WorldWideScience

Sample records for variable specific heats

  1. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  2. First and Second-Law Efficiency Analysis and ANN Prediction of a Diesel Cycle with Internal Irreversibility, Variable Specific Heats, Heat Loss, and Friction Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rashidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The variability of specific heats, internal irreversibility, heat and frictional losses are neglected in air-standard analysis for different internal combustion engine cycles. In this paper, the performance of an air-standard Diesel cycle with considerations of internal irreversibility described by using the compression and expansion efficiencies, variable specific heats, and losses due to heat transfer and friction is investigated by using finite-time thermodynamics. Artificial neural network (ANN is proposed for predicting the thermal efficiency and power output values versus the minimum and the maximum temperatures of the cycle and also the compression ratio. Results show that the first-law efficiency and the output power reach their maximum at a critical compression ratio for specific fixed parameters. The first-law efficiency increases as the heat leakage decreases; however the heat leakage has no direct effect on the output power. The results also show that irreversibilities have depressing effects on the performance of the cycle. Finally, a comparison between the results of the thermodynamic analysis and the ANN prediction shows a maximum difference of 0.181% and 0.194% in estimating the thermal efficiency and the output power. The obtained results in this paper can be useful for evaluating and improving the performance of practical Diesel engines.

  3. SPECIFIC HEAT INDICATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, F.L.; Binns, J.E.

    1961-05-01

    Apparatus for continuously and automatically measuring and computing the specific heat of a flowing solution is described. The invention provides for the continuous measurement of all the parameters required for the mathematical solution of this characteristic. The parameters are converted to logarithmic functions which are added and subtracted in accordance with the solution and a null-seeking servo reduces errors due to changing voltage drops to a minimum. Logarithmic potentiometers are utilized in a unique manner to accomplish these results.

  4. Eternity Variables to Simulate Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, WH; Boiten, EA; Moller, B

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of specifications is introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. Eternity variables are introduced as a more powerful alternative for prophecy variables and backward

  5. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Odukomaiya, Adewale [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gehl, Anthony C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  6. Exergy-based ecological performance of an irreversible Otto cycle with temperature-linear-relation variable specific heat of working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yanlin; Chen, Lingen; Qin, Xiaoyong; Xie, Zhihui

    2017-05-01

    Considering internal irreversibility loss (IIL), friction loss (FL) and heat transfer loss (HTL), an irreversible Otto cycle (IOC) model is built up by using air standard (AS) assumption. Based on finite-time thermodynamics (FTT), computing entropy generation rate (EGR) by using the irreversible losses in the cycle, the ecological function (EF) performance of the cycle is optimized when the specific heat (SH) of the working fluid (WF) varies with temperature with linear relation. Some important expressions, including efficiency, power output, EGR and EF, are obtained. Moreover, the effects of variable SH of WF and three losses on cycle performance are investigated. The research conclusion can provide some guidelines for the actual Otto cycle engine performance optimization.

  7. High specific heat superconducting composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1979-01-01

    A composite superconductor formed from a high specific heat ceramic such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium-aluminum oxide and a conventional metal conductor such as copper or aluminum which are insolubly mixed together to provide adiabatic stability in a superconducting mode of operation. The addition of a few percent of insoluble gadolinium-aluminum oxide powder or gadolinium oxide powder to copper, increases the measured specific heat of the composite by one to two orders of magnitude below the 5.degree. K. level while maintaining the high thermal and electrical conductivity of the conventional metal conductor.

  8. Effect of variable thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the calculation of the critical metal hydride thickness for Ti1.1CrMn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    model is applied to the metal hydride system, with Ti 1.1 CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of absorbed hydrogen and solid bed temperat ure . Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and hydrogen content respectively , are accounted for...... with activated powder and embedded heat exchanger makes difficult to set up experimental facilities. Trustable simulation models that can address the system ́s performances to a particular design are then a funda mental step to be taken prior any experimental setup. This study considers a detailed 1D fueling...

  9. MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-09-29

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were

  10. About Variable Speed Heating and Cooling Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Popovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work has the purpose of underlying the advantages of variable speed heating and cooling pumps use for the perspective of general and particular pumping costs and efficiency. The study approaches comparisons between constant flow pumps and variable flow pumps in different given situations and comparatively analyses the pumping costs.

  11. About Variable Speed Heating and Cooling Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Popovici, Cătălin; Ignat, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The present work has the purpose of underlying the advantages of variable speed heating and cooling pumps use for the perspective of general and particular pumping costs and efficiency. The study approaches comparisons between constant flow pumps and variable flow pumps in different given situations and comparatively analyses the pumping costs.

  12. Eternity Variables to Prove Simulation of Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of specifications are introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. A specification implements another specification if and only if there is a simulation from the first one to

  13. Thermal performance analysis for heat exchangers having a variable overall heat transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. C.; Granryd, E.

    The classic, conventional analysis for the thermal performance of heat exchangers is based on three assumptions: constant fluid flow rate, constant specific heat fluids, and constant overall heat transfer coefficient. Our analysis describes a general approach for analyzing the thermal performance of heat exchangers in which the overall heat transfer coefficient varies as a function of enthalpy, with the other two basic assumptions of constant mass flow rates and constant specific heats unchanged. Many heat exchangers have an overall heat transfer coefficient that is not constant. The conventional heat exchanger thermal performance analysis is correct as long as a true, area-weighted mean value is used. In many applications, however, fluids undergo a change in phase, and the heat transfer coefficient is a function of the local quality or enthalpy; hence, the true, area-weighted, mean heat transfer coefficient will be a function of the heat flux distribution. Examples are presented that illustrate the variation in overall heat transfer coefficient for an evaporation process. We present a general method for computing a true, area-weighted mean overall heat transfer coefficient that permits use of a local overall heat transfer coefficient that is an arbitrary function of enthalpy. This method allows a simple yet accurate analysis of the effects of a variable overall heat transfer coefficient to be made without the use of a large mainframe computer. We then investigate: (1) linear variation of local overall heat transfer coefficient with respect to enthalpy; and (2) two heat transfer correlations applicable to flow-boiling inside a tube.

  14. Essential Specification Elements for Heat Exchanger Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, L.

    2015-07-01

    Performance upgrade and equipment degradation are the primary impetuses for a nuclear power plant to engage in the large capital cost project of heat exchanger replacement. Along with attention to these issues, consideration of heat exchanger Codes and Standards, material improvements, thermal redesign, and configuration are essential for developing User’s Design Specifications for successful replacement projects. The User’s Design Specification is the central document in procuring ASME heat exchangers. Properly stated objectives for the heat exchanger replacement are essential for obtaining the materials, configurations and thermal designs best suited for the nuclear power plant. Additionally, the code of construction required and the applied manufacturing standard (TEMA or HEI) affects how the heat exchanger may be designed or configured to meet the replacement goals. Knowledge of how Codes and Standards affect design and configuration details will aid in writing the User’s Design Specification. Joseph Oat Corporation has designed and fabricated many replacement heat exchangers for the nuclear power industry. These heat exchangers have been constructed per ASME Section III to various Code-Years or ASME Section VIII-1 to the current Code-Year also in accordance with TEMA and HEI. These heat exchangers have been a range of like-for-like replacement to complete thermal, material and configuration redesigns. Several examples of these heat exchangers with their Code, Standard and specification implications are presented. (Author.

  15. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  16. Specific heat of ovendry loblolly pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles W. McMillin

    1969-01-01

    In the range of 333 K to 413 K, the specific heat of ovendry loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) wood was expressed by a linear function of temperature. No relationship was detected with specific gravity, growth rate, or distance from the pith; nor were differences found between earlywood and latewood.

  17. On the specific heat of carbon steels

    OpenAIRE

    Umino, Saburo

    2010-01-01

    The results of the pre:lent investigation may be summarized as follows: (1) The heat content of carbon steels at high temperatures was determined by the mixture method, while the oxidation of the specimen was prevented by passing a purified hydrogen gas through the furnace. The specimens were twelve kinds of steels with different carbon contents from 0.09 % to 2.84 % and the range of temperature was 23~250°C. (2) According to A. Meuthen, the specific heat is constant below the A1 point, but t...

  18. On the Specific Heat Capacity of CuO Nanofluid

    OpenAIRE

    Le-Ping Zhou; Bu-Xuan Wang; Xiao-Feng Peng; Xiao-Ze Du; Yong-Ping Yang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the definition of heat capacity and clarifies the defined specific heat capacity and volumetric heat capacity. The specific heat capacity and volumetric heat capacity, with our measured experimental data for CuO nanofluids, are discussed as an illustrating example. The result indicates that the specific heat capacity of CuO nanofluid decreases gradually with increasing volume concentration of nanoparticles. The measurement and the prediction from the thermal equilib...

  19. Variable Heat Rejection Loop Heat Pipe radiator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal control systems are sized for the maximum heat load in the warmest continuous environment. This design process results in a larger radiator surface area than...

  20. Specific discharge variability in a boreal landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Steve W.; Nathanson, Marcus; Spans, André; Grabs, Thomas; Laudon, Hjalmar; Temnerud, Johan; Bishop, Kevin H.; Seibert, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Specific discharge variations within a mesoscale catchment were studied on the basis of three synoptic sampling campaigns. These were conducted during stable flow conditions within the Krycklan catchment study area in northern Sweden. During each campaign, about 80 individual locations were measured for discharge draining from catchment areas ranging between 0.12 and 67 km2. These discharge samplings allowed for the comparison between years within a given season (September 2005 versus September 2008) and between seasons within a given year (May 2008 versus September 2008) of specific discharge across this boreal landscape. There was considerable variability in specific discharge across this landscape. The ratio of the interquartile range (IQR) defined as the difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles of the specific discharges to the median of the specific discharges ranged from 37% to 43%. Factor analysis was used to explore potential relations between landscape characteristics and the specific discharge observed for 55 of the individual locations that were measured in all three synoptic sampling campaigns. Percentage wet area (i.e., wetlands, mires, and lakes) and elevation were found to be directly related to the specific discharge during the drier September 2008 sampling while potential annual evaporation was found to be inversely related. There was less of a relationship determined during the wetter post spring flood May 2008 sampling and the late summer rewetted September 2005 sampling. These results indicate the ability of forests to "dry out" parts of the catchment over the summer months while wetlands "keep wet" other parts. To demonstrate the biogeochemical implications of such spatiotemporal variations in specific discharge, we estimate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports with available data for the May 2008 and September 2008 samplings using both the spatially variable observed specific discharges and the spatially constant catchment average

  1. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall program objective is to develop a high temperature variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) backup radiator, and integrate it into a Stirling radioisotope...

  2. Incorporating the Variability of Wind Power with Electric Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Long

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available With the mass introduction of wind power in Northern China, wind power variability has appeared. In this article, both existing electric heat pumps (EHPs and coal-fired combined heat and power (CHP facilities, which are generally equipped with extraction-condensing steam turbines coupled with district heating for space heating purposes, are proposed to incorporate the variability of wind power equivalently. The authors’ proposal arises from the facts that: (1 EHPs can provide space heating in the domestic sector with little thermal comfort change (e.g., energy carriers for space heating purposes can be switched from heating water to electricity; (2 coal-fired CHP units in Northern China can usually generate more electrical power corresponding to a shaved thermal power production. Thus, it is suggested that heating water from CHP units be shaved when the wind generation is low due to the variability of wind power, so as to enable more electrical power production and compensate for the corresponding insufficient wind generation. Following this, in the future and for some space heating loads at appropriate distances, electricity used as energy carrier should be converted by electric heat pumps for space heating. Thus, more electricity consumption will be achieved so as to avoid wasting wind power when the wind generation it is high. A numerical simulation is performed in order to illustrate the authors’ proposal. It is shown that the impact of variability of wind generation can be equivalently reduced to a great extent, which enable more wind power integration instead of curtailment and potential energy conservation. Moreover, in contrast to before, both the thermal and electrical power of coal-fired CHP units are no longer constants. In addition, the ratio of electrical to thermal power of CHP units is no longer constant either, and results in less energy consumption compared with fixed ratio. Finally, electricity consumed by end users’ EHPs

  3. Influence of Variable Fluid Properties and Radiative Heat loss on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study extends the previous models to account for effects of variable fluid properties in the presence of radiative heat loss. The dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary linearly respectively, with temperature whereas the contribution of thermal radiative heat loss is based on Rosseland ...

  4. Analytical Evalution of Heat Transfer Conductivity with Variable Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Masoume; Hosseini, Mohammad Javad; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    The homotopy analysis method (HAM) as a new technique which is powerful and easy-to-use, is applied to solve heat transfer problems. In this paper, we use HAM for heat transfer conductivity equation with variable properties which may contain highly nonlinear terms. The obtained results are also...

  5. The specific heat of YBCO single crystals near Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, S.; Lawrie, I.D.; Howson, M.A. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-01

    The authors present results for the measured specific heat of YBCO single crystals between 80 and 110K. The specific heat has been measured using an a.c. optical heating technique with a temperature resolution of 15mK. The superconducting transition is marked by a sharply peaked {open_quote}Lambda{close_quote} like anomaly. The {open_quote}fluctuation{close_quote} contributions to the specific heat fit a logarithmic divergence very well.

  6. Ocean carbon and heat variability in an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. L.; Waugh, D.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean carbon and heat content are very important for regulating global climate. Furthermore, due to lack of observations and dependence on parameterizations, there has been little consensus in the modeling community on the magnitude of realistic ocean carbon and heat content variability, particularly in the Southern Ocean. We assess the differences between global oceanic heat and carbon content variability in GFDL ESM2Mc using a 500-year, pre-industrial control simulation. The global carbon and heat content are directly out of phase with each other; however, in the Southern Ocean the heat and carbon content are in phase. The global heat mutli-decadal variability is primarily explained by variability in the tropics and mid-latitudes, while the variability in global carbon content is primarily explained by Southern Ocean variability. In order to test the robustness of this relationship, we use three additional pre-industrial control simulations using different mesoscale mixing parameterizations. Three pre-industrial control simulations are conducted with the along-isopycnal diffusion coefficient (Aredi) set to constant values of 400, 800 (control) and 2400 m2 s-1. These values for Aredi are within the range of parameter settings commonly used in modeling groups. Finally, one pre-industrial control simulation is conducted where the minimum in the Gent-McWilliams parameterization closure scheme (AGM) increased to 600 m2 s-1. We find that the different simulations have very different multi-decadal variability, especially in the Weddell Sea where the characteristics of deep convection are drastically changed. While the temporal frequency and amplitude global heat and carbon content changes significantly, the overall spatial pattern of variability remains unchanged between the simulations.

  7. Heat pipes with variable thermal conductance property for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravets, V.; Alekseik, Ye.; Alekseik, O.; Khairnasov, S. [National Technical University of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Baturkin, V.; Ho, T. [Explorationssysteme RY-ES, Bremen (Germany); Celotti, L. [Active Space Technologies GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The activities presented in this paper demonstrate a new approach to provide passive thermal control using heat pipes, as demonstrated on the electronic unit of DLR’s MASCOT lander, which embarked on the NEA sample return mission Hayabusa 2 (JAXA). The focus is on the development and testing of heat pipes with variable thermal conductance in a predetermined temperature range. These heat pipes act as thermal switches. Unlike standard gasloaded heat pipes and thermal-diode heat pipes construction of presented heat pipes does not include any additional elements. Copper heat pipes with metal fibrous wicks were chosen as baseline design. We obtained positive results by choosing the heat carrier and structural parameters of the wick (i.e., pore diameter, porosity, and permeability). The increase in the thermal conductivity of the heat pipes from 0.04 W/K to 2.1 W/K was observed in the temperature range between −20 °C and +55 °C. Moreover, the heat pipes transferred the predetermined power of not less than 10 W within the same temperature range. The heat pipes have been in flight since December 2014, and the supporting telemetry data were obtained in September 2015. The data showed the nominal operation of the thermal control system.

  8. Transient characteristics of a grooved water heat pipe with variable heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The transient characteristics of a grooved water heat pipe were studied by using variable heat load. First, the effects of the property variations of the working fluid with temperature were investigated by operating the water heat pipe at several different temperatures. The experimental results show that, even for the same heat input profile and heat pipe configuration, the heat pipe transports more heat at higher temperature within the tested temperature range. Adequate liquid return to the evaporator due to decreasing viscosity of the working fluid permits continuous vaporization of water without dry-out. Second, rewetting of the evaporator was studied after the evaporator had experienced dry-out. To rewet the evaporator, the elevation of the condenser end was the most effective way. Without elevating the condenser end, rewetting is not straight-forward even with power turned off unless the heat pipe is kept at isothermal condition for sufficiently long time.

  9. Cappuccino and specific heat versus heat of vaporization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidden, Frits; Boomsma, Jorn; Schins, Anton; Van den Berg, Ed

    2012-01-01

    A cappuccino is prepared by adding about 50 mL frothing, foaming milk to a cup of espresso. Whole milk is best for foaming and the ideal milk temperature when adding it to the espresso is 65 °C. The espresso itself may be warmer than that. During the heating the milk should not burn, as that would

  10. The Heat Is on: An Inquiry-Based Investigation for Specific Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Deborah G.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial number of upper-level science students and practicing physical science teachers demonstrate confusion about thermal equilibrium, heat transfer, heat capacity, and specific heat capacity. The traditional method of instruction, which involves learning the related definitions and equations, using equations to solve heat transfer…

  11. Cappuccino and Specific Heat versus Heat of Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidden, Frits; Boomsma, Jorn; Schins, Anton; van den Berg, Ed

    2012-01-01

    A cappuccino is prepared by adding about 50 mL frothing, foaming milk to a cup of espresso. Whole milk is best for foaming and the ideal milk temperature when adding it to the espresso is 65 [degrees]C. The espresso itself may be warmer than that. During the heating the milk should not burn, as that would spoil the taste. The best way is to heat…

  12. Performance optimization of Brayton heat engine at maximum efficient power using temperature dependent specific heat of working fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kaushik, S C; Kumar, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Efficient power optimization of Brayton heat engine with variable specific heat of the working fluid is analyzed from the view of finite time thermodynamics. The efficient power is defined as the multiplication of engine power and engine efficiency. Hence, the proposed method considers not only the power output but also the engine efficiency. Optimizing the efficient power gives a compromise between power and engine efficiency. Results obtained are compared with those obtained by using the ma...

  13. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the viscous dissipation and variable viscosity effects on the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the presence of chemical reaction. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity ...

  14. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  15. Development of a high capacity variable conductance heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosson, R.; Hembach, R.; Edelstein, F.; Loose, J.

    1973-01-01

    The high-capacity, pressure-primed, tunnel-artery wick concept was used in a gas-controlled variable conductance heat pipe. A variety of techniques were employed to control the size of gas/vapor bubbles trapped within the artery. Successful operation was attained with a nominal 6-foot long, 1-inch diameter cold reservoir VCHP using ammonia working fluid and nitrogen control gas. The pipe contained a heat exchanger to subcool the liquid in the artery. Maximum transport capacity with a 46-inch effective length was 1200 watts level (more than 50,000 watt-inches) and 800 watts at 0.5-inch adverse tilt.

  16. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  17. The Specific Heat of Matter at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Tari, A

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of new materials and improvements in calorimetric techniques have given new impetus to the subject of specific heat. Nevertheless, there is a serious lack of literature on the subject. This invaluable book, which goes some way towards remedying that, is concerned mainly with the specific heat of matter at ordinary temperatures. It discusses the principles that underlie the theory of specific heat and considers a number of theoretical models in some detail. The subject matter ranges from traditional materials to those recently discovered - heavy fermion compounds, high temper

  18. Specific heat properties of electrons in generalized Fibonacci quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriz, P. W.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the specific heat properties of electrons in one-dimensional quasiperiodic potentials, arranged in accordance with the generalized Fibonacci sequence. The electronic energy spectra are calculated using the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a tight-binding approximation. Both analytical and numerical results on the temperature dependence of the electron's specific heat associated with their multiscale fractal energy spectra are presented. We compare our numerical results with those found for the ordinary Fibonacci structure. A rich and varied behavior is found for the specific heat oscillations when T→0, with interesting physical consequences.

  19. Specific heat in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanlı, A. M.; Ibragimov, B. G.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the specific heat and magnetization of a quantum ring of a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material in the presence of magnetic field. We take into account the effect of Rashba spin-orbital interaction, the exchange interaction and the Zeeman term on the specific heat. We have calculated the energy spectrum of the electrons in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring. Moreover we have calculated the specific heat dependency on the magnetic field and Mn concentration at finite temperature of a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring.

  20. Intrafamilial phenotypic variability of Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha-Doering, Lisa; Regele, Sabrina; Deuster, Dirk; Seidl, Rainer; Bogdanova, Nadja; Röpke, Albrecht; Wieacker, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette

    2016-08-01

    We investigated language functions in 32 members of a four generation family with several members affected by Specific Language Impairment with an extensive language test battery in order to determine the prevalence, overlap, and homogeneity of linguistic deficits within one pedigree. In sum, one fourth of all family members tested fulfilled the criteria of Specific Language Impairment. Despite of some similarities in language abilities, different combinations of language deficits were observed, and individual language profiles varied substantially. Thus, though there is a high prevalence of language deficits in this family which raises the likelihood of a genetic origin of these deficits, and though all affected study participants displayed selective linguistic deficits with normal non-verbal functioning, language testing showed considerable variance in overlap and homogeneity of linguistic deficits. Thus, even in one genetic population, an underlying linguistic disorder manifests itself in different language abilities to a variant degree. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of variable heat input on the heat transfer characteristics in an Organic Rankine Cycle system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboaltabooq Mahdi Hatf Kadhum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the heat transfer characteristics of an ORC evaporator applied on a diesel engine using measured data from experimental work such as flue gas mass flow rate and flue gas temperature. A mathematical model was developed with regard to the preheater, boiler and the superheater zones of a counter flow evaporator. Each of these zones has been subdivided into a number of cells. The hot source of the ORC cycle was modeled. The study involves the variable heat input's dependence on the ORC system's heat transfer characteristics, with especial emphasis on the evaporator. The results show that the refrigerant's heat transfer coefficient has a higher value for a 100% load from the diesel engine, and decreases with the load decrease. Also, on the exhaust gas side, the heat transfer coefficient decreases with the decrease of the load. The refrigerant's heat transfer coefficient increased normally with the evaporator's tube length in the preheater zone, and then increases rapidly in the boiler zone, followed by a decrease in the superheater zone. The exhaust gases’ heat transfer coefficient increased with the evaporator’ tube length in all zones. The results were compared with result by other authors and were found to be in agreement.

  2. Influence of System Variables on the Heating Characteristics of Water during Continuous Flow Microwave Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A domestic microwave oven (1000 W was modified to permit the continuous flow of liquids run through a helical coil centrally located inside the oven cavity. Heating characteristics were evaluated by measuring inlet and outlet temperatures of coil as a function of system variables. The influence of number of turns, coil diameter, tube diameter, pitch and initial temperature were evaluated at different flow rates. The average residence time of water was computed by dividing the coil volume by the volumetric flow rate. The influence of Dean number was evaluated. Results from this study showed that (1 higher number of turns resulted in lower heating rate, lower temperature fluctuations, higher exit temperature and longer time to achieve temperature equilibrium; (2 larger tube or coil diameter gave larger coil volume causing the heating rate to decrease; (3 faster flow rates resulted in lower exit temperatures, lower temperature fluctuation, higher Dean number and slightly higher heating rate; (4 higher initial temperatures resulted in higher exit temperatures; (5 higher Dean number resulted in more uniform heating and slightly higher heating rate. Overall, the coil volume was the more dominant factor affecting heating rate as compared with flow rate and Dean number.

  3. Can the frequency-dependent specific heat be measured by thermal effusion methods?

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Tage; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been shown that plane-plate heat effusion methods devised for wide-frequency specific-heat spectroscopy do not give the isobaric specific heat, but rather the so-called longitudinal specific heat. Here it is shown that heat effusion in a spherical symmetric geometry also involves the longitudinal specific heat.

  4. Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

  5. What weather variables are important in predicting heat-related mortality? A new application of statistical learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Schwartz, Joel D; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-07-01

    Hot weather increases risk of mortality. Previous studies used different sets of weather variables to characterize heat stress, resulting in variation in heat-mortality associations depending on the metric used. We employed a statistical learning method - random forests - to examine which of the various weather variables had the greatest impact on heat-related mortality. We compiled a summertime daily weather and mortality counts dataset from four U.S. cities (Chicago, IL; Detroit, MI; Philadelphia, PA; and Phoenix, AZ) from 1998 to 2006. A variety of weather variables were ranked in predicting deviation from typical daily all-cause and cause-specific death counts. Ranks of weather variables varied with city and health outcome. Apparent temperature appeared to be the most important predictor of heat-related mortality for all-cause mortality. Absolute humidity was, on average, most frequently selected as one of the top variables for all-cause mortality and seven cause-specific mortality categories. Our analysis affirms that apparent temperature is a reasonable variable for activating heat alerts and warnings, which are commonly based on predictions of total mortality in next few days. Additionally, absolute humidity should be included in future heat-health studies. Finally, random forests can be used to guide the choice of weather variables in heat epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution of heat equation with variable coefficient using derive

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lebelo, RS

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available -reviewed Conference Proceedings, 22 – 26 September  2008  - 129 - Solution of heat equation with variable coefficient using derive RS Lebeloα, I Fedotov and M Shatalovβ Department of Mathematics and Statistics Tshwane University of Technology Pretoria... of algebraic and transcedental equations. Buffelspoort TIME2008 Peer-reviewed Confe- rence Proceedings, 22-26 September, South Africa, ISBN 978-3-901769- 82-5, pp. 162 – 173. [5] R.S. Lebelo (2008). Approximating solutions of partial differential equations...

  7. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem for frequency-dependent specific heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    1996-01-01

    A derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) theorem for the frequency-dependent specific heat of a system described by a master equation is presented. The FD theorem is illustrated by a number of simple examples, including a system described by a linear Langevin equation, a two-level system......, and a system described by the energy master equation. It is shown that for two quite different models with low-energy cutoffs—a collection of two-level systems and a system described by the energy master equation—the frequency-dependent specific heat in dimensionless units becomes universal at low temperatures......, i.e., independent of both energy distribution and temperature. These two models give almost the same universal frequency-dependent specific heat, which compares favorably to experiments on supercooled alcohols....

  8. Dynamic specific heat of frustrated Ising spin rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, G

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic specific heat C(omega) is calculated exactly for rings of six coupled Ising spins within Glauber dynamics. We used the response of the internal energy to small temperature oscillations to find C(omega). The spin glass (SG) and disordered ferromagnetic (DFM) rings showed here have four energy minima and thus four diverging relaxation times in the time evolution of magnetization and three such times in the evolution of energy. The properties of the real and imaginary parts of dynamic specific heat are investigated for different temperatures and frequencies. The dynamic susceptibility is affected by the longest relaxing mode while the dynamic specific heat is not. Our results confirm that C(omega) is sensitive only to rapidly relaxing processes for ferromagnetic (FM) and anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) cases. (Author)

  9. Specific heat of a non-local attractive Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calegari, E.J., E-mail: eleonir@ufsm.br [Laboratório de Teoria da Matéria Condensada, Departamento de Física, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Lobo, C.O. [Laboratório de Teoria da Matéria Condensada, Departamento de Física, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Magalhaes, S.G. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litorânea s/n, 24210, 346, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Chaves, C.M.; Troper, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    The specific heat C(T) of an attractive (interaction G<0) non-local Hubbard model is investigated within a two-pole approximation that leads to a set of correlation functions, which play an important role as a source of anomalies as the pseudogap. For a giving range of G and n{sub T} (where n{sub T}=n{sub ↑}+n{sub ↓}), the specific heat as a function of the temperature presents a two peak structure. Nevertehelesss, the presence of a pseudogap eliminates the two peak structure. The effects of the second nearest-neighbor hopping on C(T) are also investigated.

  10. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colloid thrusters have long been known for their exceptional thrust efficiency and ability to operate over a range of specific impulse due to easily variable...

  11. Pool boiling of distilled water over tube bundle with variable heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Abhilas; Mohanty, Rajiva Lochan; Das, Mihir Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The experimental investigation of saturated pool boiling heat transfer of distilled water over plain tube bundle, under uniform and varying heat flux condition along the height are presented in this article. Experiments are carried out under various heat flux configurations applied to rows of tube bundles and pitch distance to diameter ratios of 1.25, 1.6 and 1.95. The wall superheats and pool boiling heat transfer coefficients over individual rows are determined. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for variable heat flux and uniform heat flux conditions are compared. The results indicate that the bundle effect is found to exist for uniform as well as variable heat flux under all operating conditions in the present investigation. The variable heat flux resulted in range of wall superheat being highest for decreasing heat flux from bottom to top and lowest for increasing heat flux from bottom to top.

  12. Measurement of the specific heat capacity of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D.T.; Roger, P

    2006-01-15

    With the objective of implementing graphite calorimetry at the BIPM to measure absorbed dose, an experimental assembly has recently been constructed to measure the specific heat capacity of graphite. A status description of the apparatus and results from the first measurements are given. The outcome is discussed and the experimental uncertainty is reviewed. (authors)

  13. Specific heat of the simple-cubic Ising model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, X.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an expression quantitatively describing the specific heat of the Ising model on the simple-cubic lattice in the critical region. This expression is based on finite-size scaling of numerical results obtained by means of a Monte Carlo method. It agrees satisfactorily with series expansions

  14. Measurement of the Specific Heat Using a Gravity Cancellation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fang

    2003-01-01

    The specific heat at constant volume C(sob V) of a simple fluid diverges near its liquid-vapor critical point. However, gravity-induced density stratification due to the divergence of isothermal susceptibility hinders the direct comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of renormalization group theory. In the past, a microgravity environment has been considered essential to eliminate the density stratification. We propose to perform specific heat measurements of He-3 on the ground using a method to cancel the density stratification. A He-3 fluid layer will be heated from below, using the thermal expansion of the fluid to cancel the hydrostatic compression. A 6% density stratification at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) can be cancelled to better than 0.1% with a steady 1.7 micro K temperature difference across a 0.05 cm thick fluid layer. A conventional AC calorimetry technique will be used to determine the heat capacity. The minimized bulk density stratification with a relaxation time 6500 sec at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) will stay unchanged during 1 Hz AC heating. The smear of the specific heat divergence due to the temperature difference across the cell is about 0.1% at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6). The combination of using High Resolution Thermometry with a 0.5 n K temperature resolution in the AC technique and the cancellation of the density stratification will enable C(sub V) to be measured down to a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6) with less than a 1% systematic error.

  15. Heat waves and cause-specific mortality at all ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basagaña, Xavier; Sartini, Claudio; Barrera-Gómez, Jose; Dadvand, Payam; Cunillera, Jordi; Ostro, Bart; Sunyer, Jordi; Medina-Ramón, Mercedes

    2011-11-01

    Mortality has been shown to increase with extremely hot ambient temperatures. Details on the specific cause of mortality can be useful for improving preventive policies. Infants are often identified as a population that is vulnerable to extreme heat conditions; however, information on heat and infant mortality is scarce, with no studies reporting on cause-specific mortality. The study includes all deaths in the Catalonia region of Spain during the warm seasons of 1983-2006 (503,389 deaths). We used the case-crossover design to evaluate the association between the occurrence of extremely hot days (days with maximum temperature above the 95th percentile) and mortality. Total mortality and infant mortality were stratified into 66 and 8 causes of death, respectively. Three consecutive hot days increased total daily mortality by 19%. We calculated that 1.6% of all deaths were attributable to heat. About 40% of attributable deaths did not occur during heat-wave periods. The causes of death that were increased included cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, mental and nervous system disorders, infectious and digestive system diseases, diabetes, and some external causes such as suicide. In infants, the effect of heat was observed on the same day and was detected only for conditions originating in the perinatal period (relative risk = 1.53 [95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.02]). Within the perinatal causes, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive system, and hemorrhagic and hematologic disorders were the causes of death with stronger effects. Heat contributes to an increase in mortality from several causes. In infants, the first week of life is the most critical window of vulnerability.

  16. Specific Heat and Second Sound Measurements with the DYNAMIX Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Joel

    2003-01-01

    In addition to its primary role of studying non-linear heat transport effects near the lambda transition of He-4, the DYNAMX apparatus is suitable for measurements of the specific heat and the velocity of second sound. We plan to take advantage of available time on orbit to make measurements in these areas near to the lambda transition. The specific heat work would be similar to LPE, aimed at improving our knowledge of the singularity in the bulk heat capacity at the transition, but would provide more accurate results close to the transition. It would focus roughly equally on each side of the transition and would be synergistic with the CQ experiment, providing wider-range data at Q = 0. The second sound measurements are made possible by the fast time constant and high resolution of the DYNAMX thermometers, which allow accurate time-of-flight measurements of second sound pulses. It appears possible to measure the second sound velocity to about 1% at a reduced temperature of t = 5x10(exp -8) by averaging over a moderate number of pulses. The data would complement and extend earlier ground-based measurements, leading to improved tests of the theory of static critical phenomena at the lambda transition.

  17. Specific heat of PrNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim-Ngan, N.H. [Center for Solid State Physics, Sw Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)]|[Van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratorium, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Radwanski, R.J. [Center for Solid State Physics, Sw Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)]|[Inst. Physics and Informatics, Pedagogical University, 30-084, Krakow (Poland); Kayzel, F.E. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratorium, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Franse, J.J.M. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratorium, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-02-09

    Specific-heat measurements have been performed on single-crystalline PrNi{sub 5} from 1.3 to 250 K, in order to evaluate the contribution of the Pr subsystem. PrNi{sub 5} does not order magnetically down to the lowest temperatures as crystalline-electric-field (CEF) interactions, producing the non-magnetic singlet ground state {Gamma}{sub 4}, dominate the exchange interactions. Analysis of the specific heat unambiguously establishes the position of the two lowest excited levels at 33.7 K ({Gamma}{sub 1}) and 45.7 K ({Gamma}{sub 6}) which levels cannot be observed in inelastic-neutron-scattering experiments. A set of CEF parameters of the Pr{sup 3+} ion in the f{sup 2} configuration has been evaluated that gives the best account for all known experimental results of this compound. ((orig.)).

  18. The 55 K specific heat anomaly in palladium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, N.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A specific heat anomaly in PdH and PdD has been observed by Aston et al. (1957) close to 55 K. Its position was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration and its magnitude to be linear in hydrogen concentration. Ferguson's (1965) and Brodowsky's (1972) explanations of the anomaly are shown to be unsatisfactory. This is true also for the detailed mechanical statistical model proposed by Staford and McLellan (1974) for interstitial solid solutions of hydrogen in transition metals. It is shown that Gopal's (1966) simple Schottky model of specific heat anomaly, which considers a system of several levels with Boltzmann statistics, provides much better agreement with experiment than the more elaborate models, both in magnitude and in predicting a linear dependence on hydrogen concentration.

