inferred cloud charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkey, J. T.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Ngin, T.; Gamerota, W. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Caicedo, J.; Hare, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data are used to compare the propagation paths of seven rocket-triggered lightning flashes to the inferred charge structure of the thunderstorms in which they were triggered. This is the first LMA study of Florida thunderstorm charge structure. Three sequentially (within 16 min) triggered lightning flashes, whose initial stages were the subject of Hill et al. (2013), are reexamined by comparing the complete flashes to the preceding natural lightning to demonstrate that the three rocket-triggered flashes propagated through an inferred negative charge region that decreased from about 6.8 to about 4.4 km altitude as the thunderstorm dissipated. Two other flashes were also sequentially triggered (within 9 min) in a thunderstorm that contained a convectively intense region ahead of a stratiform region, with similar observed results. Finally, two unique cases of triggered lightning flashes are presented. In the first case, the in-cloud portion of the triggered lightning flash, after ascending to and turning horizontal at 5.3 km altitude, just above the 0°C level, was observed to very clearly resemble the geometry of the in-cloud portion of the preceding natural lightning discharges. In the second case, a flash was triggered relatively early in the storm's lifecycle that did not turn horizontal near the 0°C level, as is usually the case for triggered lightning in dissipating storms, but ascended to nearly 7.5 km altitude before exhibiting extensive horizontal branching.

  11. Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ Part I – Using Hourly NLDN Lightning Strike Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  12. The influence of personal protection equipment, occupant body size, and restraint system on the frontal impact responses of Hybrid III ATDs in tactical vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Orton, Nichole Ritchie; Gruber, Rebekah; Rupp, Jonathan; Scherer, Risa; Reed, Matthew; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-08-18

    Although advanced restraint systems, such as seat belt pretensioners and load limiters, can provide improved occupant protection in crashes, such technologies are currently not utilized in military vehicles. The design and use of military vehicles presents unique challenges to occupant safety-including differences in compartment geometry and occupant clothing and gear-that make direct application of optimal civilian restraint systems to military vehicles inappropriate. For military vehicle environments, finite element (FE) modeling can be used to assess various configurations of restraint systems and determine the optimal configuration that minimizes injury risk to the occupant. The models must, however, be validated against physical tests before implementation. The objective of this study was therefore to provide the data necessary for FE model validation by conducting sled tests using anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). A secondary objective of this test series was to examine the influence of occupant body size (5th percentile female, 50th percentile male, and 95th percentile male), military gear (helmet/vest/tactical assault panels), seat belt type (3-point and 5-point), and advanced seat belt technologies (pretensioner and load limiter) on occupant kinematics and injury risk in frontal crashes. In total, 20 frontal sled tests were conducted using a custom sled buck that was reconfigurable to represent both the driver and passenger compartments of a light tactical military vehicle. Tests were performed at a delta-V of 30 mph and a peak acceleration of 25 g. The sled tests used the Hybrid III 5th percentile female, 50th percentile male, and 95th percentile male ATDs outfitted with standard combat boots and advanced combat helmets. In some tests, the ATDs were outfitted with additional military gear, which included an improved outer tactical vest (IOTV), IOTV and squad automatic weapon (SAW) gunner with a tactical assault panel (TAP), or IOTV and rifleman with

  13. Washington D.C. Lightning Mapping Array Demonstration Project Risk Reduction for GOES Lightning Mapper Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephan B.; Goodman, Steven; Krehbiel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A 10-site, ground-based total lightning mapping array (LMA) has been installed in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area in 2006. The total lightning data from DC LMA are being processed in real-time and derived products are being provided to the forecasters of the National Weather Service (NWS) forecast office in Sterling, Virginia. The NWS forecasters are using the products to monitor convective activity along with conventional radar and satellite products. Operational experience with these products is intended to inform decision making in how to best utilize in NWS operations similar data available from the GOES Lightning Mapper. The paper will discuss specifics of the LMA as well as proposed research into use of total lightning data in predicting and warning for cloud-to-ground lightning.

  14. LDAR, A Three-Dimensional Lightning Warning System: Its Development and Use by the Government, and Transition to Public Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Stan; Sharp, David; Merceret, Francis; Madura, John; Murphy, Martin

    1998-01-01

    NASA, at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), developed and operates a unique high precision lightning location system to provide lightning related weather warnings. These warnings are used to stop lightning-sensitive operations such as space vehicle launches and ground operations where equipment and personnel are at risk. The data is provided to the Range Weather Operations [45th Weather Squadron, U. S. Air Force (USAF)] where it is used with other meteorological data to issue weather advisories and warnings for Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) and KSC operations. This system, called Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR), provides users with a graphical display in three dimensions of 66 MHz radio frequency events generated by lightning processes. The locations of these events provide a sound basis for the prediction of lightning hazards. NASA and Global Atmospherics, Inc. are developing a new system that will replace the unique LDAR components with commercially available and maintainable components having improved capabilities. These components will be phased in to ensure full continuity and access to this important warning technology. These LDAR systems are expected to eventually be available for installation and use by the public at specialized facilities, such as airports, and for general weather warnings via the National Weather Service (NWS) or television broadcast. The NWS in Melbourne has had access to real-time LDAR data since 1993 on an experimental basis. This use of LDAR has shown promise for the improvement of aviation forecasts and severe weather warnings. More so, it has opened the door to investigate the feasibility of issuing lightning-related public advisories. The success of its early use suggests that this technology may improve safety and potentially save lives, therefore constituting a significant benefit to the public. This paper describes the LDR system, the plans and progress of these upgrades, and the potential benefits of its use.

  15. Lightning forecasting studies using LDAR, LLP, field mill, surface mesonet, and Doppler radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Gregory S.; Hoffert, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to develop rules, algorithms, display software, and training materials that can be used by the operational forecasters who issue weather advisories for daily ground operations and launches by NASA and the United States Air Force to improve real-time forecasts of lightning. Doppler radar, Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR), Lightning Location and Protection (LLP), field mill (Launch Pad Lightning Warning System -- LPLWS), wind tower (surface mesonet) and additional data sets have been utilized in 10 case studies of thunderstorms in the vicinity of KSC during the summers of 1994 and 1995. These case studies reveal many intriguing aspects of cloud-to-ground, cloud-to-cloud, in-cloud, and cloud-to-air lightning discharges in relation to radar thunderstorm structure and evolution. They also enable the formulation of some preliminary working rules of potential use in the forecasting of initial and final ground strike threat. In addition, LDAR and LLP data sets from 1993 have been used to quantify the lightning threat relative to the center and edges of LDAR discharge patterns. Software has been written to overlay and display the various data sets as color imagery. However, human intervention is required to configure the data sets for proper intercomparison. Future efforts will involve additional software development to automate the data set intercomparisons, to display multiple overlay combinations in a windows format, and to allow for animation of the imagery. The software package will then be used as a tool to examine more fully the current cases and to explore additional cases in a timely manner. This will enable the formulation of more general and reliable forecasting guidelines and rules.

  16. Meteorological Aspects of Two Modes of Lightning Triggered Upward Lightning (LTUL) Events in Sprite-Producing MCSs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T. E.; Warner, T. A.; Lang, T. J.; Cummins, K.; Quick, M.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P.; Cummer, S. A.; Meyers, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    between the +CG return stroke and LTUL initiation (10s to 100s of ms). The parent lightning discharges for both sprites and LTULs have many common aspects and tend to occur in similar meteorological regimes, with the two phenomena often occurring together. An earlier LUTL, at 2320Z, 29 May 2013 was captured at 9900 fps by a Phantom camera in the PhOCAL mobile Lightning Investigation Vehicle (LIV). This discharge, exhibiting numerous recoil leaders, also occurred in a stratiform region some 50-100 km north of an MCS convective core. While there was no preceding +CG, there was an extensive network of IC channels, one of which passed overhead close to the turbine. These observations are consistent with the ongoing UPLIGHTS studies of LTULs from tall towers in Rapid City. While a +CG is usually involved (85% of the time), the LTUL occurs because of the associated extensive in cloud components passing over towers. The earlier case without a +CG typifies this second mode where the triggering component is a negative leader associated with the IC activity passing near the towers initiates the upward positive leaders. We will discuss the parent discharges, shown in their meteorological (radar and satellite) context, and attempt to better understand the charge structures present in both the convective and stratiform regions of the MCS. The sprite and its relationship to the parent discharge will similarly be discussed

  17. Franklin Lecture: Lightning in Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    A broad overview is given of lightning in planetary atmospheres. Searches for lightning using spacecraft-borne instrumentation have now been conducted at almost all of the planets in the solar system, the exceptions being Mercury, which has no appreciable atmosphere, and Pluto which has not yet been visited by a spacecraft. The techniques used include (1) imaging observations to detect optical flashes produced by lightning; (2) high-frequency radio measurements to detect the impulsive broadband radio bursts, called spherics, produced by lightning discharges; and (3) low-frequency plasma wave measurements to detect the whistling tones, called whistlers, produced by lightning. Using these techniques, lightning has been reported at five planets other than Earth. These are: Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Of these, the existence of lightning at Venus is doubtful, and the evidence of lightning at Neptune is at best marginal. Jupiter and Saturn have by far the most intense and well documented lightning activity. During the Voyager 1 flyby of Jupiter, whistlers and intense optical flashes, comparable to those from terrestrial superbolts, were observed by the plasma wave and optical imaging instruments. However, no impulsive high-frequency radio bursts were observed. Two factors may be responsible for the absence of high-frequency radio signals: (1) the very strong magnetic field of Jupiter, which blocks the escape of the extra-ordinary mode; and (2) the relatively high electron collision frequency in the ionosphere, which increases the absorption of radio waves. During the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of Saturn many very strong high-frequency radio bursts, called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs), were detected. Although the origin of these impulsive radio bursts was initially uncertain, strong evidence now exists that SEDs are produced by lightning. Recent optical imaging and radio measurements from the Cassini spacecraft clearly show that SEDs originate from

  18. VAISALA US NLDN LIGHTNING FLASH DATA V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by Vaisala. A network of over 100 antennae are connected to a...

  19. TRMM-LBA LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TRMM-LBA Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (ER-2 LIP), which measures the electric field above,...

  20. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM Science Data V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Science Data was collected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), which was an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement...

  1. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM Backgrounds V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Backgrounds was collected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), which was an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement...

  2. CAMEX-4 DC-8 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 DC-8 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which allows the vector components of the...

  3. Multiparameter Investigation of Significant Lightning Producing Storms in Northeastern Colorado

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauthier, Michael

    1999-01-01

    We present a regional, summer season, climatology of cloud to ground (CG) lightning immediately east of the central Rocky mountains from 1996-98 using data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN...

  4. Lightning chemistry on Earth-like exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaseva, Aleksandra; Rimmer, Paul B.; Waldmann, Ingo; Rocchetto, Marco; Yurchenko, Sergey N.; Helling, Christiane; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for lightning shock-induced chemistry that can be applied to atmospheres of arbitrary H/C/N/O chemistry, hence for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The model couples hydrodynamics and the STAND2015 kinetic gas-phase chemistry. For an exoplanet analogue to the contemporary Earth, our model predicts NO and NO2 yields in agreement with observation. We predict height-dependent mixing ratios during a storm soon after a lightning shock of NO ≈10-3 at 40 km and NO2 ≈10-4 below 40 km, with O3 reduced to trace quantities (≪10-10). For an Earth-like exoplanet with a CO2/N2 dominated atmosphere and with an extremely intense lightning storm over its entire surface, we predict significant changes in the amount of NO, NO2, O3, H2O, H2 and predict a significant abundance of C2N. We find that, for the Early Earth, O2 is formed in large quantities by lightning but is rapidly processed by the photochemistry, consistent with previous work on lightning. The chemical effect of persistent global lightning storms are predicted to be significant, primarily due to NO2, with the largest spectral features present at ˜3.4 and ˜6.2 μm. The features within the transmission spectrum are on the order of 1 ppm and therefore are not likely detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope. Depending on its spectral properties, C2N could be a key tracer for lightning on Earth-like exoplanets with a N2/CO2 bulk atmosphere, unless destroyed by yet unknown chemical reactions.

  5. Lightning-induced overvoltages in low-voltage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeidalen, Hans Kristian

    1997-12-31

    Lightning-induced overvoltages (LIOs) are a main source of failures in low-voltage overhead line systems. This thesis deals mainly with calculations of LIOs aiming to enable the design of a proper voltage protection. Models for calculation of LIOs are adapted from the literature or developed based on measurements. The models used are believed to be fairly accurate for the first few microseconds, which is usually sufficient for predicting the maximum induced voltage in the system. The lightning channel is modelled by the Modified Transmission Line (MTL) model with the Transmission Line (TL) model as a special case. The coupling between the electrical fields from a lightning channel and an overhead line is modelled by Agrawal`s model. The attenuation of electrical fields over a lossy ground is modelled by Norton`s- or the Surface Impedance methods. The validity of all the applied models is analysed. In addition, measurements have been performed in order to develop models of distribution transformers and low-voltage power installation (LVPI) networks. Simple models of typical transformers and LVPIs are developed for calculations when specific data are unavailable. The practical range of values and its influence on the LIOs in a system is investigated. The main frequency range of interest related to LIOs is 10 kHz - 1 MHz in which all the models are accurate. The adapted or developed models are used to calculate LIOs in low-voltage systems. The influence of various key parameters in the system is investigated. Most important are the return stroke amplitude and rise time, the overhead line height and location, the termination of overhead line segments, neutral grounding, and the ground conductivity. 135 refs., 136 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Grounding, Bonding, Shielding, and Lightning Bibliography 1972 to 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    channel. The interaction of lightning and aircraft is included. A discussion of ball lightning is included. H. H. Hoshiko, "Helical Channel Multiplier...project Telsa which produced artificial ball lightning with potentials as large as 20 million volts and provides a brief explanation of the hazards of... ball lightning . S. Stoller, "In-Plant Generation-Design Considerations for Industrial Facilities," IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. IA-12

  7. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-01-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel fra...

  8. Analysis of Conditions favorable for Ball Lightning Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Boerner, H.

    2016-01-01

    This report uses a few well documented cases of Ball Lightning (or BL for short) observations to demonstrate a correlation between BL and positive lightning, especially strong positive lightning. This allows to draw conclusions and predictions about future BL observations and the pro- duction of these objects in the laboratory. Contrary to many current BL theories, these objects can be created without direct contact to a lightning channel. Very high electric fields appear to be essential for ...

  9. Lightning in the Ionosphere with C/NOFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-25

    loca lightning, electric field, ionosphere , ionospheric plasma, plasma irregularities U U U U Prof. Robert H. Holzworth 206 685 7410 Reset INSTRUCTIONS... ionospheric plasma density irregularities and the occurrence of optical lightning activity; and the observation that lightning electric fields were often the...Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2011, abstract #AE21A-0239 On the Relationship between Lightning and Equatorial Ionosphere Density Irregularities , McCarthy

  10. High-Temperature Properties of Ceramic Fibers and Insulations for Thermal Protection of Atmospheric Entry and Hypersonic Cruise Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations which will operate in the 500C to 1000C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described in this paper consist of ceramic fabrics, insulations, and metal foils quilted together using ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics of these insulations must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of multilayer insulations and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation

  11. Interrelation between ball lightning and optically induced forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    Optically induced forces are considered as a key factor for explaining the phenomenon of ball lightning. They can provide not only the existence of ball lightning in the form of self-confined intense white light circulating in a spherical shell of air strongly compressed by the light but also the anomalous motion of ball lightning in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  12. A Performance Evaluation of Lightning-NO Algorithms in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQv5.2) model, we have implemented two algorithms for lightning NO production; one algorithm is based on the hourly observed cloud-to-ground lightning strike data from National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to replace the previous m...

  13. Explosive spread F caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. P.; Freidberg, J. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning-produced electromagnetic effects may produce significant modifications in the ionospheric plasmas. An outstanding phenomenon investigated in this paper is the so-called explosive spread F, whose close link with lightning has been identified (Woodman and Kudeki, 1984). Parametric instability excited by the lightning-induced whistler waves is proposed as a potential source mechanism causing the explosive spread F.

  14. Classification of Small Negative Lightning Reports at the KSC-ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Krider, Philip

    2008-01-01

    bypass conventional lightning protection that relies on a sufficient attractive radius to prevent "shielding failure" (Golde, 1977). They also have larger location errors compared to the larger current events. In this study, we use the estimated peak current provided by the CGLSS and the results of our classification to determine the minimum Ip for each category of CG stroke and its probability of occurrence. Where possible, these results are compared to the findings in the literature.

  15. Lightning flash sizes relative to storm structure and turbulence during the Kinematic Texture and Lightning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, E. C.; Salinas, V.; Berkseth, S.; Chmielewski, V.; Brothers, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ongoing work as part of the Kinematic Texture and Lightning Experiment at Texas Tech University has quantified the lightning flash size, rate, and energy alongside the turbulent structure of thunderclouds. 2016 was the final year of observations, which fielded two high-resolution mobile Ka-band radars and mobile environmental soundings. Lightning measurements were made by a VHF Lightning Mapping Array. In order to enhance the detection of the smallest lightning discharges in the turbulent portions of the thundercloud, a rapidly-deployable mobile Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) station augmented a traditional fixed LMA. This capability of targeting particular storm complexes with LMA measurements will be described, and the improved detection capability quantified. The complete set of field measurements from 2014-16 sampled numerous individual cells and storm complexes, ranging in intensity from multicellular convection to supercells and mesoscale convective systems. Flash measurements coincident with radar observations included deep, highly turbulent convective cores and extensive anvil regions. Comparison of flash characteristics across these storm morphologies will be shown, with a focus on the dynamical organization of storms and the turbulent kinematics that drive differences in lightning flash sizes and rates.

  16. Lightning NOx Statistics Derived by NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2013-01-01

    What is the LNOM? The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) [Koshak et al., 2009, 2010, 2011; Koshak and Peterson 2011, 2013] analyzes VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) data to estimate the lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) produced by individual flashes. Figure 1 provides an overview of LNOM functionality. Benefits of LNOM: (1) Does away with unrealistic "vertical stick" lightning channel models for estimating LNOx; (2) Uses ground-based VHF data that maps out the true channel in space and time to < 100 m accuracy; (3) Therefore, true channel segment height (ambient air density) is used to compute LNOx; (4) True channel length is used! (typically tens of kilometers since channel has many branches and "wiggles"); (5) Distinction between ground and cloud flashes are made; (6) For ground flashes, actual peak current from NLDN used to compute NOx from lightning return stroke; (7) NOx computed for several other lightning discharge processes (based on Cooray et al., 2009 theory): (a) Hot core of stepped leaders and dart leaders, (b) Corona sheath of stepped leader, (c) K-change, (d) Continuing Currents, and (e) M-components; and (8) LNOM statistics (see later) can be used to parameterize LNOx production for regional air quality models (like CMAQ), and for global chemical transport models (like GEOS-Chem).

