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Sample records for variant protects radiation-induced

  1. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); Zeng, Jing [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Wang, Hong-Mei [Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury. (orig.)

  2. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  3. Inactivation of kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride protects murine liver from radiation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shi-Suo; Qiang, Min; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ke, Ai-Wu; Ji, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Liu, Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protection against radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Sun, Huiyan; Xiao, Fengjun; Wang, Xiaojie; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Qunwei; Wu, Chutse; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene could prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. Thirty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups, in which phosphate buffer saline (PBS), mock adenovirus vector (Ad-null) or adenovirus vector containing HGF (Ad-HGF) were injected into the tail vein of each group, respectively. After 48 hours, the mice received a single irradiation dose of 6.5 Gy (60)Co gamma rays. Blood samples were extracted via the tail vein at day 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 24 and 30 after irradiation, for red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) and cluster of differentiation4 (CD4)/cluster of differentiation8 (CD8) ratio assessment. At weekly intervals following irradiation, serum erythropoietin (EPO), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). On post-irradiation day 30, the mice were autopsied and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) were evaluated. Adenovirus-mediated HGF gene transfer could increase human HGF level in serum and have a significant elevation in RBC and WBC count. Ad-HGF increased EPO and IL-6 levels and prompted BFU-E formation. Ad-HGF decreased radiation- induced micronucleus frequency in the mouse bone marrow (BM). Most evidence of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage was observed morphologically in bone marrow specimen four weeks after irradiation. Ad-HGF protected against radiation-induced BM failure and increased survival. Finally, Ad-HGF increased the thymic index and enhanced immune function in the irradiated C57BL/6 mice. This is the first report to date that demonstrates the potential of HGF gene transfer to prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage.

  5. Protective effect of mild endoplasmic reticulum stress on radiation-induced bystander effects in hepatocyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Peifeng; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the defense and self-protective mechanisms of bystander normal cells are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia, where the ratio of the yield of bystander MN induction to the yield of radiation-induced MN formation under hypoxia was much higher than that of normoxia. Nonetheless, thapsigargin induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and dramatically suppressed this bystander response manifested as the decrease of MN and apoptosis inductions. Meanwhile, the interference of BiP gene, a major ER chaperone, amplified the detrimental RIBE. More precisely, thapsigargin provoked ER sensor of PERK to initiate an instantaneous and moderate ER stress thus defensed the hazard form RIBE, while BiP depletion lead to persistently destroyed homeostasis of ER and exacerbated cell injury. These findings provide new insights that the mild ER stress through BiP-PERK-p-eIF2α signaling pathway has a profound role in protecting cellular damage from RIBE and hence may decrease the potential secondary cancer risk after cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27958308

  6. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ATM sequence variants and risk of radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis after postmastectomy radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the hypothesis that women who are carriers of genetic alterations in the ATM gene are more likely to develop subcutaneous fibrosis after radiotherapy for treatment of breast cancer compared with patients who do not possess DNA sequence variations in this gene. METHODS...... in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy...... AND MATERIALS: DNA samples isolated from fibroblast cell lines established from 41 women treated with postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer were screened for genetic variants in ATM using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). A minimum follow-up of 2 years enabled analysis of late...

  8. Nutritional supplementation with arginine protects radiation-induced effects: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Flavia Cristina Morone, E-mail: fcmorone@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Campos-Silva, Pamella; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Costa, Waldemar Silva; Sampaio, Francisco Jose Barcellos [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of L-arginine on the prostate (nonneoplasic) of rats with radiation-induced injury. Methods: Twenty-nine Wistar rats, male adult, allocated into three groups: Control group (C) was not exposed to irradiation (n=10); Radiated group (R) had undergone pelvic irradiation (n=10); Supplemented and radiated group (R+S) had undergone pelvic irradiation plus L-arginine supplementation (n=9). The animals were observed for signs of toxicity. After euthanization, the prostate was dissected under magnification and stained by hematoxylin and eosin to study acinar structures and stained with Picrosirius red for collagen analysis. Results: After radiation exposure, all animals presented diarrhea, but supplementation with L-arginine reduced this effect. The weight gain in the R+S group was significantly higher than in the C and R groups. In the R+S group the collagen density and the prostate acinar area was similar to the R and C groups. Epithelial height was significantly reduced in group R compared with group C (p<0.0001). When comparing the group R+S with R, a statistical difference was observed to be present (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Pelvic radiation promotes systemic effects and some structural modifications in the ventral prostate of rats. These modifications can be prevented by oral supplementation with L-arginine. (author)

  9. Flavonols Protect Against UV Radiation-Induced Thymine Dimer Formation in an Artificial Skin Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Sabia; Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet light has been shown to have a number of deleterious effects including photoaging, photoimmunosuppression and photoinduced DNA damage which can lead to the development of skin cancer. In this paper we present a study on the ability of three flavonols to protect EpiDerm™, an artificial skin mimic, against UV-induced damage. EpiDerm™ samples were treated with flavonol in acetone and exposed to UVA (100 kJ/m(2) at 365 nm) and UVB (9000 J/m(2) at 310 nm) radiation. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) were determined by ELISA, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were quantified using LC-APCI-MS. EpiDerm™ treated topically with quercetin significantly decreased MMP-1 secretion induced by UVA (100 µM) or UVB (200 µM) and TNF-a secretion was significantly reduced at 100 µM quercetin for both UVA and UVB radiation. In addition, topically applied quercetin was found to be photostable over the duration of the experiment. EpiDerm™ samples were treated topically with quercetin, kaempferol or galangin (52 µM) immediately prior to UVA or UVB exposure, and the cyclobutane thymine dimers (T-T (CPD)) were quantified using an HPLC-APCI MS/MS method. All three flavonols significantly decreased T-T (CPD) formation in UVB irradiated EpiDerm™, however no effect could be observed for the UVA irradiation experiments as thymine dimer formation was below the limit of quantitation. Our results suggest that flavonols can provide protection against UV radiation-induced skin damage through both antioxidant activity and direct photo-absorption. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  10. Dietary Supplement Attenuates Radiation-Induced Osteoclastogenic and Oxidative Stress-Related Responses and Protects Adult Mice from Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Tahimic, Candice; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua; Shahnazari, Mohammed; Halloran, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Our central hypothesis is that oxidative stress plays a key role in cell dysfunction and progressive bone loss caused by radiation exposure during spaceflight. In animal studies, excess free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. We previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation rapidly increases expression levels of pro-osteoclastogenic and oxidative stress-related genes in bone and marrow, followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. To screen various antioxidants for radioprotective effects on bone, 4 month old, male C57Bl6/J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable alpha-lipoic acid, or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs total body radiation and one day later marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Of the candidates tested, DP was most effective in reducing bone resorption-related gene expression. Microcomputed tomography revealed that DP also prevented the radiation-induced deterioration of skeletal microarchitecture, as indicated by percent bone volume, trabecular spacing and trabecular number. DP had similar protective effects on skeletal structure after sequential exposure to protons (0.5 Gy, 150MeV/n) and 56Fe 0.5Gy, 600 MeV/n). When cultured ex vivo under osteogenic conditions, bone marrow-derived cells from DP-fed animals exhibited increased colony numbers compared to control diet-fed animals. These findings suggest that DP exerted pro-osteogenic effects apart from previously identified anti-resorptive actions, which may contribute to radioprotection of skeletal tissue. In conclusion, a diet enriched in certain types of antioxidants and polyphenols such as DP may be useful as an intervention to protect tissues from degenerative effects of ionizing radiation.

  11. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Katiyar

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum, inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  12. Adenosine kinase inhibition protects against cranial radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

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    Munjal M Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting, however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK. Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks (novel place recognition, novel object recognition, and contextual fear conditioning 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the fear conditioning task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection also against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS

  13. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  14. The Protective Effects of 5-Methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic Acid on Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Injury

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    Deguan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are prospective radioprotectors because of their ability to scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. The hematopoietic system is widely studied in radiation research because of its high radiosensitivity. In the present study, we describe the beneficial effects of 5-methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic acid (MLA, which was synthesized from melatonin and α-lipoic acid, against radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. MLA administration significantly enhanced the survival rate of mice after 7.2 Gy total body irradiation. The results showed that MLA not only markedly increased the numbers and clonogenic potential of hematopoietic cells but also decreased DNA damage, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, MLA decreased the levels of ROS in hematopoietic cells by inhibiting NOX4 expression. These data demonstrate that MLA prevents radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the number and function of and by inhibiting DNA damage and ROS production in hematopoietic cells. These data suggest MLA is beneficial for the protection of radiation injuries.

  15. Hydrogen-rich PBS protects cultured human cells from ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage

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    Qian Liren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play an important role in ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage, while hydrogen can selectively reduce hydroxyl radicals in vitro. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrogen-rich PBS may be an effective radioprotective agent in vitro. Compared to cells pretreated without hydrogen, we demonstrated that treating cells with hydrogen-rich PBS before irradiation could significantly inhibit IR-induced apoptosis, increase viability of human intestinal crypt cells, significantly increase endogenous antioxidant, and decrease malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentrations of human lymphocyte AHH-1 cells. It is concluded that hydrogen has a potential as an effective and safe radioprotective agent.

  16. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  17. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liping [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Wei, E-mail: hanw@hfcas.cn [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy.

  18. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liping; Yu, K N; Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi; Han, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  20. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: an FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Gulgun; Miller, Lisa M; Zorlu, Faruk; Severcan, Feride

    2012-04-15

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH(2) groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH(3) groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective Effects of Myrtol Standardized Against Radiation-Induced Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-yun; Qu, Hong-jin; Guo, Jia-ming; Zhao, Hai-nan; Yang, Yan-yong; Zhang, Pei; Cao, Kun; Lei, Xiao; Cui, Jian-guo; Liu, Cong; Cai, Jian-ming; Gao, Fu; Li, Bai-long

    2016-01-01

    As a major complication after thoracic radiotherapy, radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) has great impact on long term quality of life and could result in fatal respiratory insufficiency The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of Myrtol standardized on RILI, and to investigate the underlying mechanism. A mouse model of radiation-induced lung injury was generated by using thoracic irradiation with a single dose of 16Gy. Mice were orally administrated with Myrtol (25 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks after irradiation, while prednisone (5 mg/kg/day) was used as a positive control. After then, the body weight and lung coefficient were calculated. The severity of fibrosis was evaluated by observing pulmonary sections after radiation and collagen content in lung tissues was calculated following the hydroxyproline (HYP) assay. Pathological changes were observed in all the groups by using HE staining and Masson staining. The serum levels of TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2 were also measured with an ELISA assay. Western blot assay was used to measure the impact of Myrtol on AKT and its downstream signaling pathway, including MMP-2 and MMP-9. The levels of Vimentin and α-SMA were evaluated with an immunofluorescence assay. Treatment with Myrtol standardized, but not prednisone, reduced lung coefficient and collagen deposition in lung tissues, while attenuated histological damages induced by irradiation. Myrtol standardized also reduced the production of MDA, while increased the level of SOD. It was also observed that Myrtol standardized inhibited TGF-β1 and a series of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2. While in prednisone group, even though the early pneumonitis was ameliorated, the collagen disposition remained unchanged in latter times. Immunofluorescence analysis also revealed elevation of vimentin and α-SMA in the alveoli after a single dose of 16Gy. The present results suggest Myrtol standardized as an effective agent for

  2. Protective Effects of Myrtol Standardized Against Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

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    De-yun Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: As a major complication after thoracic radiotherapy, radiation-induced lung injury (RILI has great impact on long term quality of life and could result in fatal respiratory insufficiency The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of Myrtol standardized on RILI, and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: A mouse model of radiation-induced lung injury was generated by using thoracic irradiation with a single dose of 16Gy. Mice were orally administrated with Myrtol (25 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks after irradiation, while prednisone (5 mg/kg/day was used as a positive control. After then, the body weight and lung coefficient were calculated. The severity of fibrosis was evaluated by observing pulmonary sections after radiation and collagen content in lung tissues was calculated following the hydroxyproline (HYP assay. Pathological changes were observed in all the groups by using HE staining and Masson staining. The serum levels of TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2 were also measured with an ELISA assay. Western blot assay was used to measure the impact of Myrtol on AKT and its downstream signaling pathway, including MMP-2 and MMP-9. The levels of Vimentin and α-SMA were evaluated with an immunofluorescence assay. Results: Treatment with Myrtol standardized, but not prednisone, reduced lung coefficient and collagen deposition in lung tissues, while attenuated histological damages induced by irradiation. Myrtol standardized also reduced the production of MDA, while increased the level of SOD. It was also observed that Myrtol standardized inhibited TGF-β1 and a series of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2. While in prednisone group, even though the early pneumonitis was ameliorated, the collagen disposition remained unchanged in latter times. Immunofluorescence analysis also revealed elevation of vimentin and α-SMA in the alveoli after a single dose of 16Gy. Conclusion: The present

  3. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

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    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  4. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

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    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  5. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

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    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  6. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

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    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  7. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  8. Association of genetic variants in apoptosis genes FAS and FASL with radiation-induced late toxicity after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurner, E.M.; Krenn-Pilko, S.; Kapp, K.S.; Langsenlehner, T. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, U. [Division of Internal Medicine, GKK Outpatient Department, Graz (Austria); Renner, W. [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Gerger, A. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    Fas ligand (FASL) triggers apoptotic cell death by cross-linking with its receptor FAS, and after irradiation, expression of FAS and FASL is increased. In the present study, we investigated the association between common polymorphisms in the genes for FAS and FASL and the risk of late side effects after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The role of FAS (- 1377G > A, rs2234767 and - 670A > G, rs1800682) and FASL (- 844C > T, rs763110) gene polymorphisms in the development of high-grade late rectal and/or urinary toxicity (defined as late toxicity EORTC/RTOG grade ≥ 2) was analyzed in 607 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. DNA was isolated and the selected polymorphisms were determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays. After a median follow-up time of 82 months, high-grade late rectal and/or urinary toxicity was observed in 175 patients (29.7 %). Univariate analysis revealed a significantly decreased risk of high-grade late toxicity in carriers of the FASL - 844T allele. After adjusting for covariates, patients harboring at least one - 844T allele (CT or TT genotype) remained at decreased risk of high-grade late toxicity compared with patients harboring the CC genotype [hazard ratio (HR) 0.585, 95 %CI 0.39-0.878; p = 0.010]. For patients with the - 844TT genotype, the HR was 0.404 (95 %CI 0.171-0.956; p = 0.039) in multivariate analysis. No significant associations were found for the remaining polymorphisms analyzed. These results provide the first evidence that the presence of the FASL - 844T variant allele may have a protective effect against the development of high-grade late rectal and/or urinary side effects after prostate cancer radiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Fas-Ligand (FASL) triggert durch Bindung an seinen Rezeptor FAS den apoptotischen Zelltod, desweiteren konnte nach Bestrahlung eine Ueberexpression von FAS und FASL beobachtet werden. Ziel der vorliegenden prospektiven Studie war die Untersuchung der Zusammenhaenge von

  9. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

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    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  10. Niacin protects against UVB radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured human skin keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIN, FUQUAN; XU, WEN; GUAN, CUIPING; ZHOU, MIAONI; HONG, WEISONG; FU, LIFANG; LIU, DONGYIN; XU, AIE

    2012-01-01

    Niacin and its related derivatives have been shown to have effects on cellular activities. However, the molecular mechanism of its reduced immunosuppressive effects and photoprotective effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the photoprotective effect of niacin in ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). We found that niacin effectively suppressed the UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis of HaCaT cells. Existing data have shown that AKT activation is involved in the cell survival process. Yet, the potential mechanism of niacin in protection against UV-induced skin damage has thus far not fully been eluvidated. We observed that niacin pretreatment enhances UV induced activation of AKT (Ser473 phosphorylation) as well as that of the downstream signal mTOR (S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation). The PI3K/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, largely neutralized the protective effects of niacin, suggesting that AKT and downstream signaling mTOR/S6 activation are necessary for the niacin-induced protective effects against UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis. Collectively, our data suggest that niacin may be utilized to prevent UV-induced skin damage and provide a novel mechanism of its photoprotective effects against the UV radiation of sunlight by modulating both AKT and downstream mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:22246168

  11. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  12. Protective role of hesperidin against γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Nadia Z; Ahmed Zahran, Ahmed M; El-Rashidy, Fatma H; Abdo Kodous, Ahmad S

    2017-12-01

    Gamma (γ) ray, an electromagnetic radiation, is occasionally accompanying the emission of an alpha or beta particle. Exposure to such radiation can cause cellular changes such as mutations, chromosome aberration and cellular damage which depend upon the total amount of energy, duration of exposure and the dose. Ionizing radiation can impair spermatogenesis and can cause mutations in germ cells. In general, type B spermatogonia are sensitive to this type of radiation. The current study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of hesperidin (H), as a polyphenolic compound, on rat testis injury induced by γ-radiation. Rats were divided into groups including C group (control rats), R (irradiated) group (rats irradiated with γ-radiation), Vehicle (V) group (rats administered with dimethylsulfoxide "DMSO"), H group (rats administered with H only), HR and RH groups (rats treated with H before and after exposure to γ-radiation, respectively). Malondialdehyde (MDA: the end product of lipid peroxidation "LPO") and xanthine oxidase (XO: it generates reactive oxygen species "ROS") in testes homogenate as well as nitric oxide (NO: as ROS) in mitochondrial matrix were determined. The apoptotic markers including DNA-fragmentation (DNAF) in testes homogenate and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) in mitochondrial matrix were determined. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in testes homogenate, while reduced glutathione "GSH" in nuclear matrix were determined. Also histopathological examination for testes tissues through electron microscope was studied. Exposure of rats to γ-radiation (R group) increased the levels of MDA, NO, DNAF, Ca(2+) and XO activity, while it decreased GSH level, SOD and CAT activities as compared to the C groups; γ-radiation increased oxidative stress (OS), LPO, apoptosis and induced testes injuries. These results are in agreement with the histopathological examination. In contrast, treatment with H before or after exposure to

  13. Oral nicotinamide protects against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemides, Eleni; Sivapirabu, Geetha; Halliday, Gary M; Park, Joohong; Damian, Diona L

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous immunity, which is a key defence against the development of skin cancers, is suppressed by even small doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Preventing this UV-induced immunosuppression may therefore reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has immune-protective and cancer-preventive effects against UV radiation in mice, and we have shown previously that topical nicotinamide is immune protective in humans. Using the Mantoux model of skin immunity in healthy volunteers, we compared oral nicotinamide to placebo (both administered for 1 week) in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design against the effects of solar-simulated ultraviolet (ssUV) radiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin purified protein derivative. Discrete areas of the back were irradiated with low doses of ssUV daily for three consecutive days. Immunosuppression, calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema of irradiated sites compared with unirradiated control sites, was determined in volunteers taking oral nicotinamide and placebo. Significant immunosuppression occurred in an UV dose-dependent manner in the presence of placebo. Oral nicotinamide, at doses of either 1500 or 500 mg daily, was well tolerated and significantly reduced UV immunosuppression with no immune effects in unirradiated skin. Oral nicotinamide is safe and inexpensive and looks promising as a chemopreventive supplement for reducing the immunosuppressive effects of sunlight.

  14. Protective effect of curcumin, ellagic acid and bixin on radiation induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresiamma, K C; George, J; Kuttan, R

    1998-12-01

    Induction of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations produced by whole body exposure of r-radiation (1.5-3.0 Gy) in mice was found to be significantly inhibited by oral administration of natural antioxidants, curcumin (400 micro moles), ellagic acid (200 micro moles) and bixin (200 micro moles) per kilogram body weight. These antioxidants induced inhibition of micronucleated polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes, was comparable with alpha-tocopherol (200 micro moles) administration. Curcumin and ellagic acid were also found to significantly reduce the number of bone marrow cells with chromosomal aberrations and chromosomal fragments as effectively as alpha-tocopherol. Moreover, administration of antioxidants inhibited the DNA strand breaks produced in rat lymphocytes upon radiation as seen from the DNA unwinding studies. These results indicated that antioxidant curcumin, ellagic acid and bixin provide protection against chromosome damage produced by radiation.

  15. Triphala, an ayurvedic rasayana drug, protects mice against radiation-induced lethality by free-radical scavenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Malagi, Krishna J; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Venkatesh, Ponemone; Veruva, Rosi Reddy

    2004-12-01

    The effects of 10 mg/kg of triphala extract (TE) was studied on radiation-induced sickness and mortality in mice exposed to 7-12 Gray (Gy) of gamma-irradiation. Treatment of mice with triphala once daily for 5 consecutive days before irradiation delayed the onset of mortality and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness when compared with the non-drug double distilled water treated irradiated controls (DDW). Triphala provided protection against both gastrointestinal and hemopoetic death. However, animals of both the TE + irradiation and DDW + irradiation groups did not survive up to 30 days post-irradiation beyond 11 Gy irradiation. The LD50/30 was found to be 8.6 Gy for the DDW + irradiation group and 9.9 Gy for TE + irradiation group. The administration of triphala resulted in an increase in the radiation tolerance by 1.4 Gy, and the dose reduction factor was found to be 1.15. To understand the mechanism of action of triphala, the free radical scavenging activity of the drug was evaluated. Triphala was found to scavenge (.)OH, O(2) (.) 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS)(.+) and NO(.) radicals in a dose dependent manner.

  16. Protective Effect of Anthocyanins from Lingonberry on Radiation-induced Damages

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    Shuang-Qi Tian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively eliminate free radicals, but studies on the immunoregulatory and anti-radiation effects of anthocyanins from lingonberry (ALB are less reported. In this experiment, mice were given orally once daily for 14 consecutive days before exposure to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation and were sacrificed on the 7th day post-irradiation. The results showed that the selected dose of extract did not lead to acute toxicity in mice; while groups given anthocyanins orally were significantly better than radiation control group according to blood analysis; pretreatment of anthocyanins significantly (p < 0.05 enhanced the thymus and spleen indices and spleen cell survival compared to the irradiation control group. Pretreatment with anthocyanins before irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of micronuclei (MN in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs. These findings indicate that anthocyanins have immunostimulatory potential against immunosuppression induced by the radiation.

  17. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Ligands Protect Tumor Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death

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    Ildefonso Alves da Silva-Junior

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation generates oxidized phospholipids that activate platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR associated with pro-tumorigenic effects. Here, we investigated the involvement of PAFR in tumor cell survival after irradiation. Cervical cancer samples presented higher levels of PAF-receptor gene (PTAFR when compared with normal cervical tissue. In cervical cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT, the expression of PTAFR was significantly increased. Cervical cancer-derived cell lines (C33, SiHa, and HeLa and squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC90 and SCC78 express higher levels of PAFR mRNA and protein than immortalized keratinocytes. Gamma radiation increased PAFR expression and induced PAFR ligands and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in these tumor cells. The blocking of PAFR with the antagonist CV3938 before irradiation inhibited PGE2 and increased tumor cells death. Similarly, human carcinoma cells transfected with PAFR (KBP were more resistant to radiation compared to those lacking the receptor (KBM. PGE2 production by irradiated KBP cells was also inhibited by CV3988. These results show that irradiation of carcinoma cells generates PAFR ligands that protect tumor cells from death and suggests that the combination of RT with a PAFR antagonist could be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  18. Fibronectin-Containing Extracellular Vesicles Protect Melanocytes against Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Nan-Hyung; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kim, Sung Tae; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Ai-Young; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-05-01

    Skin melanocytes are activated by exposure to UV radiation to secrete melanin-containing melanosomes to protect the skin from UV-induced damage. Despite the continuous renewal of the epidermis, the turnover rate of melanocytes is very slow, and they survive for long periods. However, the mechanisms underlying the survival of melanocytes exposed to UV radiation are not known. Here, we investigated the role of melanocyte-derived extracellular vesicles in melanocyte survival. Network analysis of the melanocyte extracellular vesicle proteome identified the extracellular matrix component fibronectin at a central node, and the release of fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles was increased after exposure of melanocytes to UVB radiation. Using an anti-fibronectin neutralizing antibody and specific inhibitors of extracellular vesicle secretion, we demonstrated that extracellular vesicles enriched in fibronectin were involved in melanocyte survival after UVB radiation. Furthermore, we observed that in the hyperpigmented lesions of patients with melasma, the extracellular space around melanocytes contained more fibronectin compared with normal skin, suggesting that fibronectin is involved in maintaining melanocytes in pathological conditions. Collectively, our findings suggest that melanocytes secrete fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles to increase their survival after UVB radiation. These data provide important insight into how constantly stimulated melanocytes can be maintained in pathological conditions such as melasma. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

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    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  20. Assessment of the hamster cheek pouch as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, and evaluation of the protective effects of keratinocyte growth factor using this model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Suemaru, Katsuya; Nakanishi, Miki; Nakajima, Noriko; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Araki, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy impacts quality of life. Previous studies have reported on the use of the hamster as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis; however, details regarding factors such as radiation dose response, effects on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and related histopathological changes remain unclear. In the present study using the hamster, we evaluated the dose dependency of radiation-induced oral mucositis and the effects of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin). Oral mucositis was induced in the cheek pouch by X-irradiation using single doses in the range 20-50 Gy. To evaluate the protective effect of palifermin, administration was carried out (5 mg/kg) on days 1, 2 and 3 or on days 9, 10 and 11 after single irradiation at a dose of 40 Gy. The oral mucositis score, MPO activity and histopathological findings of inflammation increased in a dose dependent manner. Palifermin treatment stimulated the proliferation of mucosal epithelial cells. Additionally, palifermin when administered on days 1, 2 and 3 after irradiation (40 Gy) reduced the severity of oral mucositis. The hamster was found to be a suitable model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, with excellent results regarding the evaluation of radiation dose response and drug reactivity.

  1. Radiation induced oral mucositis

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    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  2. Suppression of Sclerostin Alleviates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Protecting Bone-Forming Cells and Their Progenitors Through Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Young, Tiffany; Tong, Wei; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X. Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Focal radiotherapy is frequently associated with skeletal damage within the radiation field. Our previous in vitro study showed that activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway can overcome radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis of osteoblastic cells. Neutralization of circulating sclerostin with a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) is an innovative approach for treating osteoporosis by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in bone. Together with the fact that focal radiation increases sclerostin amount in bone, we sought to determine whether weekly treatment with Scl-Ab would prevent focal radiotherapy-induced osteoporosis in mice. Micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that Scl-Ab blocked trabecular bone structural deterioration after radiation by partially preserving osteoblast number and activity. Consistently, trabecular bone in sclerostin null mice was resistant to radiation via the same mechanism. Scl-Ab accelerated DNA repair in osteoblasts after radiation by reducing the number of γ-H2AX foci, a DNA double-strand break marker, and increasing the amount of Ku70, a DNA repair protein, thus protecting osteoblasts from radiation-induced apoptosis. In osteocytes, apart from using similar DNA repair mechanism to rescue osteocyte apoptosis, Scl-Ab restored the osteocyte canaliculi structure that was otherwise damaged by radiation. Using a lineage tracing approach that labels all mesenchymal lineage cells in the endosteal bone marrow, we demonstrated that radiation damage to mesenchymal progenitors mainly involves shifting their fate to adipocytes and arresting their proliferation ability but not inducing apoptosis, which are different mechanisms from radiation damage to mature bone forming cells. Scl-Ab treatment partially blocked the lineage shift but had no effect on the loss of proliferation potential. Taken together, our studies provide proof-of-principle evidence for a novel use of Scl-Ab as a therapeutic treatment for radiation-induced osteoporosis and

  3. Nanoencapsulation of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate protects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Natháli S; Barbieri, Allanna V; Camponogara, Camila; Mattiazzi, Juliane; Brum, Evelyne S; Marchiori, Marila C L; Oliveira, Sara M; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of producing semisolid formulations based on nanocapsule suspensions containing the association of the coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate by adding gellan gum (2%) to the suspensions. Furthermore, we studied their application as an alternative for the treatment of inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. For this, an animal model of injury induced by UVB-radiation was employed. All semisolids presented pH close to 5.5, drug content above 95% and mean diameter on the nanometric range, after redispersion in water. Besides, the semisolids presented non-Newtonian flow with pseudoplastic behavior and suitable spreadability factor values. The results also showed that the semisolid containing coenzyme Q10-loaded nanocapsules with higher vitamin E acetate concentration reduced in 73±8% the UVB radiation-induced ear edema. Moreover, all formulations tested were able to reduce inflammation parameters evaluated through MPO activity and histological procedure on injured tissue and the semisolids containing the nanoencapsulated coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative parameters assessment through the non-protein thiols levels and lipid peroxidation. This way, the semisolids based on nanocapsules may be considered a promising approach for the treatment and prevention of skin inflammation diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: Impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, L.J. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Y.C. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Wang, H.Z. [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that {alpha}-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1 h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  5. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W; Yu, K N; Wu, L J; Wu, Y C; Wang, H Z

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mice drinking goji berry juice (Lycium barbarum) are protected from UV radiation-induced skin damage via antioxidant pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Vivienne E; Allanson, Munif; Arun, Sondur Jayappa; Domanski, Diane; Painter, Nicole

    2010-04-01

    The goji berry, Lycium barbarum, has long been recognised in traditional Chinese medicine for various therapeutic properties based on its antioxidant and immune-modulating effects. This study describes the potential for orally consumed goji berry juice to alter the photodamage induced in the skin of mice by acute solar simulated UV (SSUV) irradiation. In Skh:hr-1 hairless mice, 5% goji berry juice significantly reduced the inflammatory oedema of the sunburn reaction. Dilutions of goji berry juice between 1% and 10% dose-dependently protected against SSUV-induced immunosuppression, and against suppression induced by the mediator, cis-urocanic acid, measured by the contact hypersensitivity reaction. The immune protection could not be ascribed to either the minor excipients in the goji juice, pear and apple juice, nor the vitamin C content, nor the preservative, and appeared to be a property of the goji berry itself. Antioxidant activity in the skin was demonstrated by the significant protection by 5% goji juice against lipid peroxidation induced by UVA radiation. Furthermore, two known inducible endogenous skin antioxidants, haem oxygenase-1 and metallothionein, were found to be involved in the photoimmune protection. The results suggest that consumption of this juice could provide additional photoprotection for susceptible humans.

  7. Moderate acute intake of de-alcoholised red wine, but not alcohol, is protective against radiation-induced DNA damage ex vivo-Results of a comparative in vivo intervention study in younger men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenrod, W. [CSIRO Health Sciences and Nutrition, Genome Health and Nutrigenomics Laboratory, PO Box 10041, Adelaide BC, SA 5000 (Australia); Department of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Stockley, C.S. [Australian Wine Research Institute, South Australia (Australia); Burcham, P. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Abbey, M. [CSIRO Health Sciences and Nutrition, Genome Health and Nutrigenomics Laboratory, PO Box 10041, Adelaide BC, SA 5000 (Australia); Fenech, M. [CSIRO Health Sciences and Nutrition, Genome Health and Nutrigenomics Laboratory, PO Box 10041, Adelaide BC, SA 5000 (Australia)]. E-mail: michael.fenech@hsn.csiro.au

    2005-12-11

    Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remains unclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress in a crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21-26 years. The participants adhered to a low plant phenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300 mL of complete red wine, dealcoholised red wine or ethanol on separate occasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiation-induced genome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentration was measured. Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1 and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wine protected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated with the concentration of total plasma catechin (R = -0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction of red wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin.

  8. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  9. Dragon's blood extracts reduce radiation-induced peripheral blood injury and protects human megakaryocyte cells from GM-CSF withdraw-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Xu, Bing; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Shan, Shuangquan; Ma, Hong; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB), a Chinese traditional herb, was shown to have certain protective effects on radiation-induced bone marrow injury due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. The 50% ethanol extracts (DBE) were separated from DB by the methods of alcohol extracting-water precipitating. The protective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis were studied, particularly on megakaryocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vivo radioprotective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis and pathological changes using an irradiated-mouse model. Moreover, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of DBE on megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro were explored in GM-CSF depletion-induced Mo7e cell model. DBE significantly promoted the recovery of peripheral blood cells in irradiated mice. Histology bone marrow confirmed the protective effect of DBE, as shown by an increased number of hematopoietic cells and a reduction of apoptosis. In a megakaryocytic apoptotic model, DBE (50 µg/mL) markedly alleviated GM-CSF withdrawal-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest of Mo7e cells. DBE (50 µg/mL) also significantly decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 expression, inhibited the active caspase-3 expression. In addition, DBE could induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in GM-CSF-depleted Mo7e cell, but not Akt. Our data demonstrated that DBE could effectively accelerate the recovery of peripheral blood cells, especially platelet. DBE attenuated cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the reduction of active caspase-3 expression. The effect of DBE on Mo7e cells survival and proliferation is likely associated with the activation of ERK, but not Akt. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Topical nicotinamide modulates cellular energy metabolism and provides broad-spectrum protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirabu, G; Yiasemides, E; Halliday, G M; Park, J; Damian, D L

    2009-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation can profoundly suppress the cutaneous immune system, thus enhancing carcinogenesis. Agents that prevent UV-induced immunosuppression may thus reduce skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) prevents UV-induced immunosuppression and carcinogenesis in mice, and solar-simulated (ss) UV-induced immunosuppression in humans. Its effectiveness against different UV wavebands and mechanism of action is as yet unknown. To determine the effects and mechanisms of topical nicotinamide on UV-induced suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in humans. Healthy Mantoux-positive volunteers in four randomised, double-blinded studies were irradiated with solar-simulated (ss)UV (UVB + UVA) or narrowband UVB (300 nm) or UVA (385 nm). Topical nicotinamide (0.2% or 5%) or its vehicle were applied immediately after each irradiation. Mantoux testing was performed at irradiated sites and adjacent unirradiated control sites 48 h after the first irradiation and measured 72 h later. Immunosuppression was calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema and induration at test sites compared to control sites. Human keratinocyte cell cultures, with and without ssUV and nicotinamide, were used for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assessment of TP53 and enzymes that regulate oxidative phosphorylation. Nicotinamide cooperated with ssUV to increase enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism and p53, and significantly protected against immunosuppression caused by UVB, longwave UVA and single and repeated ssUV exposures. Longwave UVA, which is poorly filtered by most sunscreens, was highly immune suppressive even at doses equivalent to 20 min of sun exposure. Nicotinamide, which protected against both UVB and UVA, is a promising agent for skin cancer prevention.

  11. Solar ultraviolet radiation induces biological alterations in human skin in vitro: Relevance of a well-balanced UVA/UVB protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous damages such as sunburn, pigmentation, and photoaging are known to be induced by acute as well as repetitive sun exposure. Not only for basic research, but also for the design of the most efficient photoprotection, it is crucial to understand and identify the early biological events occurring after ultraviolet (UV exposure. Reconstructed human skin models provide excellent and reliable in vitro tools to study the UV-induced alterations of the different skin cell types, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using different in vitro human skin models, the effects of UV light (UVB and UVA were investigated. UVB-induced damages are essentially epidermal, with the typical sunburn cells and DNA lesions, whereas UVA radiation-induced damages are mostly located within the dermal compartment. Pigmentation can also be obtained after solar simulated radiation exposure of pigmented reconstructed skin model. Those models are also highly adequate to assess the potential of sunscreens to protect the skin from UV-associated damage, sunburn reaction, photoaging, and pigmentation. The results showed that an effective photoprotection is provided by broad-spectrum sunscreens with a potent absorption in both UVB and UVA ranges.

  12. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  13. Protective effect of propolis on radiation-induced chromosomal damage on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spigoti, Geyza; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: kokazaki@ipen.br; Tsutsumi, Shiguetoshi [Amazon Food Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)], e-mail: fwip5138@mb.infoweb.ne.jp

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, particular interest has been given to investigations concerning natural, effective and nontoxic compounds with radioprotective capacity in concert with increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them, propolis, a resinous mixture of substances collected by honey bees (Apis mellifera) has been considered promising since it presents several advantageous characteristics, i.e., antiinflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial and free radical scavenging action. It is, therefore, a direct antioxidant that protects cells and organisms from the adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These relevant biological activities are mainly mediated by the flavonoids, present at relatively high concentrations in the propolis. Considering that the chemical composition and, consequently, the biological activity of propolis is variable according to the environmental plant ecology, the present study was conducted in order to evaluate the radioprotective capacity of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, against genotoxic damages induced by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). for this purpose, micronucleus induction was analyzed concerning irreparable damage, specifically related to DNA double-strand breaks, that are potentially carcinogenic. CHO-K1 cells were submitted to different concentrations of propolis (3 - 33 {mu}g/ml), 1 h before irradiation, with 1 Gy of {gamma} radiation (0.722 Gy/min). The data obtained showed a decreasing tendency in the quantity of radioinduced damage on cells previously treated with propolis. The radioprotective effect was more prominent at higher propolis concentration. The treatment with propolis alone did not induce genotoxic effects on CHO-K1 cells. Beside that, the treatment with propolis, associated or not with radiation, did not influence the kinetics of cellular proliferation. (author)

  14. Protective role of R-spondin1, an intestinal stem cell growth factor, against radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Bhanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS results from a combination of direct cytocidal effects on intestinal crypt and endothelial cells and subsequent loss of the mucosal barrier, resulting in electrolyte imbalance, diarrhea, weight loss, infection and mortality. Because R-spondin1 (Rspo1 acts as a mitogenic factor for intestinal stem cells, we hypothesized that systemic administration of Rspo1 would amplify the intestinal crypt cells and accelerate the regeneration of the irradiated intestine, thereby, ameliorating RIGS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Male C57Bl/6 mice received recombinant adenovirus expressing human R-spondin1 (AdRspo1 or E.coli Lacz (AdLacz, 1-3 days before whole body irradiation (WBI or abdominal irradiation (AIR. Post-irradiation survival was assessed by Kaplan Meier analysis. RIGS was assessed by histological examination of intestine after hematoxilin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining of BrdU incorporation, Lgr5 and beta-catenin expression and TUNEL staining. The xylose absorption test (XAT was performed to evaluate the functional integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier. In order to examine the effect of R-spondin1 on tumor growth, AdRspo1 and AdLacZ was administered in the animals having palpable tumor and then exposed to AIR. There was a significant increase in survival in AdRspo1 cohorts compared to AdLacZ (p<0.003 controls, following WBI (10.4 Gy. Significant delay in tumor growth was observed after AIR in both cohorts AdRspo1 and AdLacZ but AdRspo1 treated animals showed improved survival compared to AdLacZ. Histological analysis and XAT demonstrated significant structural and functional regeneration of the intestine in irradiated animals following AdRspo1 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in Lgr5+ve crypt cells and the translocation of beta-catenin from the cytosol to nucleus and upregulation of beta-catenin target genes in AdRspo1-treated mice, as

  15. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  16. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  17. Protective Effect of Adhatoda vascia Nees against Radiation-Induced Damage at Cellular, Biochemical and Chromosomal Levels in Swiss Albino Mice

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    Meenal Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Extract of Adhatoda vasica (L Nees leaves has been used for treatment of various diseases and disorders in Ayurved and Unani medicine. Modulatory effect of ethanolic extract of A. vasica (L Nees against radiation-induced changes in terms of histological alterations in testis, reduced glutathione (GSH, lipid peroxidation (LPO, acid and alkaline phosphatases levels, and chromosomal alterations in Swiss albino mice was studied at various post-irradiation intervals between 1 and 30 days. Mice exposed to 8 Gy radiation showed radiation-induced sickness including marked changes in histology of testis and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells with 100% mortality within 22 days. When ethanolic leaf extract of A. vasica was given orally at a dose of 800 mg kg−1 body weight per mouse for 15 consecutive days and then exposed to radiation, death of Adhatoda-pretreated irradiated mice was reduced to 70% at 30 days. The radiation dose reduction factor was 1.43. There was significantly lesser degree of damage to testis tissue architecture and various cell populations including spermatogonia, spermatids and Leydig cells. Correspondingly, a significant decrease in the LPO and an increase in the GSH levels were observed in testis and liver of Adhatoda-pretreated irradiated mice. Similarly, a significant decrease in level of acid phosphatase and increase in level of alkaline phosphatase were observed. Adhatoda pretreatment significantly prevented radiation-induced chromosomal damage in bone marrow cells. The study suggests that Adhatoda plant extract has significant radioprotective effects on testis that warrants further mechanistic studies aimed at identifying the role of major ingredients in the extract.