  19. Entropy, specific heat, susceptibility, and Rushbrooke inequality in percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. K.; Alam, D.; Jitu, Z. I.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate percolation, a probabilistic model for continuous phase transition, on square and weighted planar stochastic lattices. In its thermal counterpart, entropy is minimally low where order parameter (OP) is maximally high and vice versa. In addition, specific heat, OP, and susceptibility exhibit power law when approaching the critical point and the corresponding critical exponents α ,β ,γ respectably obey the Rushbrooke inequality (RI) α +2 β +γ ≥2 . Their analogs in percolation, however, remain elusive. We define entropy and specific heat and redefine susceptibility for percolation and show that they behave exactly in the same way as their thermal counterpart. We also show that RI holds for both the lattices albeit they belong to different universality classes.

  20. Low temperature specific heat of glasses: a non-extensive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Razdan, Ashok

    2005-01-01

    Specific heat is calculated using Tsallis statistics. It is observed that it is possible to explain some low temperature specific heat properties of glasses using non-extensive approach. A similarity between temperature dependence of non-extensive specific heat and fractal specific heat is also discussed.

  1. Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperature and heat budget in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, during the fair weather conditions, at the central and northern locations, the upper layer gained heat energy, while the sea surface lost (gained) heat energy at northern (central) location. This and lower values of eddy diffusivity coefficient of heat (0.0045 and 0.0150m2/s) and the northward intensification ...

  2. Generic Guide Specification for Geothermal Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, WKT

    2000-04-12

    The attached Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pump (GHP) Guide Specifications have been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the intent to assist federal agency sites and engineers in the preparation of construction specifications for GHP projects. These specifications have been developed in the industry-standard Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format and cover several of the most popular members of the family of GHP systems. These guide specifications are applicable to projects whether the financing is with conventional appropriations, arranged by GHP specialty ESCOs under the U.S. Department of Energy's Technology-Specific GHP Super ESPCs, arranged by utilities under Utility Energy Service Contracts (UESCs) or arranged by generalist ESCOs under the various regional ESPCs. These specifications can provide several benefits to the end user that will help ensure successful GHP system installations. GHP guide specifications will help to streamline the specification development, review, and approval process because the architecture and engineering (AE) firm will be working from the familiar CSI format instead of developing the specifications from other sources. The guide specifications help to provide uniformity, standardization, and consistency in both the construction specifications and system installations across multiple federal sites. This standardization can provide future benefits to the federal sites in respect to both maintenance and operations. GHP guide specifications can help to ensure that the agency is getting its money's worth from the GHP system by preventing the use of marginal or inferior components and equipment. The agency and its AE do not have to start from scratch when developing specifications and can use the specification as a template and/or a checklist in developing both the design and the contract documents. The guide specifications can save project costs by reducing the engineering effort required

  3. Monoclonal antibodies specific to heat-treated porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Nhari, Raja Mohd Hafidz; Hamid, Muhajir; Rasli, Nurmunirah Mohamad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2016-05-01

    Porcine blood is potentially being utilized in food as a binder, gelling agent, emulsifier or colorant. However, for certain communities, the usage of animal blood in food is strictly prohibited owing to religious concerns and health reasons. This study reports the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against heat-treated soluble proteins (HSPs) of autoclaved porcine blood; characterization of MAbs against blood, non-blood and plasma from different animal species using qualitative indirect non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and immunoblotting of antigenic components in HSPs of porcine blood. Fifteen MAbs are specific to heat-treated and raw porcine blood and not cross-reacted with other animal blood and non-blood proteins (meat and non-meat). Twelve MAbs are specific to porcine plasma, while three MAbs specific to porcine plasma are cross-reacted with chicken plasma. Immunoblotting revealed antigenic protein bands (∼60, ∼85-100 and ∼250 kDa) in porcine blood and plasma recognized by the MAbs. Selection of MAbs that recognized 60 kDa HSPs of porcine blood and plasma as novel monoclonal antibodies would be useful for detection of porcine plasma in processed food using the immunoassay method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Cooling of Stirling Convertor and General Purpose Heat Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Schwendeman, Carl; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  5. Two complementary approaches to quantify variability in heat resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den Heidy M.W.; Berendsen, Erwin M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Straatsma, Han; Zwietering, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    Realistic prediction of microbial inactivation in food requires quantitative information on variability introduced by the microorganisms. Bacillus subtilis forms heat resistant spores and in this study the impact of strain variability on spore heat resistance was quantified using 20 strains. In

  6. Low Cost Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Balloon Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While continuously increasing in complexity, the payloads of terrestrial high altitude balloons need a thermal management system to reject their waste heat and to...

  7. Entropy Generation of Desalination Powered by Variable Temperature Waste Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Warsinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Powering desalination by waste heat is often proposed to mitigate energy consumption and environmental impact; however, thorough technology comparisons are lacking in the literature. This work numerically models the efficiency of six representative desalination technologies powered by waste heat at 50, 70, 90, and 120 °C, where applicable. Entropy generation and Second Law efficiency analysis are applied for the systems and their components. The technologies considered are thermal desalination by multistage flash (MSF, multiple effect distillation (MED, multistage vacuum membrane distillation (MSVMD, humidification-dehumidification (HDH, and organic Rankine cycles (ORCs paired with mechanical technologies of reverse osmosis (RO and mechanical vapor compression (MVC. The most efficient technology was RO, followed by MED. Performances among MSF, MSVMD, and MVC were similar but the relative performance varied with waste heat temperature or system size. Entropy generation in thermal technologies increases at lower waste heat temperatures largely in the feed or brine portions of the various heat exchangers used. This occurs largely because lower temperatures reduce recovery, increasing the relative flow rates of feed and brine. However, HDH (without extractions had the reverse trend, only being competitive at lower temperatures. For the mechanical technologies, the energy efficiency only varies with temperature because of the significant losses from the ORC.

  8. Country-Specific Effects of Climate Variability on Human Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Clark; Wise, Erika

    2016-04-01

    Involuntary human migration is among the social outcomes of greatest concern in the current era of global climate change. Responding to this concern, a growing number of studies have investigated the consequences of short to medium-term climate variability for human migration using demographic and econometric approaches. These studies have provided important insights, but at the same time have been significantly limited by lack of expertise in the use of climate data, access to cross-national data on migration, and attention to model specification. To address these limitations, we link data on internal and international migration over a 6-year period from 9,812 origin households in Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Senegal to high-resolution gridded climate data from both station and satellite sources. Analyses of these data using several plausible specifications reveal that climate variability has country-specific effects on migration: Migration tends to increase with temperature anomalies in Uganda, tends to decrease with temperature anomalies in Kenya and Burkina Faso, and shows no consistent relationship with temperature in Nigeria and Senegal. Consistent with previous studies, precipitation shows weak and inconsistent relationships with migration across countries. These results challenge generalizing narratives that foresee a consistent migratory response to climate change across the globe.

  9. The specific heat of the solid electrolyte system CuI - AgI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, M.; Ito, Y.; Tamaki, S.

    1996-09-01

    The specific heat for AgI-doped CuI has been measured by the method of differential scanning calorimetry. Anomalous specific heats were observed around the transition temperature from non-superionic to superionic phases. These were well explained in terms of the Schottky-type excess specific heat.

  10. Homotopy Perturbation Method for Thin Film Flow and Heat Transfer over an Unsteady Stretching Sheet with Internal Heating and Variable Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chung Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the effects of variable heat flux and internal heat generation on the flow and heat transfer in a thin film on a horizontal sheet in the presence of thermal radiation. Similarity transformations are used to transform the governing equations to a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The obtained differential equations are solved approximately by the homotopy perturbation method (HPM. The effects of various parameters governing the flow and heat transfer in this study are discussed and presented graphically. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  11. How Vial Geometry Variability Influences Heat Transfer and Product Temperature During Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutellà, Bernadette; Passot, Stéphanie; Bourlés, Erwan; Fonseca, Fernanda; Tréléa, Ioan Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Vial design features can play a significant role in heat transfer between the shelf and the product and, consequently, in the final quality of the freeze-dried product. Our objective was to investigate the impact of the variability of some geometrical dimensions of a set of tubing vials commonly used for pharmaceuticals production on the distribution of the vial heat transfer coefficients (Kv) and its potential consequence on product temperature. Sublimation tests were carried out using pure water and 8 combinations of chamber pressure (4-50 Pa) and shelf temperature (-40°C and 0°C) in 2 freeze-dryers. Kv values were individually determined for 100 vials located in the center of the shelf. Vial bottom curvature depth and contact area between the vial and the shelf were carefully measured for 120 vials and these data were used to calculate Kv distribution due to variability in vial geometry. At low pressures commonly used for sensitive products (below 10 Pa), the vial-shelf contact area appeared crucial for explaining Kv heterogeneity and was found to generate, in our study, a product temperature distribution of approximately 2°C during sublimation. Our approach provides quantitative guidelines for defining vial geometry tolerance specifications and product temperature safety margins. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Lunar Landers and Rovers will require variable thermal links that can reject heat during daytime, and passively shut-off during lunar night. During the long...

  13. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can provide variable thermal conductance needed to maintain electronics and batteries on Lunar/Martian rovers/landers within desired...

  14. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    porous medium, Physics Letters A, Vol. 372, 14, pp 2355-2358. Jayanthi S. and Kumari M., 2007. Effect of variable viscosity on non-Darcy free or mixed convection flow on a vertical surface in a fluid saturated porous medium, Applied Mathematics and Computations, Vol.186, 2, pp 1643-1659. Kafoussius N.G. and Williams ...

  15. A variable multi-step method for transient heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    A variable explicit time integration algorithm is developed for unsteady diffusion problems. The algorithm uses nodal partitioning and allows the nodal groups to be updated with different time steps. The stability of the algorithm is analyzed using energy methods and critical time steps are found in terms of element eigenvalues with no restrictions on element types. Several numerical examples are given to illustrate the accuracy of the method.

  16. Homotopy analysis method for variable thermal conductivity heat flux gage with edge contact resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Abdul [Gonzaga Univ., Spokane, WA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Khani, Farzad [Bakhtar Institute of Higher Education, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics; Darvishi, Mohammad Taghi [Razi Univ., Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2010-10-15

    The homotopy analysis method (HAM) has been used to develop an analytical solution for the thermal performance of a circular-thin-foil heat flux gage with temperature dependent thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance between the edge of the foil and the heat sink. Temperature distributions in the foil are presented illustrating the effect of incident heat flux, radiation emission from the foil, variable thermal conductivity, and contact resistance between the foil and the heat sink. The HAM results agree up to four places of decimal with the numerical solutions generated using the symbolic algebra package Maple. This close comparison vouches for the high accuracy and stability of the analytic solution. (orig.)

  17. Exact solutions of time fractional heat-like and wave-like equations with variable coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable-coefficient time fractional heat-like and wave-like equation with initial and boundary conditions is solved by the use of variable separation method and the properties of Mittag-Leffler function. As a result, exact solutions are obtained, from which some known special solutions are recovered. It is shown that the variable separation method can also be used to solve some others time fractional heat-like and wave-like equation in science and engineering.

  18. Comparative analysis of single- and continuously variable-capacity heat pump concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, C.K.; Fischer, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    This work is an initial assessment of the potential benefits of continuous-capacity-modulation in electric-driven, air-to-air heat pumps for residential application. The purpose of the project was to provide a quantitative estimate of the possible annual performance gains of advanced continuously modulating heat pumps relative to single-speed designs at comparable levels of development. Previous analytical design work in this area at ORNL dealt with single-design-point, heating-mode optimization of single-speed heat pumps. For that work the ORNL Steady State Heat Pump Design Model was connected to a constrained numerical optimization code. The present work represents an extension of the earlier work in two directions. First, seasonal (heating and cooling) and annual performance factor (APF) analysis capability was added to allow direct evaluation of annual energy use from heat pump performance data generated by the ORNL heat pump model. Secondly, a modulating version of the heat pump model was developed to provide a means for simulating the steady state performance of continuously variable-speed (CVS) systems. With these tools, the APFs of both single- and continuously variable-capacity (CVC) concepts could be studied as basic heat pump design variables were varied. Based on this initial evaluation of CVS systems and considering the potential for electronics costs to further decrease as electricity prices rise, we see such advanced CVS systems as a strong future competitor to single-speed systems and as decidedly superior in energy conservation potential. To achieve this position, it seems especially important that such systems be computer optimized to take full advantage of the increased design flexibility available. Further, development of PM-ECMs or equivalent technology must continue to the point of providing speed controllers of: moderate to low cost, moderate to high performance, and high reliability. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Eurythmy therapy increases specific oscillations of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Minnerop, Antje; Trapp, Barbara; Büssing, Arndt; Cysarz, Dirk

    2015-06-06

    Mind-body therapies are beneficial for several diseases (e.g. chronic pain, arterial hypertension, mood disorders). Eurythmy therapy (EYT) is a mind-body therapy from Anthroposophic Medicine. In each EYT exercise a short sequence of body movements and simultaneous guided imagery is repeated several times. In this study, the simultaneous effects of two different EYT exercises on cardiac autonomic regulation as assessed by spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) were investigated. Twenty healthy subjects (age: 29.1 ± 9.3 years, 13 female) performed two different EYT exercises (EYT-A and EYT-B) for 8 min. Each EYT exercise was compared against two matched control exercises: control exercise 1 (CE1-A and CE1-B) consisted of a repetition of the body movements of the EYT exercise but without guided imagery, control exercise 2 consisted of walking on the spot (CE2-A and CE2-B). Spectral power of HRV during each exercise was quantified on the basis of Holter ECG recordings. During EYT-A the frequency of the peak oscillation in the very low frequency (VLF) band matched the repetition rate of the sequence of body movements (0.02 Hz). Low frequency (LF) oscillations were augmented when compared to the control exercises (EYT-A: 7.31 ± 0.84, CE1-A: 6.98 ± 0.90, CE2-A: 6.52 ± 0.87 ln ms(2), p exercises (EYT-B: 9.32 ± 0.82, CE1-B: 6.31 ± 0.75, CE2-B: 6.04 ± 0.80 ln ms(2), p exercises clearly affected cardiac autonomic regulation in a rhythmic manner according to the stimulus of the specific body movements of each EYT exercise. These results offer a physiological basis to develop a rationale for specific clinical indications of these EYT exercises such as stress reduction or prevention of hypertension. DRKS00006760 (registered on 10/10/2014, i.e. retrospective registration); view details at http://www.drks.de/DRKS00006760.

  20. Heat, chloride, and specific conductance as ground water tracers near streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M.H.; Su, G.W.; Constantz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Commonly measured water quality parameters were compared to heat as tracers of stream water exchange with ground water. Temperature, specific conductance, and chloride were sampled at various frequencies in the stream and adjacent wells over a 2-year period. Strong seasonal variations in stream water were observed for temperature and specific conductance. In observation wells where the temperature response correlated to stream water, chloride and specific conductance values were similar to stream water values as well, indicating significant stream water exchange with ground water. At sites where ground water temperature fluctuations were negligible, chloride and/or specific conductance values did not correlate to stream water values, indicating that ground water was not significantly influenced by exchange with stream water. Best-fit simulation modeling was performed at two sites to derive temperature-based estimates of hydraulic conductivities of the alluvial sediments between the stream and wells. These estimates were used in solute transport simulations for a comparison of measured and simulated values for chloride and specific conductance. Simulation results showed that hydraulic conductivities vary seasonally and annually. This variability was a result of seasonal changes in temperature-dependent hydraulic conductivity and scouring or clogging of the streambed. Specific conductance fits were good, while chloride data were difficult to fit due to the infrequent (quarterly) stream water chloride measurements during the study period. Combined analyses of temperature, chloride, and specific conductance led to improved quantification of the spatial and temporal variability of stream water exchange with shallow ground water in an alluvial system. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Modeling of heat transport through Fractures with emphasis to roughness and aperture variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigon, Benoit; Englert, Andreas; Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Fractured media are characterized by multi-scale heterogeneities implying high spatial variability of hydraulic properties. At the fracture network scale, spatial organization of fluxes is controlled by the fracture network geometry, itself characterized by fracture connectivity, fracture density, and the respective lengths and apertures of the fractures within the network. At the fracture scale, the variability of the fluxes is mainly controlled by fracture roughness and aperture variability. The multi-scale heterogeneities of fractured rocks imply complexities for prediction of solute and heat transport in space and time, and often lead to the so-called "anomalous transport" behavior. In homogeneous media, heat transport can be described using Fourier's law opening the possibility to apply the advection-dispersion equation to predict transport behavior. However, in real fractured media a "non-Fourier transport" often dominates. The latter phenomenon, characterized by asymmetric breakthrough shape, early breakthrough and long tailing cannot be described by the classical advection-dispersion equation. In the present study, we focus on heat transport within a single fracture and we explore the respective roles of fracture roughness and aperture variability. Fracture roughness has two main effects on heat transport, flow channeling and a spatial variation of heat exchange area between fluid and rock. Fracture aperture variability controls the variability of fracture flow, and thus induces spatial variation of heat transport in a fracture. Micro- to macro-scale fracture roughness measurements will be performed in the field and the laboratory using a terrestrial LIDAR, a X-Ray CT-Scanner Alpha, and a Microscope Keyence VHX 100. Thereafter the measurements will be used to better describe fracture geometry taking in account discontinuity type. To further improve the understanding of heat transfer between fracture and matrix, we will numerically model heat transport as

  2. Effective temperature in nonequilibrium state with heat flux using discrete variable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    The effective temperature, which acts as a criterion for thermalization in systems with heat flux, has been introduced on the bases of a relatively simple discrete variable model (DVM). The DVM is inherently nonlocal and can be used to describe multi-length and -time scale heat conduction including low-dimensional and sub-continuum regimes. Under far from equilibrium conditions when the heat flux tends to its maximum possible value, the effective temperature and the corresponding nonequilibrium entropy go to zero, which points to a possible generalization of the third law in nonequilibrium situations.

  3. Power spectrum analysis of cardiovascular variability during passive heating in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Anselmo Gomes; Pires, Washington; Leite, Laura Hora Rios; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Peçanha, Tiago; de Lima, Jorge Roberto Peurrot; Natali, Antônio José; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau

    2016-12-01

    The cardiovascular system plays a direct role in the maintenance of body temperature. Whether passive heating alters cardiovascular autonomic modulation in conscious rats is still unknown. This study investigated the effects of passive heating on systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) and heart rate variability (HRV) in conscious rats and the involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in the passive heating effects on SBPV and HRV. Fourteen male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the control group or the losartan treatment group. A catheter was implanted in the left carotid artery to record pulsatile arterial pressure (PAP), and a telemetry sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity to measure body temperature (Tbody). After recovering from surgery, the animals were subjected to a passive heating protocol (35°C; 30min) in resting conditions, during which Tbody, tail skin temperature and PAP were measured. The mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, double product (i.e., the product of systolic blood pressure by heart rate), SBPV and HRV were calculated from the PAP. SBPV and HRV were analyzed in terms of both time and frequency domains. Increases in the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular parameters were observed during passive heating in both groups, and those increases were reflected in the higher time and frequency domains of the SBPV. However, passive heating was not effective in altering HRV. Passive heating altered SBPV but not HRV in conscious rats when they were treated with losartan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Climate change projections of heat stress in Europe: From meteorological variables to impacts on productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanueva, Ana; Kotlarski, Sven; Liniger, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    Future climate change is likely to have important impacts in many socio-economic sectors. In particular, higher summer temperatures or more prolonged heat waves may be responsible for health problems and productivity losses related to heat stress, especially affecting people exposed to such situations (e.g. working under outside settings or in non-acclimatized workplaces). Heat stress on the body under work load and consequently their productivity loss can be described through heat stress indices that are based on multiple meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, wind and radiation. Exploring the changes of these variables under a warmer climate is of prime importance for the Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability communities. In particular, the H2020 project HEAT-SHIELD aims at analyzing the impact of climate change on heat stress in strategic industries in Europe (manufacturing, construction, transportation, tourism and agriculture) within an inter-sectoral framework (climate scientists, biometeorologists, physiologists and stakeholders). In the present work we explore present and future heat stress over Europe using an ensemble of the state-of-the-art RCMs from the EURO-CORDEX initiative. Since RCMs cannot be directly used in impact studies due to their partly substantial biases, a standard bias correction method (empirical quantile mapping) is applied to correct the individual variables that are then used to derive heat stress indices. The objectives of this study are twofold, 1) to test the ability of the separately bias corrected variables to reproduce the main characteristics of heat stress indices in present climate conditions and 2) to explore climate change projections of heat stress indices. We use the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) as primary heat stress index, considering two different versions for indoor (or in the shade, based on temperature and humidity conditions) and outdoor settings (including also wind and radiation). The WBGT

  5. Lattice specific heat and local density of states of Ni-based dilute ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to calculate the local density of states of substitutional impurities and lattice specific heat in different alloys. The resonance ... therefore, we have calculated lattice specific heat of a number of dilute alloys and discussed the results in the light of ..... [9] J C Ho and R Viswanathan, Phys. Rev. 172, 705 (1968). [10] M Dixon, F E ...

  6. Specific heat of Ho sub 2 Co sub 17 and Er sub 2 Co sub 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franse, J.J.M.; Klaasse, J.C.P.; Sinnema, S. (Amsterdam Univ. (NL). Natuurkunding Lab.); Radwanski, R.J. (University of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (PL). Solid State Physics Dept.)

    1988-12-01

    The specific heat of polycrystalline samples of Ho{sub 2}Co{sub 17} and Er{sub 2}Co{sub 17} has been measured between 1.25 K and 38 K in zero field and in an applied field of 5 T. The electronic, lattice, nuclear and crystal field contributions to the specific heat have been separated.

  7. Better latent heat and specific heat of stearic acid with magnetite/graphene nanocomposite addition for thermal storage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiarto, R.; Nuryadin, M. K.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, the addition of Magnetite (Fe3O4) into Stearic acid (Sa) as an organic phase change material (PCM) shows an enhancement in the latent heat for thermal energy storage applications. The latent heat of the PCM can also be increased by adding graphene material. Therefore, in this research, the thermal properties of Sa have been studied by the sonication method for several different concentrations of Fe3O4/Graphene nanocomposite additions. The structural properties of all of the samples were observed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). Melting-solidifying behavior and specific heat value were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal degradation process of all samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Based on the DSC results, the presence of Fe3O4/Graphene in the Sa enhances the latent heat up to 20%. The specific heat value of the mixture was also found to be increased as the concentration of Fe3O4/Graphene to Sa increased. The TGA results show a lowered thermal degradation process of the Sa by the addition of the Fe3O4/Graphene which indicates a higher thermal stability of the mixture. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the addition of Fe3O4/Graphene to Sa improves both the sensible heat and the latent heat of the mixture which are very important for thermal energy storage applications

  8. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. On Thermally Interacting Multiple Boreholes with Variable Heating Strength: Comparison between Analytical and Numerical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature response in the soil surrounding multiple boreholes is evaluated analytically and numerically. The assumption of constant heat flux along the borehole wall is examined by coupling the problem to the heat transfer problem inside the borehole and presenting a model with variable heat flux along the borehole length. In the analytical approach, a line source of heat with a finite length is used to model the conduction of heat in the soil surrounding the boreholes. In the numerical method, a finite volume method in a three dimensional meshed domain is used. In order to determine the heat flux boundary condition, the analytical quasi-three-dimensional solution to the heat transfer problem of the U-tube configuration inside the borehole is used. This solution takes into account the variation in heating strength along the borehole length due to the temperature variation of the fluid running in the U-tube. Thus, critical depths at which thermal interaction occurs can be determined. Finally, in order to examine the validity of the numerical method, a comparison is made with the results of line source method.

  10. Changes in heart rate variability during the induction and decay of heat acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Poirier, Martin P; Bravi, Andrea; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Herry, Christophe; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the changes in core temperature, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) during the induction and decay of heat acclimation. Ten males (23 ± 3 years; 79.5 ± 3.5 kg; 15.2 ± 4.5 percent body fat; 51.13 ± 4.61 mLO(2)∙kg(-1)∙min(-1) peak oxygen uptake) underwent a 14-day heat acclimation protocol comprising of 90-min cycling at ~50 % peak oxygen uptake at 40 °C and ~20 % relative humidity. Core temperature, heart rate, and 102 HRV measures were recorded during a heat tolerance test conducted at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the induction (day 14) and decay (day 28) phases. Heat acclimation resulted in significantly reduced core temperature [rectal (χ (2) = 1298.14, p rate (χ (2) = 1230.17, p heat acclimation-induced reductions in rectal temperature, esophageal temperature, and heart rate, respectively, were lost. Heat acclimation was accompanied by profound and broad changes in HRV: at the end of the induction phase, 75 of the 102 variability measures computed were significantly different (p Heat acclimation is accompanied by reduced core temperature, significant bradycardia, and marked alterations in HRV, which we interpret as being related to vagal dominance. The observed changes in core temperature persist for at least 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat, while the changes in heart rate and HRV decay faster and are only partly evident after 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat.

  11. Development of energy efficient smart module with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, W.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Lee, H.J. [Jeju University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    This work has been carried out to develop thermal diode modules with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity. The module can be used for space heating in winter and reduce the cooling load of buildings in summer. this concept could be also utilized for domestic hot water heating. The modules are categorized as follows; (1) Loop Type Smart Module, (2) Bayonet Type Smart Module, (3) Roller Type Smart Module, (4) Plane Tubeless Solar Collector and Storage System Utilizing the Bayonet Concept. Each system generally features either or both of the passive or active schemes. The Loop Type, in particular, is designed with the photo diode and microprocessor to harness the solar energy more aggressively. It is essential to contrive a totally new design concept apart from conventional ones to fully appreciate the availability of the sun`s energy. In this regard, the solar modules under investigation in the present study is of great significance. (author) 29 refs., 65 figs., 5 photos.

  12. Some specific features of subcooled boiling heat transfer and crisis at extremely high heat flux densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotovsky, M.A. [Polzunov Institute, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Forced convection boiling is the process used widely in a lot of industry branches including NPP. Heat transfer intensity under forced convection boiling is considered in different way in dependence on conditions. One of main problems for the process considered is an influence of interaction between forced flow and boiling on heat transfer character. For saturated water case a transition from ''pure'' forced convection to nucleate boiling can be realized in smooth form. (author)

  13. ‘‘Cooling by Heating’’- Demonstrating the Significance of the Longitudinal Specific Heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Jon J.; Dyre, J. C.; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2012-01-01

    is generally considerably larger than in solids. This paper presents analytical solutions of the relevant coupled thermoviscoelastic equations. In general, there is a difference between the isobaric specific heat cp measured at constant isotropic pressure and the longitudinal specific heat cl pertaining...... between these two specific heats. For a typical glass-forming liquid, when the temperature at the surface is increased by 1 K, a lowering of the temperature at the sphere center of the order of 5 mK is expected if the experiment is performed at the glass transition. The cooling-by-heating effect......Heating a solid sphere at its surface induces mechanical stresses inside the sphere. If a finite amount of heat is supplied, the stresses gradually disappear as temperature becomes homogeneous throughout the sphere. We show that before this happens, there is a temporary lowering of pressure...

  14. Review of Test Procedure for Determining HSPFs of Residential Variable-Speed Heat Pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report reviews the suitability of the existing Heating Seasonal Performance Factor (HSPF) ratings and testing requirements for the current generation of variable-speed (VS) air-source heat pumps. Recent field test results indicate larger discrepancies between rated HSPF and field-observed HSPF for VS models than for single-speed models in the same houses. These findings suggest that the heating season test and ratings procedure should be revisited for VS heat pumps. The ratings and testing procedures are described in ANSI/AHRI 210/240 (2008) for single-speed, two-capacity, and variable-speed units. Analysis of manufacturer and independent test performance data on VS units reveals why the current VS testing/ratings procedure results in overly optimistic HSPF ratings for some VS units relative to other types of heat pumps. This is due to a combination of extrapolation of low speed test data beyond the originally anticipated ambient temperature operating range and the constraints of unit controls, which prevent low speed operation over the range of ambient temperatures assumed in the procedure for low speed. As a result, the HSPFs of such units are being overpredicted relative to those for single- and two-capacity designs. This overprediction has been found to be significantly reduced by use in the HSPF ratings procedure of an alternative higher-load heating load line, described in a companion report (Rice et al., 2015).

  15. Seasonal variability of cyclone heat potential in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, D.P.; Shastri, P.N.M.; Subrahmanyam, M.V.

    Monthly maps of cyclone heat potential (CHP) in the Bay of Bengal have been prepared by using Levitus climatological data set. Seasonal variability of CHP in the Bay of Bengal has been studied using the CTD data sets collected during five cruises...

  16. Temporal and spatial variability of urban heat island and thermal comfort within the Rotterdam agglomeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, van B.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Elbers, J.A.; Driel, van B.L.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on temporal and spatial variability of local climate and outdoor human thermal comfort within the Rotterdam agglomeration. We analyse three years of meteorological observations (2010–2012) from a monitoring network. Focus is on the atmospheric urban heat island (UHI); the

  17. Determination of the thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of neem seeds by inverse problem method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Nnamchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the thermal conductivity and the specific heat capacity of neem seeds (Azadirachta indica A. Juss usingthe inverse method is the main subject of this work. One-dimensional formulation of heat conduction problem in a spherewas used. Finite difference method was adopted for the solution of the heat conduction problem. The thermal conductivityand the specific heat capacity were determined by least square method in conjunction with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm.The results obtained compare favourably with those obtained experimentally. These results are useful in the analysis ofneem seeds drying and leaching processes.

  18. Measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of supported and suspended graphene by a comprehensive Raman optothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin-Yi; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Yingying; Li, Qunyang; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing

    2017-08-03

    The last decade has seen the rapid growth of research on two-dimensional (2D) materials, represented by graphene, but research on their thermophysical properties is still far from sufficient owing to the experimental challenges. Herein, we report the first measurement of the specific heat of multilayer and monolayer graphene in both supported and suspended geometries. Their thermal conductivities were also simultaneously measured using a comprehensive Raman optothermal method without needing to know the laser absorption. Both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed lasers were used to heat the samples, based on consideration of the variable laser spot radius and pulse duration as well as the heat conduction within the substrate. The error from the laser absorption was eliminated by comparing the Raman-measured temperature rises for different spot radii and pulse durations. The thermal conductivity and specific heat were extracted by analytically fitting the temperature rise ratios as a function of spot size and pulse duration, respectively. The measured specific heat was about 700 J (kg K)(-1) at room temperature, which is in accordance with theoretical predictions, and the measured thermal conductivities were in the range of 0.84-1.5 × 10(3) W (m K)(-1). The measurement method demonstrated here can be used to investigate in situ and comprehensively the thermophysical properties of many other emerging 2D materials.

  19. Determination of Specific Heat Capacity on Composite Shape-Stabilized Phase Change Materials and Asphalt Mixtures by Heat Exchange System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Zhou, Xue-Yan; Liu, Jiang; You, Zhanping; Wei, Kun; Huang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-05-19

    Previous research has shown that composite shape-stabilized phase change material (CPCM) has a remarkable capacity for thermal storage and stabilization, and it can be directly applied to highway construction without leakage. However, recent studies on temperature changing behaviors of CPCM and asphalt mixture cannot intuitively reflect the thermoregulation mechanism and efficiency of CPCM on asphalt mixture. The objective of this paper is to determine the specific heat capacity of CPCM and asphalt mixtures mixed with CPCM using the heat exchange system and the data acquisition system. Studies have shown that the temperature-rise curve of 5 °C CPCM has an obvious temperature plateau, while an asphalt mixture mixed with 5 °C CPCM does not; with increasing temperature, the specific heat capacities of both 5 °C CPCM and asphalt mixture first increase and then decrease, while the variation rate of 5 °C CPCM is larger than that of the asphalt mixture, and the maximum specific heat capacity of 5 °C CPCM appears around the initial phase change temperature. It is concluded that the temperature intervals of 5 °C CPCM are -18 °C-7 °C, 7 °C-25 °C and 25 °C-44 °C, respectively, and that of the asphalt mixture are -18 °C~10 °C, -10 °C~5 °C and 5 °C~28 °C. A low dosage of 5 °C CPCM has little influence on the specific heat capacity of asphalt mixture. Finally, the functions of specific heat capacities and temperature for CPCM and asphalt mixture mixed with CPCM were recommended by the sectional regression method.

  20. Spatially Variable Geothermal Heat Flux in West Antarctica: Evidence and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeman, Carolyn Branecky; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2017-10-01

    Geothermal heat flux (GHF) is an important part of the basal heat budget of continental ice sheets. The difficulty of measuring GHF below ice sheets has directly hindered progress in the understanding of ice sheet dynamics. We present a new GHF measurement from below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, made in subglacial sediment near the grounding zone of the Whillans Ice Stream. The measured GHF is 88 ± 7 mW m-2, a relatively high value compared to other continental settings and to other GHF measurements along the eastern Ross Sea of 55 mW m-2 and 69 ± 21 mW m-2 but within the range of regional values indicated by geophysical estimates. The new GHF measurement was made 100 km from the only other direct GHF measurement below the ice sheet, which was considerably higher at 285 ± 80 mW m-2, suggesting spatial variability that could be explained by shallow magmatic intrusions or the advection of heat by crustal fluids. Analytical calculations suggest that spatial variability in GHF exceeds spatial variability in the conductive heat flux through ice along the Siple Coast. Accurate GHF measurements and high-resolution GHF models may be necessary to reliably predict ice sheet evolution, including responses to ongoing and future climate change.

  1. Measurement and Model Validation of Nanofluid Specific Heat Capacity with Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry O'Hanley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are being considered for heat transfer applications; therefore it is important to know their thermophysical properties accurately. In this paper we focused on nanofluid specific heat capacity. Currently, there exist two models to predict a nanofluid specific heat capacity as a function of nanoparticle concentration and material. Model I is a straight volume-weighted average; Model II is based on the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the particles and the surrounding fluid. These two models give significantly different predictions for a given system. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, a robust experimental methodology for measuring the heat capacity of fluids, the specific heat capacities of water-based silica, alumina, and copper oxide nanofluids were measured. Nanoparticle concentrations were varied between 5 wt% and 50 wt%. Test results were found to be in excellent agreement with Model II, while the predictions of Model I deviated very significantly from the data. Therefore, Model II is recommended for nanofluids.

  2. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity with LFA 447 apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    The LFA 447 can be successfully used for measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of various samples. It is especially useful when determining the properties of materials on a very small scale. The matrix measurement mode allows for determining the local...... properties with a fine resolution, down to 1 millimeter. Special attention needs to be taken when determining the specific heat capacity in the comparative method. First of all, the test and reference sample should be of nearly identical thickness. Secondly, their heat diffusion time should be comparable, so...... that the heat losses from both samples during the measurement are similar. Finally, the leveling of the samples is very important. Very small discrepancies can cause a massive error in the derivation of specific heat capacity and, as a result, thermal conductivity....