  17. Visual Analytics approach for Lightning data analysis and cell nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stefan; Meng, Liqiu; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and their ground effects, such as flash floods, hail, lightning, strong wind and tornadoes, are responsible for most weather damages (Bonelli & Marcacci 2008). Thus to understand, identify, track and predict lightning cells is essential. An important aspect for decision makers is an appropriate visualization of weather analysis results including the representation of dynamic lightning cells. This work focuses on the visual analysis of lightning data and lightning cell nowcasting which aim to detect and understanding spatial-temporal patterns of moving thunderstorms. Lightnings are described by 3D coordinates and the exact occurrence time of lightnings. The three-dimensionally resolved total lightning data used in our experiment are provided by the European lightning detection network LINET (Betz et al. 2009). In all previous works, lightning point data, detected lightning cells and derived cell tracks are visualized in 2D. Lightning cells are either displayed as 2D convex hulls with or without the underlying lightning point data. Due to recent improvements of lightning data detection and accuracy, there is a growing demand on multidimensional and interactive visualization in particular for decision makers. In a first step lightning cells are identified and tracked. Then an interactive graphic user interface (GUI) is developed to investigate the dynamics of the lightning cells: e.g. changes of cell density, location, extension as well as merging and splitting behavior in 3D over time. In particular a space time cube approach is highlighted along with statistical analysis. Furthermore a lightning cell nowcasting is conducted and visualized. The idea thereby is to predict the following cell features for the next 10-60 minutes including location, centre, extension, density, area, volume, lifetime and cell feature probabilities. The main focus will be set to a suitable interactive visualization of the predicted featured within the GUI. The developed visual

  18. New results about the study of the lightning activity and characteristics over the large urban area of the city of São Paulo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, W. R.; Pinto, O.; Pinto, I. R.

    2009-12-01

    The urban effect on lightning activity has been studied in many places around the world. The Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP) in the Southeast region of Brazil is one of the greatest and more populous urban areas of the world with a density of about 3000 inhabitants/km2. Similar to observations in other large urban areas, there is a significant enhancement in the number of negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning and a decrease in the percentage of positive CG flashes over the city of São Paulo. This work investigates the role of air polluted on lightning in MRSP. The CG lightning data set used was provided by Brazilian lightning detection network (BrasilDAT) for a period of 10 years (1999 - 2008). In this period, only days with CG flashes during the spring and summer seasons (from October to March) were considered and, for these days, only lightning data from 14 h to 20 h LT, were considered since this period corresponds to the time of the day with maximum lightning activity. The air polluted data set used in this work, was provided by the São Paulo environmental agencies (CETESB). The main results are: there is a tendency of increase in the ratio between lightning activity in the center area and surrounding area of the MRSP during the ten years in agreement with the same tendency observed for the number of automotive vehicles circulating on the center area of the city; there is a statistical significant increase in the CG lightning activity during the week days over MRSP related to the PM10 concentration. Apparently the increase in the lightning activity is related to an increase in the lifetime of the storms and, in consequence, the number of flashes per storm, and not to the mean flash rate of the storms. However, the increase also suggest that the effect of the pollution in the enhancement of the CG lightning activity is probably less significant compared to the effect of the urban heat island. A similar study is being done for other lightning spot

  19. Lightning studies using LDAR and companion data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Research was conducted to use the KSC Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system, together with companion data, in four subprojects: weather forecasting and advisory applications of LDAR, LDAR in relation to field mill readings, lightning flash and stroke detection using LDAR, and LDAR in relation to radar reflectivity patterns and KSC wind profiler vertical velocities. The research is aimed at developing rules, algorithms, and training materials that can be used by the operational weather forecasters who issue weather advisories for daily ground operations and launches by NASA and the United States Air Force. During the summer of 1993, LDAR data was examined on an hourly basis from 14 thunderstorm days and compared to ground strike data measured by the Lightning Location and Protection (LLP) system. These data were re-examined during 1994 to identify, number, and track LDAR-detected storms continually throughout the day and avoid certain interpretation problems arising from the use of hourly files. An areal storm growth factor was incorporated into a scheme to use current mappings of LDAR-defined thunderstorms to predict future ground strikes. During the summer of 1994, extensive sets of LDAR and companion data have been collected for 16 thunderstorm days, including a variety of meteorological situations. Detailed case studies are being conducted to relate the occurence of LDAR to the radar structure and evolution of thunderstorms. Field mill (LPWS) data are being examined to evaluate the complementary nature of LDAR and LPLWS data in determining the time of beginning and ending of the ground strike threat at critical sites. A computerized lightning flash and stroke discrimination algorithm has been written that can be used to help locate the points of origin of the electrical discharges, help distinguish in-cloud, cloud-ground, and upward flashes, and perhaps determine when the threat of ground strikes has ceased. Surface wind tower (mesonet), radar, sounding

  20. Can Protection Motivation Theory predict pro-environmental behavior? Explaining the adoption of electric vehicles in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockarjova, M.; Steg, L.

    Scholars have proposed that the Protection Motivation Theory provides a valuable framework to explain pro-environmental choices, by employing a wide set of predictors, such as the costs and benefits of current (maladaptive) behavior as well as prospective adaptive behavior. However, no comprehensive

  1. Can Protection Motivation Theory predict pro-environmental behavior? Explaining the adoption of electric vehicles in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockarjova, M.; Steg, L.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have proposed that the Protection Motivation Theory provides a valuable framework to explain pro-environmental choices, by employing a wide set of predictors, such as the costs and benefits of current (maladaptive) behavior as well as prospective adaptive behavior. However, no comprehensive

  2. 77 FR 17344 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule for Motor Vehicle Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 RIN-2060-AR20 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendment to HFO-1234yf SNAP Rule... conditions under EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. The revised use condition... SNAP program are available on EPA's Stratospheric Ozone Web site at http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/regs...

  3. Global Positioning System (GPS) Precipitable Water in Forecasting Lightning at Spaceport Canaveral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer, Kristen; Graf, Brian G.; Roeder, William

    2005-01-01

    Using meteorology data, focusing on precipitable water (PW), obtained during the 2000-2003 thunderstorm seasons in Central Florida, this paper will, one, assess the skill and accuracy measurements of the current Mazany forecasting tool and, two, provide additional forecasting tools that can be used in predicting lightning. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are located in east Central Florida. KSC and CCAFS process and launch manned (NASA Space Shuttle) and unmanned (NASA and Air Force Expendable Launch Vehicles) space vehicles. One of the biggest cost impacts is unplanned launch scrubs due to inclement weather conditions such as thunderstorms. Each launch delay/scrub costs over a quarter million dollars, and the need to land the Shuttle at another landing site and return to KSC costs approximately $ 1M. Given the amount of time lost and costs incurred, the ability to accurately forecast (predict) when lightning will occur can result in significant cost and time savings. All lightning prediction models were developed using binary logistic regression. Lightning is the dependent variable and is binary. The independent variables are the Precipitable Water (PW) value for a given time of the day, the change in PW up to 12 hours, the electric field mill value, and the K-index value. In comparing the Mazany model results for the 1999 period B against actual observations for the 2000-2003 thunderstorm seasons, differences were found in the False Alarm Rate (FAR), Probability of Detection (POD) and Hit Rate (H). On average, the False Alarm Rate (FAR) increased by 58%, the Probability of Detection (POD) decreased by 31% and the Hit Rate decreased by 20%. In comparing the performance of the 6 hour forecast period to the performance of the 1.5 hour forecast period for the Mazany model, the FAR was lower by 15% and the Hit Rate was higher by 7%. However, the POD for the 6 hour forecast period was lower by 16% as compared to the POD of the 1

  4. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The test sequence was to measure electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case when a simulated lightning discharge strikes an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was conducted between 21 June and 17 July 1990. Thirty-six high rate-of-rise Marx generator discharges and eight high current bank discharges were injected onto three different test article configurations. Attach points included three locations on the top hat cover simulator and two locations on the mounting bolts. Top hat cover simulator and mounting bolt damage and grain cover damage was observed. Overall electric field levels were well below 30 kilowatts/meter. Electric field levels ranged from 184.7 to 345.9 volts/meter and magnetic field levels were calculated from 6.921 to 39.73 amperes/meter. It is recommended that the redesigned solid rocket motor top hat cover be used in Configuration 1 or Configuration 2 as an interim lightning protection device until a lightweight cover can be designed.

  5. High temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  6. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Karl D [Department of Technology, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)], E-mail: kdstephan@txstate.edu

    2008-03-15

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings.

  7. Lightning and severe thunderstorms in event management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Katie M

    2012-01-01

    There are a few national position stands/guidelines that address environmental conditions in athletics, yet they do not govern all outdoor sports. Extreme heat and cold, lightning, and severe wind can all be fatal, yet the majority of outdoor sports have no published guidelines addressing these conditions in relation to activity. Available research on extreme heat and cold conditions in athletics provides prevention strategies, to include acclimatization. Lightning and severe wind are two environmental conditions to which humans cannot accommodate, and they both can be deadly. There are strong positions on extreme heat/cold and lightning safety in athletics, but none affiliated with severe winds. Medical personnel involved in planning large outdoor sporting events must know of the presence of nationally published weather-related documents and apply them to their event. In addition, research needs to be expanded in the realm of establishing guidelines for safety to participants and spectators in severe wind conditions.

  8. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2008-03-01

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings.

  9. On the energy characteristics of ball lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, A V; Bychkov, V L; Abrahamson, John

    2002-01-15

    A compilation of 17 observations of ball lightning showing the most energetic effects is presented along with estimates of their energy content. These observations were chosen from several thousand for the much stronger interaction of each ball lightning on its surroundings, and the method of energy estimation outlined. The case is put that some of the observations show a higher energy than self-contained chemical energy could provide. Comments have been added to the paper, arguing that the energy estimations themselves should be consistent with whatever model is used for ball lightning. For example, the presence of reacting nanoparticles releasing chemical energy may bring about the same observed effects with lower estimated energy.

  10. Conceptual design of a spaceborne lightning sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, W. L.; Nagler, M.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design of a broad-area optical lightning telescope sensor (BOLTS) designed to provide full-time (day/night) coverage of the continental United States from a geosynchronous orbit is described. Variations are discussed that could cover the whole globe from four to five geosynchronous satellites or cover only smaller areas with a high (2.5 km) resolution. The design is based on research results of the initial phase of a NASA-sponsored program. The ground resolution will be 8 x 8 km. The focal plane is an 800 x 800 pixel CCD array, electronically subdivided to allow for the high data rates (1000 frames per sec) imposed by the characteristics of lightning flashes. It will detect lightning strokes whose optical power is greater than 10 million watts, with a probability of detection of 0.9, and a false alarm rate of 0.1.

  11. The response of aeroshells to lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dinallo, M.A. [Quatro Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Electrical discharges from a lightning simulator were directed at Mk12 aeroshells. Buckling of the aluminum substrate was observed after some 100-kA shots, and severe damage consisting of tearing of the aluminum and the production of inward flying aluminum shrapnel was observed after some 200-kA peak-current shots. Some shots resulted in severe damage to both the aluminum and the carbon-phenolic ablative material. It is reasonable to conclude from the experimental results that a lightning stroke with very high-peak current could, by itself, produce an opening in an Mk12 aeroshell. Because the aeroshell is part of the nuclear explosive safety exclusion region for the Mk12/W62 nuclear weapon, an opening would significantly reduce the assured safety of the weapon. It is unlikely that the observed interaction between lightning and the aeroshells would have been predicted by any form of computer simulation.

  12. Which Factors Can Protect Against Range Stress in Everyday Usage of Battery Electric Vehicles? Toward Enhancing Sustainability of Electric Mobility Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Rauh, Nadine; Günther, Madlen; Trantow, Maria; Krems, Josef F

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present research was to advance understanding of factors that can protect against range anxiety, specifically range stress in everyday usage of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). Range anxiety is a major barrier to the broad adoption of sustainable electric mobility systems. To develop strategies aimed at overcoming range anxiety, a clear understanding of this phenomenon and influencing factors is needed. We examined range anxiety in the form of everyday range stress (ERS) in a field study setting. Seventy-two customers leased a BEV for 3 months. The field study was specifically designed to enable examination of factors that can contribute to lower ERS. In particular, study design and sample recruitment were targeted at generating vehicle usage profiles that would lead to relatively frequent experience of situations requiring active management of range resources and thereby potentially leading to experienced range stress. Less frequent encounter with critical range situations, higher practical experience, subjective range competence, tolerance of low range, and experienced trustworthiness of the range estimation system were related to lower ERS. Moreover, range stress was found to be related to range satisfaction and BEV acceptance. The results underline the importance of the human factors perspective to overcome range anxiety and enhance sustainability of electric mobility systems. Trustworthiness should be employed as a key benchmark variable in the design of range estimation systems, and assistance systems should target increasing drivers' adaptive capacity (i.e., resilience) to cope with critical range situations. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  13. Developing an Enhanced Lightning Jump Algorithm for Operational Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2009-01-01

    Overall Goals: 1. Build on the lightning jump framework set through previous studies. 2. Understand what typically occurs in nonsevere convection with respect to increases in lightning. 3. Ultimately develop a lightning jump algorithm for use on the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). 4 Lightning jump algorithm configurations were developed (2(sigma), 3(sigma), Threshold 10 and Threshold 8). 5 algorithms were tested on a population of 47 nonsevere and 38 severe thunderstorms. Results indicate that the 2(sigma) algorithm performed best over the entire thunderstorm sample set with a POD of 87%, a far of 35%, a CSI of 59% and a HSS of 75%.

  14. The effect of global warming on lightning frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin; Rind, David

    1990-01-01

    The first attempt to model global lightning distributions by using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM is reported. Three sets of observations showing the relationship between lightning frequency and cloud top height are shown. Zonally averaged lightning frequency observed by satellite are compared with those calculated using the GISS GCM, and fair agreement is found. The change in lightning frequency for a double CO2 climate is calculated and found to be nearly 2.23 x 10 exp 6 extra lightning flashes per day.

  15. Lightning and precipitation produced by severe weather systems over Belém, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Maria do Nascimento Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CG Lightning flashes events monitored by a LDN of the Amazon Protection System, which included 12 LPATS IV VAISALA sensors distributed over eastern Amazonia, were analyzed during four severe rainstorm occurrences in Belem-PA-Brazil, in the 2006-2007 period. These selected case studies referred to rainfall events, which produced more than 25 mm/hour, or more than 40 mm/ 2 hours of precipitation rate totals, registered by a tipping bucket automatic high-resolution rain gauge, located at 1º 47' 53" S and 48º 30' 16" W. Centered at this location, a 30 ,10 and 5 km radius circles were drawn by means of a geographic information system, and the data from lightning occurrences within this larger area, were set apart for analysis. During these severe storms the CG lightning events, occurred almost randomly over the surrounding defined circle, previously covered by mesoscale convective systems, for all cases studied. This work also showed that the interaction between large-scale and mesoscale weather conditions have a major influence on the intensity of the storms studied cases. In addition to the enhancement of the lightning and precipitation rates, the electric activity within the larger circles can precede the rainfall at central point of the areas

  16. Automatic lightning detection and photographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Holley, L. D.; Gray, J. L.; Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A system is presented for monitoring and recording lightning strokes within a predetermined area with a camera having an electrically operated shutter with means for advancing the film in the camera after activating the shutter. The system includes an antenna for sensing lightning strikes which, in turn, generates a signal that is fed to an electronic circuit which generates signals for operating the shutter of the camera. Circuitry is provided for preventing activation of the shutter as the film in the camera is being advanced.

  17. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  18. Artificial Neural Network applied to lightning flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, R. B.; Guedes, D.; Bianchi, R.

    2013-05-01

    The development of video cameras enabled cientists to study lightning discharges comportment with more precision. The main goal of this project is to create a system able to detect images of lightning discharges stored in videos and classify them using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN)using C Language and OpenCV libraries. The developed system, can be split in two different modules: detection module and classification module. The detection module uses OpenCV`s computer vision libraries and image processing techniques to detect if there are significant differences between frames in a sequence, indicating that something, still not classified, occurred. Whenever there is a significant difference between two consecutive frames, two main algorithms are used to analyze the frame image: brightness and shape algorithms. These algorithms detect both shape and brightness of the event, removing irrelevant events like birds, as well as detecting the relevant events exact position, allowing the system to track it over time. The classification module uses a neural network to classify the relevant events as horizontal or vertical lightning, save the event`s images and calculates his number of discharges. The Neural Network was implemented using the backpropagation algorithm, and was trained with 42 training images , containing 57 lightning events (one image can have more than one lightning). TheANN was tested with one to five hidden layers, with up to 50 neurons each. The best configuration achieved a success rate of 95%, with one layer containing 20 neurons (33 test images with 42 events were used in this phase). This configuration was implemented in the developed system to analyze 20 video files, containing 63 lightning discharges previously manually detected. Results showed that all the lightning discharges were detected, many irrelevant events were unconsidered, and the event's number of discharges was correctly computed. The neural network used in this project achieved a

  19. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  20. Visual Analysis for Nowcasting of Multidimensional Lightning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Peters

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Globally, most weather-related damages are caused by thunderstorms. Besides floods, strong wind, and hail, one of the major thunderstorm ground effects is lightning. Therefore, lightning investigations, including detection, cluster identification, tracking, and nowcasting are essential. To enable reliable decisions, current and predicted lightning cluster- and track features as well as analysis results have to be represented in the most appropriate way. Our paper introduces a framework which includes identification, tracking, nowcasting, and in particular visualization and statistical analysis of dynamic lightning data in three-dimensional space. The paper is specifically focused on enabling users to conduct the visual analysis of lightning data for the purpose of identification and interpretation of spatial-temporal patterns embedded in lightning data, and their dynamics. A graphic user interface (GUI is developed, wherein lightning tracks and predicted lightning clusters, including their prediction certainty, can be investigated within a 3D view or within a Space-Time-Cube. In contrast to previous work, our approach provides insight into the dynamics of past and predicted 3D lightning clusters and cluster features over time. We conclude that an interactive visual exploration in combination with a statistical analysis can provide new knowledge within lightning investigations and, thus, support decision-making in weather forecast or lightning damage prevention.