  18. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  19. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  20. [Protective effect of Liuweidihuang Pills against cellphone electromagnetic radiation-induced histomorphological abnormality, oxidative injury, and cell apoptosis in rat testes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui-rong; Cao, Xiao-hui; Ma, Xue-lian; Chen, Jin-jin; Chen, Jing-wei; Yang, Hui; Liu, Yun-xiao

    2015-08-01

    To observe the effect of Liuweidihuang Pills in relieving cellphone electromagnetic radiation-induced histomorphological abnormality, oxidative injury, and cell apoptosis in the rat testis. Thirty adult male SD rats were equally randomized into a normal, a radiated, and a Liuweidihuang group, the animals in the latter two groups exposed to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz cellphone frequency 4 hours a day for 18 days. Meanwhile, the rats in the Liuweidihuang group were treated with the suspension of Liuweidihuang Pills at 1 ml/100 g body weight and the other rats intragastrically with the equal volume of purified water. Then all the rats were killed for observation of testicular histomorphology by routine HE staining, measurement of testicular malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels by colorimetry, and determination of the expressions of bax and bcl-2 proteins in the testis tissue by immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal controls, the radiated rats showed obviously loose structure, reduced layers of spermatocytes, and cavitation in the seminiferous tubules. Significant increases were observed in the MDA level (P radiated rats. In comparison with the radiated rats, those of the Liuweidihuang group exhibited nearly normal testicular structure, significantly lower MDA level (P electromagnetic radiation-induced histomorphological abnormality of the testis tissue and reduce its oxidative damage and cell apoptosis.

  1. Comparison of the protective roles of L-carnitine and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage by histopathological and biochemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuslat Yurut-Caloglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the radioprotective efficacies of L-carnitine (LC and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage. Materials and Methods: Forty-five, 3-month-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Control (CONT, n = 7; irradiation alone RT: radiation therapy (RT, n = 8; amifostine plus irradiation (AMI + RT, n = 8; LC plus irradiation (LC + RT, n = 8; LC and sham irradiation (LC, n = 7; and amifostine and sham irradiation (AMI, n = 7. The rats in the AMI + RT, LC + RT and RT groups were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy to the whole abdomen. LC (300 mg/kg and amifostine (200 mg/kg was given intraperitoneally 30 min before irradiation. Five days after irradiation, both antral follicles and corpus luteum in the right ovaries were counted, and tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP were measured. Results: Irradiation significantly decreased antral follicles and corpus luteum (P: 0.005 and P 0.05. The level of MDA and AOPP significantly increased after irradiation (P = 0.001 and P 0.005. The levels of both MDA and AOPP were also similar when LC + RT is compared with AMI + RT group (P > 0.005. Conclusions: L-carnitine and amifostine have a noteworthy and similar radioprotective effect against radiation-induced acute ovarian toxicity.

  2. Gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversions in rats: A comparison of the protective effects of area postrema lesions with differing doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossenkopp, K.P.; Giugno, L. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    Lesions which destroy the area postrema (AP) and damage the adjacent nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) attenuate or abolish conditioned taste aversions (CTA) induced by a variety of pharmacological agents as well as exposure to radiation. In the present experiment, 4 groups of male rats received lesions of AP and 4 groups were given sham lesions. One sham-lesioned and one AP-lesioned group were given a single pairing of 1-hr access to a novel 0.10% sodium saccharin solution followed immediately with exposure to 0, 100, 200, or 400 rad of gamma radiation, respectively. Four days later all groups were given daily two-bottle preference tests (saccharin vs. water) on 4 consecutive days. The sham-lesioned groups exposed to the radiation (100, 200, or 400 rad) developed profound aversions to the saccharin on all test days (p less than 0.001). In contrast, all of the AP-lesioned groups as well as the sham-irradiated (0 rad) sham-lesioned group exhibited strong, comparable (p greater than 0.30) preferences for saccharin. Thus, lesion of AP abolished the radiation-induced CTA at all dose levels of radiation. These results raise the possibility of pharmacological intervention at the level of AP to prevent radiation-induced CTA in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

  3. The Protective Effect of N-Acetylcysteine on Ionizing Radiation Induced Ovarian Failure and Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Female Mouse

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    Wei Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation may cause irreversible ovarian failure, which, therefore, calls for an effective radioprotective reagent. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential radioprotective effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on ionizing radiation induced ovarian failure and loss of ovarian reserve in mice. Kun-Ming mice were either exposed to X-irradiation (4 Gy, once, and/or treated with NAC (300 mg/kg, once daily for 7 days before X-irradiation. We examined the serum circulating hormone levels and the development of ovarian follicles as well as apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oxidative stress 24 hours after X-irradiation. In addition, morphological observations on the endometrial luminal epithelium and the fertility assessment were performed. We found that NAC successfully restored the ovarian and uterine function, enhanced the embryo implantation, improved the follicle development, and altered the abnormal hormone levels through reducing the oxidative stress and apoptosis level in granulosa cells while promoting the proliferation of granulosa cells. In conclusion, the radioprotective effect of NAC on mice ovary from X-irradiation was assessed, and our results suggested that NAC can be a potential radioprotector which is capable of preventing the ovarian failure occurrence and restoring the ovarian reserve.

  4. N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reliene, Ramune [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pollard, Julianne M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sobol, Zhanna; Trouiller, Benedicte [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gatti, Richard A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schiestl, Robert H., E-mail: rschiestl@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA strand breaks leading to cell death or deleterious genome rearrangements. In the present study, we examined the role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a clinically proven safe agent, for it's ability to protect against {gamma}-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and/or DNA deletions in yeast and mammals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA deletions were scored by reversion to histidine prototrophy. Human lymphoblastoid cells were examined for the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, indicative of DNA double strand break formation. DNA strand breaks were also measured in mouse peripheral blood by the alkaline comet assay. In yeast, NAC reduced the frequency of IR-induced DNA deletions. However, NAC did not protect against cell death. NAC also reduced {gamma}-H2AX foci formation in human lymphoblastoid cells but had no protective effect in the colony survival assay. NAC administration via drinking water fully protected against DNA strand breaks in mice whole-body irradiated with 1 Gy but not with 4 Gy. NAC treatment in the absence of irradiation was not genotoxic. These data suggest that, given the safety and efficacy of NAC in humans, NAC may be useful in radiation therapy to prevent radiation-mediated genotoxicity, but does not interfere with efficient cancer cell killing.

  5. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-09-26

    Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30min before exposure to 50mGy γ-ray daily for 30days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5Gy). Mice were victimized 24h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60-90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  7. On the Binding Strength Sequence for Nucleic Acid Bases and C60 with Density Functional and Dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theories: Whether C60 could protect nucleic acid bases from radiation-induced damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenming; Bu, Yuxiang; Wang, Yixuan

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this paper is to address a controversial binding sequence between nucleic acid bases (NABs) and C60 by investigating adsorptions of NABs and their cations on C60 fullerene with a variety of density functional theories including two novel hybrid meta-GGA functionals, M05-2x and M06-2x, as well as a dispersion-corrected density functional, PBE-D. The M05-2x/6-311++G** provides the same binding sequence as previously reported, guanine(G) > cytosine(C) > adenine (A) > thymine (T); however, M06-2x switches the binding strengths of A and C, and PBE-D eventually results in the following sequence, G>A>T>C, which is the same as the widely accepted hierarchy for the stacking of NABs on other carbon nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotube and graphite. The results indicate that the questionable relative binding strength is due to insufficient electron correlation treatment with the M05-2x or even the M06-2x method. The binding energy of G@C60 obtained with the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) and the PBE-D/cc-pVDZ is −7.10 and −8.07 kcal/mol, respectively, and the latter is only slightly weaker than that predicted by the MP2/6-31G(d,p) (−8.10kca/mol). Thus, the PDE-D performs better than the M06-2x for the observed NAB@C60 π-stacked complexes. To discuss whether C60 could prevent NABs from radiation-induced damage, ionization potentials of NABs and C60, and frontier molecular orbitals of the complexes NABs@C60 and (NABs@C60)+ are also extensively investigated. These results revealed that when an electron escapes from the complexes, a hole was preferentially created in C60 for T and C complexes, while for G and A the hole delocalizes over the entire complex, rather than a localization on the C60 moiety. The interesting finding might open a new strategy for protecting DNA from radiation-induced damage and offer a new idea for designing C60-based antiradiation drugs. PMID:21625361

  8. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR. All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM observation, forced swim test (FST, the open field test (OFT, the chromosome aberration (CA, the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR.

  9. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  10. GCKR variants increase triglycerides while protecting from insulin resistance in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Wu, Lijun; Xi, Bo; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Hong; Hou, Dongqing; Wang, Xingyu; Mi, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Variants in gene encoding glucokinase regulator protein (GCKR) were found to have converse effects on triglycerides and glucose metabolic traits. We aimed to investigate the influence of GCKR variants for triglycerides and glucose metabolic traits in Chinese children and adults. We genotyped two GCKR variants rs1260326 and rs1260333 in children and adults, and analyzed the association between two variants and triglycerides, glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR using linear regression model, and estimated the effect on insulin resistance using logistic regression model. Rs1260326 and rs1260333 associated with increased triglycerides in children and adults (ptriglycerides in Chinese children and adults. Triglycerides-increasing alleles of GCKR variants reduce insulin and HOMA-IR index, and protect from insulin resistance in children. Our results suggested GCKR has an effect on development of insulin resistance in Chinese children.

  11. Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor originating from smooth muscle cells, which most frequently develops in the myometrium and in the gastro-intestinal tract. Reviewing the international literature, radiation-induced sarcoma arise in 0.035 to 0.2 % of all irradiated patients. Especially in the head and neck region, radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare lesion. The authors report a case of a radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the tonsillar region of the oropharynx in a 51-year-old male patient, who had undergone radiation therapy of this region 38 years before. The lesion was treated by radical surgery. Diagnostic steps, histological presentation and therapy are described in detail and the literature concerning radiation induced malignancies in general as well as radiation induced leiomyosarcoma in particular is reviewed. The highlights of this case are an extremely uncommon location and a rare pathological entity of radiation induced malignancies.

  12. Radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesawi, Anwar M; El-Hakim, Assaad; Zorn, Kevin C; Saad, Fred

    2014-09-01

    To better understand the mechanism of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and the advantages and disadvantages of available treatment options for bladder hemorrhage as well as preventive measures. There have been several attempts recently to manage hemorrhagic cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, transurethral coagulation using Greenlight potassium-titanyl-phosphate laser and other different treatment modalities, but we still need more investigation on larger cohort studies. Hemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon urological problem. It is most often caused by radiation therapy and cyclophosphamide, but can be associated with other contributing factors. Technological advances in radiation therapy have resulted in greater treatment efficacy, with significant reduction in side-effects such as hemorrhagic cystitis. Higher dose radiation treatment, however, is more often associated with problematic hemorrhagic cystitis. Treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis is multifactorial and can range from simple bladder irrigation to cystectomy with urinary diversion.

  13. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Muhammad Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT, which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  14. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  15. Live attenuated nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus vaccine provides broad cross protection against new variant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T-H; Kim, M-S; Jang, J-H; Lee, D-H; Park, J-K; Youn, H-N; Lee, J-B; Park, S-Y; Choi, I-S; Song, C-S

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections cause great economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide, and the emergence of new variant strains complicates disease control. The present study investigated the genetic and protectotypic features of newly emerged Korean IBV strains. A phylogenetic analysis showed that several recent isolates formed 2 different clusters (new cluster 1 and 2), which were distinct from other preexisting clusters. New cluster 1 IBV strains represented recombinants between Korean nephropathogenic strain KM91 and the QXIBV strain. New cluster 2 IBV strains showed low amino acid homology (vaccines (H120 and K2 strain) against these new isolates. In cross-protection studies, the H120 strain did not provide sufficient protection against these variants. However, highly attenuated nephropathogenic IBV vaccine, K2 strain, provided significantly higher levels of protection against variants compared with chickens vaccinated with H120 (P vaccine could be helpful for the reduction of economic losses caused by newly evolving IBV recombinants (new cluster 1) and variants (new cluster 2).

  16. Rarity of the Alzheimer Disease–Protective APP A673T Variant in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-San; Naj, Adam C.; Graham, Robert R.; Crane, Paul K.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Gonzalez Murcia, Josue D.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Kukull, Walter A.; Faber, Kelley M.; Schupf, Nicole; Norton, Maria C.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Munger, Ronald G.; Corcoran, Christopher D.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Dombroski, Beth A.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Partch, Amanda; Valladares, Otto; Hakonarson, Hakon; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Green, Robert C.; Goate, Alison M.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Carney, Regina M.; Larson, Eric B.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recently, a rare variant in the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) was described in a population from Iceland. This variant, in which alanine is replaced by threonine at position 673 (A673T), appears to protect against late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). We evaluated the frequency of this variant in AD cases and cognitively normal controls to determine whether this variant will significantly contribute to risk assessment in individuals in the United States. OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency of the APP A673T variant in a large group of elderly cognitively normal controls and AD cases from the United States and in 2 case-control cohorts from Sweden. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Case-control association analysis of variant APP A673T in US and Swedish white individuals comparing AD cases with cognitively intact elderly controls. Participants were ascertained at multiple university-associated medical centers and clinics across the United States and Sweden by study-specific sampling methods. They were from case-control studies, community-based prospective cohort studies, and studies that ascertained multiplex families from multiple sources. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Genotypes for the APP A673T variant were determined using the Infinium HumanExome V1 Beadchip (Illumina, Inc) and by TaqMan genotyping (Life Technologies). RESULTS The A673T variant genotypes were evaluated in 8943 US AD cases, 10 480 US cognitively normal controls, 862 Swedish AD cases, and 707 Swedish cognitively normal controls. We identified 3 US individuals heterozygous for A673T, including 1 AD case (age at onset, 89 years) and 2 controls (age at last examination, 82 and 77 years). The remaining US samples were homozygous for the alanine (A673) allele. In the Swedish samples, 3 controls were heterozygous for A673T and all AD cases were homozygous for the A673 allele. We also genotyped a US family previously reported to harbor the A673T variant and found a mother-daughter pair, both

  17. Rarity of the Alzheimer disease-protective APP A673T variant in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-San; Naj, Adam C; Graham, Robert R; Crane, Paul K; Kunkle, Brian W; Cruchaga, Carlos; Murcia, Josue D Gonzalez; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Baldwin, Clinton T; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Kukull, Walter A; Faber, Kelley M; Schupf, Nicole; Norton, Maria C; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Munger, Ronald G; Corcoran, Christopher D; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Dombroski, Beth A; Cantwell, Laura B; Partch, Amanda; Valladares, Otto; Hakonarson, Hakon; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Green, Robert C; Goate, Alison M; Foroud, Tatiana M; Carney, Regina M; Larson, Eric B; Behrens, Timothy W; Kauwe, John S K; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Mayeux, Richard; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Albert, Marilyn S; Albin, Roger L; Apostolova, Liana G; Arnold, Steven E; Barber, Robert; Barmada, Michael; Barnes, Lisa L; Beach, Thomas G; Becker, James T; Beecham, Gary W; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A; Bigio, Eileen H; Bird, Thomas D; Blacker, Deborah; Boeve, Bradley F; Bowen, James D; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cairns, Nigel J; Cao, Chuanhai; Carlson, Chris S; Carroll, Steven L; Chui, Helena C; Clark, David G; Cribbs, David H; Crocco, Elizabeth A; DeCarli, Charles; DeKosky, Steven T; Demirci, F Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Fallon, Kenneth B; Farlow, Martin R; Ferris, Steven; Frosch, Matthew P; Galasko, Douglas R; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R; Glass, Jonathan D; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Growdon, John H; Hamilton, Ronald L; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Harrell, Lindy E; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S; Hulette, Christine M; Hyman, Bradley T; Jarvik, Gail P; Jicha, Gregory A; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H; Kowall, Neil W; Kramer, Joel H; LaFerla, Frank M; Lah, James J; Leverenz, James B; Levey, Allan I; Li, Gei; Lieberman, Andrew P; Lopez, Oscar L; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Mack, Wendy J; Marson, Daniel C; Martin, Eden R; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C; Masliah, Eliezer; McCormick, Wayne C; McCurry, Susan M; McDavid, Andrew N; McKee, Ann C; Mesulam, W Marsel; Miller, Bruce L; Miller, Carol A; Miller, Joshua W; Montine, Thomas J; Morris, John C; Murrell, Jill R; Olichney, John M; Parisi, Joseph E; Perry, William; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M; Roberson, Erik D; Rosen, Howard J; Rosenberg, Roger N; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J; Schneider, Julie A; Schneider, Lon S; Seeley, William W; Smith, Amanda G; Sonnen, Joshua A; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Trojanowski, John Q; Troncoso, Juan C; Tsuang, Debby W; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Van Eldik, Linda J; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vinters, Harry V; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Williamson, Jennifer; Wishnek, Sarah; Woltjer, Randall L; Wright, Clinton B; Younkin, Steven G; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Recently, a rare variant in the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) was described in a population from Iceland. This variant, in which alanine is replaced by threonine at position 673 (A673T), appears to protect against late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). We evaluated the frequency of this variant in AD cases and cognitively normal controls to determine whether this variant will significantly contribute to risk assessment in individuals in the United States. To determine the frequency of the APP A673T variant in a large group of elderly cognitively normal controls and AD cases from the United States and in 2 case-control cohorts from Sweden. Case-control association analysis of variant APP A673T in US and Swedish white individuals comparing AD cases with cognitively intact elderly controls. Participants were ascertained at multiple university-associated medical centers and clinics across the United States and Sweden by study-specific sampling methods. They were from case-control studies, community-based prospective cohort studies, and studies that ascertained multiplex families from multiple sources. Genotypes for the APP A673T variant were determined using the Infinium HumanExome V1 Beadchip (Illumina, Inc) and by TaqMan genotyping (Life Technologies). The A673T variant genotypes were evaluated in 8943 US AD cases, 10 480 US cognitively normal controls, 862 Swedish AD cases, and 707 Swedish cognitively normal controls. We identified 3 US individuals heterozygous for A673T, including 1 AD case (age at onset, 89 years) and 2 controls (age at last examination, 82 and 77 years). The remaining US samples were homozygous for the alanine (A673) allele. In the Swedish samples, 3 controls were heterozygous for A673T and all AD cases were homozygous for the A673 allele. We also genotyped a US family previously reported to harbor the A673T variant and found a mother-daughter pair, both cognitively normal at ages 72 and 84 years, respectively, who were both heterozygous for

  18. REC-2006—A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014 and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg−1 body weight 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  19. Radiation Induced Bystander Effect in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yunfei; Hei K. Tom

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by radiation, but merely in the presence of cells that are. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well defined in a variety of in vitro models using a range of endpoints including clonogenic survival, mutations, neoplastic transformation, apoptosis, micronucleus, chromosomal aberrations and DNA double strand breaks, the mechanism(s) as well as the pres...

  20. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  1. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  2. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  3. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  4. rs12255372 variant of TCF7L2 gene is protective for obesity in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Mejía-Benitez, María Aurora; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Burguete-García, Ana I; García-Mena, Jaime; Cruz, Miguel

    2011-08-01

    Variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene are consistently associated with type 2 diabetes in adults, but the association of TCF7L2 with weight-related traits and body fat in humans is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the TCF7L2 gene (rs12255372) and obese phenotype in Mexican school-age children. The study was performed in schools in Mexico City; 186 obese and 194 control children were studied. Fasting insulin and glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides concentration were determined. The variant rs12255372 of the TCF7L2 gene was genotyped. We used age- and sex-adjusted linear models to test for association with metabolic measurements with this variant. Genotype of the TCF7L2 rs12255372 gene was associated with lower fasting plasma glucose (p = 0.001) and lower homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-R; p = 0.001) in nonobese children. Heterozygous carriers for this variant were more prevalent in lean children (32.5%) than in the obese group (23.7%), which resulted in a strong protective effect for the normal weight condition (OR = 0.56, 0.32-0.97). TCF7L2 rs12255372 polymorphism protects Mexican children from obesity. Further research in other large, population-based studies is needed to replicate these findings. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Linking protective GAB2 variants, increased cortical GAB2 expression and decreased Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanggeng Zou

    Full Text Available GRB-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2 represents a compelling genome-wide association signal for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD with reported odds ratios (ORs ranging from 0.75-0.85. We tested eight GAB2 variants in four North American Caucasian case-control series (2,316 LOAD, 2,538 controls for association with LOAD. Meta-analyses revealed ORs ranging from (0.61-1.20 with no significant association (all p>0.32. Four variants were hetergeneous across the populations (all p<0.02 due to a potentially inflated effect size (OR = 0.61-0.66 only observed in the smallest series (702 LOAD, 209 controls. Despite the lack of association in our series, the previously reported protective association for GAB2 remained after meta-analyses of our data with all available previously published series (11,952-22,253 samples; OR = 0.82-0.88; all p<0.04. Using a freely available database of lymphoblastoid cell lines we found that protective GAB2 variants were associated with increased GAB2 expression (p = 9.5×10(-7-9.3×10(-6. We next measured GAB2 mRNA levels in 249 brains and found that decreased neurofibrillary tangle (r = -0.34, p = 0.0006 and senile plaque counts (r = -0.32, p = 0.001 were both good predictors of increased GAB2 mRNA levels albeit that sex (r = -0.28, p = 0.005 may have been a contributing factor. In summary, we hypothesise that GAB2 variants that are protective against LOAD in some populations may act functionally to increase GAB2 mRNA levels (in lymphoblastoid cells and that increased GAB2 mRNA levels are associated with significantly decreased LOAD pathology. These findings support the hypothesis that Gab2 may protect neurons against LOAD but due to significant population heterogeneity, it is still unclear whether this protection is detectable at the genetic level.

  6. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toolis, F. (Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, UK); Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  7. Antihistamines block radiation-induced taste aversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C J; Carroll, M E; Smith, J C; Hofer, K G

    1974-12-13

    When rats are treated with an antihistamine prior to being given sublethal doses of ionizing radiation, the formation of a conditioned saccharin aversion is completely inhibited. A profound aversion could be conditioned with histamine diphosphate as the aversive stimulus. The increase in histamine production after radiation exposure represents the physiological basis of radiation-induced taste aversions.

  8. IRAK1 variant is protective for orthodontic-induced external apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S; Nogueira, L; Canova, F; Lopez, M; Silva, H C

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) pathway is a key player in orthodontic-induced external apical root resorption (EARR). The aim of this work was to identify the genes related to the IL1 pathway as possible candidate genes for EARR, which might be included in an integrative predictive model of this complex phenotype. Using a stepwise multiple linear regression model, 195 patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment were assessed for clinical and genetic factors associated with %EARRmax (maximum %EARR value obtained for each patient). The four maxillary incisors and the two maxillary canines were assessed. Three functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped: rs1143634 in IL1B gene, rs315952 in IL1RN gene, and rs1059703 in X-linked IRAK1 gene. The model showed that four of the nine clinical variables and one SNP explained 30% of the %EARRmax variability. The most significant unique contributions to the model were gender (P = 0.001), treatment duration (P appliance (P < 0.001), and homozygosity/hemizygosity for variant C from IRAK1 gene (P = 0.018), which proved to be a protective factor. IRAK1 polymorphism is proposed as a protective variant for EARR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jac M M J G Aarts

    Full Text Available Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions.

  10. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alink, Gerrit M.; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C.; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions. PMID:27655273

  11. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  12. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  13. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  14. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    that development of PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect specifically against severe malaria syndromes-in particular PAM-is feasible. This review summarizes the evidence that VSAs are important targets of NAI, discusses why VSA-based vaccines might be feasible despite the extensive intra- and interclonal variation...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria.......There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs), such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria...

  15. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    that development of PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect specifically against severe malaria syndromes-in particular PAM-is feasible. This review summarizes the evidence that VSAs are important targets of NAI, discusses why VSA-based vaccines might be feasible despite the extensive intra- and interclonal variation...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria.......There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs) such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive-determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria...

  16. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  17. Radiation-induced gene expression in human subcutaneous fibroblasts is predictive of radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Alsner, Jan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer patients show a large variation in normal tissue reactions after ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. One of the most common long-term adverse effects of ionizing radiotherapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), and several attempts have been made over the last...... years to develop predictive assays for RIF. Our aim was to identify basal and radiation-induced transcriptional profiles in fibroblasts from breast cancer patients that might be related to the individual risk of RIF in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fibroblast cell lines from 31 individuals......-treated fibroblasts. Transcriptional differences in basal and radiation-induced gene expression profiles were investigated using 15K cDNA microarrays, and results analyzed by both SAM and PAM. RESULTS: Sixty differentially expressed genes were identified by applying SAM on 10 patients with the highest risk of RIF...

  18. Amelioration of ionizing radiation induced lipid peroxidation in mouse liver by Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh Kr; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Santinath; Dey, Sanjit

    2012-03-01

    Protective effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced lipid peroxidation has been investigated. Swiss albino mice, selected from an inbred colony, were administered with MoLE (300 mg/kg body wt) for 15 days before exposing to a single dose of 5 Gy 60Co-gamma radiation. After treatments, animals were necropsied at different post irradiation intervals (days 1, 7 and 15) and hepatic lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents were estimated to observe the relative changes due to irradiation and its possible amelioration by MoLE. It was observed that, MoLE treatment restored GSH in liver and prevented radiation induced augmentation in hepatic lipid peroxidation. Phytochemical analysis showed that MoLE possess various phytochemicals such as ascorbic acid, phenolics (catechin, epicatechin, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, myricetin) etc., which may play the key role in prevention of hepatic lipid peroxidation by scavenging radiation induced free radicals.

  19. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  20. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  1. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand...... to endothelial cells and enables the parasites to avoid splenic passage. PfEMP1 antibodies may protect from disease by inhibiting sequestration, thus facilitating the destruction of infected erythrocytes in the spleen. In this study, we have measured antibodies in Ghanaian children to a conserved region of PfEMP...... during the season. The prevalences of antibodies to both the conserved PfEMP1 peptide and the variant epitopes were greater than 50%, and the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) correlated with age. The levels of antibodies to both the conserved peptide and the variant epitopes were higher in protected than...

  2. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkal, B.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Gultekin, F.A. [Department of General Surgery, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Guven, B. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Turkcu, U.O. [Mugla School of Health Sciences, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla (Turkey); Bektas, S. [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Can, M. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2013-09-27

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  3. A novel protective prion protein variant that colocalizes with kuru exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Simon; Whitfield, Jerome; Poulter, Mark; Shah, Paresh; Uphill, James; Campbell, Tracy; Al-Dujaily, Huda; Hummerich, Holger; Beck, Jon; Mein, Charles A; Verzilli, Claudio; Whittaker, John; Alpers, Michael P; Collinge, John

    2009-11-19

    Kuru is a devastating epidemic prion disease that affected a highly restricted geographic area of the Papua New Guinea highlands; at its peak, it predominantly affected adult women and children of both sexes. Its incidence has steadily declined since the cessation of its route of transmission, endocannibalism. We performed genetic and selected clinical and genealogic assessments of more than 3000 persons from Eastern Highland populations, including 709 who participated in cannibalistic mortuary feasts, 152 of whom subsequently died of kuru. Persons who were exposed to kuru and survived the epidemic in Papua New Guinea are predominantly heterozygotes at the known resistance factor at codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP). We now report a novel PRNP variant--G127V--that was found exclusively in people who lived in the region in which kuru was prevalent and that was present in half of the otherwise susceptible women from the region of highest exposure who were homozygous for methionine at PRNP codon 129. Although this allele is common in the area with the highest incidence of kuru, it is not found in patients with kuru and in unexposed population groups worldwide. Genealogic analysis reveals a significantly lower incidence of kuru in pedigrees that harbor the protective allele than in geographically matched control families. The 127V polymorphism is an acquired prion disease resistance factor selected during the kuru epidemic, rather than a pathogenic mutation that could have triggered the kuru epidemic. Variants at codons 127 and 129 of PRNP demonstrate the population genetic response to an epidemic of prion disease and represent a powerful episode of recent selection in humans. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  4. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis.

  5. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy.

  6. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  7. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Baker, Alysa Fairchild Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. Keywords: non–small cell lung cancer, acute, late, toxicity, stricture

  8. Radiation-induced xerostomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This study reports a case of radiation-induced xerstomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, to emphasize the need for prompt oral care to prevent untoward effects of xerostomia and to improve patients' quality of life. CASE REPORT: A 60 year old man diagnosed of radiation-induced xerostomia, after 6 ...

  9. ACE inhibition attenuates radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Sonja J.; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; de Boer, Rudolf A; Faber, Hette; Cannon, Megan V; Nagle, Peter W; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Luijk, Peter; Coppes, Robert P

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In thoracic irradiation, the maximum radiation dose is restricted by the risk of radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage and dysfunction limiting tumor control. We showed that radiation-induced sub-clinical cardiac damage and lung damage in rats mutually interact and that

  10. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  11. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  12. A TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant SNP (rs8177374) confers protection against premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karody, V R; Le, M; Nelson, S; Meskin, K; Klemm, S; Simpson, P; Hines, R; Sampath, V

    2013-05-01

    To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway modulate susceptibility to preterm birth (PTB). Prospective case-control study examining the contribution of nine TLR SNPs to PTB (<37 weeks) and PTB <32 weeks. Genotyping was done on neonatal blood using a multiplexed single-base extension assay. Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test and classification trees were used for data analysis. Preterm infants (n=177) were more likely to be African American (P=0.02), and were more likely to be born to mothers who smoked (P=0.007), had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH; P=0.002) and placental abruption (P=0.0004) when compared with term infants (n=146). The TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, nuclear factor-kappa B1 (NFκB1), NFκBIA and IRAK1 variants were not associated with PTB whereas the TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant was more prevalent in term infants when compared with preterm infants born <32 weeks (P=0.004). PTB <32 weeks was more prevalent in infants without the TIRAP variant whose mothers had PIH and did not smoke (P=0.001). Presence of the TIRAP variant protected against PTB <32 weeks (P=0.015) in Caucasian infants. In our study, a TLR pathway adapter variant (TIRAP (rs8177374)) protected against PTB<32 weeks, supporting our hypothesis that genetic variation in the innate immune signaling pathway contributes to altered risk of PTB.

  13. Common synonymous variants in ABCA4 are protective for chloroquine induced maculopathy (toxic maculopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Felix; Bergholz, Richard; Mändl, Julia; Jägle, Herbert; Ruether, Klaus; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-03-06

    Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are used to treat auto-immune related diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus. Both drugs however can cause retinal toxicity eventually leading to irreversible maculopathy and retinopathy. Established risk factors are duration and dosage of treatment while the involvement of genetic factors contributing to toxic maculopathy is largely unclear. To address the latter issue, this study aimed to expand on earlier efforts by (1) evaluating risk-altering variants known to be associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a frequent maculopathy in individuals over 55 years of age, and (2) determining the contribution of genetic variants in the coding sequence of the ABCA4 gene. The ABCA4 gene was analyzed by deep sequencing technology using a personal genome machine (Ion Torrent) with 200 bp read length. Assessment of AMD variants was done by restriction enzyme digestion of PCR products and TaqMan SNP genotyping. Effect sizes, p-values and confidence intervals of common variants were evaluated by logistic regression (Firth's bias corrected). To account for multiple testing, p-values were adjusted according to the false discovery rate. We found no effects of known AMD-associated variants on the risk of toxic maculopathy. In contrast, we report a statistically significant association of common variants in the ABCA4 gene with retinal disease, assessed by a score-based variance-component test (PSKAT = 0.0055). This association remained significant after adjustment for environmental factors like age and duration of medication and was driven by three common variants in ABCA4 (c.5682G > C, c.5814A > G, c.5844A > G), all conferring a reduced risk for toxic maculopathy. Our findings demonstrate that minor alleles of common genetic variants in ABCA4 significantly reduce susceptibility to develop toxic maculopathy under CQ treatment. A refined risk profile based on genetic and environmental

  14. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05

  15. Radiation-Induced Amorphization of Crystalline Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice, ana lyzing the resu lts of three decades of experiments with a variety of projectiles, irradiation energy, and ice temperature, finding a similar trend of increasing resistance of amorphization with temperature and inconsistencies in results from different laboratories. We discuss the temperature dependence of amorphization in terms of the 'thermal spike' model. We then discuss the common use of the 1.65 micrometer infrared absorption band of water as a measure of degree of crystallinity, an increasingly common procedure to analyze remote sensing data of astronomical icy bodies. The discussion is based on new, high quality near-infrared refl ectance absorption spectra measured between 1.4 and 2.2 micrometers for amorphous and crystalline ices irradiated with 225 keV protons at 80 K. We found that, after irradiation with 10(exp 15) protons per square centimeter, crystalline ice films thinner than the ion range become fully amorphous, and that the infrared absorption spectra show no significant changes upon further irradiation. The complete amorphization suggests that crystalline ice observed in the outer Solar System, including trans-neptunian objects, may results from heat from internal sources or from the impact of icy meteorites or comets.

  16. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  17. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  18. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiabao; Lv, Xiaofei; Niu, Meiqi; Liu, Lizhi; Chen, Jun; Xie, Fei; Zhong, Miao; Qiu, Shijun; Li, Li; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-01-01

    Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in years after radiotherapy (RT) could involve brain gray matter (GM) and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT) NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED), and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD), and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG) in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  19. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipawee Ounsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia.

  20. Protective Low-Frequency Variants for Preeclampsia in the Fms Related Tyrosine Kinase 1 Gene in the Finnish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, A Inkeri; Daly, Emma; Triebwasser, Michael; Kurki, Mitja I; Roberson, Elisha D O; Häppölä, Paavo; Auro, Kirsi; Perola, Markus; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Salmon, Jane E; Meri, Seppo; Daly, Mark; Atkinson, John P; Laivuori, Hannele

    2017-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a common pregnancy-specific vascular disorder characterized by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria during the second half of pregnancy. Predisposition to preeclampsia is in part heritable. It is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. We have sequenced 124 candidate genes implicated in preeclampsia to pinpoint genetic variants contributing to predisposition to or protection from preeclampsia. First, targeted exomic sequencing was performed in 500 preeclamptic women and 190 controls from the FINNPEC cohort (Finnish Genetics of Preeclampsia Consortium). Then 122 women with a history of preeclampsia and 1905 parous women with no such history from the National FINRISK Study (a large Finnish population survey on risk factors of chronic, noncommunicable diseases) were included in the analyses. We tested 146 rare and low-frequency variants and found an excess (observed 13 versus expected 7.3) nominally associated with preeclampsia ( P preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. A case of radiation induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Sato, Akira; Kato, Joji (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A case of carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa is presented. The case was suspected to have been induced by irradiation therapy for a carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. An external radiotherapy, 6-MeV Linac, had been done for the carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa in a 55-year-old female, with single lateral direction from the left to the right in 1977. In 1985, a papillary lesion on the right buccal mucosa was detected, and histological examination revealed a papilloma without atypism. In 1991, as an ulcer on the right upper buccal fold as well as three papillary lesions in the central portion of the right buccal mucosa were found, the patient was referred to our clinic. Microscopical findings were consistent with the early invasive carcinomas. A surgical excision of these whole lesions and skin graft were completed. The criteria of this case for the suspicion of radiation-induced carcinoma were as follows. There was a long latent period of 14 years. The previous dose of irradiation, 60 Gy, was sufficient. The right buccal mucosa was involved in the radiation field. A severe scar on the left cheek resulted from the previous irradiation. Anatomically, there is no evidence of the secondary carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa with the primary carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. No evidence for recurrence of the tumors on both sides of buccal mucosa has been detected so far. Further observations will be necessary to detect other tumors in the irradiated field later on. (author).

  2. Genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Li, Li; Chu, Audrey Y.; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin; Grarup, Niels; Stancáková, Alena; Chen, Yuning; V.Varga, Tibor; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Willems, Sara M.; Wessel, Jennifer; Wang, Shuai; Maruthur, Nisa; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pirie, Ailith; van der Lee, Sven J.; Gillson, Christopher; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Amouyel, Philippe; Arriola, Larraitz; Arveiler, Dominique; Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Garcia, Sara Benlloch; Bis, Joshua C.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bowden, Sarah; Caldas, Carlos; Caslake, Muriel; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cruchaga, Carlos; Czajkowski, Jacek; den Hoed, Marcel; Dunn, Janet A.; Earl, Helena M.; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Foltynie, Thomas; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Hiller, Louise; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kee, Frank; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Key, Timothy J.; Kontto, Jukka; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Chunyu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Muir, Kenneth; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B.; Navarro, Carmen; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Packard, Chris J.; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peloso, Gina M.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poole, Christopher J.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez, María-José; Sattar, Naveed; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sims, Rebecca; Slimani, Nadia; Smith, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Trompet, Stella; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Walker, Mark; Walter, Klaudia; Abraham, Jean E.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Aponte, Jennifer L.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Dupuis, Josée; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Franks, Paul W.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hansen, Torben; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kooner, Jaspal; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pankow, James S.; Pedersen, Oluf; Riboli, Elio; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Deloukas, Panos; Danesh, John; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Meigs, James B.; Ehm, Margaret G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory authorities have indicated that new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) should not be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Human genetics may be able to inform development of antidiabetic therapies by predicting cardiovascular and other health endpoints. We therefore investigated the association of variants in 6 genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11,806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing, and follow-up in 39,979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow up in consortia. We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict cardiovascular safety of these agents. A low-frequency missense variant (Ala316Thr;rs10305492) in the gene encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R), the target of GLP1R agonists, was associated with lower fasting glucose and lower T2D risk, consistent with GLP1R agonist therapies. The minor allele was also associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed in randomised controlled trials. Genetic variants associated with metabolic traits and multiple disease outcomes can be used to validate therapeutic targets at an early stage in the drug development process. PMID:27252175

  3. PPARg2 Ala¹² variant protects against Graves' orbitopathy and modulates the course of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Adamska, Edyta; Daroszewski, Jacek; Bolanowski, Marek; Oficjalska, Jolanta; Janusz, Przemyslaw; Szalinski, Marek; Frydecka, Irena

    2013-07-01

    Orbital fibroblast differentiation to adipocytes is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g (PPARg)-dependent process essential for pathogenic tissue remodeling in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). PPARg2 Pro¹²Ala polymorphism modulates expression and/or function of the molecule encoded by this gene and is a promising locus of GO. Here, we analyzed associations of PPARg2 Pro¹²Ala with clinical manifestation of GO in 742 Polish Caucasians including 276 Graves' disease (GD) patients. In our study, the Ala¹² allele and Ala¹² variant (Ala¹²Ala and/or Pro¹²Ala genotype) decreased the risk of GO (p = 0.000012 and p = 0.00013). Moreover, Ala¹²Ala genotype was observed only in patients without GO (p = 0.002). GD patients with Ala¹² variant had less active and less severe eye symptoms. Female carriers of the Ala¹² allele rarely developed GO, but the marker was not related to symptoms of GO. The opposite finding was recorded in males, in whom the studied polymorphism was related to activity, but not to the development, of GO. In Ala¹² variant carriers without familial history of thyroid disease, risk of GO was lower than in persons with a familial background. The Ala¹² allele seemed to protect smokers from GO, but in nonsmokers, such a relation was not obvious. A multivariate analysis indicated the Pro¹²Ala marker as an independent risk factor of eye symptoms (p = 0.0001) and lack of Ala increases the risk of GO 3.24-fold. In conclusion, the gain-of-function Ala¹² variant protects against GO and modulates the course of the disease.