  3. Ocean heat content variability in an ensemble of twentieth century ocean reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boisséson, Eric; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Mayer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a ten-member ensemble of twentieth century Ocean ReAnalyses called ORA-20C. ORA-20C assimilates temperature and salinity profiles and is forced by the ECMWF twentieth century atmospheric reanalysis (ERA-20C) over the 1900-2010 period. This study attempts to identify robust signals of ocean heat content change in ORA-20C and detect contamination by model errors, initial condition uncertainty, surface fluxes and observing system changes. It is shown that ORA-20C trends and variability in the first part of the century result from the surface fluxes and model drift towards a warmer mean state and weak meridional overturning circulation. The impact of the observing system in correcting the mean state causes the deceleration of the warming trend and alters the long-term climate signal. The ensemble spread reflects the long-lasting memory of the initial conditions and the convergence of the system to a solution compatible with surface fluxes, the ocean model and observational constraints. Observations constrain the ocean heat uptake trend in the last decades of the twentieth century, which is similar to trend estimations from the post-satellite era. An ocean heat budget analysis attributes ORA-20C heat content changes to surface fluxes in the first part of the century. The heat flux variability reflects spurious signals stemming from ERA-20C surface fields, which in return result from changes in the atmospheric observing system. The influence of the temperature assimilation increments on the heat budget is growing with time. Increments control the most recent ocean heat uptake signals, highlighting imbalances in forced reanalysis systems in the ocean as well as in the atmosphere.

  4. An apparatus for the specific heat measurement of undercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, K.; Gatewood, J. R.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a drop calorimeter with an electromagnetic levitator that was specifically built for enthalpy measurements of undercooled liquids, including high-melting-point metals. Design diagrams of this device and of a furnace for making a suspended drop are presented together with results of measurements on an aluminum sample.

  5. Design of grid tariffs in electricity systems with variable renewable energy and power to heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Bergaentzlé, Claire; Soysal, Emilie Rosenlund

    2017-01-01

    Large shares of variable renewable energy (VRE), requires flexibility solutions are developed. Considerable flexibility potentials exist from large consumers, e.g. power-to-heat (P2H) in district heating (DH). However, the existing grid tariffs obliterate the price signals from the wholesale...... designs that facilitate more flexible energy demand of DH operators. This is illustrated by a case study of Denmark that clearly demonstrates that the introduction of innovative tariffs will improve the business case for flexible P2H technologies and increase the value of VRE. In this way larger...... flexibility potentials can be induced and larger shares of VRE become integrated in the energy systems....

  6. Specific microRNAs Regulate Heat Stress Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehammer, Camilla; Podolska, Agnieszka; Mackowiak, Sebastian D

    2015-01-01

    to heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans and show that a discrete subset of miRNAs is thermoregulated. Using in-depth phenotypic analyses of miRNA deletion mutant strains we reveal multiple developmental and post-developmental survival and behavioral functions for specific miRNAs during heat stress. We...

  7. The discontinuity of the specific heat for the 5D Ising model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Lundow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the behaviour of the specific heat around the critical point of the Ising model in dimension 5 to 7. We find a specific heat discontinuity, like that for the mean field Ising model, and provide estimates for the left and right hand limits of the specific heat at the critical point. We also estimate the singular exponents, describing how the specific heat approaches those limits. Additionally, we make a smaller scale investigation of the same properties in dimension 6 and 7, and provide strongly improved estimates for the critical temperature Kc in d=5,6,7 which bring the best MC-estimate closer to those obtained by long high temperature series expansions.

  8. Lattice specific heat and local density of states of Ni-based dilute ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based dilute alloys has been carried out. Lattice Green's function method has been used to calculate the local density of states of substitutional impurities and lattice specific heat in different alloys. The resonance condition has been investigated for ...

  9. Annual and Seasonal Variability of Net Heat Budget in the Northern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Bentamy, Abderrahim; Chen, Wen; Kumar, M. R. Ramesh; Mathew, Simi; Venkatesan, Ramasamy

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal features of the net heat budget over the Northern Indian Ocean (focusing on the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal), using satellite and numerical model estimates. The main objective is to characterize the annual, seasonal, and inter-annual patterns over this basin of climatic significance. To assess the temporal variability, several turbulent and radiative fluxes are used The turbulent fluxes are based on information from the Institut Français pout la Recherche et l'Exploitation de la MER (IFREMER V3), the Hamburg Ocean-Atmosphere Parameters from Satellite (HOAPS V3), the SEAFLUX V1, the Japanese Ocean Flux Data sets with Use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO V2), the Objective Analysis Fluxes (OAFlux V2), the European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the ERA Interim, the National centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, CFSR, and the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA). The radiative fluxes, both shortwave and longwave, include those produced at the University of Maryland (UMD) as well as those derived from several of the above mentioned numerical models. An attempt will be made to evaluate the various fluxes against buoy observations such as those from the RAMA array. The National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai, India under its Ocean Observation Program has deployed a series of OMNI Buoys both in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal. These buoys are equipped with sensors to measure the radiation as well as other parameters. Comparison has been done with the OMNI observations and good agreement has been found with the current set-up of the instrument at a 3 m level. We found significant differences between the various products at specific locations. The ultimate objective is to investigates the sources of the differences in terms of atmospheric variables (surface

  10. Numerical analysis of unsteady 3D flow of Carreau nanofluid with variable thermal conductivity and heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Irfan

    Full Text Available Inspired by modern deeds of nanotechnology and nanoscience and their abundant applications in the field of science and engineering, we establish a mathematical relation for unsteady 3D forced convective flow of Carreau nanofluid over a bidirectional stretched surface. Heat transfer phenomena of Carreau nanofluid is inspected through the variable thermal conductivity and heat generation/absorption impact. Furthermore, this research paper presents a more convincing approach for heat and mass transfer phenomenon of nanoliquid by utilizing new mass flux condition. Practically, zero mass flux condition is more adequate because in this approach we assume nanoparticle amends itself accordingly on the boundaries. Now the features of Buongiorno’s relation for Carreau nanofluid can be applied in a more efficient way. An appropriate transformation is vacant to alter the PDEs into ODEs and then tackled numerically by employing bvp4c scheme. The numerous consequence of scheming parameters on the Carreau nanoliquid velocity components, temperature and concentration fields are portrayed graphically and deliberated in detail. The numerical outcomes for local skin friction and the wall temperature gradient for nanoliquid are intended and vacant through tables. The outcomes conveyed here manifest that impact of Brownian motion parameter Nb on the rate of heat transfer for nanoliquids becomes negligible for the recently recommended revised relation. Addationally, for authentication of the present relation, the achieved results are distinguished with earlier research works in specific cases and marvelous agreement has been noted. Keywords: Unsteady flow, Three-dimensional, New mass flux condition, Numerical solution

  11. Analyzing variables for district heating collaborations between energy utilities and industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thollander, P.; Svensson, I.L.; Trygg, L. [Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-09-15

    One vital means of raising energy efficiency is to introduce district heating in industry. The aim of this paper is to study factors which promote and inhibit district heating collaborations between industries and utilities. The human factors involved showed to affect district heating collaborations more than anything else does. Particularly risk, imperfect and asymmetric information, credibility and trust, inertia and values are adequate variables when explaining the establishment or failure of industry-energy utility collaborations, while heterogeneity, access to capital and hidden costs appear to be of lower importance. A key conclusion from this study is that in an industry-energy utility collaboration, it is essential to nurture the business relationship. In summary, successful collaboration depends more on the individuals and organizations involved in the relationship between the two parties than on the technology used in the collaboration. (author)

  12. Variation of the ratio of specific heats across a detached bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. K.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    Equations are derived which allow the ratio of specific heats behind the earth's bow shock to be evaluated if several pre-shock parameters (the specific-heat ratio, the Alfvenic Mach number, the sonic Mach number, and the angle between the shock normal at the stagnation point and the magnetic field) and the density jump across the shock are known. Numerical examples show that the dependence of the post-shock ratio on the pre-shock ratio is weak.

  13. On the averaging of ratios of specific heats in a multicomponent planetary atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubisch, R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of adiabatic relations in the calculation of planetary atmospheres requires knowledge of the ratio of specific heats of a mixture of gases under various pressure and temperature conditions. It is shown that errors introduced by simple averaging of the ratio of specific heats in a multicomponent atmosphere can be roughly 0.4%. Therefore, the gamma-averaging error can become important when integrating through the atmosphere to a large depth.

  14. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  15. Spatial variability of enthalpy in broiler house during the heating phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia F. P. Ferraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The thermal environment inside a broiler house has a great influence on animal welfare and productivity during the production phase. Enthalpy is a thermodynamic property that has been proposed to evaluate the internal broiler house environment, for being an indicator of the amount of energy contained in a mixture of water vapor and dry air. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the spatial variability of enthalpy in a broiler house during the heating phase using geostatistics. The experiment was conducted in the spring season, in a commercial broiler house with heating system consisting of two furnaces that heat the air indirectly, in the first 14 days of the birds' life. It was possible to characterize enthalpy variability using geostatistical techniques, which allowed observing the spatial dependence through kriging maps. The analyses of the maps allowed observing problems in the heating system in regions inside the broiler house, which may cause a thermal discomfort to the animals besides productive and economic losses.

  16. Specific heat of pristine and brominated graphite fibers, composites and HOPG. [Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Maciag, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain specific heat values of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers and brominated P-100/epoxy composite as well as pristine and brominated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for comparison. Based on the experimental results obtained, specific heat values are calculated for several different temperatures, with a standard deviation estimated at 1.4 percent of the average values. The data presented here are useful in designing heat transfer devices (such as airplane de-icing heaters) from bromine fibers.

  17. Calculation of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity of sedimentary rocks using petrophysical well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this study, equations are developed that predict for synthetic sedimentary rocks (clastics, carbonates and evapourates) thermal properties comprising thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and thermal diffusivity. The rock groups are composed of mineral assemblages with variable contents...... of each property vary depending on the selected well-log combination. Best prediction is in the range of 2–8 per cent for the specific heat capacity, of 5–10 per cent for the thermal conductivity, and of 8–15 for the thermal diffusivity, respectively. Well-log derived thermal conductivity is validated...... by laboratory data measured on cores from deep boreholes of the Danish Basin, the North German Basin, and the Molasse Basin. Additional validation of thermal conductivity was performed by comparing predicted and measured temperature logs. The maximum deviation between these logs is conductivity...

  18. Northern North Atlantic Sea Surface Height and Ocean Heat Content Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Rhines, Peter; Worthen, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of nearly 20 years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) is investigated to understand its association with decadal to multidecadal variability of the North Atlantic heat content. Altimetric SSH is dominated by an increase of about 14 cm in the Labrador and Irminger seas from 1993 to 2011, while the opposite has occurred over the Gulf Stream region over the same time period. During the altimeter period the observed 0-700 m ocean heat content (OHC) in the subpolar gyre mirrors the increased SSH by its dominantly positive trend. Over a longer period, 1955-2011, fluctuations in the subpolar OHC reflect Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) and can be attributed to advection driven by the wind stress ''gyre mode'' bringing more subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. The extended subpolar warming evident in SSH and OHC during the altimeter period represents transition of the AMV from cold to warm phase. In addition to the dominant trend, the first empirical orthogonal function SSH time series shows an abrupt change 2009-2010 reaching a new minimum in 2010. The change coincides with the change in the meridional overturning circulation at 26.5N as observed by the RAPID (Rapid Climate Change) project, and with extreme behavior of the wind stress gyre mode and of atmospheric blocking. While the general relationship between northern warming and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) volume transport remains undetermined, the meridional heat and salt transport carried by AMOC's arteries are rich with decade-to-century timescale variability.

  19. Specific heat of NbTi from 0 to 7 T between 4. 2 and 20 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrod, S.A.; Miller, J.R.; Dresner, L.

    1981-01-01

    Specific heat measurements are reported for an annealed Nb-44% Ti rod. A formula has been derived by thermodynamic arguments for the specific heat of Type II superconductors as a function of temperature and the applied magnetic field. (MOW)

  20. Critical behavior of 2,6-dimethylpyridine-water: Measurements of specific heat, dynamic light scattering, and shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaev, S. Z.; Behrends, R.; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2006-01-01

    2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April......2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April...

  1. Experimental Investigation on the Specific Heat of Carbonized Phenolic Resin-Based Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Te; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Lisong; Cai, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    As typical phenolic resin-based ablative materials, the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic composites are widely used in aerospace field. The specific heat of the carbonized ablators after ablation is an important thermophysical parameter in the process of heat transfer, but it is rarely reported. In this investigation, the carbonized samples of the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic were obtained through carbonization experiments, and the specific heat of the carbonized samples was determined by a 3D DSC from 150 °C to 970 °C. Structural and compositional characterizations were performed to determine the mass fractions of the fiber and the carbonized product of phenolic which are the two constituents of the carbonized samples, while the specific heat of each constituent was also measured by 3D DSC. The masses of the carbonized samples were reduced when heated to a high temperature in the specific heat measurements, due to the thermal degradation of the carbonized product of phenolic resin in the carbonized samples. The raw experimental specific heat of the two carbonized samples and the carbonized product of phenolic resin was modified according to the quality changes of the carbonized samples presented by TGA results. Based on the mass fraction and the specific heat of each constituent, a weighted average method was adopted to obtain the calculated results of the carbonized samples. Due to the unconsolidated property of the fiber samples which impacts the reliability of the DSC measurement, there is a certain deviation between the experimental and calculated results of the carbonized samples. Considering the similarity of composition and structure, the data of quartz glass and graphite were used to substitute the specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber, respectively, resulting in better agreements with the experimental ones. Furthermore, the accurate specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber bundles was obtained by

  2. Parametric Sensivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Shook; Gopi Nalla; Gregory L. Mines; K. Kit Bloomfield

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  3. Parametric Sensitivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, G.; Shook, G.M.; Mines, G.L.; Bloomfield, K.K.

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  4. Diurnal variability of heat fluxes and heat content at a few locations off central east coast of India during April 1989

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, V.S.; Rao, T.V.N.

    Diurnal variability of surface wind speed, net heat exchange, sea surface temperature, vertical thermal structure and heat content at three locations, viz., station A (17 degrees 59'N, 83 degrees 53.9'E), station B (17 degrees 00'N, 82 degrees 32...

  5. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  6. A new decay heat standard proposition based on a technical specifications guide for computation codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, Frederic; Garzenne, Claude [EDF R and D SINETICS, 1 av. du Gal de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Diop, Cheikh [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ebalard, Sylvie [AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Sargeni, Antonio [IRSN, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2008-07-01

    The existing ISO international decay heat standard provides the basis for calculating the decay heat power of non-recycled nuclear fuel of light water reactors. Computing decay heat with this standard can be really efficient for standard uranium fuels. Though, for Mixed Oxide fuels, high Burn-Up uranium fuels or for non standard irradiation sequences, decay heat can only be estimated by more complex decay heat computation codes. Therefore, a new ISO international standard, a 'Technical specifications guide for decay heat computation' has been proposed to reflect the international way to compute decay heat in light water reactors. The aim of this article is to give the justifications for the methods that lead to simplified modelization of the decay heat and that will be put into this standard. These methods are useful for rapid and precise determination of reaction rates and for nuclide chains simplifications. We propose also a simple method to evaluate the sensitivity of decay heat computations with respect to nuclear data. (authors)

  7. Heat and Laplace type equations with complex spatial variables in weighted Bergman spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian G. Gal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent book, the authors of this paper have studied the classical heat and Laplace equations with real time variable and complex spatial variable by the semigroup theory methods, under the hypothesis that the boundary function belongs to the space of analytic functions in the open unit disk and continuous in the closed unit disk, endowed with the uniform norm. The purpose of the present note is to show that the semigroup theory methods works for these evolution equations of complex spatial variables, under the hypothesis that the boundary function belongs to the much larger weighted Bergman space $B_{\\alpha }^p(D$ with $1\\leq p<+\\infty $, endowed with a $L^p$-norm. Also, the case of several complex variables is considered. The proofs require some new changes appealing to Jensen's inequality, Fubini's theorem for integrals and the $L^p$-integral modulus of continuity. The results obtained can be considered as complex analogues of those for the classical heat and Laplace equations in $L^p(\\mathbb{R}$ spaces.

  8. Variability of Atlantic Ocean heat transport and its effects on the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Sutton

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the Atlantic meridional Ocean Heat Transport (OHT has been diagnosed from a simulation of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, and the mechanisms responsible for this variability have been elucidated. It has been demonstrated that the interannual variability in Atlantic OHT is dominated by windstress-driven Ekman fluctuations. In contrast, the decadal and multidecadal variability is associated with the fluctuations of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC, driven by the fluctuations in deep convection over the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (GIN Sea. The fluctuations of OHT induce Ocean Heat Content (OHC, and Sea Surface Temperature (SST anomalies over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic. The SST anomalies, in turn, have an impact on the atmosphere. The lead-lag relationships between the fluctuations of THC-related OHT and those of OHC and SST raise the possibility that a knowledge of OHT fluctuations could be used to predict variations in Atlantic Sea surface temperatures, and perhaps aspects of climate, several years in advance. A comparison of results from a second, independent, coupled model simulation is also presented, and similar conclusions reached.

  9. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air

  10. Arctic decadal variability: An auto-oscillatory system of heat and fresh water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Johnson, Mark A.; Proshutinsky, Andrey

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents a mechanism of decadal variability in the Artic Ocean-GIN Sea (Greenland, Iceland and Norwegian Seas) atmosphere-ice-ocean system. We hypothesize that Arctic variability is regulated by heat and freshwater exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the GIN Sea. The interaction between basins is weak during anticyclonic circulation regimes (low AO/NAO) and strong during cyclonic circulation regimes (high AO/NAO). Regime shifts are controlled by the system itself through oceanic and atmospheric gradients (dynamic height and surface air temperature) that increase during the anticyclonic regime and decrease during the cyclonic regime. This conceptual mechanism for Arctic decadal variability has been reproduced in a model experiment. Both model results and observational data support the suggested mechanism.

  11. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, James [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Withers, Charles [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Kono, Jamie [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard fixed-capacity systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40% - 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying 'on' for 60% - 100% more hours per day compared to fixed -capacity systems. Experiments in this research examined the performance of 2-ton and 3-ton fixed- and variable-capacity systems and the impacts of system oversizing.

  12. Compilation of Data on Radionuclide Data for Specific Activity, Specific Heat and Fission Product Yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, A.; Thomason, R.S.

    2000-09-05

    This compilation was undertaken to update the data used in calculation of curie and heat loadings of waste containers in the Solid Waste Management Facility. The data has broad general use and has been cross-checked extensively in order to be of use in the Materials Accountability arena. The fission product cross-sections have been included because they are of use in the Environmental Remediation and Waste Management areas where radionuclides which are not readily detectable need to be calculated from the relative fission yields and material dispersion data.

  13. Unsteady Flow of Reactive Viscous, Heat Generating/Absorbing Fluid with Soret and Variable Thermal Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. Uwanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the unsteady natural convection and mass transfer flow of viscous reactive, heat generating/absorbing fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite parallel porous plates having temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The motion of the fluid is induced due to natural convection caused by the reactive property as well as the heat generating/absorbing nature of the fluid. The solutions for unsteady state temperature, concentration, and velocity fields are obtained using semi-implicit finite difference schemes. Perturbation techniques are used to get steady state expressions of velocity, concentration, temperature, skin friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number. The effects of various flow parameters such as suction/injection (γ, heat source/sinks (S, Soret number (Sr, variable thermal conductivity δ, Frank-Kamenetskii parameter λ, Prandtl number (Pr, and nondimensional time t on the dynamics are analyzed. The skin friction, heat transfer coefficients, and Sherwood number are graphically presented for a range of values of the said parameters.

  14. SPECIFICITIES PRESENTED IN SOME BASIC AND SPECIFIC MOTOR SKILLS OF VARIABLES TO YOUNG BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hazir Salihu; Dardan Dehari

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the number of 62 entities aged 15-16 years, male gender, address space is composed of the locomotive and the space of ten tests. Factorial procedures are addressed in all basic and specific locomotives, together as results have gained 3 dimensions latency: - Factor of specific speed and accuracy; - Factor complex locomotive specific typical for game and basketball; - Factor of speed and explosive force to the upper extremity. Such a mix of factors, may be justi...

  15. The Nominal/Generic Specific Heat per Average Atom Concept for CHNO Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    HMX can exist in different solid polymorphic forms. At a certain temperature, TT, one form may change to another form if the heat energy of...NUMBERS 14. SUBJECT TERMS TNT, HMX , PBX-9502, Specific Heat, Reactive Temperatures, Shock Loaded Explosives, Shock Reaction Criteria 17. SECURITY...This report is devoted to substantiating this N/G CP per average atom concept and illustrating its practical utilization via examples for TNT, HMX

  16. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat...... generator is measured, made this possible. The method relied on a 1-d solution to the heat diffusion equation. There have been attempts to invoke the boundary effects to first order. However we present the fully 3-d solution to the problem including these effects. The frequency range can hereby...

  17. Non-Specific Protein Modifications by a Phytochemical Induce Heat Shock Response for Self-Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Kohta; Ohkura, Shinya; Nakahata, Erina; Ishisaka, Akari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Mori, Taiki; Ishii, Takeshi; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Kioka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Shinya; Ikeda, Yasutaka; Akiyama, Minoru; Irie, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that some phytochemicals provide beneficial effects for human health. Recently, a number of mechanistic studies have revealed that direct interactions between phytochemicals and functional proteins play significant roles in exhibiting their bioactivities. However, their binding selectivities to biological molecules are considered to be lower due to their small and simple structures. In this study, we found that zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene, binds to numerous proteins with little selectivity. Similar to heat-denatured proteins, zerumbone-modified proteins were recognized by heat shock protein 90, a constitutive molecular chaperone, leading to heat shock factor 1-dependent heat shock protein induction in hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells. Furthermore, oral administration of this phytochemical up-regulated heat shock protein expressions in the livers of Sprague-Dawley rats. Interestingly, pretreatment with zerumbone conferred a thermoresistant phenotype to hepa1c1c7 cells as well as to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. It is also important to note that several phytochemicals with higher hydrophobicity or electrophilicity, including phenethyl isothiocyanate and curcumin, markedly induced heat shock proteins, whereas most of the tested nutrients did not. These results suggest that non-specific protein modifications by xenobiotic phytochemicals cause mild proteostress, thereby inducing heat shock response and leading to potentiation of protein quality control systems. We considered these bioactivities to be xenohormesis, an adaptation mechanism against xenobiotic chemical stresses. Heat shock response by phytochemicals may be a fundamental mechanism underlying their various bioactivities. PMID:23536805

  18. Experimental study of R134a/R410A cascade cycle for variable refrigerant flow heat pump systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Jae Wan; Park, Warn Gyu [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hwan Jong; Lee, Sang Hun; Oh, Sai Kee [LG Electronics, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Cascade cycle is widely applied to heat pumps operating at low ambient temperature to overcome problems such as low heating capacity and Coefficient of performance (COP) deterioration A number of researches have been conducted on cascade cycle heat pumps, but most of those studies were focused on system optimization to determine optimal intermediate temperature in air-to-water heat pumps. However, experimental optimization in regard to air and water heating simultaneously using a cascade cycle has been an understudied area. Therefore, we focused on experimental analysis for a cascade system with Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. Experiments were conducted under a variety of operating conditions, such as ambient and water inlet temperature. COP increased up to 16% when water inlet temperature decreased. COP of VRF heat pumps with cascade cycle is three-times higher compared with conventional boilers as well as 17% higher compared to single heat pumps.

  19. Two-Dimensional Variable Property Conjugate Heat Transfer Simulation of Nanofluids in Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramiar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar two-dimensional forced convective heat transfer of CuO-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids in a horizontal microchannel has been studied numerically, considering axial conduction effects in both solid and liquid regions and variable thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity. The results show that using nanoparticles with higher thermal conductivities will intensify enhancement of heat transfer characteristics and slightly increases shear stress on the wall. The obtained results show more steep changes in Nusselt number for lower diameters and also higher values of Nusselt number by decreasing the diameter of nanoparticles. Also, by utilizing conduction number as the criterion, it was concluded from the results that adding nanoparticles will intensify the axial conduction effect in the geometry considered.

  20. Causes of intraseasonal diabatic heating variability over and near the Tibetan Plateau in boreal summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuangyan; Li, Tim

    2017-10-01

    The structure and evolution features of the first two leading modes of the intraseasonal diabatic heating variability over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) during northern summer are investigated using reanalysis and observational data. Both of the leading modes present a dominant 10-30-day intraseasonal oscillation (ISO). The first mode is characterized by a perturbation center over the southern TP (STP), which remains quasi-stationary and is closely related to the low-latitude ISO. The associated low-latitude ISO is originated from the tropical western Pacific (WP) and propagates westward/northwestward toward northwestern India along the mean monsoon trough. The westward propagation near the South China Sea is mainly attributed to anomalous meridional vorticity advection and the advection of the planetary vorticity by ISO flow. The stationary feature of the perturbation over the STP is ascribed to the topographical features around the STP. The intraseasonal heating variability over the STP is attributed to the alternation of anticyclonic and cyclonic flow associated with the westward-propagating ISO perturbation originated from the tropical WP. The second leading mode is characterized by an east-west asymmetric structure over the TP. The intraseasonal diabatic heating anomaly propagates clockwise from the northwestern to eastern TP, while a heating anomaly with an opposite sign propagates from the southeastern to western TP. The mid-latitude Rossby wave trains play an essential role in forming the dipole structure. The wave trains propagate southeastward before reaching the TP and then eastward as they cross the TP. The source of anomalous water vapor over the TP is originated from lower latitudes. The upper- and lower-level wave trains are well coupled over the TP, exhibiting a baroclinic structure.

  1. A New Method for the Determination of the Specific Heat Capacity Using Laser-Flash Calorimetry Down to 77K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, A.; Hemberger, F.; Vidi, S.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for evaluation of the specific heat capacity in the temperature regime between 77K and 330K using laser-flash calorimetry is presented. Usually, laser-flash calorimetry is accomplished by performing an additional laser-flash measurement on a reference specimen with a known specific heat capacity and by comparing the maximum rear-side temperatures rises. In this study, the calibration is achieved by comparison of the rear-side temperature rise to specific-heat-capacity data determined by other methods in an adjacent temperature regime. Subsequently, the thus yielded proportional factor is used for the evaluation of the specific heat capacity from laser-flash measurements at temperatures where no specific-heat-capacity data are available. The reliability of this method is shown by performing measurements on a material with known specific heat capacity, aluminum oxide. Furthermore, the specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity of borosilicate crown glass (BK7) was determined experimentally.

  2. Using heat to characterize streambed water flux variability in four stream reaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Hedeff I; Zamora, Celia M; McCarthy, Kathleen A; Vogel, Jason R; Wilson, John T

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of streambed water flux are needed for the interpretation of streambed chemistry and reactions. Continuous temperature and head monitoring in stream reaches within four agricultural watersheds (Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Maple Creek, NE; DR2 Drain, WA; and Merced River, CA) allowed heat to be used as a tracer to study the temporal and spatial variability of fluxes through the streambed. Synoptic methods (seepage meter and differential discharge measurements) were compared with estimates obtained by using heat as a tracer. Water flux was estimated by modeling one-dimensional vertical flow of water and heat using the model VS2DH. Flux was influenced by physical heterogeneity of the stream channel and temporal variability in stream and ground-water levels. During most of the study period (April-December 2004), flux was upward through the streambeds. At the IN, NE, and CA sites, high-stage events resulted in rapid reversal of flow direction inducing short-term surface-water flow into the streambed. During late summer at the IN site, regional ground-water levels dropped, leading to surface-water loss to ground water that resulted in drying of the ditch. Synoptic measurements of flux generally supported the model flux estimates. Water flow through the streambed was roughly an order of magnitude larger in the humid basins (IN and NE) than in the arid basins (WA and CA). Downward flux, in response to sudden high streamflows, and seasonal variability in flux was most pronounced in the humid basins and in high conductivity zones in the streambed.

  3. Theoretical analysis for the specific heat and thermal parameters of solid C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, J. R.; Calles, A.; Castro, J. J.

    1997-08-01

    We present the results of a theoretical analysis for the thermal parameters and phonon contribution to the specific heat in solid C60. The phonon contribution to the specific heat is calculated through the solution of the corresponding dynamical matrix, for different points in the Brillouin zone, and the construccion of the partial and generalized phonon density of states. The force constants are obtained from a first principle calculation, using a SCF Hartree-Fock wave function from the Gaussian 92 program. The thermal parameters reported are the effective temperatures and vibrational amplitudes as a function of temperature. Using this model we present a parametization scheme in order to reproduce the general behaviour of the experimental specific heat for these materials.

  4. Quantum criticality at the superconductor-insulator transition revealed by specific heat measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poran, S; Nguyen-Duc, T; Auerbach, A; Dupuis, N; Frydman, A; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2017-02-22

    The superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) is considered an excellent example of a quantum phase transition that is driven by quantum fluctuations at zero temperature. The quantum critical point is characterized by a diverging correlation length and a vanishing energy scale. Low-energy fluctuations near quantum criticality may be experimentally detected by specific heat, c p , measurements. Here we use a unique highly sensitive experiment to measure c p of two-dimensional granular Pb films through the SIT. The specific heat shows the usual jump at the mean field superconducting transition temperature marking the onset of Cooper pairs formation. As the film thickness is tuned towards the SIT, is relatively unchanged, while the magnitude of the jump and low-temperature specific heat increase significantly. This behaviour is taken as the thermodynamic fingerprint of quantum criticality in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition.

  5. “Cooling by Heating”—Demonstrating the Significance of the Longitudinal Specific Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon J. Papini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heating a solid sphere at its surface induces mechanical stresses inside the sphere. If a finite amount of heat is supplied, the stresses gradually disappear as temperature becomes homogeneous throughout the sphere. We show that before this happens, there is a temporary lowering of pressure and density in the interior of the sphere, inducing a transient lowering of the temperature here. For ordinary solids this effect is small because c_{p}≅c_{V}. For fluent liquids the effect is negligible because their dynamic shear modulus vanishes. For a liquid at its glass transition, however, the effect is generally considerably larger than in solids. This paper presents analytical solutions of the relevant coupled thermoviscoelastic equations. In general, there is a difference between the isobaric specific heat c_{p} measured at constant isotropic pressure and the longitudinal specific heat c_{l} pertaining to mechanical boundary conditions that confine the associated expansion to be longitudinal. In the exact treatment of heat propagation, the heat-diffusion constant contains c_{l} rather than c_{p}. We show that the key parameter controlling the magnitude of the “cooling-by-heating“ effect is the relative difference between these two specific heats. For a typical glass-forming liquid, when the temperature at the surface is increased by 1 K, a lowering of the temperature at the sphere center of the order of 5 mK is expected if the experiment is performed at the glass transition. The cooling-by-heating effect is confirmed by measurements on a glucose sphere at the glass transition.

  6. Female anthropometric variability and their effects on predicted thermoregulatory responses to work in the heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Miyo; Berglund, Larry G.; Bathalon, Gaston P.

    2012-03-01

    The use of thermoregulatory models for assessing physiological responses of workers in thermally stressful situations has been increasing because of the risks and costs related to human studies. In a previous study (Yokota et al. Eur J Appl Physiol 104:297-302, 2008), the effects of anthropometric variability on predicted physiological responses to heat stress in U.S. Army male soldiers were evaluated. Five somatotypes were identified in U.S. Army male multivariate anthropometric distribution. The simulated heat responses, using a thermoregulatory model, were different between somatotypes. The present study further extends this line of research to female soldiers. Anthropometric somatotypes were identified using multivariate analysis [height, weight, percent body fat (%BF)] and the predicted physiological responses to simulated exercise and heat stress using a thermoregulatory model were evaluated. The simulated conditions included walking at ~3 mph (4.8 km/h) for 300 min and wearing battle dress uniform and body armor in a 30°C, 25% relative humidity (RH) environment without solar radiation. Five major somatotypes (tall-fat, tall-lean, average, short-lean, and short-fat), identified through multivariate analysis of anthropometric distributions, showed different tolerance levels to simulated heat stress: lean women were predicted to maintain their core temperatures (Tc) lower than short-fat or tall-fat women. The measured Tc of female subjects obtained from two heat studies (data1: 30°C, 32% RH, protective garments, ~225 w·m-2 walk for 90 min; data2: 32°C, 75% RH, hot weather battle dress uniform, ~378 ± 32 w·m-2 for 30 min walk/30 min rest cycles for 120 min) were utilized for validation. Validation results agreed with the findings in this study: fat subjects tended to have higher core temperatures than medium individuals (data2) and lean subjects maintained lower core temperatures than medium subjects (data1).

  7. Relative contributions of external SST forcing and internal atmospheric variability to July-August heat waves over the Yangtze River valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-08-01

    The Yangtze River valley (YRV), located in central-eastern China, has witnessed increased numbers of heat waves in the summer since 1951. Knowing what factors control and affect the interannual variability of heat waves, especially distinguishing the contributions of anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) forcings and those of internal modes of variability, is important to improving heat wave prediction. After evaluating 70 members of the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP) experiments from the 25 models that participated in the coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5), 13 high-skill members (HSMs) are selected to estimate the SST-forced variability. The results show that approximately 2/3 of the total variability of the July-August heat waves in the YRV during 1979-2008 can be attributed to anomalous SST forcings, whereas the other 1/3 are due to internal variability. Within the SST-forced component, one-half of the influence is from the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the other half is from non-ENSO related SST forcings, specifically, the SST anomalies in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Both the decaying El Niño and developing La Niña accompanied by a warm Indian Ocean and cold central Pacific, respectively, are favorable to hotter summers in the YRV because these patterns strengthen and extend the western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) westwards, for which the decaying ENSO plays a dominant role. The internal variability shows a circumglobal teleconnection in which Rossby waves propagate southeastwards over the Eurasian Continent and strengthen the WNPSH. Atmospheric model sensitivity experiments confirm that non-ENSO SST forcings can modulate the WNPSH and heat wave variability by projecting their influences onto the internal mode.

  8. Short-term variability of surface heat budget of the east central Arabian Sea during November, 1992

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, L.V.G.

    The analysis of surface meteorological data collected from the east central Arabian Sea during 10-28 November, 1992 revealed considerable variability in the meteorological parameters and heat budget components on both daily and diurnal time scales...

  9. Diurnal variability of heat fluxes over the coastal waters off Visakhapatnam during post-monsoon and winter seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramu, Ch V.; Bharathi, G.; Sadhuram, Y.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.

    Diurnal variability of heat fluxes in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam has been studied during post-monsoon (Oct, 2006) and winter (Jan-Feb, 2007) seasons utilizing the surface meteorological data and radiation measurements on-board CRV Sagar...

  10. Heat content variability in the tropical Indian Ocean during second pre-INDOEX campaign (boreal winter 1996-1997)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, E.P.R.; RameshBabu, V.; Rao, L.V.G.