  1. Irregularities of ionospheric VTEC during lightning activity over Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, W.; Nor, W. N. A. Wan Mohd

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the irregularities of vertical total electron content (VTEC) during lightning activity and geomagnetic quiet days over Antarctic Peninsula in year 2014. During the lightning event, the ionosphere may be disturbed which may cause disruption in the radio signal. Thus, it is important to understand the influence of lightning on VTEC in the study of upper-lower interaction. The lightning data is obtained from World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and the VTEC data has analyzed from Global Positioning System (GPS) for O’Higgins (OHI3), Palmer (PALV), and Rothera (ROTH). The results demonstrate the VTEC variation of ∼0.2 TECU during low lightning activity which could be caused by energy dissipation through lightning discharges from troposphere into the thermosphere.

  2. Initial Comparison of the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) with Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, Tomoo; Driscoll, Kevin; Heckman, Stan; Boccippio, Dennis; Koshak, William; Christian, Hugh

    1999-01-01

    The mapping of the lightning optical pulses detected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is compared with the radiation sources by Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) for three thunderstorms observed during and overpasses on 15 August 1998. The comparison involves 122 flashes including 42 ground and 80 cloud flashes. For ground flash, the LIS recorded the subsequent strokes and changes inside the cloud. For cloud flashes, LIS recorded those with higher sources in altitude and larger number of sources. The discrepancies between the LIS and LDAR flash locations are about 4.3 km for cloud flashes and 12.2 km for ground flashes. The reason for these differences remain a mystery.

  3. Lightning Jump Algorithm Development for the GOES·R Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz. E.; Schultz. C.; Chronis, T.; Stough, S.; Carey, L.; Calhoun, K.; Ortega, K.; Stano, G.; Cecil, D.; Bateman, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Current work on the lightning jump algorithm to be used in GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)'s data stream is multifaceted due to the intricate interplay between the storm tracking, GLM proxy data, and the performance of the lightning jump itself. This work outlines the progress of the last year, where analysis and performance of the lightning jump algorithm with automated storm tracking and GLM proxy data were assessed using over 700 storms from North Alabama. The cases analyzed coincide with previous semi-objective work performed using total lightning mapping array (LMA) measurements in Schultz et al. (2011). Analysis shows that key components of the algorithm (flash rate and sigma thresholds) have the greatest influence on the performance of the algorithm when validating using severe storm reports. Automated objective analysis using the GLM proxy data has shown probability of detection (POD) values around 60% with false alarm rates (FAR) around 73% using similar methodology to Schultz et al. (2011). However, when applying verification methods similar to those employed by the National Weather Service, POD values increase slightly (69%) and FAR values decrease (63%). The relationship between storm tracking and lightning jump has also been tested in a real-time framework at NSSL. This system includes fully automated tracking by radar alone, real-time LMA and radar observations and the lightning jump. Results indicate that the POD is strong at 65%. However, the FAR is significantly higher than in Schultz et al. (2011) (50-80% depending on various tracking/lightning jump parameters) when using storm reports for verification. Given known issues with Storm Data, the performance of the real-time jump algorithm is also being tested with high density radar and surface observations from the NSSL Severe Hazards Analysis & Verification Experiment (SHAVE).

  4. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  5. The influence of lightning induced voltage on the distribution power line polymer insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Izadi

    Full Text Available Protection of medium voltage (MV overhead lines against the indirect effects of lightning is an important issue in Malaysia and other tropical countries. Protection of these lines against the indirect effects of lightning is a major concern and can be improved by several ways. The choice of insulator to be used for instance, between the glass, ceramic or polymer, can help to improve the line performance from the perspective of increasing the breakdown strength. In this paper, the electrical performance of a 10 kV polymer insulator under different conditions for impulse, weather and insulator angle with respect to a cross-arm were studied (both experimental and modelling and the results were discussed accordingly. Results show that the weather and insulator angle (with respect to the cross-arm are surprisingly influenced the values of breakdown voltage and leakage current for both negative and positive impulses. Therefore, in order to select a proper protection system for MV lines against lightning induced voltage, consideration of the local information concerning the weather and also the insulator angles with respect to the cross-arm are very useful for line stability and performance.

  6. The influence of lightning induced voltage on the distribution power line polymer insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Mahdi; Abd Rahman, Muhammad Syahmi; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Zainal Abidin; Gomes, Chandima; Jasni, Jasronita; Hajikhani, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Protection of medium voltage (MV) overhead lines against the indirect effects of lightning is an important issue in Malaysia and other tropical countries. Protection of these lines against the indirect effects of lightning is a major concern and can be improved by several ways. The choice of insulator to be used for instance, between the glass, ceramic or polymer, can help to improve the line performance from the perspective of increasing the breakdown strength. In this paper, the electrical performance of a 10 kV polymer insulator under different conditions for impulse, weather and insulator angle with respect to a cross-arm were studied (both experimental and modelling) and the results were discussed accordingly. Results show that the weather and insulator angle (with respect to the cross-arm) are surprisingly influenced the values of breakdown voltage and leakage current for both negative and positive impulses. Therefore, in order to select a proper protection system for MV lines against lightning induced voltage, consideration of the local information concerning the weather and also the insulator angles with respect to the cross-arm are very useful for line stability and performance.

  7. Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensor Technology for Lightning Mitigation and Damage Detection and Diagnosis for Composite Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Smith, Laura J.; Wang, Chuantong; Ticatch, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional methods to protect composite aircraft from lightning strike damage rely on a conductive layer embedded on or within the surface of the aircraft composite skin. This method is effective at preventing major direct effect damage and minimizes indirect effects to aircraft systems from lightning strike attachment, but provides no additional benefit for the added parasitic weight from the conductive layer. When a known lightning strike occurs, the points of attachment and detachment on the aircraft surface are visually inspected and checked for damage by maintenance personnel to ensure continued safe flight operations. A new multi-functional lightning strike protection (LSP) method has been developed to provide aircraft lightning strike protection, damage detection and diagnosis for composite aircraft surfaces. The method incorporates a SansEC sensor array on the aircraft exterior surfaces forming a "Smart skin" surface for aircraft lightning zones certified to withstand strikes up to 100 kiloamperes peak current. SansEC sensors are open-circuit devices comprised of conductive trace spiral patterns sans (without) electrical connections. The SansEC sensor is an electromagnetic resonator having specific resonant parameters (frequency, amplitude, bandwidth & phase) which when electromagnetically coupled with a composite substrate will indicate the electrical impedance of the composite through a change in its resonant response. Any measureable shift in the resonant characteristics can be an indication of damage to the composite caused by a lightning strike or from other means. The SansEC sensor method is intended to diagnose damage for both in-situ health monitoring or ground inspections. In this paper, the theoretical mathematical framework is established for the use of open circuit sensors to perform damage detection and diagnosis on carbon fiber composites. Both computational and experimental analyses were conducted to validate this new method and system for

  8. Lightning spectra at 100,000 fps

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, M. G.; Harley, J.; Haaland, R. K.; Edens, H. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of lightning can be inferred from the spectral emissions resulting from the leader and return stroke channel. We examine an event recorded at 00:58:07 on 19 July 2015 at Langmuir Laboratory. We recorded lightning spectra using a 100 line per mm grating in front of a Phantom V2010 camera with an 85mm Nikon lens recording at 100,000 frames per second. Coarse resolution spectra (approximately 5nm resolution) are produced from approximately 400 nm to 800 nm for each frame. Electric field data from the Langmuir Electric Field Array for the 03:19:19 event show 10 V/m changes in the electric field associated with multiple return strokes visible in the spectral data. We used the spectral data to compare temperatures at the top, middle and bottom of the lightning channel. Lightning Mapping Array data at Langmuir for the 00:58:07 event show a complex flash extending 10 km in the East-West plane and 6 km in the North-South plane. The imagery data imply that this is a bolt-from-the-blue event.

  9. Global reactive nitrogen deposition from lightning NOx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shepon, A.; Gildor, H.; Labrador, L.J.; Butler, T.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lawrence, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of the deposition of nitrogen compounds formed from lightning (LNO x ) using the global chemical transport Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry¿Max Planck Institute for Chemistry version. The model indicates an approximately equal deposition of LNO x in both terrestrial

  10. Lightning detection and exposure algorithms for smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Lin; Su, Laili; Huang, Yining

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the key theory of lightning detection, exposure and the experiments. Firstly, the algorithm based on differential operation between two adjacent frames is selected to remove the lightning background information and extract lighting signal, and the threshold detection algorithm is applied to achieve the purpose of precise detection of lightning. Secondly, an algorithm is proposed to obtain scene exposure value, which can automatically detect external illumination status. Subsequently, a look-up table could be built on the basis of the relationships between the exposure value and average image brightness to achieve rapid automatic exposure. Finally, based on a USB 3.0 industrial camera including a CMOS imaging sensor, a set of hardware test platform is established and experiments are carried out on this platform to verify the performances of the proposed algorithms. The algorithms can effectively and fast capture clear lightning pictures such as special nighttime scenes, which will provide beneficial supporting to the smartphone industry, since the current exposure methods in smartphones often lost capture or induce overexposed or underexposed pictures.

  11. Lightning Pin Injection Testing on MOSFETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Sankalita

    2009-01-01

    Lightning transients were pin-injected into metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to induce fault modes. This report documents the test process and results, and provides a basis for subsequent lightning tests. MOSFETs may be present in DC-DC power supplies and electromechanical actuator circuits that may be used on board aircraft. Results show that unprotected MOSFET Gates are susceptible to failure, even when installed in systems in well-shielded and partial-shielded locations. MOSFET Drains and Sources are significantly less susceptible. Device impedance decreased (current increased) after every failure. Such a failure mode may lead to cascading failures, as the damaged MOSFET may allow excessive current to flow through other circuitry. Preliminary assessments on a MOSFET subjected to 20-stroke pin-injection testing demonstrate that Breakdown Voltage, Leakage Current and Threshold Voltage characteristics show damage, while the device continues to meet manufacturer performance specifications. The purpose of this research is to develop validated tools, technologies, and techniques for automated detection, diagnosis and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight, such as from lightning transients; and to understand the interplay between lightning-induced surges and aging (i.e. humidity, vibration thermal stress, etc.) on component degradation.

  12. The Effect of Sharrows, Painted Bicycle Lanes and Physically Protected Paths on the Severity of Bicycle Injuries Caused by Motor Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Wall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted individual and ecologic analyses of prospectively collected data from 839 injured bicyclists who collided with motorized vehicles and presented to Bellevue Hospital, an urban Level-1 trauma center in New York City, from December 2008 to August 2014. Variables included demographics, scene information, rider behaviors, bicycle route availability, and whether the collision occurred before the road segment was converted to a bicycle route. We used negative binomial modeling to assess the risk of injury occurrence following bicycle path or lane implementation. We dichotomized U.S. National Trauma Data Bank Injury Severity Scores (ISS into none/mild (0–8 versus moderate, severe, or critical (>8 and used adjusted multivariable logistic regression to model the association of ISS with collision proximity to sharrows (i.e., bicycle lanes designated for sharing with cars, painted bicycle lanes, or physically protected paths. Negative binomial modeling of monthly counts, while adjusting for pedestrian activity, revealed that physically protected paths were associated with 23% fewer injuries. Painted bicycle lanes reduced injury risk by nearly 90% (IDR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02–0.33. Holding all else equal, compared to no bicycle route, a bicycle injury nearby sharrows was nearly twice as likely to be moderate, severe, or critical (adjusted odds ratio 1.94; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.91–4.15. Painted bicycle lanes and physically protected paths were 1.52 (95% CI 0.85–2.71 and 1.66 (95% CI 0.85–3.22 times as likely to be associated with more than mild injury respectively.

  13. Accident externality and vehicle size

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Lina; Lindberg, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    Vehicle mass is a crucial factor for the distribution of injuries between occupants in involved vehicles in a two-vehicle crash. A larger vehicle mass protects the occupants in the vehicle while on the same time inflicts a higher injury risk on the occupants in the collision partner. This mass externality can be internalized to reach a situation where the drivers choose vehicle mass based on the social optimum instead of a private optimum that ignores the negative effects that a large vehicle...

  14. Assessing Operational Total Lightning Visualization Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Darden, Christopher B.; Nadler, David J.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2003, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program successfully provided total lightning data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) to the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Huntsville, Alabama. The major accomplishment was providing the observations in real-time to the NWS in the native Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) decision support system. Within days, the NALMA data were used to issue a tornado warning initiating seven years of ongoing support to the NWS' severe weather and situational awareness operations. With this success, SPoRT now provides real-time NALMA data to five forecast offices as well as working to transition data from total lightning networks at Kennedy Space Center and the White Sands Missile Range to the surrounding NWS offices. The only NALMA product that has been transitioned to SPoRT's partner NWS offices is the source density product, available at a 2 km resolution in 2 min intervals. However, discussions with users of total lightning data from other networks have shown that other products are available, ranging from spatial and temporal variations of the source density product to the creation of a flash extent density. SPoRT and the Huntsville, Alabama NWS are evaluating the utility of these variations as this has not been addressed since the initial transition in 2003. This preliminary analysis will focus on what products will best support the operational warning decision process. Data from 19 April 2009 are analyzed. On this day, severe thunderstorms formed ahead of an approaching cold front. Widespread severe weather was observed, primarily south of the Tennessee River with multiple, weak tornadoes, numerous severe hail reports, and wind. This preliminary analysis is the first step in evaluation which product(s) are best suited for operations. The ultimate goal is selecting a single product for use with all total lightning networks to streamline training and

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis of lightning activity over Greece - Preliminary results derived from the recent state precision lightning network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastos, P. T.; Matsangouras, I. T.; Chronis, T. G.

    2014-07-01

    Lightning is a natural phenomenon in the atmosphere, being a major cause of storm related deaths, main trigger of forest fires and affects many electrochemical systems of the body. Significant scientific interest has come up in the last decades, as numerous lightning detection networks have been established in operational basis, providing lightning data to assess and mitigate lightning impact to the local society by spatio-temporal analysis. In this study, a preliminary analysis of spatial and temporal variabilities of recorded lightnings over Greece during the period from January 2008 to December 2009 is presented. The data for retrieving the location and time-of-occurrence (TOA) of lightning were acquired from the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS). An operational precision lightning network (PLN) has been established since 2007 by HNMS, consisting of eight time-of-arrival (TOA) sensors, spatially distributed across Greek territory. The spatial variability of lightnings revealed their incidence within specific geographical sub-regions while the temporal variability concerns the seasonal and monthly distributions. All the analyses were carried out with respect to cloud to cloud (CC), cloud to ground (CG) and ground to cloud (GC) lightnings, within the examined time period. During the autumn season, lightning activity was the highest, followed by summer and spring. Higher frequencies of stokes appear over Ionian Sea and Aegean Sea than over land during winter period against continental mountainous regions during summer period.

  16. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  17. Weekly Cycle of Lightning: Evidence of Storm Invigoration by Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2009-01-01

    We have examined summertime 1998 2009 U.S. lightning data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to look for weekly cycles in lightning activity. As was found by Bell et al. (2008) for rain over the southeast U.S., there is a significant weekly cycle in afternoon lightning activity that peaks in the middle of the week there. The weekly cycle appears to be reduced over population centers. Lightning activity peaks on weekends over waters near the SE U.S. The statistical significance of weekly cycles over the western half of the country is generally small. We found no evidence of a weekly cycle of synoptic-scale forcing that might explain these patterns. The lightning behavior is entirely consistent with the explanation suggested by Bell et al. (2008) for the cycles in rainfall and other atmospheric data from the SE U.S., that aerosols can cause storms to intensify in humid, convectively unstable environments.

  18. Chasing Lightning: Sferics, Tweeks and Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P. A.; Franzen, K.; Garcia, L.; Schou, P.; Rous, P.

    2008-12-01

    We all know what lightning looks like during a thunderstorm, but the visible flash we see is only part of the story. This is because lightning also generates light with other frequencies that we cannot perceive with our eyes, but which are just as real as visible light. Unlike the visible light from lightning, these other frequencies can carry the lightning's energy hundreds or thousands of miles across the surface of the Earth in the form of special signals called "tweeks" and "sferics". Some of these emissions can even travel tens of thousands of miles out into space before returning to the Earth as "whistlers". The INSPIRE Project, Inc is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose beginning mission was to bring the excitement of observing these very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves emissions from lightning to high school students. Since 1989, INSPIRE has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,600 participants around the world to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. Many of these participants are using the VLF data they collect in very creative projects that include fiction, music and art exhibitions. During the Fall 2008 semester, the first INSPIRE based university-level course was taught at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as part of its First-Year Seminar (FYS) series. The FYS classes are limited to 20 first-year students per class and are designed to create an active-learning environment that encourages student participation and discussion that might not otherwise occur in larger first-year classes. This presentation will cover the experiences gained from using the INSPIRE kits as the basis of a university course. This will include the lecture material that covers the basic physics of lightning, thunderstorms and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as the electronics required to understand the basic workings of the VLF kit. It will also cover the students assembly of the kit in an

  19. The impact of lightning on tropospheric ozone chemistry using a new global lightning parametrisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Finney

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A lightning parametrisation based on upward cloud ice flux is implemented in a chemistry–climate model (CCM for the first time. The UK Chemistry and Aerosols model is used to study the impact of these lightning nitric oxide (NO emissions on ozone. Comparisons are then made between the new ice flux parametrisation and the commonly used, cloud-top height parametrisation. The ice flux approach improves the simulation of lightning and the temporal correlations with ozone sonde measurements in the middle and upper troposphere. Peak values of ozone in these regions are attributed to high lightning NO emissions. The ice flux approach reduces the overestimation of tropical lightning apparent in this CCM when using the cloud-top approach. This results in less NO emission in the tropical upper troposphere and more in the extratropics when using the ice flux scheme. In the tropical upper troposphere the reduction in ozone concentration is around 5–10 %. Surprisingly, there is only a small reduction in tropospheric ozone burden when using the ice flux approach. The greatest absolute change in ozone burden is found in the lower stratosphere, suggesting that much of the ozone produced in the upper troposphere is transported to higher altitudes. Major differences in the frequency distribution of flash rates for the two approaches are found. The cloud-top height scheme has lower maximum flash rates and more mid-range flash rates than the ice flux scheme. The initial Ox (odd oxygen species production associated with the frequency distribution of continental lightning is analysed to show that higher flash rates are less efficient at producing Ox; low flash rates initially produce around 10 times more Ox per flash than high-end flash rates. We find that the newly implemented lightning scheme performs favourably compared to the cloud-top scheme with respect to simulation of lightning and tropospheric ozone. This alternative lightning scheme shows spatial and

  20. High altitude leaders mapped by the Colombia lightning mapping array

    OpenAIRE

    Montañá Puig, Juan; López Trujillo, Jesús Alberto; Van der Velde, Oscar Arnoud; Romero Durán, David; Fabró Tàpia, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    On April 2015 a Lightning Mapping Array network (COL-LMA) was installed at the north of Colombia. This network provides 3D mapping of the development of lightning leaders. For the first time such network has been setup in the tropics. That allows us to investigate the high altitude development of lightning leaders. Here we present the results of the first measurements to confirm that negative leaders at altitudes of 15 km are common in the observed thunderstorms.