  4. Protective Effect of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K dUTPase Variants on Psoriasis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Olivia Y.; Chen, Haoyan; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Hayashi, Genki; Kuebler, Peter J.; Hultman, Gustaf K.; Ariza, Maria-Eugenia; Williams, Marshall V.; Batista, Mariana D.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Foerster, John; Bowcock, Anne M.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Previous genetic and functional studies have implicated the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) dUTPase located within the PSORS1 locus in the MHC region as a candidate psoriasis gene. Here, we describe a variant discovery and case-control association study of HERV-K dUTPase variants in 708 psoriasis cases and 349 healthy controls. Five common HERV-K dUTPase variants were found to be highly associated with psoriasis, with the strongest association occurring at the missense SNP rs3134774 (K158R, p=3.28 × 10-15, OR=2.36 [1.91-2.92]). After adjusting the association of the HERV-K dUTPase variants for the potential confounding effects of HLA alleles associated with psoriasis, the HERV-K SNPs rs9264082 and rs3134774 remained significantly associated. Haplotype analysis revealed that HERV-K haplotypes containing the non-risk alleles for rs3134774 and rs9264082 significantly reduced the risk of psoriasis. Functional testing showed higher antibody responses against recombinant HERV-K dUTPase in psoriasis patients compared to controls (pT-cell responses against a single HERV-K dUTPase peptide (ppsoriasis susceptibility, and suggest the need for additional studies to clarify the role of this dUTPase in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:22437317

  5. Simvastatin attenuates radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liping Xu,* Xi Yang,* Jiayan Chen, Xiaolin Ge, Qin Qin, Hongcheng Zhu, Chi Zhang, Xinchen Sun Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs, which have pleiotropic effects, such as anti-inflammation, and vascular protection. In our study, we investigated the radioprotective potential of simvastatin (SIM in a murine model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Design: Ninety-six Institute of Cancer Research mice were randomly divided into four groups: solvent + sham irradiation (IR (Group I, SIM + sham IR (Group II, IR + solvent (Group III, and IR + SIM (Group IV. SIM (10 mg/kg body weight, three times per week was administered intraperitoneally 1 week prior to IR through to the end of the experiment. Saliva and submandibular gland tissues were obtained for biochemical, morphological (hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome, and Western blot analysis at 8 hours, 24 hours, and 4 weeks after head and neck IR. Results: IR caused a significant reduction of salivary secretion and amylase activity but elevation of malondialdehyde. SIM remitted the reduction of saliva secretion and restored salivary amylase activity. The protective benefits of SIM may be attributed to scavenging malondialdehyde, remitting collagen deposition, and reducing and delaying the elevation of transforming growth factor β1 expression induced by radiation. Conclusion: SIM may be clinically useful to alleviate side effects of radiotherapy on salivary gland. Keywords: simvastatin, radiation protection, submandibular gland, transforming growth factor-β1, mice

  6. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  7. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  8. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  9. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Igo, Robert P; Haripriya, Aravind; Williams, Susan E; Astakhov, Yury S; Orr, Andrew C; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nakano, Satoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Hauser, Michael; Li, Zheng; Prakadeeswari, Gopalakrishnan; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Kang, Jae H; Nelson, Sarah; Hayashi, Ken; Manabe, Shin-Ichi; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Inoue, Kenji; Irkec, Murat; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Järvelä, Irma; Schlottmann, Patricio; Lerner, S Fabian; Lamari, Hasnaa; Nilgün, Yildirim; Bikbov, Mukharram; Park, Ki Ho; Cha, Soon Cheol; Yamashiro, Kenji; Zenteno, Juan C; Jonas, Jost B; Kumar, Rajesh S; Perera, Shamira A; Chan, Anita S Y; Kobakhidze, Nino; George, Ronnie; Vijaya, Lingam; Do, Tan; Edward, Deepak P; de Juan Marcos, Lourdes; Pakravan, Mohammad; Moghimi, Sasan; Ideta, Ryuichi; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kappelgaard, Per; Wirostko, Barbara; Thomas, Samuel; Gaston, Daniel; Bedard, Karen; Greer, Wenda L; Yang, Zhenglin; Chen, Xueyi; Huang, Lulin; Sang, Jinghong; Jia, Hongyan; Jia, Liyun; Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Xuyang; Zhao, Bowen; Wang, Ya-Xing; Xu, Liang; Leruez, Stéphanie; Reynier, Pascal; Chichua, George; Tabagari, Sergo; Uebe, Steffen; Zenkel, Matthias; Berner, Daniel; Mossböck, Georg; Weisschuh, Nicole; Hoja, Ursula; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich-Christoph; Mardin, Christian; Founti, Panayiota; Chatzikyriakidou, Anthi; Pappas, Theofanis; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Lambropoulos, Alexandros; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Shetty, Rohit; Porporato, Natalia; Saravanan, Vijayan; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Shivkumar, Chandrashekaran; Kalpana, Narendran; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Kanavi, Mozhgan R; Beni, Afsaneh Naderi; Yazdani, Shahin; Lashay, Alireza; Naderifar, Homa; Khatibi, Nassim; Fea, Antonio; Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Rolle, Teresa; Frezzotti, Paolo; Paoli, Daniela; Salvi, Erika; Manunta, Paolo; Mori, Yosai; Miyata, Kazunori; Higashide, Tomomi; Chihara, Etsuo; Ishiko, Satoshi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Yanagi, Masahide; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Takako; Chuman, Hideki; Aihara, Makoto; Inatani, Masaru; Miyake, Masahiro; Gotoh, Norimoto; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Sotozono, Chie; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Sagong, Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Ahn, Jeeyun; Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Ezzouhairi, Sidi M; Rafei, Abderrahman; Chong, Yaan Fun; Ng, Xiao Yu; Goh, Shuang Ru; Chen, Yueming; Yong, Victor H K; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Olawoye, Olusola O; Ashaye, Adeyinka O; Ugbede, Idakwo; Onakoya, Adeola; Kizor-Akaraiwe, Nkiru; Teekhasaenee, Chaiwat; Suwan, Yanin; Supakontanasan, Wasu; Okeke, Suhanya; Uche, Nkechi J; Asimadu, Ifeoma; Ayub, Humaira; Akhtar, Farah; Kosior-Jarecka, Ewa; Lukasik, Urszula; Lischinsky, Ignacio; Castro, Vania; Grossmann, Rodolfo Perez; Megevand, Gordana Sunaric; Roy, Sylvain; Dervan, Edward; Silke, Eoin; Rao, Aparna; Sahay, Priti; Fornero, Pablo; Cuello, Osvaldo; Sivori, Delia; Zompa, Tamara; Mills, Richard A; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Hewitt, Alex W; Coote, Michael; Crowston, Jonathan G; Astakhov, Sergei Y; Akopov, Eugeny L; Emelyanov, Anton; Vysochinskaya, Vera; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Fayzrakhmanov, Rinat; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Owaidhah, Ohoud; Aljasim, Leyla Ali; Chowbay, Balram; Foo, Jia Nee; Soh, Raphael Q; Sim, Kar Seng; Xie, Zhicheng; Cheong, Augustine W O; Mok, Shi Qi; Soo, Hui Meng; Chen, Xiao Yin; Peh, Su Qin; Heng, Khai Koon; Husain, Rahat; Ho, Su-Ling; Hillmer, Axel M; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Escudero-Domínguez, Francisco A; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Martinon-Torres, Frederico; Salas, Antonio; Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Hansapinyo, Linda; Wanichwecharugruang, Boonsong; Kitnarong, Naris; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Nguyn, Hip X; Nguyn, Giang T T; Nguyn, Trình V; Zenz, Werner; Binder, Alexander; Klobassa, Daniela S; Hibberd, Martin L; Davila, Sonia; Herms, Stefan; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Rautenbach, Robyn M; Ziskind, Ari; Carmichael, Trevor R; Ramsay, Michele; Álvarez, Lydia; García, Montserrat; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Rodríguez-Calvo, Pedro P; Fernández-Vega Cueto, Luis; Oguz, Çilingir; Tamcelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Batu, Bilge; Aktas, Dilek; Kasım, Burcu; Wilson, M Roy; Coleman, Anne L; Liu, Yutao; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon; Kuchtey, Rachel W; Kuchtey, John; Curtin, Karen; Chaya, Craig J; Crandall, Alan; Zangwill, Linda M; Wong, Tien Yin; Nakano, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; den Hollander, Anneke I; Vesti, Eija; Fingert, John H; Lee, Richard K; Sit, Arthur J; Shingleton, Bradford J; Wang, Ningli; Cusi, Daniele; Qamar, Raheel; Kraft, Peter; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Heegaard, Steffen; Kivelä, Tero; Reis, André; Kruse, Friedrich E; Weinreb, Robert N; Pasquale, Louis R; Haines, Jonathan L; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Jonasson, Fridbert; Allingham, R Rand; Milea, Dan; Ritch, Robert; Kubota, Toshiaki; Tashiro, Kei; Vithana, Eranga N; Micheal, Shazia; Topouzis, Fotis; Craig, Jamie E; Dubina, Michael; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Stefansson, Kari; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasutto, Francesca; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2017-07-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS cases to refine the association at LOXL1, which previously showed inconsistent results across populations, and to identify new variants associated with XFS. We identified a rare protective allele at LOXL1 (p.Phe407, odds ratio (OR) = 25, P = 2.9 × 10-14) through deep resequencing of XFS cases and controls from nine countries. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of XFS cases and controls from 24 countries followed by replication in 18 countries identified seven genome-wide significant loci (P < 5 × 10-8). We identified association signals at 13q12 (POMP), 11q23.3 (TMEM136), 6p21 (AGPAT1), 3p24 (RBMS3) and 5q23 (near SEMA6A). These findings provide biological insights into the pathology of XFS and highlight a potential role for naturally occurring rare LOXL1 variants in disease biology.

  10. Hesperidin as radioprotector against radiation-induced lung damage in rat: A histopathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hassan Haddadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated by ionizing radiation, and one of the organs commonly affected by ROS is the lung. Radiation-induced lung injury including pneumonia and lung fibrosis is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy (RT of patients with thorax irradiation. Administration of antioxidants has been proved to protect against ROS. The present study was aimed to assess the protective effect of hesperidin (HES against radiation-induced lung injury of male rats. Fifty rats were divided into three groups. G1: Received no HES and radiation (sham. G2: Underwent γ-irradiation to the thorax. G3: Received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. The rats were exposed to a single dose of 18 Gy using cobalt-60 unit and were administered HES (100 mg/kg for 7 days before irradiation. Histopathological analysis was performed 24 h and 8 weeks after RT. Histopathological results in 24 h showed radiation-induced inflammation and presence of more inflammatory cells as compared to G1 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES significantly decreased such an effect when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Histopathological evaluation in 8 weeks showed a significant increase in mast cells, inflammation, inflammatory cells, alveolar thickness, vascular thickness, pulmonary edema, and fibrosis in G2 when compared to G1 (P < 0.05. HES significantly decreased inflammatory response, fibrosis, and mast cells when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES resulted in decreased radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis in the lung tissue. Thus, the present study showed HES to be an efficient radioprotector against radiation-induced damage in the lung of tissue rats.

  11. Ionizing radiation induced cataract; Katarakt-Induktion durch ionisierende Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    2013-07-01

    Until recently it was believed that the cataract (opacity of the eye lens) is a deterministic effect with a dose threshold of several Gray in dependence on the exposure conditions. Studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, of American radiologic technologists, astronauts, and patients after having received several computer tomographies of the head region, however, have shown that this assumption is not correct. It had been overlooked in the past that with decreasing dose the latency period is increasing. Therefore, the originally available studies were terminated too early. The more recent studies show that, in the case of a threshold existing at all, it is definitely below 0.8 Gy independently of an acute or a chronic exposure. All studies, however, include 0 Gy in the confidence interval, so that the absence of a dose threshold cannot be excluded. The German Commission on Radiological Protection (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK) suggested therefore among others: targeted recording of the lens dose during activities which are known to be associated with possible significant lens exposure, examination of the lens should be included as appropriate in the medical monitoring of people occupationally exposed to radiation, if there is potentially high lens exposure, adoption of research strategies to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying radiation induced cataracts. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) actually assumes a threshold dose of 0.5 Gy and, based on this assumption, has recommended in 2011 to reduce the dose limit for the eye lens from 150 mSv in a year to 20 mSv in a year for people occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. (orig.)

  12. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Kevin F., E-mail: KSeals@mednet.ucla.edu; Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cagnon, Christopher H., E-mail: CCagnon@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Hakim, Ramsey A., E-mail: RAlhakim@mednet.ucla.edu; Kee, Stephen T., E-mail: SKee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  13. Spinacia oleracea Modulates Radiation-Induced Biochemical Changes in Mice Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Yadav, Ritu K; Sharma, K V; Bhatia, A L

    2008-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of spinach against radiation induced oxidative stress, since its leaves are rich in antioxidants like carotenoids (beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and high content of proteins, minerals, vitamin C. For the experimental study, healthy Swiss mice were selected from an inbred colony and divided into four groups. Group I (normal) it did not receive any treatment. Group II (drug treated) was orally supplemented with extract of spinach extract once daily at the dose of 1100 mg/kg for fifteen consecutive days. Group III (control) received distilled water orally equivalent to spinach extract for fifteen days than exposed to 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Group IV (experimental) was also administered orally with spinach extract for 15 consecutive days once daily. Thereafter, exposed to single dose of 5Gy of gamma radiation. After the exposure mice were than sacrificed at different autopsy intervals viz. 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Testis was removed for various biochemical estimations viz. LPO, protein, cholesterol and glycogen. Radiation induced augmentation in lipid peroxidation, glycogen and cholesterol values were significantly ameliorated by supplementation of SE extract, whereas radiation induced deficit in protein content could be elevated. This indicates that spinach extract pre - treatment renders protection against various biochemical changes in the mice testis to some extent if taken continuously which might be due to synergistic effect of antioxidant constituents present in the spinach.

  14. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue Takehiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Methods BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1 or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA. Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. Results The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Conclusions Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury.

  15. Predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Chia-Hsuan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the factors affecting the incidence of radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy by the analysis of dosimetry and topical treatments. Methods Between September 2002 and July 2009, 158 breast cancer patients were treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy after undergoing surgery. Before November 2006, 90 patients were subjected to therapeutic skin care group and topical corticosteroid therapy was used for acute radiation dermatitis. Thereafter, 68 patients received prophylactic topical therapy from the beginning of radiotherapy. The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinical and treatment factors. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of topical treatment on radiation-induced dermatitis were investigated in vivo. Results The incidence of radiation-induced moist desquamation was 23% across 158 patients. Higher volume receiving 107% of prescribed dose within PTV (PTV-V107%; >28.6% and volume receiving 110% of prescribed dose within treated volume (TV-V110%; > 5.13%, and no prophylactic topical therapy for irradiated skin, were associated with higher incidence of acute radiation dermatitis. The protective effect of prophylactic topical treatment was more pronounced in patients with TV-V110% > 5.13%. Furthermore, using irradiated mice, we demonstrated that topical steroid cream significantly attenuated irradiation-induced inflammation, causing a decrease in expression of inflammatory cytokines and TGF-beta 1. Conclusion TV-V110% > 5.13% may be an important predictor for radiation induced dermatitis. Prophylactic topical treatment for irradiated skin can significantly improve the tolerance of skin to adjuvant radiotherapy, especially for patients with higher TV-V110%.

  16. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  17. C/EBPδ deficiency sensitizes mice to ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehalata A Pawar

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the radiation response is critical for developing interventions to mitigate radiation-induced injury to normal tissues. Exposure to radiation leads to increased oxidative stress, DNA-damage, genomic instability and inflammation. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (Cebpd; C/EBPδ is implicated in regulation of these same processes, but its role in radiation response is not known. We investigated the role of C/EBPδ in radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury using a Cebpd knockout mouse model. Cebpd-/- mice showed increased lethality at 7.4 and 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI, compared to Cebpd+/+ mice. Two weeks after a 6 Gy dose of TBI, Cebpd-/- mice showed decreased recovery of white blood cells, neutrophils, platelets, myeloid cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells, decreased colony-forming ability of bone marrow progenitor cells, and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells compared to Cebpd+/+ controls. Cebpd-/- mice exhibited a significant dose-dependent decrease in intestinal crypt survival and in plasma citrulline levels compared to Cebpd+/+ mice after exposure to radiation. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of γ-H2AX in Cebpd-/- intestinal crypts and villi at 1 h post-TBI, increased mitotic index at 24 h post-TBI, and increase in apoptosis in intestinal crypts and stromal cells of Cebpd-/- compared to Cebpd+/+ mice at 4 h post-irradiation. This study uncovers a novel biological function for C/EBPδ in promoting the response to radiation-induced DNA-damage and in protecting hematopoietic and intestinal tissues from radiation-induced injury.

  18. Radiation-induced adaptive response in fish cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lorna A; Seymour, Colin B; O'Neill-Mehlenbacher, Alicia; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2008-04-01

    There is considerable interest at present in low-dose radiation effects in non-human species. In this study gamma radiation-induced adaptive response, a low-dose radiation effect, was examined in three fish cell lines, (CHSE-214 (Chinook salmon), RTG-2 (rainbow trout) and ZEB-2J (zebrafish)). Cell survival after exposure to direct radiation with or without a 0.1 Gy priming dose, was determined using the colony forming assay for each cell line. Additionally, the occurrence of a bystander effect was examined by measuring the effect of irradiated cell culture medium from the fish cell lines on unexposed reporter cells. A non-linear dose response was observed for all cell lines. ZEB-2J cells were very sensitive to low doses and a hyper-radiosensitive (HRS) response was observed for doses fish cell lines tested. Rather, it was found that pre-exposure of these cells to 0.1 Gy radiation sensitized the cells to subsequent high doses. In CHSE-214 cells, increased sensitivity to subsequent high doses of radiation was observed when the priming and challenge doses were separated by 4 h; however, this sensitizing effect was no longer present when the interval between doses was greater than 8 h. Additionally, a "protective" bystander response was observed in these cell lines; exposure to irradiated medium from fish cells caused increased cloning efficiency in unirradiated reporter cells. The data confirm previous conclusions for mammalian cells that the adaptive response and bystander effect are inversely correlated and contrary to expectations probably have different underlying mechanisms.

  19. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced

  20. Intravesical ozone therapy for progressive radiation-induced hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavo, Bernardino; Gutiérrez, Dominga; Martín, Dionisio; Suárez, Gerardo; Hernández, María A; Robaina, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    Progressive radiation-induced cystitis can become a serious clinical problem the therapeutic solution of which is limited and almost invariably aggressive. Ozone therapy is a nonconventional therapy that has been reported to offer benefits in late-onset wound healing and ischemic disorders. This report describes a patient with progressive radiation-induced hematuria from standard conservative treatment that was further treated with ozone therapy. Ozone therapy was achieved by intravesical instillation of ozonized bi-distilled water over a period of 30 minutes, three sessions per week during the first weeks. Later, ozone therapy sessions were decreased and involved ozonized water or direct intravesicular instillation of ozone at 20-25 microg/mL. Hematuria was successfully controlled by intravesical application of ozone therapy. The successes achieved with this technique suggest that intravesicular instillation of ozonized bi-distilled water or ozone merits further investigation with a view to its application to counter this radiation-induced side-effect.

  1. Case report of radiation-induced rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaki, Y.; Nagase, T.; Hokari, I.; Hasegawa, A.; Tazawa, K. (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    A 70-year-old woman who had been treated by irradiation of unknown dose for cervical carcinoma of uterus 27 years before, was admitted in our hospital. Barium enema and romanoscope with rectal biopsy revealed rectal carcinoma with narrow recto-sigmoidal segment and procto-ilela fistula. Sections from resected specimen showed mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum with severe disorganization around the cancer lesion such as fibrosis, ulcer and vascular degeneration as a possible effect of previous irradiation. Radiation-induced carcinomas of the large intestine previously reported in the literatures were reviewed and the problems of the criteria of so-called radiation induced malignancy were discussed.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  3. Variant surface antigen-specific IgG and protection against clinical consequences of pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Shulman, Caroline E; Bulmer, Judith N

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-associated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum adherence to chondroitin sulfate A in the placental intervillous space is a major cause of low birthweight and maternal anaemia in areas of endemic P falciparum transmission. Adhesion-blocking antibodies that specifically...... recognise parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) are associated with resistance to pregnancy-associated malaria. We looked for a possible relation between VSA-specific antibody concentrations, placental infection, and protection from low birthweight and maternal anaemia. METHODS: We used flow...... selected or not selected for chondroitin sulfate A adhesiveness in-vitro. FINDINGS: Concentrations of plasma IgG specific for VSA, expressed by chondroitin sulfate A-adhering parasites (VSA in pregnancy-associated malaria or vsa-pam), increased with gravidity and were associated with placental histological...

  4. Seven cases of radiation-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Osamu; Suenaga, Yoshinori [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We report 7 cases of radiation-induced skin cancer. The diagnosis was based on the history of radiotherapy for benign skin diseases (5 cases) and of occupational exposures to medical doctors (2 cases). All cases were squamous cell carcinomas which arose from chronic radiodermatitis. The estimated latent period of these tumors ranged from 6 to 64 years, with an average of 29.9 years. After surgical treatments of the lesions, no local recurrences were observed in all cases. Benign skin diseases had sometimes been treated with low-energy radiation before the 1960s. Considering the estimated latent period, the peak time point of developing risk of radiation-induced skin cancer by such treatment has been already passed, however, the danger of it should not be ignored in future. In association with multiplicity of radiation usage, occupational exposure of radiation may develop the risk of occurrence of skin cancer in future. Therefore, we should recognize that radiation-induced skin cancer is not in the past. In the cases of chronic skin diseases showing warty keratotic growth, erosion and ulcer, we should include chronic radio-dermatitis in the differential diagnosis. It is necessary to recall all patients about the history of radiotherapy or radiation exposure. Rapid histopathological examination is mandatory because of the suspicion of radiation-induced skin cancer. (author)

  5. Radiation-induced femoral head necrosis | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are very few cases of radiation-induced femoral head necrosis described in the literature, therefore, this case will add new knowledge and highlights important aspects in the diagnosis and management of this uncommon condition. Our patient was 74 years old and presented with left hip and groin pain for 8 months, ...

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Oliveira, Tiago M; Carmelo Romão, António J; Gamito Guerreiro, Francisco M; Matos Lopes, Tomé M

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and to identify factors associated with successful treatment. Clinical records from 176 patients with refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis treated at the Portuguese Navy Center for Underwater and Hyperbaric Medicine, during a 15-year period, were retrospectively analyzed. Evolution of macroscopic hematuria was used to analyze treatment efficacy and correlated with other external variables. From a total of 176 treated patients, 23.9% evidenced other radiation-induced soft tissue lesions. After an average on 37 sessions, 89.8% of patients showed resolution of hematuria, with only 1.7% of adverse events. In our sample, hematuria resolution after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen was statistically associated to the need for transfusion therapy (P = 0.026) and the number of sessions of hyperbaric oxygen (P = 0.042). No relationship was found with the remaining variables. Refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis can be successfully and safely treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Treatment effectiveness seems to be correlated with the need for transfusion therapy and the number of sessions performed. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Radiation-induced vascular lesions of the skin: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, U.E.; Requena, L.; Mentzel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced cutaneous vascular neoplasms occur infrequently and comprise benign, so-called atypical vascular lesions (AVL) and angiosarcomas (AS), often being high-grade malignant tumors. Both arise most frequently within previously irradiated skin in breast-conserving-treated mammary cancer

  8. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. (Technion Medical School, Haifa (Israel))

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  9. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible, a severe consequence of radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies can cause a reduction of the 'mandibular space' and alteration of the morphometric measurements, viz.

  10. Radioprotective effect of atorvastatin against ionizing radiation-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebpour Amiri, Fereshteh; Hamzeh, Maedeh; Naeimi, Ramezan Ali; Ghasemi, Arash; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2018-02-01

    Kidneys are exposed to ionizing radiation during radiotherapy in patients with abdominal malignancy. The aim of this study is to investigate the protective effect of atorvastatin (ATV) against ionizing radiation-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Sixty male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into six groups (10 mice per group); control, irradiation (IR), IR plus ATV (10, 20 and 50 mg/kg) and only ATV (50 mg/kg). ATV groups received ATV for seven days via oral gavage before exposure to IR. Animals were exposed to 2 Gy whole body of X-ray on day 8. After exposure to IR, biochemical, histological and immunohistological assays were performed. ATV significantly decreased the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in irradiated mice in comparison with IR alone. A significant reduction in the urea and creatinine levels was observed in ATV plus IR group compared to IR alone. Tubular degeneration, glomerular atrophy, interstitial expansion and fibrosis were observed in irradiated mice. Tubular degeneration and atrophy in the kidneys of IR plus ATV group were less than IR group. In addition, pre-treated animal with ATV significantly showed reduction in caspase-3 immunoreactivity. ATV has significant protective effect against radiation-induced nephrotoxicity in mice and is a promising medication for protection of patients during radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation-induced cancers of the head and neck, (3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umatani, Katsunori; Satoh, Takeo; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Takagi, Tadashi; Fujii, Takashi; Hatta, Chihiro; Maetani, Chikahide; Lu, Bo (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    This paper discusses twenty patients with radiation-induced cancers of the head and neck treated in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, the Center for Adult Diseases, Osaka, from January 1979 to December 1985. The most common site of radiation-induced cancers was the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus (70%). We found synchronous double cancers in 2 out of the 20 patients (10%). One patient had hypopharyngeal cancer and thyroid cancer, and the other had oropharyngeal cancer and thyroid cancer. All of the laryngeal cancers were in the supraglottic area. Cancer of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus occurred more frequently in females (1:3.7 males-females ratio). Half of the patients (10/20) had received irradiation for tuberculous cervical adenitis and 8 patients had been irradiated for malignant tumors. The averaged latent period in the patients who had irradiated for benign conditions was 37.4 years, and that for malignant diseases was 16.0 years. Therefore the latent period of the former was 2.3 times as long as that of the latter. The incidence of radiation-induced cancers in all the patients who had the cancer of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus was 9% and that of the laryngeal cancer was 0.7%. The incidence of radiation-induced cancers in the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus remarkably differed from that in the larynx. However, it was suggested that the larynx was as resistant to radiation induction as the hypopharynx. Six of the 20 patients (30%) had radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Among them, the incidence of cancers was 33%. (author).

  12. Prophylactic role of melatonin against radiation induced damage in mouse cerebellum with special reference to Purkinje cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Kumari, Seema; Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Bhatia, A L [Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Melatonin, a hormone with a proven antioxidative efficacy, crosses all morphophysiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and distributes throughout the cell. The present study is an attempt to investigate the prophylactic influence of a chronic low level of melatonin against an acute radiation induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum of Swiss albino mice, with special reference to Purkinje cells. After 15 days of treatment the mice were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 30 days. Biochemical parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels as the endpoints. The quantitative study included alterations in number and volume of Purkinje cells. Swiss albino mice were orally administered a very low dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/mouse/day) for 15 consecutive days before single exposure to 4 Gy gamma radiation. Melatonin checked the augmented levels of LPO, by approximately 55%, by day 30 day post-exposure. Radiation induced depleted levels of GSH could be raised by 68.9% by day 30 post-exposure. Radiation exposure resulted in a reduction of the volume of Purkinje cells and their total number. The administration of melatonin significantly protected against the radiation induced decreases in Purkinje cell volume and number. Results indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin resulting in its prophylactic property against radiation induced biochemical and cellular alterations in the cerebellum. The findings support the idea that melatonin may be used as an anti-irradiation drug due to its potent free radical scavenging and antioxidative efficacy.

  13. Palliative effects of lutein intervention in gamma-radiation-induced cellular damages in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Vidya; Tenkanidiyoor, Yogish Somayaji; Radhakrishna, Vishakh; Shivappa, Pooja; Lakshman, Srikanth Patil; Fernandes, Ronald; Patali, Krishna Ananthapura

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced hematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic damages to the normal cells are major concerns in the field of radiotherapy. The carotenoids and their derivatives have been the source of antioxidants with wide range of medicinal applications. The objective is to evaluate the protective effects of lutein, a carotenoid, against radiation-induced cellular and tissue damages. Swiss albino mice were grouped into 5, 50, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. of lutein treatment groups, a sham and vehicle control group. The groups were irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy y'-radiation. The mortality was recorded for 30 days to optimize the protective dose against radiation. The mice were administered with the compound orally for 15 consecutive days and irradiated with a sublethal dose of 6Gy. The hematological changes in blood and antioxidant parameters were determined in liver, kidney homogenates, and hemolysate/serum. The hematological parameters were recorded using an automated cell counter. The antioxidants such as malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were spectrophotometrically determined. The red blood cell, white blood cell count, lymphocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet levels, and hematocrit value were found to be decreased in the irradiated groups. Lutein pretreatment maintains near-normal levels of these parameters indicating resistance/recovery from the radiation-induced damages. The antioxidant levels were found to be reduced in all the irradiated groups. However, lutein pretreatment (50 mg/kg b.wt.) has increased the catalase activity of hemolysate. Lutein pretreatment has reduced the MDA levels in hemolysate, when administered at doses of 5, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. in comparison to its control. The study demonstrates the radioprotective potential of lutein by maintaining the hematological and antioxidant homeostasis.

  14. Nicaraven attenuates radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Kawakatsu

    Full Text Available Nicaraven, a chemically synthesized hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger, has been demonstrated to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs. We investigated whether nicaraven can attenuate radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is the conmen complication of radiotherapy and one of the major causes of death in sub-acute phase after accidental exposure to high dose radiation. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1 Gy γ-ray radiation daily for 5 days in succession (a total of 5 Gy, and given nicaraven or a placebo after each exposure. The mice were sacrificed 2 days after the last radiation treatment, and the protective effects and relevant mechanisms of nicaraven in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with radiation-induced damage were investigated by ex vivo examination. We found that post-radiation administration of nicaraven significantly increased the number, improved the colony-forming capacity, and decreased the DNA damage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The urinary levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of DNA oxidation, were significantly lower in mice that were given nicaraven compared with those that received a placebo treatment, although the levels of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the bone marrow cells did not differ significantly between the two groups. Interestingly, compared with the placebo treatment, the administration of nicaraven significantly decreased the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma of mice. Our data suggest that nicaraven effectively diminished the effects of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is likely associated with the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of this compound.

  15. A Loss-of-Function Variant in a Minor Isoform of ANK3 Protects Against Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy; Hansson, Lars; Sønderby, Ida E; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Zuber, Verena; Tesli, Martin; Song, Jie; Hultman, Christina M; Bergen, Sarah E; Landén, Mikael; Melle, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole Andreas; Djurovic, Srdjan

    2016-08-15

    Ankyrin-3 (ANK3) was one of the first genes to reach significance in a bipolar disorder genome-wide association study. Many subsequent association studies confirmed this finding and implicated this gene in schizophrenia. However, the exact nature of the role of ANK3 in the pathophysiology remains elusive. In particular, the specific isoforms involved and the nature of the imbalance are unknown. We genotyped a Norwegian sample of 402 patients with bipolar disorder, 293 patients with schizophrenia, and 330 healthy control subjects genome-wide with the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip. We performed allelic association tests at the genome-wide and gene levels and found a significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism in a splice site of ANK3. We replicated this finding in two other samples and studied the functional effect of this single nucleotide polymorphism by performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction on the affected exon junction in complementary DNA from blood total RNA. The splice site single nucleotide polymorphism (rs41283526) is located in an alternatively spliced exon of ANK3 and has a strong and significant protective effect against bipolar disorder (odds ratio = .31) and schizophrenia (odds ratio = .21). The minor allele of rs41283526 is a loss-of-function variant that disables the correct splicing of the transcript. Data from the BrainSpan human developmental transcriptome show that the exon bearing this variant is expressed only in a minor isoform of ANK3, the transcription of which is initiated in early adolescence. Our results suggest that an elevated expression of this transcript starting in adolescence may be an important factor in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of Institutional Care on Attachment Disorganization and Insecurity of Ukrainian Preschoolers: Protective Effect of the Long Variant of the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5HTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Dobrova-Krol, Natasha; van IJzendoorn, Marinus

    2012-01-01

    Institutional care has been shown to lead to insecure and disorganized attachments and indiscriminate friendliness. Some children, however, are surprisingly resilient to the adverse environment. Here the protective role of the long variant of the serotonin receptor gene (5HTT) is explored in a small hypothesis-generating study of 37 Ukrainian…

  17. Functional genetic variants of glutathione S-transferase protect against serum ascorbic acid deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Leah E; Fontaine-Bisson, Bénédicte; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2009-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are detoxifying enzymes that contribute to the glutathione-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) antioxidant cycle. The objective was to determine whether GST genotypes modify the association between dietary vitamin C and serum ascorbic acid. Nonsmoking men and women (n = 905) between 20 and 29 y of age were participants in the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Overnight fasting blood samples were collected to determine serum ascorbic acid concentrations by HPLC and to genotype for deletion polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1 and an Ile105Val substitution in GSTP1. A 196-item food-frequency questionnaire was used to estimate vitamin C intake. A gene-diet interaction on serum ascorbic acid was observed for GSTM1 (P = 0.04) and GSTT1 (P = 0.01) but not for GSTP1 (P = 0.83). The odds ratio (95% CI) for serum ascorbic acid deficiency (Allowance of vitamin C compared with those who did. The corresponding odds ratios (95% CIs) were 2.17 (1.10, 4.28) and 12.28 (4.26, 33.42), respectively, for individuals with the GSTT1*1/*1 +*1/*0 (functional) and GSTT1*0/*0 (null) genotypes and 2.29 (0.96, 5.45) and 4.03 (2.01, 8.09), respectively, for the GSTM1*1/*1+GSTM1*1/*0 and GSTM1*0/*0 genotypes. The recommended intake of vitamin C protects against serum ascorbic acid deficiency, regardless of genotype. Individuals with GST null genotypes had an increased risk of deficiency if they did not meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamin C, which suggests that the GST enzymes protect against serum ascorbic acid deficiency when dietary vitamin C is insufficient.

  18. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin [Leipzig University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren haben Bewegungsstoerungen von Wirbelsaeule und paraspinaler Muskulatur in

  19. A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Ye

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty eight NPC patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN were recruited in the study. Duplex ultrasonography was used to scan bilateral carotid arterials to evaluate the intima-media thickness (IMT and occurrence of plaque formation. Flow velocities of bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, internal carotid arteries (ICAs and basal artery (BA were estimated through Transcranial Color Doppler (TCD. The results were compared with data from 33 patients who were free from radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis after radiotherapy and 29 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Significant differences in IMT, occurrence of plaques of ICAs and flow velocities of both MCAs and ICAs were found between patients after radiotherapy and healthy individuals (p<0.05. IMT had positive correlation with post radiation interval (p = 0.049. Compared with results from patients without radiation-induced TLN, the mean IMT was significantly thicker in patients with TLN (p<0.001. Plaques were more common in patients with TLN than patients without TLN (p = 0.038. In addition, flow velocities of MCAs and ICAs in patients with TLN were much faster (p<0.001, p<0.001. Among patients with unilateral TLN, flow velocity of MCAs was significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral sides to the lesion (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Thickening of IMT, occurrence of plaque formation and hemodynamic abnormality are more common in patients after radiotherapy, especially in those with TLN, compared with healthy individuals.

  20. Thioredoxin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic stem cell injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation exposure poses a significant threat to public health. Hematopoietic injury is one of the major manifestations of acute radiation sickness. Protection and/or mitigation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from radiation injury is an important goal in the development of medical countermeasure agents (MCM. We recently identified thioredoxin (TXN as a novel molecule that has marked protective and proliferative effects on HSCs. In the current study, we investigated the effectiveness of TXN in rescuing mice from a lethal dose of total body radiation (TBI and in enhancing hematopoietic reconstitution following a lethal dose of irradiation. Methods We used in-vivo and in-vitro methods to understand the biological and molecular mechanisms of TXN on radiation mitigation. BABL/c mice were used for the survival study and a flow cytometer was used to quantify the HSC population and cell senescence. A hematology analyzer was used for the peripheral blood cell count, including white blood cells (WBCs, red blood cells (RBCs, hemoglobin, and platelets. Colony forming unit (CFU assay was used to study the colongenic function of HSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the bone marrow cellularity. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay was used for cell senescence. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the DNA damage and senescence protein expression. Immunofluorescence staining was used to measure the expression of γ-H2AX foci for DNA damage. Results We found that administration of TXN 24 h following irradiation significantly mitigates BALB/c mice from TBI-induced death: 70% of TXN-treated mice survived, whereas only 25% of saline-treated mice survived. TXN administration led to enhanced recovery of peripheral blood cell counts, bone marrow cellularity, and HSC population as measured by c-Kit+Sca-1+Lin– (KSL cells, SLAM + KSL cells and CFUs. TXN treatment reduced cell senescence and radiation-induced

  1. Dietary Curcumin Increases Antioxidant Defenses in Lung, Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis, and Improves Survival in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James C.; Kinniry, Paul A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Serota, Matthew; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Javvadi, Prashanthi; Koumenis, Constantinos; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of lung radiotherapy is limited by radiation tolerance of normal tissues and by the intrinsic radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells. The chemopreventive agent curcumin has known antioxidant and tumor cell radiosensitizing properties. Its usefulness in preventing radiation-induced pneumonopathy has not been tested previously. We evaluated dietary curcumin in radiation-induced pneumonopathy and lung tumor regression in a murine model. Mice were given 1%or 5%(w/w) dietary curcumin or control diet prior to irradiation and for the duration of the experiment. Lungs were evaluated at 3 weeks after irradiation for acute lung injury and inflammation by evaluating bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid content for proteins, neutrophils and at 4 months for pulmonary fibrosis. In a separate series of experiments, an orthotopic model of lung cancer using intravenously injected Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells was used to exclude possible tumor radioprotection by dietary curcumin. In vitro, curcumin boosted antioxidant defenses by increasing heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) levels in primary lung endothelial and fibroblast cells and blocked radiation-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dietary curcumin significantly increased HO-1 in lungs as early as after 1 week of feeding, coinciding with a steady-state level of curcumin in plasma. Although both 1% and 5% w/w dietary curcumin exerted physiological changes in lung tissues by significantly decreasing LPS-induced TNF-α production in lungs, only 5%dietary curcumin significantly improved survival of mice after irradiation and decreased radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Importantly, dietary curcumin did not protect LLC pulmonary metastases from radiation killing. Thus dietary curcumin ameliorates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and increases mouse survival while not impairing tumor cell killing by radiation. PMID:20426658

  2. Fibrinogen beta variants confer protection against coronary artery disease in a Greek case-control study

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    Zakopoulos Nikolaos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although plasma fibrinogen levels are related to cardiovascular risk, data regarding the role of fibrinogen genetic variation in myocardial infarction (MI or coronary artery disease (CAD etiology remain inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of fibrinogen A (FGA, fibrinogen B (FGB and fibrinogen G (FGG gene SNPs and haplotypes on susceptibility to CAD in a homogeneous Greek population. Methods We genotyped for rs2070022, rs2070016, rs2070006 in FGA gene, the rs7673587, rs1800789, rs1800790, rs1800788, rs1800787, rs4681 and rs4220 in FGB gene and for the rs1118823, rs1800792 and rs2066865 SNPs in FGG gene applying an arrayed primer extension-based genotyping method (APEX-2 in a sample of CAD patients (n = 305 and controls (n = 305. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Results None of the FGA and FGG SNPs and FGA, FGB, FGG and FGA-FGG haplotypes was associated with disease occurrence after adjustment. Nevertheless, rs1800787 and rs1800789 SNPs in FGB gene seem to decrease the risk of CAD, even after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 0.42, 95%CI: 0.19-0.90, p = 0.026 and OR = 0.44, 95%CI:0.21-0.94, p = 0.039, respectively. Conclusions FGA and FGG SNPs as well as FGA, FGB, FGG and FGA-FGG haplotypes do not seem to be important contributors to CAD occurrence in our sample. On the contrary, FGB rs1800787 and rs1800789 SNPs seem to confer protection to disease onset lowering the risk by about 50% in homozygotes for the minor alleles.