    Surface meteorological data and upper ocean temperature profiles are obtained on-board ORV Sagar Kanya (cruise 120) during the second pre-INDOEX Campaign (December 1996-January 1997) for evaluating the north-south variability of surface heat fluxes...

  11. Fluctuation contribution to the specific heat in non-Fermi models for superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Tifrea, I.; Grosu, I.; Crisan, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuation contribution to the specific heat of a two-dimensional superconductor with a non-Fermi normal state described by a Anderson Green's function $G(k,i\\omega)=\\omega_c^{-\\alpha}/(i\\omega-\\epsilon_k)^{1-\\alpha}$. The specific heat corrections contain a term proportional to $(T^{2\\alpha-T_c^{2\\alpha}})^{-1}$ and another logarithmic one. We defined a coherence length as function of the non-Fermi parameter $\\alpha$, which showed that a crossover study between BCS and Bo...

  12. Specific heats of lunar surface materials from 90 to 350 degrees Kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.; Wilson, W.H.

    1970-01-01

    The specific heats of lunar samples 10057 and 10084 returned by the Apollo 11 mission have been measured between 90 and 350 degrees Kelvin by use of an adiabatic calorimeter. The samples are representative of type A vesicular basalt-like rocks and of finely divided lunar soil. The specific heat of these materials changes smoothly from about 0.06 calorie per gram per degree at 90 degrees Kelvin to about 0.2 calorie per gram per degree at 350 degrees Kelvin. The thermal parameter ??=(k??C)-1/2 for the lunar surface will accordingly vary by a factor of about 2 between lunar noon and midnight.

  13. Spin excitations and the electronic specific heat of URu2Si2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, T.E.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    1991-01-01

    and conduction electrons yields m*/m(b) almost-equal-to 7.7 for T T(N) which is sufficient to account for the difference between band-structure calculations and the measured electronic specific heat. In addition, inclusion of the temperature dependence of the spin...... excitations as T(N) is approached from below reproduces, qualitatively, the peak observed in the specific heat at T(N). The peak arises from a gap in the spin, not charge spectrum below T(N)....

  14. Specific heat studies of pure Nb{sub 3}Sn single crystals at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, R; Morales, F [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Bernes, S, E-mail: escu@servidor.unam.m [Facultad de Ciencias QuImicas, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2009-08-12

    Specific heat measurements performed on high purity vapor-grown Nb{sub 3}Sn crystals show clear features related to both the martensitic and superconducting transitions. Our measurements indicate that the martensitic anomaly does not display hysteresis, meaning that the martensitic transition could be a weak first-order or a second-order thermodynamic transition. Careful measurements of the two transition temperatures display an inverse correlation between them. At low temperature, specific heat measurements show the existence of a single superconducting energy gap feature.

  15. Impacts of Atmospheric Modes of Variability on Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionissios E.

    2014-05-01

    The potential impacts on Red Sea surface heat exchange of various major modes of atmospheric variability are investigated using the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Flux dataset (OAFlux) merged satellite+reanalysis dataset. The mode impacts on surface net heat flux are quantified by calculating the heat flux anomaly that corresponds to a unit positive value of each index for each grid point. The seasonal effects of the atmospheric forcing are investigated considering two and four typical seasons of a calendar year. Considering two seasons, the impacts are strongest during the winter-centered part of the year (October to March) mainly over the northern sub-basin. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic - West Russia Pattern (EAWR), and the Indian Monsoon Index (IMI) have the greatest effects. They generate negative anomalies (by definition additional ocean heat loss) of 7-12 W/m2 in the northern Red Sea basin mean net heat flux for a unit positive value of the mode index. During the summer (April to September), the signal is smaller and the East Atlantic (EA) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) modes have the strongest impact which is now located in the southern Red Sea (sub-basin anomalies of 4 W/m2 for unit positive mode index, negative for EA and positive for MEI). Results obtained by analysis carried out on the traditional four-season basis reveal that indices impact peaks during the typical boreal winter (DJF) with average anomalies of 12-18 W/m2 to be found in the northern part. It is noteworthy that during the winter, the EAWR generates negative anomalies around 30 W/m2 over the most of the central Red Sea. During the spring (MAM), summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) the anomalies are considerably lower, especially during the spring when the mode impacts are negligible. Atmospheric modes have a stronger effect on air-sea heat flux over the northern

  16. Characterization of Machine Variability and Progressive Heat Treatment in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie; Tilson, Will; Jones, Zack

    2015-01-01

    The absence of an economy of scale in spaceflight hardware makes additive manufacturing an immensely attractive option for propulsion components. As additive manufacturing techniques are increasingly adopted by government and industry to produce propulsion hardware in human-rated systems, significant development efforts are needed to establish these methods as reliable alternatives to conventional subtractive manufacturing. One of the critical challenges facing powder bed fusion techniques in this application is variability between machines used to perform builds. Even with implementation of robust process controls, it is possible for two machines operating at identical parameters with equivalent base materials to produce specimens with slightly different material properties. The machine variability study presented here evaluates 60 specimens of identical geometry built using the same parameters. 30 samples were produced on machine 1 (M1) and the other 30 samples were built on machine 2 (M2). Each of the 30-sample sets were further subdivided into three subsets (with 10 specimens in each subset) to assess the effect of progressive heat treatment on machine variability. The three categories for post-processing were: stress relief, stress relief followed by hot isostatic press (HIP), and stress relief followed by HIP followed by heat treatment per AMS 5664. Each specimen (a round, smooth tensile) was mechanically tested per ASTM E8. Two formal statistical techniques, hypothesis testing for equivalency of means and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), were applied to characterize the impact of machine variability and heat treatment on six material properties: tensile stress, yield stress, modulus of elasticity, fracture elongation, and reduction of area. This work represents the type of development effort that is critical as NASA, academia, and the industrial base work collaboratively to establish a path to certification for additively manufactured parts. For future

  17. Quantifying variety-specific heat resistance and the potential for adaptation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jesse; Barkley, Andrew; Rife, Trevor W; Poland, Jesse A; Nalley, Lawton Lanier

    2016-08-01

    The impact of climate change on crop yields has become widely measured; however, the linkages for winter wheat are less studied due to dramatic weather changes during the long growing season that are difficult to model. Recent research suggests significant reductions under warming. A potential adaptation strategy involves the development of heat resistant varieties by breeders, combined with alternative variety selection by producers. However, the impact of heat on specific wheat varieties remains relatively unstudied due to limited data and the complex genetic basis of heat tolerance. Here, we provide a novel econometric approach that combines field-trial data with a genetic cluster mapping to group wheat varieties and estimate a separate extreme heat impact (temperatures over 34 °C) across 24 clusters spanning 197 varieties. We find a wide range of heterogeneous heat resistance and a trade-off between average yield and resistance. Results suggest that recently released varieties are less heat resistant than older varieties, a pattern that also holds for on-farm varieties. Currently released - but not yet adopted - varieties do not offer improved resistance relative to varieties currently grown on farm. Our findings suggest that warming impacts could be significantly reduced through advances in wheat breeding and/or adoption decisions by producers. However, current adaptation-through-adoption potential is limited under a 1 °C warming scenario as increased heat resistance cannot be achieved without a reduction in average yields. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Determination of the specific heat petroleum derivates; Determinacao do calor especifico de derivados ultrapesados de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros Hernandez, Julie A.; Zuniga Linan, Lamia; Jardini, Andre; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens Maciel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica; Medina, Lilian Carmen [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In the development of the specific mathematical modeling for heavy and ultra heavy petroleum fractions in a molecular distiller is very important the definition of physical and chemical parameters as density and specific heat of the mixture, the enthalpy of vaporization, among others, since they are used in the energy balance. Information on these properties and their variation with temperature are found in the open literature for mixture with few components (simple mixtures). However, for multicomponent solutions consisting of complex mixtures such as oil and its heavy and ultraheavy fractions, available data are few, or are limited to low temperatures. The specific heat is an important property in the energy balance. This property can be measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), which gives results with great sensitivity and accuracy. This paper presents the variation of specific heat with the temperature of ultra-heavy oil fractions in the range from 80 deg to 350 deg C . Through the study of this variation, the equation nowadays used can be adjusted, in order to determine the specific heat. New values of the constants are determined, so that the equation can be used for these complex products, optimizing the estimative of Cp and so no experimental data are always necessary for simulations. (author)

  19. Effects of weather variables on thermoregulation of calves during periods of extreme heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; Anderson, David E; White, Brad J; Miesner, Matt D; Larson, Robert L

    2014-03-01

    To determine effects of ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, relative barometric pressure, and temperature-humidity index (THI) on nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures in cattle during extreme summer conditions. 20 black crossbred beef heifers (mean body weight, 217.8 kg). Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures were monitored every 2 hours for 24 hours on 3 nonconsecutive days when ambient temperature was forecasted to exceed 32.2°C. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and relative barometric pressure were continuously monitored at a remote weather station located at the research facility. The THI was calculated and used in the livestock weather safety index (LWSI). Relationships between nasal submucosal or rectal temperature and weather variables were evaluated. Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures were related to all weather variables monitored. A positive relationship was determined for ambient temperature and THI with both nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures. A negative relationship was evident for nasal submucosal and rectal temperature with relative humidity, wind speed, and relative barometric pressure. Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures increased with increasing severity of LWSI category. Effects of environmental conditions on thermoregulation in calves exposed to extreme heat were detected. The positive relationship between nasal submucosal temperature and ambient temperature and THI raised concerns about the efficacy of intranasal administration of temperature-sensitive modified-live virus vaccines during periods of extreme heat. Environmental conditions must be considered when rectal temperature is used as a diagnostic tool for identifying morbid cattle.

  20. Spatio-temporal variability of urban heat islands in local climate zones of Delhi-NCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Bakul; Pathak, Prasad; Agrawal, Girish

    2017-10-01

    Land use change is at the nexus of human territory expansion and urbanization. Human intrusion disturbs the natural heat energy balance of the area, although a new equilibrium of energy flux is attained but with greater diurnal range and adversely affecting the geo/physical variables. Modification in the trend of these variables causes a phenomenon known as Urban Heat Island (UHI) i.e. a dome of heat is formed around the city which has 7-10 °C high temperature than the nearby rural area at night. The study focuses on Surface UHI conventionally studied using thermal band of the remotely sensed satellite images. Land Surface Temperature (LST) is determined for the year 2015 using Landsat 8 for Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). This region was chosen because it is the biggest urban agglomeration in India, many satellite cities are coming in periphery and it has temperate climate. Quantification of UHI is predictably done using UHI intensity that is the difference between representative Urban and rural temperature. Recently the definition of urban and rural has been questioned because of various kinds of configurations of urban spaces across the globe. Delhi NCR urban configurations vary spatially- thus one UHI intensity does not give a deep understanding of the micro-climate. Advancement was made recently to standardize UHI intensity by dividing city into Local Climate Zones (LCZ), comes with 17 broad categories. LCZ map of Delhi NCR has been acquired from World Urban Database. The seasonality in LST across LCZ has been determined along with identifying warmest and coolest LCZ.

  1. Combined function specification-regularization procedure for solution of inverse heat conduction problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J. V.; Murio, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The inverse heat conduction problem involves the calculation of surface heat flux and/or temperature histories from transient, measured temperatures inside solids. This paper proposes and investigates a new combined procedure that is based on two different methods. One of these methods is the sequential function specification method which was originally proposed by Beck. The other method is the regularization method which has been used by Tikhonov and others. The combined method uses the sequential feature of the function specification method and the special function that is minimized in the regularization method. A test case is investigated of a semi-infinite body exposed to a heat flux that is initially zero, has a step increase and then drops to zero. A wide range of parameters is investigated. The combined procedure is much more computationally efficient than the usual regularization procedure when all the flux components are found simultaneously and yet the calculated values found by combined method are little different.

  2. Variable Speed Heat Pump Sizing Guide for Mixed-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Odukomaiya, Adewale [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jackson, Roderick K [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boudreaux, Philip R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The similarities and differences between different capacity units in a model family will vary depending on the manufacturer. These unit specific details are critical to choosing the VSHP capacity that will yield the highest energy savings without compromising comfort. In addition, the house construction, climate, and occupant behavior will influence the balance of the heating and cooling load on the house as well as the sensible and latent cooling demand. All of these factors need to be considered when trying to select the proper unit for the highest energy savings. Based on the simulations performed in this study, it is likely that VSHPs with an enhanced dehumidification mode can be sized up to two times the cooling load of the house without any reduction in comfort when compared to a single speed heat pump assuming a typical home and occupant behavior in the mixed-humid and cold climates.

  3. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  4. Effect of nonmagnetic and magnetic impurities on the specific heat jump in anisotropic superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Openov, LA

    The specific-heat jump DeltaC at a critical temperature T-c in an anisotropic superconductor containing both potential and spin-flip scatterers is calculated within a weak-coupling mean-field approximation. It is shown that the presence of even a small amount of spin-flip scatterers in the sample

  5. Specific heat studies in Ho–Ba–CuO superconductors: Fermionic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specific heat studies in Ho–Ba–CuO superconductors: Fermionic and bosonic contributions. DINESH VARSHNEY*, SANJAY SHAH and R K SINGH†. School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452 017, India. †School of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas University, Bilaspur 495 ...

  6. Page 1 The Specific Heats of Crystals—II 161 different techniques. It ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    different techniques. It is a simple matter with the aid of the table to cal- culate the contributions to the specific heat arising from the nine modes of internal vibration of the diamond structure. The lowest frequency appearing in the table expressed in wave-numbers, viz., 621 cm." may also be properly assumed to be the upper ...

  7. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  8. Low-temperature specific heat and thermal conductivity of silica aerogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleator, T.; Bernasconi, A.; Posselt, D.

    1991-01-01

    Specific-heat and thermal-conductivity measurements were made on a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. Evidence for a crossover between regimes of characteristically different excitations was observed. The data analysis indicates a "bump" in the density...

  9. Laboratory Activity: Specific Heat by Change in Internal Energy of Silly Putty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koser, John

    2011-01-01

    Students in introductory physics courses often don't study thermodynamics or thermodynamic events. If any thermal physics is taught in introductory courses (e.g., Physics 101 for Liberal Arts Majors), it usually involves the concepts of specific heat and various temperature scales. Seldom are the first and second laws of thermodynamics taught in…

  10. Low-temperature specific-heat and thermal-conductivity of silica aerogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernasconi, A.; Sleator, T.; Posselt, D.

    1992-01-01

    Specific heat, C(p), and thermal conductivity, lambda, have been measured on a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. Results for both C(p)(T) and lambda(T) confirm that the different length-scale regions observed in the aerogel structure are reflected...

  11. Order parameter anisotropy of MgB2 using specific heat jump of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Order parameter anisotropy of MgB2 using specific heat jump of layered superconductors. I N ASKERZADE1 2. 1Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100-Tando˘gan-Ankara, Turkey. 2Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H-Cavid 33, Baku-370143,. Azerbaijan.

  12. Low temperature specific heat of the spin-density-wave compound (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odin, J.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Biljakovic, K.

    1994-01-01

    We report on specific heat measurements of the SDW compound (TMTSF)2PF6 between 2 and 25 K, performed by two different techniques. We discuss the two successive transitions which occur in this T-range : the SDW ordering transition at T = 12.1 K, and a glass transition around-3-3.5 K. The latter...

  13. Specifications for temperature measurement in the district heating sector; Anforderungen an die Temperaturmessung in der Fernwaerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, Nicolaus [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany); Schupp, Reiner [MID-Cert GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Wrong design of thermometers often causes faulty billing. Correct design depends on the requirements of the market segment and of the heating systems concerned. Additionally, aspects resulting from the measurement process and the environmental conditions must be taken into account as well as equipment-specific criteria. The authors outline the requirements to a correct temperature measurement. (orig./GL)

  14. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  15. INDUSTRIAL CARBON DIOXIDE HEAT PUMP STATION WITH EVAPORATORS WORKING AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURE LEVELS AND AT VARIABLE LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The block diagram of an industrial carbon dioxide heat pump working in a supercritical cycle, with two evaporators included in parallel working at different temperature levels (mainly for wine-making factories is developed. Heat pump is intended for simultaneous production of heat and cold and works at variable thermal loading. It is shown, how an ejector inclusion in the heat pump scheme provides growth of its thermal efficiency. The way of construction of the hydraulic scheme and a control system provides full controllability of the thermal pump.

  16. Specific heat of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, R.W.L.; Neal, P.D. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Fazeli, F.; Aniolek, M. [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Gezgin, S. [NETZSCH-Geratebau GmbH, Wittelsbacherstr, Selb/Bavaria (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Specific heats of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material have been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) between 100{sup o}C and 1200{sup c}C using a heating and cooling rate of 20{sup o}C/min. A hysteresis was observed in the specific heat curves between heating and cooling. A maximum value occurs at a higher temperature on heating than on cooling, and the magnitude is larger for cooling when compared to heating. The as-manufactured tube material showed a small enthalpy change during first heating, attributed to decomposition of meta-stable β-Zr; and this did not appear on second heating after being first heated to 1200{sup o}C. Further studies are suggested to characterize the hysteresis behaviour. (author)

  17. The New S-RAM Air Variable Compressor/Expander for Heat Pump and Waste Heat to Power Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Jestings, Lee [S-RAM Dynamics; Conde, Ricardo [S-RAM Dynamics

    2016-05-23

    S-RAM Dynamics (S-RAM) has designed an innovative heat pump system targeted for commercial and industrial applications. This new heat pump system is more efficient than anything currently on the market and utilizes air as the refrigerant instead of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, leading to lower operating costs, minimal environmental costs or concerns, and lower maintenance costs. The heat pumps will be manufactured in the United States. This project was aimed at determining the feasibility of utilizing additive manufacturing to make the heat exchanger device for the new heat pump system. ORNL and S-RAM Dynamics collaborated on determining the prototype performance and subsequently printing of the prototype using additive manufacturing. Complex heat exchanger designs were fabricated using the Arcam electron beam melting (EBM) powder bed technology using Ti-6Al-4V material. An ultrasonic welding system was utilized in order to remove the powder from the small openings of the heat exchanger. The majority of powder in the small chambers was removed, however, the amount of powder remaining in the heat exchanger was a function of geometry. Therefore, only certain geometries of heat exchangers could be fabricated. SRAM Dynamics evaluated a preliminary heat exchanger design. Although the results of the additive manufacturing of the heat exchanger were not optimum, a less complex geometry was demonstrated. A sleeve valve was used as a demonstration piece, as engine designs from S-RAM Dynamics require the engine to have a very high density. Preliminary designs of this geometry were successfully fabricated using the EBM technology.

  18. Conceptualization and Operationalisation of Specific Variables in Exploratory Researches – An Example for Business Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zait Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In exploratory researches we are looking for clues, trying to get a better picture of the research variables and relationships. Besides variables already studied, identified in the literature review, we might deal with specific variables - for the investigated subject and socio-cultural region - the ones that might lead us to new explanations and theories. These new variables can be depicted from in-depth interviews and informal discussions with intervening actors, through a process of identification, conceptualization (obtaining theoretical definitions, and operationalisation (suggesting ways for the measurement of the identified variables. The present paper offers an example of such a process for a particular subject - identifying potential specific influences on the business negotiation behaviour. The focus is on the methodological aspects of such a research endeavour.

  19. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  1. Variability of Jovian ion winds: an upper limit for enhanced Joule heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Lystrup

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that short-timescale fluctuations about the mean electric field can significantly increase the upper atmospheric energy inputs at Jupiter, which may help to explain the high observed thermospheric temperatures. We present data from the first attempt to detect such variations in the Jovian ionosphere. Line-of-sight ionospheric velocity profiles in the Southern Jovian auroral/polar region are shown, derived from the Doppler shifting of H3+ infrared emission spectra. These data were recently obtained from the high-resolution CSHELL spectrometer at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We find that there is no variability within this data set on timescales of the order of one minute and spatial scales of 640 km, putting upper limits on the timescales of fluctuations that would be needed to enhance Joule heating.

  2. Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump (CCHP) w/Variable Speed Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messmer, Craig S. [Unico, Inc., Arnold, MO (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of a three year program awarded to Unico, Inc. to commercialize a residential cold climate heat pump. Several designs were investigated. Compressors were selected using analysis from Oakridge National Laboratories followed by prototype construction and lab testing in a specially built environmental chamber capable of reaching -30°F. The initial design utilized two variable speed compressors in series with very good capacity results and acceptable efficiency at very cold temperatures. The design was then modified to reduce cost and complexity by redesigning the system using three dual-stage compressors: two in parallel followed by one in series. Extensive testing found significant challenge with oil management, reliability, weight and cost which prevented the system from being fully commercialized. Further analysis of other conceptual designs indicated that these challenges could be overcome in the future.

  3. Modeling of North Pacific Climate Variability Forced by Oceanic Heat Flux Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulaeva, Elena; Schneider, Niklas; Pierce, David W.; Barnett, Tim P.

    2001-10-01

    Potential predictability of low-frequency climate changes in the North Pacific depends on two main factors. The first is the sensitivity of the atmosphere to ocean-induced anomalies at the sea surface in midlatitudes. The second is the degree of teleconnectivity of the tropical low-frequency variability to midlatitudes. In contrast to the traditional approach of prescribing sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, the response of a coupled atmospheric general circulation (CCM3)-mixed layer ocean model to oceanic perturbations of the mixed layer heat budget is examined. Since positive oceanic heat flux perturbations partially increase SST anomalies (locally), and partially are vented directly into the atmosphere, expressing boundary forcing on the atmosphere by prescribing upper-ocean heat flux anomalies allows for better understanding of the physical mechanism of low-frequency variability in midlatitudes. In the framework of this approach SST is considered to be a part of the adjustment of the coupled system rather than an external forcing. Wintertime model responses to mixed layer heat budget perturbations of up to 40 W m2 in the Kuroshio extension region and in the tropical central Pacific show statistically significant anomalies of 500-mb geopotential height (Z500) in the midlatitudes. The response to the tropical forcing resembles the well-known Pacific-North American pattern, one of the leading modes of internal variability of the control run. The amplitude of the Z500 geopotential height reaches 40 m in the region of the Aleutian low. The response of Z500 to forcing in the Kuroshio Current extension region resembles the mixture of western Pacific and Pacific-North American patterns, the first two modes of the internal variability of the atmosphere. In midlatitudes this response is equivalent barotropic, with the maximum of 80 m at (60°N, 160°W). Examination of the vorticity and thermodynamic budgets reveals the crucial role of submonthly transient eddies in

  4. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  5. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  6. Effect of the variables of evaporation: pressure and heat flux in the quality of panela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Esperanza Prada Forero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the industry of panela (called uncentrifuged sugar by the FAO, is estimated that multiple-effect evaporators (EME, allow greater control and increases by 36 % the overall efficiency of process. However, the implementation of these technologies requires the technical adjustment of the process; it keeps the quality of panela obtained in open systems evaporation too. Condition has unveiled a technological gap with respect to influence of the complex reactions that occur during water evaporation and concentration of sugars on the characteristics of sugar cane and brown sugar. To fill part of this technological gap, the objective of the work presented here was determine the effect of the variables of evaporation, pressure and heat flux on the quality of sugar cane and the panela. To achieve this, it worked one experimental design, completely at randomized with 4x3 factorial arrangement, four repetitions and the variety of cane CC 85-46, without flocculant, adjuvant or antifoam. The results showed that heat flow densities of 17 kW/m2 and pressurized systems, adversely affect quality of panela in areas such as color, pH, glycoside and solidification rate, to the point of not meeting the requirements of resolution 779 of the Colombian Ministry of Social Protection from sucrose and reducing sugars.

  7. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 1; Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. They are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the first part of the experimental study, i.e. the effects of a centrifugal force on the LHP start-up. Tests were conducted by varying the heat load to the evaporator, sink temperature, magnitude and frequency of centrifugal force, and LHP orientation relative to the direction of the accelerating force. The accelerating force seems to have little effect on the loop start-up in terms of temperature overshoot and superheat at boiling incipience. Changes in these parameters seem to be stochastic with or without centrifugal accelerating forces. The LHP started successfully in all tests.

  8. Optimizing the District Heating Primary Network from the Perspective of Economic-Specific Pressure Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A district heating (DH system is one of the most important components of infrastructures in cold areas. Proper DH network design should balance the initial investment and the heat distribution cost of the DH network. Currently, this design is often based on a recommended value for specific pressure loss (R = ∆P/L in the main lines. This will result in a feasible network design, but probably not be optimal in most cases. The paper develops a novel optimization model to facilitate the design by considering the initial investment in the pipes and the heat distribution costs. The model will generate all possible network scenarios consisting of different series of diameters for each pipe in the flow direction of the network. Then, the annuity on the initial investment, the heat distribution cost, and the total annual cost will be calculated for each network scenario, taking into account the uncertainties of the material prices and the yearly operating time levels. The model is applied to a sample DH network and the results indicate that the model works quite well, clearly identifying the optimal network design and demonstrating that the heat distribution cost is more important than the initial investment in DH network design.

  9. Radiative heat transfer with hydromagnetic flow and viscous dissipation over a stretching surface in the presence of variable heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer steady flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible fluid due to a stretching plate with viscous dissipation effect in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is studied. The equations of motion and heat transfer are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and the exact solutions are obtained using properties of confluent hypergeometric function. It is assumed that the prescribed heat flux at the stretching porous wall varies as the square of the distance from origin. The effects of the various parameters entering into the problem on the velocity field and temperature distribution are discussed.

  10. Mass Transfer and MHD Effects on Unsteady Porous Stretching Surface Embedded in a Porous Medium With Variable Heat Flux in The Presence of Heat Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Ramana REDDY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady two dimensional boundary layer flowof a viscous, incompressible, electrically conducting fluid over aporous stretching surface embedded in a porous medium in thepresence of heat source or sink is studied in chapter 7. Theunsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by thetime dependence of the stretching velocity and the surface heatflux. The governing partial differential equations aretransformed into a system of ordinary differential equationsusing similarity variables, which is then solved numerically byapplying shooting method using Runge-Kutta method. Thesolution is found to be dependent on the governing parametersincluding the Prandtl number, porous parameter, heat source/sink parameter, suction or injection parameter andunsteadiness parameter. Comparison of numerical results ismade with previously published results under the special cases,and found to be in good agreement. Effects of the Prandtlnumber, porous parameter, heat source /sink parameter, suctionor injection parameter and unsteadiness parameter on the flowand heat transfer are examined.

  11. Heat and Humidity in the City: Neighborhood Heat Index Variability in a Mid-Sized City in the Southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa L. Hass

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily weather conditions for an entire city are usually represented by a single weather station, often located at a nearby airport. This resolution of atmospheric data fails to recognize the microscale climatic variability associated with land use decisions across and within urban neighborhoods. This study uses heat index, a measure of the combined effects of temperature and humidity, to assess the variability of heat exposure from ten weather stations across four urban neighborhoods and two control locations (downtown and in a nearby nature center in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Results suggest that trees may negate a portion of excess urban heat, but are also associated with greater humidity. As a result, the heat index of locations with more trees is significantly higher than downtown and areas with fewer trees. Trees may also reduce heat stress by shading individuals from incoming radiation, though this is not considered in this study. Greater amounts of impervious surfaces correspond with reduced evapotranspiration and greater runoff, in terms of overall mass balance, leading to a higher temperature, but lower relative humidity. Heat index and relative humidity were found to significantly vary between locations with different tree cover and neighborhood characteristics for the full study time period as well as for the top 10% of heat index days. This work demonstrates the need for high-resolution climate data and the use of additional measures beyond temperature to understand urban neighborhood exposure to extreme heat, and expresses the importance of considering vulnerability differences among residents when analyzing neighborhood-scale impacts.

  12. Impacts of Realistic Urban Heating, Part I: Spatial Variability of Mean Flow, Turbulent Exchange and Pollutant Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Negin; Martilli, Alberto; Kleissl, Jan

    2017-10-01

    As urbanization progresses, more realistic methods are required to analyze the urban microclimate. However, given the complexity and computational cost of numerical models, the effects of realistic representations should be evaluated to identify the level of detail required for an accurate analysis. We consider the realistic representation of surface heating in an idealized three-dimensional urban configuration, and evaluate the spatial variability of flow statistics (mean flow and turbulent fluxes) in urban streets. Large-eddy simulations coupled with an urban energy balance model are employed, and the heating distribution of urban surfaces is parametrized using sets of horizontal and vertical Richardson numbers, characterizing thermal stratification and heating orientation with respect to the wind direction. For all studied conditions, the thermal field is strongly affected by the orientation of heating with respect to the airflow. The modification of airflow by the horizontal heating is also pronounced for strongly unstable conditions. The formation of the canyon vortices is affected by the three-dimensional heating distribution in both spanwise and streamwise street canyons, such that the secondary vortex is seen adjacent to the windward wall. For the dispersion field, however, the overall heating of urban surfaces, and more importantly, the vertical temperature gradient, dominate the distribution of concentration and the removal of pollutants from the building canyon. Accordingly, the spatial variability of concentration is not significantly affected by the detailed heating distribution. The analysis is extended to assess the effects of three-dimensional surface heating on turbulent transfer. Quadrant analysis reveals that the differential heating also affects the dominance of ejection and sweep events and the efficiency of turbulent transfer (exuberance) within the street canyon and at the roof level, while the vertical variation of these parameters is less

  13. Specific heat of CePb{sub 3} in magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietri, R.; Andraka, B.

    2000-10-01

    The specific heat of polycrystalline CePb{sub 3} was measured in magnetic fields to 14 T and temperatures down to 0.4 K. An anomaly related to an aniferromagnetic phase transition is effectively attenuated by magnetic fields and disappears for fields larger than 6 T. The electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} increases for small fields, has a maximum value at 6 T, and decreases for larger fields. This field dependence of {gamma} correlates with previously studied quadratic temperature coefficient of the resistivity as a function of a magnetic field. A/{gamma}{sup 2} is field dependent below 6 T, but constant ({approx}10{sup -5} {Omega}cmK{sup 2}mol{sup 2}J{sup -2}) for fields larger than 6 T within the experimental uncertainty.

  14. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  15. Specific heat of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 4 O sub 8 near T sub c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Tomeno, Izumi; Miyatake, Takayuki; Itoh, Takao; Tai, Keishi; Koshizuka, Naoki; Tanaka, Shoji (International Superconductivity Tech. Center, Tokyo (Japan). Superconductivity Research Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Specific heat measurements are reported for a polycrystalline, bulk sample of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} prepared at high oxygen pressure. The magnitude of the idealized specific heat jump {triangle}C{sub p}/T at {Tc} (= 80 {plus minus} 0.5K) is 15.5 {plus minus} 2 mJ/K{sup 2}-mole. The transition width {triangle} {Tc} is about 3K. The size of the jump is greatly reduced compared to YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. The normal state magnetic susceptibility is somewhat smaller than in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and is temperature dependent. The results suggest a smaller electronic density of states for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Dynamic properties of silica aerogels as deduced from specific-heat and thermal-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernasconi, A.; Sleator, T.; Posselt, D.

    1992-01-01

    The specific heat C(p) and the thermal conductivity lambda of a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels have been measured at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. The results confirm that the different length-scale regions observed in the aerogel structure are reflected in the dynamic behavior of...... SiO2 are most likely not due to fractal behavior.......The specific heat C(p) and the thermal conductivity lambda of a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels have been measured at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. The results confirm that the different length-scale regions observed in the aerogel structure are reflected in the dynamic behavior...

  17. The DNA electronic specific heat at low temperature: The role of aperiodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Mendes, G.A. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Vasconcelos, M.S. [Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Ujsághy, O. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-16

    The electronic specific heat spectra at constant volume (C{sub V}) of a long-range correlated extended ladder model, mimicking a DNA molecule, is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of a double-stranded structure made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. The role of the aperiodicity on C{sub V} is discussed, considering two different nucleotide arrangements with increasing disorder, namely the Fibonacci and the Rudin–Shapiro quasiperiodic structures. Comparisons are made for different values of the band fillings, considering also a finite segment of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22. -- Highlights: ► Quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. ► Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. ► Electronic density of states. ► Electronic specific heat spectra.

  18. Homotopy method for optimization of variable-specific-impulse low-thrust trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhemin; Yang, Hongwei; Chen, Shiyu; Li, Junfeng

    2017-11-01

    The homotopy method has been used as a useful tool in solving fuel-optimal trajectories with constant-specific-impulse low thrust. However, the specific impulse is often variable for many practical solar electric power-limited thrusters. This paper investigates the application of the homotopy method for optimization of variable-specific-impulse low-thrust trajectories. Difficulties arise when the two commonly-used homotopy functions are employed for trajectory optimization. The optimal power throttle level and the optimal specific impulse are coupled with the commonly-used quadratic and logarithmic homotopy functions. To overcome these difficulties, a modified logarithmic homotopy function is proposed to serve as a gateway for trajectory optimization, leading to decoupled expressions of both the optimal power throttle level and the optimal specific impulse. The homotopy method based on this homotopy function is proposed. Numerical simulations validate the feasibility and high efficiency of the proposed method.

  19. Accurate determination of specific heat at high temperatures using the flash diffusivity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersande, J. W.; Zoltan, A.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    The flash diffusivity method of Parker et al. (1961) was used to measure accurately the specific heat of test samples simultaneously with thermal diffusivity, thus obtaining the thermal conductivity of these materials directly. The accuracy of data obtained on two types of materials (n-type silicon-germanium alloys and niobium), was + or - 3 percent. It is shown that the method is applicable up to at least 1300 K.

  20. Effects of heat transfer on MHD flow of blood through an inclined porous artery with stenosis having variable viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Bhavya

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, effects of heat transfer on the blood flow through a stenosed, inclined non-tapered porous artery subject to the action of external magnetic field is investigated. Viscosity is assumed as variable viscosity with variable Hematocrit throughout the region of the artery. Governing equations have been modeled by taking blood as incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Newtonian fluid. The energy equation is formulated by taking an extra factor of the heat source in its equation. The nonlinear momentum equations are simplified under the assumption of mild stenosis. Homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is used to solve nonlinear equations of velocity and temperature profiles. Effects of porosity parameter (Z), applied magnetic field parameter (M), variable hematocrit parameter(Hr), Brinkman number (Br), heat source parameter (Q) and the Grashof number (Gr) on velocity and temperature profiles are discussed graphically.

  1. Specific heat of the two-dimensional Hubbard model at weak to intermediate coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2004-03-01

    We show how, in the weak to intermediate coupling regime, the thermodynamics of the two-dimensional t-t'-U Hubbard model can be obtained from the Two-Particle Self-Consistent approach.[1] The results agree with Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We then compute the specific heat and the double occupancy. Close to half-filling, the rapid decrease of double occupancy with decreasing temperature signals a growing antiferromagnetic correlation length and a concomitant pseudogap. The decrease in double occupancy corresponds to an increase in the local magnetic moment and to a decrease in potential energy. These phenomena manifest themselves as a low temperature peak in the specific heat. The high-temperature peak in the specific heat arises from the kinetic energy and is much less sensitive to antiferromagnetic correlations. We obtain the domain, in the temperature-doping plane, where a pseudogap appears and we study the evolution of this domain with U and t'. With a large enough frustration t', there is a complete suppression of the pseudogap. [1] Y.M. Vilk and A.-M.S. Tremblay, J. Phys. I France 7, 1309 (1997).