  1. GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper Performance Specifications and Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Petersen, William A.; Boldi, Robert A.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Bateman, Monte G.; Buchler, Dennis E.; McCaul, E. William, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a single channel, near-IR imager/optical transient event detector, used to detect, locate and measure total lightning activity over the full-disk. The next generation NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series will carry a GLM that will provide continuous day and night observations of lightning. The mission objectives for the GLM are to: (1) Provide continuous, full-disk lightning measurements for storm warning and nowcasting, (2) Provide early warning of tornadic activity, and (2) Accumulate a long-term database to track decadal changes of lightning. The GLM owes its heritage to the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (1997- present) and the Optical Transient Detector (1995-2000), which were developed for the Earth Observing System and have produced a combined 13 year data record of global lightning activity. GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. The science data will consist of lightning "events", "groups", and "flashes". The algorithm is being designed to be an efficient user of the computational resources. This may include parallelization of the code and the concept of sub-dividing the GLM FOV into regions to be processed in parallel. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds (e.g., Lightning Mapping Arrays in North Alabama, Oklahoma, Central Florida, and the Washington DC Metropolitan area) are being used to develop the prelaunch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution.

  2. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson; Dinniss

    2000-02-03

    Observations of ball lightning have been reported for centuries, but the origin of this phenomenon remains an enigma. The 'average' ball lightning appears as a sphere with a diameter of 300 mm, a lifetime of about 10 s, and a luminosity similar to a 100-W lamp. It floats freely in the air, and ends either in an explosion, or by simply fading from view. It almost invariably occurs during stormy weather. Several energy sources have been proposed to explain the light, but none of these models has succeeded in explaining all of the observed characteristics. Here we report a model that potentially accounts for all of those properties, and which has some experimental support. When normal lightning strikes soil, chemical energy is stored in nanoparticles of Si, SiO or SiC, which are ejected into the air as a filamentary network. As the particles are slowly oxidized in air, the stored energy is released as heat and light. We investigated this basic process by exposing soil samples to a lightning-like discharge, which produced chain aggregates of nanoparticles: these particles oxidize at a rate appropriate for explaining the lifetime of ball lightning.

  3. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  4. Modelling of lightning streamer formation and propagation in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2013-01-01

    setups. Furthermore, the tests may need to be repeated when a new conducting element is included in the blade with unpredictable effects for the lightning protection system. Numerical methods to determine the areas of a structure more likely to be struck by lightning have proved to be a useful tool....... The present paper presents a method to investigate the origin and propagation of streamers from different conductive elements of the blade when exposed to a high electric field. The calculations are performed using dynamic simulations with the finite element method, and the results have been correlated...... models can involve a high level of detail and therefore be used in the detailed positioning of air terminations in blades equipped with conductive elements such as carbon fiber or electrical monitoring systems (load, temperature, etc.)....

  5. Predicting the Probability of Lightning Occurrence with Generalized Additive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabsic, Peter; Mayr, Georg; Simon, Thorsten; Zeileis, Achim

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the predictability of lightning in complex terrain. The main objective is to estimate the probability of lightning occurrence in the Alpine region during summertime afternoons (12-18 UTC) at a spatial resolution of 64 × 64 km2. Lightning observations are obtained from the ALDIS lightning detection network. The probability of lightning occurrence is estimated using generalized additive models (GAM). GAMs provide a flexible modelling framework to estimate the relationship between covariates and the observations. The covariates, besides spatial and temporal effects, include numerous meteorological fields from the ECMWF ensemble system. The optimal model is chosen based on a forward selection procedure with out-of-sample mean squared error as a performance criterion. Our investigation shows that convective precipitation and mid-layer stability are the most influential meteorological predictors. Both exhibit intuitive, non-linear trends: higher values of convective precipitation indicate higher probability of lightning, and large values of the mid-layer stability measure imply low lightning potential. The performance of the model was evaluated against a climatology model containing both spatial and temporal effects. Taking the climatology model as a reference forecast, our model attains a Brier Skill Score of approximately 46%. The model's performance can be further enhanced by incorporating the information about lightning activity from the previous time step, which yields a Brier Skill Score of 48%. These scores show that the method is able to extract valuable information from the ensemble to produce reliable spatial forecasts of the lightning potential in the Alps.

  6. The detection and location of lightning from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.; Vaughan, W. W.; Dodge, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A lightning mapper sensor was conceived for detecting and locating lightning over large areas of the earth's surface, taking into account also a measurement of the radiant energy and a recording of the time of lightning occurrence. The considered device will basically be a calibrated lightning imager. The type of information provided is currently not available on a large scale basis. By using the mapper, scientists will, for the first time, be able to study the electrosphere from scales on the order of the earth's diameter down to the size of individual storms (10 km). Attention is given to details regarding the sensor components, and questions of sensor performance.

  7. Explosion protection for vehicles intended for the transport of flammable gases and liquids--an investigation into technical and operational basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Hans; Günther, Werner

    2009-05-30

    In Europe, the transport of flammable gases and liquids in tanks has been impacted by new developments: for example, the introduction of the vapour-balancing technique on a broad scale and the steady increase in the application of electronic components with their own power sources; furthermore, new regulatory policies like the ATEX Directives are being enforced in the European Union. With this background in mind, the present investigation aims to provide a basis for future developments of the relevant explosion protection regulations in the safety codes for the transport of dangerous goods (RID/ADR). Specifically, the concentration of gas in the air was measured under various practical conditions while tank vehicles were being loaded with flammable gases or liquids. These spot-test data were supplemented by systematic investigations at a road tanker placed in our test field. With respect to non-electrical ignition sources, a closer investigation of the effect of hot surfaces was carried out. With regard to improving the current regulations, the results of our investigation show that it would be reasonable to implement a stronger differentiation of the characteristics of the dangerous goods (gaseous/liquid, flashpoint) on the one hand and of the techniques applied (loading with and without vapour-balancing system) on the other hand. Conclusions for the further development of the current international regulations are proposed.

  8. Ionospheric effects of thunderstorms and lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Erin H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Tropospheric thunderstorms have been reported to disturb the lower ionosphere (~65-90 km) by convective atmospheric gravity waves and by electromagnetic field changes produced by lightning discharges. However, due to the low electron density in the lower ionosphere, active probing of its electron distribution is difficult, and the various perturbative effects are poorly understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that by using remotely-detected ?me waveforms of lightning radio signals it is possible to probe the lower ionosphere and its fluctuations in a spatially and temporally-resolved manner. Here we report evidence of gravity wave effects on the lower ionosphere originating from the thunderstorm. We also report variations in the nighttime ionosphere atop a small thunderstorm and associate the variations with the storm’s electrical activity. Finally, we present a data analysis technique to map ionospheric acoustic waves near thunderstorms.

  9. The detection of lightning from geostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS), a space sensor capable of mapping intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning discharges from geostationary orbit during day and night. The LMS is expected to have a spatial resolution of 10 km and a detection efficiency of 90 percent. The LMS combines modern solid state mosaic focal planes with extensive on-board signal processing to make it possible to detect weak background-contaminated signals. The LMS is planned to have a 10.5 degree field of view covering all of the continental U.S. The characteristics and design of the LMS are described, noting the possible applications of the sensor.

  10. Lightning Strikes and Attribution of Climatic Change

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Using lightning strikes as an example, two possible schemes are discussed for the attribution of changes in event frequency to climate change, and estimating the cost associated with them. The schemes determine the fraction of events that should be attributed to climatic change, and the fraction that should be attributed to natural chance. They both allow for the expected increase in claims and the fluctuations about this expected value. Importantly, the attribution fraction proposed in the second of these schemes is necessarily different to that found in epidemiological studies. This ensures that the statistically expected fraction of attributed claims is correctly equal to the expected increase in claims. The analysis of lightning data highlights two particular difficulties with data-driven, as opposed to modeled, attribution studies. The first is the possibility of unknown "confounding" variables that can influence the strike frequency. This is partly accounted for here by considering the influence of temp...

  11. Investigation of the radiation risk due to environmental contamination by 241Am from lightning rods disposed at uncontrolled garbage dumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumo, Júlio T; Isiki, Vera L K; Miyamoto, Hissae; Ferreira, Rafael V P; Bellini, Maria H; de Lima, Luis F C P

    2008-02-01

    Radioactive lightning rods were manufactured in Brazil until 1989, when the licenses for using radioactive sources in these products were lifted by the national nuclear authority. Since then, these rods have been replaced by the Franklin type and collected as radioactive waste. However, only 20% of the estimated total number of installed rods has been delivered to the Brazilian Nuclear Commission. This situation causes concern, since there is the possibility of the rods to be disposed as domestic waste. In Brazil, 64% of the municipal solid waste is disposed at garbage dumps without sufficient control. In addition, (241)Am, the radionuclide most commonly employed, is classified as a high-toxicity element, when incorporated. In the present study, (241)Am migration experiments were performed by means of a lysimeter system, in order to evaluate the risk of contamination caused by radioactive lightning rods disposed as common solid waste. (241)Am sources removed from lightning rods were placed inside lysimeters filled with organic waste that was collected at the restaurant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. The generated leachate was periodically analyzed, and characteristics such as pH, redox potential, solid content and the concentration of the radioactive material were determined. The equivalent dose for members of the public was calculated considering ingestion of contaminated drinking water as the major path of exposure. Estimated doses were about 20-times below the effective dose limit of 1 mSv year(-1) for members of the public as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This suggests the radiation risk caused by lightning rods disposed at uncontrolled garbage dumps to be low. It should be noted, however, that the number of investigated lightning rods was quite small. The results of this study might therefore not be entirely representative and should be interpreted with care. They provide, however, a very first

  12. An Assessment of Land Surface and Lightning Characteristics Associated with Lightning-Initiated Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, James; Schultz, Christopher J.; Case, Jonathan L.

    2017-01-01

    Can we use modeled information of the land surface and characteristics of lightning beyond flash occurrence to increase the identification and prediction of wildfires? Combine observed cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes with real-time land surface model output, and Compare data with areas where lightning did not start a wildfire to determine what land surface conditions and lightning characteristics were responsible for causing wildfires. Statistical differences between suspected fire-starters and non-fire-starters were peak-current dependent 0-10 cm Volumetric and Relative Soil Moisture comparisons were statistically dependent to at least the p = 0.05 independence level for both polarity flash types Suspected fire-starters typically occurred in areas of lower soil moisture than non-fire-starters. GVF value comparisons were only found to be statistically dependent for -CG flashes. However, random sampling of the -CG non-fire starter dataset revealed that this relationship may not always hold.

  13. Photonuclear reactions triggered by lightning discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Wada, Yuuki; Furuta, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yuasa, Takayuki; Okuda, Kazufumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Sato, Mitsuteru; Sato, Yousuke; Nakano, Toshio; Umemoto, Daigo; Tsuchiya, Harufumi

    2017-11-01

    Lightning and thunderclouds are natural particle accelerators. Avalanches of relativistic runaway electrons, which develop in electric fields within thunderclouds, emit bremsstrahlung γ-rays. These γ-rays have been detected by ground-based observatories, by airborne detectors and as terrestrial γ-ray flashes from space. The energy of the γ-rays is sufficiently high that they can trigger atmospheric photonuclear reactions that produce neutrons and eventually positrons via β+ decay of the unstable radioactive isotopes, most notably 13N, which is generated via 14N + γ → 13N + n, where γ denotes a photon and n a neutron. However, this reaction has hitherto not been observed conclusively, despite increasing observational evidence of neutrons and positrons that are presumably derived from such reactions. Here we report ground-based observations of neutron and positron signals after lightning. During a thunderstorm on 6 February 2017 in Japan, a γ-ray flash with a duration of less than one millisecond was detected at our monitoring sites 0.5-1.7 kilometres away from the lightning. The subsequent γ-ray afterglow subsided quickly, with an exponential decay constant of 40-60 milliseconds, and was followed by prolonged line emission at about 0.511 megaelectronvolts, which lasted for a minute. The observed decay timescale and spectral cutoff at about 10 megaelectronvolts of the γ-ray afterglow are well explained by de-excitation γ-rays from nuclei excited by neutron capture. The centre energy of the prolonged line emission corresponds to electron-positron annihilation, providing conclusive evidence of positrons being produced after the lightning.

  14. Lightning Detection at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Rautenberg, Julian; Filipčič, Andrej; Kukec Mezek, Gašper; Saleh, Ahmed; Stanič, Samo; Trini, Marta; Veberič, Darko; Vorobiov, Serguei; Yang, Lili; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array, an extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory with antennas in the MHz range, requires to monitor the atmospheric conditions, which have a large influence on the radio emission of air showers. In particular, amplified signals up to an order of magnitude have been detected as an affect of thunderstorms. For a more detailed investigation and more generally, for detecting thunderstorms, a new lightning detection system has been install...

  15. Anomalous light output from lightning dart leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C.; Krider, E. P.

    1985-01-01

    About 5 percent of the multiple-stroke cloud-to-ground lightning discharges recorded at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 1981 contained dart leaders that produced an unusually large light output. An analysis of these cases indicates that the average peak light output per unit length in the leader may be comparable to or even exceed that of the return stroke that follows.

  16. Simulation of Meteosat Third Generation-Lightning Imager through tropical rainfall measuring mission: Lightning Imaging Sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Daniele; De Leonibus, Luigi; Laquale, Paolo; Labate, Demetrio; Zauli, Francesco; Melfi, Davide

    2008-08-01

    The Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica recently hosted a fellowship sponsored by Galileo Avionica, with the intent to study and perform a simulation of Meteosat Third Generation - Lightning Imager (MTG-LI) sensor behavior through Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Lightning Imaging Sensor data (TRMM-LIS). For the next generation of earth observation geostationary satellite, major operating agencies are planning to insert an optical imaging mission, that continuously observes lightning pulses in the atmosphere; EUMETSAT has decided in recent years that one of the three candidate mission to be flown on MTG is LI, a Lightning Imager. MTG-LI mission has no Meteosat Second Generation heritage, but users need to evaluate the possible real time data output of the instrument to agree in inserting it on MTG payload. Authors took the expected LI design from MTG Mission Requirement Document, and reprocess real lightning dataset, acquired from space by TRMM-LIS instrument, to produce a simulated MTG-LI lightning dataset. The simulation is performed in several run, varying Minimum Detectable Energy, taking into account processing steps from event detection to final lightning information. A definition of the specific meteorological requirements is given from the potential use in meteorology of lightning final information for convection estimation and numerical cloud modeling. Study results show the range of instrument requirements relaxation which lead to minimal reduction in the final lightning information.

  17. An Optical Lightning Simulator in an Electrified Cloud-Resolving Model to Prepare the Future Space Lightning Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovalo, Christophe; Defer, Eric; Pinty, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The future decade will see the launch of several space missions designed to monitor the total lightning activity. Among these missions, the American (Geostationary Lightning Mapper - GLM) and European (Lightning Imager - LI) optical detectors will be onboard geostationary satellites (GOES-R and MTG, respectively). For the first time, the total lightning activity will be monitored over the full Earth disk and at a very high temporal resolution (2 and 1 ms, respectively). Missions like the French Tool for the Analysis of Radiation from lightNIng and Sprites (TARANIS) and ISS-LIS will bring complementary information in order to better understand the lightning physics and to improve the weather prediction (nowcasting and forecasting). Such missions will generate a huge volume of new and original observations for the scientific community and weather prediction centers that have to be prepared. Moreover, before the launch of these missions, fundamental questions regarding the interpretation of the optical signal property and its relation to cloud optical thickness and lightning discharge processes need to be further investigated. An innovative approach proposed here is to use the synergy existing in the French MesoNH Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM). Indeed, MesoNH is one of the only CRM able to simulate the lifecycle of electrical charges generated within clouds through non-inductive charging process (dependent of the 1-moment microphysical scheme). The lightning flash geometry is based on a fractal law while the electrical field is diagnosed thanks to the Gauss' law. The lightning optical simulator is linked to the electrical scheme as the lightning radiance at 777.4 nm is a function of the lightning current, approximated by the charges neutralized along the lightning path. Another important part is the scattering of this signal by the hydrometeors (mainly ice particles) that is taken into account. Simulations at 1-km resolution are done over the Langmuir Laboratory (New

  18. Illumination of mesospheric irregularity by lightning discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; Velde, Oscar; Evans, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical model calculations recently predicted the existence of mesospheric irregularities which assist the initiation of sprites. Here we report the experimental detection of a ˜3-19 km3 large mesospheric irregularity at ˜80-85 km height which is illuminated by the electromagnetic field of an intense positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharge. While the lightning discharge causes a prompt group of four sprites above the lightning discharge, the mesospheric irregularity is found at a horizontal distance at least ˜15-20 km away from the sprite group and it rebrightens ˜40-60 ms after the sprite group occurrence. This rebrightening is driven by a local quasi-static electric field enhancement with a charge moment ˜4-20 Ckm which causes the irregularity to develop a downward descending luminous column from ˜75-85 km height. The quasi-static electric field enhancement is caused by the reorganization of residual charge inside the thundercloud during a high-level activity of intracloud discharges with ˜10-20 pulses per ms. Such mesospheric irregularities might have an effect on the wave propagation of 100 kHz radio waves which are used for atomic time transfer and marine navigation.