  3. Fibrinogen beta variants confer protection against coronary artery disease in a Greek case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoraki, Eirini V; Nikopensius, Tiit; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Peppes, Vassileios; Fili, Panagiota; Kolovou, Genovefa; Papamikos, Vassileios; Richter, Dimitrios; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Dedoussis, George V

    2010-02-18

    Although plasma fibrinogen levels are related to cardiovascular risk, data regarding the role of fibrinogen genetic variation in myocardial infarction (MI) or coronary artery disease (CAD) etiology remain inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of fibrinogen A (FGA), fibrinogen B (FGB) and fibrinogen G (FGG) gene SNPs and haplotypes on susceptibility to CAD in a homogeneous Greek population. We genotyped for rs2070022, rs2070016, rs2070006 in FGA gene, the rs7673587, rs1800789, rs1800790, rs1800788, rs1800787, rs4681 and rs4220 in FGB gene and for the rs1118823, rs1800792 and rs2066865 SNPs in FGG gene applying an arrayed primer extension-based genotyping method (APEX-2) in a sample of CAD patients (n = 305) and controls (n = 305). Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), before and after adjustment for potential confounders. None of the FGA and FGG SNPs and FGA, FGB, FGG and FGA-FGG haplotypes was associated with disease occurrence after adjustment. Nevertheless, rs1800787 and rs1800789 SNPs in FGB gene seem to decrease the risk of CAD, even after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 0.42, 95%CI: 0.19-0.90, p = 0.026 and OR = 0.44, 95%CI:0.21-0.94, p = 0.039, respectively). FGA and FGG SNPs as well as FGA, FGB, FGG and FGA-FGG haplotypes do not seem to be important contributors to CAD occurrence in our sample. On the contrary, FGB rs1800787 and rs1800789 SNPs seem to confer protection to disease onset lowering the risk by about 50% in homozygotes for the minor alleles.

  4. Gossypetin ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice liver--a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Ujjal; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Sikder, Kunal; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-10-01

    Radioprotective action of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver was explored in the present article. Our main aim was to evaluate the protective efficacy of GTIN against radiation-induced alteration of liver in murine system. To evaluate the effect of GTIN, it was orally administered to mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight for three consecutive days prior to γ-radiation at a dose of 5 Gy. Radioprotective efficacy of GTIN were evaluated at physiological, cellular, and molecular level using biochemical analysis, comet assay, flow cytometry, histopathology, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques. Ionizing radiation was responsible for augmentation of hepatic oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies showed that irradiation enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) level, which leads to hepatic inflammation. To investigate further, we found that radiation induced the activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK)-mediated apoptotic pathway and deactivation of the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated redox signaling pathway, whereas GTIN pretreatment ameliorated these radiation-mediated effects. This is the novel report where GTIN rationally validated the molecular mechanism in terms of the modulation of cellular signaling system' instead of ' This is the novel report where GTIN is rationally validated in molecular terms to establish it as promising radioprotective agents. This might be fruitful especially for nuclear workers and defense personnel assuming the possibility of radiation exposure.

  5. Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the posterior neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Gorjón, Pablo; Gil Melcón, María; Muñoz Herrera, Angel M; Franco Calvo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas are mesenchymal malignant tumours that appear in smooth muscle cells. Their most frequent locations are the uterus and gastrointestinal tract. Their occurrence in head and neck is considered exceptional. We present a patient with a posterior neck region leiomyosarcoma who had received radiation for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma 20 years earlier. The incidence ratio of these tumours in radiated patients (therefore considered radiation-induced) ranges from 0,035 to 0,2%. Radiation-induced sarcomas are difficult to diagnose due to the induration and fibrosis in the radiated area and the non-specific symptoms that they present. Their prognosis is very poor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  7. Radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Matsubayashi, Jun; Nagao, Toshitaka; Chiba, Hiroshige

    2011-07-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) originates from primitive mesenchymal cells and has the capacity for dual histiocytic and fibroblastic differentiation. We report on an MFH of the left maxilla that developed in a 79-year old woman 20 years after surgery and radiation for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Postoperative radiotherapy with 70 Gy was administered for a primary neoplasm of SCC of the left maxilla to a localized field through two lateral ports. This secondary neoplasm arose at the site of tumor resection (partial maxillectomy) within the irradiated field, and was resected. The development of sarcomas is a recognized complication of radiation therapy. The final diagnosis after the operation was MFH. The patient died of tumor recurrence at the skull base and within the cranium, 19 months after the operation. Radiation-induced sarcoma is well known, but radiation-induced MFH is relatively rare in the head and neck region. The details of this case are presented with a review of literature.

  8. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  9. Radiation-induced edge effects in deep submicron CMOS transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F

    2005-01-01

    The study of the TID response of transistors and isolation test structures in a 130 nm commercial CMOS technology has demonstrated its increased radiation tolerance with respect to older technology nodes. While the thin gate oxide of the transistors is extremely tolerant to dose, charge trapping at the edge of the transistor still leads to leakage currents and, for the narrow channel transistors, to significant threshold voltage shift-an effect that we call Radiation Induced Narrow Channel Effect (RINCE).

  10. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    or the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines and related molecules by DCs. To overcome this radiation-induced immunosuppression, we plan to...effects on the tumor microenvironment, such as up- regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators (e.g. COX2 and PGE2), heat shock proteins ...Economou. 1997. Genetic immunization for the melanoma antigen MART- 1/ Melan -A using recombinant adenovirus-transduced murine dendritic cells. Cancer Res

  11. A functional variant in TIRAP, also known as MAL, and protection against invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Chiea C.; Chapman, Stephen J.; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Dunne, Aisling; Murphy, Caroline; Ling, Edmund Y; Frodsham, Angela J.; Walley, Andrew J; Kyrieleis, Otto; Khan, Amir; Aucan, Christophe; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E.; Knox, Kyle; Campbell, Sarah J.; Lienhardt, Christian; Scott, Anthony; Aaby, Peter; Sow, Oumou Y.; Grignani, Robert T.; Sillah, Jackson; Sirugo, Girogio; Peshu, Nobert; Williams, Thomas N.; Maitland, Kathryn; Davies, Robert J. O.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Day, Nicholas P.; Yala, Djamel; Crook, Derrick W.; Marsh, Kevin; Berkley, James A; O’Neill, Luke A.J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and members of their signalling pathway play an important role in the initiation of the innate immune response to a wide variety of pathogens1,2,3. The adaptor protein TIRAP mediates downstream signalling of TLR-2 and -44,5,6. We report a case-control genetic association study of 6106 individuals from Gambia, Kenya, United Kingdom, and Vietnam, with invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis. Thirty-three SNPs were genotyped, including TIRAP S180L. Heterozygous carriage of this variant was found to associate independently with all four infectious diseases in the different study populations (P=0.003, OR=0.59, 95%CI 0.42-0.83 for IPD; P=0.003, OR=0.40, 95%CI 0.21-0.77 for bacteraemia; P=0.002, OR=0.47, 95%CI 0.28-0.76 for malaria; P=0.008, OR=0.23 95%CI 0.07-0.73 for tuberculosis). Substantial support for a protective effect of S180L heterozygosity against infectious diseases was observed when the study groups were combined (N=6106, Overall P≤9.6×10-8). Tirap S180L was also shown to be functionally impaired in TLR2 signal transduction. PMID:17322885

  12. Radiation-induced pseudotumor following therapy for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lacey F.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); O' Connor, Mary I. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Menke, David M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and imaging appearance of radiation induced pseudotumors in patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. We retrospectively reviewed the serial magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. A total of 208 exams were reviewed (mean, 8.7 exams per patient) and included all available studies following the start of radiation therapy. Exams were analyzed for the identification of focal signal abnormalities within the surgical bed suggesting local tumor recurrence. Histopathologic correlation was available in nine patients suspected of having local tumor recurrence. Additional information recorded included patient demographics, tumor type and location, radiation type, and dose. The study group consisted of 12 men and 12 women, having an average age of 63 years (range, 39-88 years). Primary tumors were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 13), leiomyosarcoma (n = 6), liposarcoma (n = 3), synovial sarcoma (n = 1), and extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (n = 1). All lesions were high-grade sarcomas, except for two myxoid liposarcomas. Average patient radiation dose was 5,658 cGy (range, 4,500-8,040 cGy). Average follow-up time was 63 months (range, 3-204 months). Focal signal abnormalities suggesting local recurrence were seen in nine (38%) patients. Three of the nine patients with these signal abnormalities were surgically proven to have radiation-induced pseudotumor. The pseudotumors developed between 11 and 61 months following the initiation of radiation therapy (mean, 38 months), with an average radiation dose of 5,527 cGy (range, 5,040-6,500 cGy). MR imaging demonstrated a relatively ill-defined ovoid focus of abnormal signal and intense heterogeneous enhancement with little or no associated mass effect. MR imaging of radiation-induced pseudotumor typically demonstrates a relatively ill-defined ovoid mass-like focus of intense

  13. Cinnamon extract ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced cellular injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Khaled Sh; Mostafa, Abdel-Halem A; Ali, Ehab M M; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed A S

    2011-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective role of cinnamon extract against inflammatory and oxidative injuries in gamma irradiated rats. Rats were subjected to fractionated doses of gamma radiation. Cinnamon extract were daily administrated before starting irradiation and continued after radiation exposure. The results obtained revealed that the administration of cinnamon extract to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in liver antioxidant system; catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. The liver's lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation indices were significantly decreased when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. Furthermore, the changes induces in xanthine oxidoreductase system were significantly diminished. In addition, the changes in liver nitric oxide contents, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein levels were markedly improved. In conclusion, the administration of cinnamon extract might provide substantial protection against radiation-induced oxidative and inflammatory damages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ITPA gene variant protects against anemia induced by pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin therapy for Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Nakagawa, Mina; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Azuma, Seishin; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Kakinuma, Sei; Nishida, Nao; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Honda, Masao; Ito, Kiyoaki; Mizokami, Masashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2010-11-01

    Host genetic variants leading to inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) deficiency, a condition not thought to be clinically important, protect against hemolytic anemia in chronic hepatitis C patients receiving ribavirin. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of ITPA variants in Japanese hepatitis C patients who were treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. In this multicenter retrospective cross-sectional study, 474 hepatitis C patients were enrolled who were treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in four geographically different hospitals in Japan. Patients were grouped according to hemoglobin decline of more than 3 g/dL at week 4. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within or adjacent to the ITPA gene (rs6051702, rs1127354) were genotyped.  A functional SNP, rs1127354, within the ITPA exon was strongly associated with protection against anemia with only one (0.8%) in 129 patients with the ITPA minor variant A developing severe anemia (P=5.9×10(-20) ). For rs6051702, which had significant association in European-Americans, significant but weak association with severe hemoglobin reduction was found in Japanese (P= 0.009). In patients excluding genotype 1b and high viral load, those with the ITPA minor variant A achieved significantly higher sustained viral response rate than those with the major variant (CC) (96% vs 70%, respectively, P= 0.0066). ITPA SNP, rs1127354, is confirmed to be a useful predictor of ribavirin-induced anemia in Japanese patients. Patients with the ITPA minor variant A (~ 27%) have an advantage in pegylated interferon plus ribavirin-based therapies, due to expected adherence of ribavirin doses, resulting in a higher viral clearance rate. © 2010 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  15. Two variants on chromosome 17 confer prostate cancer risk, and the one in TCF2 protects against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur

    2007-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association scan to search for sequence variants conferring risk of prostate cancer using 1,501 Icelandic men with prostate cancer and 11,290 controls. Follow-up studies involving three additional case-control groups replicated an association of two variants on chromoso...

  16. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice.

  17. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  18. TYK2 protein-coding variants protect against rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity, with no evidence of major pleiotropic effects on non-autoimmune complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothée Diogo

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS in detecting a large number of loci for complex phenotypes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA susceptibility, the lack of information on the causal genes leaves important challenges to interpret GWAS results in the context of the disease biology. Here, we genetically fine-map the RA risk locus at 19p13 to define causal variants, and explore the pleiotropic effects of these same variants in other complex traits. First, we combined Immunochip dense genotyping (n = 23,092 case/control samples, Exomechip genotyping (n = 18,409 case/control samples and targeted exon-sequencing (n = 2,236 case/controls samples to demonstrate that three protein-coding variants in TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2 independently protect against RA: P1104A (rs34536443, OR = 0.66, P = 2.3 x 10(-21, A928V (rs35018800, OR = 0.53, P = 1.2 x 10(-9, and I684S (rs12720356, OR = 0.86, P = 4.6 x 10(-7. Second, we show that the same three TYK2 variants protect against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Pomnibus = 6 x 10(-18, and provide suggestive evidence that two of the TYK2 variants (P1104A and A928V may also protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P(omnibus = 0.005. Finally, in a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS assessing >500 phenotypes using electronic medical records (EMR in >29,000 subjects, we found no convincing evidence for association of P1104A and A928V with complex phenotypes other than autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE and IBD. Together, our results demonstrate the role of TYK2 in the pathogenesis of RA, SLE and IBD, and provide supporting evidence for TYK2 as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  19. Development and Characterization of VEGF165-Chitosan Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Skin Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojiang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced skin injury, which remains a serious concern in radiation therapy, is currently believed to be the result of vascular endothelial cell injury and apoptosis. Here, we established a model of acute radiation-induced skin injury and compared the effect of different vascular growth factors on skin healing by observing the changes of microcirculation and cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was more effective at inhibiting apoptosis and preventing injury progression than other factors. A new strategy for improving the bioavailability of vascular growth factors was developed by loading VEGF with chitosan nanoparticles. The VEGF-chitosan nanoparticles showed a protective effect on vascular endothelial cells, improved the local microcirculation, and delayed the development of radioactive skin damage.

  20. Radiation-Induced Changes in Serum Lipidome of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Jelonek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer radiotherapy (RT induces response of the whole patient’s body that could be detected at the blood level. We aimed to identify changes induced in serum lipidome during RT and characterize their association with doses and volumes of irradiated tissue. Sixty-six patients treated with conformal RT because of head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, during and about one month after the end of RT. Lipid extracts were analyzed using MALDI-oa-ToF mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. The major changes were observed when pre-treatment and within-treatment samples were compared. Levels of several identified phosphatidylcholines, including (PC34, (PC36 and (PC38 variants, and lysophosphatidylcholines, including (LPC16 and (LPC18 variants, were first significantly decreased and then increased in post-treatment samples. Intensities of changes were correlated with doses of radiation received by patients. Of note, such correlations were more frequent when low-to-medium doses of radiation delivered during conformal RT to large volumes of normal tissues were analyzed. Additionally, some radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome were associated with toxicity of the treatment. Obtained results indicated the involvement of choline-related signaling and potential biological importance of exposure to clinically low/medium doses of radiation in patient’s body response to radiation.

  1. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  2. A variant of Smurf2 protects mice against colitis-associated colon cancer by inducing transforming growth factor β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornhoff, Heike; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Strand, Dennis; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Neufert, Clemens; Mudter, Jonas; Markl, Jürgen; Siebler, Jürgen; Neurath, Markus F

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which is down-regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitin regulating factor 2 (Smurf2), promotes development of cancer. We identified a splice variant of Smurf2 (ΔE2Smurf2) and investigated its role in colon carcinogenesis in mice. Colitis-associated colon cancer was induced in mice by administration of azoxymethane, followed by 3 cycles of oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate. Messenger RNA levels of Smurf2 in colon tumors and control tissue were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; lymphocyte and cytokine levels were measured in tumor and tissue samples. Tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) cells expressed higher levels of ΔE2Smurf2 than CD4(+) cells from nontumor tissues of wild-type mice. T cell-specific overexpression of ΔE2Smurf2 increased TGF-β signaling by suppressing protein levels of Smurf2, accompanied by an increase in levels of TGF-β receptor type II. Transgenic mice that overexpress ΔE2Smurf2 were protected against development of colitis-associated tumors and down-regulated proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. Patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly lower ratio of Smurf2/ΔE2Smurf2 than control individuals. T cell-specific ΔE2Smurf2 degrades wild-type Smurf2 and controls intestinal tumor growth in mice by up-regulating TGF-β receptor type II, reducing proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A GENETIC VARIANT OF THE ATRIAL NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE GENE IS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOMETABOLIC PROTECTION IN THE GENERAL COMMUNITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannone, Valentina; Boerrigter, Guido; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Costello-Boerrigter, Lisa C.; Olson, Timothy M.; McKie, Paul M.; Heublein, Denise M.; Lahr, Brian D.; Bailey, Kent R.; Averna, Maurizio; Redfield, Margaret M.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Burnett, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to define the cardiometabolic phenotype associated with rs5068, a genetic variant of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene. Background ANP and BNP play an important role in cardiorenal homeostasis but also exert metabolic actions. Methods We genotyped 1608 randomly selected residents from Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA. Subjects were well characterized. Results Genotype frequencies were: AA 89.9%, AG 9.7%, and GG 0.4%; all subsequent analyses were AA vs AG+GG. After adjustment for age and gender the G allele was associated with increased plasma levels of N-terminal-proANP (NT-proANP) (p=0.002). The minor allele was also associated with lower BMI (p=0.006), prevalence of obesity (p=0.002), waist circumference (p=0.021), lower levels of C-reactive protein (p=0.027) and higher values of HDL cholesterol (p=0.019). The AG+GG group had a lower systolic blood pressure (p=0.011) and lower prevalence of myocardial infarction (p=0.042). The minor allele was associated with a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (p=0.025). After adjusting for BMI the association between the G allele and HDL cholesterol, C – reactive protein values, myocardial infarction and metabolic syndrome was not significant; the association with systolic blood pressure, BMI, obesity, waist circumference remained significant even after adjusting for NT-proANP. Conclusions In a random sample of the general US population the minor allele of rs5068 is associated with a favorable cardiometabolic profile. These findings suggest that rs5068 or genetic loci in linkage disequilibrium may affect susceptibility for cardiometabolic diseases and support the possible protective role of natriuretic peptides by their favorable effects on metabolic function. Replication studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:21798427

  4. Immunogenicity and protective immunity against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague by immunization of mice with the recombinant V10 antigen, a variant of LcrV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBord, Kristin L; Anderson, Deborah M; Marketon, Melanie M; Overheim, Katie A; DePaolo, R William; Ciletti, Nancy A; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to Yersinia pestis LcrV, the recombinant V10 (rV10) variant (lacking residues 271 to 300) does not suppress the release of proinflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Immunization with rV10 generates robust antibody responses that protect mice against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague, suggesting that rV10 may serve as an improved plague vaccine.

  5. Modern cataract surgery for radiation-induced cataracts in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ihab M; Abouzeid, Hana; Balmer, Aubin; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Othenin-Girard, Philippe; Pica, Alessia; Moeckli, Raphaël; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L

    2011-02-01

    Surgery of radiation-induced cataracts in children with retinoblastoma (RB) is a challenge as early intervention is weighted against the need to delay surgery until complete tumour control is obtained. This study analyses the safety and functional results of such surgery. In a retrospective, non-comparative, consecutive case series, we reviewed medical records of RB patients ≤ 14 y of age who underwent either external beam radiotherapy or plaque treatment and were operated for radiation-induced cataract between 1985 and 2008. In total, 21 eyes of 20 RB patients were included and 18 out of the 21 eyes had Reese-Ellsworth stage V or ABC classification group D/E RB. Median interval between last treatment for RB and cataract surgery was 21.5 months, range 3-164 months. Phacoaspiration was performed in 13 eyes (61%), extra-capsular cataract extraction in 8 (39%) and intraocular lens implantation in 19 eyes (90%). The majority of cases, 11/21 (52%), underwent posterior capsulorhexis or capsulotomy and 6/21 (28%) an anterior vitrectomy. Postoperative visual acuity was ≥ 20/200 in 13 eyes and < 20/200 in 5 eyes. Intraocular tumour recurrence was noted in three eyes. Mean postoperative follow up was 90 months ± 69 months. Modern cataract surgery, including clear cornea approach, lens aspiration with posterior capsulotomy, anterior vitrectomy and IOL implantation is a safe procedure for radiation-induced cataract as long as RB is controlled. The visual prognosis is limited by initial tumour involvement of the macula and by corneal complications of radiotherapy. We recommend a minimal interval of 9 months between completion of treatment of retinoblastoma and cataract surgery.

  6. Construction of radiation - induced metastasis model in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jae Sung; Hwang, Sang Gu; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In treatment of cancer, distant metastases are important limiting factor because an estimated 50% of all cancer patients will develop metastases, and the metastases are major causing of cancer treatment failure. Recently a few reports indicated {gamma}-radiation induced an increase of invasiveness of several cancer cells. In this study, we had tried to show the possibility that radiation could also induce metastasis in vivo system. To prove our hypothesis, we constructed primary tumor by using C6-TL transfectant cell line expressing HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase (fLuc), and then {gamma}-radiation was treated to xenografts locally. Treatment of {gamma}-radiation to primary C6-TL xenografts of mice reduced size of xenografts and elongated survival of mice than those of mock control mice. But we also show that {gamma}-radiation treatment was followed by the growth of dormant metastases in various organs including lung and intestine after 2-4 weeks of {gamma}-radiation treatment. When bioluminescence imaging indicated growth of tumor in organs in mice, we sacrificed the mice and repeat acquired bioluminescence imaging after repeatedly. These images presented tumor growth locations exactly in organs. Because metastatic tumor candidates have morphology of foci, biopsies were performed for histological analysis or PCR analysis to confirm metastases. In most foci, histological analysis indicated several features of typical cancer tissue and PCR analysis showed present of fLuc gene in metastases. Detection of fLuc gene in metastases indicated these foci were originated from primary C6-TL xenografts, and the results suggest that {gamma}-radiation could promote metastasis in vivo as well as in vitro system. Although we need to understand changes of intracellular signaling or physiological phenomena of the radiation-induced metastasis yet, these results also imply that {gamma}-radiation treatment only to cancer patients need to pay attention carefully, and development of new

  7. Radiation-induced erectile dysfunction: Recent advances and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Mahmood, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men in the United States. A large number of patients undergo radiation therapy (RT as a standard care of treatment; however, RT causes erectile dysfunction (radiation-induced erectile dysfunction; RiED because of late side effects after RT that significantly affects quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Within 5 years of RT, approximately 50% of patients could develop RiED. Based on the past and current research findings and number of publications from our group, the precise mechanism of RiED is under exploration in detail. Recent investigations have shown prostate RT induces significant morphologic arterial damage with aberrant alterations in internal pudendal arterial tone. Prostatic RT also reduces motor function in the cavernous nerve which may attribute to axonal degeneration may contributing to RiED. Furthermore, the advances in radiogenomics such as radiation induced somatic mutation identification, copy number variation and genome-wide association studies has significantly facilitated identification of biomarkers that could be used to monitoring radiation-induced late toxicity and damage to the nerves; thus, genomic- and proteomic-based biomarkers could greatly improve treatment and minimize arterial tissue and nerve damage. Further, advanced technologies such as proton beam therapy that precisely target tumor and significantly reduce off-target damage to vital organs and healthy tissues. In this review, we summarize recent advances in RiED research and novel treatment modalities for RiED. We also discuss the possible molecular mechanism involved in the development of RiED in prostate cancer patients. Further, we discuss various readily available methods as well as novel strategies such as stem cell therapies, shockwave therapy, nerve grafting with tissue engineering, and nutritional supplementations might be used to

  8. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  9. A model of radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the rst and second generation introducing extra U(1) gauge symmetry, discrete Z 2 symmetry, vector-like fermions and exotic scalar elds. Then we analyze the allowed parameter regions which simultaneously satisfy the constraints of FCNCs for the quark sector and of LFVs including μ - e conversion, observed quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. In addition, the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model is presented. We also show extension of the model in which Majorana type neutrino masses are generated at the two loop level.

  10. Radiation-induced inhibition of RNA synthesis in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S G; Rustad, R C; Oleinick, N L

    1975-07-01

    Radiation-induced disturbances in RNA synthesis were investigated in exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Sub-lethal doses of gamma-radiation lead to a transient, dose-dependent decrease in the rate of total RNA synthesis measured by 3H-uridine incorporation, without an alteration of 3H-uridine uptake by the cells. The rate of 3H-uridine incorporation decreases exponentially with dose. In contrast, the duration of inhibition of RNA synthesis is linearly dependent on dose. Target-theory calculations suggest that the sensitive molecule has a molecular weight of about 2 X 10(7) Daltons.

  11. Possible protective role of the ABCA4 gene c.1268A>G missense variant in Stargardt disease and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa in a Sicilian family: Preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Donato, Luigi; Venza, Isabella; Scimone, Concetta; Aragona, Pasquale; Sidoti, Antonina

    2017-04-01

    In the wide horizon of ophthalmologically rare diseases among retinitis pigmentosa forms, Stargardt disease has gradually assumed a significant role due to its heterogeneity. In the present study, we aimed to support one of two opposite hypotheses concerning the causative or protective role of heterozygous c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene in Stargardt disease and in syndromic retinitis pigmentosa. This study was based on a family consisting of three members: proband, age 54, with high myopia, myopic chorioretinitis and retinal dystrophy; wife, age 65, with mild symptoms; daughter, age 29, asymptomatic. After genetic counseling, ABCA4 and RP1 gene analysis was performed. The results highlighted an important genetic picture. The proband was found to carry two variant RP1 SNPs, rs2293869 (c.2953A>T) and rs61739567 (c.6098G>A), and, a wild-type condition for four RP1 polymorphisms, rs444772 (c.2623G>A) and three SNPs in the 'hot-spot' region, exon 4. The proband's wife, instead, showed an opposite condition compared to her husband: a homozygous mutated condition for the first four SNPs analyzed, while the last two were wild-type. Regarding the ABCA4 gene, the proband evidenced a wild-type condition. Furthermore, the wife showed a heterozygous condition of ABCA4 rs3112831 (c.1268A>G). As expected, the daughter presented heterozygosity for all variants of both genes. In conclusion, even though the c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene has often been reported as causative of disease, and in other cases protective of disease, in our family case, the variant appears to reduce or delay the risk of onset of Stargardt disease.

  12. Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in radiology; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A. [Dornbirn Hospital (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Brand, M.; Engert, C.; Uder, M. [Erlangen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schwab, S.A. [Radiologis, Oberasbach (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the principle of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations.

  13. Decrease in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Nara (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We are constantly exposed to environmental radiation. ICRP recommends annual limitations of radiation exposure of 1 and 50 mSv for the general public and for radiation workers, respectively. Initially, there were doubts about different limitations between the two groups based on radiation sensitivity. Regarding the dose/effect relationship, two discrepant hypotheses are the linear no-threshold theory and non-linear with threshold theory, which form the basis of the current radiation protection programs. The radioadaptive response fully occurs near the range of natural radiation and radiation-related working area. This response is a biological defense mechanism in which low dose and low dose-rate irradiation elicits cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent irradiation. However, its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This article reviews the trends in research and our recent findings on decreases in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure.

  14. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  15. The efficiency of adjusted-da-chai-ling-tang in radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Tong Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain edema induced by radiotherapy is a common complication in patients with brain tumors, for which medical treatment is the treatment of choice. Adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang, a Chinese herbal formulation, has been confirmed to be protective against the radiation-induced edema. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang in radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors. Materials and Methods: A total of 46 patients with brain tumors treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with surgery were enrolled. These patients were divided into two groups: The experimental group with adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang and the control group with conventional medical treatment. Clinical data including symptoms and serologic results were collected pretreatment and on the 4 th , 7 th and 10 th day posttreatment. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed to investigate changes in brain edema. Results: Clinical symptoms including headache, dizziness, nausea/vomiting and fatigue significantly improved in the experimental group (P < 0.05. No difference in serological results was observed. Brain edema was significantly reduced in the experimental group in magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Adjusted-Da-Chai-Ling-Tang is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced brain edema in patients with brain tumors. No obvious side effects were observed.

  16. Radiation-Induced Correlation between Molecules Nearby Metallic Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Osaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate optical absorption of molecules embedded nearby metallic antennas by using discrete dipole approximation method. It is found that the spectral peak of the absorption is shifted due to the radiation-induced correlation between the molecules. The most distinguishing feature of our work is to show that the shift is largely enhanced even when the individual molecules couple with localized surface plasmons near the different antennas. Specifically, we first consider the case that two sets of dimeric gold blocks with a spacing of a few nanometers are arranged and reveal that the intensity and spectral peak of the optical absorption strongly depend on the position of the molecules. In addition, when the dimeric blocks and the molecules are periodically arranged, the peak shift is found to increase up to ~1.2 meV (300 GHz. Because the radiation-induced correlation is essential for collective photon emission, our result implies the possibility of plasmon-assisted superfluorescence in designed antenna-molecule complex systems.

  17. RrgB321, a Fusion Protein of the Three Variants of the Pneumococcal Pilus Backbone RrgB, Is Protective In Vivo and Elicits Opsonic Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfouche, Carole; Filippini, Sara; Gianfaldoni, Claudia; Ruggiero, Paolo; Moschioni, Monica; Maccari, Silvia; Pancotto, Laura; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Galletti, Bruno; Censini, Stefano; Mori, Elena; Giuliani, Marzia; Facciotti, Claudia; Cartocci, Elena; Savino, Silvana; Doro, Francesco; Pallaoro, Michele; Nocadello, Salvatore; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Haston, Mitch; Goldblatt, David; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus 1 is present in 30 to 50% of invasive disease-causing strains and is composed of three subunits: the adhesin RrgA, the major backbone subunit RrgB, and the minor ancillary protein RrgC. RrgB exists in three distinct genetic variants and, when used to immunize mice, induces an immune response specific for each variant. To generate an antigen able to protect against the infection caused by all pilus-positive S. pneumoniae strains, we engineered a fusion protein containing the three RrgB variants (RrgB321). RrgB321 elicited antibodies against proteins from organisms in the three clades and protected mice against challenge with piliated pneumococcal strains. RrgB321 antisera mediated complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis of piliated strains at levels comparable to those achieved with the PCV7 glycoconjugate vaccine. These results suggest that a vaccine composed of RrgB321 has the potential to cover 30% or more of all pneumococcal strains and support the inclusion of this fusion protein in a multicomponent vaccine against S. pneumoniae. PMID:22083702

  18. The Beneficial Radioprotective Effect of Tomato Seed Oil Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezz, Magda K; Ibrahim, Nashwa K; Said, Mahmoud M; Farrag, Mostafa A

    2018-01-16

    Radiation protection research receives intense focus due to its significant impact on human health. The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of pretreatment with tomato seed oil (TSO) against gamma radiation-induced damage in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (1) untreated control; (2) TSO-supplemented; (3) gamma-irradiated; (4) TSO-pretreated and gamma-irradiated. Acute exposure of animals to a single gamma radiation dose (6 Gy) induced oxidative stress in major body organs, altered serum lipid homeostasis, significantly increased serum testosterone and sorbitol dehydrogenase levels, and elicited a systemic inflammation as manifested by the induction of serum vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Oral pretreatment with TSO (1 ml/kg; 3 times/week for 8 weeks) before exposure to gamma radiation protected rats against ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress, restored lipid homeostasis, and suppressed systemic inflammation. Histological findings of target tissues verified biochemical data. The radioprotective ability of TSO was attributed to its content of phytosterols, policosanol, and antioxidants, including lycopene, β-carotene, lutein, and tocopherols. TSO is considered a promising radioprotective agent that can be effectively used to protect the body from the damaging effects of harmful radiation.

  19. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aung, T.; Ozaki, M.; Lee, M.C.; Schlotzer-Schrehardt, U.; Thorleifsson, G.; Mizoguchi, T.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Haripriya, A.; Williams, S.E.; Astakhov, Y.S.; Orr, A.C.; Burdon, K.P.; Nakano, S.; Mori, K.; Abu-Amero, K.; Hauser, M.; Li, Z.; Prakadeeswari, G.; Bailey, J.N.; Cherecheanu, A.P.; Kang, J.H.; Nelson, S.; Hayashi, K.; Manabe, S.I.; Kazama, S.; Zarnowski, T.; Inoue, K.; Irkec, M.; Coca-Prados, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Jarvela, I.; Schlottmann, P.; Lerner, S.F.; Lamari, H.; Nilgun, Y.; Bikbov, M.; Park, K.H.; Cha, S.C.; Yamashiro, K.; Zenteno, J.C.; Jonas, J.B.; Kumar, R.S.S.; Perera, S.A.; Chan, A.S.Y.; Kobakhidze, N.; George, R.; Vijaya, L.; Do, T.; Edward, D.P.; Juan Marcos, L. de; Pakravan, M.; Moghimi, S.; Ideta, R.; Bach-Holm, D.; Kappelgaard, P.; Wirostko, B.; Thomas, S.; Gaston, D.; Bedard, K.; Greer, W.L.; Yang, Z; Chen, X.; Huang, L.; Sang, J.; Jia, H.; Jia, L.; Qiao, C.; Zhang, H.; Liu, X.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Y.X.; Xu, L.; Leruez, S.; Reynier, P.; Chichua, G.; Tabagari, S.; Uebe, S.; Zenkel, M.; Berner, D.; Mossbock, G.; Weisschuh, N.; Hoja, U.; Welge-Luessen, U.C.; Mardin, C.; Founti, P.; Chatzikyriakidou, A.; Pappas, T.; Anastasopoulos, E.; Lambropoulos, A.; Ghosh, A.; Shetty, R.; Porporato, N.; Saravanan, V.; Venkatesh, R.; Shivkumar, C.; Kalpana, N.; Sarangapani, S.; Kanavi, M.R.; Beni, A.N.; Yazdani, S.; Hollander, A.I. den; Pasutto, F.; Khor, C.C.

    2017-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS

  20. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin

    2017-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS c...

  1. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  2. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  3. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  4. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  5. Radiation Induced Hypoplasia of the Mandible and Retarded Tooth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tuteja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Few cases of radiation-induced damage to the teeth and jaws, have been reported in the literature. Radiation therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients affected with head and neck cancer. In spite of its recognized benefits in the treatment of malignant tumors, radiation therapy has several side-effects in the head and neck region. This paper highlights a case report where hypoplasia of the mandible, trismus and stunted permanent teeth roots were observed in an 18-year-old patient who was diagnosed with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma—embryonal type group III at the age of 5 years. He had received radiation therapy of 50 Gy to the nasopharynx for about 1 year and was reviewed for a period of 11 years. Full mouth periapical radiographs and panoramic radiograph revealed hypoplasia of the mandible and generalized hypoplasia of the roots of the permanent teeth.

  6. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.; Zandbank, U.; Reichenthal, E.

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  7. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology; Fernberg, J.-O. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology

    1996-05-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author).

  8. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spałek M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Spałek Department of Radiotherapy I, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients’ quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF. RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and

  9. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  10. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  11. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  12. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  13. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  14. Identification of kinase fusion oncogenes in post-Chernobyl radiation-induced thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Li, Sheng; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Voza, Francesca; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Bogdanova, Tetyana; Thomas, Geraldine A; Mason, Christopher E; Fagin, James A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood markedly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid cancer. We examined tissues from 26 Ukrainian patients with thyroid cancer who were younger than 10 years of age and living in contaminated areas during the time of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. We identified nonoverlapping somatic driver mutations in all 26 cases through candidate gene assays and next-generation RNA sequencing. We found that 22 tumors harbored fusion oncogenes that arose primarily through intrachromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, 23 of the oncogenic drivers identified in this cohort aberrantly activate MAPK signaling, including the 2 somatic rearrangements resulting in fusion of transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6) with neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) and fusion of acylglycerol kinase (AGK) with BRAF. Two other tumors harbored distinct fusions leading to overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. Fusion oncogenes were less prevalent in tumors from a cohort of children with pediatric thyroid cancers that had not been exposed to radiation but were from the same geographical regions. Radiation-induced thyroid cancers provide a paradigm of tumorigenesis driven by fusion oncogenes that activate MAPK signaling or, less frequently, a PPARγ-driven transcriptional program.

  15. UV radiation-induced immunosuppression is greater in men and prevented by topical nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L; Patterson, Clare R S; Stapelberg, Michael; Park, Joohong; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    UV radiation-induced immunosuppression augments cutaneous carcinogenesis. The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase despite increased use of sunscreens, which are less effective at preventing immunosuppression than sunburn. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we investigated the effects of solar-simulated (ss) UV and its component UVA and UVB wavebands and tested the ability of topical nicotinamide to protect from UV-induced immunosuppression. Healthy, Mantoux-positive volunteers were UV-irradiated on their backs, with 5% nicotinamide or vehicle applied to different sites in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Subsequent Mantoux testing at irradiated and adjacent unirradiated sites enabled measurement of UV-induced immunosuppression with and without nicotinamide. Suberythemal ssUV caused significant immunosuppression, although component UVB and UVA doses delivered independently did not. Men were immunosuppressed by ssUV doses three times lower than those required to immunosuppress women. This may be an important cause of the higher skin cancer incidence and mortality observed in men. Topical nicotinamide prevented immunosuppression, with gene chip microarrays suggesting that the mechanisms of protection may include alterations in complement, energy metabolism and apoptosis pathways. Nicotinamide is a safe and inexpensive compound that could be added to sunscreens or after-sun lotions to improve protection from immunosuppression. immunosuppression.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub

  16. Variant G57E of mannose binding lectin associated with protection against tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium africanum but not by M. tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Thye

    Full Text Available Structural variants of the Mannose Binding Lectin (MBL cause quantitative and qualitative functional deficiencies, which are associated with various patterns of susceptibility to infectious diseases and other disorders. We determined genetic MBL variants in 2010 Ghanaian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB and 2346 controls and characterized the mycobacterial isolates of the patients. Assuming a recessive mode of inheritance, we found a protective association between TB and the MBL2 G57E variant (odds ratio 0.60, confidence interval 0.4-0.9, P 0.008 and the corresponding LYQC haplotype (P(corrected 0.007 which applied, however, only to TB caused by M. africanum but not to TB caused by M. tuberculosis. In vitro, M. africanum isolates bound recombinant human MBL more efficiently than did isolates of M. tuberculosis. We conclude that MBL binding may facilitate the uptake of M. africanum by macrophages, thereby promoting infection and that selection by TB may have favoured the spread of functional MBL deficiencies in regions endemic for M. africanum.

  17. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  18. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening a modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. Miglioretti (Diana); J. Lange (Jane); J.J. Van Den Broek (Jeroen J.); C.I. Lee (Christoph I.); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); D. Ritley (Dominique); K. Kerlikowske (Karla); J.J. Fenton (Joshua J.); J. Melnikow (Joy); H.J. de Koning (Harry); R.A. Hubbard (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. Objective: To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and

  19. A live gI/gE-deleted pseudorabies virus (PRV) protects weaned piglets against lethal variant PRV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaowan; Li, Ping; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jun; Fan, Yi; Sun, Xiangang; Zhu, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Emerging pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has led to frequent outbreaks of PRV infection among Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine population in Chinese swine farms and caused high mortality in pigs of all age since late 2011. Here, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP) based on PRV variant strain (PRV-XJ) through homologous DNA recombination. Compared to parental strain, rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP showed similar growth kinetics in vitro. Its safety and immunogenicity were evaluated in weaned piglets. Our results showed that piglets immunized with rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP did not exhibit any clinical symptoms, and a high level of gB-specific antibody was detected. After lethal challenge with variant PRV (PRV-FJ strain), all vaccinated piglets survived without showing any clinical symptoms except slight fever within 7 days post-challenge. In unvaccinated piglets, typical clinical symptoms of pseudorabies were observed, and the piglets were all died at 5 days post-challenge. These results indicated that a live rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP vaccine could be a maker vaccine candidate to control the currently epidemic pseudorabies in China.