  2. Specific heat, Electrical resistivity and Electronic band structure properties of noncentrosymmetric Th7Fe3superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, V H; Sahakyan, M

    2017-11-17

    Noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th 7 Fe 3 has been investigated by means of specific heat, electrical resisitivity measurements and electronic properties calculations. Sudden drop in the resistivity at 2.05 ± 0.15 K and specific heat jump at 1.98 ± 0.02 K are observed, rendering the superconducting transition. A model of two BCS-type gaps appears to describe the zero-magnetic-field specific heat better than those based on the isotropic BCS theory or anisotropic functions. A positive curvature of the upper critical field H c2 (T c ) and nonlinear field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K qualitatively support the two-gap scenario, which predicts H c2 (0) = 13 kOe. The theoretical densities of states and electronic band structures (EBS) around the Fermi energy show a mixture of Th 6d- and Fe 3d-electrons bands, being responsible for the superconductivity. Furthermore, the EBS and Fermi surfaces disclose significantly anisotropic splitting associated with asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). The ASOC sets up also multiband structure, which presumably favours a multigap superconductivity. Electron Localization Function reveals the existence of both metallic and covalent bonds, the latter may have different strengths depending on the regions close to the Fe or Th atoms. The superconducting, electronic properties and implications of asymmetric spin-orbit coupling associated with noncentrosymmetric structure are discussed.

  3. A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for a 16 kDa heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke K Trilling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant antibodies are powerful tools in engineering of novel diagnostics. Due to the small size and stable nature of llama antibody domains selected antibodies can serve as a detection reagent in multiplexed and sensitive assays for M. tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Antibodies for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb recognition were raised in Alpaca, and, by phage display, recombinant variable domains of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH binding to M. tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Two phage display selection strategies were followed: one direct selection using semi-purified protein antigen, and a depletion strategy with lysates, aiming to avoid cross-reaction to other mycobacteria. Both panning methods selected a set of binders with widely differing complementarity determining regions. Selected recombinant VHHs were produced in E. coli and shown to bind immobilized lysate in direct Enzymelinked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA tests and soluble antigen by surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis. All tested VHHs were specific for tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and exclusively recognized an immunodominant 16 kDa heat shock protein (hsp. The highest affinity VHH had a dissociation constant (KD of 4 × 10(-10 M. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for 16 kDa heat shock protein of M. tuberculosis is available. This protein is highly stable and abundant in M. tuberculosis. The VHH that detect this protein are applied in a robust SPR sensor for identification of tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria.

  4. Near-global freshwater-specific environmental variables for biodiversity analyses in 1 km resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domisch, Sami; Amatulli, Giuseppe; Jetz, Walter

    2015-12-08

    The lack of freshwater-specific environmental information at sufficiently fine spatial grain hampers broad-scale analyses in aquatic biology, biogeography, conservation, and ecology. Here we present a near-global, spatially continuous, and freshwater-specific set of environmental variables in a standardized 1 km grid. We delineate the sub-catchment for each grid cell along the HydroSHEDS river network and summarize the upstream climate, topography, land cover, surface geology and soil to each grid cell using various metrics (average, minimum, maximum, range, sum, inverse distance-weighted average and sum). All variables were subsequently averaged across single lakes and reservoirs of the Global lakes and Wetlands Database that are connected to the river network. Monthly climate variables were summarized into 19 long-term climatic variables following the 'bioclim' framework. This new set of variables provides a basis for spatial ecological and biodiversity analyses in freshwater ecosystems at near global extent, yet fine spatial grain. To facilitate the generation of freshwater variables for custom study areas and spatial grains, we provide the 'r.stream.watersheds' and 'r.stream.variables' add-ons for the GRASS GIS software.

  5. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of...

  6. Variability in tropical cyclone heat potential over the Southwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, N.; Reason, C. J. C.; Loveday, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) has been proposed as being important for hurricane and typhoon intensity. Here, a climatology of TCHP is developed for the Southwest Indian Ocean, a basin that experiences on average 11-12 tropical cyclones per year, many of which impact on Mauritius, Reunion and Madagascar, and Mozambique. SODA data and a regional ocean model forced with the GFDL-CORE v.2b reanalysis winds and heat fluxes are used to derive TCHP values during the 1948-2007 period. The results indicate that TCHP increases through the austral summer, peaking in March. Values of TCHP above 40 kJ cm-2, suggested as the minimum needed for tropical cyclone intensification, are still present in the northern Mozambique Channel in May. A time series of TCHP spatially averaged over the Seychelles-Chagos thermocline ridge (SCTR), an important area for tropical cyclones, is presented. The model time series, which agrees well with XBT-based observations (r = 0.82, p = 0.01), shows considerable interannual variability overlaying an upward tendency that matches with an observed increase in severe tropical cyclone days in the Southwest Indian Ocean. Although an increase in severe storms is seen during 1997-2007, the increasing TCHP tendency time series after 1997 coincides with a decrease in total cyclone numbers, a mismatch that is ascribed to increased atmospheric anticyclonicity over the basin. Seasons of increased (decreased) TCHP over the SCTR appear to be associated with dry (wet) conditions over certain areas of southern and East Africa and are linked with changes in zonal wind and vertical motion in the midtroposphere.

  7. Climate variability of heat wave and future warming scenario in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-yao

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the heat wave definition and climate variability of HW days according to air temperature are conducted in order to find out the local threshold and variation trends in the past 40 years (1971-2010), in three major cities, Taipei (TP), Taichung (TC) and Kaohsiung (KH) in Taiwan. As for Taiwan's high humidity atmospheric condition, the heat stress index wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is also employed in the past (2003-2012) and future warming scenario in 2075-2099. The simulation WBGT in the past (2003-2012) and future warming projection (2075-2099) are deduced from the results of ECHAM5/MPIOM-WRF (ECW) dynamic downscaling 5-km resolution in these three cities. Box plot analyzing shows the differences between observed and simulated WBGT distribution at 25%, 50% and 75% percentiles are all within 0.7 °C in 2003-2012. Even the extreme values, the differences are all within 0.9 °C. In other words, the ranges of the WBGT variation from observations are reasonably captured by the ECW in three cities. According to the good performance of ECW in the WBGT simulation, the projection of future WBGT in these three cities has been evaluated under IPCC A1B scenario by using ECW. It is estimated that nearly 50% of the days in summer (July and August) are all at the level of danger (WBGT>31 °C ) at the period 2075-2099.It is a significant increase because they are only 10.74%, 4.22% and 11.28% above this level in the past in 2003-2012 in TP, TC and KH, respectively. From public health point of view, the impacts are huge and worthy to pay attention under the global warming trend.

  8. Regional Heat Sources and the Active and Break Phases of Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, H; Sperber, K R

    2003-12-15

    The boreal summer intraseasonal variability (BSISV) associated with the 30-50 day mode is represented by the co-existence of three components, poleward propagation of convection over the Indian and tropical west Pacific longitudes and eastward propagation along the equator. The hypothesis that the three components influence each other has been investigated using observed OLR, NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, and solutions from an idealized linear model. The null hypothesis is that the three components are mutually independent. Cyclostationary EOF (CsEOF) analysis is applied on filtered OLR to extract the life-cycle of the BSISV. The dominant mode of CsEOF is significantly tied to observed rainfall over the Indian subcontinent. The components of the heating patterns from CsEOF analysis serve as prescribed forcings for the linear model. This allows us to ascertain which heat sources and sinks are instrumental in driving the large-scale monsoon circulation during the BSISV life-cycle. We identify three new findings: (1) the circulation anomalies that develop as a Rossby wave response to suppressed convection over the equatorial Indian Ocean associated with the previous break phase of the BSISV precondition the ocean-atmosphere system in the western Indian Ocean and trigger the next active phase of the BSISV, (2) the development of convection over the tropical west Pacific forces descent anomalies to the west. This, in conjunction with the weakened cross-equatorial flow due to suppressed convective anomalies over the equatorial Indian Ocean reduce the tropospheric moisture over the Arabian Sea, and promote westerly wind anomalies that do not recurve over India. As a result the low-level cyclonic vorticity shifts from India to southeast Asia and break conditions are initiated over India, and (3) the circulation anomalies forced by equatorial Indian Ocean convective anomalies significantly influence the active/break phases over the tropical west Pacific. Our model solutions support

  9. The Low Temperature Specific Heat of Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The low temperature specific heat of polycrystalline perovskite-type Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3 manganese oxide has been investigated experimentally. It is found that the low temperature electron specific heat in zero magnetic field is obviously larger than that of ordinary rare-earth manganites oxide. To get the contribution of phonon to the specific heat precisely, the lattice specific heat is calculated by Debye model fitting. Results confirm that the low temperature specific heat of Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3 is related to the itinerant electrons in ferromagnetic clusters and the disorder in the sample.

  10. Ocean heat content variability and change in an ensemble of ocean reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, M. D.; Roberts, C. D.; Balmaseda, M.; Chang, Y.-S.; Chepurin, G.; Ferry, N.; Fujii, Y.; Good, S. A.; Guinehut, S.; Haines, K.; Hernandez, F.; Köhl, A.; Lee, T.; Martin, M. J.; Masina, S.; Masuda, S.; Peterson, K. A.; Storto, A.; Toyoda, T.; Valdivieso, M.; Vernieres, G.; Wang, O.; Xue, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the location and magnitude of ocean heat content (OHC) variability and change is essential for understanding the processes that govern decadal variations in surface temperature, quantifying changes in the planetary energy budget, and developing constraints on the transient climate response to external forcings. We present an overview of the temporal and spatial characteristics of OHC variability and change as represented by an ensemble of dynamical and statistical ocean reanalyses (ORAs). Spatial maps of the 0-300 m layer show large regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans where the interannual variability of the ensemble mean exceeds ensemble spread, indicating that OHC variations are well-constrained by the available observations over the period 1993-2009. At deeper levels, the ORAs are less well-constrained by observations with the largest differences across the ensemble mostly associated with areas of high eddy kinetic energy, such as the Southern Ocean and boundary current regions. Spatial patterns of OHC change for the period 1997-2009 show good agreement in the upper 300 m and are characterized by a strong dipole pattern in the Pacific Ocean. There is less agreement in the patterns of change at deeper levels, potentially linked to differences in the representation of ocean dynamics, such as water mass formation processes. However, the Atlantic and Southern Oceans are regions in which many ORAs show widespread warming below 700 m over the period 1997-2009. Annual time series of global and hemispheric OHC change for 0-700 m show the largest spread for the data sparse Southern Hemisphere and a number of ORAs seem to be subject to large initialization `shock' over the first few years. In agreement with previous studies, a number of ORAs exhibit enhanced ocean heat uptake below 300 and 700 m during the mid-1990s or early 2000s. The ORA ensemble mean (±1 standard deviation) of rolling 5-year trends in full-depth OHC shows a relatively steady

  11. Assessment of indoor heat stress variability in summer and during heat warnings: a case study using the UTCI in Berlin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walikewitz, Nadine; Jänicke, Britta; Langner, Marcel; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    Humans spend most of their time in confined spaces and are hence primarily exposed to the direct influence of indoor climate. The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) was obtained in 31 rooms (eight buildings) in Berlin, Germany, during summer 2013 and 2014. The indoor UTCI was determined from measurements of both air temperature and relative humidity and from data of mean radiant temperature and air velocity, which were either measured or modeled. The associated outdoor UTCI was obtained through facade measurements of air temperature and relative humidity, simulation of mean radiant temperature, and wind data from a central weather station. The results show that all rooms experienced heat stress according to UTCI levels, especially during heat waves. Indoor UTCI varied up to 6.6 K within the city and up to 7 K within building. Heat stress either during day or at night occurred on 35 % of all days. By comparing the day and night thermal loads, we identified maximum values above the 32 °C threshold for strong heat stress during the nighttime. Outdoor UTCI based on facade measurements provided no better explanation of indoor UTCI variability than the central weather station. In contrast, we found a stronger relationship of outdoor air temperature and indoor air temperature. Building characteristics, such as the floor level or window area, influenced indoor heat stress ambiguously. We conclude that indoor heat stress is a major hazard, and more effort toward understanding the causes and creating effective countermeasures is needed.

  12. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.; Welp, U.; Divan, R.; Hudl, M.; Islam, Z.; Kwok, W.-K.; Rydh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  13. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  14. The specific heat of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Larrea, I. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Apto. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Lopez-Echarri, A. [Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Apto. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)]. E-mail: a.lopezecharri@ehu.es; Bocanegra, E.H. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Apto. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); No, M.L. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Apto. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); San Juan, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Apto. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2006-11-25

    The specific heat of Cu{sub 81.8}Al{sub 13.7}Ni{sub 4.5} (AK10) shape memory alloy has been studied by means of conventional DSC and adiabatic calorimetry techniques. The transformation temperatures and the shape of the calorimetric curves obtained by adiabatic calorimetry do not show any noticeable dependence on the temperature measurement rates, contrarily to what is observed by other calorimetric techniques. The dynamical character of the various experimental methods together with the influence of the latent heat associated to the first order character of these phase transitions are discussed. The specific heat of AK10 has been measured from 50 to 350 K which covers the phase transformation temperature range. The forward and reverse martensitic transformation peaks were found at 299.5 and 304.6 K, showing a thermal hysteresis of 5.1 deg. C. The C {sub p} accuracy can be estimated in 0.1% of C {sub p} and permits a reliable assignment of the following values to the phase transition thermodynamic functions: {delta}H = 7.4 {+-} 0.2 J/g and {delta}S = 0.025 {+-} 0.001 J/gK.

  15. Round robin test on the measurement of the specific heat of solar salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Belén; Nieto-Maestre, Javier; González-Aguilar, José; Julia, José Enrique; Navarrete, Nuria; Faik, Abdessamad; Bauer, Thomas; Bonk, Alexander; Navarro, María Elena; Ding, Yulong; Uranga, Nerea; Veca, Elisabetta; Sau, Salvatore; Giménez, Pau; García, Pierre; Burgaleta, Juan Ignacio

    2017-06-01

    Solar salt (SS), a well-known non-eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate (60% w/w) and potassium nitrate (40% w/w), is commonly used either as Thermal Energy Storage (TES) material (double tank technology) or Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) (solar tower) in modern CSP plants worldwide. The specific heat (cp, kJ kg-1 °C-1) of SS is a very important property in order to support the design of new CSP Plants or develop novel materials based on SS. A high scientific effort has been dedicated to perform a suitable thermophysical characterization of this material. However, there is still a great discrepancy among the cp values reported by different authors1. These differences may be due to either experimental errors (random or systematic) or divergences in the starting material (grade of purity, presence of impurities and/or water). In order to avoid the second source of uncertainty (the starting material), a Round Robin Test (RRT) was proposed starting from a common material. In this way, the different methods from each laboratory could be compared. The study should lay the foundations for the establishment of a systematic procedure for the measurement of the specific heat of this kind of materials. Nine institutions, research centers and companies, accepted the proposal and are contributing with their results. The initiative was organized within the Workshop SolarPACES Task III - Material activity.

  16. Magnetization, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of hexagonal ErMnO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J. D.; Fan, C.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Zhang, F. B.; Zhao, J. Y.; Liu, X. G.; Zhao, X.; Liu, Y. J.; Wang, J. F.; Sun, X. F.

    2017-11-01

    We report a study of magnetism and magnetic transitions of hexagonal ErMnO3 single crystals by magnetization, specific heat, and heat transport measurements. Magnetization data show that the c -axis magnetic field induces three magnetic transitions at 0.8, 12, and 28 T. The specific heat shows a peak at 2.2 K, which is due to a magnetic transition of Er3 + moments. For low-T thermal conductivity (κ ), a clear diplike feature appears in the κ (H ) isotherm at 1-1.25 T for H ∥a b , while in the case of H ∥c , a steplike increase is observed at 0.5-0.8 T. The transition fields in κ (H ) are in good agreement with those obtained from magnetization, and the anomaly of κ can be understood by a spin-phonon scattering scenario. The natures of magnetic structures and corresponding field-induced transitions at low temperatures are discussed.

  17. Low-temperature specific heat of the superconductor Mo{sub 3}Sb{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, V.H. [W. Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: v.h.tran@int.pan.wroc.pl; Miller, W. [W. Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland); Bukowski, Z. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    The low-temperature specific heat of a superconductor Mo{sub 3}Sb{sub 7} with T{sub c} = 2.2 {+-} 0.05 K has been measured in magnetic fields up to 5 T. In the normal state, the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma}{sub n}, and the Debye temperature {theta}{sub D} are found to be 34.5(2) mJ mol{sup -1} K{sup -2} and 283(5) K, respectively. The enhanced {gamma}{sub n} value is interpreted as due to a narrow Mo-4d band pinned at the Fermi level. The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state can be analyzed in terms a phenomenological two BCS-like gap model with the gap widths 2{delta}{sub 1}/k{sub B}T{sub c} = 4.0 and 2{delta}{sub 2}/k{sub B}T{sub c} = 2.5, and relative weights of the molar electronic heat coefficients {gamma}{sub 1}/{gamma}{sub n} = 0.7 and {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub n} = 0.3. Some characteristic thermodynamic parameters for the studied superconductor, like the specific heat jump at T{sub c}, {delta}C(T{sub c})/{gamma}{sub n}T{sub c}, the electron-phonon coupling constant, {lambda}{sub e-ph}, the upper H{sub c2} and thermodynamic critical H{sub c0} fields, the penetration depth {lambda}, coherence length {xi} and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa} are evaluated. The estimated values of parameters such as 2{delta}{sub 0}/k{sub B}T{sub c}, {delta}C(T{sub c})/{gamma}{sub n}T{sub c}, N(E{sub F}) and {lambda}{sub e-ph} suggest that Mo{sub 3}Sb{sub 7} belongs to an intermediate-coupling regime. The electronic band structure calculations indicate that the density of states near the Fermi level is formed mainly by the Mo-4d orbitals and that there is no overlap between the Mo-4d and Sb-sp orbitals.

  18. The Calculation Methods of the Specific Fuel Rate in Combined Heat and Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Chuchueva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a specific fuel rate in combined heat and electricity production using CHP technology. There are two objectives for calculation of specific fuel rate: a CHP technical efficiency estimate, b increasing CHP competitiveness at electricity and district heat markets. Currently, development of a number of thermo-dynamical methods of calculation solves the first problem while to solve the second one there is a number of developed economical methods of calculation. In Russia despite a decade of the wholesale electricity market progress the CHP market offers are still tightly connected with technical efficiency rate. To estimate the technical efficiency rate is widely used the least effective thermo-dynamical method – so called “physical” method”. The paper formulates a problem statement that is the specific fuel rate calculation and reviews the most widely applied methods. The review consists of two parts: in the first the Russian methods are discussed, and in the second one the methods widely used in the countries with highly developed electricity and district heat markets. A new thermo-dynamical method to calculate the specific fuel rate is introduced, which uses the linear characteristic curves of a steam turbine. The developed method allows us to take into consideration the energy inequality of the CHP products. Another advantages of this new method are calculation simplicity and small number of input data. To compare the effectiveness of different methods were introduced comparison rules and also calculations were performed. The comparison of thermo-dynamical methods shows that the most effective methods are an exergy method and also the method that takes into consideration the reduced generation of electricity (work method. Calculation complexity and large number of input data are main disadvantages of these methods. The comparison of economical methods shows that the most effective from stated point of view are a

  19. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  20. Culture-Specific Variables That May Affect Employment Outcomes for Mexican-American Youth with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Kronick, Nancy

    This paper reviews variables specific to the Mexican-American culture that might influence work-related behavior and outcomes for youths with disabilities from this population. Areas covered include: parental/family network; cultural view of disability; religious influences; acculturation levels; language issues; education and employment…

  1. Non-redundant and natural variables definition of heat valid for open systems

    OpenAIRE

    González Álvarez, Juan Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Although an unambiguous definition of heat is available for closed systems, the question of how best to define heat in open systems is not yet settled. After introducing a set of physical requirements for the definition of heat, this article reviews the non-equivalent definitions of heat for open systems used by Callen, Casas-Vázquez, DeGroot, Fox, Haase, Jou, Kondepudi, Lebon, Mazur, Misner, Prigogine, Smith, Thorne, and Wheeler, emphasizing which physical requirements are not...

  2. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change.

  3. Climate Variability and Industrial-Suburban Heat Environment in a Mediterranean Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina A. Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomenon prevalently concerns industrialized countries. It consists of a significant increase in temperatures, especially in industrialized and urbanized areas, in particular, during extreme warm periods like summer. This paper explores the climate variability of temperatures in two stations located in Matera city (Southern Italy, evaluating the increase in temperatures from 1988 to 2015. Moreover, the Corine Land Covers (1990–2000–2006–2012 were used in order to investigate the effect of land use on temperatures. The results obtained confirm the prevalence of UHI phenomena for industrialized areas, highlighting the proposal that the spreading of settlements may further drive these effects on the microclimate. In particular, the presence of industrial structures, even in rural areas, shows a clear increase in summer maximum temperatures. This does not occur in the period before 2000, probably due to the absence of the industrial settlement. On the contrary, from 2000 to 2015, changes are not relevant, but the maximum temperatures have always been higher than in the suburban area (station localized in green zone during daylight hours.

  4. Radiogenic heat production variability of some common lithological groups and its significance to lithospheric thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, M.; Fernández, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2010-07-01

    Determining the temperature distribution within the lithosphere requires the knowledge of the radiogenic heat production (RHP) distribution within the crust and the lithospheric mantle. RHP of crustal rocks varies considerably at different scales as a result of the petrogenetic processes responsible for their formation and therefore RHP depends on the considered lithologies. In this work we address RHP variability of some common lithological groups from a compilation of a total of 2188 representative U, Th and K concentrations of different worldwide rock types derived from 102 published studies. To optimize the use of the generated RHP database we have classified and renamed the rock-type denominations of the original works following a petrologic classification scheme with a hierarchical structure. The RHP data of each lithological group is presented in cumulative distribution plots, and we report a table with the mean, the standard deviation, the minimum and maximum values, and the significant percentiles of these lithological groups. We discuss the reported RHP distribution for the different igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic lithological groups from a petrogenetic viewpoint and give some useful guidelines to assign RHP values to lithospheric thermal modeling.

  5. Long-term variability of heat waves in Argentina and recurrence probability of the severe 2008 heat wave in Buenos Aires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rusticucci, M.; Kyselý, Jan; Almeira, G.; Lhotka, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 3 (2016), s. 679-689 ISSN 0177-798X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB15AR001 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : heat waves * long-term variability * climate extremes Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.640, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00704-015-1445-7

  6. Atmospheric aerosol variability above the Paris Area during the 2015 heat wave - Comparison with the 2003 and 2006 heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien; Shang, Xiaoxia

    2017-12-01

    The aerosol layers during the heat wave of July 2015 over Paris Area have been studied using a N2-Raman lidar with co- and cross-polarized channels. The lidar observations are examined to allow the identification of main aerosol types and their origins, in synergy with measurements of the AERONET sunphotometer network and back trajectory studies from the HYSPLIT model. The results are compatible with spaceborne observations of MODIS and CALIOP. As for previous heat waves of August 2003 and July 2006 occurring in France, the aerosol optical thickness is very large, up to 0.8 at the lidar wavelength of 355 nm (between 0.5 and 0.7 at 550 nm). However, air mass trajectories highlight that the observed aerosol layers may have multiple and diverse origins during the 2015 heat wave (North America, Northwest Africa, Southern and Northern Europe). Biomass burning, pollution and desert dust aerosols have been identified, using linear particle depolarization ratio, lidar ratio and analysis of back trajectories initiated at the altitudes and arrival times of the plumes. These layers are elevated and are shown to have little impact on surface aerosol concentrations (PM10 albedo distributions at 550 nm: 0.90 ± 0.03, 0.95 ± 0.02 and 0.93 ± 0.04 for 2003, 2006 and 2015, respectively.

  7. Modelling spatial and temporal variability of surface water-groundwater fluxes and heat exchange along a lowland river reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, Matthias; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan; Oswald, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    In this study we used the deterministic, fully-integrated surface-subsurface flow and heat transport model (HydroGeoSphere) to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface water-groundwater (SFW-GW) interaction along a lowland river reach. The model incorporates the hydrological as well as the heat transport processes including (1) radiative fluxes warming and cooling the surface water; (2) seasonal groundwater temperature changes; (3) occasionally occurring heat inputs due to precipitation and (4) highly variable SFW-GW water advective heat exchange driven by the general relation between SFW and GW hydraulic heads and geomorphological structure of the riverbed. The study area is a 100 m long lowland river reach of the Selke river, at the boundary of the Harz mountains characterized by distinctive gravel bars. Continuous time series of hydraulic heads and temperatures at different depth in the river bank, the hyporheic zone and within the river are used to define the boundary conditions, to calibrate and to validate the numerical model. The 3D modelling results show that the water and heat exchange at the SFW-GW interface is highly variable in space with zones of daily temperature oscillations penetrating deep into the sediment and spots of daily constant temperature following the average GW temperature. To increase the understanding of evolving pattern, the observed temperature variations in space and time will be linked to dominant stream flow conditions, streambed morphology, advective and conductive heat exchange between SFW and GW and subsurface solute residence times. This study allows to analyse and quantify water and heat fluxes at the SFW-GW interface, to trace subsurface flow paths within the streambed sediments and thus improves the understanding of hyporheic zone exchange mechanisms. It is a sound basis for investigating quantitatively variations of sediment properties, boundary conditions and streambed morphology and also for subsequent

  8. Sex specific effects of heat induced hormesis in Hsf-deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J G; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kristensen, K V

    2007-01-01

    In insects mild heat stress early in life has been reported to increase life span and heat resistance later in life, a phenomenon termed hormesis. Here, we test if the induction of the heat shock response by mild heat stress is mediating hormesis in longevity and heat resistance at older age....... To test this hypothesis we used two heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) mutant stocks. One stock harbours a mutation giving rise to a heat sensitive Hsf which inactivates the heat shock response at high temperature and the other is a rescued mutant giving rise to a wild-type phenotype. We measured...... longevity, heat resistance and expression level of a heat shock protein, Hsp70, in controls and mildly heat treated flies. We found a marked difference between males and females with males showing a beneficial effect of the early heat treatment on longevity and heat resistance later in life in the rescued...

  9. Landscape controls on spatiotemporal variability of specific discharge in a boreal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, R.; Grabs, T.; Bishop, K. H.; Laudon, H.; Seibert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of specific discharge is rarely measured at the small-catchment-scale and is commonly ignored by most studies which instead assume spatially uniform specific discharge. This assumption is convenient but can lead to fundamentally wrong results, e.g., when calculating solute fluxes at the catchment scale. Pioneering work on 14, partly nested, sub-catchments in a boreal meso-scale (67 km2) catchment in Northern Sweden revealed substantial spatial and temporal variations in both the magnitude and timing of specific discharge. We explore the structure of this variability and its connection to the landscape characteristics using a 5-year gap filled time series of continuous flow records.For the long term (5 years) flow magnitudes for the various sub-catchments varied between 73 % and 132 % relative to the flow at the main outlet, with higher flows from wetland dominated catchments (Spearman rank correlation R=0.81). Looking at seasonal and short term flows, both more pronounced variability and stronger links to different landscape properties are seen. Spring flood magnitudes were correlated (R=0.61 to 0.80) with wet areas, while summer flows were negatively correlated to catchment tree volumes (R=-0.61 to -0.75) and potential evaporation (R=-0.48 to -0.78).On shorter timescales, from daily to monthly, also other catchment properties explained the observed spatial discharge variability. During dry periods of low summer baseflows, sub-catchments with deep fluvial deposits maintained a higher discharge than catchments with shallow soils. This pattern was reversed during summer stormflow events.The results show that there is a spatial structure in the specific discharge and that this structure is temporally variable. Different landscape characteristics influence the flows at different time scales, and the spatiotemporal discharge variability depends on seasonal climatic variability. The observed structure does not only influence mass balance

  10. Effects of phonon dimensionality in the specific heat of multiwall carbon nanotubes at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Guillermo A; Bekeris, V; Acha, C [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escobar, M M; Goyanes, S [Laboratorio de Polimeros y Materiales Compuestos, Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zilli, D; Cukierman, A L [PINMATE, Departamento de Industrias, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R J, E-mail: gjorge@df.uba.a [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y EnergIa, CONICET-UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the specific heat at constant pressure, C{sub p}, of three different samples of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT). For all samples, C{sub p} departs from a graphitic behavior at T < 120 K. C{sub p} measurements show a temperature threshold from a linear regime for intermediate temperature to a higher-order power law for low temperatures. Moreover, it was found that this crossover only depends on the internal structure of the individual MWNT and not on the spatial order of the MWNT within a bundle.

  11. Modelling of Dynamic Transmission Cable Temperature Considering Soil-Specific Heat, Thermal Resistivity, and Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus; Anders, George J.; Holboell, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    as functions of the moisture content which is known to vary with time. Furthermore, issues related to the cooling effect during rainy weather are considered. The algorithm is based on the lumped parameters model and takes as input distributed temperature sensing measurements as well as the current and ambient......This paper presents an algorithm for the estimation of the time-dependent temperature evolution of power cables, when real-time temperature measurements of the cable surface or a point within its vicinity are available. The thermal resistivity and specific heat of the cable surroundings are varied...

  12. Anomalous Schottky Specific Heat and Structural Distortion in Ferromagnetic PrAl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, D.; Mudryk, Y.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2013-05-01

    Unique from other rare earth dialuminides, PrAl2 undergoes a cubic to tetragonal distortion below T=30K in a zero magnetic field, but the system recovers its cubic symmetry upon the application of an external magnetic field of 10 kOe via a lifting of the 4f crystal field splitting. The nuclear Schottky specific heat in PrAl2 is anomalously high compared to that of pure Pr metal. First principles calculations reveal that the 4f crystal field splitting in the tetragonally distorted phase of PrAl2 underpins the observed unusual low temperature phenomena.

  13. Temporal variability and stability in infant-directed sung speech: evidence for language-specific patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Simone

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, sung speech is used as a methodological tool to explore temporal variability in the timing of word-internal consonants and vowels. It is hypothesized that temporal variability/stability becomes clearer under the varying rhythmical conditions induced by song.This is explored crosslinguistically in German - a language that exhibits a potential vocalic quantity distinction - and the non-quantity languages French and Russian. Songs by non-professional singers, i.e. parents that sang to their infants aged 2 to 13 months in a non-laboratory setting, were recorded and analyzed.Vowel and consonant durations at syllable contacts of trochaic word types with CVCV or CV:CV structure were measured under varying rhythmical conditions. Evidence is provided that in German non-professional singing, the two syllable structures can be differentiated by two distinct temporal variability patterns: vocalic variability (and consonantal stability) was found to be dominant in CV:CV structures whereas consonantal variability (and vocalic stability) was characteristic for CVCV structures. In French and Russian, however, only vocalic variability seemed to apply.Additionally, findings suggest that the different temporal patterns found in German were also supported by the stability pattern at the tonal level. These results point to subtle (supra) segmental timing mechanisms in sung speech that affect temporal targets according to the specific prosodic nature of the language in question.

  14. Spin-Wave Analysis of Specific Heat and Magnetization in EuO and EuS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Henderson, A. J.; Meyer, H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering measurements of the spin-wave spectrum have shown that the second-nearest-neighbor exchange constant in EuO is ferromagnetic, in disagreement with previously published results from both specific-heat and magnetization measurements. We undertook a thorough study of the bulk...... data on both EuO and its isomorph EuS, including some previously unpublished specific-heat data. The new analysis resolved the controversy regarding the specific heat, which is actually in good agreement with the neutron scattering results. However, the NMR data are more sensitive to effects other than...

  15. A new experimental method to determine specific heat capacity of inhomogeneous concrete material with incorporated microencapsulated-PCM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    The study presented in this paper focuses on an experimental investigation of the specific heat capacity as a function of the temperature Cp (T) of concrete mixed with various amounts of phase change material (PCM). The tested specimens are prepared by directly mixing concrete and microencapsulated...... PCM. This paper describes the development of the new material and the experimental set-up to determine the specific heat capacity of the PCM concrete material. Moreover, various methods are proposed and compared to calculate the specific heat capacity of the PCM concrete. Finally, it is hoped...

  16. The relative importance of water vapour and dust in controlling the variability in radiative heating of the summertime Saharan heat low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsham, John H.; Parker, Douglas J.; Todd, Martin C.; Banks, Jamie R.; Brindley, Helen E.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Roberts, Alexander J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2017-04-01

    The summertime Sahara heat low (SHL) is a key component of the West African monsoon (WAM) system but is a key source of uncertainty in global models. There is considerable uncertainty over the relative importance of water vapour and dust concentrations in controlling the radiation budget over the Sahara. This limits our ability to explain the variability and trends in the SHL and WAM systems, and so hampers our ability to reduce model biases. Here we use in situ observations from Fennec supersite-1 in the central Sahara from June 2011 and 2012, as well as satellite retrievals from GERB, to quantify how total column water vapour (TCWV) and dust aerosols control day-to-day variability in the energy balance in observations and ECMWF reanalyses (ERA-I). Results show that the earth-atmosphere system is radiatively heated in June 2011 and 2012. While we are not able to completely disentangle the roles of water vapour, clouds and dust from the observations, the analysis demonstrates that TCWV provides a far stronger control on TOA net radiation, and so the net heating of the earth-atmosphere system, than AOD does. Variations in dust provide a much stronger control on surface heating, but the reduction in surface heating associated with high dust loadings are largely compensated by associated increases in atmospheric heating, and so dust control on net TOA radiation is weak. Dust and TCWV are both important for direct atmospheric heating. ERA-I assimilated radiosondes from the Fennec campaign but uses a monthly dust climatology, and so cannot capture the impact of daily variations in dustiness. Despite this, ERA-I managed to capture the control of TOA net flux by TCWV, with a positive correlation (r = 0.6) between observed and modelled TOA net radiation. Variations in surface net radiation, and so the vertical profile of radiative heating, are not captured in ERA-I, given it does not capture variations in dust. Results show that ventilation of the SHL by cool moist air

  17. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  18. A noncontact measurement technique for the specific heat and total hemispherical emissivity of undercooled refractory materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1994-03-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the constant pressure specific heat (cpl) and the total hemispherical emissivity (ɛTl) of undercooled refractory materials is presented. In purely radiative cooling, a simple formula which relates the post-recalescence isotherm duration and the undercooling level to cpl is derived. This technique also allows us to measure ɛTl once cpl is known. The experiments were performed using the high-temperature high-vacuum electrostatic levitator at JPL in which 2-3 mm diameter metallic samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in vacuum. The averaged specific heats and total hemispherical emissivities of Zr and Ni over the undercooled regions agree well with the results obtained by drop calorimetry: cpl,av(Zr)=40.8±0.9 J/mol K, ɛTl,av(Zr)=0.28±0.01, cpl,av(Ni)=42.6±0.8 J/mol K, and ɛTl,av(Ni)=0.16±0.01.