  19. Lightning fatalities and injuries in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilev-Tanriover, Ş.; Kahraman, A.; Kadioğlu, M.; Schultz, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    A database of lightning-related fatalities and injuries in Turkey was constructed by collecting data from the Turkish State Meteorological Service, newspaper archives, European Severe Weather Database, and the internet. The database covers January 1930 to June 2014. In total, 742 lightning incidents causing human fatalities and injuries were found. Within these 742 incidents, there were 895 fatalities, 149 serious injuries, and 535 other injuries. Most of the incidents (89 %) occurred during April through September, with a peak in May and June (26 and 28 %) followed by July (14 %). Lightning-related fatalities and injuries were most frequent in the afternoon. Most of the incidents (86 %) occurred in rural areas, with only 14 % in the urban areas. Approximately, two thirds of the victims with known gender were male. Because of the unrepresentativeness of the historical data, determining an average mortality rate over a long period is not possible. Nevertheless, there were 31 fatalities (0.42 per million) in 2012, 26 fatalities (0.35 per million) in 2013, and 25 fatalities (0.34 per million) in 2014 (as of June). There were 36 injuries (0.49 per million) in each of 2012 and 2013, and 62 injuries (0.84 per million) in 2014 (as of June).

  20. Characterizing the Relationships Among Lightning and Storm Parameters: Lightning as a Proxy Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, S. J.; Raghavan, R.; William, E.; Weber, M.; Boldi, B.; Matlin, A.; Wolfson, M.; Hodanish, S.; Sharp. D.

    1997-01-01

    We have gained important insights from prior studies that have suggested relationships between lightning and storm growth, decay, convective rain flux, vertical distribution of storm mass and echo volume in the region, and storm energetics. A study was initiated in the Summer of 1996 to determine how total (in-cloud plus ground) lightning observations might provide added knowledge to the forecaster in the determination and identification of severe thunderstorms and weather hazards in real-time. The Melbourne Weather Office was selected as a primary site to conduct this study because Melbourne is the only site in the world with continuous and open access to total lightning (LDAR) data and a Doppler (WSR-88D) radar. A Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Demonstration (LISDAD) system was integrated into the forecaster's workstation during the Summer 1996 to allow the forecaster to interact in real-time with the multi-sensor data being displayed. LISDAD currently ingests LDAR data, the cloud-to-ground National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) data, and the Melbourne radar data in f real-time. The interactive features provide the duty forecaster the ability to perform quick diagnostics on storm cells of interest. Upon selection of a storm cell, a pop-up box appears displaying the time-history of various storm parameters (e.g., maximum radar reflectivity, height of maximum reflectivity, echo-top height, NLDN and LDAR lightning flash rates, storm-based vertically integrated liquid water content). This product is archived to aid on detailed post-analysis.

  1. Performance assessment of Beijing Lightning Network (BLNET) and comparison with other lightning location networks across Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhay; Tian, Ye; Qie, Xiushu; Wang, Dongfang; Sun, Zhuling; Yuan, Shanfeng; Wang, Yu; Chen, Zhixiong; Xu, Wenjing; Zhang, Hongbo; Jiang, Rubin; Su, Debin

    2017-11-01

    The performances of Beijing Lightning Network (BLNET) operated in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban cluster area have been evaluated in terms of detection efficiency and relative location accuracy. A self-reference method has been used to show the detection efficiency of BLNET, for which fast antenna waveforms have been manually examined. Based on the fast antenna verification, the average detection efficiency of BLNET is 97.4% for intracloud (IC) flashes, 73.9% for cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes and 93.2% for the total flashes. Result suggests the CG detection of regional dense network is highly precise when the thunderstorm passes over the network; however it changes day to day when the thunderstorms are outside the network. Further, the CG stroke data from three different lightning location networks across Beijing are compared. The relative detection efficiency of World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and Chinese Meteorology Administration - Lightning Detection Network (CMA-LDN, also known as ADTD) are approximately 12.4% (16.8%) and 36.5% (49.4%), respectively, comparing with fast antenna (BLNET). The location of BLNET is in middle, while WWLLN and CMA-LDN average locations are southeast and northwest, respectively. Finally, the IC pulses and CG return stroke pulses have been compared with the S-band Doppler radar. This type of study is useful to know the approximate situation in a region and improve the performance of lightning location networks in the absence of ground truth. Two lightning flashes occurred on tower in the coverage of BLNET show that the horizontal location error was 52.9 m and 250 m, respectively.

  2. Quantification and identification of lightning damage in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Gora, Evan M; Burchfield, Jeffrey M; Bitzer, Phillip M; Detto, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    Accurate estimates of tree mortality are essential for the development of mechanistic forest dynamics models, and for estimating carbon storage and cycling. However, identifying agents of tree mortality is difficult and imprecise. Although lightning kills thousands of trees each year and is an important agent of mortality in some forests, the frequency and distribution of lightning-caused tree death remain unknown for most forests. Moreover, because all evidence regarding the effects of lightning on trees is necessarily anecdotal and post hoc, rigorous tests of hypotheses regarding the ecological effects of lightning are impossible. We developed a combined electronic sensor/camera-based system for the location and characterization of lightning strikes to the forest canopy in near real time and tested the system in the forest of Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Cameras mounted on towers provided continuous video recordings of the forest canopy that were analyzed to determine the locations of lightning strikes. We used a preliminary version of this system to record and locate 18 lightning strikes to the forest over a 3-year period. Data from field surveys of known lightning strike locations (obtained from the camera system) enabled us to develop a protocol for reliable, ground-based identification of suspected lightning damage to tropical trees. In all cases, lightning damage was relatively inconspicuous; it would have been overlooked by ground-based observers having no knowledge of the event. We identified three types of evidence that can be used to consistently identify lightning strike damage in tropical forests: (1) localized and directionally biased branch mortality associated with flashover among tree and sapling crowns, (2) mortality of lianas or saplings near lianas, and (3) scorched or wilting epiphytic and hemiepiphytic plants. The longitudinal trunk scars that are typical of lightning-damaged temperate trees were never observed in this study. Given the

  3. Estimates of lightning NOx production from GOME satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Boersma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite spectrometer are used to quantify the source strength and 3-D distribution of lightning produced nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2. A sharp increase of NO2 is observed at convective cloud tops with increasing cloud top height, consistent with a power-law behaviour with power 5±2. Convective production of clouds with the same cloud height are found to produce NO2 with a ratio 1.6/1 for continents compared to oceans. This relation between cloud properties and NO2 is used to construct a 10:30 local time global lightning NO2 production map for 1997. An extensive statistical comparison is conducted to investigate the capability of the TM3 chemistry transport model to reproduce observed patterns of lightning NO2 in time and space. This comparison uses the averaging kernel to relate modelled profiles of NO2 to observed NO2 columns. It exploits a masking scheme to minimise the interference of other NOx sources on the observed total columns. Simulations are performed with two lightning parameterizations, one relating convective preciptation (CP scheme to lightning flash distributions, and the other relating the fifth power of the cloud top height (H5 scheme to lightning distributions. The satellite-retrieved NO2 fields show significant correlations with the simulated lightning contribution to the NO2 concentrations for both parameterizations. Over tropical continents modelled lightning NO2 shows remarkable quantitative agreement with observations. Over the oceans however, the two model lightning parameterizations overestimate the retrieved NO2 attributed to lightning. Possible explanations for these overestimations are discussed. The ratio between satellite-retrieved NO2 and modelled lightning NO2 is used to rescale the original modelled lightning NOx production. Eight estimates of the lightning NOx production in 1997 are obtained from spatial and temporal

  4. METHODS OF MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF LIGHTNING BY SIMULATING ITS STRIKES WITH THE INTERVAL ASSESSMENT OF THE RESULTS OF MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Kriksin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the development of new methods aimed at more accurate interval estimate of the experimental values of voltages on grounding devices of substations and circuits in the control cables, that occur when lightning strikes to lightning rods; the abovementioned estimate made it possible to increase the accuracy of the results of the study of lightning noise by 28 %. A more accurate value of interval estimation were achieved by developing a measurement model that takes into account, along with the measured values, different measurement errors and includes the special processing of the measurement results. As a result, the interval of finding the true value of the sought voltage is determined with an accuracy of 95 %. The methods can be applied to the IK-1 and IKP-1 measurement complexes, consisting in the aperiodic pulse generator, the generator of high-frequency pulses and selective voltmeters, respectively. To evaluate the effectiveness of the developed methods series of experimental voltage assessments of grounding devices of ten active high-voltage substation have been fulfilled in accordance with the developed methods and traditional techniques. The evaluation results confirmed the possibility of finding the true values of voltage over a wide range, that ought to be considered in the process of technical diagnostics of lightning protection of substations when the analysis of the measurement results and the development of measures to reduce the effects of lightning are being fulfilled. Also, a comparative analysis of the results of measurements made in accordance with the developed methods and traditional techniques has demonstrated that the true value of the sought voltage may exceed the measured value at an average of 28 %, that ought to be considered in the further analysis of the parameters of lightning protection at the facility and in the development of corrective actions. The developed methods have been

  5. Vehicle to Vehicle Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe Rørbæk

    2008-01-01

    As computing devices, sensors, and actuators pervade our surroundings, new applications emerge with accompanying research challenges. In the transportation domain vehicles are being linked by wireless communication and equipped with an array of sensors and actuators that make is possible to provide...... location aware infotainment, increase safety, and lessen environmental strain. This dissertation is about service oriented architecture for pervasive computing with an emphasis on vehicle to vehicle applications. If devices are exposed as services, applications can be created by composing a set of services...... and governing the flow of data among them. In pervasive computing, composing services is, however, not the whole story. To fully realize their potential, applications must also deal with challenges such as device heterogeneity, context awareness, openendedness, and resilience to dynamism in network connectivity...

  6. Lightning protection of flap system for wind turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2014-01-01

    Formålet med dette ph.d.-projekt har været at undersøge hvordan en Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flap (CRTEF) i en vindmøllevinge reagerer, når den bliver udsat for lynnedslag og finde den bedste tekniske løsning til at beskytte CRTEF’en og kontrolsystemet mod lyn, på baggrund af resultater fra simuleringsmodeller og højspændingsprøver.Vindmøller er ofte udsat for lynnedslag på grund af deres højde og placering, og vingerne er den del, der er mest udsat for direkte udladninger. At beskytt...

  7. Lightning, IT Diffusion and Economic Growth across US States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Bentzen, Jeanet; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars

    Empirically, a higher frequency of lightning strikes is associated with slower growth in labor productivity across the 48 contiguous US states after 1990; before 1990 there is no correlation between growth and lightning. Other climate variables (e.g., temperature, rainfall and tornadoes) do...

  8. Comparison of Jovian and Terrestrial Lightning as Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Boccippio, Dennis; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We compare the images of Jovian lightning taken by Galileo spacecraft with the images of terrestrial lightning observed by Lightning Imaging Spectrometer (LIS) onboard the TERRA spacecraft. Both data sets have good spatial resolution: Galileo's pixel is 25 km, or about half the atmospheric scale height, LIS pixel is 3-6 km, also about half of the scale height. This good resolution allows us to see that both Jovian and terrestrial lightning spots look diffuse because of the scattering in the clouds above. Previously we used the appearance of the diffuse spots on Jupiter to model lightning depths and the opacity and shape of the overlying clouds (Dyudina and Ingersoll, 2000). The comparison with LIS data allowed us to verify that the model is valid for terrestrial lightning. The irregular shapes of large terrestrial lightning suggests 30-km scale horizontal bolts. On Jupiter the spots, projected onto the horizontal plane, are nearly circular suggesting that the large size of the spots is mostly due to the horizontal diffusion of the photons scattered in the clouds. Unlike the Galileo observations, LIS has fine temporal resolution of 2 ms, or about 250 frames per single lightning flash. We will discuss the temporal evolution of terrestrial flashes and its implications for Jupiter.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation to Estimate Likelihood of Direct Lightning Strikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Medelius, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    A software tool has been designed to quantify the lightning exposure at launch sites of the stack at the pads under different configurations. In order to predict lightning strikes to generic structures, this model uses leaders whose origins (in the x-y plane) are obtained from a 2D random, normal distribution.

  10. Lightning Sensors for Observing, Tracking and Nowcasting Severe Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Price

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe and extreme weather is a major natural hazard all over the world, oftenresulting in major natural disasters such as hail storms, tornados, wind storms, flash floods,forest fires and lightning damages. While precipitation, wind, hail, tornados, turbulence,etc. can only be observed at close distances, lightning activity in these damaging stormscan be monitored at all spatial scales, from local (using very high frequency [VHF]sensors, to regional (using very low frequency [VLF] sensors, and even global scales(using extremely low frequency [ELF] sensors. Using sensors that detect the radio wavesemitted by each lightning discharge, it is now possible to observe and track continuouslydistant thunderstorms using ground networks of sensors. In addition to the number oflightning discharges, these sensors can also provide information on lightningcharacteristics such as the ratio between intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning, thepolarity of the lightning discharge, peak currents, charge removal, etc. It has been shownthat changes in some of these lightning characteristics during thunderstorms are oftenrelated to changes in the severity of the storms. In this paper different lightning observingsystems are described, and a few examples are provided showing how lightning may beused to monitor storm hazards around the globe, while also providing the possibility ofsupplying short term forecasts, called nowcasting.

  11. Integration of Lightning- and Human-Caused Wildfire Occurrence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilar, Lara; Nieto Solana, Hector; Martín, M. Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Fire risk indices are useful tools for fire prevention actions by fire managers. A fire ignition is either the result of lightning or human activities. In European Mediterranean countries most forest fires are due to human activities. However, lightning is still an important fire ignition source ...

  12. Lightning location system supervising Swedish power transmission network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Stefan A.

    1991-01-01

    For electric utilities, the ability to prevent or minimize lightning damage on personnel and power systems is of great importance. Therefore, the Swedish State Power Board, has been using data since 1983 from a nationwide lightning location system (LLS) for accurately locating lightning ground strikes. Lightning data is distributed and presented on color graphic displays at regional power network control centers as well as at the national power system control center for optimal data use. The main objectives for use of LLS data are: supervising the power system for optimal and safe use of the transmission and generating capacity during periods of thunderstorms; warning service to maintenance and service crews at power line and substations to end operations hazardous when lightning; rapid positioning of emergency crews to locate network damage at areas of detected lightning; and post analysis of power outages and transmission faults in relation to lightning, using archived lightning data for determination of appropriate design and insulation levels of equipment. Staff have found LLS data useful and economically justified since the availability of power system has increased as well as level of personnel safety.

  13. Lightning characteristics of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Franks, John R.; Suranovic, Katelyn R.; Barbachem, Brent; Cannon, Declan; Cooper, Stonie R.

    2016-06-01

    Derechos, or widespread, convectively induced wind storms, are a common warm season phenomenon in the Central and Eastern United States. These damaging and severe weather events are known to sweep quickly across large spatial regions of more than 400 km and produce wind speeds exceeding 121 km h-1. Although extensive research concerning derechos and their parent mesoscale convective systems already exists, there have been few investigations of the spatial and temporal distribution of associated cloud-to-ground lightning with these events. This study analyzes twenty warm season (May through August) derecho events between 2003 and 2013 in an effort to discern their lightning characteristics. Data used in the study included cloud-to-ground flash data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network, WSR-88D imagery from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and damaging wind report data obtained from the Storm Prediction Center. A spatial and temporal analysis was conducted by incorporating these data into a geographic information system to determine the distribution and lightning characteristics of the environments of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems. Primary foci of this research include: (1) finding the approximate size of the lightning activity region for individual and combined event(s); (2) determining the intensity of each event by examining the density and polarity of lightning flashes; (3) locating areas of highest lightning flash density; and (4) to provide a lightning spatial analysis that outlines the temporal and spatial distribution of flash activity for particularly strong derecho producing thunderstorm episodes.

  14. Unusual features caused by lightning impact in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, P.; Abrahamsen, N.; Rasmussen, T.

    2006-01-01

       Two lightning impacts are described from an area near the Inland Ice in West Greenland. The first lightning blasted an outcrop of metacherts. It subsequently split into two branches, which traversed rock outcrops and boulders, leaving behind two white almost straight lines, 30 m and 14 m long ...

  15. Lightning stroke and neuropsychological impairment : cases and questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, AH; ten Duis, HJ; Minderhoud, JM; Sipma, M

    Objective-To objectify neuropsychological impairments in survivors of lightning stroke with lasting complaints about poor concentration and inability to divide their attention. Design-A series of six cases of lightning stroke were studied. All patients had lost consciousness and reported amnesia of

  16. Chitosan Combined with Poly-L-arginine as Efficient, Safe, and Serum-Insensitive Vehicle with RNase Protection Ability for siRNA Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarwadee Plianwong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS combined with poly-L-arginine (PLA was formulated and evaluated for its performance to deliver siRNA to HeLa cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Compared with the formulations using single polymer in which the polyplexes were completely formed at the weight ratio of >20 : 1 for CS/siRNA or 1 : 1 for PLA/siRNA, the combination of CS and PLA could reduce the amounts of the polymers required for the complete complexation with siRNA, thereby forming positively charged, nanosized polyplex at the weight ratio of CS/PLA/siRNA of 5 : 0.5: 1. In addition, while the transfection efficiency of CS/siRNA and PLA/siRNA was very low at physiological pH (7.4, CS/PLA/siRNA at the optimal weight ratio of 5 : 0.5 : 1 satisfactorily silenced the endogenous EGFP gene at pH 7.4 as well as at pH 6.4 without the deterrent effect from serum. The combined polymers could protect siRNA from RNase degradation over a period of at least 6 h. Furthermore, MTT assay results demonstrated that CS/PLA/siRNA complexes showed acceptably low cytotoxicity with 75% cell viability. Therefore, CS combined with PLA is easy to prepare, safe, and promising for use as an efficient siRNA delivery vehicle.

  17. Lightning severity in Malaysia and some parameters of interest for engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ab-Kadir Mohd Zainal Abidin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To the electric utility engineer, the parameters of the flash that are of primary interest are the crest current for the first and subsequent strokes, the waveshape of these currents, correlation between the parameters, the number of strokes per flash and flash incidence rates where the ground flash density, denoted as flashes per square km-year and symbolized by Ng. The first three parameters, as we know them today, are to a very large extent based on the measurements of Berger. Berger's masts, 70 and 80 meters high, were mounted atop Mt. San Salvatore (Switzerland, which is 650 meters above Lake Lugano, where it can be readily noted that these 125 records represent one of the best and most extensive set of data available to the industry to date. This paper focuses on the lightning severity scenario in Malaysia, which could also applicable to other tropic countries, and some of the useful parameters for lightning protection system design and forensic study. Some specific engineering applications have also been summarised, taking into account various lightning parameters, available from past and current measurements available.