  20. Risk and protective genetic variants in suicidal behaviour: association with SLC1A2, SLC1A3, 5-HTR1B &NTRK2 polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Avril

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicidal behaviour is known to aggregate in families. Patients with psychiatric disorders are at higher risk for suicide attempts (SA, however protective and risk genetic variants for suicide appear to be independent of underlying psychiatric disorders. Here we investigate genetic variants in genes important for neurobiological pathways linked to suicidal behaviour and/or associated endophenotypes, for association with SA among patients with co-existing psychiatric illness. Selected gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also tested. Methods DNA was obtained from bloods of 159 patients (76 suicide attempters and 83 non-attempters, who were profiled for DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 18 candidate genes (COMT, 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, 5-HTR1B, TPH1, MAO-A, TPH2, DBH, CNR1, BDNF, ABCG1, GABRA5, GABRG2, GABRB2, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, NTRK2, CRHR1 were genotyped. Genotyping was performed by KBioscience. Tests of association between genetic variants and SA were conducted using Chi squared and Armitage Trend tests. Binary logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of individual genetic variants to the prediction of SA, and to examine SNPs for potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Results Our analysis identified 4 SNPs (rs4755404, rs2269272, rs6296 and rs1659400, which showed evidence of association with SA compared to a non-attempter control group. We provide evidence of a 3-locus gene-gene interaction, and a putative gene-environment interaction, whereby genetic variation at the NTRK2 locus may moderate the risk associated with history of childhood abuse. Conclusion Preliminary findings suggest that allelic variability in SLC1A2/3, 5-HTR1B and NTRK2 may be relevant to the underlying diathesis for suicidal acts.

  1. Risk and protective genetic variants in suicidal behaviour: association with SLC1A2, SLC1A3, 5-HTR1B &NTRK2 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Therese M; Ryan, Maria; Foster, Tom; Kelly, Chris; McClelland, Roy; O'Grady, John; Corcoran, Eleanor; Brady, John; Reilly, Michael; Jeffers, Anne; Brown, Katherine; Maher, Anne; Bannan, Noreen; Casement, Alison; Lynch, Dermot; Bolger, Sharon; Tewari, Prerna; Buckley, Avril; Quinlivan, Leah; Daly, Leslie; Kelleher, Cecily; Malone, Kevin M

    2011-06-28

    Suicidal behaviour is known to aggregate in families. Patients with psychiatric disorders are at higher risk for suicide attempts (SA), however protective and risk genetic variants for suicide appear to be independent of underlying psychiatric disorders. Here we investigate genetic variants in genes important for neurobiological pathways linked to suicidal behaviour and/or associated endophenotypes, for association with SA among patients with co-existing psychiatric illness. Selected gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also tested. DNA was obtained from bloods of 159 patients (76 suicide attempters and 83 non-attempters), who were profiled for DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 18 candidate genes (COMT, 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, 5-HTR1B, TPH1, MAO-A, TPH2, DBH, CNR1, BDNF, ABCG1, GABRA5, GABRG2, GABRB2, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, NTRK2, CRHR1) were genotyped. Genotyping was performed by KBioscience. Tests of association between genetic variants and SA were conducted using Chi squared and Armitage Trend tests. Binary logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of individual genetic variants to the prediction of SA, and to examine SNPs for potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Our analysis identified 4 SNPs (rs4755404, rs2269272, rs6296 and rs1659400), which showed evidence of association with SA compared to a non-attempter control group. We provide evidence of a 3-locus gene-gene interaction, and a putative gene-environment interaction, whereby genetic variation at the NTRK2 locus may moderate the risk associated with history of childhood abuse. Preliminary findings suggest that allelic variability in SLC1A2/3, 5-HTR1B and NTRK2 may be relevant to the underlying diathesis for suicidal acts.

  2. Risk and protective genetic variants in suicidal behaviour: association with SLC1A2, SLC1A3, 5-HTR1B &NTRK2 polymorphisms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Therese M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicidal behaviour is known to aggregate in families. Patients with psychiatric disorders are at higher risk for suicide attempts (SA), however protective and risk genetic variants for suicide appear to be independent of underlying psychiatric disorders. Here we investigate genetic variants in genes important for neurobiological pathways linked to suicidal behaviour and\\/or associated endophenotypes, for association with SA among patients with co-existing psychiatric illness. Selected gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also tested. METHODS: DNA was obtained from bloods of 159 patients (76 suicide attempters and 83 non-attempters), who were profiled for DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 18 candidate genes (COMT, 5-HT2A, 5-HT1A, 5-HTR1B, TPH1, MAO-A, TPH2, DBH, CNR1, BDNF, ABCG1, GABRA5, GABRG2, GABRB2, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, NTRK2, CRHR1) were genotyped. Genotyping was performed by KBioscience. Tests of association between genetic variants and SA were conducted using Chi squared and Armitage Trend tests. Binary logistical regression analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of individual genetic variants to the prediction of SA, and to examine SNPs for potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. RESULTS: Our analysis identified 4 SNPs (rs4755404, rs2269272, rs6296 and rs1659400), which showed evidence of association with SA compared to a non-attempter control group. We provide evidence of a 3-locus gene-gene interaction, and a putative gene-environment interaction, whereby genetic variation at the NTRK2 locus may moderate the risk associated with history of childhood abuse. CONCLUSION: Preliminary findings suggest that allelic variability in SLC1A2\\/3, 5-HTR1B and NTRK2 may be relevant to the underlying diathesis for suicidal acts.

  3. Caffeine intake and CYP1A2 variants associated with high caffeine intake protect non-smokers from hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Idris; Dobrinas, Maria; Kutalik, Zoltán; Pruijm, Menno; Ehret, Georg; Maillard, Marc; Bergmann, Sven; Beckmann, Jacques S; Cusi, Daniele; Rizzi, Federica; Cappuccio, Franco; Cornuz, Jacques; Paccaud, Fred; Mooser, Vincent; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Waeber, Gérard; Burnier, Michel; Vollenweider, Peter; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2012-07-15

    The 15q24.1 locus, including CYP1A2, is associated with blood pressure (BP). The CYP1A2 rs762551 C allele is associated with lower CYP1A2 enzyme activity. CYP1A2 metabolizes caffeine and is induced by smoking. The association of caffeine consumption with hypertension remains controversial. We explored the effects of CYP1A2 variants and CYP1A2 enzyme activity on BP, focusing on caffeine as the potential mediator of CYP1A2 effects. Four observational (n = 16 719) and one quasi-experimental studies (n = 106) including European adults were conducted. Outcome measures were BP, caffeine intake, CYP1A2 activity and polymorphisms rs762551, rs1133323 and rs1378942. CYP1A2 variants were associated with hypertension in non-smokers, but not in smokers (CYP1A2-smoking interaction P = 0.01). Odds ratios (95% CIs) for hypertension for rs762551 CC, CA and AA genotypes were 1 (reference), 0.78 (0.59-1.02) and 0.66 (0.50-0.86), respectively, P = 0.004. Results were similar for the other variants. Higher CYP1A2 activity was linearly associated with lower BP after quitting smoking (P = 0.049 and P = 0.02 for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively), but not while smoking. In non-smokers, the CYP1A2 variants were associated with higher reported caffeine intake, which in turn was associated with lower odds of hypertension and lower BP (P = 0.01). In Mendelian randomization analyses using rs1133323 as instrument, each cup of caffeinated beverage was negatively associated with systolic BP [-9.57 (-16.22, -2.91) mmHg]. The associations of CYP1A2 variants with BP were modified by reported caffeine intake. These observational and quasi-experimental results strongly support a causal role of CYP1A2 in BP control via caffeine intake.

  4. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  5. Functional studies on the IBD susceptibility gene IL23R implicate reduced receptor function in the protective genetic variant R381Q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pidasheva

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in several populations have demonstrated significant association of the IL23R gene with IBD (Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC and psoriasis, suggesting that perturbation of the IL-23 signaling pathway is relevant to the pathophysiology of these diseases. One particular variant, R381Q (rs11209026, confers strong protection against development of CD. We investigated the effects of this variant in primary T cells from healthy donors carrying IL23R(R381 and IL23R(Q381 haplotypes. Using a proprietary anti-IL23R antibody, ELISA, flow cytometry, phosphoflow and real-time RT-PCR methods, we examined IL23R expression and STAT3 phosphorylation and activation in response to IL-23. IL23R(Q381 was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation upon stimulation with IL-23 and decreased number of IL-23 responsive T-cells. We also observed slightly reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion in IL23R(Q381 positive donors. Our study shows conclusively that IL23R(Q381 is a loss-of-function allele, further strengthening the implication from GWAS results that the IL-23 pathway is pathogenic in human disease. This data provides an explanation for the protective role of R381Q in CD and may lead to the development of improved therapeutics for autoimmune disorders like CD.

  6. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed.Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05.These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative-based therapies.

  7. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komarnicky, Lydia T., E-mail: lydia.komarnicky-kocher@drexelmed.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  8. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  9. An inactivated gE-deleted pseudorabies vaccine provides complete clinical protection and reduces virus shedding against challenge by a Chinese pseudorabies variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichun; Guo, Rongli; Qiao, Yongfeng; Xu, Mengwei; Wang, Zhisheng; Liu, Yamei; Gu, Yiqi; Liu, Chang; Hou, Jibo

    2016-12-07

    Since the end of 2011 an outbreak of pseudorabies affected Chinese pig herds that had been vaccinated with the commercial vaccine made of Bartha K61 strain. It is now clear that the outbreak was caused by an emergent PRV variant. Even though vaccines made of PRV Bartha K61 strain can confer certain cross protection against PRV variants based on experimental data, less than optimal clinical protection and virus shedding reduction were observed, making the control or eradication of this disease difficult. An infectious clone of PRV AH02LA strain was constructed to generate a gE deletion mutant PRV(LA-AB) strain. PRV(LA-AB) strain can reach a titer of 108.43 TCID50 /mL (50% tissue culture infectious dose) on BHK-21 cells. To evaluate the efficiency of the inactivated vaccine made of PRV(LA-AB) strain, thirty 3-week-old PRV-negative piglets were divided randomly into six groups for vaccination and challenge test. All five piglets in the challenge control showed typical clinical symptoms of pseudorabies post challenge. Sneezing and nasal discharge were observed in four and three piglets in groups C(vaccinated with inactivated PRV Bartha K61 strain vaccine) and D(vaccinated with live PRV Bartha K61 strain vaccine) respectively. In contrast, piglets in both groups A(vaccinated with inactivated PRV LA-AB strain vaccine) and B(vaccinated with inactivated PRV LA-AB strain vaccine with adjuvant) presented mild or no clinical symptoms. Moreover, viral titers detected via nasal swabs were approximately 100 times lower in group B than in the challenge control, and the duration of virus shedding (3-4 days) was shorter than in either the challenge control (5-10 days) or groups C and D (5-6 days). The infectious clone constructed in this study harbors the whole genome of the PRV variant AH02LA strain. The gE deletion mutant PRV(LA-AB)strain generated from PRV AH02LA strain can reach a high titer on BHK-21 cells. An inactivated vaccine of PRV LA-AB provides clinical protection

  10. The humoral response to Plasmodium falciparum VarO rosetting variant and its association with protection against malaria in Beninese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentley Graham

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capacity of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to bind uninfected erythrocytes (rosetting is associated with severe malaria in African children. Rosetting is mediated by a subset of the variant surface antigens PfEMP1 targeted by protective antibody responses. Analysis of the response to rosette-forming parasites and their PfEMP1 adhesive domains is essential for understanding the acquisition of protection against severe malaria. To this end, the antibody response to a rosetting variant was analysed in children recruited with severe or uncomplicated malaria or asymptomatic P. falciparum infection. Methods Serum was collected from Beninese children with severe malaria, uncomplicated malaria or P. falciparum asymptomatic infection (N = 65, 37 and 52, respectively and from immune adults (N = 30 living in the area. Infected erythrocyte surface-reactive IgG, rosette disrupting antibodies and IgG to the parasite crude extract were analysed using the single variant Palo Alto VarO-infected line. IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 to PfEMP1-varO-derived NTS-DBL1α1, CIDRγ and DBL2βC2 recombinant domains were analysed by ELISA. Antibody responses were compared in the clinical groups. Stability of the response was studied using a blood sampling collected 14 months later from asymptomatic children. Results Seroprevalence of erythrocyte surface-reactive IgG was high in adults (100% and asymptomatic children (92.3% but low in children with severe or uncomplicated malaria (26.1% and 37.8%, respectively. The IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 antibody responses to the varO-derived PfEMP1 domains were significantly higher in asymptomatic children than in children with clinical malaria in a multivariate analysis correcting for age and parasite density at enrolment. They were essentially stable, although levels tended to decrease with time. VarO-surface reactivity correlated positively with IgG reactivity to the rosetting domain varO-NTS-DBL1α1. None of the

  11. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  12. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  13. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of {gamma}-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  14. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: vitoriabraga06@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandopereirabh@gmail.com, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  15. Structural investigation of radiation-induced aggregates of ribonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajos, Gy.; Delincee, H. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-10-01

    Following irradiation of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease in aqueous solution with /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays protein aggregates are formed. The nature of the bonds linking these radiation-induced aggregates together has been investigated by chromatographic and electrophoretic methods. Thin-layer gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate, demonstrated the existence of covalent crosslinks between the aggregates. Non-covalent crosslinking also plays a role in the radiolysis of ribonuclease. Thin-layer gel filtration with and without 6 M urea and 2 per cent ..beta..-mercaptoethanol added to the gel, revealed that only part of the covalent bonds between the aggregates consisted of disulphide linkages. By separation of the reduced aggregates by thin-layer gel filtration and electrophoresis, both with SDS, this finding was substantiated. Densitometric measurements indicated for example that the percentage of covalently linked dimers held together by disulphide bridges amounted to about 40-45 per cent, whereas the remaining 55-60 per cent of the dimers must be linked by other covalent bonds. The existence of covalent crosslinks other than disulphide bonds was also confirmed by isoelectric focusing, definite differences being established between the proteolytic hydrolysates of the reduced aggregates and the reduced monomer of ..gamma..-irradiated ribonuclease.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazato, Tomonori; Yusa, Toshiko; Onaga, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Kimio; Koyama, Yuzo; Hatano, Tadashi; Ogawa, Yoshihide [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-05-01

    Radiation therapy has widely been used for cancers in the pelvis. Radiation cystitis, one of the late complications, presents often as hemorrhagic cystitis, which is refractory to the conventional therapy and may threaten the patient`s life. We used hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with radiation cystitis to test its potential benefit. Ten patients aged from 46 to 81 years with a mean of 62 years underwent one or more courses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy according to their symptoms, consisting of 20 sessions (3 to 5 sessions a week) at the Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, the University of the Ryukyus Hospital in the 9-year period from 1985 to 1994. They included 8 patients having a history of cervical cancer, one with external genital cancer and one with vaginal cancer. During the 75 min hyperbaric oxygen therapy patients received 100% oxygen at 2 absolute atmosphere pressure in the Multiplace Hyperbaric Chamber. Hematuria subsided and subjective symptoms including urinary frequency improved in seven patients. Cystoscopic findings including mucosal edema, redness, and capillary dilation were partially improved. The procedure subjectively and objectively palliated the 10 patients in a favorable manner. To date we have not armed any active procedure to control radiation-induced refractory hemorrhagic cystitis in terms of efficacy, invasiveness, and adverse effects. Therefore, in consideration of our clinical results, hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be useful for radiation cystitis. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  18. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  19. MRI findings in radiation-induced hepatic injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Yuji; Kato, Takashi; Yoshida, Kotaro; Sugihara, Shuji; Kamba, Masayuki; Ohta, Yoshio [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced hepatic injuries (RIHI), magnetic resonance image (MRI) was conducted on 12 patients, to 6 months after radiotherapy on regions including the liver. T1-weighted and T2-weighted image (T1WI, T2WI), and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced T1WI well obtained. Within 1 week, these MRI studies were repeated after chondroitin sulphate iron colloid (CSIC) administration. MRI findings and total irradiation doses were compared. Abnormalities were seen on one or more types of MRI in 7 patients. The total dose of irradiation was 40 or more Gy in these patients, and 40 or less Gy in those who showed no abnormal MR findings. Plain T2WI of the 7 cases showing MRI abnormalities demonstrated a slightly higher signal intensity (SI) in the irradiated areas in 2, an iso SI in 2, a slightly lower or lower SI in 3 cases. The irradiated and nonirradiated areas were clearly demarcated on Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1WI in 4 cases. Following CSIC administration, the irradiated areas became more marked in 3 cases. A clear demarcation between the 2 areas was obtained with double contrast MRI in the 7 cases. The present study indicates that MRI may be a useful noninvasive means of evaluating RIHI. (author)

  20. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-18

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  1. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  2. Effect of epicatechin against radiation-induced oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Seob Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC, a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. RESULTS: EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis.

  3. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. A comparative review of radiation-induced cancer risk models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seok Jung [Risk and Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    With the need for a domestic level 3 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), it is essential to develop a Korea-specific code. Health effect assessments study radiation-induced impacts; in particular, long-term health effects are evaluated in terms of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to analyze the latest cancer risk models developed by foreign organizations and to compare the methodology of how they were developed. This paper also provides suggestions regarding the development of Korean cancer risk models. A review of cancer risk models was carried out targeting the latest models: the NUREG model (1993), the BEIR VII model (2006), the UNSCEAR model (2006), the ICRP 103 model (2007), and the U.S. EPA model (2011). The methodology of how each model was developed is explained, and the cancer sites, dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) and mathematical models are also described in the sections presenting differences among the models. The NUREG model was developed by assuming that the risk was proportional to the risk coefficient and dose, while the BEIR VII, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and U.S. EPA models were derived from epidemiological data, principally from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The risk coefficient does not consider individual characteristics, as the values were calculated in terms of population-averaged cancer risk per unit dose. However, the models derived by epidemiological data are a function of sex, exposure age, and attained age of the exposed individual. Moreover, the methodologies can be used to apply the latest epidemiological data. Therefore, methodologies using epidemiological data should be considered first for developing a Korean cancer risk model, and the cancer sites and DDREF should also be determined based on Korea-specific studies. This review can be used as a basis for developing a Korean cancer risk model in the future.

  5. Vaccine Containing the Three Allelic Variants of the Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Antigen Induces Protection in Mice after Challenge with a Transgenic Rodent Malaria Parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Marina Gimenez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax is the most common species that cause malaria outside of the African continent. The development of an efficacious vaccine would contribute greatly to control malaria. Recently, using bacterial and adenoviral recombinant proteins based on the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP, we demonstrated the possibility of eliciting strong antibody-mediated immune responses to each of the three allelic forms of P. vivax CSP (PvCSP. In the present study, recombinant proteins representing the PvCSP alleles (VK210, VK247, and P. vivax-like, as well as a hybrid polypeptide, named PvCSP-All epitopes, were generated. This hybrid containing the conserved C-terminal of the PvCSP and the three variant repeat domains in tandem were successfully produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris. After purification and biochemical characterization, they were used for the experimental immunization of C57BL/6 mice in a vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Poly(I:C. Immunization with a recombinant protein expressing all three different allelic forms in fusion elicited high IgG antibody titers reacting with all three different allelic variants of PvCSP. The antibodies targeted both the C-terminal and repeat domains of PvCSP and recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoites. More importantly, mice that received the vaccine formulation were protected after challenge with chimeric Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing CSP repeats of P. vivax sporozoites (Pb/PvVK210. Our results suggest that it is possible to elicit protective immunity against one of the most common PvCSP alleles using soluble recombinant proteins expressed by P. pastoris. These recombinant proteins are promising candidates for clinical trials aiming to develop a multiallele vaccine against P. vivax malaria.

  6. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry

    2003-01-01

    ... of this project are to (1) screen 50 breast cancer patients for a ATM mutations who developed radiation-induced grade 3/4 late subcutaneous tissue morbidity as defined by the RTOG/EORTC scoring scheme, (2...

  7. Radiation induced membrane effects at the apoptotic cell death; Strahleninduzierte Membraneffekte beim apoptotischen Zelltod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, H.A. [Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik, Abt. Biophysik, Bremen Univ. (Germany); Ojeda, F. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    1996-12-31

    Lymphocytes are rather sensitive towards radiation induced apoptosis. The hypothesis can be tried that the cellular membrane (or intracellular membranes) be the primary target for the radiation induced apoptosis. Chemically induced and radiation induced apoptosis follow, at least partially, common mechanistic patterns. It involves a fluidisation of the cellular membrane. Rigidisation of the membrane by incorporation of cholesterol interferes with the radiation induced apoptosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Lymphozyten sind sehr empfindlich gegen die strahleninduzierte Apoptosis. Die Hypothese wird aufgestellt, dass die Zellmembran (oder intrazellulaere Membranen) Primaertarget der Strahlung zur Induktion der Apoptose ist. Die chemisch induzierte und die strahleninduzierte Apoptose haben, zumindest partiell, gemeinsame Mechanismenstraenge. Sie geht einher mit einer Fludisierung der Zellmembran. Rigidisierung der Zellmembran durch Einbau von Cholesterin interferiert mit der strahleninduzierten Apoptose. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-Induced Processing of Hydrocarbons in Environments Relevant to Pluto

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Robert

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the formation of the larger molecules in the outer solar system, by radiation induced processing of more primitive constituents, has implications relating to the evolution of the solar system...

  9. Design Methodologies and to Combat Radiation Induced Corruption in FPGAs and SoCs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Traditional radiation hardened by process (RHBP) and radiation hardened by design (RHBD) techniques have seen success in mitigating the effects of radiation induced...

  10. Targeted Metabolomics Identifies Pharmacodynamic Biomarkers for BIO 300 Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jace W; Jackson, Isabel L; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kaytor, Michael D; Kane, Maureen A

    2017-10-02

    Biomarkers serve a number of purposes during drug development including defining the natural history of injury/disease, serving as a secondary endpoint or trigger for intervention, and/or aiding in the selection of an effective dose in humans. BIO 300 is a patent-protected pharmaceutical formulation of nanoparticles of synthetic genistein being developed by Humanetics Corporation. The primary goal of this metabolomic discovery experiment was to identify biomarkers that correlate with radiation-induced lung injury and BIO 300 efficacy for mitigating tissue damage based upon the primary endpoint of survival. High-throughput targeted metabolomics of lung tissue from male C57L/J mice exposed to 12.5 Gy whole thorax lung irradiation, treated daily with 400 mg/kg BIO 300 for either 2 weeks or 6 weeks starting 24 h post radiation exposure, were assayed at 180 d post-radiation to identify potential biomarkers. A panel of lung metabolites that are responsive to radiation and able to distinguish an efficacious treatment schedule of BIO 300 from a non-efficacious treatment schedule in terms of 180 d survival were identified. These metabolites represent potential biomarkers that could be further validated for use in drug development of BIO 300 and in the translation of dose from animal to human.

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effects. Mechanisms, biological implications, and current investigations at the Leipzig LIPSION facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterreicher, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Radiobiology and Immunology, Purkyne Military Medical Academy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D. [Gray Cancer Inst., Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Vogt, J.; Butz, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, J.M. [Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Background: The bystander effect is a relatively new area of radiobiological research, which is aimed at studying post-radiation changes in neighboring non-hit cells or tissues. The bystander effect of ionizing irradiation is important after low-dose irradiation in the range of up to 0.2 Gy, where a higher incidence of stochastic damage was observed than was expected from a linear-quadratic model. It is also important when the irradiation of a cell population is highly non-uniform. Objective: This review summarizes most of the important results and proposed bystander effect mechanisms as well as their impact on theory and clinical practice. The literature, in parts contradictory, is collected, the main topics are outlined, and some basic papers are described in more detail. In order to illustrate the microbeam technique, which is considered relevant for the bystander effect research, the state of the Leipzig LIPSION nanoprobe facility is described. Results: The existence of a radiation-induced bystander effect is now generally accepted. The current state of knowledge on it is summarized here. Several groups worldwide are working on understanding its different aspects and its impact on radiobiology and radiation protection. Conclusion: The observation of a bystander effect has posed many questions, and answering them is a challenging topic for radiobiology in the future. (orig.)

  12. Role of ROS-mediated autophagy in radiation-induced bystander effect of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jianghong; Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Ye, Shuang; Liu, Weili; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular response to ionizing radiation, but it is unclear whether autophagy can modulate radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Here, we investigated the relationship between bystander damage and autophagy in human hepatoma cells of HepG2. HepG2 cells were treated with conditioned medium (CM) collected from 3 Gy γ-rays irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells for 4, 12, or 24 h, followed by the measurement of micronuclei (MN), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and protein expressions of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and Beclin-1 in the bystander HepG2 cells. In some experiments, the bystander HepG2 cells were respectively transfected with LC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA), Beclin-1 siRNA or treated with 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Additional MN and mitochondrial dysfunction coupled with ROS were induced in the bystander cells. The expressions of protein markers of autophagy, LC3-II/LC3-I and Beclin-1, increased in the bystander cells. The inductions of bystander MN and overexpressions of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly diminished by DMSO. However, when the bystander cells were transfected with LC3 siRNA or Beclin-1 siRNA, the yield of bystander MN was significantly enhanced. The elevated ROS have bi-functions in balancing the bystander effects. One is to cause MN and the other is to induce protective autophagy.

  13. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  14. The prevention of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells by salvianic acid A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of radiation always provokes public debate, and the uses of radiation for therapeutic and other purposes have always been associated with some anxiety. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases including cerebrovascular diseases, coronary artery diseases, and myocardial infarction. Salvianolic acid A (SAA d (+-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid is the principal effective, watersoluble constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In our present study, radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC in the presence and absence of SAA were examined. We investigated the effects of SAA on ROS formation and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, the lipid peroxidative index and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidant (GSH. Finally, we investigated whether the reduction of radiation-induced cell death caused by SAA might be related to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Present findings indicate that SAA is a promising radioprotective agent with a strong antioxidant activity. SAA exerted its protective action on the proliferative activity of HIEC cells as evidenced by decreased cytotoxicity after exposure to γ-radiation. It is possible that SAA achieved its radioprotective action, at least in part, by enhancing DNA repair and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, by scavenging ROS and by inhibiting the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  15. Acidic polysaccharide of Panax ginseng regulates the mitochondria/caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway in radiation-induced damage to the jejunum in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Ahn, Ginnae; Im, Jaehak; Kim, Dae Seung; Ha, Danbee; Cho, Jinhee; Kim, Areum; Jee, Youngheun

    2014-04-01

    Owing to its susceptibility to radiation, the small intestine of mice is valuable for studying radioprotective effects. When exposed to radiation, intestinal crypt cells immediately go through apoptosis, which impairs swift differentiation necessary for the regeneration of intestinal villi. Our previous studies have elucidated that acidic polysaccharide of Panax ginseng (APG) protects the mouse small intestine from radiation-induced damage by lengthening villi with proliferation and repopulation of crypt cells. In the present study, we identified the molecular mechanism involved. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with gamma-rays with or without APG and the expression levels of apoptosis-related molecules in the jejunum were investigated using immunohistochemistry. APG pretreatment strongly decreased the radiation-induced apoptosis in the jejunum. It increased the expression levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-XS/L) and dramatically reduced the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (p53, BAX, cytochrome c and caspase-3). Therefore, APG attenuated the apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, which is controlled by p53 and Bcl-2 family members. Results presented in this study suggest that APG protects the mouse small intestine from irradiation-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the p53-dependent pathway and the mitochondria/caspase pathway. Thus, APG may be a potential agent for preventing radiation induced injuries in intestinal cells during radio-therapy such as in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Department of Plastic Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Ho [Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [College of Pharmacy & Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewah Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  17. Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Linn W.

    2002-12-21

    This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models

  18. Functional analysis of molecular mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis, that are not mediated by DNA damages; Funktionelle Analyse molekularer Mechanismen der strahleninduzierten Apoptose, die nicht ueber direkte DNA-Schaeden vermittelt werden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermeier, Marita; Moertl, Simone [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie

    2012-09-15

    The effects of low-dose irradiation pose new challenges on the radiation protection efforts. Enhanced cellular radiation sensitivity is displayed by disturbed cellular reactions and resulting damage like cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. Apoptosis serves as genetically determinate parameter for the individual radiation sensitivity. In the frame of the project the radiation-induced apoptosis was mechanistically investigated. Since ionizing radiation induced direct DNA damage and generates a reactive oxygen species, the main focus of the research was the differentiation and weighting of DNA damage mediated apoptosis and apoptosis caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  19. "You Have to Give Them a Place where They Feel Protected and Safe and Loved": The Views of Parents Who Have Gender-Variant Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Darryl B.; Menvielle, Edgardo

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on the experiences of parents of gender-variant children and teens. The goal was to document issues faced by parents of kids with childhood gender-variant behaviors and/or gender-variant identity and to compile their wisdom. Telephone interviews were conducted with 43 parents of 31 youth (all who met the DSM criteria for Gender…

  20. The 23K variant of the R23K polymorphism in the glucocorticoid receptor gene protects against postnatal growth failure and insulin resistance after preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finken, Martijn J J; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Dekker, Friedo W; Frölich, Marijke; Romijn, Johannes A; Slagboom, P Eline; Wit, Jan M

    2007-12-01

    Preterm birth is associated with postnatal growth failure, abdominal fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and hypertension, resembling increased glucocorticoid bioactivity. We tested the effects of the R23K and N363S polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor gene, associated with decreased and increased sensitivity to cortisol, respectively, on linear growth and the adult metabolic profile in a cohort (n = 249) of men and women born less than 32 gestational weeks and followed up prospectively from birth until 19 yr of age. This was a birth cohort study that included 249 19-yr-old survivors born at a gestational age less than 32 wk from the Dutch Project on Preterm and Small-for-Gestational-Age Infants cohort. This project was a nationwide multicenter follow-up study. Linear growth and adult body composition, fasting cortisol, glucose, insulin, and cholesterol concentrations, and blood pressure were measured. The 23K variant (n = 24) was associated with lower fasting insulin levels [mean difference after log transformation: -0.09 (95% confidence interval -0.16, -0.01) mU/liter] and a lower homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index [mean difference after log transformation: -0.09 (95% confidence interval -0.16, -0.01)] as well as with a taller stature departing from the age of 1 yr onward. 23K carriers showed complete catch-up growth between the ages of 3 months and 1 yr, and attained height was similar to the population reference mean, whereas stature in noncarriers was on average 0.5 sd below this mean. In contrast, the N363S polymorphism was not associated with any of the outcomes. Carriers of the 23K variant are, at least in part, protected against postnatal growth failure and insulin resistance after preterm birth.

  1. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  2. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Burak, Miroslaw [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Poland); Kalinski, Thomas [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Pathologie (Germany); Garlipp, Benjamin [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefäßchirurgie (Germany); Koelble, Konrad [Philipps Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Medizin der, Abteilung für Neuropathologie (Germany); Wust, Peter [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie (Germany); Antweiler, Kai [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Biometrie und Medizinische Informatik (Germany); Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  3. A role for TRAIL/TRAIL-R2 in radiation-induced apoptosis and radiation-induced bystander response of human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-03-01

    Adult neurons, which are terminally differentiated cells, demonstrate substantial radioresistance. In contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC), which have a significant proliferative capacity, are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Cranial irradiation that is widely used for treatment of brain tumors may induce death of NSC and further cause substantial cognitive deficits such as impairing learning and memory. The main goal of our study was to determine a mechanism of NSC radiosensitivity. We observed a constitutive high-level expression of TRAIL-R2 in human NSC. On the other hand, ionizing radiation through generation of reactive oxygen species targeted cell signaling pathways and dramatically changed the pattern of gene expression, including upregulation of TRAIL. A significant increase of endogenous expression and secretion of TRAIL could induce autocrine/paracrine stimulation of the TRAIL-R2-mediated signaling cascade with activation of caspase-3-driven apoptosis. Furthermore, paracrine stimulation could initiate bystander response of non-targeted NSC that is driven by death ligands produced by directly irradiated NSC. Experiments with media transfer from directly irradiated NSC to non-targeted (bystander) NSC confirmed a role of secreted TRAIL for induction of a death signaling cascade in non-targeted NSC. Subsequently, TRAIL production through elimination of bystander TRAIL-R-positive NSC might substantially restrict a final yield of differentiating young neurons. Radiation-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis could be partially suppressed by anti-TRAIL antibody added to the cell media. Interestingly, direct gamma-irradiation of SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells using clinical doses (2-5 Gy) resulted in low levels of apoptosis in cancer cells that was accompanied however by induction of a strong bystander response in non-targeted NSC. Numerous protective mechanisms were involved in the maintenance of radioresistance of neuroblastoma cells, including

  4. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasom Shin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2 has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  5. Interferon-alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1) variants are associated with protection against cerebral malaria in the Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucan, C; Walley, A J; Hennig, B J W; Fitness, J; Frodsham, A; Zhang, L; Kwiatkowski, D; Hill, A V S

    2003-06-01

    The chromosome 21q22.11 cytokine receptor cluster contains four genes that encode subunits of the receptors for the cytokines interleukin-10 and interferon-alpha, -beta and -gamma that may have a role in malaria pathogenesis. A total of 15 polymorphic markers located within these genes were initially genotyped in 190 controls and 190 severe malaria cases from The Gambia. Two interferon-alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1) gene SNPs (17470 and L168 V) showed evidence for an association with severe malaria phenotypes and were typed in a larger series of samples comprising 538 severe malaria cases, 338 mild malaria cases and 562 controls. Both the 17470-G/G and L168V-G/G genotypes were associated with protection against severe malaria, in general, and cerebral malaria, in particular (P=0.004 and 0.003, respectively). IFNAR1 diplotypes were then constructed for these two markers using the PHASE software package. The (17470-G L168V-G/17470-G L168V-G) diplotype was found to be associated with a reduced risk of cerebral malaria and the (17470-C L168V-C/17470-G L168V-G) diplotype with an increased risk of cerebral malaria (overall 3 x 2 chi(2)=12.8, d.f.=2, P=0.002 and 3 x 2 chi(2)=15.2, d.f.=2, P=0.0005, respectively). These data suggest a role for the type I interferon pathway in resistance to cerebral malaria.

  6. Radioprotective Efficacy of Lutein in Ameliorating Electron Beam Radiation-induced Oxidative Injury in Swiss Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Vasudeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lutein, a carotenoid compound, has previously been studied for its antioxidant and medicinal properties as well as the moderate protection it confers against gamma radiation. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of lutein against radiation-induced hematological and biochemical changes in mice. Methods: The optimized dose of the compound was orally administered for 15 days, and the mice were irradiated (6 Gy on day 15 after the administration of the compound. The groups were divided (6 mice in each group into normal control, radiation control, gallic acid control, 10% DMSO control, lutein control, and irradiated groups pretreated with gallic acid, 10% DMSO, and lutein. Gallic acid was used to maintain a standard since it is a proven radioprotector. Within 24 hours post irradiation, the animals were anesthetized and sacrificed. The hematological, biochemical, and antioxidant changes were determined using suitable methods. Data were analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier curve (log-rank test and ANOVA (the Tukey test. The independent t test was used to compare the independent groups. SPSS (ver. 16 was employed. Results: Maximum survival was observed with a dose of 250 mg/kg b.wt lutein. The total leukocyte count and the percentage lymphocyte count exhibited a significant decline in the irradiated groups pretreated with gallic acid and lutein in comparison to their controls, whereas the percentage granulocyte count showed a significant rise. Antioxidant activity had markedly declined in the irradiated groups, indicating oxidative stress. Lutein pretreatment reduced the damage and maintained the antioxidant system. Conclusion: The present study suggests a protective role for lutein in palliating radiation-induced oxidative changes and maintaining the antioxidant system in vivo.

  7. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  8. Silibinin attenuates radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis and reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Han, Na-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hae-June

    2017-09-19

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for cancer patients, but its use is often restricted by the tolerance of normal tissue. As cancer patients live longer, delayed radiation effects on normal tissue have become a concern. Radiation-induced enteropathy, including inflammatory bowel disease and fibrosis, are major issues for long-term cancer survivors. To investigate whether silibinin attenuates delayed radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, we focused on intestinal fibrotic changes. Silibinin improved delayed radiation injuries in mice in association with decreased collagen deposition within the intestines and deceased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels in the intestine and plasma. Treating mice bearing CT26 mouse colon cancer tumors with both silibinin and radiation stimulated tumor regression more than radiation alone. We also investigated the effect of silibinin on the radiation-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the primary mechanism of fibrosis. We assessed changes in E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and demonstrated that silibinin attenuates radiation-induced EMT. Irradiating intestinal epithelial cells increased TGF-β1 levels, but silibinin suppressed TGF-β1 expression by inhibiting Smad2/3 phosphorylation. These results suggest silibinin has the potential to serve as a useful therapeutic agent in patients with radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis.

  9. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boonsirichai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. -H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of -H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation

  10. Gamma Radiation-induced Proteome of Deinococcus radiodurans Primarily Targets DNA Repair and Oxidative Stress Alleviation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans primarily originates from its efficient DNA repair ability. The kinetics of proteomic changes induced by a 6-kGy dose of gamma irradiation was mapped during the post-irradiation growth arrest phase by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. The results revealed that at least 37 proteins displayed either enhanced or de novo expression in the first 1 h of post-irradiation recovery. All of the radiation-responsive proteins were identified, and they belonged to the major functional categories of DNA repair, oxidative stress alleviation, and protein translation/folding. The dynamics of radiation-responsive protein levels throughout the growth arrest phase demonstrated (i) sequential up-regulation and processing of DNA repair proteins such as single-stranded DNA-binding protein (Ssb), DNA damage response protein A (DdrA), DNA damage response protein B (DdrB), pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair (PprA), and recombinase A (RecA) substantiating stepwise genome restitution by different DNA repair pathways and (ii) concurrent early up-regulation of proteins involved in both DNA repair and oxidative stress alleviation. Among DNA repair proteins, Ssb was found to be the first and most abundant radiation-induced protein only to be followed by alternate Ssb, DdrB, indicating aggressive protection of single strand DNA fragments as the first line of defense by D. radiodurans, thereby preserving genetic information following radiation stress. The implications of both qualitative or quantitative and sequential or co-induction of radiation-responsive proteins for envisaged DNA repair mechanism in D. radiodurans are discussed. PMID:21989019

  11. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-June [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hee-Chung [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hee-Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil, E-mail: yslee0425@ewha.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Woman' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  12. Amifostine use in radiation-induced kidney damage. Preclinical evaluation with scintigraphic and histopathologic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaldir, M. [The Ministry of Health, Numune Hospital, Erzurum (Turkey); Cosar-Alas, R.; Yurut-Caloglu, V.; Saynak, M.; Caloglu, M.; Kocak, Z.; Tokatli, F.; Uzal, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey); Cermik, T.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey); Altaner, S. [Dept. of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey); Tuere, M. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey); Parlar, S. [Dept. of Medical Radiophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: to assess the degree of protective effects of amifostine on kidney functions via semiquantitative static renal scintigraphy and histopathologic analysis. Material and methods: 30 female albino rats were divided into three equal groups as control (CL), radiotherapy alone (RT), and radiotherapy + amifostine (RT+AMI). The animals in the CL and RT groups were given phosphate-buffered saline, whereas the animals in the RT+AMI group received amifostine (200 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection 30 min before irradiation. RT and RT+AMI groups were irradiated with a single dose of 6 Gy using a {sup 60}Co unit at a source-skin distance of 80 cm to the whole right kidney. They were followed up for 6 months. CL, RT, and RT+AMI groups underwent static kidney scintigraphy at the beginning of the experiment and, again, on the day before sacrificing. Histopathologically, tubular atrophy and fibrosis of the kidney damage were evaluated. Results: after irradiation, the median value of right kidney function was 48% (44-49%) and 50.5% (49%-52%) in RT and RT+AMI groups, respectively (p = 0.0002). Grade 1 kidney fibrosis was observed to be 60% in the RT group, while it was only 30% in the RT+AMI group. Grade 2 kidney fibrosis was 30% and 0% in the RT and RT+AMI group, respectively. Grade 1 tubular atrophy was 70% and 50% in the RT and RT+AMI group, respectively. Grade 2 tubular atrophy effect was the same in both groups (10%). Conclusion: static kidney scintigraphy represents an objective and reproducible method to noninvasively investigate kidney function following irradiation. Amifostine produced a significant reduction in radiation-induced loss of renal function. (orig.)