  19. Low-temperature specific heat in hydrogenated and Mn-doped La (Fe,Si ) 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Edmund; Ghivelder, Luis; Nicotina, Amanda; Turcaud, Jeremy; Bratko, Milan; Caplin, A. David; Basso, Vittorio; Barcza, Alexander; Katter, Matthias; Cohen, Lesley F.

    2016-10-01

    It is now well established that the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition in the magnetocaloric La (FeSi) 13 is a cooperative effect involving spin, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom. However, the influence of this correlated behavior on the ferromagnetic state is as yet little studied. Here we measure the specific heat at low temperatures in a systematic set of LaF exM nyS iz samples, with and without hydrogen, to extract the Sommerfeld coefficient, the Debye temperature, and the spin-wave stiffness. Substantial and systematic changes in magnitude of the Sommerfeld coefficient are observed with Mn substitution and introduction of hydrogen, showing that over and above the changes to the density of states at the Fermi energy there are significant enhanced d -band electronic interactions at play. The Sommerfeld coefficient is found to be 90 -210 mJ mo l-1K-2 , unusually high compared to that expected from band-structure calculations. The Debye temperature determined from the specific heat measurement is insensitive to Mn and Si doping but increases when hydrogen is introduced into the system. The Sommerfeld coefficient is reduced in magnetic field for all compositions that have a measurable spin-wave contribution. These results move our understanding of the cooperative effects forward in this important and interesting class of materials significantly and provide a basis for future theoretical development.

  20. Improvement of stability of Nb3Sn superconductors by introducing high specific heat substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X. [Fermilab; Li, P. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Peng, X. [Unlisted, US, OH

    2018-01-08

    High-J c Nb3Sn conductors have low stability against perturbations, which accounts for the slow training rates of high-field Nb3Sn magnets. While it is known that adding substances with high specific heat (C) into Nb3Sn wires can increase their overall specific heat and thus improve their stability, there has not been a practical method that is compatible with the fabrication of long-length conductors. In this work, we put forward a scheme to introduce such substances to distributed-barrier Nb3Sn wires, which adds minimum difficulty to the wire manufacturing process. Multifilamentary wires using a mixture of Cu and high-C Gd2O3 powders have been successfully fabricated along this line. Measurements showed that addition of Gd2O3 had no negative effects on residual resitivity ratio or non-Cu J c, and that flux jumps were remarkably reduced, and minimum quench energy values at 4.2 K, 14 T were increased by a factor of three, indicating that stability was significantly improved. We also discussed the influences of the positioning of high-C substances and their thermal diffusivity on their effectiveness in reducing the superconductor temperature rise against perturbations. Based on these results, we proposed an optimized conductor architecture to maximize the effectiveness of this approach.

  1. Hydromagnetic mixed convective flow over a wall with variable thickness and Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model: OHAM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Awan, Saeed Ehsan; Iqbal, Khalid; Khan, Zuhaib Ashfaq; Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor

    2018-03-01

    The effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for the hydro-magnetic mixed convective flow of a non-Newtonian fluid is presented. The flow over a wall having variable thickness is anticipated under the influence of transverse magnetic field and internal heat generation/absorption effects. Mathematical formulation has been performed by making use of the suitable transformations. Convergence analysis has been performed and the optimal values are computed by employing optimal homotopy analysis method. The effects of physical parameters are elaborated in depth via graphical and numerical illustrations.

  2. Same same but different - quantifying the importance of intra-specific variability to plankton biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menden-Deuer, S.; Rowlett, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Planktonic microbes are vastly more diverse than theoretically explicable (Hutchinson 1961). We recently suggested that intra-specific variability was the key characteristic that allowed co-existence of dozens of planktonic species because the outcome of competitions between individuals with variable competitive abilities was unpredictable (Menden-Deuer and Rowlett 2014). Building on this game-theoretic model, here we examine the quantitative consequences of different degrees of intra-specific variability on species survival and co-existence probability. Frequency distributions of species competitive abilities (i.e. species behavior distributions SBD) vary, including invariant distributions with each individual's competitive ability identical to the mean to entirely bimodal distributions, consisting only of individuals with the highest and lowest competitive ability. In total, we explore the effect of 14 different SBDs on species survival probability in individual-based competition model simulations across varying durations and population sizes. We find that particularly at small population sizes intra-specific diversity enhances survival probability and for some SBDs extinctions are not observed. These results have implications for anticipating species ability to withstand changing environmental conditions and understand diverse planktonic communities in a seemingly uniform ocean.

  3. Experimental study on density, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and viscosity of water-ethylene glycol mixture dispersed with carbon nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ganeshkumar Jayabalan; Kathirkaman Durai; Raja Kandhaswamy; Kumaresan Vellisamy; Velraj Ramalingam

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the effect of adding multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in water – ethylene glycol mixture on density and various thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat and viscosity...

  4. Heat flux measurements of Tb{sub 3}M series (M=Co, Rh and Ru): Specific heat and magnetocaloric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, J.C.B., E-mail: jolmiui@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil); Lombardi, G.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil); Reis, R.D. dos [Max-Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Freitas, H.E.; Cardoso, L.P.; Mansanares, A.M.; Gandra, F.G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    We report on the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) for the Tb{sub 3}M series, with M=Co, Rh and Ru, obtained using a heat flux technique. The specific heat of Tb{sub 3}Co and Tb{sub 3}Rh are very similar, with a first order type transition occurring around 6 K below the magnetic ordering temperature without any corresponding feature on the magnetization. The slightly enhanced electronic specific heat, the Debye temperature around 150 K and the presence of the magnetic specific heat well above the ordering temperature are also characteristic of many other compounds of the R{sub 3}M family (R=Rare Earth). The specific heat for Tb{sub 3}Ru, however, presents two peaks at 37 K and 74 K. The magnetization shows that below the first peak the system presents an antiferromagnetic behavior and is paramagnetic above 74 K. We obtained a magnetocaloric effect for M=Co and Rh, −∆S=12 J/kg K, but for Tb{sub 3}Ru it is less than 3 J/kg K (μ{sub 0}∆H=5 T). We believe that the experimental results show that the MCE is directly related with the process of hybridization of the (R)5d-(M)d electrons that occurs in the R{sub 3}M materials.

  5. Seasonal variability of heat flux divergence in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, B.P.; Sadhuram, Y.

    in premonsoon seasons while it loses heat in the other seasons. The mean heat loss is found to be about 19.8 W/m super(2) annually. The magnitude of Qv is comparable with the net radiation at the sea surface (QR) during monsoon and post monsoon seasons, whereas...

  6. MHD effects on heat transfer over stretching sheet embedded in porous medium with variable viscosity, viscous dissipation and heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunegnaw Dessie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this analysis, MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a fluid with variable viscosity through a porous medium towards a stretching sheet by taking in to the effects of viscous dissipation in presence of heat source/sink is considered. The symmetry groups admitted by the corresponding boundary value problem are obtained by using Lie’s scaling group of transformations. These transformations are used to convert the partial differential equations of the governing equations into self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by Runge-Kutta fourth order with shooting method. Numerical results obtained for different parameters such as viscosity variation parameter A, permeability parameter k1, heat source/sink parameter λ, magnetic field parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, and Eckert number Ec are drawn graphically and effects of different flow parameters on velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The skin-friction coefficient -f″(0 and heat transfer coefficient −θ′(0 are presented in tables.

  7. Characterization of dynamic thermal control schemes and heat transfer pathways for incorporating variable emissivity electrochromic materials into a space suit heat rejection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massina, Christopher James

    The feasibility of conducting long duration human spaceflight missions is largely dependent on the provision of consumables such as oxygen, water, and food. In addition to meeting crew metabolic needs, water sublimation has long served as the primary heat rejection mechanism in space suits during extravehicular activity (EVA). During a single eight hour EVA, approximately 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water is lost from the current suit. Reducing the amount of expended water during EVA is a long standing goal of space suit life support systems designers; but to date, no alternate thermal control mechanism has demonstrated the ability to completely eliminate the loss. One proposed concept is to convert the majority of a space suit's surface area into a radiator such that the local environment can be used as a radiative thermal sink for rejecting heat without mass loss. Due to natural variations in both internal (metabolic) loads and external (environmental) sink temperatures, radiative transport must be actively modulated in order to maintain an acceptable thermal balance. Here, variable emissivity electrochromic devices are examined as the primary mechanism for enabling variable heat rejection. This dissertation focuses on theoretical and empirical evaluations performed to determine the feasibility of using a full suit, variable emissivity radiator architecture for space suit thermal control. Operational envelopes are described that show where a given environment and/or metabolic load combination may or may not be supported by the evaluated thermal architecture. Key integration considerations and guidelines include determining allowable thermal environments, defining skin-to-radiator heat transfer properties, and evaluating required electrochromic performance properties. Analysis also considered the impacts of dynamic environmental changes and the architecture's extensibility to EVA on the Martian surface. At the conclusion of this work, the full suit, variable emissivity

  8. Tissue-Type-Specific Heat-Shock Response and Immunolocalization of Class I Low-Molecular-Weight Heat-Shock Proteins in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, T. L.; Chang, PFL.; Chen, Y. M.; Key, J. L.; Lin, C. Y.

    1997-06-01

    A monospecific polyclonal antibody was used to study the tissue-type specificity and intracellular localization of class I low-molecular-weight (LMW) heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in soybean (Glycine max) under different heat-shock regimes. In etiolated soybean seedlings, the root meristematic regions contained the highest levels of LMW HSP. No tissue-type-specific expression of class I LMW HSP was detected using the tissue-printing method. In immunolocalization studies of seedlings treated with HS (40[deg]C for 2 h) the class I LMW HSPs were found in the aggregated granular structures, which were distributed randomly in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. When the heat shock was released, the granular structures disappeared and the class I LMW HSPs became distributed homogeneously in the cytoplasm. When the seedlings were then given a more severe heat shock following the initial 40[deg]C -> 28[deg]C treatment, a large proportion of the class I LMW HSPs that originally localized in the cytoplasm were translocated into the nucleus and nucleolus. Class I LMW HSPs may assist in the resolubilization of proteins denatured or aggregated by heat and may also participate in the restoration of organellar function after heat shock.

  9. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, James [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Withers, Charles [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Kono, Jamie [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2015-06-24

    A new generation of full variable-capacity air-conditioning (A/C) and heat pump units has come on the market that promises to deliver very high cooling and heating efficiency. The units are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, the new units can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40%–118% of nominal full capacity) and stay on for 60%–100% more hours per day than the fixed-capacity systems depending on load-to-capacity ratios. Two-stage systems were not evaluated in this research effort.

  10. Combined effect of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity of non-darcy convection heat transfer in a fluidsaturated porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity on the non-Darcy free, mixed, and forced convection heat transfer along a vertical flat plate embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium are investigated. Forchheimer extension is employed in the flow equation to express the non-Darcy model. The fluid viscosity varies as an inverse linear function of temperature. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. Similarity solutions of the governing equations, for an isothermally heated plate, are obtained. Effects of the physical parameters, which govern the problem, on the rate of heat transfer in terms of Nusselt number, the slip velocity, and the boundary layer thickness, for the two cases Darcy and non-Darcy, are shown on graphs or entered in tables. © 2013 by Begell House, Inc.

  11. Specifics of heat and mass transfer in spherical dimples under the effect of external factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, A. V.; Il'inkov, A. V.; Takmovtsev, V. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The specifics are examined of heat transfer enhancement with spherical dimples under the effect of factors important for practice and characteristic of cooling systems of gas-turbine engines and power units. This experimental investigation deals with the effect of the following factors on the flow in a channel with hemispherical dimples: continuous air swirl in an annulus with dimples on its concave wall, dimples on the convex or concave wall of a curved rectangular channel, imposition of regular velocity fluctuations on the external flow in a straight rectangular channel, and adverse or favorable pressure gradient along the flow direction. The flow is turbulent. Reynolds numbers based on the channel hydraulic diameter are on the order of 104. Results of the investigation of a model of a two-cavity diffuser dimple proposed by the authors are presented. It has been found that results for channels with spherical dimples and for smooth channels differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Thus, if the effect of centrifugal mass forces on convex and concave surfaces with hemispherical dimples and in a smooth channel is almost the same (quantitative and qualitative indicators are identical), the pressure gradient in the flow direction brings about the drastically opposite results. At the same time, the quantitative contribution to a change in heat transfer in hemispherical dimples is different and depends on the impact type. The results are discussed with the use of physical models created on the basis of the results of flow visualization studies and data on the turbulence intensity, pressure coefficient, etc. Results of the investigations suggest that application of spherical dimples under nonstandard conditions requires the calculated heat transfer to be corrected to account for one or another effect.

  12. Streams in the urban heat island: spatial and temporal variability in temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Kayleigh A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Grace, James B.; Hassett, Brooke A.; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Wang, Siyi; Urban, Dean L.

    2013-01-01

    Streams draining urban heat islands tend to be hotter than rural and forested streams at baseflow because of warmer urban air and ground temperatures, paved surfaces, and decreased riparian canopy. Urban infrastructure efficiently routes runoff over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams and can lead to rapid, dramatic increases in temperature. Thermal regimes affect habitat quality and biogeochemical processes, and changes can be lethal if temperatures exceed upper tolerance limits of aquatic fauna. In summer 2009, we collected continuous (10-min interval) temperature data in 60 streams spanning a range of development intensity in the Piedmont of North Carolina, USA. The 5 most urbanized streams averaged 21.1°C at baseflow, compared to 19.5°C in the 5 most forested streams. Temperatures in urban streams rose as much as 4°C during a small regional storm, whereas the same storm led to extremely small to no changes in temperature in forested streams. Over a kilometer of stream length, baseflow temperature varied by as much as 10°C in an urban stream and as little as 2°C in a forested stream. We used structural equation modeling to explore how reach- and catchment-scale attributes interact to explain maximum temperatures and magnitudes of storm-flow temperature surges. The best predictive model of baseflow temperatures (R2  =  0.461) included moderately strong pathways directly (extent of development and road density) and indirectly, as mediated by reach-scale factors (canopy closure and stream width), from catchment-scale factors. The strongest influence on storm-flow temperature surges appeared to be % development in the catchment. Reach-scale factors, such as the extent of riparian forest and stream width, had little mitigating influence (R2  =  0.448). Stream temperature is an essential, but overlooked, aspect of the urban stream syndrome and is affected by reach-scale habitat variables, catchment-scale urbanization

  13. Countermovement jump height: gender and sport-specific differences in the force-time variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Wagner, Phillip P; Tombleson, Tom I L

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess (a) the eccentric rate of force development, the concentric force, and selected time variables on vertical performance during countermovement jump, (b) the existence of gender differences in these variables, and (c) the sport-specific differences. The sample was composed of 189 males and 84 females, all elite athletes involved in college and professional sports (primarily football, basketball, baseball, and volleyball). The subjects performed a series of 6 countermovement jumps on a force plate (500 Hz). Average eccentric rate of force development (ECC-RFD), total time (TIME), eccentric time (ECC-T), Ratio between eccentric and total time (ECC-T:T) and average force (CON-F) were extracted from force-time curves and the vertical jumping performance, measured by impulse momentum. Results show that CON-F (r = 0.57; p height (JH), whereas the time variables are slightly and negatively correlated (r = -0.21-0.23, p sport-specific signatures: volleyball players revealed a temporal-prevailing profile, a weak-force with large ECC-T:T for basketball players and explosive and powerful profiles for football and baseball players.

  14. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  15. A form of MHD universal equations of unsteady incompressible fluid flow with variable elctroconductivity on heated moving plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boričić Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with laminar, unsteady flow of viscous, incompressible and electro conductive fluid caused by variable motion of flat plate. Fluid electro conductivity is variable. Velocity of the plate is time function. Plate moves in its own plane and in "still" fluid. Present external magnetic filed is perpendicular to the plate. Plate temperature is a function of longitudinal coordinate and time. Viscous dissipation, Joule heat, Hole and polarization effects are neglected. For obtaining of universal equations system general similarity method is used as well as impulse and energy equation of described problem.

  16. Evaluation of variables affecting crack propagation by Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zr-2.5Nb with different heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieza, J.I., E-mail: mieza@cnea.gov.ar [CNEA, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Dano por Hidrogeno, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Instituto Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Vigna, G.L.; Domizzi, G. [CNEA, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Dano por Hidrogeno, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is a failure mechanism that may occur in zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactor core components. The knowledge of the direct effects of the variables affecting the cracking velocity could be used to minimize the risk of crack propagation. In practice, most of these variables - as for example the alloy yield stress and hydrogen diffusion coefficient - are coupled and vary during reactor operation, leading to a complex variable dependence of the cracking mechanism. In order to get an insight into the relative effect of these variables, experimental data and a theoretical approach using a generally accepted DHC model were used in this work. A series of DHC velocity measurements were made in Zr-2.5Nb tube with different heat treatments. The yield stress, the Nb concentration in {beta} phase, and hydrogen solvus of the alloy were measured for different heat treatments. Niobium concentration in {beta} phase gave an indirect indication of {beta}-phase continuity and, with a proper correlation, of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient. The obtained values were used as inputs in a theoretical calculation of cracking velocity. Good agreement between experimental data and predicted values was obtained, showing that hydrogen diffusion coefficient was the most relevant variable affecting DHC velocity cracking. Furthermore, this approach has been demonstrated to be useful in estimating DHC velocity in irradiated materials.

  17. Contributions of weather variables for specific adaptation of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.- Arg clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshan P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific adaptation of 15 rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis clones was assessed by analyzing yield during a normal year (1997-98 and a year (1998-99 in which the yield was exceptional. Differences in yield in response to changes in weather conditions over the years were evident with clones RRII 203, RRIM 703, PB 5/51 and PB 235 which all exhibited a negative trend with increasing wind velocity during 1997-98, these clones also exhibited a negative correlation with minimum temperature during 1998-99. The prominent yield differences across the years made selection based on both yield and stability inevitable through computing weather variables and environmental index as covariant. To determine the contribution of variable(s to genotype-environment (GE interactions, the GE interaction was partitioned into heterogeneity and residual GE interaction. Heterogeneity only for environmental index was highly significant (p = 0.01, meaning that stability or instability of clones was due to a linear effect of the environmental index. The non-significant values of heterogeneity for the weather variables revealed that none of these factors individually was sufficient to explain heterogeneity. A QBASIC computer program called STABLE was used to select simultaneously for yield and stability. Clones PB 235, RRII 118, RRII 203, RRIM 703 and RRIM 600 were stable over the years investigated.

  18. Non-equilibrium temperatures and heat transport in nanosystems with defects, described by a tensorial internal variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restuccia Liliana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the meaning of non-equilibrium temperatures in nanosystems with an internal variable, describing defects inside them, and implications on heat transport. In equilibrium all definitions of temperature lead to the same value, but in nonequilibrium steady states they lead to different values, giving information on different degrees of freedom. We discuss the caloric and entropic non-equilibrium temperatures and the relations among them, in defective nanosystems (crystals with dislocations or porous channels, carbon nanotubes in a solid matrix and so on, crossed by an external energy flux. Here, we present a model for nanocrystals with dislocation defects submitted to an external energy flux. The dislocations may have a strong influence on the effective thermal conductivity, and their own dynamics may be coupled in relevant way to the heat flux dynamics. In the linear case the constitutive relations, the rate equations for the internal variable and the heat flux are worked out and a generalized telegraphic heat equation is derived in the anisotropic and isotropic case, describing the thermal disturbances with finite velocity.

  19. Metamagnetic-like anomalies in f-electron systems investigated by specific heat measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hideyuki; Aoki, Yuji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Sugawara, Hitoshi [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Andreev, A.V.; Sechovsky, V.; Havela, L.; Settai, Rikio; Onuki, Yoshichika

    1999-02-28

    We report the results on the specific heat (C) and magnetocaloric effect measurements in 4f- and 5f-compounds exhibiting metamagnetic-like anomaly (MLA) at field (H) around H{sub M} from the paramagnetic ground state. The MLA in Ce-compounds (CeRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CeCu{sub 6}) and UCoAl have both close resemblance and apparent difference; the first order character has been confirmed for UCoAl but not for the Ce compounds. For the Ce compounds, a single peak C(H)/T at H{sub M} at lowest temperature splits into double peaks at finite temperatures. For UCoAl, a step-like decreases of C(H)/T across H{sub M} at lowest temperature changes to a peak structure around HM at higher temperatures. (author)

  20. High-field magnetization and specific heat of TmNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Franse, J.J.M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Colpa, J.H.P. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Kim-Ngan, N.-H. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Tai, L.T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Gignoux, D. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 -Grenoble (France). Lab. Louis Neel

    1996-05-01

    High-field magnetization on two single-crystalline samples from different batches of TmNi{sub 5} has been measured along the crystallographic a, b and c directions up to 38 T at 1.5 K. A small high-field susceptibility {chi}{sub HF}=6.3.10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}/T f.u. was observed along the easy c-axis. The magnetization measured alon g both a- and b-axis shows hysteresis and a magnetic transition between 5 and 15 T. Specific heat has been measured from 1.5 to 160 K. A {lambda}-type peak found at about 3.7 K originates from the magnetic system. (orig.).

  1. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  2. Effect of impurity pinning on conduction and specific heat in the Luttinger liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemenko, S.N. [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute for Radio-Engineering and Electronics of the RAS, Mokhovaya str. 11-7, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: sartemenko@googlemail.com; Remizov, S.V.; Shapiro, D.S.; Vakhitov, R.R. [V.A. Kotelnikov Institute for Radio-Engineering and Electronics of the RAS, Mokhovaya str. 11-7, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-01

    We study theoretically two effects related to impurity depinning that are common for 1D Luttinger liquid (LL) and linear-chain charge-density wave (CDW) conductors. First, we consider the electron transport through a single impurity in a 1D conducting channel and study a new regime of conduction related to LL sliding at voltage above a threshold one. The DC current in this regime is accompanied by oscillations with frequency f=I/e. This resembles the CDW depinning in linear-chain conductors, the Josephson effect, and the Coulomb blockade. Second, we found that strong pinning of the LL by impurities leads to a magnetic field dependence of the low-temperature specific heat similar to that observed experimentally in CDW compounds. We interpret this in favor of possibility of formation of the LL in linear-chain compounds.

  3. Specific heating power of fatty acid and phospholipid stabilized magnetic fluids in an alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuyper, M de; Soenen, S J H [Interdisciplinary Research Centre, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven-Campus Kortrijk, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Hodenius, M; Ivanova, G; Baumann, M; Paciok, E; Schmitz-Rode, T [Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Eckert, T [Department of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen, Landoltweg 2, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: hodenius@hia.rwth-aachen.de

    2008-05-21

    Magnetic fluids (MFs) with a similar narrow size distribution of the iron oxide core were stabilized with lauric acid (MF 1), oleate (MF 2) or, after dialysis in the presence of liposomes, with phospholipid molecules (MF 3 and MF 4, respectively). The hydrodynamic sizes of the MF 1 and MF 3 were half those found for MF 2 and MF 4. The MFs were exposed to inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 200 kHz and a maximum magnetic field strength of 3.8 kA m{sup -1}. Specific absorption rates (SAR) of 294 {+-} 42 (MF 1), 214 {+-} 16 (MF 2), 297 {+-} 13 (MF 3) and 213 {+-} 6 W g{sup -1} Fe (MF 4) were obtained. The data for MF 2 and MF 4 were identical to those found for the commercially available ferucarbotran. The biomedical relevance of the phospholipid-coated MFs is briefly discussed.

  4. Solid and liquid Equation of state for initially porous aluminum where specific heat is constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jerry W.; Lemar, E. R.; Brown, Mary

    2011-06-01

    A porous solid's initial state is off the thermodynamic surface of the non-porous solid to start with but when pressure is high enough to cause total pore collapse or crush up, then the final states are on the condensed matter thermodynamic surfaces. The Hugoniot for the fully compacted solid is above the Principle Hugoniot with pressure, temperature and internal energy increased at a given v. There are a number of ways to define this hotter Hugoniot, which can be referenced to other thermodynamic paths on this thermodynamic surface. The choice here was to use the Vinet isotherm to define a consistent thermodynamic surface for the solid and melt phase of 6061 aluminum where specific heat is constant for the P-v-T space of interest. Analytical equations are developed for PH and TH.

  5. MHD boundary layer slip flow and radiative nonlinear heat transfer over a flat plate with variable fluid properties and thermophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Parida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the two-dimensional steady MHD boundary layer flow of heat and mass transfer over a flat plate with partial slip at the surface subjected to the convective heat flux. The particular attraction lies in searching the effects of variable viscosity and variable thermal diffusivity on the behavior of the flow. In addition, non-linear thermal radiation effects and thermophoresis are taken into account. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations for the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity variable, which are solved numerically by applying Runge–Kutta fourth–fifth order integration scheme in association with quasilinear shooting technique. The novel results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature, concentration and ambient Prandtl number within the boundary layer are displayed graphically for various parameters that characterize the flow. The local skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown graphically. The numerical results obtained for the particular case are fairly in good agreement with the result of Rahman [6].

  6. Climate variability of heat waves and their associated diurnal temperature range variations in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, M.-T.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chuang, Y.-J.; Sheng, Y.-F.; Chien, Y.-Y.

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates heat waves in Taiwan and their maintenance mechanism, based upon observations and dynamically downscaled simulations. A 95th percentile threshold is used for identifying hot extremes over a period of consecutive days. Heat waves are forecast to become more severe in the future projection. Daily minimum temperatures are generally high and diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) are relatively large. The daily minimum temperature serves as the primary control in the variation in DTR during heat waves. An apparent increase in the daily minimum temperature suggests elevated heat stress at nighttime during future heat waves. Heat waves in Taiwan are associated with abnormal warming and drying atmospheric conditions under the control of an enhanced western North Pacific subtropical high. The surrounding waters serve as a vast moisture source to suppress the drying magnitude in the surface layer as the temperature rises, thereby ensuring a high humidity level during the hot spell. The subsidence and adiabatic warming above can trap the warm and humid air in the surface layer, leading to positive feedback to the abnormally hot surface condition. The associated warming and drying atmospheric conditions cover certain spatial extents, suggesting that the extreme situation identified here is not confined to just an island-wide hot spell; the abnormal hot weather can take place across a broad geographical area.

  7. Specific heat and Hall effect of the ferromagnetic Kondo lattice UCu0.9Sb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, V. H.; Bukowski, Z.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the electrical resistivity ρ, specific heat C p and Hall coefficient R H on a single crystal of a ferromagnetic Kondo lattice UCu0.9Sb2. The experimental ρ (T) , C p (T) and {{R}\\text{H}}(T) data evidence a bulk magnetic phase transition at {{T}\\text{C}}=113 K, and additionally exhibit an unexpected bump located in the temperature range T C/10-T C/3. UCu0.9Sb2 has an enhanced electronic specific heat coefficient γ ˜ 71 mJ molK-2, corresponding to Kondo temperature {{T}\\text{K}}˜ 6.8 K. An analysis of the Hall effect data for j//(a, b)-plane and H// c-axis reveals that the low-temperature ordinary Hall coefficient R 0 is positive, suggesting that p-type electrical conductivity is dominant. The density of the carriers at 2 K is about 0.6 holes f.u.-1, which may categorize the studied compound into class of low carrier density compounds. Combined γ and R 0 data divulge an effective mass of charge carriers {{m}\\ast}˜ 27 m e . This finding together with quite low Hall mobility {μ\\text{H}}=25 cm2 Vs-1 and Kadowaki-Woods ratio {{r}\\text{KW}}=0.98× ~{{10}-5} μ Ω cm (mol K2 mJ-1)2, manifest the development of heavy-fermion state in the ferromagnetic UCu0.9Sb2 compound at low temperatures.

  8. Numerical Renormalization Group computation of temperature dependent specific heat for a two-channel Anderson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, J.V.B., E-mail: joao.ferreira@ufms.br [Fundacao Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Ferreira, A.I.I.; Leite, A.H. [Fundacao Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Libero, V.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, SP, Universidade Estadual de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    The Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) is applied to diagonalize a two-channel Anderson model describing a local magnetic impurity embedded in a fermionic bath. In spite of the difficulty in computing the specific heat using NRG, the interleaving discretization and multi-step iterative transformation virtually eliminate the numerical oscillations introduced by the logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. These allow to cover uniformly a large range of temperature, from the top of the band to a very small fraction of the bandwidth. This is relevant in describing, for instance, the presence of a low temperature Kondo resonance together with a high temperature Schottky peak, as well to cover Fermi and non-Fermi liquid regimes, like in the recent studied Ce{sub 1-x}La{sub x}Ni{sub 9}Ge{sub 4} family. We highlight the importance in describing the Schottky peak to define the number of degrees of freedom of the local levels, in order to correctly define the model to describe a given compound. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-channel Anderson model exhibits FL and nFL regimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NRG, with interleaving and the multi-step procedures, solve Hamiltonian. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large temperature in the specific heat curves, from Kondo to Schottky peak. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of Ce{sub 1-x}La{sub x}Ni{sub 9}Ge{sub 4} compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Schottky-like peak in this compound suggests J=9/2 multiplet at the impurity level.

  9. Empirical equations for viscosity and specific heat capacity determination of paraffin PCM and fatty acid PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreneche, C.; Ferrer, G.; Palacios, A.; Solé, A.; Inés Fernández, A.; Cabeza, L. F.

    2017-10-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) used in thermal energy storage (TES) systems have been presented, over recent years, as one of the most effective options in energy storage. Paraffin and fatty acids are some of the most used PCM in TES systems, as they have high phase change enthalpy and in addition they do not present subcooling nor hysteresis and have proper cycling stability. The simulations and design of TES systems require the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of PCM. Thermal conductivity, viscosity, specific heat capacity (Cp) can be experimentally determined, but these are material and time consuming tasks. To avoid or to reduce them, and to have reliable data without the need of experimentation, thermal properties can be calculated by empirical equations. In this study, five different equations are given to calculate the viscosity and specific heat capacity of fatty acid PCM and paraffin PCM. Two of these equations concern, respectively, the empirical calculation of the viscosity and liquid Cp of the whole paraffin PCM family, while the other three equations presented are for the corresponding calculation of viscosity, solid Cp, liquid Cp of the whole fatty acid family of PCM. Therefore, this study summarize the work performed to obtain the main empirical equations to measure the above mentioned properties for whole fatty acid PCM family and whole paraffin PCM family. Moreover, empirical equations have been obtained to calculate these properties for other materials of these PCM groups and these empirical equations can be extrapolated for PCM with higher or lower phase change temperatures within a lower relative error 4%.

  10. Biological Variation of Hemostasis Variables in Thrombosis and Bleeding: Consequences for Performance Specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; van Schie, Marianne; Kluft, Cornelis; Leebeek, Frank W G; Meijer, Piet

    2016-12-01

    Levels of hemostasis factors vary between and within individuals as a result of genetic and environmental factors and analytical variation of the assays. The current state of the art for defining analytical precision requirements for analytical testing is based on this between- and within-individual (biological) variation. However, information on biological variation in hemostasis variables is still limited.The aim of this study was to determine the biological variation of coagulation variables involved in thrombosis and bleeding to provide a recommendation for performance specifications and to assess whether hemostasis assays fulfill the recommendation. We performed a longitudinal study by repeated blood sampling (in total 13 times over a 1-year period) in 40 healthy individuals and measured prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, antithrombin, factor VIII, factor IX, von Willebrand factor (VWF), protein C, and protein S. We evaluated the effect of the biological variation on parameters of analytical variation and propose required performance specifications. Biological variation was highly different for various hemostasis variables: the within-subject variation ranged from 2.6% (PT) to 25.6% [VWF collagen binding (CB) activity], the between-subject variation varied from 4.1% (PT) to 31.2% (VWF:ristocetin cofactor acitivity), and the assay variation from 1.3% (PT) to 12.9% (VWF:CB). With the reagents and analyzers used in this study, most of the hemostasis tests variables fulfill the current quality criteria for diagnosis and monitoring of routine hemostasis assays. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  11. Sensitivity, Specificity and Predictive Value of Heart Rate Variability Indices in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kastelianne França da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Heart rate variability (HRV indices may detect autonomic changes with good diagnostic accuracy. Type diabetes mellitus (DM individuals may have changes in autonomic modulation; however, studies of this nature in this population are still scarce. Objective: To compare HRV indices between and assess their prognostic value by measurements of sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in young individuals with type 1 DM and healthy volunteers. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, physical and clinical assessment was performed in 39 young patients with type 1 DM and 43 young healthy controls. For HRV analysis, beat-to-beat heart rate variability was measured in dorsal decubitus, using a Polar S810i heart rate monitor, for 30 minutes. The following indices were calculated: SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, TINN, RRTri, LF ms2, HF ms2, LF un, HF un, LF/HF, SD1, SD2, SD1/SD2, and ApEn. Results: Type 1 DM subjects showed a decrease in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and overall variability of autonomic nervous system. The RMSSD, SDNN, PNN50, LF ms2, HF ms2, RRTri, SD1 and SD2 indices showed greater diagnostic accuracy in discriminating diabetic from healthy individuals. Conclusion: Type 1 DM individuals have changes in autonomic modulation. The SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, RRtri, LF ms2, HF ms2, SD1 and SD2 indices may be alternative tools to discriminate individuals with type 1 DM.

  12. Sensitivity, Specificity and Predictive Value of Heart Rate Variability Indices in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Christofaro, Diego Giuliano Destro; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2017-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) indices may detect autonomic changes with good diagnostic accuracy. Type diabetes mellitus (DM) individuals may have changes in autonomic modulation; however, studies of this nature in this population are still scarce. Objective To compare HRV indices between and assess their prognostic value by measurements of sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in young individuals with type 1 DM and healthy volunteers. Methods In this cross-sectional study, physical and clinical assessment was performed in 39 young patients with type 1 DM and 43 young healthy controls. For HRV analysis, beat-to-beat heart rate variability was measured in dorsal decubitus, using a Polar S810i heart rate monitor, for 30 minutes. The following indices were calculated: SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, TINN, RRTri, LF ms2, HF ms2, LF un, HF un, LF/HF, SD1, SD2, SD1/SD2, and ApEn. Results Type 1 DM subjects showed a decrease in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and overall variability of autonomic nervous system. The RMSSD, SDNN, PNN50, LF ms2, HF ms2, RRTri, SD1 and SD2 indices showed greater diagnostic accuracy in discriminating diabetic from healthy individuals. Conclusion Type 1 DM individuals have changes in autonomic modulation. The SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, RRtri, LF ms2, HF ms2, SD1 and SD2 indices may be alternative tools to discriminate individuals with type 1 DM. PMID:28443958

  13. Connecting social environment variables to the onset of major specific health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick L; Weston, Sara J; Jackson, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    The present research examined the effects of the social environment on the onset of specific health ailments. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we examined participants' responses to social environment questions in 2006 as predictors of onset of different health conditions over the next four years. Healthy participants (n = 7514) reported on their number of social partners, interaction frequency, positive social support and negative social support with respect to both their family and friends. These variables were used to predict onset of seven conditions in 2010: high blood pressure, heart condition, lung disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes and arthritis. Logistic regressions indicated that the social environment provided some predictive value for onset of most health outcomes, with more positive and less negative social support appearing to buffer against onset. Social environmental variables related to friendships appeared to play a greater role than the family indicators. However, no variable proved universally adaptive, and social indicators had little value in predicting onset of chronic conditions. The current findings point to the potential for the social environment to influence later health, while demonstrating the nuanced role that our social lives play with respect to health.