  18. Fact Sheet: Protection of the Stratospheric Ozone: New Substitute in the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, EPA is listing HFO-1234yf as an acceptable substitute for ozone depleting substances (ODS) in motor vehicle air conditioning (MVAC) systems in new cars and other light duty-vehicles and is speci

  19. When do lightning strokes become whistlers detectable on the ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronczay, David; Lichtenberger, Janos; Steinbach, Peter; Ferencz, Csaba; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Darrouzet, Fabien; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2017-04-01

    AWDANet is a ground-based network for automatic whistler detection and analysis. It detects and analyses whistler waves that penetrate the ionosphere, undergo ducted propagation in the plasmasphere, and return to the ground in the opposite hemisphere. In this study, we analyse recordings of several years from a number of AWDANet stations around the globe. Based on a large number of whistlers detected in these data, we compare the annual, monthly, daily and hourly whistler counts to lightning stroke counts from the source region corresponding to each receiver station (these regions having been determined in our previous studies). For lightning data we use lightning stroke databases such as the WWLLN. We identify periods of correlation between lightning activity and whistler activity, and periods of no correlation, i.e. a lack of whistler detections during lightning activity. We investigate possible effects that contribute to the existence or absence of detectable whistlers, such as geomagnetic activity.

  20. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel frame-to-frame difference comparison with an adjustable threshold and on-chip digital processing allowing an efficient localization of a faint lightning pulse on the entire large format array at a frequency of 1 kHz. A CMOS prototype sensor with a 256×256 pixel array and a 60 μm pixel pitch has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2P 5M technology and tested to validate the selected detection approach.

  1. Optical and Radio Perspectives on Lightning Flash Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M. J.; Rudlosky, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    A synthesis of satellite optical measurements and ground-based radio observations are used to examine the evolution of lightning flashes that propagate within the parent thunderstorm. Flashes that propagate over substantial horizontal distances that can exceed 300 km have been noted in the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) literature and carry with them implications for lightning physics and the relationship between thunderstorm microphysical and dynamical processes and charging. Quite separately, propagating flashes have recently been identified in optical Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) observations that are similar to what will be provided by the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on the upcoming GOES-R satellite. This study combines LIS and Northern Alabama LMA observations of propagating flashes to demonstrate the sensitivity of LIS observations to flash structure.

  2. The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and the Global Observing System for Total Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Koshak, W.; Buechler, D.; Carey, L.; Chronis, T.; Mach, D.; Bateman, M.; Peterson, H.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; hide

    2014-01-01

    for the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. New and improved instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution for the next generation Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The GLM will map total lightning continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product latency of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency among a number of potential applications. The GLM will help address the National Weather Service requirement for total lightning observations globally to support warning decision-making and forecast services. Science and application development along with pre-operational product demonstrations and evaluations at NWS national centers, forecast offices, and NOAA testbeds will prepare the forecasters to use GLM as soon as possible after the planned launch and check-out of GOES-R in 2016. New applications will use GLM alone, in combination with the ABI, or integrated (fused) with other available tools (weather radar and ground strike networks, nowcasting systems, mesoscale analysis, and numerical weather prediction models) in the hands of the forecaster responsible for issuing more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings.

  3. Multiple Lightning Discharges in Wind Turbines Associated with Nearby Cloud-to-Ground Lightning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Madsen, Søren Find

    2015-01-01

    -triggering video cameras were correlated with data from the U.S. National Lighting Detection Network. In all five events, the correlation showed that a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke with high peak current struck the ground within 10 km of the affected turbines at the time of the currents in the wind...

  4. Major Burn Injury From Lightning Strike: A Case Report and Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When lightning strikes, it draws the attention of the public, news media, and the medical profession. Since lightning rarely causes major burn, we hereby present a 75-year old man who sustained a major burn injury (TBSA-42%) from a lightning strike with a review of literature on lightning strike. METHOD: A 75-year old man ...

  5. Lightning rod ionizing natural ionca - Ionic electrode active trimetallictriac of grounding - Definitive and total solution against 'blackouts' and electrical faults generated by atmospheric charges (lightning)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabareda, Luis

    2010-09-15

    The Natural Ionizing System of Electrical Protection conformed by: Lightning Rod Ionizing Natural Ionca and Ionic Electrode Active Trimetallic Triac of Grounding offers Total Protection, Maximum Security and Zero Risk to Clinics, Hospitals, Integral Diagnostic Center, avoiding ''the burning'' of Electronics Cards; Refineries, Tanks and Stations of Fuel Provision; Electrical Substations, Towers and Transmission Lines with transformer protection, motors, elevators, A/C, mechanicals stairs, portable and cooling equipment, electrical plants, others. This New High Technology is the solution to the paradigm of Benjamin Franklin and it's the mechanism to end the 'Blackouts' that produces so many damages and losses throughout the world.

  6. Improving Lightning and Precipitation Prediction of Severe Convection Using Lightning Data Assimilation With NCAR WRF-RTFDDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoliang; Liu, Yubao; Cheng, William Y. Y.; Zhao, Tianliang; Xu, Mei; Liu, Yuewei; Shen, Si; Calhoun, Kristin M.; Fierro, Alexandre O.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a lightning data assimilation (LDA) scheme was developed and implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Weather Research and Forecasting-Real-Time Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation system. In this LDA method, graupel mixing ratio (qg) is retrieved from observed total lightning. To retrieve qg on model grid boxes, column-integrated graupel mass is first calculated using an observation-based linear formula between graupel mass and total lightning rate. Then the graupel mass is distributed vertically according to the empirical qg vertical profiles constructed from model simulations. Finally, a horizontal spread method is utilized to consider the existence of graupel in the adjacent regions of the lightning initiation locations. Based on the retrieved qg fields, latent heat is adjusted to account for the latent heat releases associated with the formation of the retrieved graupel and to promote convection at the observed lightning locations, which is conceptually similar to the method developed by Fierro et al. Three severe convection cases were studied to evaluate the LDA scheme for short-term (0-6 h) lightning and precipitation forecasts. The simulation results demonstrated that the LDA was effective in improving the short-term lightning and precipitation forecasts by improving the model simulation of the qg fields, updrafts, cold pool, and front locations. The improvements were most notable in the first 2 h, indicating a highly desired benefit of the LDA in lightning and convective precipitation nowcasting (0-2 h) applications.

  7. Do cosmic ray air showers initiate lightning?: A statistical analysis of cosmic ray air showers and lightning mapping array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, B. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Winner, L. H.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Caicedo, J. A.; Wilkes, R. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Gamerota, W. R.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2017-08-01

    It has been argued in the technical literature, and widely reported in the popular press, that cosmic ray air showers (CRASs) can initiate lightning via a mechanism known as relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA), where large numbers of high-energy and low-energy electrons can, somehow, cause the local atmosphere in a thundercloud to transition to a conducting state. In response to this claim, other researchers have published simulations showing that the electron density produced by RREA is far too small to be able to affect the conductivity in the cloud sufficiently to initiate lightning. In this paper, we compare 74 days of cosmic ray air shower data collected in north central Florida during 2013-2015, the recorded CRASs having primary energies on the order of 1016 eV to 1018 eV and zenith angles less than 38°, with Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data, and we show that there is no evidence that the detected cosmic ray air showers initiated lightning. Furthermore, we show that the average probability of any of our detected cosmic ray air showers to initiate a lightning flash can be no more than 5%. If all lightning flashes were initiated by cosmic ray air showers, then about 1.6% of detected CRASs would initiate lightning; therefore, we do not have enough data to exclude the possibility that lightning flashes could be initiated by cosmic ray air showers.

  8. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates Parameterization of Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  9. A lightning climatology of the South-West Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bovalo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN data have been used to perform a lightning climatology in the South-West Indian Ocean (SWIO region from 2005 to 2011. Maxima of lightning activity were found in the Maritime Continent and southwest of Sri Lanka (>50 fl km−2 yr−1 but also over Madagascar and above the Great Lakes of East Africa (>10–20 fl km−2 yr−1. Lightning flashes within tropical storms and tropical cyclones represent 50 % to 100 % of the total lightning activity in some oceanic areas of the SWIO (between 10° S and 20° S.

    The SWIO is characterized by a wet season (November to April and a dry season (May to October. As one could expect, lightning activity is more intense during the wet season as the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ is present over all the basin. Flash density is higher over land in November–December–January with values reaching 3–4 fl km−2 yr−1 over Madagascar. During the dry season, lightning activity is quite rare between 10° S and 25° S. The Mascarene anticyclone has more influence on the SWIO resulting in shallower convection. Lightning activity is concentrated over ocean, east of South Africa and Madagascar.

    A statistical analysis has shown that El Niño–Southern Oscillation mainly modulates the lightning activity up to 56.8% in the SWIO. The Indian Ocean Dipole has a significant contribution since ~49% of the variability is explained by this forcing in some regions. The Madden–Julian Oscillation did not show significative impact on the lightning activity in our study.

  10. High lightning activity in maritime clouds near Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kucienska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lightning activity detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN over oceanic regions adjacent to Mexico is often as high as that observed over the continent. In order to explore the possible causes of the observed high flash density over those regions, the relationships between lightning, rainfall, vertical hydrometeor profiles, latent heating, wind variability and aerosol optical depth are analyzed. The characteristics of lightning and precipitation over four oceanic zones adjacent to Mexican coastlines are contrasted against those over the continent. The number of flashes per rainfall over some coastal maritime regions is found to be higher than over the continent. The largest number of flashes per rainfall is observed during the biomass burning season. In addition, we compare two smaller areas of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: one located within the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone and characterized by high rainfall and weak lightning activity and the other one influenced by a continental wind jet and characterized by high rainfall and strong lightning activity. During the rainy season, the monthly distribution of lightning within the region influenced by the continental wind jet is contrary to that of rainfall. Moreover, the monthly variability of lightning is very similar to the variability of the meridional wind component and it is also related to the variability of aerosol optical depth. The analysis suggests that the high lightning activity observed over coastal Pacific region is linked to the continental cloud condensation nuclei advected over the ocean. Analysis of daily observations indicates that the greatest lightning density is observed for moderate values of the aerosol optical depth, between 0.2 and 0.35.

  11. Using cloud ice flux to parametrise large-scale lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Finney

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lightning is an important natural source of nitrogen oxide especially in the middle and upper troposphere. Hence, it is essential to represent lightning in chemistry transport and coupled chemistry–climate models. Using ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis data we compare the lightning flash density distributions produced using several existing lightning parametrisations, as well as a new parametrisation developed on the basis of upward cloud ice flux at 440 hPa. The use of ice flux forms a link to the non-inductive charging mechanism of thunderstorms. Spatial and temporal distributions of lightning flash density are compared to tropical and subtropical observations for 2007–2011 from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM satellite. The well-used lightning flash parametrisation based on cloud-top height has large biases but the derived annual total flash density has a better spatial correlation with the LIS observations than other existing parametrisations. A comparison of flash density simulated by the different schemes shows that the cloud-top height parametrisation has many more instances of moderate flash densities and fewer low and high extremes compared to the other parametrisations. Other studies in the literature have shown that this feature of the cloud-top height parametrisation is in contrast to lightning observations over certain regions. Our new ice flux parametrisation shows a clear improvement over all the existing parametrisations with lower root mean square errors (RMSEs and better spatial correlations with the observations for distributions of annual total, and seasonal and interannual variations. The greatest improvement with the new parametrisation is a more realistic representation of the zonal distribution with a better balance between tropical and subtropical lightning flash estimates. The new parametrisation is appropriate for testing in chemistry transport and chemistry

  12. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal

  13. Fast Positive Breakdown, NBEs, and Lightning Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Stock, M.; Edens, H. E.; Shao, X. M.; Thomas, R. J.; Stanley, M. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    High power narrrow bipolar events (NBEs) have been found to be produced by arelatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown (Rison etal., 2016). The breakdown occurs with a wide range of strengths, both in terms of its broadband sferic and its VHF radiation, and is found to be theinitiating event of many and likely all lightning discharges inside storms. Itdoes not produce a conducting channel but instead appears to be produced by avolumetric system of repeated, cascading positive streamers in virgin air.That positive corona and streamers would be responsible for initiatinglightning was proposed in the 1960s by Loeb, Dawson and Winn. In the 1970sPhelps and Griffiths showed that the streamers would be self-intensifying,leading to negative breakdown being initiated back at their starting points.Petersen et al. (2008) described experimental results showing that thestreamers could be initiated by ice crystals at cold temperatures, and thephysical processes leading to the breakdown being fast has been reported inrecent modeling studies by Shi et al. (2016). In this paper we summarize the observational data in support of the abovefindings, and report on additional observations of NBEs and lightninginitiation currently being obtained at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. References: Rison W., P.R. Krehbiel M.G.Stock, H.E. Edens, X-M. Shao, R.J. Thomas,M.A. Stanley, Y. Zhang, Observations of narrow bipolar events revealhow lightning is initiated in thunderstorms, Nature Comms. 7, 2016.doi:10.1038/ncomms10721. Petersen, D., Bailey, M., Beasley, W. & Hallett, J. A brief review ofthe problem of lightning initiation and a hypothesis of initiallightning leader formation. J. Geophys. Res. 113, D17205 (2008). Shi, F., N. Liu, and H. K. Rassoul (2016), Properties of relativelylong streamers initiated from an isolated hydrometeor, J. Geophys.Res. Atmos., 121, 7284-7295, doi:10.1002/2015JD024580.

  14. A proposed experiment on ball lightning model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatovich, Vladimir K., E-mail: v.ignatovi@gmail.com [Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ignatovich, Filipp V. [1565 Jefferson Rd., 420, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: → We propose to put a glass sphere inside an excited gas. → Then to put a light ray inside the glass in a whispering gallery mode. → If the light is resonant to gas excitation, it will be amplified at every reflection. → In ms time the light in the glass will be amplified, and will melt the glass. → A liquid shell kept integer by electrostriction forces is the ball lightning model. -- Abstract: We propose an experiment for strong light amplification at multiple total reflections from active gaseous media.

  15. Are Perytons Signatures of Ball Lightning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-10-01

    The enigmatic downchirped signals, called "perytons," that are detected by radio telescopes in the GHz frequency range may be produced by an atmospheric phenomenon known as ball lightning (BL). If BLs act as nonstationary radio frequency cavities, their characteristic emission frequencies and evolution timescales are consistent with peryton observations, and so are general patterns in which BLs are known to occur. Based on this evidence, testable predictions are made that can confirm or rule out a causal connection between perytons and BLs. In either case, how perytons are searched for in observational data may warrant reconsideration because existing procedures may be discarding events that have the same nature as known perytons.

  16. A randomized controlled clinical study to evaluate the effectiveness of an active moisturizing lotion with colloidal oatmeal skin protectant versus its vehicle for the relief of xerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaaji, Amer N; Wallo, Warren

    2014-10-01

    Xerosis is a common skin condition, occurring most often in the winter and in low relative humidity, which results in loss of moisture, cracking, and desquamation. Many emollient creams and lotions are available for use as preventive moisturizers. However, few controlled experiments have been published comparing the efficacy of active moisturizing products versus the vehicle used to deliver the products to the skin. Therefore, we conducted this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical study to objectively compare a commercially available moisturizing product against its own vehicle. The active colloidal oatmeal moisturizer used in this study showed significant benefits versus its vehicle control in several dermatological parameters used to measure skin dryness.

  17. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  18. A Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Upward Triggered Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballweber, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Alana Ballweber, John H. Helsdon Jr., and Tom A. Warner South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Ten tall communication towers lining the ridge in Rapid City, South Dakota provide a unique opportunity to study the phenomenon of lightning-triggered upward lightning. The Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS), seeks to determine if upward positive leaders are triggered from these towers by: (1) the approach of horizontally propagating negative stepped leaders associated with either intracloud development or following a positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) return stroke, and/or (2) a +CG return stroke as it propagates through a previously formed leader network near the towers. As part of the UPLIGHTS research, two separate lightning mapping devices were used to aid in a 3D re-creation of the triggering flash, a 3D digital interferometer and a Lightning Mapping Array. Through the use of these two devices, we present findings founded on the analysis of data collected from these assets during the 2013 storm season. Specifically, we quantify the spatial and temporal relationship of the triggering flash leader activity relative to the tall objects when upward leaders develop and when upward leaders fail to develop. Furthermore, the lightning mapping devices were correlated with high-speed optical and electrical field observations to provide a further insight as to why certain flashes trigger upward lightning from tall structures and others do not.

  19. Assigning the causative lightning to the whistlers observed on satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chum

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the penetration of lightning induced whistler waves through the ionosphere by investigating the correspondence between the whistlers observed on the DEMETER and MAGION-5 satellites and the lightning discharges detected by the European lightning detection network EUCLID. We compute all the possible differences between the times when the whistlers were observed on the satellite and times when the lightning discharges were detected. We show that the occurrence histogram for these time differences exhibits a distinct peak for a particular characteristic time, corresponding to the sum of the propagation time and a possible small time shift between the absolute time assigned to the wave record and the clock of the lightning detection network. Knowing this characteristic time, we can search in the EUCLID database for locations, currents, and polarities of causative lightning discharges corresponding to the individual whistlers. We demonstrate that the area in the ionosphere through which the electromagnetic energy induced by a lightning discharge enters into the magnetosphere as whistler mode waves is up to several thousands of kilometres wide.

  20. A source location algorithm of lightning detection networks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. X. Hu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate retrieval of lightning sources is crucial to the early warning and quick repairs of lightning disaster. An algorithm for computing the location and onset time of cloud-to-ground lightning using the time-of-arrival (TOA and azimuth-of-arrival (AOA data is introduced in this paper. The algorithm can iteratively calculate the least-squares solution of a lightning source on an oblate spheroidal Earth. It contains a set of unique formulas to compute the geodesic distance and azimuth and an explicit method to compute the initial position using TOA data of only three sensors. Since the method accounts for the effects of the oblateness of the Earth, it would provide a more accurate solution than algorithms based on planar or spherical surface models. Numerical simulations are presented to test this algorithm and evaluate the performance of a lightning detection network in the Hubei province of China. Since 1990s, the proposed algorithm has been used in many regional lightning detection networks installed by the electric power system in China. It is expected that the proposed algorithm be used in more lightning detection networks and other location systems.

  1. NASA storm hazards research in lightning strikes to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. D.; Brown, P. W.; Plumer, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The lightning strike condition data gathered in the 1980-1984 period are presented, together with the lightning attachment point analysis for the NASA F-106B research aircraft are presented. The analysis of the experienced 637 direct lightning strikes shows that the highest strike rates (2.1 strikes/min and 13 strikes/penetration) occurred at altitudes between 38,000 and 40,000 ft. The regions of highest risk for an aircraft to experience a direct lightning strike were the areas of thunderstorms where the ambient temperature was colder than -40 C and where the relative turbulence and precipitation intensities were characterized as negligible to light. The presence and location of lightning, therefore, did not necessarily indicate the presence and location of hazardous precipitation and turbulence. The total onboard data show that the lightning attachment patterns on this aircraft fall into four general categories, although the 1984 data suggest that the entire surface of the F-106B may be susceptible to lightning attachment.