  13. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  14. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Arguello, J.A. (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada)

    1991-02-01

    The effects of an acute dose of {gamma}-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19+-1{sup 0}C and 42+-2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author).

  15. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France); Corre, Isabelle, E-mail: icorre@nantes.inserm.fr [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  16. The inhibition of radiation-induced mutagenesis by the combined effects of selenium and the aminothiol WR-1065

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Dale, P. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    In order to evaluate the anti-mutagenic effects of the potential chemoprotective compounds selenium and S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-1065), CHO AA8 cells were exposed to both compounds either individually or in combination prior to irradiation. Mutation frequency following exposure to 8 Gy was evaluated by quantitation of the mutations detected at the hprt locus of these cells. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was observed for both 30 nM sodium selenite or 4 mM WR-1065. In addition, the protection against mutation induction provided by the combination of these agents appeared additive. In contrast, sodium selenite did not provide protection against radiation toxicity when provided either alone or in conjunction with WR-1065. In order to evaluate the possible mechanisms of the anti-mutagenic effects observed in these cells, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was evaluated following exposure to the chemopreventative compounds. The addition of sodium selenite to the culture media resulted in a 5-fold increase in GPX activity, which was unaltered by the presence of the WR-1065. Northern analysis of RNA derived from these cells indicated that selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in the mRNA for the cytosolic GPx (GSHPx-1) which was insufficient to account for the stimulation of GPx activity observed in cellular extracts. These results suggest that selenium and WR-1065 offer protection via independent mechanisms and that GPX stimulation remains a possible mechanism of the anti-mutagenic effect of selenium.

  17. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  18. A Rare Case of Radiation-Induced Osteosarcoma of the Ethmoid Sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaed Alzahrani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy has been recognized as a useful modality of treatment in head and neck malignant tumors. However, radiation over 10 Gy may predispose to secondary tumors. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus is unusual. These tumors may present long after radiation with epistaxis. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and biopsy are the modalities of diagnosis. We report a case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus 9 years after initial exposure. We describe the clinical presentation, the radiological findings, and the management.

  19. Radiation induced myxoma of superior vena cava origin presenting as a right atrial mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, F; Faraji, R

    2014-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors. Myxomas are more common in the left heart chamber than the right side chamber. An extracardiac origin presenting as a right atrial mass is very rare. Right-sided tumors are considerably less common than left-sided tumors, and however myxoma of great vessels origin presenting as right atrial masses are rare but radiation induced villous myxoma in superior vena cava (SVC) is exceedingly rare tumor. A case of radiation induced myxoma originating in a previously undescribed location and presenting as a right atrial mass is reported.

  20. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the successful treatment of two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Akihito; Ohkubo, Yuhei; Takashima, Rikiya; Furugen, Nobuaki; Tochimoto, Masato; Tsuchiya, Akira (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital)

    1994-08-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been established no definitive treatment. We experienced 2 cases of radiation-induced severe hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with hyperbaric oxygen to control hematuria was performed and obtained successful results. Gross hematuria was disappeared and cystoscopic figure was remarkably improved. No remarkable side-effect was observed in both patients. This experience suggested that hyperbaric oxygen could be considered as the primary treatment for patient with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis instead of usual treatment. (author).

  2. Terahertz Photovoltaic Detection of Cyclotron Resonance in the Regime of Radiation-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    these radiation-induced oscillations do overlap the more-rapidly- varying-with-B Shubnikov–de Haas ( SdH ) oscillations; see also Refs. 17, 21, and 22. A... SdH Oscillations RIMRO FIG. 2. (Color online) Microwave (f < 300 GHz) and terahertz (f 300 GHz) radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in...Shubnikov–de Haas ( SdH ) oscillations. A subset of oscillations of each type are marked on the figure. The solid vertical lines below 0.1 T marks the

  3. Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

  4. Low-Dose Bevacizumab Is Effective in Radiation-Induced Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Alessandretti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiation-induced necrosis is a complication of brain irradiation. Treatment options are limited. Methods: The response to treatment with low-dose bevacizumab in 2 patients with radiation-induced necrosis was reported. Results: Both patients with metastatic melanoma, aged 48 and 51 years, had significant symptomatic and radiological improvement with low-dose bevacizumab treatment. Doses as low as 5 mg/kg every 6 weeks and 7.5 mg/kg i.v. every 4 weeks were used and were highly effective. Conclusions: Low-dose bevacizumab is a solid option in the management of edema associated with radiation necrosis.

  5. A genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Robert A; Freitag, Daniel F; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    . We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association of those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict...

  6. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation-induced cellular energy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joohong; Halliday, Gary M; Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation is carcinogenic by causing mutations in the skin and also by suppressing cutaneous antitumor immunity. We previously found nicotinamide (vitamin B3) to be highly effective at reducing UV-induced immunosuppression in human volunteers, with microarray studies on in vivo irradiated human skin suggesting that nicotinamide normalizes subsets of apoptosis, immune function and energy metabolism-related genes that are downregulated by UV exposure. Using human adult low calcium temperature keratinocytes, we further investigated nicotinamide's effects on cellular energy metabolism. We found that nicotinamide prevented UV-induced cellular ATP loss and protected against UV-induced glycolytic blockade. To determine whether nicotinamide alters the effects of UV-induced oxidative stress posttranslationally, we also measured UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotinamide had no effect on ROS formation, and at the low UV doses used in these studies, equivalent to ambient daily sun exposure, there was no evidence of apoptosis. Hence, nicotinamide appears to exert its UV protective effects on the skin via its role in cellular energy pathways.

  7. Radiation-Induced Liver Injury in Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Postoperative or Locoregional Recurrent Gastric Cancer: Risk Factors and Dose Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guichao; Wang, Jiazhou; Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    , radiation-induced liver injury may occur and affect the overall treatment plan. The total number of chemotherapy cycles correlated with liver function injury, and V35 and ALP are significant predictive factors for radiation-induced liver injury. Our dose limitation reference for liver protection is feasible.

  8. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  9. Protective effect of curcumin, ellagic acid and bixin on radiation induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresiamma, K C; George, J; Kuttan, R

    1996-09-01

    Whole body irradiation of rats (10 Gy as five fractions) found to produce lung fibrosis within 2 months as seen from increased lung collagen hydroxyproline and histopathology. Oral administration of antioxidants curcumin, ellagic acid, bixin and alpha-tocopherol at a concentration 200 mumole/kg body weight significantly reduced the lung collagen hydroxyproline in these animals. In serum and liver lipid peroxidation which were found to be increased by irradiation was reduced significantly by antioxidant treatment. The liver superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity were also found to be increased and catalase activity decreased in irradiated control. Superoxide dismutase activity reduced significantly by antioxidant treatment while catalase activity was found to be increased with alpha-tocopherol treatment. The increased frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes after whole body irradiation of mice was found to be significantly reduced with antioxidants.

  10. Protective Effect of Anthocyanin from Lonicera Caerulea var. Edulis on Radiation-Induced Damage in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitian Zhao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC, was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole body 60Coγ radiation. The spleen index, thymus index, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, malondialdehyde (MDA content, and glutathione (GSH content in liver tissue were measured. Compared with the radiation control group, the levels of MDA in all ALC treated groups decreased significantly (p < 0.05. Moreover, the GSH content, activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver tissue were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05 in all ALC groups. These results demonstrate that ALC may be a potential radioprotector, and a further study of the molecular mechanism is needed for further application.

  11. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  12. High-LET radiation-induce malignant and benign tumors in rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhao, P.; Hiz, Z.; Chen, S.; Roy, N.

    1999-03-01

    In the multistage theory of carcinogenesis, cells progress to cancer through a series of mutations in cancer-relevant genes, and sometimes the intermediate stages become benign neoplastic lesions. Although cancer induction by low LET radiation is subject to repair or recovery in the sense that multiple exposures produce fewer cancers than the same single dose, this recovery is not seen following exposure to high LET radiation. Data are presented on squamous and basal cell carcinoma and fibroma induction in rat skin exposed to: 1. an electron beam (LET=0.34 kV/{mu}), 2. a neon ion beam (LET=30 kV/{mu} ) and 3. an argon ion beam (LET=125 kV/{mu}). Cancer yields were fitted by a LET-dependent quadratic equation, and equation parameters were estimated by regression analysis for each type of radiation. The results are consistent with the interpretation that carcinoma induction can be explained by a pathway involving 2 radiation-induced events, 1 radiation-induced mutation and 1 spontaneous mutation, while benign fibromas can be explained by a pathway involving 1 radiation-induced event and 1 radiation-induced mutation. (author)

  13. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  14. A cases of radiation-induced insufficiency fracture of the sacrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Kawase, Tomoko; Okabe, Harumi; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Endo, Siho; Nakata, Mihoko [Kyoto First Red-Cross Hospital (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    We presented a case of radiation-induced insufficiency fracture of the sacrum, clinically confused with metastasis. Bone scintigraphy showed characteristic H-shaped uptake, CT showed multiple fractures and sclerotic changes, and T1 weighted MR imaging provided diffuse decreased signal intensity in the sacrum. Bone scintigraphy, CT and MR imaging are useful technique for detecting insufficiency fracture. (author)

  15. Radiation induced cell loss in rat submandibular gland and its relation to gland function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilstra, LJW; Vissink, A; Konings, AWT; Coppes, RP

    Purpose: To understand early and late radiation-induced loss of function of the submandibular gland, changes in cell number were documented and correlated with data on gland function. Modulation of the radiation effect by sialogogues was used to investigate possible mechanisms of action. Materials

  16. Short and long term radiation induced cardiovascular disease in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is well described as a late effect in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors with resultant long-term side effects related to their cancer...

  17. Stem Cell Therapy to Reduce Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Rob P.; van der Goot, Annemieke; Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.

    Normal tissue damage after radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced side effects and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in stem cell research with respect to their

  18. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-11-24

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  19. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Balentova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  20. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  1. Comparison of three rat strains for development of radiation-induced lung injury after hemithoracic irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, MR; Kampinga, HH; Szabo, BG; Vujaskovic, Z

    The purpose of this study is to define differences in radiation sensitivity among rat strains using breathing frequency and lung perfusion as end points of radiation-induced lung injury. The results have confirmed previous findings in mice showing that-under stringently controlled iso-dose/volume

  2. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  3. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  4. Stem cells and the repair of radiation-induced salivary gland damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, R. P.; Stokman, M. A.

    Hyposalivation underlying xerostomia after radiotherapy is still a major problem in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced hyposalivation and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in

  5. The role of pilocarpine in the reduction of radiation induced damage to the salivary glands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burlage, Fred Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Regarding late morbidity, hyposalivation is one of the most frequently reported radiation-induced side effects which has a negative impact on health-related quality of life [1;2]. Besides the subjective sensation of a dry mouth (xerostomia), saliva also plays a major role in speech, taste

  6. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism : Development of an NTCP Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E. M. C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively

  7. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosting, Sjoukje F. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A., E-mail: j.a.langendijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

  8. Radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head and neck cancer patients : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    Purpose: To review literature on the relationship between the dose distribution in the thyroid gland and the incidence of radiation-induced hypothyroidism in adults. Material and Methods: Articles were identified through a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Approximately 2449

  9. Validation of genetic predictors of late radiation-induced morbidity in prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Line M H; Petersen, Stine E; Nielsen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    in 96 patients (rs2788612, rs1800629, rs264663, rs2682585, rs2268363, rs1801516, rs13035033, rs7120482 and rs17779457). A validated gene expression profile predictive of resistance to radiation-induced skin fibrosis was tested in 42 patients. An RT-induced anorectal dysfunction score (RT-ARD) served...

  10. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  11. THE ROLE OF SECRETORY GRANULES IN RADIATION-INDUCED DYSFUNCTION OF RAT SALIVARY-GLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PETER, B; VANWAARDE, MAWH; VISSINK, A; SGRAVENMADE, EJ; KONINGS, AWT

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini, At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy

  12. Radiation-induced sterility for pupal and adult stages of the malaria moquito Anopheles arabiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, M.E.H.; Parker, A.G.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background - In the context of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), radiation-induced sterility in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) was studied. Male mosquitoes were exposed to gamma rays in the pupal or adult stage and dose-sterility curves were determined.

  13. AN IMAGE-ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF RADIATION-INDUCED DNA FRAGMENTATION AFTER CHEF ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROSEMANN, M; KANON, B; KONINGS, AWT; KAMPINGA, HH

    CHEF-electrophoresis was used as a technique to detect radiation-induced DNA breakage with special emphasis to biological relevant X-ray doses (0-10 Gy). Fluorescence detection of DNA-fragments using a sensitive image analysis system was directly compared with conventional scintillation counting of

  14. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL. We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98 and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61, as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93 and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54. Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3 reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for

  15. P53 status in radiation-induced soft-tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubert, H.; Meye, A.; Hinze, R.; Holzhausen, H.J.; Schmidt, H.; Rath, F.W. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle/Saale (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Bache, M.; Dunst, J. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle/Saale (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Wuerl, P. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Surgical Clinic

    1998-08-01

    Background: Following therapeutic irradiation after a latency period of many years radiation-induced tumors, often sarcomas, can arise. Results of radiation-induced DNA damage can be 1. p53 over-expression, inducing growth arrest or apoptosis, and 2. occurrence of mutations, frequently including the p53 gene, as one molecular promotor for carcinogenesis. We were interested whether radiation-induced sarcomas are associated with alterations of the p53 status. Material and Methods: Samples from 11 radiation-induced soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) were studied by a non-radioactive PCR-SSCP sequencing analysis and by immunohistochemistry with five antibodies for their p53 status. Results: A tumor of one patient possessed a G>A transition in codon 280 (exon 8). Of 11 tumors, 9 showed nuclear p53 positivity, detected by monoclonal antibody DO-1. Of these 9 patients, 7 died during the observation period, whereas the 2 patients with DO-1 negative tumor samples are still alive. Conclusions: p53 over-expression and p53 mutation occur in radiation-induced STS. p53 status is expected to have prognostic impact for radiation-induced STS. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Als Folge therapeutischer Bestrahlung koennen nach einer laengeren Latenzzeit von mehreren Jahren strahleninduzierte Tumoren, oft Sarkome, entstehen. Als Ergebnis strahleninduzierter DNA-Schaeden kann es 1. zu einer Ueberexprimierung von p53 und damit verbunden zu einer Wachstumsarretierung bzw. Apoptose kommen und 2. zum Auftreten von Mutationen fuehren, die haeufig das p53-Gen betreffen und Promotor fuer eine Kanzerogenese sind. Uns interessierte, ob fuer strahleninduzierte Sarkome ein veraenderter p53-Status vorliegt. Patientengut und Methode: Wir untersuchten Tumorproben von elf strahleninduzierten Weichteilsarkomen in einer nichtradioaktiven PCR-SSCP-Sequenzierungsanalyse und immunhistochemisch mit Hilfe von fuenf p53-Antikoerpern auf Veraenderungen im p53-Status. Ergebnisse: Der Tumor eines Patienten wies eine G

  16. Modification of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, M; Ross, G A

    2004-02-01

    A new non-toxic drug (compound A) consisting of curcumin, alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil was developed and its efficacy tested in the treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the rat. Mature (12 weeks old, 200-225 g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. While under general anaesthesia, the tongues of the animals were slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV beta-rays from a 5-mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was about 10 Gy min(-1) at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anaesthesia maintained by a 1.5% halothane/oxygen mixture. Six groups of animals were irradiated with single doses of 13.5, 15.0, 16.5 or 18Gy. One subgroup (radiation only) received no further treatment, while the other five groups received 0.5 ml day(-1) of either compound A, sunflower oil, alpha-tocopherol, curcumin or water containing 10% ethanol by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed, the tongues of the animals were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and a dose-modification factor was obtained. There was a modest increase in ED50, the dose expected to cause mucositis in 50% of the animals after both alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil were administered. This resulted in dose-modification factors of 1.05. While curcumin treatment resulted in a dose-modification factor of 1.09. Compound A significantly reduced the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis with a statistically significant dose-modification factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1. Curcumin and other components of compound A

  17. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Tissue-specific effects of acute aluminium exposure on the radiation-induced bystander effect in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Moccia, Richard D; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if aluminium (Al) modifies the rainbow trout response to radiation exposure and/or the induction of a radiation-induced bystander effect. Rainbow trout were exposed to 100 or 200 μg l(-1) Al (for 3 h), a 0.5 Gy X-ray dose or Al followed immediately by irradiation. The exposed fish were then swum with completely untreated bystander fish. A human reporter cell clonogenic assay was used to determine whether Al exposure modified the effects of irradiation on the skin and gills from directly exposed fish and also the radiation-induced bystander effect in untreated fish. Al exposure did not modify the response to direct irradiation by the skin, or the gill. Al did not modify the bystander effect in the skin. However Al did modify the bystander effect in the gill. Gills of bystander fish swum with fish exposed to 200 μg l(-1) Al, followed by irradiation, caused a greater reduction in HPV-G cell survival than was caused by irradiation only. Interestingly Al exposure only also caused a bystander effect (reduced HPV-G survival) in the gill. This study shows that, in a multiple stressor scenario, the communication of radiation-induced stress signals is modified on a tissue-specific basis by acute Al exposure. Aside from the implications this has for radiological protection this response may also have potential for environmental monitoring where detection of the bystander effect could act as an indicator of radiation exposure when direct exposure responses are not evident.

  19. Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Mitkova, Maria [Department of Electrical Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9309 (United States); Poweleit, Christian [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2090 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

  20. A case showing effective radiotherapy for a radiation-induced glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Kimiko; Inamura, Takanori; Nakamizo, Akira; Ikezaki, Kiyonobu; Inoha, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    Radiation-induced glioblastoma is usually resistant to all treatments. We report a case with radiation-induced glioblastoma, in which radiotherapy was remarkably effective. A 14-year-old female with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the age of 7, underwent 15 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain. She was admitted to our department due to the development of headache and nausea. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an irregularly enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. Partial removal of the mass was performed and histological examination showed it to be glioblastoma with a high MIB-1 index. The patient underwent 40 Gy of local radiotherapy and chemotherapy with ACNU and Interferon-{beta} for 2 years. The residual tumor disappeared after the radiotherapy, and her status is still ''complete remission'', 29 months after the onset. (author)

  1. The effects of herbs on the radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; An, Mi Ra; Nah, Seung Yeol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ha; Shin, Dong Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Sung Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [Sangju National Univ., Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the effect of several herbs on radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells. Longyanrou(Euphoris logana), Suanzaoren(Zizyphus vulgaris), Yuanzhi(Polygala tenuifolia), Rensan(Panax ginseng), Fuling(Poria cocos), Muxiang(Saussurea lappa), Chuanxiong(Cnidium offcinale), Baishaoyao(Paeonia lactifolia), Shengma(Cimicifuga heracleifolia), Chaihu(Bupleurum falcatum) and Dongchongxiacao(Paecilomyces japonica) reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Longyanrou, Suanzaoren, Yuanzhi, Rensan, Fuling, Muxiang, Chuanxiong, Baishaoyao, Shengma, Chaihu and Dongchongxiacao might be useful inhibitors of apoptosis, especially since these are relative nontoxic natural products.

  2. A kinetic-based model of radiation-induced intercellular signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J McMahon

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that intercellular communication can cause significant variations in cellular responses to genotoxic stress. The radiation-induced bystander effect is a prime example of this effect, where cells shielded from radiation exposure see a significant reduction in survival when cultured with irradiated cells. However, there is a lack of robust, quantitative models of this effect which are widely applicable. In this work, we present a novel mathematical model of radiation-induced intercellular signalling which incorporates signal production and response kinetics together with the effects of direct irradiation, and test it against published data sets, including modulated field exposures. This model suggests that these so-called "bystander" effects play a significant role in determining cellular survival, even in directly irradiated populations, meaning that the inclusion of intercellular communication may be essential to produce robust models of radio-biological outcomes in clinically relevant in vivo situations.

  3. Clinical and experimental studies on effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadasaki, Kouichi

    1988-12-01

    Clinical and experimental studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage. In a clinical study, one hundred patients with lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the development of radiation pneumonitis. In the patients treated with radiation and chemotherapy except for cisplatinum, radiation pneumonitis occurred more frequently and severely than patients with radiation alone. In an experimental study, male SD rats received 15 Gy radiation to the right lungs with or without injection of chemotherapeutic agents including cisplatinum, adriamycin or peplomycin. Histological changes and hydroxyproline contents of the lungs were evaluated at 2 or 5 months after treatment. Pulmonary damage was severer in rats with radiation and drugs than those with radiation alone. However, rats with cisplatinum had less damage than those with other drugs. In conclusion, radiation-induced pulmonary damage was enhanced by administration of several chemotherapeutic agents. However, cisplatinum seemed to enhance pulmonary damage less than other drugs. (author) 77 refs.

  4. Low temperature diffusion of hydrogenic species in oxide crystals: Radiation induced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gonzalez, R. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria

    1993-10-01

    Normally stable configurations of substitutional protons or deuterons in oxide crystal become highly unstable during ionizing radiation at room temperature, resulting in the displacements of these species. The cross section for radiation-induced-displacements of protons is exceedingly large and is a strong function of temperature. The displacement cross section of protons from cation sites is twice that of deuterons. Diffusion of these species can be induced at temperatures not otherwise possible by thermal means. For example, using electron irradiation near room temperature the O-H bond is readily broken and the hydrogenic species can be channeled along the c-axis in TiO{sub 2} by an applied electric field. Radiation induced displacements of protons from anion sites (hydride ions) at room temperature are also discussed.

  5. Transurethral coagulation for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis using Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Xue, Boxin; Shan, Yuxi; Yang, Dongrong; Zang, Yachen

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to to demonstrate the initial treatment outcomes of Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser on radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common complication of radiation therapy for pelvic tumors. From September 2004 to February 2011, 10 patients with radiation-induced intractable hemorrhagic cystitis underwent transurethral Greenlight KTP laser coagulation of the bladder. The power setting was limited to 20-30 W. Bleeding stopped in all cases after one session of laser treatment. Mean follow-up time was 17 months (6-36 months). All patients underwent cystoscopy 3 months postoperatively, and no bleeding or significant scar was found. Recurrence of significant bleeding was seen in one case 7 months post-operation, and was again cured by KTP laser. There were no complications from the procedures. Our experience suggests that transurethral coagulation using KTP laser is a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

  6. Management of radiation-induced early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liu; Fa-ya, Liang; Ping, Han; Hua, Zou; Qiu-jian, Chen; Xiao-yu, Jiang; Rui-Chen, Li; Xiao-Ming, Huang

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the conservative management of radiation-induced early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From June 2008 to June 2010, patients with bilateral or unilateral early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for NPC were selected. All patients received endoscopic management and then nasal irrigation daily and nasal steroids spray for at least 3 months. All of the clinical data and follow-up endoscopy were analyzed. There were 40 patients enrolled. The mean follow-up period was 19.6 months (range, 12-24 months) after procedure. Thirty-eight patients (95%) had patent nasal cavity during follow-up. Two patients (5%) had not received endoscopy regularly and developed severe fibrosis. For the whole group, nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, hyposmia, and xerostomia all were improved from before management according to visual analog score (p sprays and nasal irrigation provides a convenient, simple, effective, and minimally invasive therapy to treat early radiation-induced nasal adhesion patients.

  7. Radiation-induced crosslinking of polyvinyltrimethylsilane in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and allyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Roustam; Burillo, Guillermina [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Starannikova, Ludmila; Teplyakov, Vladimir [A.V. Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking of homogeneous glassy polyvinyltrimethylsilane was carried out either by the {gamma}-irradiation of the polymeric films containing 3-20 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or by the radiation-induced grafting of allyl methacrylate from vapour phase onto films made of pure polymer. The dependence of grafting value on the absorbed {gamma}-irradiation dose and film thickness was investigated. The modified films were analyzed for the sol/gel content and the dependence of gel fraction yield of crosslinked polymer on absorbed dose, concentration of the crosslinking agents and film thickness. The radiation-chemical yields of crosslinking and degradation as well as gelation doses were calculated. The permeability of oxygen and nitrogen through the crosslinked films was determined.

  8. Radiation-induced crosslinking of polyvinyltrimethylsilane in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and allyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Roustam; Starannikova, Ludmila; Teplyakov, Vladimir; Burillo, Guillermina

    1998-11-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking of homogeneous glassy polyvinyltrimethylsilane was carried out either by the γ-irradiation of the polymeric films containing 3-20 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or by the radiation-induced grafting of allyl methacrylate from vapour phase onto films made of pure polymer. The dependence of grafting value on the absorbed γ-irradiation dose and film thickness was investigated. The modified films were analyzed for the sol/gel content and the dependence of gel fraction yield of crosslinked polymer on absorbed dose, concentration of the crosslinking agents and film thickness. The radiation-chemical yields of crosslinking and degradation as well as gelation doses were calculated. The permeability of oxygen and nitrogen through the crosslinked films was determined.

  9. Effect of radiation induced deep level traps on Si detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V; Li, Z

    2002-01-01

    The main factor, which leads to semiconductor detector degradation in high-energy physics experiments, is the introduction of lattice defects in the detector material produced by radiation. Based on the spectrum of radiation induced defects in the silicon bulk, the overview of effects and mechanisms responsible for the changes in the main detector parameters such as effective concentration of the space charge in the depleted region, space charge sign inversion, charge collection efficiency, and detector breakdown voltage are considered. Special attention is paid to the electric field distortion related with high concentration of radiation induced deep traps, which is the key question for the design of detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. In particular, the charge collection recovery at low temperature, often refereed as the Lazarus effect, and the limitation for the detection rate related to the polarization effect are considered.

  10. Effective formalin treatment of two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ietsugu, Kenichi; Kosugi, Mitsuyo; Nakashima, Hisayuki; Sakatoku, Mitsuaki; Bando, Hiroyuki; Sunohara, Tetsuyuki [Tonami General Hospital, Toyama (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Radiation colitis sometimes shows uncontrollable bleeding. The treatment by 4 percent formalin solution was effective for two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis. Case 1 was an 80-year-old female who had cloacogenic carcinoma, poorly-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma type. This was complicated by hemorrhagic proctitis 16 months after radiation therapy. Bleeding could not be controlled by steroid enema and endoscopic laser therapy. Formalin treatment was very effective for hemostasis. Case 2 was 47-year-old female who had breast cancer with multiple bone metastases. This was complicated by hemorrhagic colitis 15 months after radiation therapy of bone metastases of the lumbar spine and the sacrum. Three formalin treatments were needed for hemostasis, however, they were effective. The formalin treatment is a simple, effective and minimally invasive therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis of the lower sigmoid colon and the rectum. (author)

  11. Radiation-induced chondrosarcomas: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy has become an important component of various cancer treatments. The development of second malignancy as a result of radiation therapy is a well-known sinister complication. However, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS are rare complications of radiation therapy. The timescale between completion of the radiotherapy and the development of a second malignancy, known as the latent period, can vary widely from as little as 5 years to 50 years later. Radiation-induced sarcomas per se are very rare and those with histomorphology of chondrosarcomas are even rarer. We report a rare case of RIS of left iliac bone in a 62-year-old lady after combined chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma (stage IIb. This case is being reported for its extreme rarity, vivid histology and clinical presentation.

  12. Radiation-induced preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles in the films of interpolyelectrolyte complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Dmitry I.; Zezina, Elena A.; Zezin, Sergei B.; Yang, Mingshu; Wang, Feng; Shvedunov, Vasiliy I.; Feldman, Vladimir I.; Zezin, Alexey A.

    2018-01-01

    The bimetallic nanostructures are of considerable interest for various prospective applications. This paper reports a generation of the Cu/Ag and Cu/Au nanoparticles in the interpolyelectrolyte films irradiated in aqueous media. It was shown that the radiation-induced reduction of (Cu/Ag) or (Cu/Au) ions in the matrix of poly(acrylic acid)-polyethylenimine complexes led to formation of the nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The core-shell structure of nanoparticles was demonstrated by the TEM results. According to the X-ray diffraction data, the nanoparticle cores (Ag or Au) are formed at early stage of irradiation, while increase of the absorbed dose results in the growth of copper shell. It was demonstrated that the radiation-induced reduction could be applied for effective preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles directly in the polymer matrix.

  13. Treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis with prednisolone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Hong; Chen, Yi; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2012-12-28

    Radiation-induced gastritis is an infrequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. It is a serious complication arising from radiation therapy, and the standard treatment method has not been established. The initial injury is characteristically acute inflammation of gastric mucosa. We presented a 46-year-old male patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for metastatic retroperitoneal lymph node of hepatocellular carcinoma. The endoscopic examination showed diffuse edematous hyperemicmucosa with telangiectasias in the whole muscosa of the stomach and duodenal bulb. Multiple hemorrhagic patches with active oozing were found over the antrum. Anti-secretary therapy was initiated for hemostasis, but melena still occurred off and on. Finally, he was successfully treated by prednisolone therapy. We therefore strongly argue in favor of perdnisolone therapy to effectively treat patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis.

  14. Radiation-induced color centers in La-doped PbWO sub 4 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Q; Zhu, R Y

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the result of a study on radiation-induced color center densities in La-doped lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4) crystals. The creation and annihilation constants of radiation-induced color centers were determined by using transmittance data measured for a PbWO sub 4 sample before and during sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 15 rad/h. Following a model of color center kinetics, these constants were used to calculate color center densities under irradiations at 100 rad/h. The result was found to be in good agreement with experimental data, indicating that the behaviour of PbWO sub 4 crystals under irradiation can be predicted according to this model.

  15. Radiation Induced Grafting of Acrylate onto Waste Rubber: The Effect of Monomer Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirajuddin Siti Salwa M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three different acrylate group monomers, namely n-butyl acrylate, methacrylic acid and tripropylene glycol diacrylate of radiation induced grafting onto waste rubber was studied. The electron beam accelerator operated at voltage of 2MeV was used to irradiate the waste rubber at 10 kGy and 100 kGy absorbed radiation dose, respectively. The formation of grafting was observed from the increase in the grafting yield and confirmed by Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy results. According to the result obtained, only tripropylene glycol diacrylate was selected to graft onto waste rubber. The carbonyl bond from acrylate groups was seen at 1726 cm-1 band which confirmed the presence of TPGDA in the polymer matrix. This indicates the successful preparation of the TPGDA-grafted waste rubber via radiation induced grafting techniques.

  16. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  17. Studies on the radiation induced apoptosis by morphological and biochemical analysis in A431 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Keun Hee [Dong Shin College, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Bom, Hee Seung; Kim, Ji Yeul [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the process of radiation induced apoptosis in A431 skin epithelial cancer cell line. Low to high dose radiation (0, 2, 5, 10, 25 Gy) was given to A431 cells by Cs-137 cell irradiator. Apoptosis was evaluated by cell morphology, dye exclusion test, and DNA laddering. Cell viability decreased as the radiation dose increased. Number of apoptotic bodies increased as radiation dose increased. It increased most significantly at 12 hours after irradiation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture medium increased according to radiation dose and time after irradiation. DNA ladders could be identified in irradiated cells, but, it had no correlation with radiation dose or time after irradiation. Radiation-induced apoptosis which was the main course of cell death in A431 cells could be analyzed quantitatively by counting apoptotic bodies under microscope. Apoptosis increased as radiation dose increased.

  18. Radiation Induced Crosslinking of Polyethylene in the Presence of Bifunctional Vinyl Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, M. S.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius; Silverman, J.

    1977-01-01

    Several reports have been published showing that the radiation induced grafting of bifunctional vinyl monomers to low density polyethylene results in a product with an unusually high density of crosslinks. The same grafting reactions are shown to reduce the incipient gel dose by more than a factor...... of fifty. This paper is concerned with the apparent crosslinking produced by the radiation grafting of two monomers to polyethylene: acrylic acid and acrylonitrile....

  19. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardino Clavo; Norberto Santana-Rodriguez; Pedro Llontop; Dominga Gutierrez; Daniel Ceballos; Charlin Méndez; Gloria Rovira; Gerardo Suarez; Dolores Rey-Baltar; Laura Garcia-Cabrera; Gregorio Martínez-Sánchez; Dolores Fiuza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil...

  20. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bone Loss and Effects on Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    skeletal sites. Indeed, within five years of radiation treatment at the pelvic region ( cervical , rectal or anal cancer), the risk of hip fracture ...radiation-induced effects at skeletal sites, including bone loss and increased fracture risk at the hip [2-4]. Indeed, the risk of hip fracture within...general population [5-7]. Hip fracture causes considerable morbidity and mortality to cancer patients during the course of treatment and poses a

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir [Medical Student' s Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholamrezaei, Ali, E-mail: Gholamrezaei@med.mui.ac.ir [Medical Student' s Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursina Hakim Research Institution, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemati, Simin [Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  2. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  3. Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Lee, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced taste aversion was examined to assess the importance of the vagus nerve in transmitting information on the peripheral toxicity of radiation to the brain. Vagotomy had no effect on taste aversion learning, consistent with reports using other toxins. The data support the involvement of a blood-borne factor in the acquisition of taste aversion induced by ionizing radiation.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced macular ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim A Haji

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Shamim A Haji1,2, Ronald EP Frenkel1,2,31Eye Research Foundation, Stuart, FL, USA; 2East Florida Eye Institute, Stuart, FL, USA; 3Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, FL, USAPurpose: To report a case of radiation-induced macular ischemia where vision and macular perfusion improved after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy.Methods: A 62-year-old male patient developed radiation-induced macular ischemia after he was treated with radiation for brain glioma. The patient presented with best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA acuity of 20/400 in his right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed central macular thickness of 468 μm. The patient received focal laser, intravitreal triamcinolone, and HBO therapy.Results: The patient’s vision improved from 20/400 to 20/100 after focal laser and intravitreal triamcinolone. His central macular thickness improved from 468 μm to 132 μm. After receiving HBO therapy, his VA improved to 20/50 and fluorescein angiography showed improvement in macular perfusion.Conclusion: HBO therapy improves macular perfusion in patients with radiation-induced macular ischemia.Keywords: macular ischemia, visual acuity, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, macular perfusion

  5. Antioxidant activity of capsaicin on radiation-induced oxidation of murine hepatic mitochondrial membrane preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangabhagirathi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramachandran Gangabhagirathi,1 Ravi Joshi,2 1Bioorganic Division, 2Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India Abstract: Capsaicin is the major capsaicinoid in chili peppers and is widely used as a spice. It is also used for topical applications in cases of peripheral neuropathy. The present study deals with its role in modulation of gamma radiation-induced damages of the biochemical constituents of rat liver mitochondrial membrane (RLM preparation. The extent of lipid hydroperoxide formation, depletion in protein thiols, and formation of protein carbonyls have been biochemically assessed in the presence of varying concentrations of capsaicin in RLM. Decrease in the activities of the important antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is involved in the scavenging of free radicals, and the mitochondrial marker enzyme succinate dehydrogenase have been also looked into. Capsaicin has been found to efficiently inhibit radiation-induced biochemical alterations, namely lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. It also significantly prevented radiation-induced loss in the activity of antioxidant enzyme and the important endogenous antioxidant glutathione. The study suggests that capsaicin can act as an antioxidant and radioprotector in physiological systems. Keywords: capsaicin, gamma radiation, radioprotection, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, enzyme activity

  6. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioprotective effects of dragon's blood and its extracts on radiation-induced myelosuppressive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Hasan, Murtaza; Jia, Qiutian; Tang, Bo; Shan, Shuangquan; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-07-03

    Dragon׳s blood, a traditional Chinese herb, has been used to "panacea of blood activating" and its major biological activity appears to be from phenolic compounds. In this study, our research aims to examine the effects of Dragon׳s blood (DB) and its extracts (DBE) on radiation-induced myelosuppressive mice. Adult BALB/C mice were exposed to the whole body irradiation with 4 Gy (60)Co γ-rays. DB and DBE were respectively administered orally for 5 constitutive days prior to irradiation treatment. The radioprotective effects and relevant mechanisms of DB and DBE in radiation-induced bone marrow injury were investigated by ex vivo examination. We found that the administration of DB and DBE significantly increased the numbers of peripheral blood cells and colony forming unit of bone marrow-derived stem/progenitor cells. Interestingly, compared with the irradiation group, the administration of DB and DBE significantly decreased the levels of the inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ and oxidative stress injury such as SOD, CAT, GSH, MDA in serum of mice. Furthermore, DBE markedly improved the morphology of bone marrow histopathology. Our data suggest that DB and DBE effectively attenuate radiation-induced damage in bone marrow, which is likely associated with the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of DB and DBE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival.

  9. Radiation-induced damage to mitochondrial D-. beta. -hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, O.; Nakazawa, T. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Miyahara, M.; Shiraishi, N. (Kochi Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Medical Biology)

    1985-07-01

    Radiation-induced damage to the reconstituted system of membrane-bound enzyme, D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase obtained from rat liver mitochondria, was investigated in relation to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. The D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in fresh mitochondria was very low in general and not affected by irradiation because of little incorporation of substrates into mitochondria. Enzyme activity in one-day-aged mitochondria or submitochondrial particles was five times higher than that of fresh mitochondria and decreased with increasing radiation dose accompanying the increase in peroxidation of membrane lipids. D-..beta..-hydroxyl-butyrate dehydrogenase activity in the reconstituted system of the purified enzyme with irradiated liver microsomes or irradiated liposomes was decreased considerably in comparison with either unirradiated control or irradiated enzyme. Radiation-induced decrease in the enzyme activity was thought to be caused mainly by peroxidation of membrane lipids and not due to direct damage by radiation to the enzyme molecule itself. Irradiation of microsomes caused decreases in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content and an increase in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Arachidonic acid contents in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine were also markedly decreased with increasing radiation dose. These results are discussed in terms of a mechanism involving radiation-induced damage to membrane function and structures.