  14. Intraindividual Variability in Domain-Specific Cognition and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraindividual variability among cognitive domains may predict dementia independently of interindividual differences in cognition. A multidomain cognitive battery was administered to 2305 older adult women (mean age 74 years enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative. Women were evaluated annually for probable dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI for an average of 5.3 years using a standardized protocol. Proportional hazards regression showed that lower baseline domain-specific cognitive scores significantly predicted MCI (N=74, probable dementia (N=45, and MCI or probable dementia combined (N=101 and that verbal and figural memory predicted each outcome independently of all other cognitive domains. The baseline intraindividual standard deviation across test scores (IAV Cognitive Domains significantly predicted probable dementia and this effect was attenuated by interindividual differences in verbal episodic memory. Slope increases in IAV Cognitive Domains across measurement occasions (IAV Time explained additional risk for MCI and MCI or probable dementia, beyond that accounted for by interindividual differences in multiple cognitive measures, but risk for probable dementia was attenuated by mean decreases in verbal episodic memory slope. These findings demonstrate that within-person variability across cognitive domains both at baseline and longitudinally independently accounts for risk of cognitive impairment and dementia in support of the predictive utility of within-person variability.

  15. Patient-Specific Classification of ICU Sedation Levels From Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Sunil B; Biswal, Siddharth; Boyle, Emily J; Zhou, David W; McClain, Lauren M; Bajwa, Ednan K; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Barbieri, Riccardo; Purdon, Patrick L; Westover, M Brandon

    2017-07-01

    To develop a personalizable algorithm to discriminate between sedation levels in ICU patients based on heart rate variability. Multicenter, pilot study. Several ICUs at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. We gathered 21,912 hours of routine electrocardiogram recordings from a heterogenous group of 70 adult ICU patients. All patients included in the study were mechanically ventilated and were receiving sedatives. As "ground truth" for developing our method, we used Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale scores grouped into four levels denoted "comatose" (-5), "deeply sedated" (-4 to -3), "lightly sedated" (-2 to 0), and "agitated" (+1 to +4). We trained a support vector machine learning algorithm to calculate the probability of each sedation level from heart rate variability measures derived from the electrocardiogram. To estimate algorithm performance, we calculated leave-one-subject out cross-validated accuracy. The patient-independent version of the proposed system discriminated between the four sedation levels with an overall accuracy of 59%. Upon personalizing the system supplementing the training data with patient-specific calibration data, consisting of an individual's labeled heart rate variability epochs from the preceding 24 hours, accuracy improved to 67%. The personalized system discriminated between light- and deep-sedation states with an average accuracy of 75%. With further refinement, the methodology reported herein could lead to a fully automated system for depth of sedation monitoring. By enabling monitoring to be continuous, such technology may help clinical staff to monitor sedation levels more effectively and to reduce complications related to over- and under sedation.

  16. Variability of the ocean heat content during the last millennium – an assessment with the ECHO-g Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ortega

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies addressing climate variability during the last millennium generally focus on variables with a direct influence on climate variability, like the fast thermal response to varying radiative forcing, or the large-scale changes in atmospheric dynamics (e.g. North Atlantic Oscillation. The ocean responds to these variations by slowly integrating in depth the upper heat flux changes, thus producing a delayed influence on ocean heat content (OHC that can later impact low frequency SST (sea surface temperature variability through reemergence processes. In this study, both the externally and internally driven variations of the OHC during the last millennium are investigated using a set of fully coupled simulations with the ECHO-G (coupled climate model ECHAMA4 and ocean model HOPE-G atmosphere–ocean general circulation model (AOGCM. When compared to observations for the last 55 yr, the model tends to overestimate the global trends and underestimate the decadal OHC variability. Extending the analysis back to the last one thousand years, the main impact of the radiative forcing is an OHC increase at high latitudes, explained to some extent by a reduction in cloud cover and the subsequent increase of short-wave radiation at the surface. This OHC response is dominated by the effect of volcanism in the preindustrial era, and by the fast increase of GHGs during the last 150 yr. Likewise, salient impacts from internal climate variability are observed at regional scales. For instance, upper temperature in the equatorial Pacific is controlled by ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation variability from interannual to multidecadal timescales. Also, both the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO modulate intermittently the interdecadal OHC variability in the North Pacific and Mid Atlantic, respectively. The NAO, through its influence on North Atlantic surface heat fluxes and convection, also plays an important role on

  17. The variability of Joule heating, and its effects on the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A considerable fraction of the solar wind energy that crosses the magnetopause ends up in the high-latitude thermosphere-ionosphere system as a result of Joule heating, the consequences of which are very significant and global in nature. Often Joule heating calculations use hourly averages of the electric field, rather than the time-varying electric field. This leads to an underestimation of the heating. In this paper, we determine the magnitude of the underestimation of Joule heating by analysing electric field data from the EISCAT Incoherent Scatter Radar, situated at the 67° E magnetic latitude. We find that the underestimation, using hourly-averaged electric field values, is normally ~20%, with an upper value of about 65%. We find that these values are insensitive to changes in solar flux, magnetic activity and magnetic local time, implying that the electric field fluctuations are linear related to the amplitude of the electric field. Assuming that these changes are representative of the entire auroral oval, we then use a coupled ionosphere-thermosphere model to calculate the local changes these underestimations in the heating rate cause to the neutral temperature, mean molecular mass and meridional wind. The changes in each parameter are of the order of a few percent but they result in a reduction in the peak F-region concentration of ~20% in the summer hemisphere at high latitudes, and about half of this level in the winter hemisphere. We suggest that these calculations could be used to add corrections to modelled values of Joule heating.Key words. Ionosphere (eletric fields and currents; ionospheric disturbances; polar ionosphere

  18. High field magnetization and specific heat of ErNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E.; Franse, J.J.M. [Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1994-03-01

    High field magnetization studies of single crystalline ErNi{sub 5} in fields up to 38T at 1.5K along the main crystallographic directions have been performed. Along the easy direction, the hexagonal axis, the spontaneous magnetization, M{sub s}, amounts to 8.62{mu}{sub B}/f.u. The high-field susceptibility is very small and equal to 41 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}{mu}{sub B}/Tf.u. There exists a distinct difference between the curves along the a- and b-axis. The a-axis curve monotonously increases with field up to 38T. The b-axis curve coincides with the a-axis curve up to 12T but starts to deviate from it above this field, resulting in a value for the magnetization at 38T which is almost the full moment value. The specific beat of a newly-grown single-crystalline sample has been measured in zero field and in applied fields along the c-axis (B = 0.3, 1, 2, 5T). The zero-field measurements coincide with previously reported results The specific heat shows a rapid decrease of the ferrimagnetic order with applied field. Already in 1T, the sharp lambda-type of peak at the magnetic transition is decreased by two third and becomes a broad bump that coincides with the la measurement above 30K. Higher fields further suppress the transition.

  19. Heat transfer in MHD unsteady stagnation point flow with variable wall temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Soundalgekar, V.M.; Murty, T.V.R.; Takhar, H.S.

    ) (J~+ P, [ heated blunt-nosed cylinder whose wall temperature varies as Ax N is presented. Temparature profiles arc shown graphicaIIy for different values of N and the numerical values of the rate of heat transfer (- 0' (0», IJ...

  20. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer with Variable Fluid Properties on a Moving Flat Plate in a Parallel Free Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid on a moving flat plate in a parallel free stream with variable fluid properties are studied. Two special cases, namely, constant fluid properties and variable fluid viscosity, are considered. The transformed boundary layer equations are solved numerically by a finite-difference scheme known as Keller-box method. Numerical results for the flow and the thermal fields for both cases are obtained for various values of the free stream parameter and the Prandtl number. It is found that dual solutions exist for both cases when the fluid and the plate move in the opposite directions. Moreover, fluid with constant properties shows drag reduction characteristics compared to fluid with variable viscosity.

  1. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    similarities with the BoB. Interesting new results on seasonal time scales are shown. Penetration of solar heat flux need to be taken into account for two reasons. First an average of 28.6Wm-2 is lost beneath the mixed layer over the year. Second...

  2. Stage- and sex-specific heat tolerance in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Gautier, Roland; Nick, Marcel; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schäfer, Martin A

    2014-12-01

    Thermal tolerance varies at all hierarchical levels of biological organization: among species, populations, individuals, and even within individuals. Age- or developmental stage- and sex-specific thermal effects have received relatively little attention in the literature, despite being crucial for understanding thermal adaptation in nature and responses to global warming. We document stage- and sex- specific heat tolerance in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae), a species common throughout the northern hemisphere that generally favours cool climates. Exposure of eggs to temperatures up to 32°C did not affect larval hatching rate, but subsequent egg-to-adult survival at a benign temperature was reduced. Permanent transfer from benign (18°C) to hot temperatures (up to 31°C) at different larval and pupal stages strongly decreased egg-to-adult survival, though survival continuously improved the later the transfer occurred. Temporary transfer for only two days increased mortality more weakly, survival being lowest when temperature stress was imposed early during the larval or pupal stages. Adult flies provided with sugar and water tolerated 31°C longer than previously thought (5 days in males to 9 days in females). Eggs were thus less susceptible to thermal stress than larvae, pupae or adults, in agreement with the hypothesis that more mobile stages require less physiological protection against heat because they can behaviourally thermoregulate. The probability of mating, of laying a clutch, and hatching success were generally independently reduced by exposure of females or males to warm temperatures (24°C) during the juvenile or adult stages, with some interactions evident. High temperature stress thus affects survival differentially depending on when it occurs during the juvenile or the pre-reproductive adult life stage, and affects reproductive success via the mating behaviour of both sexes, female physiology in terms of

  3. Epibacterial community patterns on marine macroalgae are host-specific but temporally variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachnit, Tim; Meske, Diana; Wahl, Martin; Harder, Tilmann; Schmitz, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Marine macroalgae are constantly exposed to epibacterial colonizers. The epiphytic bacterial patterns and their temporal and spatial variability on host algae are poorly understood. To investigate the interaction between marine macroalgae and epiphytic bacteria, this study tested if the composition of epibacterial communities on different macroalgae was specific and persisted under varying biotic and abiotic environmental conditions over a 2-year observation time frame. Epibacterial communities on the co-occurring macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus, Gracilaria vermiculophylla and Ulva intestinalis were repeatedly sampled in summer and winter of 2007 and 2008. The epibacterial community composition was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene libraries. Epibacterial community profiles did not only differ significantly at each sampling interval among algal species, but also showed consistent seasonal differences on each algal species at a bacterial phylum level. These compositional patterns re-occurred at the same season of two consecutive years. Within replicates of the same algal species, the composition of bacterial phyla was subject to shifts at the bacterial species level, both within the same season but at different years and between different seasons. However, 7-16% of sequences were identified as species specific to the host alga. These findings demonstrate that marine macroalgae harbour species-specific and temporally adapted epiphytic bacterial biofilms on their surfaces. Since several algal host-specific bacteria were highly similar to other bacteria known to either avoid subsequent colonization by eukaryotic larvae or to exhibit potent antibacterial activities, algal host-specific bacterial associations are expected to play an important role for marine macroalgae. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Genome-wide survey and expression profiling of heat shock proteins and heat shock factors revealed overlapped and stress specific response under abiotic stresses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenhuo; Hu, Guocheng; Han, Bin

    2009-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperons, which function in protein folding and assembly, protein intracellular localization and secretion, and degradation of misfolded and truncated proteins. Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are the transcriptional activators of Hsps. It has been reported that Hsps and Hsfs are widely involved in response to various abiotic stresses such as heat, drought, salinity and cold. To elucidate the function and regulation of rice Hsp and Hsf genes, we examined a global expression profiling with heat stressed rice seedling, and then compared our results with the previous rice data under cold, drought and salt stresses. The comparison revealed that, while most Hsfs and Hsps had highly similar and overlapped response and regulation patterns under different stresses, some of those genes showed significantly specific response to distinct stress. We also found that heat-responsive gene profiling differed largely from those under cold/drought/salt stresses, and that drought treatment was more effective to up-regulate Hsf expression in rice than in Arabidopsis. Overall, our data suggests that Hsps and Hsfs might be important elements in cross-talk of different stress signal transduction networks. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of variable heat treatment modes on microstructures of Fe-Cr-B cast iron alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Changqing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment mode on the microstructure of Fe-Cr-B cast iron alloys was investigated in this paper by comparing the difference of precipitation patterns of secondary particles after thermal cycling treatment (TCT with those after normal heat treatment (NHT. No obvious differences were found in precipitation patterns of secondary particles between TCT and NHT when experimental temperature was below Ar1. However, when temperature was over Ar1, there were significant differences, with secondary particles prominently segregated at the grain boundaries under TCT, while the particles evenly distributed in the matrix under NHT. The reason for the microstructure differences could be associated with the development of non-equilibrium segregation of boron during TCT.

  6. Variable interstellar radiation fields in simulated dwarf galaxies: supernovae versus photoelectric heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Naab, Thorsten; Glover, Simon C. O.; Walch, Stefanie; Clark, Paul C.

    2017-10-01

    We present high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies including self-gravity, non-equilibrium cooling and chemistry, interstellar radiation fields (ISRF) and shielding, star formation, and stellar feedback. This includes spatially and temporally varying photoelectric (PE) heating, photoionization, resolved supernova (SN) blast waves and metal enrichment. A new flexible method to sample the stellar initial mass function allows us to follow the contribution to the ISRF, the metal output and the SN delay times of individual massive stars. We find that SNe play the dominant role in regulating the global star formation rate, shaping the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) and driving galactic outflows. Outflow rates (with mass-loading factors of a few) and hot gas fractions of the ISM increase with the number of SNe exploding in low-density environments where radiative energy losses are low. While PE heating alone can suppress star formation as efficiently as SNe alone can do, it is unable to drive outflows and reproduce the multiphase ISM that emerges naturally whenever SNe are included. We discuss the potential origins for the discrepancy between our results and another recent study that claimed that PE heating dominates over SNe. In the absence of SNe and photoionization (mechanisms to disperse dense clouds), the impact of PE heating is highly overestimated owing to the (unrealistic) proximity of dense gas to the radiation sources. This leads to a substantial boost of the infrared continuum emission from the UV-irradiated dust and a far-infrared line-to-continuum ratio too low compared to observations.

  7. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  8. Density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in PrOs4Sb12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alrub, Tayseer; Curnoe, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-relaxation rate in the unconventional superconductor PrOs4Sb12. In this material, superconductivity is best described by a three component order parameter in the triplet channel. Instead of nodes, deep dips appear in the gap function producing power law temperature dependencies at higher temperatures and exponential suppression at low temperatures of the specific heat and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate. Various experimental observations will be discussed in this context.

  9. High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerenius, Lage; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Yanjiao; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Gunnar Andersson, M; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Crustacean hemocytes were found to produce a large number of transcripts coding for Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs). A detailed study performed with the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the shrimp Penaeus monodon revealed the presence of at least 26 and 20 different Kazal domains from the hemocyte KPIs, respectively. Comparisons with KPIs from other taxa indicate that the sequences of these domains evolve rapidly. A few conserved positions, e.g. six invariant cysteines were present in all domain sequences whereas the position of P1 amino acid, a determinant for substrate specificity, varied highly. A study with a single crayfish animal suggested that even at the individual level considerable sequence variability among hemocyte KPIs produced exist. Expression analysis of four crayfish KPI transcripts in hematopoietic tissue cells and different hemocyte types suggest that some of these KPIs are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis or hemocyte release as they were produced in particular hemocyte types or maturation stages only.

  10. Site-Specific Variability in the Chemical Diversity of the Antarctic Red Alga Plocamium cartilagineum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Young

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plocamium cartilagineum is a common red alga on the benthos of Antarctica and can be a dominant understory species along the western Antarctic Peninsula. Algae from this region have been studied chemically, and like “P. cartilagineum” from other worldwide locations where it is common, it is rich in halogenated monoterpenes, some of which have been implicated as feeding deterrents toward sympatric algal predators. Secondary metabolites are highly variable in this alga, both qualitatively and quantitatively, leading us to probe individual plants to track the possible link of variability to genetic or other factors. Using cox1 and rbcL gene sequencing, we find that the Antarctic alga divides into two closely related phylogroups, but not species, each of which is further divided into one of five chemogroups. The chemogroups themselves, defined on the basis of Bray-Curtis similarity profiling of GC/QqQ chromatographic analyses, are largely site specific within a 10 km2 area. Thus, on the limited geographical range of this analysis, P. cartilagineum displays only modest genetic radiation, but its secondary metabolome was found to have experienced more extensive radiation. Such metabogenomic divergence demonstrated on the larger geographical scale of the Antarctic Peninsula, or perhaps even continent-wide, may contribute to the discovery of cryptic speciation.

  11. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  12. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published “new” WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a “gold standard” for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  13. Population-specificity of heat stress gene induction in northern and southern eelgrass Zostera marina populations under simulated global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Rauch, Gisep; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Gu, Jenny; Nelle, Peter; Fricke, Birgit; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2010-07-01

    Summer heat waves have already resulted in mortality of coastal communities, including ecologically important seagrass meadows. Gene expression studies from controlled experiments can provide important insight as to how species/genotypes react to extreme events that will increase under global warming. In a common stress garden, we exposed three populations of eelgrass, Zostera marina, to extreme sea surface temperatures, simulating the 2003-European heat wave. Populations came from locations widely differing in their thermal regime, two northern European locations [Ebeltoft (Kattegat), Doverodde (Limfjord, Baltic Sea)], and one southern population from Gabicce Mare (Adriatic Sea), allowing to test for population specificity in the response to a realistic heat stress event. Eelgrass survival and growth as well as the expression of 12 stress associated candidate genes were assessed during and after the heat wave. Contrary to expectations, all populations suffered equally from 3 weeks of heat stress in terms of shoot loss. In contrast, populations markedly differed in multivariate measures of gene expression. While the gene expression profiles converged to pre-stress values directly after the heat wave, stress correlated genes were upregulated again 4 weeks later, in line with the observed delay in shoot loss. Target genes had to be selected based on functional knowledge in terrestrial plants, nevertheless, 10/12 genes were induced relative to the control treatment at least once during the heat wave in the fully marine plant Z. marina. This study underlines the importance of realistic stress and recovery scenarios in studying the impact of predicted climate change.

  14. Three-dimensional flow of an oldroyd-B fluid with variable thermal conductivity and heat generation/absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Ali Shehzad

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the series solutions of three dimensional boundary layer flow. An Oldroyd-B fluid with variable thermal conductivity is considered. The flow is induced due to stretching of a surface. Analysis has been carried out in the presence of heat generation/absorption. Homotopy analysis is implemented in developing the series solutions to the governing flow and energy equations. Graphs are presented and discussed for various parameters of interest. Comparison of present study with the existing limiting solution is shown and examined.

  15. SEAWAT: A Computer Program for Simulation of Variable-Density Groundwater Flow and Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    SEAWAT is a MODFLOW-based computer program designed to simulate variable-density groundwater flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. The program has been used for a wide variety of groundwater studies including saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers, aquifer storage and recovery in brackish limestone aquifers, and brine migration within continental aquifers. SEAWAT is relatively easy to apply because it uses the familiar MODFLOW structure. Thus, most commonly used pre- and post-processors can be used to create datasets and visualize results. SEAWAT is a public domain computer program distributed free of charge by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  16. Variable fluid properties and variable heat flux effects on the flow and heat transfer in a non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid over an unsteady stretching sheet with slip velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. Megahed

    2013-09-01

    The effects of variable fluid properties and variable heat flux on the flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of slip velocity have been studied. The governing differential equations are transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved with a numerical technique using appropriate boundary conditions for various physical parameters. The numerical solution for the governing non-linear boundary value problem is based on applying the fourth-order Runge—Kutta method coupled with the shooting technique over the entire range of physical parameters. The effects of various parameters like the viscosity parameter, thermal conductivity parameter, unsteadiness parameter, slip velocity parameter, the Deborah number, and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  17. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: assessing variability in CT dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Olav; Li, Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-01

    The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED(adj)). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED(adj) between scanner models and across institutions. No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p = 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED(adj) that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size

  18. Effect of concurrent training on gender-specific biochemical variables and adiposity in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Barbara de Moura Mello; Christofaro, Diego Giuliano Destro; Monteiro, Paula Alves; Silveira, Loreana Sanches; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo; Mota, Jorge; Freitas Júnior, Ismael Forte

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effects of a 20-week concurrent training (20 WCT) intervention program on gender-specific body composition and metabolic variables in obese adolescents. Sample was composed of twenty-five obese adolescents, aged between 12 and 15 (13.4 ± 0.96) years. Fat-free mass (FFM), percentage trunk fat mass (TFM%) and percentage fat mass (%FM) were evaluated through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Measurement of intra-abdominal adiposity (IAAT) was performed using ultrasound. Blood pressure was measured and blood samples analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), triglycerides (TG) and plasma glucose. All participants performed the concurrent training (combination of weight training and aerobic training) three times per week, one hour per day, for 20 weeks. Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures were used to compare baseline, 10 week and 20 week moments using the Bonferroni post-hoc test. Statistical significance was set at p concurrent training. A significant increase in height was found in both the male and female groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.047, respectively), after 20 weeks of concurrent training. In addition, several modifications were observed in body composition and metabolic variables, with a significant decrease in BMI (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017), BMI z-score (p = 0.033 and p = 0.004), FM% (p = 0.002 and p = 0.002), TFM% (p = 0.009 and p = 0.018), TC (p = 0.042 and p = 0.001) and LDL-c (p = 0.006 and p = 0.001) in the male and female groups, respectively, after 20 weeks of intervention when compared with baseline. Our results identified that concurrent training was an effective intervention for treating metabolic variable and body composition disorders, in both genders, by decreasing adiposity with consequent improvement in BMI and BMI z-scores, and enhancement in lipid profile variables.

  19. Association of Hematological Variables with Team-Sport Specific Fitness Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P; Hauser, Anna; Steiner, Thomas; Wehrlin, Jon P; Rysman, Julien; Girard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    We investigated association of hematological variables with specific fitness performance in elite team-sport players. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) was measured in 25 elite field hockey players using the optimized (2 min) CO-rebreathing method. Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), hematocrit and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were analyzed in venous blood. Fitness performance evaluation included a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test (8 x 20 m sprints, 20 s of rest) and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (YYIR2). Hbmass was largely correlated (r = 0.62, PRSA-derived parameters (r ranging from -0.06 to -0.32; all P>0.05). [Hb] and MCHC displayed moderate correlations with both YYIR2TD (r = 0.44 and 0.41; both PRSA sprint decrement score (r = -0.41 and -0.44; both PRSA best and total sprint times (r = -0.46, PRSA sprint decrement score (r = -0.19, P>0.05). Hbmass is positively correlated with specific aerobic fitness, but not with RSA, in elite team-sport players. Additionally, the negative relationships between YYIR2 and RSA tests performance imply that different hematological mechanisms may be at play. Overall, these results indicate that these two fitness tests should not be used interchangeably as they reflect different hematological mechanisms.

  20. Association of Hematological Variables with Team-Sport Specific Fitness Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Brocherie

    Full Text Available We investigated association of hematological variables with specific fitness performance in elite team-sport players.Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass was measured in 25 elite field hockey players using the optimized (2 min CO-rebreathing method. Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb], hematocrit and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC were analyzed in venous blood. Fitness performance evaluation included a repeated-sprint ability (RSA test (8 x 20 m sprints, 20 s of rest and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (YYIR2.Hbmass was largely correlated (r = 0.62, P0.05. [Hb] and MCHC displayed moderate correlations with both YYIR2TD (r = 0.44 and 0.41; both P0.05.Hbmass is positively correlated with specific aerobic fitness, but not with RSA, in elite team-sport players. Additionally, the negative relationships between YYIR2 and RSA tests performance imply that different hematological mechanisms may be at play. Overall, these results indicate that these two fitness tests should not be used interchangeably as they reflect different hematological mechanisms.

  1. Effect of variable surface catalysis on heating near the stagnation point of a blunt body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.; Kolodziej, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes arc-jet data obtained on the performance of glass coated thermal protection systems in a convectively heated environment. These data confirm earlier flight and arc-jet data that show an increased surface catalysis with salt contamination and a decreased surface catalysis near the softening point temperature of the glass. In addition, surface temperature distributions along sphere-cones with abruptly changing surface catalysis were measured near the stagnation point and compared well with computations using a reacting boundary layer code.

  2. Seasonal variability of the temperature and heat fluxes in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavala Hidalgo, J.; Pares Sierra, A.; Ochoa, J. [Division de Oceanologia, CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2002-04-01

    Heat fluxes between the atmosphere and the sea surface in the Gulf of Mexico are computed using COADS climatology, bulk formulae, radiation estimations from satellite, and a numerical model. 9 W m{sup -}2 is the estimated mean surface heat flux into the ocean, this is higher than previous studies due to different bulk formulae and data sources. The annual cycle has an amplitude of 168 W m{sup -}2. The contribution of each term in the heat equation is computed, analyzed and compared to previous studies. A numerical model with thermodynamics is used to study the relative importance of heat advection and entrainment on the sea surface temperature. The results indicate that the entrainment is important in the winter cooling of surface waters. When entrainment, which depends on the buoyancy loss and the wind induced turbulent kinetic energy, is not included, temperatures in winter stay higher than observations, with a root mean square (RMS) difference from observations of 1.5 C. Including entrainment and detainment the RMS decreases to 1.0 C. [Spanish] Se estudian los flujos de calor entre la atmosfera y la superficie del mar en el Golfo de Mexico, utilizando los datos climatologicos de la base Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphera Data Set (COADS), formulas empiricas, estimaciones de la radiacion mediante satelite y con la ayuda de la modelacion numerica. Para los flujos superficiales de calor se obtuvo una media de 9 W m{sup -}2. Este valor es mas alto que el de estudios previos debido a que se utilizaron distintas fuentes de datos y formulas empiricas. Para el ciclo anual se obtuvo una amplitud de 168 W m{sup -}2. Se calcula y analiza la contribucion de cada termino en la ecuacion de calor comparando los valores obtenidos con los de estudios previos. Un modelo numerico con termodinamica es utilizado para estudiar la importancia relativa de la adveccion de calor y los flujos verticales asociados al aporte de agua de la capa intermedia a la superficial. Los resultados

  3. A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELD ON HEAT CONVECTION WITH VARIABLE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyaddin RECEBLİ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In some studies, the effect of magnetic field on heat convection has been investigated given that physical properties are constant regardless of temperature. The effect of magnetic field on heat convection and fluids whose physical properties change by temperature has been investigated in this study as physical properties of fluids change by the effect of temperature. Momentum, continuity and energy equations including electromagnetic force affecting the fluid were used in the solution. Temperatures at axial and radial directions and Nusselt numbers were calculated depending on magnetic field intensity and other physical properties of fluid by solving the equation system written in cylindrical coordinates system by means of one of the numerical methods which is finite difference method. According to results, velocity and temperature of the cooled fluid decreased following an increase in the intensity of magnetic field placed vertically to flow direction. As determined in the previous one, this study also indicated that the increase in Reynolds number increases Nusselt number, and increasing the effect of magnetic field decreases Nusselt number. The theoretical results of the present study are in conformity with the results of our previous one.

  4. Influence of a weak dc electric field on tricritical phase transition in TGSe: evidence of different specific heat behaviour on cooling and heating runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F J; Gallardo, M C; Jimenez, J; Cerro, J del [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto Ciencia Materiales Sevilla, Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, PO Box 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-11-08

    The para-ferroelectric tricritical phase transition of a single crystal of triglycine selenate (TGSe) has been studied in the neighbourhood of the transition temperature, under weak electric fields, E, using a highly sensitive calorimetric technique. The specific heat, c{sub E}, under fields in the range between 5 and 175 V cm{sup -1} and close to transition temperature (0.2 K), shows different behaviour on cooling and on heating at a temperature variation rate of {+-} 0.03 K h{sup -1}; for Theating and on cooling runs is discussed and it is concluded that data on heating correspond to the thermal equilibrium.

  5. Variability in cell response of Cronobacter sakazakii after mild-heat treatments and its impact on food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio eParra-Flores

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. have been responsible for severe infections in infants associated with consumption of powdered infant formula (PIF and follow-up formulae (FUF. Despite several risk assessments described in published studies, few approaches have considered the tremendous variability in cell response that small micropopulations or single cells can have in infant formula during storage, preparation or post process/preparation before the feeding of infants. Stochastic approaches can better describe microbial single cell response than deterministic models as we prove in this study. A large variability of lag phase was observed in single cell and micropopulations of ≤50 cells. This variability increased as the heat shock increased and growth temperature decreased. Obviously, variability of growth of individual Cronobacter sakazakii cell is affected by inoculum size, growth temperature and the probability of cells able to grow at the conditions imposed by the experimental conditions should be taken into account, especially when errors in bottle-preparation practices, such as improper holding temperatures or manipulation, may lead to growth of the pathogen to a critical cell level. The mean probability of illness from initial inoculum size of 1 cell were below 0.2 in all the cases and for inoculum size of 50 cells the mean probability of illness were, in most of the cases, was above 0.7.

  6. Physiological-metabolic variables of heat stress in cows grazing in silvopastoral systems and in one treeless prairie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Andrés Berragán-Hernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze changes of physiological and metabolic parameters as indicators of heat stress of cows in pasture systems. The research was carried out from 2011 to 2012 at the Turipaná Agricultural Research Center of Corpoica located in the Caribbean region in Cereté–Colombia. Environmental temperature (T and relative humidity (H were determined, as well as and rectal temperature (RT, skin temperature (ST, respiratory frequency (RF and the acid-basic status of animals. The variables were measured in the morning (6:00 h and in the afternoon (13:00 h. Significant Statistical differences were observed (p<0.05 in environmental temperature treatments (T with 7% and 6% less temperature in p-Arbus-Arbor y p-Arbor, respectively, compared with grass treatment. There was a significant hour effect on T and H (p<0.05 and a significant treatment-hour interaction on T (p<0.05. TP and FR showed a significant treatment-hour interaction per hour (6:00/13:00 h. The results show a positive effect of shadow from trees on the physiological variables. The negative effects observed on the physiological variables of unshaded treatments impacted in a minimal way the metabolic variables suggesting homeostatic responses in the animals under the evaluated stressful environmental conditions.

  7. Effects of Shear Dependent Viscosity and Variable Thermal Conductivity on the Flow and Heat Transfer in a Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Miao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the effects of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on the heat transfer in the pressure-driven fully developed flow of a slurry (suspension between two horizontal flat plates. The fluid is assumed to be described by a constitutive relation for a generalized second grade fluid where the shear viscosity is a function of the shear rate, temperature and concentration. The heat flux vector for the slurry is assumed to follow a generalized form of the Fourier’s equation where the thermal conductivity k depends on the temperature as well as the shear rate. We numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the non-dimensional form and perform a parametric study to see the effects of various dimensionless numbers on the velocity, volume fraction and temperature profiles. The different cases of shear thinning and thickening, and the effect of the exponent in the Reynolds viscosity model, for the temperature variation in viscosity, are also considered. The results indicate that the variable thermal conductivity can play an important role in controlling the temperature variation in the flow.

  8. A novel conditional gene silencing method using a tumor-specific and heat-inducible siRNA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Wang, Xiaoyu; Liao, Yi; Feng, Jianguo; Tang, Liling

    2016-06-01

    RNAi technology is an invaluable tool for investigating gene function. However, the non-temporal and non-spatial control is the primary limitation, which leads to siRNA leakiness and off-target effects. In this study, we inserted three kinds of HSE into tumor specific promoter hTERT, which aims to construct a temperature-inducible and tumor-specific RNAi plasmid vector. In our system, the expression of mature siRNA is tightly controlled by the heat shock-inducible and tumor-specific promoters. From the expression level of RNA and protein, we determined the efficiency of the inducible siRNA system by targeting SNCG gene in HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Results showed that the controllable siRNA system could be induced to initiate siRNA expression by heat-induce. The silencing effect of SNCG is on a relative low level (10 %) at 37 °C, while it is significantly increased to 50 or 60 % after heat inducing at 43 °C. This new conditional siRNA system provides a novel approach to drive the siRNA expression by heat-inducible and tumor-specific promoter.

  9. CHNO Energetic Polymer Specific Heat Prediction From The Proposed Nominal/Generic (N/G) CP Concept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Billingsley, James P

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the specific heat (Cp) of CHNO energetic polymers relative to their impact shock sensitivity has been documented in MICOM TR-RD-SS-95-2, AMCOM TR-KD-SS-99-8, and RDECOM TR- AMR-SS-06-09...

  10. Specific heat of Nb{sub 3}Sn: The case for a single gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Y. J., E-mail: jophy@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jian; Sung, Zu Hawn; Lee, Peter J.; Larbalestier, D. C. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The important influence of multiple gaps in the superconductivity of MgB{sub 2} and Fe-based compounds, especially because of the possibility that manipulation of a second gap can significantly raise the upper critical field H{sub c2}, has refocused attention on Nb{sub 3}Sn because anomalies in both specific heat and point-contact tunneling studies have led to the proposal that Nb{sub 3}Sn is also a two-gap superconductor. Here, we search for evidence of the second gap in a careful study of the influence of the homogenization temperature on the sample uniformity. We show that it is very difficult to fabricate samples that are both homogeneous and stoichiometric. We find so-called “second-gap” anomalies disappear only after high temperature and long-term annealing. Such a well-annealed sample shows only a strong, electron-phonon-coupled, single-gap behavior. In contrast, samples reacted and annealed at lower temperatures, as in the earlier two-gap studies, show small chemical composition variations of the A15 phase. We propose that the second gap sightings are actually due to variation of T{sub c} within very difficult-to-fully homogenize samples. A curiosity of the A15 Nb{sub 3}Sn phase is that almost any mixture of Nb and Sn tries to form a stoichiometric A15 composition, but the residue of course contains off-stoichiometric A15, Nb, and other phases when the Nb:Sn ratio departs from the true 3:1 stoichiometry.