  2. Beijing Lightning Network (BLNET): Configuration, Function and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, X.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Tian, Y.; Lu, G.

    2015-12-01

    A regional multi-frequency-band lightning detection network in Beijing (BLNET) has been developed for both research and operational purposes. The network is employed in the experiment of Dynamic-microphysical-electrical Processes in Severe Thunderstorms and Lightning Hazards (Storm973), supported by Ministry of Science and Technology as National Key Basic Research Program of China or 973 Program. The network consisted of 16 stations in 2015 covering most part of The "Jing-Jin-Ji" (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei) metropolis zone, one of the most developed areas in China. Four different sensors, including slow antenna, fast antenna, magnetic antenna, and VHF antenna, are integrated in each station to detect lightning radiation signals in different frequency band. The Chan algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt method are adopted jointly in the lightning location algorithm. In addition to locate the lightning radiation pulses in two-dimension or three-dimension in different band, the charge source neutralized by the lightning discharge can be retrieved either. The theoretical horizontal error over the network is less than 200 m and the vertical error is less than 500 m over the network. The comparison of total lightning location results with corresponding radar echoes for thunderstorm cases indicates the good performance of BLNET in the severe convection surveillance. The actual two-dimensional location error in VLF/LF band, compared with a ground truth that acquired with a GPS-synchronized high-speed video camera, is about 250 m.

  3. A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The network will support on-going ground validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. It will also provide for many interesting and detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and will offer many interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical wets associated with lightning and thunderstorms. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. In this study, a new revised channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced. The algorithm is an extension of earlier work provided in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996) in the analysis of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system. As in the 1996 study, direct algebraic solutions are obtained by inverting a simple linear system of equations, thereby making computer searches through a multi-dimensional parameter domain of a Chi-Squared function unnecessary. However, the new algorithm is developed completely in spherical Earth-centered coordinates (longitude, latitude, altitude), rather than in the (x, y, z) cartesian coordinates employed in the 1996 study. Hence, no mathematical transformations from (x, y, z) into spherical coordinates are required (such transformations involve more numerical error propagation, more computer program coding, and slightly more CPU computing time). The new algorithm also has a more realistic

  4. The Riddle of Ball Lightning: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Donoso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing and enduring scientific challenges is to find an explanation for ball lightning, the shining fireballs that sometimes appear near lightning strokes. Although many theoretical ideas have been proposed and much experimental work has been performed, there is not yet an accepted explanation of their amazing properties. They are surprisingly stable, lasting up to 10 s, even minutes in some rare cases. By night, their appearance can be spectacular, but their brilliance is just similar to that of a home electric bulb. Most of the time, their motion is smooth and horizontal, but it can also be erratic and chaotic; they can penetrate indoors through window panes. We review here some of the most discussed approaches, including both theoretical models to find an explanation as well as experimental efforts to reproduce them in the laboratory. We distinguish between chemical and physical models, depending on whether their stability is mainly based on their chemical composition or on purely physical phenomena involving electromagnetic fields and plasmas.

  5. Magnetotelluric distortions directly observed with lightning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Lachlan; Macnae, James

    2017-08-01

    Galvanic distortions complicate magnetotelluric (MT) soundings. In this research, we use lightning network data to identify specific sferics in MT measurements and analyse these events on the basis of the lightning source location. Without source information, identification and removal of galvanic distortion is a fundamentally ill-posed problem, unless data are statistically decomposed into determinable and indeterminable parts. We use realistic assumptions of the earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation velocity to accurately predict the time of arrival, azimuth and amplitude for every significant sferic in our time-series data. For each sferic with large amplitude, we calculate the rotation of the electric field from the measured to the predicted arrival azimuth. This rotation of the electric field is a primary parameter of distortion. Our results demonstrate that a rudimentary model for near-surface galvanic distortion consistently fits observed electric field rotations. When local features rotate regional electric fields, then counter-rotating data to predicted arrival azimuths should correct the directional dependence of static shift. Although we used amplitude thresholds to simplify statistical processing, future developments should incorporate both signal-to-noise improvements and multisite decompositions. Lower amplitude signal may also be useful after the appropriate signal processing for noise reduction. We anticipate our approach will be useful for further work on MT distortion.

  6. LOFAR for lightning-interferometery and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Olaf; Buitink, Stijn; trinh, Gia; Bonardi, Antonio; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katherine; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Joerg; Rossetto, Laura; Rutjes, Casper; Schellart, Pim; Thoudam, Satayendra; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias; Hare, Brian

    2017-04-01

    We show that a new observation mode at the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for Lightning-Interferometery and Mapping (LIM) allows for lightning observations with a resolution that is at least an order of magnitude better than presently operating Lightning Napping Arrays LMAs. Furthermore the polarization of the signal can be used to reconstruct the direction of the discharge. LOFAR, consisting of many thousands of antennas, is a digital radio telescope, primarily build for astronomy observations. The Low Band Antennas (LBA) we use for this work are sensitive to the frequency range of 10 - 90 MHz and consist of two inverted V-shaped dipoles. The antennas are grouped in stations consisting of 48 LBA spread over an area with a diameter of about 30 m for which the relative timing is known accurately. The LOFAR core of approximately 2 km diameter contains 24 such stations located near Exloo in the north of The Netherlands. Remote stations for LIM may lie at a distance of 100 km from the core. Signals are sampled at 200 MS/s (sampling time of 5 ns). All antennas are equipped with ring buffers, that store the raw voltage traces for up to 5 s. When a trigger is received, for example with a lightning flash, the ring buffers are frozen and their contents are copied over the network to a central storage location. We will show an initial analysis of data taken on June 19, 2013, for a thunderstorm at a distance of some 50 km from the telescope. The source location and emission time for each event (lightning step) is found by fitting the arrival times of the pulses for each separate antenna adjusting the station offsets, keeping them the same for all events. The fit reproduces the measurements with an accuracy of about 1 time sample. Interestingly much fine structure is seen in the time-traces and examples will be shown for some events. The time traces for antennas in different stations are very similar and thus not due to noise. We also see a clear polarization-dependent structure

  7. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, J. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kendl, A., E-mail: alexander.kendl@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-28

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  8. Ball lightning with the nonrelativistic electrons of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2015-08-01

    The lifetimes, volume densities of energy, electron and ion densities and other parameters of ball lightning cores with the nonrelativistic electrons are estimated. The model according to which the motion of the electrons of the ball lightning core is the superposition of the oscillatory motion and the thermal motion in the directions perpendicular to those of the oscillations is proposed. Some problems related to isolation of the ball lightning core from the atmosphere and the transfer of the atmospheric pressure on it are considered.

  9. Anna Sangadzhi-Goryaeva, A Legend About Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaeva, Bair; Babaev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Anna’s mother was born in the village of Khar-Tolga in Yashkul’skiy rayon. There, lightning, thunder and dust storms were frequent occurrences. Anna heard from her mother that she should not be afraid of lightning. According to a legend, once upon a time a god descended on earth but could not ascent back to the skies. He was helped by a pair of helping hands from Anna’s maternal clan. Since then lightning never harms people from this clan. One day when Anna lived in the village of Chilgir lig...

  10. Geostationary Lightning Mapper for GOES-R and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Koshak, W.

    2008-01-01

    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a single channel, near-IR imager/optical transient event detector, used to detect, locate and measure total lightning activity over the full-disk as part of a 3-axis stabilized, geostationary weather satellite system. The next generation NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch readiness in December 2014 will carry a GLM that will provide continuous day and night observations of lightning from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fUlly operational. The mission objectives for the GLM are to 1) provide continuous, full-disk lightning measurements for storm warning and nowcasting, 2) provide early warning of tornadic activity, and 3) accumulate a long-term database to track decadal changes of lightning. The GLM owes its heritage to the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (1997-Present) and the Optical Transient Detector (1995-2000), which were developed for the Earth Observing System and have produced a combined 13 year data record of global lightning activity. Instrument formulation studies were completed in March 2007 and the implementation phase to develop a prototype model and up to four flight models will be underway in the latter part of 2007. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds (e.g., Lightning Mapping Arrays in North Alabama and the Washington DC Metropolitan area) are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time lightning mapping data are being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS

  11. Airborne Laser Scanning Quantification of Disturbances from Hurricanes and Lightning Strikes to Mangrove Forests in Everglades National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keqi; Simard, Marc; Ross, Michael; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H; Houle, Patricia; Ruiz, Pablo; Twilley, Robert R; Whelan, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements derived before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma (2005) were used to quantify the impact of hurricanes and lightning strikes on the mangrove forest at two sites in Everglades National Park (ENP). Analysis of LIDAR measurements covering 61 and 68 ha areas of mangrove forest at the Shark River and Broad River sites showed that the proportion of high tree canopy detected by the LIDAR after the 2005 hurricane season decreased significantly due to defoliation and breakage of branches and trunks, while the proportion of low canopy and the ground increased drastically. Tall mangrove forests distant from tidal creeks suffered more damage than lower mangrove forests adjacent to the tidal creeks. The hurricanes created numerous canopy gaps, and the number of gaps per square kilometer increased from about 400~500 to 4000 after Katrina and Wilma. The total area of gaps in the forest increased from about 1~2% of the total forest area to 12%. The relative contribution of hurricanes to mangrove forest disturbance in ENP is at least 2 times more than that from lightning strikes. However, hurricanes and lightning strikes disturb the mangrove forest in a related way. Most seedlings in lightning gaps survived the hurricane impact due to the protection of trees surrounding the gaps, and therefore provide an important resource for forest recovery after the hurricane. This research demonstrated that LIDAR is an effective remote sensing tool to quantify the effects of disturbances such as hurricanes and lightning strikes in the mangrove forest.

  12. Airborne Laser Scanning Quantification of Disturbances from Hurricanes and Lightning Strikes to Mangrove Forests in Everglades National Park, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Whelan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR measurements derived before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma (2005 were used to quantify the impact of hurricanes and lightning strikes on the mangrove forest at two sites in Everglades National Park (ENP. Analysis of LIDAR measurements covering 61 and 68 ha areas of mangrove forest at the Shark River and Broad River sites showed that the proportion of high tree canopy detected by the LIDAR after the 2005 hurricane season decreased significantly due to defoliation and breakage of branches and trunks, while the proportion of low canopy and the ground increased drastically. Tall mangrove forests distant from tidal creeks suffered more damage than lower mangrove forests adjacent to the tidal creeks. The hurricanes created numerous canopy gaps, and the number of gaps per square kilometer increased from about 400~500 to 4000 after Katrina and Wilma. The total area of gaps in the forest increased from about 1~2% of the total forest area to 12%. The relative contribution of hurricanes to mangrove forest disturbance in ENP is at least 2 times more than that from lightning strikes. However, hurricanes and lightning strikes disturb the mangrove forest in a related way. Most seedlings in lightning gaps survived the hurricane impact due to the protection of trees surrounding the gaps, and therefore provide an important resource for forest recovery after the hurricane. This research demonstrated that LIDAR is an effective remote sensing tool to quantify the effects of disturbances such as hurricanes and lightning strikes in the mangrove forest.

  13. Full scale lightning surge tests of distribution transformers and secondary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedde, G.L.; Dugan, R.C. Sr.; Rowe, L.D. (Cooper Power Systems, Thomas A. Edison Technical Center, Franksville, WI (US))

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that low-side surges are known to cause failures of distribution transformers. They also subject load devices to overvoltages. A full-scale model of a residential service has been set up in a laboratory and subjected to impulses approximating lightning strokes. The tests were made to determine the impulse characteristics of the secondary system and to test the validity of previous analyses. Among the variables investigated were stroke location, the balance of the surges in the service cable, and the effectiveness of arrester protection. Low-side surges were found to consist of two basic components: the natural frequency of the system and the inductive response of the system to the stoke current. The latter component is responsible for transformer failures while the former may be responsible for discharge spots often found around secondary bushings. Arresters at the service entrance are effective in diverting most of the energy from a lightning strike, but may not protect sensitive loads. Additional local protection is also needed. The tests affirmed previous simulations and uncovered additional phenomena as well.

  14. Automated Storm Tracking and the Lightning Jump Algorithm Using GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Christopher Joseph; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a fully automated lightning jump system encompassing objective storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper proxy data, and the lightning jump algorithm (LJA), which are important elements in the transition of the LJA concept from a research to an operational based algorithm. Storm cluster tracking is based on a product created from the combination of a radar parameter (vertically integrated liquid, VIL), and lightning information (flash rate density). Evaluations showed that the spatial scale of tracked features or storm clusters had a large impact on the lightning jump system performance, where increasing spatial scale size resulted in decreased dynamic range of the system's performance. This framework will also serve as a means to refine the LJA itself to enhance its operational applicability. Parameters within the system are isolated and the system's performance is evaluated with adjustments to parameter sensitivity. The system's performance is evaluated using the probability of detection (POD) and false alarm ratio (FAR) statistics. Of the algorithm parameters tested, sigma-level (metric of lightning jump strength) and flash rate threshold influenced the system's performance the most. Finally, verification methodologies are investigated. It is discovered that minor changes in verification methodology can dramatically impact the evaluation of the lightning jump system.

  15. Lightning related fatalities in livestock: veterinary expertise and the added value of lightning location data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, E; Weyens, P; Poelman, D R; Chiers, K; Deprez, P; Pardon, B

    2015-01-01

    Although lightning strike is an important cause of sudden death in livestock on pasture and among the main reasons why insurance companies consult an expert veterinarian, scientific information on this subject is limited. The aim of the present study was to provide objective information on the circumstantial evidence and pathological findings in lightning related fatalities (LRF), based on a retrospective analysis of 410 declarations, examined by a single expert veterinarian in Flanders, Belgium, from 1998 to 2012. Predictive logistic models for compatibility with LRF were constructed based on anamnestic, environmental and pathological factors. In addition, the added value of lightning location data (LLD) was evaluated. Pathognomonic singe lesions were present in 84/194 (43%) confirmed reports. Factors which remained significantly associated with LRF in the multivariable model were age, presence of a tree or open water in the near surroundings, tympany and presence of feed in the oral cavity at the time of investigation. This basic model had a sensitivity (Se) of 53.8% and a specificity (Sp) of 88.2%. Relying only on LLD to confirm LRF in livestock resulted in a high Se (91.3%), but a low Sp (41.2%), leading to a high probability that a negative case would be wrongly accepted as an LRF. The best results were obtained when combining the model based on the veterinary expert investigation (circumstantial evidence and pathological findings), together with the detection of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning at the time and location of death (Se 89.1%; Sp 66.7%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  17. Simulation of Quasi-Linear Mesoscale Convective Systems in Northern China: Lightning Activities and Storm Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanli, Li

    2017-04-01

    Two intense quasi-linear mesoscale convective systems (QLMCSs) in northern China were simulated using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model and the 3D-Var (three-dimensional variational) analysis system of the ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) model. A new method in which the lightning density is calculated using both the precipitation and non-precipitation ice mass was developed to reveal the relationship between the lightning activities and QLMCS structures. Results indicate that, compared with calculating the results using two previous methods, the lightning density calculated using the new method presented in this study is in better accordance with observations. Based on the calculated lightning densities using the new method, it was found that most lightning activity was initiated on the right side and at the front of the QLMCSs, where the surface wind field converged intensely. The CAPE was much stronger ahead of the southeastward progressing QLMCS than to the back it, and their lightning events mainly occurred in regions with a large gradient of CAPE. Comparisons between lightning and non-lightning regions indicated that lightning regions featured more intense ascending motion than non-lightning regions; the vertical ranges of maximum reflectivity between lightning and non-lightning regions were very different; and the ice mixing ratio featured no significant differences between the lightning and non-lightning regions.

  18. 75 FR 33515 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Electric-Powered Vehicles; Electrolyte Spillage and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... Standards; Electric-Powered Vehicles; Electrolyte Spillage and Electrical Shock Protection AGENCY: National... electric-powered vehicle, and the next generation of hybrid and battery electric powered vehicles. It does... for electric-powered vehicles to align it more closely with the April 2005 version of the Society of...

  19. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  20. OLS DIGITAL DERIVED LIGHTNING FROM DMSP F12 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) flown on DMSP 5D-F12 have been analyzed from...

  1. TRMM-LBA LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package measures the electric field above, below, and around the aircraft. The ER-2 LIP consists of eight electric field mills, a...

  2. Lightning Forecasts and Data Assimilation into Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Mansell, E. R.; Fierro, A.; Ziegler, C.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation reviews two aspects of lightning in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models: forecasting lightning and assimilating lightning data into NWP models to improve weather forecasts. One of the earliest routine forecasts of lightning was developed for fire weather operations. This approach used a multi-parameter regression analysis of archived cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data and archived NWP data to optimize the combination of model state variables to use in forecast equations for various CG rates. Since then, understanding of how storms produce lightning has improved greatly. As the treatment of ice in microphysics packages used by NWP models has improved and the horizontal resolution of models has begun approaching convection-permitting scales (with convection-resolving scales on the horizon), it is becoming possible to use this improved understanding in NWP models to predict lightning more directly. An important role for data assimilation in NWP models is to depict the location, timing, and spatial extent of thunderstorms during model spin-up so that the effects of prior convection that can strongly influence future thunderstorm activity, such as updrafts and outflow boundaries, can be included in the initial state of a NWP model run. Radar data have traditionally been used, but systems that map lightning activity with varying degrees of coverage, detail, and detection efficiency are now available routinely over large regions and reveal information about storms that is complementary to the information provided by radar. Because data from lightning mapping systems are compact, easily handled, and reliably indicate the location and timing of thunderstorms, even in regions with little or no radar coverage, several groups have investigated techniques for assimilating these data into NWP models. This application will become even more valuable with the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on the GOES-R satellite, which will extend routine

  3. OLS DIGITAL DERIVED LIGHTNING FROM DMSP F10 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) flown on DMSP 5D-F10 have been analyzed from...

  4. Regional lightning NOx sources during the TROCCINOX experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mari, C; Chaboureau, J. P; Pinty, J. P; Duron, J; Mascart, P; Cammas, J. P; Gheusi, F; Fehr, T; Schlager, H; Roiger, A; Lichtenstein, M; Stock, P

    2006-01-01

    A lightning NOx (LiNOx) source has been implemented in the deep convection scheme of the Meso-NH mesoscale model following a mass-flux formalism coherent with the transport and scavenging of gases inside the convective scheme...