  10. Impact of VEGF gene polymorphisms and haplotypes on radiation-induced late toxicity in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, Tanja; Thurner, Eva-Maria; Kapp, Karin S. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Renner, Wilfried [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Clinical Inst. of Medical and Chemical Lab. Diagnostics; Gerger, Armin; Hofmann, Guenter [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Division of Oncology; Langsenlehner, Uwe [GKK Outpatient Dept. Graz (Austria). Division of Internal Medicine

    2011-12-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important determinant of microvascular permeability and angiogenesis and has been shown to be up-regulated during the late phase of radiation injury. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate the role of VEGF gene polymorphisms and haplotypes in the development of radiation-induced late side effects in prostate cancer patients. The association of VEGF gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with high-grade late rectal or urinary toxicity (defined as late toxicity EORTC/RTOG {>=}2) was analyzed using 493 prostate cancer patients from the Austrian PROCAGENE study treated with definitive radiotherapy. Seven candidate polymorphisms in the VEGF gene were selected and determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays. Within a median follow-up time of 48 months, 42 patients (8.6%) developed high-grade late rectal and 47 patients (9.6%) urinary toxicity, respectively. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, carriers of the VEGF -7C > T polymorphism were at increased risk of high-grade late rectal toxicity (p = 0.003) and in a multivariate analysis including clinical and dosimetric parameters as potential confounders the VEGF -7C > T polymorphism remained a significant predictor (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.349-5.813; p = 0.006). Furthermore, the ATTGT haplotype formed by five polymorphisms upstream of the coding sequence demonstrated a significant association with late rectal toxicity grade {>=}2 (p = 0.001). No significant associations were found for the remaining polymorphisms and haplotypes. We conclude that genetic variants in the VEGF gene may influence the risk of high-grade late rectal toxicity after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  11. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  12. Enhanced antioxidant effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and Trolox in combination against radiation induced-oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Liu, Rui; Chen, Hong-Li; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Di; Li, Wen-Li; Hai, Chun-Xu

    2014-01-25

    Combinations of antioxidants are believed to be more effective than single antioxidant because when antioxidants are combined they support each other synergistically to create a magnified effect. Discovering the enhancer effects or synergies between bioactive components is valuable for resisting oxidative stress and improving health benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible cooperation of natural antioxidant caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) with synthetic antioxidant Trolox in the model systems of chemical generation of free radicals, lipid peroxidation of microsomes and radiation-induced oxidative injury in L929 cells. Based on the intermolecular interaction between CAPE and Trolox, the present study shows a synergistic effect of CAPE and Trolox in combination on elimination of three different free radicals and inhibition of lipid peroxidation initiated by three different systems. CAPE and Trolox added simultaneously to the L929 cells exerted an enhanced preventive effect on the oxidative injury induced by radiation through decreasing ROS generation, protecting plasma membrane and increasing the ratios of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione and the expression of key antioxidant enzymes mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Our results showed for the first time that administration of CAPE and Trolox in combination may exert synergistic antioxidant effects, and further indicate that CAPE and Trolox combination functions mainly through scavenging ROS directly, inhibiting lipid peroxidation and promoting redox cycle of GSH mediated by Nrf2-regulated glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative study of the effects of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao YANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the protective effect of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis (ROM. Methods Fifty male 6-8-week-old C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal group, irradiation control group, rhKGF group, CBLB502 group, and WR2721 group (n=10 each. The 30-day survival rate and change in body weight of mice that had received 17Gy irradiation of head and neck area were recorded. In another group of 20 mice, 1% toluidine blue staining and HE staining were used to observe oral ulcers and pathological changes in the tongue tissue. The proliferation of keratinocyte cells was assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with the irradiation control group, administration of rhKGF and WR2721 could significantly improve the 30-day survival rate, accelerate the recovery of body weight, and promote the proliferation of keratinized epithelial cells of mice after irradiation, without inducing obvious oral mucositis. However, There was no significant difference between CBLB502 group and irradiation control group in survival rate, body weight and pathological changes in tongue tissues of mice. Conclusion rhKGF and WR2721 could alleviate ROM and improve the survival of mice, while CBLB502 has no such effect. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.19

  14. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Transgenerational Genomic Instability and Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Gao, Yinglong; Zhang, Baodong

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to genome instability in the germline, and therefore to transgenerational genome and epigenome instability in offspring of exposed males. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced genome instability in directly exposed and in bystander organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in genome instability development. The potential of localized body-part exposures to affect the germline and thus induce genome and epigenome changes in the progeny has not been studied. To investigate whether or not the paternal cranial irradiation can exert deleterious changes in the protected germline and the offsprings, we studied the alteration of DNA methylation in the shielded testes tissue. Here we report that the localized paternal cranial irradiation results in a significant altered DNA methylation in sperm cells and leads to a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the unexposed progeny conceived 3 months after paternal exposure. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Transgenerational effect; Genomic Instability Bystander Effects; DNA methylation.

  15. Differential modulation of a radiation-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma cells by pifithrin-α and wortmannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunlin; Zhang, Jianghong; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The implication of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) for both radiation protection and radiotherapy has attracted significant attention, but a key question is how to modulate the RIBE. The present study found that, when a fraction of glioblastoma cells in T98G population were individually targeted with precise helium particles through their nucleus, micronucleus (MN) were induced and its yield increased non-linearly with radiation dose. After co-culturing with irradiated cells, additional MN could be induced in the non-irradiated bystander cells and its yield was independent of irradiation dose, giving direct evidence of a RIBE. Further results showed that the RIBE could be eliminated by pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) but enhanced by wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor). Moreover, it was found that nitric oxide (NO) contributed to this RIBE, and the levels of NO of both irradiated cells and bystander cells could be extensively diminished by pifithrin-α but insignificantly reduced by wortmannin. Our results indicate that RIBE can be modulated by p53 and PI3K through a NO-dependent and NO-independent pathway, respectively.

  16. Evaluation of the Photoprotective Effect of Dongchongxiacao (Paecilomyces japonica) Extract against Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Skin Wrinkling and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae June [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang Jong; Kim, Jong Choon; Kim Sung Ho [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [Department of Animal Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the ability of Dongchongxiacao (Paecilomyces japonica ) extract (PJE) to protect the skin from photo damage, the gross and microscopic changes in the skin of hairless mice and PJE-treated mice exposed chronically to ultraviolet (UV) were examined. The skin of the UV-irradiated mice showed characteristic signs of photo aging, such as deep wrinkles across the back. PJE-treated mice showed a significantly decreased wrinkling score. By the 22nd week, 88.9% (i.p. with saline) or 44.4% (topical administration with cream base) of the UV-irradiated mice developed at least one tumor. PJE delayed tumor onset significantly. PJE (i.p.) was also effective in reducing the occurrence of UV radiation-induced skin tumors and reduced the number of tumors per mouse. After 22 weeks of treatment, 80.0% (i.p.) and 75.0% (topical) of the mice treated with PJE were tumor-free. Tumor multiplicity was reduced by 96.2% (i.p.) in the PJE treated groups. It is noted that skin that is chronically exposed to UV is subject to photo aging and photo carcinogenesis and regular use of PJE would prevent these photo damaging effects of UV.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Kukoamine a against Radiation-induced Rat Brain Injury through Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqiong; Cheng, Zhihua; Wang, Changli; Ma, Hongda; Meng, Weihong; Zhao, Qingchun

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-induced brain injury (RIBI) is a prominent side effect of radiotherapy for cranial tumors. Kukoamine A (KuA) has the ability of anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether KuA would prevent the detrimental effect of ionizing radiation on hippocampal neurons. For this study, male Wistar rats were received either sham irradiation or whole brain irradiation (30 Gy single dose of X-rays) followed by the immediate injection of either KuA or vehicle intravenously. The dose of KuA was 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg respectively. The protective effects of KuA were assessed by Nissl staining. The levels of oxidative stress marker and antioxidants activities were assayed by kits. TUNEL staining was performed to detect the level of apoptosis in hippocampal neurons. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins as well as the brain-derived neurophic factor (BDNF) was evaluated by western blot. Whole brain irradiation led to the neuronal abnormality and it was alleviated by KuA. KuA decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as alleviated neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome C, Bax and Bcl-2. Additionally, KuA increased the expression of BDNF. These data indicate that KuA has neuroprotective effects against RIBI through inhibiting neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  18. High-frequency detection of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster in semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V., E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru; Kozlov, V. A.; Volkova, E. V.; Paveliev, D. G. [Lobachevsky Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The processes of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster upon the arrival of a fast neutron to the space-charge region of a semiconductor diode are analyzed. The current pulse formed by secondary electrons is calculated and the spectrum of the signal generated by the diode (detector) under the action of an instantaneous neutron flux of the fission spectrum is determined. The possibility of experimental detection of the picosecond radiation-induced transition processes is discussed.

  19. Forward current enhanced elimination of the radiation induced boron-oxygen complex in silicon n+-p diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Yakushevich, H S; Moll, M; Pintilie, I

    2014-01-01

    Using forward current injection with densities in the range 15-30A/cm(2) we can effectively eliminate the radiation-induced boron-oxygen complex, which is the main compensating center in irradiated Si solar cells. It was found that for a given forward current density the elimination rate is decreasing with increasing irradiation dose. Additionally, some evidences have been obtained on the negative-U properties of the radiation-induced boron-oxygen complex.

  20. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camats, Núria; García, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan José; Calaf, Joaquim; Martín, Miguel; Caldés, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells from X-ray-treated female rats and that this RIGI enhances the chromosomal damage caused by the chemical agent aphidicolin.

  1. Investigating and comparing uranium and gamma radiation induced effects on photosynthetic parameters for Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Horemans, Nele; Saenen, Eline; Biermans, Geert; Nauts, Robin; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, 2400, Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    As the environment is inevitably exposed to radionuclides and ionizing radiation from natural and anthropogenic sources, it is important to study the effects induced by these stressors on plants. In addition, it is already known that photosynthesis can be affected under various metal exposure situations. The objective of this research is to compare uranium induced effects with gamma radiation induced effects on photosynthetic parameters in Arabidopsis thaliana. First, 18-day-old seedlings were exposed to 50 μM uranium during 4 days. Second, 14-day-old seedlings were exposed to gamma radiation for 7 days to a total dose of 6.7 Gy. By using chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, the photosynthetic performance was assessed. Based on the data obtained during the measurement of induction curves, parameters providing information on the photosynthetic efficiency and heat dissipation can be calculated. For uranium exposed leaves, it was observed that the potential photosynthetic efficiency (measured as Fv/Fm) remained maximal while the effective efficiency of photosystem II (φPSII), which is a measure for the proportion of light absorbed by PSII used in photochemistry, even increased. The increase of φPSII could be related to a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), which reflects the protective mechanism against excess light intensity by converting energy into heat, but no alterations in non-regulated energy dissipation (NO). A high NO value would indicate the inefficiency of photochemistry and heat conversion and the plant's inability to regulate the radiation energy. In plants exposed to uranium, NO levels were similar to the control. Under gamma irradiation, the capacity of PSII remained intact and plants started optimizing their photosynthetic process by increasing φPSII and decreasing NPQ. When comparing the NPQ kinetic responses of gamma radiation and uranium exposure, a remarkable difference can be highlighted. While gamma radiation exposure

  2. Variable protection against experimental broiler necrotic enteritis after immunization with the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and a non-toxic NetB variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Mot, Dorien; Geeraerts, Sofie; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been shown to play a key role in avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant costs to the poultry production industry worldwide. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunization with a non-toxic variant of NetB (NetB W262A) and the C-terminal fragment of C. perfringens alpha-toxin (CPA247-370) would provide protection against experimental necrotic enteritis. Immunized birds with either antigen or a combination of antigens developed serum antibody levels against NetB and CPA. When CPA247-370 and NetB W262A were used in combination as immunogens, an increased protection was observed after oral challenge by individual dosing, but not after in-feed-challenge.

  3. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji [Kure National Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  4. The Effect of Pentoxifylline on Radiation-Induced Cardiac Injury in ICR Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kang, Seung Hee; Kang, Yun Kyung [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    Purpose : Chest irradiation leads to a significant cardiac injury in a number of patients. To prevent, or to reduce the risk of radiation-induced cardiac injury, pentoxifylline(PTX), a haemorrheologic agent that improves the blood flow through small blood capillaries has been employed. Materials and Methods : One hundred and eighty ICR mice were divided into three study groups : control, radiation alone, and radiation-pentoxifylline. Each group was subdivided into 12 subgroups: 1,3,6 and 10 days and 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks observation period after irradiation. The total 15 Gy of radiation was delivered in a single fraction through anterior mediastinal port. Pentoxifylline was injected subcutaneously daily 50mg/k to the back of the mice from the first day of irradiation throughout the observation period. The mice of each group after a certain observation period were sacrificed and sectioned for histopathologic examination of the heart. Results : The findings of acute radiation-induced carditis i.e., heterohpilic infiltration and vacuolization and ballooning of endothelial cells were on served upto weeks and reduced sharply afterwards. The late radiation effects including pericarditis with mononuclear cell infiltration, pericardial fibrosis, endothelial cell changes, myocardial degeneration and fibrosis present from 4 weeks onwards after irradiation but with various degree of severity. The overall process of pathologic changes of radiation-pentoxify-acute stage was relatively short and the severity of late cardiac toxicity was much lesser compared with those of radiation alone group. Conclusion : Pentoxifyllline can effectively reduce the late radiation-induced cardiac injury and resolve the acute effects relatively rapidly.

  5. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Efficacy of glutamine in the prevention of oral mucositis and acute radiation-induced esophagitis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is a nutraceutic with antioxidant and immune functions that can protect from adverse effects associated with radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to test whether oral glutamine prevents oral mucositis (OM) or acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) and favors nutritional status. This retrospective, cohort study included patients treated with RT for cancer on head and neck (HN) or chest areas during the 2008-2010 period. Data on glutamine treatment (initiated before RT, during RT, or no glutamine), appearance of mucositis (according to World Health Organization criteria), weight loss (WL) during RT, moderate [body mass index (BMI) 5%) or severe (BMI 10%) malnutrition, and nutritional support were collected. Quantitative data were compared using Student's t-test and analysis of variance, and qualitative data using the chi-square test. The risk difference was calculated with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The sample included 117 patients. Overall, glutamine was associated with a significant reduction of mucositis, WL, and enteral nutrition. The risk difference for developing OM in patients receiving glutamine when compared with controls was -9.0% (95% CI = -18.0% to -1.0%), and for ARIE it was -14.0% (95% CI = -26.0% to -1.0%). More of the patients not receiving glutamine developed severe malnutrition when compared with those receiving this supplement, but there were no differences in other outcomes such as interruption of RT, hospitalization, use of opioid analgesics, or death during RT. Glutamine may have a protective effect during RT, reducing the risk and severity of OM and ARIE, preventing weight loss, and reducing the need for nutritional support. Prospective trials are required.

  7. Identification of novel senescence-associated genes in ionizing radiation-induced senescent carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Yoo, Hee Jung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chu, In Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Hee [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Cellular senescence is considered as a defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces stress-induced premature senescence as well as apoptosis in various cancer cells. Senescent cells undergo functional and morphological changes including large and flattened cell shape, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}Gal) activity, and altered gene expressions. Even with the recent findings of several gene expression profiles and supporting functional data, it is obscure that mechanism of IR-induced premature senescence in cancer cells. We performed microarray analysis to identify the common regulated genes in ionizing radiation-induced prematurely senescent human carcinoma cell lines.

  8. Resistance of radiation-induced tropical wood-polymer composites to fungal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, L.H.L.; Lim, V.S.L.; Yap, M.G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The resistance of six tropical hardwoods to fungal degradation by two wild-type strains of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall was investigated using vermiculite burial and wood-block weight loss techniques. Radiation-induced wood-polymer composites (WPC), based on two hardwoods Ramin and Rubberwood with methyl methacrylate, were prepared, and samples were also exposed to the wood-rotting fungus. A significant improvement in resistance to fungal decay was observed in the WPC. Scanning-electron micrographs of the two woods and their composites after fungal degradation are presented and discussed.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygenation was effective in a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Ayumi; Dake, Yoshinori; Amemiya, Tsugio [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    A 68-year-old female underwent radiation treatment followed by surgical extirpation for olfactory neuroblastoma in the left ethmoidal sinus. Acute optic neuropathy developed 16 months later in her left eye. The visual acuity was reduced to finger counting at 30 cm. Treatment with systemic corticosteroid and hyperbaric oxygenation for 2 months resulted in improvement in fundus findings and improvement of visual acuity to 0.5. The findings show the potential effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced optic neuropathy. (author).

  10. Summary of round robin measurements of radiation induced conductivity in Wesgo AL995 alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This existing data on radiation induced conductivity (RIC) measurements performed on the same heat of the IEA reference ceramic insulator are summarized. Six different sets of RIC measurements have been performed on Wesgo AL995 at dose rates between 10 Gy/s and 1 MGy/s. In general, good agreement was obtained between the different groups of researchers. The data indicate that the RIC at a test temperature of 400-500{degrees}C is approximately linear with ionizing dose rate up to {approximately}1000 Gy/s, and exhibits an approximately square root dependence on dose rate between 1 kGy/s and 1 MGy/s.

  11. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  12. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  13. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  14. Modeling of radiation-induced charge trapping in MOS devices under ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, M. A., E-mail: m.a.petukhov@gmail.com; Ryazanov, A. I. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The numerical model of the radiation-induced charge trapping process in the oxide layer of a MOS device under ionizing irradiation is developed; the model includes carrier transport, hole capture by traps in different states, recombination of free electrons and trapped holes, kinetics of hydrogen ions which can be accumulated in the material during transistor manufacture, and accumulation and charging of interface states. Modeling of n-channel MOSFET behavior under 1 MeV photon irradiation is performed. The obtained dose dependences of the threshold voltage shift and its contributions from trapped holes and interface states are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Effect of radiation-induced xerostomia on the human oral microflora. Report no. 12 (final), 1 Jul 1971-30 Jun 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Brown, L.R.

    1976-06-30

    The caries-conducive impact of xerostomia was studied in 42 irradiated cancer patients. The radiation-induced xerostomia was paralleled by changes in the physical, microbial, biochemical, immunologic and dietary parameters of cariogenicity that collectively comprised an overwhelming caries challenge. Microbiologically, significant xerostomia-related increases in Strep. mutans, lactobacilli, staphylococci, yeasts and catalase-positive diphtheroids were accompanied by decreases in Strep. sanguis, bacteroides and fusobacteria in each of the 5 microenvironments tested. The scanty xerostomic saliva contained greater amounts of Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(++), Mg(++), Prot(-), lysozyme, IgA and IgG and considerably less HCO3(-). The increased concentrations of caries protective electrolytes and immunoproteins were negated by huge reductions in total daily saliva output. The xerostomia created caries challenge was almost completely neutralized by a preventive program of daily topical NaF applications and strict oral hygiene. (GRA)

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy of zoledronic acid and amifostine on radiation induced bone loss in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sueum; Kang, Sohi; Moon, Cahng Jong; Kim, Jong Choon; Kim, Sung Ho [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeungeup (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [College of Ecology and Environmental Science, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on radiation-induced bone loss in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeN mice were divided into sham control and three irradiated groups (3 Gy, gamma ray). The irradiated mice were treated for 12 weeks with vehicle, amifostine (intraperitoneal injection), or ZA (subcutaneous injection). Grip strength, uterus weight, and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) levels were measured. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography. Treatment of ZA (100 μg·kg{sup -1}·week{sup -1}) significantly preserved trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, bone mineral density of proximal tibia metaphysic, and cortical bone volume, but did not alter the uterus weight of the mice. The administration of ZA for 12 weeks lowered serum ALP and TRAP levels in irradiated mice, suggesting that ZA can reduce the bone turnover rate in mice. No differences were apparent between the amifostine-treated group and the irradiation control group. The results indicate that ZA can prevent radiation-induced bone loss in mice.

  17. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The

  19. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  20. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Redmond, Robert W. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liber, Howard L., E-mail: howard.liber@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent {gamma}-ray exposures.

  1. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  2. Detection of radiation-induced myocardial damage by technetium-99m sestamibi scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyenes, G. [Southern Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Fornander, T. [Southern Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Carlens, P, [Southern Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Physiology; Glas, U. [Southern Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Rutqvist, L.E. [Oncologic Center, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-03-01

    A prospective study was initiated to assess the side-effects of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with left-sided early breast cancer. Twelve patients with early breast cancer were examined before and a year after radiotherapy. Echocardiography, ECG and bicycle ergometry stress test with technetium-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion scintigraphic were carried out to assess changes in regional myocardial blood flow. Six of the 12 patients had new fixed scintigraphic defects after radiotherapy (as compared with the preradiation examination). The localization of the defects corresponded well with the irradiated volume of the left ventricle. These defects were probably due to microvascular damage to the myocardium. Neither ECG changes nor left ventricular segmental wall motion abnormalities could be detected by echocardiography. To our knowledge this study is the first to show that radiation-induced microvascular damage to the myocardium may be detected by perfusion scintigraphy. This may limit the use of scintigraphy in diagnosing coronary artery disease in patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy. Long-term follow-up is necessary to assess whether the presence of microvascular damage is a prognostic sign for the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. (orig.)

  3. Possible Radiation Sensitisation by Trastuzumab Leading to Radiation-Induced Myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alastair B; Evans, Tamasin; Hayward, Richard L; Higgins, Geoffrey S; Murray, Katherine L; Summers, David; Kunkler, Ian H

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: Trastuzumab is used as adjuvant treatment in patients with HER2-positive breast cancers and has been shown to reduce the chance of recurrence by up to 50%. However, experience with it given with radiotherapy is limited and there is in vitro evidence of a radiosensiti-sation effect. We describe the first case of trastuzumab-associated radiation-induced myelitis. CASE REPORT: This patient received a calculated dose of 28 Gy to the spinal cord when receiving adjuvant radiotherapy to the chest wall and supraclavicular and axillary lymph nodes. This is well below the accepted radiation tolerance of the spinal cord (50-60 Gy) but she developed radiation-induced myelitis of her spinal cord with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging changes. We postulate that trastuzu-mab given concurrently with radiation may have acted as a radiosensitiser and that normal repair mechanisms in the acute stage were affected by trastuzumab blockage of epidermal growth factor receptors, resulting in demy-elination at a lower dose of radiation than normally seen. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant radiotherapy and adjuvant trastuzumab treatment should be given with caution and consideration made of delaying trastuzumab until after radiotherapy has been completed. As longer-term data become available for patients who received trastuzumab and radiation, it will become clearer whether there is a significant interaction on organs such as the heart and spinal cord in the radiation field.

  4. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  5. Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12) correlates with radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Gu; Jeong, Ye Ji; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sujae [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    MMPs are classified into five subgroups: collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13), gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9), stromelysins (MMP-3, MMP-10, MMP-11), as well as metalloelastase (MMP-12), the membrane-type MMPs (MMP14, MMP15), and other MMPS (e. g., MMP-19, and MMP20). MMP-12 (matrix metalloproteinase12), also known as macrophage metalloelastase, was first identified as an elastolytic metalloproteinase secreted by inflammatory macrophages 30 years ago. MMP-12 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) components to facilitate tissue remodeling. It can degrade elastin and other substrates, such as type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, vitronectin, entactin, heparin, and chondroitin sulfates. In the lung, MMP-12 is identified in alveolar macrophages of cigarette smokers as an elastolytic MMP. Inactivation of the MMP-12 gene in knockout mice demonstrates a critical role of MMP-12 in smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of MMP-12 by radiation in lung, so we evaluate that MMP-12 expression pattern in normal lung tissue and cancer cell following radiation. Radiation induced lung injury most commonly occurs as a result of radiation therapy administered to treat cancer. The present study demonstrates that MMP-12 was highly increased in the lung damaged by radiation Thus, MMP-12 might be of potential relevance as a clinically diagnostic tool and sensitive biomarker for radiation induced lung injury and fibrosis.

  6. Radiation-induced circumscribed superficial morphea after brachytherapy for endometrial adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Trivedi, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced morphea (RIM is a rare and underrecognized complication of radiation therapy that most commonly occurs in women after treatment for breast cancer. Although not fully understood, RIM is hypothesized to arise from an increase in cytokines that stimulate collagen production and extracellular matrix formation. Most documented cases of RIM occur 1 year after radiation therapy and are localized to areas that were treated for breast cancer. We report on a case of a female patient with stage IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who was treated with 24 Gray of adjuvant brachytherapy. The patient developed a diffuse morpheaform, pruritic eruption only at distant sites from the brachytherapy treatment field. Although treatment for RIM is generally unsatisfactory, our patient experienced improvement in the pruritus and a regression of the lesions while applying topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment and 0.1% triamcinolone creme. An early diagnosis of RIM can prevent extensive workup, guide treatment, and improve quality of life for patients. Keywords: radiation-induced morphea, postirradiation morphea

  7. EPR spectral investigation of radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuner, Hasan [Balikesir University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Balikesir (Turkey)

    2017-11-15

    In the present work, spectroscopic features of the radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid compounds were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While un-irradiated samples presented no EPR signal, irradiated samples exhibited an EPR spectrum consisting of an intense resonance line at the center and weak lines on both sides. Detailed microwave saturation investigations were carried out to determine the origin of the experimental EPR lines. It is concluded that the two side lines of the triplet satellite originate from forbidden ''spin-flip'' transitions. The spectroscopic and structural features of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using EPR spectrum fittings. The experimental EPR spectra of the two gallic acid compounds were consistent with the calculated EPR spectroscopic features of the proposed radicals. It is concluded that the most probable radicals are the cyclohexadienyl-type, O(OH){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2}COOH radicals for both compounds. (orig.)

  8. A Practical Approach to the Management of Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Xavier; Saad, Fred; Delouya, Guila

    2015-09-01

    Radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a complication of pelvic radiotherapy, mainly for prostate and uterine cancers. In the acute phase, patients feel urinary urgency and bladder pain. This phase is reversible after radiotherapy. In the chronic stage, an irritative syndrome is coupled with hematuria during the 2-10 years following radiotherapy. Cystoscopy shows white and frosted mucosa with telangiectasia. The incidence is estimated at 5 % or less. It is suggested that the radiation oncologist reviews the dosimetry plan to validate that the lesions coincide with significant radiation exposure confirming diagnosis of radiation-induced HC. The treatment for HC is first symptomatic, with bladder lavage, clot evacuation, coagulation via cystoscopy and blood transfusions if necessary. Subsequently, hyaluronic acid bladder instillation can be done with little toxicity. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy delivers pure oxygen to patients in a pressurized cabin, promoting angio-neogenesis and lowering hypoxia to the irradiated tissues. The clinical response rate is estimated to be around 80 %. Nevertheless, this approach is limited by the low availability, and length of treatment. While surgery remains an effective treatment for HC, it is the last option because of the high morbidity and mortality risks. Prospective studies need to be conducted to identify and evaluate new interventions, particularly for HC.

  9. Radiation-induced crosslinking and post-processing of poly(L-lactic acid) composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, Naotsugu, E-mail: nagasawa.naotsugu@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kasai, Noboru; Yagi, Toshiaki; Yoshii, Fumio; Tamada, Masao [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Poly(L-lactic acid), PLLA, was irradiated using electron beams (EBs) in the presence of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) at 5% concentration as crosslinking agent. The crosslinked PLLA obtained has heat resistance, as demonstrated by retention of its original shape at glass transition temperature or even higher than 200 {sup o}C. As an application of this fact, crosslinked PLLA is applied in spectacle lens to prevent shape deformation of eyeglass frames in displaying and transporting. However, in this application to lens, it is not enough to improve the thermal deformation of PLLA under stress at 70 {sup o}C. Radiation-induced crosslinking of a PLLA/silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) composite with TAIC and post-processing of the crosslinked PLLA composite by heating were further investigated from the viewpoint of thermal deformation. The PLLA materials have several advantages such as high heat resistance and transparency. It is therefore proved that the combination of radiation-induced crosslinking, composition of SiO{sub 2} and post-heating is beneficial for expanding the applications of PLLA.

  10. Radiation-induced desulfurization of Arabian crude oil and straight-run diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basfar, A.A., E-mail: abasfar@kacst.edu.sa [Radiation Technology Center, Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, K.A. [Radiation Technology Center, Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-15

    Radiation-induced desulfurization of four types of Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) and straight-run diesel (SRD) was investigated over the range of 10-200 kGy. Results show that gamma radiation processing at absorbed doses up to 200 kGy without further treatment is not sufficient for desulfurization. However, the combination of gamma-irradiation with other physical/chemical processes (i.e. L/L extraction, adsorption and oxidation) may be capable of removing considerable levels of sulfur compounds in the investigated products. Currently, this approach of combined radiation/physical/chemical processes is under investigation. The findings of these attempts will be reported in the future. - Highlights: > Irradiation effect on desulfurization in Arabian crude oils and straight-run diesel was investigated. > No noticeable changes in sulfur content after irradiation up to 200 kGy were observed. > Stricter regulations on sulfur levels in fuels motivate search for improved desulfurization processes. > Limited investigations on radiation-induced desulfurization of oil products are conducted.

  11. Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, Andrei; Doyle, Dominic; Glebov, Leonid; Berghmans, Francis

    2005-09-01

    Space-born optical systems must be tolerant to radiation to guarantee that the required system performance is maintained during prolonged mission times. The radiation-induced absorption in optical glasses is often related with the presence of impurities, which are, intentionally or not, introduced during the manufacturing process. Glass manufacturers use proprietary fabrication processes and one can expect that the radiation sensitivity of nominally identical optical glasses from different manufacturers is different. We studied the gamma-radiation induced absorption of several crown glasses with nd ≈ 1.516 and vd ≈ 64, i.e. NBK7 (Schott), S-BSL7 (Ohara), BSC 517642 (Pilkington) and K8 (Russia). NBK7 recently replaced the well-known BK7. We therefore also compared the radiation response of NBK7 and BK7 glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they show a different induced absorption after irradiation and also different post-radiation recovery kinetics. Taking these differences into account can help to improve the radiation tolerance of optical systems for space applications.

  12. Caffeine ameliorates radiation-induced skin reactions in mice but does not influence tumour radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebbar, S.A.; Mitra, A.K.; George, K.C.; Verma, N.C. [Radiation Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: ncverma@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2002-03-01

    Intramuscular administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight to the gastrocnemius muscles of Swiss mice 5 min prior to local irradiation (35 Gy) of the leg delayed the progression of radiation-induced skin reactions in such animals. While 90% epilation with reddening of the skin was noted in animals treated with radiation alone, animals pretreated with caffeine suffered only partial hair loss with slight reddening of the skin on the 16th and 20th days post-irradiation. Beyond the 28th day, damage scores in irradiated feet for both the groups were similar (score 3) and remained unchanged until the 32nd day and then decreased and disappeared completely in both treatment groups by the 40th day after irradiation. In addition, the effect of caffeine on the radiation response of a mouse fibrosarcoma was investigated. Results showed that intratumoral administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight 5 min prior to local exposure of tumours to 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays did not influence the response of tumours to radiation. The present study thus showed that although caffeine ameliorated radiation-induced skin reactions in the mouse leg, it did not affect the tumour radiation response, indicating its potential application in cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Acupuncture for the prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio do Prado Florence Braga

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in minimizing the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 24 consecutive patients receiving > 5000 cGy radiotherapy (RT involving the major salivary glands bilaterally were assigned to either the preventive acupuncture group (PA, n = 12, treated with acupuncture before and during RT, or the control group (CT, n = 12, treated with RT and not receiving acupuncture. After RT completion, clinical response was assessed in all patients by syalometry, measuring the resting (RSFR and stimulated (SSFR salivary flow rates, and by the visual analogue scale (VAS regarding dry mouth-related symptoms. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated-measures using a mixed-effect modeling procedure and analysis of variance. An alpha level of 0.05 was accepted for statistical significance. Although all patients exhibited some degree of impairment in salivary gland functioning after RT, significant differences were found between the groups. Patients in the PA group showed improved salivary flow rates (RSFR, SSFR; p < 0.001 and decreased xerostomia-related symptoms (VAS, p < 0.05 compared with patients in the CT group. Although PA treatment did not prevent the oral sequelae of RT completely, it significantly minimized the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia. The results suggest that acupuncture focused in a preventive approach can be a useful therapy in the management of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing RT.

  14. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction: An experimental model in the old rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I. [Laboratoire de Biophysique, Paris (France); Chen, Q.M.; Poisson, M. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    To develop a model of radiation-induced behavioral dysfunction. A course of whole brain radiation therapy (30 Gy/10 fractions/12 days) was administered to 26 Wistar rats ages 16-27 months, while 26 control rats received sham irradiation. Sequential behavioral studies including one-way avoidance, two-way avoidance, and a standard operant conditioning method (press-lever avoidance) were undertaken. In addition, rats were studied in a water maze 7 months postradiation therapy. Prior to radiation therapy, both groups were similar. No difference was found 1 and 3 months postradiation therapy. At 6-7 months postradiation therapy, irradiated rats had a much lower percentage of avoidance than controls for one-way avoidance (23% vs. 55%, p {le} 0.001) and two-way avoidance (18% vs. 40%, p {le} 0.01). Seven months postradiation therapy the reaction time was increased (press-lever avoidance, 11.20 s vs. 8.43 s, p {le} 0.05) and the percentage of correct response was lower (water maze, 53% vs. 82%) in irradiated rats compared with controls. Pathological examination did not demonstrate abnormalities of the irradiated brains at the light microscopic level. Behavioral dysfunction affecting mainly memory can be demonstrated following conventional radiation therapy in old rats. This model can be used to study the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive changes. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systematic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure. (Author)

  16. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-06-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H1 and H2 histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H1 and H2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systemic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H1 and H2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Radiation-Induced Brain Injury by Inhibiting Microglia Pyroptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced brain injury (RI commonly occurs in patients who received head and neck radiotherapy. However, the mechanism of RI remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether pyroptosis was involved in RI and the impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on it. BALB/c male mice (6–8 weeks were cranially irradiated (15 Gy, and MSCs were transplanted into the bilateral cortex 2 days later; then mice were sacrificed 1 month later. Meanwhile, irradiated BV-2 microglia cells (10 Gy were cocultured with MSCs for 24 hours. We observed that irradiated mice brains presented NLRP3 and caspase-1 activation. RT-PCR then indicated that it mainly occurred in microglia cells but not in neurons. Further, irradiated BV-2 cells showed pyroptosis and increased production of IL-18 and IL-1β. RT-PCR also demonstrated an increased expression of several inflammasome genes in irradiated BV-2 cells, including NLRP3 and AIM2. Particularly, NLRP3 was activated. Knockdown of NLRP3 resulted in decreased LDH release. Noteworthily, in vivo, MSCs transplantation alleviated radiation-induced NLRP3 and caspase-1 activation. Moreover, in vitro, MSCs could decrease caspase-1 dependent pyroptosis, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and ROS production induced by radiation. Thus, our findings proved that microglia pyroptosis occurred in RI. MSCs may act as a potent therapeutic tool in attenuating pyroptosis.

  18. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen as sole treatment for severe radiation - induced haemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellis, Athanasios, E-mail: aedellis@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaieion Academic Hospital, Athens (Greece); Papatsoris, Athanasios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Skolarikos, Andreas [Department of Urology, University of Athens, Sismanoglio General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kalentzos, Vasileios [Department of Diving and Hyperbaric Oxygen, Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens (Greece)

    2017-05-15

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary and sole treatment for severe radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as primary treatment in 38 patients with severe radiation cystitis. Our primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment, while the secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results: All patients completed therapy without complications with a mean follow-up of 29.33 months. Median number of sessions needed was 33. Complete and partial response rate was 86.8% and 13.2%, respectively. All 33 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset. One patient needed cystectomy, while 33 patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Our study suggests the early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen for radiation-induced severe cystitis as an effective and safe treatment option. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  1. Radiation-induced glioblastoma in a medulloblastoma patient: a case report with molecular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessi, Marco; Maderna, Emanuela; Guzzetti, Sara; Cefalo, Graziella; Massimino, Maura; Solero, Carlo L; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-12-01

    We report a case of glioblastoma (GBM) occurring 8 years after radiation therapy for a medulloblastoma. A 15-year-old boy underwent surgery and radiotherapy for a medulloblastoma and 8 years later he developed a second tumor at the same site. The second lesion showed different histological and molecular features, was diagnosed as a glioblastoma and fulfilled the criteria of radiation-induced neoplasm. Mutational analysis of the p53 gene showed a C to G transition at codon 176 in tumor DNA. LOH was detected at 17p and 19q. The tumor also showed O6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT) promoter methylation and no amplification of EGF receptor. In conclusion, the radiation-induced MGMT hyper-methylation and p53 mutations may have a role in the development of a subgroup of radio-induced glioma (RIG), suggesting that these molecular alterations directly cooperate in the genesis of the post-irradiation GBM. Moreover RIGs seem to be a heterogeneous group of tumors that may resemble either primary or secondary GBM.

  2. A non-human primate model of radiation-induced cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wanchang; Bennett, Alexander W; Zhang, Pei; Barrow, Kory R; Kearney, Sean R; Hankey, Kim G; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2016-03-31

    Cachexia, or muscle wasting, is a serious health threat to victims of radiological accidents or patients receiving radiotherapy. Here, we propose a non-human primate (NHP) radiation-induced cachexia model based on clinical and molecular pathology findings. NHP exposed to potentially lethal partial-body irradiation developed symptoms of cachexia such as body weight loss in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Severe body weight loss as high as 20-25% was observed which was refractory to nutritional intervention. Radiographic imaging indicated that cachectic NHP lost as much as 50% of skeletal muscle. Histological analysis of muscle tissues showed abnormalities such as presence of central nuclei, inflammation, fatty replacement of skeletal muscle, and muscle fiber degeneration. Biochemical parameters such as hemoglobin and albumin levels decreased after radiation exposure. Levels of FBXO32 (Atrogin-1), ActRIIB and myostatin were significantly changed in the irradiated cachectic NHP compared to the non-irradiated NHP. Our data suggest NHP that have been exposed to high dose radiation manifest cachexia-like symptoms in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This model provides a unique opportunity to study the mechanism of radiation-induced cachexia and will aid in efficacy studies of mitigators of this disease.

  3. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  4. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  5. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-11

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2.

  6. Gamma radiation induced micronuclei and erythrocyte cellular abnormalities in the fish Catla catla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbumani, S. [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Mohankumar, Mary N., E-mail: marynmk@rediffmail.com [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2012-10-15

    Ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in fishes is a scarcely studied topic and very few studies are available in fishes exposed to ionizing radiation using the erythrocyte micronucleus assay under laboratory conditions. Since radionuclides released accidentally or during a nuclear disaster can contaminate inland water bodies, biomonitoring methods are required for assessing the impacts of high and low levels of radiation that may ultimately result in ionizing radiation exposure to both humans and non-human biota. Fresh water fish, Catla catla were subjected to protracted (0.002 Gy/min) and acute (3.2 Gy/min) gamma radiation to a total dose of 5 Gy. Peripheral blood samples were collected at different intervals (days 3, 6, 12, 18, 30, 45, 90, 135, 202) and analyzed by the erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Nuclear anomalies observed were micronuclei (MN), deformed nuclei (DN), nuclear bud (NBu), nuclear bridge (NBr), vacuolated nucleus (VN), binucleated cell (BNC), apoptotic cells (AC) while cytoplasmic abnormalities detected were vacuolated cytoplasm (VC), anisochromasia (AN), echinocytes (EC) and enucleus (EN). Both exposures caused a statistically significant increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities that correlated with micronucleus and other nuclear anomalies. However, the extent of damage is higher after an acute exposure lasting for a longer period leading to apoptosis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities are the resultants of gamma radiation induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  7. A case of radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis developing 16 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Toyama, Takuji; Hamada, Seiki; Miyatake, Kunio; Imakita, Masami (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)); Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1993-09-01

    We reported a 51-yr-old female with radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis. At age 29, she had received mastectomy and postoperative irradiation because of left breast cancer. At age 45, she had syncope and was diagnosed with complete atrioventricular block and a pacemaker was implanted. At that time, pericardial thickening with effusion was noted. The following year, tricuspid regurgitation was noted. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of the right ventricular pressure curve appeared. At age 50, tricuspid regurgitation worsened due to the lead wire of the pacemaker compressing the leaflet, and the pacemaker was reimplanted. However, the following year, she complained of general fatigue and dyspnea and was admitted to our hospital. On [sup 67]Ga study, diffuse accumulation in the cardiac region appeared. There was no perfusion defect detected in the myocardium, but right myocardial damage was suspected by thallium study. In [sup 99m]Tc-HSA RI angiography, right atrium dilatation appeared and a pericardial halo around the ventricles was seen. She underwent pericardectomy, tricuspid replacement and pacemaker reimplanted, but she died. On autpsy, pericardial thickening and adhesion, right myocardial fibrosis, the fibrotic change of the bundle branches were seen. We reported a case of radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis. Radionuclide studies were useful in diagnosing and following the patient. (author).