  5. A simple lightning assimilation technique for improving retrospective WRF simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convective rainfall is often a large source of error in retrospective modeling applications. In particular, positive rainfall biases commonly exist during summer months due to overactive convective parameterizations. In this study, lightning assimilation was applied in the Kain-F...

  6. Effects of Lightning Injection on Power-MOSFETs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightning induced damage is one of the major concerns in aircraft health monitoring. Such short-duration high voltages can cause significant damage to electronic...

  7. The effect of polarization on radar detection of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, V.; Walker, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    The polarization dependence of lightning echoes received with a 23-cm wavelength radar is estimated theoretically and experimentally. The reduction in the lightning radar cross-section due to the transmission of circular polarization instead of linear is measured to be about 4 dB and is much smaller than the 15-30 dB reduction in reflectivity of weak precipitation regions. The 8.7 dB average reduction in reflectivity maxima has been observed. This leads to an increase in the detected lightning flash rate by as much as 40%. The radar cross-section ratio of circular to linear polarization obtained experimentally suggests that lightning elements tend to be horizontally oriented.

  8. LIGHTNING IMAGING SENSOR (LIS) SCIENCE DATA V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite (TRMM) used to detect the distribution and variability of...

  9. CAMEX-3 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) allows the vector components of the electric field (i.e, Ex,Ey, Ez )to be readily obtained, and thus, greatly improves...

  10. TCSP ER-2 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 7 rotating vane type electric field sensors and a two channel conductivity probe along with a central...

  11. CAMEX-4 DC-8 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The DC-8 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) allows the vector components of the electric field (i.e, Ex,Ey, Ez )to be readily obtained, and thus, greatly improves...

  12. CAMEX-4 ER-2 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) allows the vector components of the electric field (i.e, Ex, Ey, Ez )to be readily obtained, and thus, greatly improves...

  13. TCSP ER-2 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TCSP ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 7 rotating vane type electric field sensors and a two channel conductivity probe along with a central...

  14. CAMEX-4 ER-2 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 LIP, which allows the vector components of the electric field (i.e, Ex, Ey, Ez...

  15. Convective Induced Turbulence (CIT) Detection via Total Lightning Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We proposes to build a prototype Convective-Induced Turbulence (CIT) hazard detection system based on total lightning sensing as an indicator of the location and...

  16. Pathognomonic symptom associated with lightning strike: Lichtenberg figure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Mehmet; Tanrikulu, Nazmiye; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Yigit, Eda

    2015-02-01

    Lightning strikes especially occur during spring and summer months in the afternoons when there is heavy rain. In deaths resulting from lightning strike, there may either be no evidence on the dead person's clothes or body, or there may be burnt or torn patches on their clothes and lichtenberg figures specific to lightning strikes on their bodies. In such cases that also have a comorbid of cognitive dysfunction, since there is generally amnesia, having these figures during the physical examination has a valuable place in early diagnosis and quick treatment. This paper presents a case of lightning strike that was found to have Lichtenberg figures on the back and right leg after secondary examination.

  17. A Probabilistic, Facility-Centric Approach to Lightning Strike Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.; Roeder, William p.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    A new probabilistic facility-centric approach to lightning strike location has been developed. This process uses the bivariate Gaussian distribution of probability density provided by the current lightning location error ellipse for the most likely location of a lightning stroke and integrates it to determine the probability that the stroke is inside any specified radius of any location, even if that location is not centered on or even with the location error ellipse. This technique is adapted from a method of calculating the probability of debris collisionith spacecraft. Such a technique is important in spaceport processing activities because it allows engineers to quantify the risk of induced current damage to critical electronics due to nearby lightning strokes. This technique was tested extensively and is now in use by space launch organizations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Future applications could include forensic meteorology.

  18. The Distribution of Lightning Channel Lengths in Northern Alabama Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, H. S.; Koshak, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Lightning is well known to be a major source of tropospheric NOx, and in most cases is the dominant natural source (Huntreiser et al 1998, Jourdain and Hauglustaine 2001). Production of NOx by a segment of a lightning channel is a function of channel segment energy density and channel segment altitude. A first estimate of NOx production by a lightning flash can be found by multiplying production per segment [typically 104 J/m; Hill (1979)] by the total length of the flash s channel. The purpose of this study is to determine average channel length for lightning flashes near NALMA in 2008, and to compare average channel length of ground flashes to the average channel length of cloud flashes.

  19. Lightning Optical Pulse Statistics from Storm Overflights During the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, D. M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect time resolved optical pulse data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We divided our data into two amplitude groups based on prior NASA U2 aircraft optical data and our pulse characteristics. The group of large pulses with radiance greater than 2.1 mW /sq m sr had mean and median 10 - 10% optical pulse widths of 765 and 735 microns respectively, the 50-50% pulse widths of 396 and 355 microns respectively, and 10-90% rise times of 290 and 260 microns. These values are very similar to the previous U2 based optical results The other group of pulses consisting of slightly more than a quarter of the total pulses observed had radiances less than the minimum values detected in the U2 study. The small pulses were narrower than the large pulses with 5040% mean and median values of 198 and 160 ps respectively. Only 12 % of the flashes contained only small pulses, minimizing the impact of this data on the estimates of detection efficiencies of the orbital instruments, the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Optical Transient Detector.

  20. TIN CANS OR ASSAULT VEHICLES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard TAY, Dr.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the policy implications of the traditional approach to vehicle safety, which tends to focus on the crashworthiness of a vehicle and its occupant protection capability, and an alternative approach that focuses more on the non-aggressiveness of the vehicle. It is argued that this alternative approach will improve road safety as well as social equity and environmental quality.

  1. First data of the Colombia Lightning Mapping Array - COLMA

    OpenAIRE

    López Trujillo, Jesús Alberto; Montañá Puig, Juan; Van der Velde, Oscar Arnoud; Romero Durán, David; Aranguren Fino, Harby Daniel; Torres Sanchez, Horacio; Taborda, John; Martínez, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    The first data set of VHF lightning mapping using a Lightning Mapping Array system - LMA in a tropical region is presented in this paper. Six sensors were installed at the north of Colombia near Santa Marta city. Since the installation of the LMA network in 2015, up to 7000 intra-cloud (IC) discharges from September to November 2015 have been analyzed. The data suggests that, the electrical charge distribution in tropical thunderstorms shows higher vertical development re...

  2. Ball lightning observation: an objective video-camera analysis report

    OpenAIRE

    Sello, Stefano; Viviani, Paolo; Paganini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a video-camera recording of a (probable) ball lightning event and both the related image and signal analyses for its photometric and dynamical characterization. The results strongly support the BL nature of the recorded luminous ball object and allow the researchers to have an objective and unique video document of a possible BL event for further analyses. Some general evaluations of the obtained results considering the proposed ball lightning models conclude the paper.

  3. Observation of the Optical and Spectral Characteristics of Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Jianyong; Yuan, Ping; Xue, Simin

    2014-01-01

    Ball lightning (BL) has been observed with two slitless spectrographs at a distance of 0.9 km. The BL is generated by a cloud-to-ground lightning strike. It moves horizontally during the luminous duration. The evolution of size, color, and light intensity is reported in detail. The spectral analysis indicates that the radiation from soil elements is present for the entire lifetime of the BL.

  4. Lightning Sensors for Observing, Tracking and Nowcasting Severe Weather

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Price

    2008-01-01

    Severe and extreme weather is a major natural hazard all over the world, often resulting in major natural disasters such as hail storms, tornados, wind storms, flash floods, forest fires and lightning damages. While precipitation, wind, hail, tornados, turbulence, etc. can only be observed at close distances, lightning activity in these damaging storms can be monitored at all spatial scales, from local (using very high frequency [VHF] sensors), to regional (using very low frequency [VLF] sens...

  5. Variation of a Lightning NOx Indicator for National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Vant-Hull, B.; McCaul, E. W.; Peterson, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) indirectly influences our climate since these molecules are important in controlling the concentration of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the atmosphere [Huntrieser et al., 1998]. In support of the National Climate Assessment (NCA) program, satellite Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS; Christian et al. [1999]; Cecil et al. [2014]) data is used to estimate LNOx production over the southern portion of the conterminous US for the 16 year period 1998-2013.

  6. Estimate Of Positive Ground Lightning Flashes In Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The instrument used was lightning flash counter designed to isolate only positive lightning discharges at average radiation field change of 5.0 v/m and peak frequency response of 17.0kHz with 3dB attenuation and effective range of 60km. A total of 444 flashes were obtained with most of the flashes occurring at night times.

  7. Severe soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity in motor vehicle crashes involving partial ejection: the protective role of side curtain airbags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Robert; Fraade-Blanar, Laura; Lipira, Angelo; Friedrich, Jeffrey; Bulger, Eileen

    2017-05-01

    Partial ejection (PE) of the upper extremity (UE) can occur in a motor vehicle crash (MVC) resulting in complex and severe soft tissue injuries (SSTI). This study evaluated the relationship between partial ejection and UE injuries, notably SSTIs, in MVCs focusing on crash types and characteristics, and further examined the role of side curtain airbags (SCABs) in the prevention of partial ejection and reducing SSTI of the UE. Weighted data was analyzed from the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) from 1993 to 2012. Logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship of PE with SSTI of the UE and the effect of SCABs in both nearside impacts and rollover collisions. Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) case studies illustrated PE involving SSTI of the UE, and long term treatment. Rollover and nearside impact collisions had the highest percentages of partial ejection, with over half occurring in rollover collisions. Annually over 800 SSTIs of the UE occurred in all MVCs. For nearside lateral force impacts, a multivariable analysis adjusting for belt use and delta V showed a 15 times (OR 15.35, 95% CI 4.30, 54.79) greater odds of PE for occupants without SCABs compared to those with a SCAB deployment. No occupants (0 of 51,000) sustained a SSTI of the UE when a SCAB deployed in nearside impacts, compared to 0.01% (114 of 430,000) when SCABs were unavailable or did not deploy. In rollover collisions, a multivariable analysis adjusted for number of quarter turns and belt use showed 3 times the odds (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.22, 7.47) of PE for occupants without SCABs compared to those with a SCAB deployment. Just 0.17% (32 of 19,000) of the occupants sustained a SSTI of the UE in rollovers with a SCAB deployment, compared to 0.53% (2294 of 431,000) of the occupants when SCABs were unavailable or did not deploy. CIREN case studies illustrated the injury causation of SSTI of the UE due to partial ejection, and the

  8. Are perytons signatures of ball lightning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The enigmatic downchirped signals, called 'perytons', that are detected by radio telescopes in the GHz frequency range may be produced by an atmospheric phenomenon known as ball lightning (BL). If BLs act as nonstationary radio frequency cavities, their characteristic emission frequencies and evolution timescales are consistent with peryton observations, and so are general patterns in which BLs are known to occur. Based on this evidence, testable predictions are made that can confirm or rule out a causal connection between perytons and BLs. In either case, how perytons are searched for in observational data may warrant reconsideration because existing procedures may be discarding events that have the same nature as known perytons.

  9. An Operational Comparison of Lightning Warning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. L.; Janota, D. E.; Hay, J. E.

    1982-05-01

    During the spring-summer of 1979, six lightning warning devices were evaluated in a side-by-side comparison study at three test sites. Stock commercial devices were selected based upon distinct concepts of operation. The devices tested included a sferics counter, a corona point, a radioactive probe, a field mill, an azimuth/range locator and a triangulation locator. The test sites were chosen to provide varied thunderstorm conditions: 1) San Antonio, Texas (cold air advection), 2) Kennedy Space Center, Florida (localized surface heating) and 3) Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico (orographic effects). The evaluation parameters were advance warning time, time to clear after hazard, alarm reliability, and false alarm and failure to alarm probabilities. The triangulation locator provided the best overall performance; however, all systems indicated a need for improvement in the failure to alarm rate.

  10. Greased Lightning (GL-10) Flight Testing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, William J.; McSwain, Robert G.; Beaton, Brian F.; Klassman, David W.; Theodore, Colin R.

    2017-01-01

    Greased Lightning (GL-10) is an aircraft configuration that combines the characteristics of a cruise efficient airplane with the ability to perform vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL). This aircraft has been designed, fabricated and flight tested at the small unmanned aerial system (UAS) scale. This technical memorandum will document the procedures and findings of the flight test experiments. The GL-10 design utilized two key technologies to enable this unique aircraft design; namely, distributed electric propulsion (DEP) and inexpensive closed loop controllers. These technologies enabled the flight of this inherently unstable aircraft. Overall it has been determined thru flight test that a design that leverages these new technologies can yield a useful VTOL cruise efficient aircraft.

  11. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-,20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  12. Cell-tracking with lightning data from LINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Betz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A new lightning detection network (LINET has been developed at the University of Munich, which locates and reports both cloud discharges and cloud-to-ground strokes with high accuracy. The network started operation in May 2006; since then lightning data for Europe are being delivered to many scientific groups, and to the German Weather Service (DWD on an operational basis (powered by nowcast GmbH, Germany. Using about 90 lightning sensors in 17 countries, an area from longitude 10° W–25° E to latitude 35° N–65° N is covered. Further expansion is in the planning stage with the aim to attain higher efficiency for Mediterranean storms. The total lightning capability, not readily available otherwise in large areas, is particularly helpful because it can provide useful information about the development of severe weather and strong storm cells. A cell-tracking module has been developed that allows the investigation of lightning parameters for specific convective cells. Present efforts are devoted to the question for what kind of storms and to what extent lightning-based cell tracking allows improved nowcasting. Numerous case studies have been carried out and typical examples will be presented.

  13. Storm Tracking in the Southwest using 2D Lightning Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signell, J.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    We explore the climatology of thunderstorms through analyses of cloud-to-ground lightning data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). We assess a 2D storm tracking algorithm that only uses cloud-to-ground lightning data. The NLDN consists of over 100 ground-based sensors that since 1991 have detected and recorded the timing and location of lightning strikes in the continental US. Writing tools in Python - an open source programming language - and wrapping a pre-existing geostatistical library in R (SpatialVx developed by NCAR), we developed a reproducible workflow to explore the structure and evolution of thunderstorms using NLDN data. We found that 2D lightning tracking compares favorably to conventional 3D radar tracking conducted using the Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting (TITAN) algorithms. The results point to synergistic analyses of thunderstorm properties using both radar and lightning data. Analyses are motivated by problems that center on examining the climatology of flash flood producing storm systems; results are illustrated for the Southwestern US.

  14. Anvil microphysical signatures associated with lightning-produced NOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Stith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thunderstorm anvils were studied during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry experiment (DC3, using in situ measurements and observations of ice particles and NOx together with radar and Lightning Mapping Array measurements. A characteristic ice particle and NOx signature was found in the anvils from three storms, each containing high lightning flash rates in the storm core prior to anvil sampling. This signature exhibits high concentrations of frozen droplets (as measured by a Cloud Droplet Probe coincident with lower NOx on the edges of the anvil. The central portion of these anvils exhibited a high degree of aggregation of these frozen droplets and higher levels of NOx. In contrast, a deep convective cell with low lightning flash rates had high concentrations of both frozen droplets and aggregated frozen droplets in its anvil's central region. A conceptual model for these results is presented and applied to the observations from each of these storms. High NOx concentrations are often found where aggregation of frozen droplets has occurred, which may be a reflection of aggregation by electrical forces in the regions where lightning is occurring, although the level of NOx for a given concentration of aggregates varies from storm to storm. These observations between anvil microphysics and lightning and/or NOx signatures suggest that lightning data may be an important tool to characterize or infer the microphysical, radiative, and chemical properties of thunderstorm anvils.

  15. The GOES-R Series Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) is the next series to follow the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), which will have just completed Critical Design Review and move forward into the construction phase of instrument development. The GLM will operate continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development (an engineering development unit and 4 flight models), a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms, cal/val performance monitoring tools, and new applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional ground-based lightning networks are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms, test data sets, and applications, as well as improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. In this presentation we review the planned implementation of the instrument and suite of operational algorithms

  16. The Goes-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) is the next series to follow the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved storm diagnostic capability with the Advanced Baseline Imager. The GLM will map total lightning activity (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lighting flashes) continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms, cal/val performance monitoring tools, and new applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. In this paper we will report on new Nowcasting and storm warning applications being developed and evaluated at various NOAA Testbeds.

  17. The Role of Public and Private Protection in Disruptive Innovation: The Automotive Industry and the Emergence of Low-Emission Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinkse, J.; Bohnsack, R.; Kolk, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the automotive industry, the need to move toward more sustainable trajectories of innovation has received much attention. Car manufacturers have started to develop lower emission alternatives for the internal combustion engine, particularly electric, hybrid, and fuel-cell vehicles. They face the

  18. Coordinated lightning, balloon-borne electric field, and radar observations of triggered lightning flashes in North Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Waugh, S.; Pilkey, J. T.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Ngin, T.; Gamerota, W. R.; Carrie, G.; Hyland, P.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines coordinated storm and triggered lightning observations made in July-August 2013 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing to determine why triggered flashes in Florida typically transition from an upward vertical channel entering the cloud to horizontal structure near the storm's melting level. Data from a balloon-borne electric field meter, a mobile 5 cm wavelength radar, and a small-baseline VHF Lightning Mapping Array acquired during a period in which three flashes were triggered on 1 August confirmed the hypothesis that the transition to horizontal lightning structure just above the melting level occurred in a layer of negative charge. This experiment was the first to provide vertical profiles of the electric field in Florida storms, from which their vertical charge distribution could be inferred. Three dissipating storms observed on different days all had negative charge near the melting level, but a growing mature storm had positive charge there.

  19. Global Lightning Climatology from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) has been collecting observations of total lightning in the global tropics and subtropics (roughly 38 deg S - 38 deg N) since December 1997. A similar instrument, the Optical Transient Detector, operated from 1995-2000 on another low earth orbit satellite that also saw high latitudes. Lightning data from these instruments have been used to create gridded climatologies and time series of lightning flash rate. These include a 0.5 deg resolution global annual climatology, and lower resolution products describing the annual cycle and the diurnal cycle. These products are updated annually. Results from the update through 2013 will be shown at the conference. The gridded products are publicly available for download. Descriptions of how each product can be used will be discussed, including strengths, weaknesses, and caveats about the smoothing and sampling used in various products.

  20. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 2. Appendix A: Resistance measurements. Appendix B: Lightning test data plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Resistance measurements are given in graphical for when a simulated lightning discharge strikes on an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was to measure the electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case.