  8. Implication of prostaglandins and histamine h1 and h2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A .

    1988-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy cobalt 60 gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxgenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H(1) and H(2) receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia since both the H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggested that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

  9. Radiation-induced functional damages in the regeneration system for the gastrointestinal epithelium cell and analysis of its nutritional modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Narita, Mayumi; Ogawa, Yuko; Shinohara, Kiyoko; Nakazawa, Yukiko; Yamada, Keiko [National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    It has been known that the stem cells of villus-crypt zone are highly sensitive to radiation exposure. In this study, radiation-induced damages in gastrointestinal cell regeneration system were investigated from an aspect of nutritional factors to clarify the damages in digestive functions caused by X-ray exposure and recovery from them. The activities of digestive enzymes in the small intestine after in vivo X-ray exposure at 100 Gy were determined. The sucrose activity in the upper intestine was gradually reduced to about a half 3 days after the exposure. This change pattern of activity was also observed in other regions in the intestine. This tendency was similar to that of trehalase activity, but the changes in alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino-peptidase activities were less than the above two enzymes. Therefore, time course changes of sucrose and trehalase pattern in the villus-crypt zone were monitored after radiation exposure. Either of the two enzyme activities was low in the crypt and gradually increased from the basement of villus to its top. These activities were dose-dependently reduced by X-ray exposure. Especially it was marked for trehalose activity. Moreover, the amounts of short-chain fatty acids such as acetic acid, propionic acid, butylic acid in the cecum were determined. Significant increases in acetic acid and propionic acid contents were fount at 1 or 2 days after the X-ray exposure. These increases in fatty acids contents were more distinctive in the animals that received forced and free administration of food than those that received free administration alone. The presence of food components in the intestine might be effective for protecting the mucous membrane regeneration from radiation exposure. (M.N.)

  10. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition With Rapamycin Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su I. [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF) is a late toxicity of therapeutic radiation. Signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin drives several processes implicated in RIPF, including inflammatory cytokine production, fibroblast proliferation, and epithelial senescence. We sought to determine if mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with rapamycin would mitigate RIPF. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6NCr mice received a diet formulated with rapamycin (14 mg/kg food) or a control diet 2 days before and continuing for 16 weeks after exposure to 5 daily fractions of 6 Gy of thoracic irradiation. Fibrosis was assessed with Masson trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. Cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Senescence was assessed by staining for β-galactosidase activity. Results: Administration of rapamycin extended the median survival of irradiated mice compared with the control diet from 116 days to 156 days (P=.006, log-rank test). Treatment with rapamycin reduced hydroxyproline content compared with the control diet (irradiation plus vehicle, 45.9 ± 11.8 μg per lung; irradiation plus rapamycin, 21.4 ± 6.0 μg per lung; P=.001) and reduced visible fibrotic foci. Rapamycin treatment attenuated interleukin 1β and transforming growth factor β induction in irradiated lungs compared with the control diet. Type II pneumocyte senescence after irradiation was reduced with rapamycin treatment at 16 weeks (3-fold reduction at 16 weeks, P<.001). Conclusions: Rapamycin protected against RIPF in a murine model. Rapamycin treatment reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, extracellular matrix production, and senescence in type II pneumocytes.

  11. Perilla frutescens leaves extract ameliorates ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Soo; Han, Mira; Shin, Hee Soon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-01-04

    Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. (Lamiaceae) is a traditional herb that is consumed in East Asian countries as a traditional medicine. This traditional herb has been documented for centuries to treat various diseases such as depression, allergies, inflammation and asthma. However, the effect of Perilla frutescens on skin has not been characterized well. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Perilla frutescens leaves extract (PLE) on ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin. Human dermal fibroblasts and Skh-1 hairless mice were irradiated with UV and treated with PLE. Protein and mRNA levels of various target molecules were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Histological changes of mouse skin were analyzed by H&E staining. To elucidate underlying mechanism of PLE, activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding assay and the measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed. PLE significantly inhibited basal and UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression dose-dependently, and also decreased UV-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and c-Jun N-terminal kinases. This inhibitory effects of PLE on MMP-1 and MMP-3 were mediated by reduction of ROS generation and AP-1 DNA binding activity induced by UV. Furthermore, PLE promoted type I procollagen production irrespective of UV irradiation. In the UV-irradiated animal model, PLE significantly reduced epidermal skin thickness and MMP-13 expression induced by UV. Our results demonstrate that PLE has the protective effect against UV-induced dermal matrix damage. Therefore, we suggest that PLE can be a potential agent for prevention of skin aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation-induced cancer. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the maxilla after interstitial radiotherapy for hemangioma of the palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanazawa, Tomomi; Kimura, Yukinori; Hachisu, Reiko; Seki, Kenji; Sano, Tsukasa; Okano, Tomohiro; Nagumo, Masao [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1996-06-01

    A case of radiation-induced cancer is presented. A 59-year-old woman underwent interstitial radiotherapy with radon seeds for the hemangioma of the hard palate 32 years ago. Although a complete response was achieved, the perforation of the hard palate occured 6 years ago because of the induced osteoradionecrosis. An ulcer and swelling in the hard palate was observed around the perforation. CT examination revealed extensive bony destruction of the maxillary sinus walls. Biopsy revealed mucoepidermoid carcinoma. More than 80% of radiation-induced cancer in the head and neck region are squamous cell carcinoma irrespective of the histology of the original lesions. This may be the first case reported of radiation-induced mucoepidermoid carcinoma in the head and neck region. (author)

  13. Decay and microwave power saturation features to determine the radiation-induced radicals of sorbic acid and potassium sorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuner, Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Gamma irradiated sorbic acid (SA) and its potassium salt (KSA) were present complex unresolved Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra. Spectroscopic features and possible structures of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using spectrum simulation calculations according to the microwave power saturations, room and high-temperatures decay findings. It is found that while the radicals decayed in time some of the radicals transferred to another type of radical. The spectrum simulations of SA and KSA were carried out on different spectra recorded in different conditions. Although, most of the radiation-induced radicals of SA and KSA have the similar chemical structures different EPR spectroscopic features were observed. It has been determined that there are three and four different radical species best describe the experimental spectra of SA and KSA, respectively. If the decay rates of the radiation-induced radicals are different, using the information derived from the decay findings present significant information about the spectroscopic features of the existing radicals.

  14. Mechanisms of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cell Death in Primary Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    sapiens and Mus musculus were recorded The Homo sapiens spliced variant is predicted to have a molecular weight of ~50 kda while that of Mus musculus...been reported in Pubmed database for Bos taurus, possibly due to lack of research on the Bos taurus SIRT1 gene, however, splicing variants for Homo

  15. Proximity of Radiation Desiccation Response Motif to the core promoter is essential for basal repression as well as gamma radiation-induced gyrB gene expression in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-06-05

    The radioresistant D. radiodurans regulates its DNA damage regulon (DDR) through interaction between a 17bp palindromic cis-regulatory element called the Radiation Desiccation Response Motif (RDRM), the DdrO repressor and a protease IrrE. The role of RDRM in regulation of DDR was dissected by constructing RDRM sequence-, position- or deletion-variants of Deinococcal gyrB gene (DR0906) promoter and by RDRM insertion in the non-RDRM groESL gene (DR0606) promoter, and monitoring the effect of such modifications on the basal as well as gamma radiation inducible promoter activity by quantifying fluorescence of a GFP reporter. RDRM sequence-variants revealed that the conservation of sequence at the 5th and 13th position and the ends of RDRM is essential for basal repression by interaction with DdrO. RDRM position-variants showed that the sequence acts as a negative regulatory element only when located around transcription start site (TSS) and within the span of RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding region. RDRM deletion-variants indicated that the 5' sequence of RDRM possibly possesses an enhancer-like element responsible for higher expression yields upon repressor clearance post-irradiation. The results suggest that RDRM plays both a negative as well as a positive role in the regulation of DDR in D. radiodurans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheeshkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. Aims: 1 To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2 To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema. The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Results: Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. Discussion: The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain

  17. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  18. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Radiation-Induced Systemic Bystander Signals in the Bone Marrow and Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmári, Tünde; Kis, Dávid; Bogdándi, Enikő Noémi; Benedek, Anett; Bright, Scott; Bowler, Deborah; Persa, Eszter; Kis, Enikő; Balogh, Andrea; Naszályi, Lívia N.; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Lumniczky, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to the induction of biological changes in cells not directly hit by radiation implying that the number of cells affected by radiation is larger than the actual number of irradiated cells. Recent in vitro studies suggest the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in mediating radiation-induced bystander signals, but in vivo investigations are still lacking. Here, we report an in vivo study investigating the role of EVs in mediating radiation effects. C57BL/6 mice were total-body irradiated with X-rays (0.1, 0.25, 2 Gy), and 24 h later, EVs were isolated from the bone marrow (BM) and were intravenously injected into unirradiated (so-called bystander) animals. EV-induced systemic effects were compared to radiation effects in the directly irradiated animals. Similar to direct radiation, EVs from irradiated mice induced complex DNA damage in EV-recipient animals, manifested in an increased level of chromosomal aberrations and the activation of the DNA damage response. However, while DNA damage after direct irradiation increased with the dose, EV-induced effects peaked at lower doses. A significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell pool in the BM as well as CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte pool in the spleen was detected in mice injected with EVs isolated from animals irradiated with 2 Gy. These EV-induced alterations were comparable to changes present in the directly irradiated mice. The pool of TLR4-expressing dendritic cells was different in the directly irradiated mice, where it increased after 2 Gy and in the EV-recipient animals, where it strongly decreased in a dose-independent manner. A panel of eight differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNA) was identified in the EVs originating from both low- and high-dose-irradiated mice, with a predicted involvement in pathways related to DNA damage repair, hematopoietic, and immune system regulation, suggesting a direct involvement of these pathways in mediating radiation-induced

  19. Chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma several years following childhood total body irradiation: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Shuji [Kurume University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fukuoka (Japan); Shen, Robert K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Inwards, Carrie Y. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wenger, Doris E.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Malignant degeneration arising in radiation-induced osteochondromas is extremely rare. We report a case of a 34-year-old man with a chondrosarcoma arising from an osteochondroma of the left posterior eighth rib that developed following total body irradiation received as part of the conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation at age 8. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of a chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma and the first case occurring following childhood total body irradiation. (orig.)

  20. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  1. Measurement of 60CO gamma radiation induced attenuation in multimode step-index POF at 530 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Milan S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As optical fibres are used ever more extensively in space applications, nuclear industry, medicine and high-energy physics experiments, it has become essential to investigate the influence of ionizing radiation on their characteristics. In this work, the radiation-induced attenuation at 530 nm is investigated experimentally in step-index multimode polymethyl-methacrylate plastic optical fibres exposed to low dose-rate gamma radiation. Cumulative doses ranged from 50 Gy to 500 Gy. The radiation induced attenuation has been empirically found to obey the power law RIA= aDb, where D is the total radiation dose and a and b are the constants determined by fitting.

  2. Challenges in Clinical Management of Radiation-Induced Illnesses in Exploration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca; Chancellor, Jeffery; Suresh, Rahul; Carnell, Lisa; Reyes, David; Nowadly, Craig; Antonsen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Historical solar particle events (SPEs) provide context for some understanding of acute radiation exposure risk to astronauts traveling outside of low Earth orbit. Modeling of potential doses delivered to exploration crewmembers anticipates limited radiation-induced health impacts, including prodromal symptoms of nausea, emesis, and fatigue, but suggests that more severe clinical manifestations are unlikely. Recent large animal-model research in space-analogs closely mimicking SPEs has identified coagulopathic events independent of the hematopoietic sequelae of higher radiation doses, similar in manifestation to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We explored the challenges of clinical management of radiation-related clinical manifestations, using currently accepted modeling techniques and anticipated physiological sequelae, to identify medical capabilities needed to successfully manage SPE-induced radiation illnesses during exploration spaceflight.

  3. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  4. A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer after an irradiation for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikenaga, Masakazu; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Masataka; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Monden, Morito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-04-01

    A 75-year-old woman, who had undergone a hysterectomy and an irradiation for cervical cancer 44 years earlier, was seen at the hospital because of anal bleeding. Barium enema and colonoscopy demonstrated a cancerous lesion in the rectum, and an abdominoperineal excision of the rectum was performed. Marcoscopic findings of the resected specimen demonstrated an ulcerous lesion accompanied by rectal wall thickening and mucosal atrophy. No apparent crater was seen. Histopathological findings revealed moderately differentiated ademocarcinoma with subserosal invasion without lymph node metastases (ss, ly1, v0, n0, stage II), accompanied by mucosal atrophy and fibrous change both in submucoal and subserosal areas. The late phase features of radiation colitis were observed around the cancer which provided a clue to diagnose the lesions with radiation-induced cancer. In the follow-up of patients who underwent pelvic irradiation, attention should be paid for possible occurrence of second rectal cancer. (author)

  5. Asymmetric radiation-induced inclusion polymerization of 3-methyl-1,4-pentadiene in deoxycholic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Franco, E-mail: franco.cataldo@fastwebnet.i [Lupi Chemical Research, Via Casilina 1626/A, 00133 Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio di Astrofisica di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); Ursini, Ornella; Angelini, Giancarlo [Institute of Chemical Methodologies, CNR, Via Salaria Km. 29300 00016 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The radiation-induced polymerization of 3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene (3MPD) as an inclusion complex in deoxycholic acid (DOCA) has produced in good yield the optically active polymer poly(3-methyl-1,4-pentadiene) (P3MPD) whose structure and properties were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TGA, DTG and DTA). The data show that the polymer is essentially trans-1,4-P3MPD as expected for the polymerization in constrained media. Trans-1,4-P3MPD is optically active with [alpha]{sub D} values comprised between +4.3 and +5.6. The optical rotatory dispersion curve of the P3MPD is completely different from that of DOCA as expected.

  6. Radiation-induced effects in GaN by photoconductivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L. [Physics Department, University of Bologna, V.le Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Spectral photoconductivity is a very efficient tool to explore the forbidden gap of wide gap semiconductors, detecting band-to-band or deep level-to-band transitions of the charge carriers. In this paper we present some results obtained by spectral photoconductivity concerning HVPE (hydride vapour phase epitaxy) grown gallium nitride submitted to high energy proton irradiation. The behaviour of the material before and after irradiation may give information on the characteristics of the deep bands and their association to surface or bulk defects. In particular we observed how irradiation quenches the yellow band and correspondingly inhibits persistent photocurrent effects. Persistent photocurrent measurements carried out at different temperatures give further insights on the radiation-induced effects. The possible correlation among the deep-related transitions and the persistent photo-effects is here proposed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) prepared by radiation-induced polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martellini, Flavia; Innocentini Mei, Lucia H.; Lora, Silvano; Carenza, Mario E-mail: carenza@lnl.infn.it

    2004-10-01

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on bacterial poly(3-hydroxy butyrate) with a hydrophilic monomer at different compositions were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization using {gamma}-rays from a {sup 60}Co source with a total dose of 10-100 kGy. The swelling behaviour was determined by water content at equilibrium, while thermal properties and crystallinity were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Extraction of the soluble part of PHB from the films at low and high temperature with water or chloroform as well as FTIR data indicate the occurrence of the crosslinking reaction in the hydrogels. The results show a water uptake increasing with the hydrophilic component until 25%.

  8. Characterization of Network Structure of Polyacrylamide Based Hydrogels Prepared By Radiation Induced Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudi, Naim; Şen, Murat; Güven, Olgun; Rendevski, Stojan

    2007-04-01

    In this study network structure of polyacrylamide based hydrogels prepared by radiation induced polymerization has been investigated. Polyacrylamide based hydrogels in the rod form were prepared by copolymerization of acrylamide(AAm) with hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and methyl acrylamide(MAAm) in the presence of cross-linking agent and water by gamma rays at ambient temperature. Molecular weight between cross-links and effective cross-link density of hydrogels were calculated from swelling as well as shear modulus data obtained from compression tests. The results have shown that simple compression analyses can be used for the determination of effective cross-link density of hydrogels without any need to some polymer-solvent based parameters as in the case of swelling based determinations. Diffusion of water into hydrogels was examined by analyzing water absorption kinetics and the effect of network, structure on the diffusion type and coefficient was discussed.

  9. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  11. Influence of matrix porosity on the immobilization of penicillin acylase by radiation-induced polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Boccù, E.; Largajolli, R.; Veronese, F. M.

    Penicillin acylase was immobilized by low temperature radiation-induced polymerization into polymer matrices obtained from monomers of different hydrophilicities, at various ratios of monomer to enzyme solution and at different polymerization conversions. It was found that the penicillin acylase retention (60-85% of the starting enzyme) is independent of the monomer used in thepolymerization, of the polymerization conversion and of the porosity of the polymer matrix. On the other hand, the penicillin acylase retention strongly depends on the presence in the irradiation mixture of the hydrophobic crosslinking agent, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, even in low amounts. The data suggest that the enzyme is bound to the polymer matrix by hydrophobic interactions through crosslinking agent molecules.

  12. Influence of matrix porosity on the immobilization of penicillin acylase by radiation-induced polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Boccu, E.; Largajolli, R.; Veronese, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    Penicillin acylase was immobilized by low temperature radiation-induced polymerization into polymer matrices obtained from monomers of different hydrophilicities, at various ratios of monomer to enzyme solution and at different polymerization conversions. It was found that the penicillin acylase retention (60-85% of the starting enzyme) is independent of the monomer used in the polymerization, of the polymerization conversion and of the porosity of the polymer matrix. On the other hand, the penicillin acylase retention strongly depends on the presence in the irradiation mixture of the hydrophobic crosslinking agent, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, even in low amounts. The data suggest that the enzyme is bound to the polymer matrix by hydrophobic interactions through crosslinking agent molecules.

  13. Modeling of radiation-induced sink evolution in 6061 aluminum alloy in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Kwon, Junhyun [Division of Nuclear Materials Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The objective of this study is a detailed analysis of the radiation effects on sink generation and growth in order to understand the phenomenon of irradiation hardening of 6061 aluminum alloy in research reactor conditions. In order to have a fundamental understanding, various sink behavior characteristics such as size and number density of dislocation loop, void, and precipitation were calculated and examined. Thereafter, theoretical assessment of various sink effects on irradiation hardening was conducted based on the mean field rate theory (MFRT). Dislocation loop, void, and precipitation were examined by defect flux. For the quantitative analysis of radiation-induced degradation, change in sink size was calculated using number density. 6061 Alloy showed great dependence on precipitation generation and growth. However, dislocation loop and void did not have any significant effect on irradiation hardening. Finally, the behavior of sinks was compared with the experimental results for validation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  15. Latest advances in the management of radiation-induced pain flare, nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nicholas; Chiu, Leonard; Popovic, Marko; DeAngelis, Carlo; Pasetka, Mark; Lutz, Stephen; Zhang, Na; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Mendez, Lucas Castro; Lechner, Breanne; Pulenzas, Natalie; Milakovic, Milica; Chow, Ronald; Chow, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases. However, pain flare, nausea and vomiting are common adverse effects associated with this treatment. The management of pain flare and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) are important endpoints in palliative care. Our report documents the incidence, clinical importance, and advances in the management of these two adverse-effects. We recommend that antiemetic prophylaxis be given based on emetic risk category as outlined in the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines. Newer antiemetics investigated in the chemotherapy setting should also be studied in the radiation setting. As there are no guidelines for the use of pain flare prophylaxis at present, further research in this area is needed.

  16. Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junchao; Liu, Liteng; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Experiments showed that the radiation-induced bystander effect exists in cells, or tissues, or even biological organisms when irradiated with energetic ions or X-rays. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model is developed to study the mechanisms of bystander effect under the cells sparsely populated conditions. This model, based on our previous experiment which made the cells sparsely located in a round dish, focuses mainly on the spatial characteristics. The simulation results successfully reach the agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, other bystander effect experiment is also computed by this model and finally the model succeeds in predicting the results. The comparison of simulations with the experimental results indicates the feasibility of the model and the validity of some vital mechanisms assumed.

  17. Bioinformatics methods for learning radiation-induced lung inflammation from heterogeneous retrospective and prospective data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sarah J; Bonnin, Damian Almiron; Deasy, Joseph O; Bradley, Jeffrey D; El Naqa, Issam

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between physical and biological factors, reflecting both treatment conditions and underlying genetics. Recent advances in radiotherapy and biotechnology provide new opportunities and challenges for predicting radiation-induced toxicities, particularly radiation pneumonitis (RP), in lung cancer patients. In this work, we utilize datamining methods based on machine learning to build a predictive model of lung injury by retrospective analysis of treatment planning archives. In addition, biomarkers for this model are extracted from a prospective clinical trial that collects blood serum samples at multiple time points. We utilize a 3-way proteomics methodology to screen for differentially expressed proteins that are related to RP. Our preliminary results demonstrate that kernel methods can capture nonlinear dose-volume interactions, but fail to address missing biological factors. Our proteomics strategy yielded promising protein candidates, but their role in RP as well as their interactions with dose-volume metrics remain to be determined.

  18. Intestinal Radiation-Induced Stricture Favours Small Bowel Obstruction by Phytobezoar: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Quercioli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bezoars represent the fifth most frequent cause of acute small bowel obstruction. Phytobezoar is the most common type of bezoar. It is a concretion of undigestible fibers derived from ingested vegetables and fruits. We report a case of a woman with a 1-year history of recurrent epigastric and periumbilical abdominal pain with intermittent vomiting caused by phytobezoar of the terminal ileum. After careful investigation of the case and review of literature, we identified the factor involved in bezoar formation as radiation-induced ileal stenosis due to previous treatment for a pelvic tumour. This report provides evidence to consider phytobezoar as a possible cause of small bowel obstruction in patients previously treated with abdominal radiotherapy.

  19. Radiation-induced grafting of dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate onto PE/PP nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaklı, Pınar Akkaş; Kavaklı, Cengiz; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Güven, Olgun

    2007-12-01

    A new adsorbent was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (DMAEMA) onto polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabric. The trunk polymer was irradiated by electron beam at a voltage of 2 MeV and a current of 3 mA in nitrogen atmosphere at dry-ice temperature to different doses. The degree of grafting was determined as a function of irradiation dose, monomer concentration, temperature and reaction time. Grafting conditions were optimized and about 150% grafted samples were used for further experiments. DMAEMA grafted polymer was later protonated in acid solution to prepare specialty adsorbent for the removal of phosphate. Adsorption experiments were performed in column mode for removal of phosphate. It was shown that 2000 bed volumes of phosphate-free water can be produced from 100 ppb phosphate (as P) solution at high space velocity.

  20. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Waichiro; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient`s nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author).

  1. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-27

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management.

  2. Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminum alloy: low dose effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjana, K.; Ampornrat, P.; Channuie, J.

    2017-06-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminium alloy 6061 (AA6061) immersed in demineralized water was studied at radiation dose up to 206 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the oxide produced on the post-irradiated samples were investigated using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) of the post-irradiated samples were measured. The corrosion behavior of AA6061 appeared to be dose dependent under the experimental conditions. A dramatic change in surface morphology was observed in the samples exposed to gamma radiation at 206 kGy. At this radiation dose the aluminium oxide scale developed can be clearly seen. The results from electrochemical corrosion tests have shown that the corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) can be undoubtedly decreased by gamma irradiation, giving corrosion rate of 7 × 10-4 mm/yr.

  3. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  4. Graft polymerization using radiation-induced peroxides and application to textile dyeing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Ichiro, E-mail: enomoto.ichiro@iri-tokyo.j [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, KFC Bldg., 12F, 1-6-1, Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 130-0015 (Japan); School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kudo, Hisaaki [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Soeda, Shin [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, KFC Bldg., 12F, 1-6-1, Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 130-0015 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    To improve the dyeing affinity of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber, surface treatment by radiation-induced graft polymerization was performed. Methyl methacrylate (MMA), acrylic acid (AA) and styrene (St) were used as the monomers. The grafting yields as a function of storage time after irradiation were examined. Although the grafting yield of St after the sulfonation processing was quite low compared with those of MMA and AA, it was successfully dyed to a dark color with a cationic dye. Some acid dyes can dye the grafted fiber with AA. The acid dye is distributed to the amorphous domains of the AA grafted fiber. The dyeing concentration depended on the grafting yield, and the higher the grafting yield the darker the dye color.

  5. A Case of Radiation-Induced Multifocal Laryngeal Angiosarcoma Presenting as a Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme R. Dowdall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are relatively rare tumors, with angiosarcomas representing a small subset. Angiosarcoma is a malignant endothelial neoplasm characterized by atypical, multilayered, or solid endothelial proliferation with vasoformative architecture. The global incidence of irradiation-associated sarcoma is estimated as between 0.03% and 0.08%. Here we reported the case of an elderly woman previously treated with radiation more than 20 years ago for an unknown primary of head and neck. This interesting case presented as a diagnostic challenge, and multiple biopsies were required to eventually establish the diagnosis of laryngeal angiosarcoma. We additionally have confirmation from our prior radiation records that the patient did, in fact, receive a substantial dose of radiation to the site previously. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a documented radiation-induced multifocal laryngeal angiosarcoma.

  6. Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2014-06-01

    We performed measurements and analyses of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of polyurethane foam and glass microballoon foam at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. The RIC coefficient was non-linear with dose rate for polyurethane foam; however, typical values at 1E11 rad(si)/s dose rate was measured as 0.8E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 5 lb./cu ft. foam and 0.3E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 10 lb./cu ft. density polyurethane foam. For encapsulated glass microballoons (GMB) the RIC coefficient was approximately 1E-15 mho/m/rad/s and was not a strong function of dose rate.

  7. Cytoprotective Efficacy of Amifostine Against Radiation- Induced Rectal Toxicity: Objective and Subjective Grading Scales for Radiomucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Kouvaris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Curative radiation therapy of pelvic malignancies, frequently results in doselimitingtoxicities such as serous, mucoid, or more rarely, bloody diarrhea. Several studieshave evaluated the cytoprotective effects of amifostine in preventing rectal mucositisassociated with radiation treatment. We searched Medline for published comparativestudies that evaluated the use of amifostine to reduce radiation-induced toxicity associatedwith pelvic irradiation. In ten studies there was an evidence-based cytoprotection (P less than 0.05by amifostine. Although results are variable, current evidence suggests that amifostine mayhave a radioprotective effect in the rectal mucosa, particularly when administeredintrarectally. Significant improvements were seen in both symptomatic and objective(rectosigmoidoscopy end points. There is a need to conduct well-designed clinical trialswith sufficient numbers of participants to confirm these findings together with a costbenefitstudy. Objective measurements using rectosigmoidoscopy are superior tosubjective measures such as WHO or RTOG/EORTC toxicity grading scales.

  8. Three Cases of Radiation-Induced Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation after Hepatic Tomotherapy: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Moon Kyoo; Hong, Seong Eon; Kim, Byung Ho; Choi, Jin Hyun [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) has been characterized as a veno-occlusive disease with anicteric elevation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). However, some RILD patients present with elevated transaminase levels rather than with anicteric elevation of ALP, and these findings are common in the Asia-Pacific region where hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with 70-90% of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) cases. In addition, the development of RILD is more common in patients with hepatitis B virus-related HCC. These findings indicate that susceptibility to RILD might be different in HBV carriers and non-carriers, and moreover, RILD in patients with HBV-related HCC might be associated with another unique pathogenesis such as HBV reactivation. However, HBV reactivation after hepatic irradiation has been reported in only a few studies. This study reports three cases of HBV reactivation after hepatic tomotherapy for management of HCC.

  9. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  10. Preclinical Research into Basic Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boerma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD is a potentially severe side effect of radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors if all or part of the heart was included in the radiation field. RIHD presents clinically several years after irradiation and manifestations include accelerated atherosclerosis, pericardial and myocardial fibrosis, conduction abnormalities, and injury to cardiac valves. There is no method to prevent or reverse these injuries when the heart is exposed to ionizing radiation. This paper presents an overview of recent studies that address the role of microvascular injury, endothelial dysfunction, mast cells, and the renin angiotensin system in animal models of cardiac radiation injury. These insights into the basic mechanisms of RIHD may lead to the identification of targets for intervention in this late radiotherapy side effect.

  11. Radiation-induced erectile dysfunction using prostate-confined modern radiotherapy in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masaki; Yan, Hui; Rabbani, Zahid; Satoh, Takefumi; Baba, Shiro; Yin, Fang-fang; Polascik, Thomas J; Donatucci, Craig F; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Koontz, Bridget F

    2011-08-01

    The mechanisms of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) are unclear, as clinical studies are limited, and previous animal models were based on wide-field irradiation, which does not model current radiotherapy (RT) techniques. To perform functional and morphological analyses of erectile function (EF) utilizing image-guided stereotactic prostate-confined RT in a rat model. Sixty young adult male rats aged 10-12 weeks old were divided into age-matched sham and RT groups. A single 20-Gy fraction to the prostate was delivered to RT animals. Penile bulb, shaft, and testes were excluded from treatment fields. Bioassay and intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurements were conducted at 2, 4, and 9 weeks following RT. Perfusion analysis of the corpora cavernosa (CC) was conducted using Hoechst injected prior to sacrifice. Penile shaft and cavernous nerve (CN) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Plasma testosterone level was analyzed using a testosterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay kit. Irradiated animals demonstrated statistically significant time-dependent functional impairment of EF by bioassay and ICP measurement from 4 weeks. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression was decreased in CN by 4 weeks. In CC, expression levels of anti-alpha smooth muscle actin and endothelial NOS were significantly decreased at 9 weeks. In penile dorsal vessels, smooth muscle/collagen ratio was significantly decreased at 4 and 9 weeks. Additionally, Hoechst perfusion showed time-dependent decrease in CC of RT animals, whereas CD31 expression was not affected. No toxicities were noted; testosterone levels were similar in both groups. We demonstrated time-dependent ED following image-guided stereotactic RT. Our results imply that reduction of neuronal NOS expression in cavernous nerve could trigger consecutive reduction of smooth muscle content as well as blood perfusion in CC that resulted in corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction. Present study could be a

  12. Radiation-induced oesophagitis in lung cancer patients. Is susceptibility for neutropenia a risk factor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruysscher, D. de [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Meerbeeck, J. van [Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine; Vandecasteele, K. [Ghent Univ. Hospital (BE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2012-07-15

    Background: Radiation-induced oesophagitis is a major side effect of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A strong association between neutropenia and oesophagitis was previously shown, but external validation and further elucidation of the possible mechanisms are lacking. Methods and patients: A total of 119 patients were included at two institutions. The concurrent group comprised 34 SCLC patients treated with concurrent carboplatin and etoposide, and concurrent chest irradiation, and 36 NSCLC patients with concurrent cisplatin and etoposide, and concurrent radiotherapy, while the sequential group comprised 49 NSCLC patients received sequential cisplatin and gemcitabine, and radiotherapy. Results: Severe neutropenia was very frequent during concurrent chemoradiation (grade: 4 41.4%) and during induction chemotherapy in sequentially treated patients (grade 4: 30.6%), but not during radiotherapy (only 4% grade 1). In the concurrent group, the odds ratios of grade 3 oesophagitis vs. neutropenia were the following: grade 2 vs. grade 0/1: 5.60 (95% CI 1.55-20.26), p = 0.009; grade 3 vs. grade 0/1: 10.40 (95% CI 3.19-33.95); p = 0.0001; grade 4 vs. grade 0/1: 12.60 (95% CI 4.36-36.43); p < 0.00001. There was no correlation between the occurrence of neutropenia during induction chemotherapy and acute oesophagitis during or after radiotherapy alone. In the univariate analysis, total radiation dose (p < 0.001), overall treatment time of radiotherapy (p < 0.001), mean oesophageal dose (p = 0.038) and neutropenia (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with the development of oesophagitis. In a multivariate analysis, only neutropenia remained significant (p = 0.023). Conclusion: We confirm that neutropenia is independently correlated with oesophagitis in concurrent chemoradiation, but that the susceptibility for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is not associated with radiation-induced oesophagitis. Further studies focusing on the underlying mechanisms are thus

  13. Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  14. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  15. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Milas, Luka [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thames, Howard D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mason, Kathy A., E-mail: kmason@mdanderson.org [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  16. MRI findings of radiation-induced myocardial damage in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, R; Ota, H; Takanami, K; Ichinose, A; Matsushita, H; Saito, H; Takase, K; Jingu, K

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced myocardial damage after mediastinal radiotherapy using MRI. Between May 2010 and April 2011, delayed contrast-enhanced MRI was performed for patients who had maintained a complete response to curative radiotherapy for oesophageal cancer for more than 6 months. The patients received radiotherapy with a median total dose of 66 Gy (60-70 Gy) for the primary tumour and metastatic lymph nodes. Images of MRI were analysed by a 17-segment method recommended by the American Heart Association. A segment included mainly in the 40 Gy dose line was defined as Segment 40 Gy, a segment included mainly in the 60 Gy dose line as Segment 60 Gy, and a segment out of the radiation fields as Segment OUT. The percentage of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was examined in those categories. The layer in which LGE was predominantly distributed was evaluated for each patient. Four hundred and eight segments in 24 patients were analysed. The median interval from completion of radiotherapy to MRI was 23.5 months (range 6-88 months). LGE was detected in 12 of the 24 patients. LGE was detected in 15.38% of Segment 40 Gy cases, 21.21% of Segment 60 Gy cases, and 0% of Segment OUT cases. LGE in mid-myocardial and subendocardial layers was detected in 11 patients and one patient, respectively. LGE suggesting radiation induced myocardial fibrosis was observed by performing delayed contrast-enhanced MRI. Care should be taken when planning radiotherapy to avoid late cardiac damage. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu Rui; Liu, Yong Ai; Sun, Fang; Li, He; Lei, Su Wen; Wang, Ju Fang

    2016-07-01

    To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence- associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  19. Is Pilocarpine Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Xerostomia? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wei-fa; Liao, Gui-qing [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Ouyang, Dai-qiao [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Su, Yu-xiong, E-mail: richsu@hku.hk [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of concomitant administration of pilocarpine on radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: The PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials were searched to identify randomized, controlled trials studying the effect of concomitant administration of pilocarpine for radiation-induced xerostomia. Included trials were systematically reviewed, and quantifiable outcomes were pooled for meta-analysis. Outcomes of interest included salivary flow, clinician-rated xerostomia grade, patient-reported xerostomia scoring, quality of life, and adverse effects. Results: Six prospective, randomized, controlled trials in 8 articles were included in this systematic review. The total number of patients was 369 in the pilocarpine group and 367 in the control group. Concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation could increase the unstimulated salivary flow rate in a period of 3 to 6 months after treatment, and also reduce the clinician-rated xerostomia grade. Patient-reported xerostomia was not significantly impacted by pilocarpine in the initial 3 months but was superior at 6 months. No significant difference of stimulated salivary flow rate could be confirmed between the 2 arms. Adverse effects of pilocarpine were mild and tolerable. Conclusions: The concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation increases unstimulated salivary flow rate and reduces clinician-rated xerostomia grade after radiation. It also relieves patients' xerostomia at 6 months and possibly at 12 months. However, pilocarpine has no effect on stimulated salivary flow rate.

  20. The role of serotonin and p53 status in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Dahle, Jostein

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serotonin and protein 53 (p53) status of the cells in the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). The radiation-induced bystander response was investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells employing medium-transfer experiments and micronuclei (MN) induction as an end-point. Irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) from cells exposed to α-particle or γ-radiation was filtered and transferred to unirradiated cells 2 h following irradiation. MCF-7 cells were irradiated with 0.5 Gy α-particles, while HCT116 p53(+/+) and HCT116 p53(-/-) cells were irradiated with 0.5 Gy γ-radiation. Bystander MCF-7 cells, recipient of ICCM from 0.5 Gy α-particle irradiated MCF-7 cells grown in high serotonin conditions showed a modest but significant increase in MN, while MCF-7 cells receiving ICCM with low serotonin levels did not show any bystander effect. Added serotonin (100 ng/ml) led to a bystander effectin HCT116 p53(-/-) cells recipient of ICCM from 0.5 Gy γ-irradiated HCT116 p53(+/+) cells, but had no effect when the ICCM was from γ-irradiated HCT116 P53(-/-) cells. The results indicate that serotonin levels in the medium play a role in the RIBE and that there may be an interaction between the role of serotonin and the p53 status of the irradiated cells.

  1. Kukoamine A Prevents Radiation-Induced Neuroinflammation and Preserves Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Rats by Inhibiting Activation of NF-κB and AP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqiong; Gao, Lingyue; Cheng, Zhihua; Cai, Jiayi; Niu, Yixuan; Meng, Weihong; Zhao, Qingchun

    2017-02-01

    Impaired hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury. Kukoamine A (KuA) was demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects through inhibiting oxidative stress and apoptosis after whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether administration of KuA would prevent radiation-induced neuroinflammation and the detrimental effect on hippocampal neurogenesis. For this study, male Wistar rats received either sham irradiation or WBI (30 Gy single dose of X-rays) followed by the immediate injection of either KuA or vehicle intravenously. The dose of KuA was 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, respectively. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assayed by ELISA kits. The newborn neurons were detected by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)/neuronal nuclei (NeuN) double immunofluorescence. Microglial activation was measured by Iba-1 immunofluorescence. The expression of Cox-2 and the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activating protein 1(AP-1), and PPARδ were evaluated by western blot. WBI led to a significant increase in the level of TNF-α, IL-1β, and Cox-2, and it was alleviated by KuA administration. KuA attenuated microglial activation in rat hippocampus after WBI. Neurogenesis impairment induced by WBI was ameliorated by KuA. Additionally, KuA alleviated the increased translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit and phosphorylation of c-jun induced by WBI and elevated the expression of PPARδ. These data indicate that KuA could ameliorate the neuroinflammatory response and protect neurogenesis after WBI, partially through regulating the activation of NF-κB, AP-1, and PPARδ.

  2. [Comparison of protective properties of the smallpox DNA-vaccine based on the variola virus A30L gene and its variant with modified codon usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksiutov, R A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of candidate DNA-vaccines based on the variola virus natural gene A30L and artificial gene A30Lopt with modified codon usage, optimized for expression in mammalian cells, was tested. The groups of mice were intracutaneously immunized three times with three-week intervals with candidate DNA-vaccines: pcDNA_A30L or pcDNA_A30Lopt, and in three weeks after the last immunization all mice in the groups were intraperitoneally infected by the ectromelia virus K1 strain in 10 LD50 dose for the estimation of protection. It was shown that the DNA-vaccines based on natural gene A30L and codon-optimized gene A30Lopt elicited virus, thereby neutralizing the antibody response and protected mice from lethal intraperitoneal challenge with the ectromelia virus with lack of statistically significant difference.

  3. YopP-expressing variant of Y. pestis activates a potent innate immune response affording cross-protection against yersiniosis and tularemia [corrected].

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    Ayelet Zauberman

    Full Text Available Plague, initiated by Yersinia pestis infection, is a rapidly progressing disease with a high mortality rate if not quickly treated. The existence of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains emphasizes the need for the development of novel countermeasures against plague. We previously reported the generation of a recombinant Y. pestis strain (Kim53ΔJ+P that over-expresses Y. enterocolitica YopP. When this strain was administered subcutaneously to mice, it elicited a fast and effective protective immune response in models of bubonic, pneumonic and septicemic plague. In the present study, we further characterized the immune response induced by the Kim53ΔJ+P recombinant strain. Using a panel of mouse strains defective in specific immune functions, we observed the induction of a prompt protective innate immune response that was interferon-γ dependent. Moreover, inoculation of mice with Y. pestis Kim53ΔJ+P elicited a rapid protective response against secondary infection by other bacterial pathogens, including the enteropathogen Y. enterocolitica and the respiratory pathogen Francisella tularensis. Thus, the development of new therapies to enhance the innate immune response may provide an initial critical delay in disease progression following the exposure to highly virulent bacterial pathogens, extending the time window for successful treatment.

  4. Hesperidin ameliorates UV radiation-induced skin damage by abrogation of oxidative stress and inflammatory in HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lin, Xiang-Fei; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Bing-Rong; Luo, Dan

    2016-12-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation contributes to skin photoaging. Hesperidin which is a flavanone glycoside found in citrus fruit peels, have been intensively studied for their UVA-protective activity, but its effects and mechanisms on UVA irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress have never been described. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of hesperidin in skin oxidative stress and inflammation induced by UVA irradiation. In this study, we firstly examined whether hesperidin may exert direct protective effects on the UVA-induced in human keratinocytes (