  11. Istra district heating system. Specific technical report. Appendix 2 to the master plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    The objective of the master plan project is to improve heat supply in Istra. The considerable system losses from the fuel supplied to the end-users are one subject for improvement. At the same time, the current system operation results in poor quality heat for the consumers. Due to the inflexibility of the system, the dwellings/premises of the consumers are either overheated or insufficiently heated. The financial situation in Istra, the legal ownership of the district heating system and consumers ability to pay limit the possibilities for system improvements. The Master Plan and Feasibility Study evaluates four different development scenarios. Each of the scenarios is compared to the current situation in Istra, where nothing is done to change the system, but only to operate the present system in a sustainable way. The sustainable operation of the district heating system includes all necessary renovations and component replacements necessary. The project does not take into account the present financial situation in Istra, which has resulted in less maintenance than necessary. This situation is not a comparable parameter, as it is not sustainable and will lead to a breakdown of the heat supply within a short time horizon. (EHS)

  12. On the Interpretation of Instrumental Variables in the Presence of Specification Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A.V.B. Swamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of instrumental variables (IV and the generalized method of moments (GMM, and their applications to the estimation of errors-in-variables and simultaneous equations models in econometrics, require data on a sufficient number of instrumental variables that are both exogenous and relevant. We argue that, in general, such instruments (weak or strong cannot exist.

  13. Engineering method of calculation temperature fields and thermal stresses in the initial stage of radiation convection heating (cooling body with variable heat transfer coefficient, and the temperature of environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov A.D.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing solutions of radiant and convective heating (cooling body problems at the initial stage at unsteady heat transfer coefficients and temperatures are rather cumbersome. The purpose of this work is getting simpler dependencies. Decisions are based on the analysis of relations between the cause (heat flow and the effect (surface temperature in the initial period of heating. Two simple and effective engineering methods of calculation of unsteady temperature fields, and axial thermal stresses at the initial stage of heating (cooling of body of canonical form for both convection and radiation heat transfer at variable ambient temperature and environmental factors have been developed. Some of the solutions are generic in nature, which allows significantly reducing the number of variables and thus using the graphical method of problem solving. The formulas for calculating the bulk and central temperature in the initial stage are provided; other researchers of nonlinear heat conduction problems did not usually do this. It has been found that the axial thermal stresses are determined entirely by the heat flow on the surface. The adequacy of the developed techniques is based on five cases of calculation of heating (cooling plates under various conditions of its thermal loading. It is shown that the error in determining the surface temperature does not exceed 6%, and that the developed method can be used up to Fourier numbers Fo<0.4

  14. Sequence variability, recombination analysis, and specific detection of the W strain of Plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, Miroslav; Malinowski, Tadeusz; Predajňa, Lukáš; Pupola, Neda; Dekena, Dzintra; Michalczuk, Lech; Candresse, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, is the causal agent of Sharka, the most detrimental disease of stone-fruit trees worldwide. PPV isolates are grouped into seven distinct strains. The minor PPV-W strain was established recently for the divergent W3174 isolate found in Canada. Here, the partial or complete genomic sequences of four PPV-W isolates from Latvia have been determined. The completely sequenced isolates LV-141pl and LV-145bt share 93.1 and 92.1% nucleotide identity, respectively, with isolate W3174, with two regions of higher (>20%) divergence in the P1/HC-Pro and NIa (VPg) regions. Further analyses demonstrated that these two regions correspond to two independent recombination events in the W3174 genome, one involving PPV-M (approximate genome positions 692 to 1424) and the other PPV-D (nucleotides 5672 to 5789). The LV-141pl and LV-145bt isolates appear to be representatives of the "ancestral" PPV-W strain, not affected by recombination. The PPV-W intrastrain variability is substantially higher than that of all other PPV strains, with potential implications for the serological detection of PPV-W isolates. A PPV-W-specific primer pair has been developed, allowing the specific reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction detection of all five presently available W isolates. The characterization of these new PPV-W isolates sheds light on PPV-W evolutionary history, further supports the hypothesis of its East-European origin, and opens the way for the biological and epidemiological characterization of this poorly known PPV strain.

  15. Correlation between maximum isometric strength variables and specific performance of Brazilian military judokas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Moraes Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It was our objective to correlate specific performance in the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT and the maximum isometric handgrip (HGSMax, scapular traction (STSMax and lumbar traction (LTSMax strength tests in military judo athletes. Twenty-two military athletes from the judo team of the Brazilian Navy Almirante Alexandrino Instruction Centre, with average age of 26.14 ± 3.31 years old, and average body mass of 83.23 ± 14.14 kg participated in the study. Electronic dynamometry tests for HGSMax, STSMax and LTSMax were conducted. Then, after approximately 1 hour-interval, the SJFT protocol was applied. All variables were adjusted to the body mass of the athletes. Pearson correlation coefficient for statistical analysis was used. The results showed moderate negative correlation between the SJFT index and STSMax (r= -0.550, p= 0.008, strong negative correlations between the SJFT index and HGSMax (r= -0.706, p< 0.001, SJFT index and LTSMax (r= -0.721; p= 0.001, besides the correlation between the sum of the three maximum isometric strength tests and the SJFT index (r= -0.786, p< 0.001. This study concludes that negative correlations occur between the SJFT index and maximum isometric handgrip, shoulder and lumbar traction strength and the sum of the three maximum isometric strength tests in military judokas.

  16. Laser heat hyperalgesia is not a feature of non-specific chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Ritter, A; Puta, C; Nötzel, D; Miltner, W H R; Weiss, T

    2014-11-01

    Based upon studies using mechanical pin-prick, pressure, electrical or heat stimuli applied to painful and/or pain-free parts of the body, chronic low back pain (CLBP) has been shown to be associated with generalized and enhanced pain sensitivity and altered brain responses to noxious stimuli. To date, no study examined the processing of noxious laser heat pulses, which are known to selectively excite thermal nociceptors located in the superficial skin layers, in CLBP. We studied laser heat pain thresholds (LHPTs) and nociceptive laser-evoked brain electrical potentials (LEPs) following skin stimulation of the pain-affected back and the pain-free abdomen using noxious laser heat stimulation in 16 CLBP patients and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs). We observed no statistically significant differences in LHPTs between CLBP patients and HCs, neither on the back nor on the abdomen. Furthermore, we found no evidence for altered brain responses between CLBP patients and HCs in response to stimulation of the back and abdomen in single-trial latencies and amplitudes of LEP components (N2, P2). The results are in contrast to previous studies showing hypersensitivity to different experimental noxious stimuli (e.g., contact heat). We argue that these discrepancies may be due to low spatial and temporal summation within the central nervous system following laser heat stimulation. Our results indicate important methodological differences between laser heat and thermode stimulation that should be taken into account when interpreting results, such as from thermal quantitative sensory testing. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  17. The spatial variability of air temperature and nocturnal urban heat island intensity in the city of Brno, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovolný Petr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to quantify the effects of a number of factors on the nocturnal air temperature field in a medium-sized central European city located in complex terrain. The main data sources consist of mobile air temperature measurements and a geographical database. Temperature measurements were taken along several profiles through the city centre and were made under a clear sky with no advection. Altogether nine sets of detailed measurements, in all seasons, were assembled. Altitude, quantity of vegetation, density of buildings and the structure of the transportation (road system were considered as explanatory variables. The result is that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the density of buildings were the most important factors, each of them explaining a substantial part (more than 50% of overall air temperature variability. Mobile measurements with NDVI values as a covariate were used for interpolation of air temperature for the entire study area. The spatial variability of nocturnal air temperature and UHI intensity in Brno is the main output presented. Air temperatures interpolated from mobile measurements and NDVI values indicate that the mean urban heat island (UHI intensity in the early night in summer is at its highest (approximately 5 °C in the city centre and decreases towards the suburban areas.

  18. Prediction of persistent post-operative pain: Pain-specific psychological variables compared with acute post-operative pain and general psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn-Hofmann, C; Scheel, J; Dimova, V; Parthum, A; Carbon, R; Griessinger, N; Sittl, R; Lautenbacher, S

    2018-01-01

    Psychological variables and acute post-operative pain are of proven relevance for the prediction of persistent post-operative pain. We aimed at investigating whether pain-specific psychological variables like pain catastrophizing add to the predictive power of acute pain and more general psychological variables like depression. In all, 104 young male patients undergoing thoracic surgery for pectus excavatum correction were studied on the pre-operative day (T0) and 1 week (T1) and 3 months (T2) after surgery. They provided self-report ratings (pain-related: Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale = PASS, Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire = PVAQ; general psychological: Screening for Somatoform Symptoms, State-Anxiety Inventory-X1, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale = CES-D). Additional predictors (T1) as well as criterion variables (T2) were pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale) and pain disability (Pain Disability Index). Three months after surgery, 25% of the patients still reported clinically relevant pain (pain intensity ≥3) and over 50% still reported pain-related disability. Acute post-operative pain as well as general psychological variables did not allow for a significant prediction of persistent post-operative pain; in contrast, pain-related psychological variables did. The best single predictors were PASS for pain intensity and PVAQ for pain disability. Pain-related psychological variables derived from the fear-avoidance model contributed significantly to the prediction of persistent post-operative pain. The best possible compilation of these measures requires further research. More general psychological variables may become relevant predictors later in the medical history. Our results suggest that pain-specific psychological variables such as pain anxiety and pain hypervigilance add significantly to the prediction of persistent post-operative pain and might even outperform established predictors such as

  19. Analysis of Cattaneo-Christov heat and mass fluxes in the squeezed flow embedded in porous medium with variable mass diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farooq

    Full Text Available This research article investigates the squeezing flow of Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity over a stretchable sheet inserted in Darcy porous medium. Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion models are implemented to scrutinize the characteristics of heat and mass transfer via variable thermal conductivity and variable mass diffusivity. These models are the modification of conventional laws of Fourier’s and Fick’s via thermal and solutal relaxation times respectively. The homotopy analysis Method (HAM is being utilized to provide the solution of highly nonlinear system of coupled partial differential equations after converted into dimensionless governing equations. The behavior of flow parameters on velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions are sketched and analyzed physically. The result indicates that both concentration and temperature distributions decay for higher solutal and thermal relaxation parameters respectively. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Porous medium, Variable viscosity, Cattaneo-Christov heat and mass flux models, Variable thermal conductivity, Variable mass diffusivity

  20. Occupational exposure in small and medium scale industry with specific reference to heat and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakhwinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arvind; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess heat and noise exposure and occupational safety practices in small and medium scale casting and forging units (SMEs) of Northern India. We conducted personal interviews of 350 male workers of these units through a comprehensive questionnaire and collected information on heat and noise exposure, use of protective equipment, sweat loss and water intake, working hour. The ambient wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT index) was measured using quest temp 34/36o area heat stress monitor. A-weighted Leq ambient noise was measured using a quest sound level meter "ANSI SI. 43-1997 (R 2002) type-1 model SOUNDPRO SE/DL". We also incorporated OSHA norms for hearing conservation which include - an exchange rate of 5dB(A), criterion level at 90dB(A), criterion time of eight hours, threshold level is equal to 80dB(A), upper limit is equal to 140dB(A) and with F/S response rate. Results of the study revealed that occupational heat exposure in melting, casting, forging and punching sections is high compared to ACGIH/NIOSH norms. Ambience noise in various sections like casting / molding, drop forging, cutting presses, punching, grinding and barreling process was found to be more than 90dB(A). About 95% of the workers suffered speech interference where as high noise annoyance was reported by only 20%. Overall, 68% workers were not using any personal protective equipment (PPE). The study concluded that the proportion of SME workers exposed to high level heat stress and noise (60 - 72 hrs/week) is high. The workers engaged in forging and grinding sections are more prone to noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) at higher frequencies as compared to workers of other sections. It is recommended that there is a strong need to implement the standard of working hours as well as heat stress and noise control measures.

  1. Occupational exposure in small and medium scale industry with specific reference to heat and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhwinder Pal Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to assess heat and noise exposure and occupational safety practices in small and medium scale casting and forging units (SMEs of Northern India. We conducted personal interviews of 350 male workers of these units through a comprehensive questionnaire and collected information on heat and noise exposure, use of protective equipment, sweat loss and water intake, working hour. The ambient wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT index was measured using quest temp 34/36o area heat stress monitor. A-weighted Leq ambient noise was measured using a quest sound level meter "ANSI SI. 43-1997 (R 2002 type-1 model SOUNDPRO SE/DL". We also incorporated OSHA norms for hearing conservation which include - an exchange rate of 5dB(A, criterion level at 90dB(A, criterion time of eight hours, threshold level is equal to 80dB(A, upper limit is equal to 140dB(A and with F/S response rate. Results of the study revealed that occupational heat exposure in melting, casting, forging and punching sections is high compared to ACGIH/NIOSH norms. Ambience noise in various sections like casting / molding, drop forging, cutting presses, punching, grinding and barreling process was found to be more than 90dB(A. About 95% of the workers suffered speech interference where as high noise annoyance was reported by only 20%. Overall, 68% workers were not using any personal protective equipment (PPE. The study concluded that the proportion of SME workers exposed to high level heat stress and noise (60 - 72 hrs/week is high. The workers engaged in forging and grinding sections are more prone to noise induced hearing loss (NIHL at higher frequencies as compared to workers of other sections. It is recommended that there is a strong need to implement the standard of working hours as well as heat stress and noise control measures.

  2. Investigations of temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and specific heat capacity of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eser, Erhan, E-mail: eserphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Polatlı Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, Polatlı, Ankara (Turkey); Koç, Hüseyin [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Muş Alparslan University, Muş (Turkey)

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we calculated the electrical resistivity and heat capacities of some ideal metals (Cu, Pt, and Pd) using a method that it employs the statistical model and Debye functions. The method is used to provide a simple and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. The results obtained for the electrical resistivity and heat capacity have been compared with the results in literature. The results obtained at low temperature are in excellent agreement with experimental and theoretical results. Finally the used approximation and analytical method are a useful approach to calculate thermophysical properties of metals.

  3. Comparing measured and modelled soil carbon: which site-specific variables are linked to high stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Schipanski, Meagan; Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; McNamara, Niall; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Changes in soil carbon (C) stocks have been studied in depth over the last two decades, as net greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks are highlighted to be a partial solution to the causes of climate change. However, the stability of this soil C is often overlooked when measuring these changes. Ultimately a net sequestration in soils is far less beneficial if labile C is replacing more stable forms. To date there is no accepted framework for measuring soil C stability, and as a result there is considerable uncertainty associated with the simulated impacts of land management and land use change when using process-based systems models. However, a recent effort to equate measurable soil C fractions to model pools has generated data that help to assess the impacts of land management, and can ultimately help to reduce the uncertainty of model predictions. Our research compiles this existing fractionation data along with site metadata to create a simplistic statistical model able to quantify the relative importance of different site-specific conditions. Data was mined from 23 published studies and combined with original data to generate a dataset of 100+ land use change sites across Europe. For sites to be included they required soil C fractions isolated using the Zimmermann et al. (2007) method and specific site metadata (mean annual precipitation, MAP; mean annual temperature, MAT; soil pH; land use; altitude). Of the sites, 75% were used to develop a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to create coefficients where site parameters can be used to predict influence on the measured soil fraction C stocks. The remaining 25% of sites were used to evaluate uncertainty and validate this empirical model. Further, four of the aforementioned sites were used to simulate soil C dynamics using the RothC, DayCent and RZWQM2 models. A sensitivity analysis (4096 model runs for each variable applying Latin hypercube random sampling techniques) was then used to observe whether these models place

  4. Evaluation of heat stress response in crossbred dairy cows under tropical climate by analysis of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bun, Chan; Watanabe, Youki; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Inoue, Naoko; Ieda, Nahoko; Matsuda, Fuko; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Ohkura, Satoshi; Pheng, Vutha

    2017-12-11

    The present study aims to examine the effect of tropical temperatures on autonomic nervous activity in Cambodian dairy cattle by analyzing heart rate variability (HRV). Holter-type electrocardiograms were recorded in adult crossbred cows (Cambodian native × Holstein) either in a sheltered area or under direct sunlight. Rectal temperatures and heart rates increased in animals under direct sunlight as compared to those in the shelter. The power spectral analysis of HRV revealed that three out of the five cows studied underwent a decrease in parasympathetic nervous activity under direct sunlight with the remaining two cows showing no apparent change. The HRV analysis would prove to be a useful tool to reveal information about heat tolerance in dairy cows.

  5. Physical effect of a variable magnetic field on the heat transfer of a nanofluid-based concentrating parabolic solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahari, M.; Ghorbanian, A.; Hatami, M.; Jing, D.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the physical effect of a variable magnetic field on a nanofluid-based concentrating parabolic solar collector (NCPSC) is demonstrated. A section of reservoir is modeled as a semi-circular cavity under the solar radiation with the magnetic source located in the center or out of the cavity and the governing equations were solved by the FlexPDE numerical software. The effect of four physical parameters, i.e., Hartmann Number (Ha), nanoparticles volume fraction ( φ, magnetic field strength ( γ and magnetic source location ( b, on the Nusselt number is discussed. To find the interaction of these parameters and its effect on the heat transfer, a central composite design (CCD) is used and analysis is performed on the 25 experiments proposed by CCD. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the results reveals that increasing the Hartmann number decreases the Nusselt number due to the Lorentz force resulting from the presence of stronger magnetic field.

  6. Transgenerational effects of mild heat in Arabidopsis thaliana show strong genotype specificity that is explained by climate at origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Maartje P; Kubisch, Alexander; Ouborg, N Joop; Pagel, Jörn; Schmid, Karl J; Vergeer, Philippine; Lampei, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Transgenerational environmental effects can trigger strong phenotypic variation. However, it is unclear how cues from different preceding generations interact. Also, little is known about the genetic variation for these life history traits. Here, we present the effects of grandparental and parental mild heat, and their combination, on four traits of the third-generation phenotype of 14 Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. We tested for correlations of these effects with climate and constructed a conceptual model to identify the environmental conditions that favour the parental effect on flowering time. We observed strong evidence for genotype-specific transgenerational effects. On average, A. thaliana accustomed to mild heat produced more seeds after two generations. Parental effects overruled grandparental effects in all traits except reproductive biomass. Flowering was generally accelerated by all transgenerational effects. Notably, the parental effect triggered earliest flowering in genotypes adapted to dry summers. Accordingly, this parental effect was favoured in the model when early summer heat terminated the growing season and environments were correlated across generations. Our results suggest that A. thaliana can partly accustom to mild heat over two generations and genotype-specific parental effects show non-random evolutionary divergence across populations that may support climate change adaptation in the Mediterranean. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. A modified variable physical properties model, for analyzing nanofluids flow and heat transfer over nonlinearly stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooria Akbarzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of laminar nanofluid flow which results from the nonlinear stretching of a flat sheet is investigated numerically. In this paper, a modified variable physical properties model for analyzing nanofluids flow and heat transfer is introduced. In this model, the effective viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity of the solid-liquid mixture (nanofluids which are commonly utilized in the homogenous single-phase model, are locally combined with the prevalent single-phase model. A numerical similarity solution is considered which depends on the local Prandtl number, local Brownian motion number, local Lewis number, and local thermophoresis number. The results are compared to the prevalent single-phase model. This comparison depicts that the prevalent single-phase model has a considerable deviation for predicting the behavior of nanofluids flow especially in dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction. In addition the effect of the governing parameters such as Prandtl number, the Brownian motion number, the thermophoresis parameter, the Lewis number, and etc. on the velocity, temperature, and volume fraction distribution and the dimensionless heat and mass transfer rates are examined.

  8. Determination of the Specific Heat Ratio of a Gas in a Plastic Syringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The rapid compression or expansion of a gas in a plastic syringe is a poor approximation of an adiabatic process. Heat exchange with the walls of the syringe brings the gas to equilibrium in an amount of time that is not significantly greater than the length of the compression or expansion itself. Despite this limitation, it is still possible to…

  9. Order parameter anisotropy of MgB2 using specific heat jump of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recently obtained analytical result [1] for renormalization of the jump of the heat capacity (S-N)/N by anisotropy of the order parameter is applied to the layered superconductors. The graph of (S-N)/N vs. the anisotropy of the order parameter allows a direct determination of the gap anisotropy in MgB2 using ...

  10. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. [Space heating energy demand modeling; Program HEATLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Johnson, G.R.; Somervell, W.L. Jr.; Sparling, E.W.; Dreiseitly, E.; Macdonald, B.C.; McGuirk, J.P.; Starr, A.M.

    1976-11-01

    Research conducted between 1 July 1975 and 31 October 1976 is reported. A ''physical-adaptive'' model of the space-conditioning demand for energy and its response to changes in weather regimes was developed. This model includes parameters pertaining to engineering factors of building construction, to weather-related factors, and to socio-economic factors. Preliminary testing of several components of the model on the city of Greeley, Colorado, yielded most encouraging results. Other components, especially those pertaining to socio-economic factors, are still under development. Expansion of model applications to different types of structures and larger regions is presently underway. A CRT-display model for energy demand within the conterminous United States also has passed preliminary tests. A major effort was expended to obtain disaggregated data on energy use from utility companies throughout the United States. The study of atmospheric variability revealed that the 22- to 26-day vacillation in the potential and kinetic energy modes of the Northern Hemisphere is related to the behavior of the planetary long-waves, and that the midwinter dip in zonal available potential energy is reflected in the development of blocking highs. Attempts to classify weather patterns over the eastern and central United States have proceeded satisfactorily to the point where testing of our method for longer time periods appears desirable.

  11. Evaluation of heat transfer mathematical models and multiple linear regression to predict the inside variables in semi-solar greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Taki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Controlling greenhouse microclimate not only influences the growth of plants, but also is critical in the spread of diseases inside the greenhouse. The microclimate parameters were inside air, greenhouse roof and soil temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation intensity. Predicting the microclimate conditions inside a greenhouse and enabling the use of automatic control systems are the two main objectives of greenhouse climate model. The microclimate inside a greenhouse can be predicted by conducting experiments or by using simulation. Static and dynamic models are used for this purpose as a function of the metrological conditions and the parameters of the greenhouse components. Some works were done in past to 2015 year to simulation and predict the inside variables in different greenhouse structures. Usually simulation has a lot of problems to predict the inside climate of greenhouse and the error of simulation is higher in literature. The main objective of this paper is comparison between heat transfer and regression models to evaluate them to predict inside air and roof temperature in a semi-solar greenhouse in Tabriz University. Materials and Methods In this study, a semi-solar greenhouse was designed and constructed at the North-West of Iran in Azerbaijan Province (geographical location of 38°10′ N and 46°18′ E with elevation of 1364 m above the sea level. In this research, shape and orientation of the greenhouse, selected between some greenhouses common shapes and according to receive maximum solar radiation whole the year. Also internal thermal screen and cement north wall was used to store and prevent of heat lost during the cold period of year. So we called this structure, ‘semi-solar’ greenhouse. It was covered with glass (4 mm thickness. It occupies a surface of approximately 15.36 m2 and 26.4 m3. The orientation of this greenhouse was East–West and perpendicular to the direction of the wind prevailing

  12. The calculation of high-temperature equilibrium and nonequilibrium specific heat data for N2, O2 and NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Specific heat data for high-temperature air species are needed to compute the temperature and enthalpy of gas mixtures in aerothermodynamics flowfield calculations. Accurate data are known only for temperatures under 6000 K, but are required for temperatures exceeding 25,000 K. In the present study, CP data are computed for N2, O2 and NO. The calculations are based on summations over all the vibration-rotation energy levels for all known bound electronic states. Estimates are made for the error introduced by the neglect of possible additional high-lying electronic states. In addition, a scheme for the partitioning of the internal energy into vibrational, rotational and electronic contributions is presented which consistently accounts for the nonseparable nature of the various energy modes. The multitemperature specific heat data are recommended for use in nonequilibrium flowfield models.

  13. The specific heat of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overend, N.; Howson, M.A. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Abell, S. [Universities of Birmingham and Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The specific heat of twinned and detwinned single crystal samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} have been measured with magnetic fields up to 8 tesla applied parallel to the c-axes of the crystals. The samples measured had transition temperatures around 90K and transition widths from 0.3 K to 2 K. The data exhibits scaling behaviour characteristic of the 3-dimensional X-Y model with critical exponents consistent with those observed in superfluid {sup 4}He. The authors then compare the scaling properties of the specific heat in the different samples and look for the {open_quote}universal{close_quote} nature of the scaling function.

  14. Bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds in copepods: environmental triggers and sources of intra-specific variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarese, H. E.; García, P.; Diéguez, M. D.; Ferraro, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature are two globally important abiotic factors affecting freshwater ecosystems. Planktonic organisms have developed a battery of counteracting mechanisms to minimize the risk of being damaged by UVR, which respond to three basic principles: avoid, protect, repair. Copepods are among the most successful zooplankton groups. They are highly adaptable animals, capable of displaying flexible behaviors, physiologies, and life strategies. In particular, they are well equipped to cope with harmful UVR. Their arsenal includes vertical migration, accumulation of photoprotective compounds, and photorepair. The preference for a particular strategy is affected by a plethora of environmental (extrinsic) parameters, such as the existence of a depth refuge, the risk of visual predation, and temperature. Temperature modifies the environment (e.g. the lake thermal structure), and animal metabolism (e.g., swimming speed, bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds). In addition, the relative weight of UVR-coping strategies is also influenced by the organism (intrinsic) characteristics (e.g., inter- and intra-specific variability). The UV absorbing compounds, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), are widely distributed among freshwater copepods. Animals are unable to synthesize MAAs, and therefore depend on external sources for accumulating these compounds. Although copepods may acquire MAAs from their food, for the few centropagic species investigated so far, the main source of MAAs are microbial (most likely prokaryotic) organisms living in close association with the copepods. Boeckella gracilipes is a common centropagic copepod in Patagonian lakes. We suspected that its occurrence in different types of lakes, hydrologically unconnected, but within close geographical proximity, could have resulted in different microbial-copepod associations (i.e., different MAAs sources) that could translate into intra-specific differences in the accumulation

  15. Variability in Heat Strain in Fully Encapsulated Impermeable Suits in Different Climates and at Different Work Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenHartog, Emiel A; Rubenstein, Candace D; Deaton, A Shawn; Bogerd, Cornelis Peter

    2017-03-01

    A major concern for responders to hazardous materials (HazMat) incidents is the heat strain that is caused by fully encapsulated impermeable (NFPA 1991) suits. In a research project, funded by the US Department of Defense, the thermal strain experienced when wearing these suits was studied. Forty human subjects between the ages of 25 and 50 participated in a protocol approved by the local ethical committee. Six different fully encapsulated impermeable HazMat suits were evaluated in three climates: moderate (24°C, 50% RH, 20°C WBGT), warm-wet (32°C, 60% RH, 30°C WBGT), and hot-dry (45°C, 20% RH, 37°C WBGT, 200 W m-2 radiant load) and at three walking speeds: 2.5, 4, and 5.5 km h-1. The medium speed, 4 km h-1, was tested in all three climates and the other two walking speeds were only tested in the moderate climate. Prior to the test a submaximal exercise test in normal clothing was performed to determine a relationship between heart rate and oxygen consumption (pretest). In total, 163 exposures were measured. Tolerance time ranged from as low as 20 min in the hot-dry condition to 60 min (the maximum) in the moderate climate, especially common at the lowest walking speed. Between the six difference suits limited differences were found, a two-layered aluminized suit exhibited significant shorter tolerance times in the moderate climate, but no other major significant differences were found for the other climates or workloads. An important characteristic of the overall dataset is the large variability between the subjects. Although the average responses seem suitable to be predicted, the variability in the warmer strain conditions ranged from 20 min up to 60 min. The work load in these encapsulated impermeable suits was also significantly higher than working in normal clothing and higher than predicted by the Pandolf equation. Heart rate showed a very strong correlation to body core temperature and was in many cases the limiting factor. Setting the heart rate

  16. A study on specific heat capacities of Li-ion cell components and their influence on thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loges, André; Herberger, Sabrina; Seegert, Philipp; Wetzel, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Thermal models of Li-ion cells on various geometrical scales and with various complexity have been developed in the past to account for the temperature dependent behaviour of Li-ion cells. These models require accurate data on thermal material properties to offer reliable validation and interpretation of the results. In this context a thorough study on the specific heat capacities of Li-ion cells starting from raw materials and electrode coatings to representative unit cells of jelly rolls/electrode stacks with lumped values was conducted. The specific heat capacity is reported as a function of temperature and state of charge (SOC). Seven Li-ion cells from different manufactures with different cell chemistry, application and design were considered and generally applicable correlations were developed. A 2D thermal model of an automotive Li-ion cell for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) application illustrates the influence of specific heat capacity on the effectivity of cooling concepts and the temperature development of Li-ion cells.

  17. Specific heat of REBaSrCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} compounds (R=Nd, Sm, Dy, Er)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarnawski, Z. [Academy of Min. and Metall., Cracow (Poland). Solid State Phys. Dept.]|[Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Wang, X.Z. [Johannes Keppler Univ., Linz (Austria). Angewandte Physik; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H. [Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Center for Solid State Physics]|[Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Radwanski, R.J. [Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Center for Solid State Physics]|[Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Franse, J.J.M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.

    1996-05-01

    Specific heat measurements have been performed on polycrystalline REBaSrCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (R=Nd, Sm, Dy, Er) in the temperature range from 0.3 to 3 K. Antiferromagnetic order is indicated by the {lambda}-type peak in the specific heat at 1.2 and 0.6 K for Dy and Er compounds, respectively, whereas only a broad anomaly around 0.6 K is observed for Nd and Sm compounds. The specific heat data for Nd and Sm compounds are well fit with a Schottky-type anomaly with an energy splitting of 1.4 K, indicating the existence of an internal field of 2.42 T at the RE site. The magnetic singlet ground state of ErBaSrCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and DyBaSrCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} is produ ced by exchange interactions of -0.05 and -0.035 T f.u./{mu}{sub B}, respectively. (orig.).

  18. Experimental study on density, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and viscosity of water-ethylene glycol mixture dispersed with carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganeshkumar Jayabalan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the effect of adding multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT in water – ethylene glycol mixture on density and various thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat and viscosity. Density of nanofluids was measured using standard volumetric flask method and the data showed a good agreement with the mixing theory. The maximum thermal conductivity enhancement of 11 % was noticed for the nanofluids with 0.9 wt. %. Due to lower specific heat of the MWCNT, the specific heat of the nanofluids decreased in proportion with the MWCNT concentration. The rheological analysis showed that the transition region from shear thinning to Newtonian extended to the higher shear stress range compared to that of base fluids. Viscosity ratio of the nanofluids augmented anomalously with respect to increase in temperature and about 2.25 fold increase was observed in the temperature range of 30 – 40 ˚C. The modified model of Maron and Pierce predicted the viscosity of the nanofluids with the inclusion of effect of aspect ratio of MWCNT and nanoparticle aggregates.

  19. The determination of values of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials used in track bed structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The report concentrates on the determination of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials (liapor, styrodur, foam concrete. The aim of the report is to gain the necessary input parameters for the numerical modelling of the temperature changes of various track bed structures of the railway line where a part or, if appropriate, the whole protective layer is replaced by the material with better thermal insulation properties. There are described the methods for stating the specific heat capacity as well as the calibration of the calorimeter for stating of the calorimetric constant in the introduction of the report. The parameters needed for calculation of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials are characterized in the second part of the report. There are also introduced the laboratory stated values of the parameter in question. The comparison of the values stated by the laboratory measurements with the values introduced in the technical data sheets from their producers (or if appropriate gained from the foreign sources is made in the conclusion of the report.

  20. Variable rate application of nematicides on cotton fields: a promising site-specific management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Brenda V; Perry, Calvin; Sullivan, Dana; Lu, Ping; Kemerait, Robert; Davis, Richard F; Smith, Amanda; Vellidis, George; Nichols, Robert

    2012-03-01

    specific application of nematicides based on management zones, although this approach might not be economically beneficial in fields with little variability in soil texture.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis-specific...

  2. Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, O.L.

    1980-03-18

    This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

  3. Specific Aspects Regarding Coupled Numerical Modeling of Inverter and Load Equipments in an Induction Heating Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu MICH-VANCEA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The most propitious projection of inductiveelectrothermic installation requires a deep study ofcoupled electrothermic and circuits problems; thereforethe present paper follows the same line. Research inspecific literature have emphasized that induction heatinghas a much higher efficiency if the supply of the charge(inductor – piece is done at frequencies other thatindustrial one. [1]. Due to material alter depending ontemperature and, implicitly, the variation of the electricalparameters of the heating installation it is necessary totackle the projection of these inductive electrothermicinstallation projected through coupled numericalmodeling of the inverter circuit and of the heatingthrough induction process. The paper presents thenumerical modeling of the continuous current –alternating current conversion bridge (inverter withelements of static switch – over, the type of commandsignal (PWM of elements of static switch of power, thenumerical modeling of the heating throughelectromagnetic induction process and aspects ofcorrelation regarding the functioning/ working of theinstallation depending on the parameters of the load. Theparameters get modified due to material alter dependingon temperature during the heating process.

  4. 16 kDa heat shock protein from heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a homodimer - suitability for diagnostic applications with specific llama VHH monoclonals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh K; Ruigrok, Vincent J B; Thompson, Natalie J; Trilling, Anke K; Heck, Albert J R; van Rijn, Cees; Beekwilder, Jules; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2013-01-01

    The 16 kDa heat shock protein (HSP) is an immuno-dominant antigen, used in diagnosis of infectious Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.) causing tuberculosis (TB). Its use in serum-based diagnostics is limited, but for the direct identification of M.tb. bacteria in sputum or cultures it may represent a useful tool. Recently, a broad set of twelve 16 kDa specific heavy chain llama antibodies (VHH) has been isolated, and their utility for diagnostic applications was explored. To identify the epitopes recognized by the nine (randomly selected from a set of twelve 16 kDa specific VHH antibodies) distinct VHH antibodies, 14 overlapping linear epitopes (each 20 amino acid long) were characterized using direct and sandwich ELISA techniques. Seven out of 14 epitopes were recognized by 8 out of 9 VHH antibodies. The two highest affinity binders B-F10 and A-23 were found to bind distinct epitopes. Sandwich ELISA and SPR experiments showed that only B-F10 was suitable as secondary antibody with both B-F10 and A-23 as anchoring antibodies. To explain this behavior, the epitopes were matched to the putative 3D structure model. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine the higher order conformation. A homodimer model best explained the differential immunological reactivity of A-23 and B-F10 against heat-treated M.tb. lysates. The concentrations of secreted antigens of M.tb. in sputum are too low for immunological detection and existing kits are only used for identifying M.tb. in cultures. Here we describe how specific combinations of VHH domains could be used to detect the intracellular HSP antigen. Linked to methods of pre-concentrating M.tb. cells prior to lysis, HSP detection may enable the development of protein-based diagnostics of sputum samples and earlier diagnosis of diseases.

  5. Heat wave phenomenon in southern Slovakia: long-term changes and variability of daily maximum air temperature in Hurbanovo within the 1901-2009 period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, J.; Výberči, D.; Jarošová, M.; Å¥Astný, P. Å.

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of long-term changes and temporal variability of heat waves incidence in the region of southern Slovakia within the 1901-2009 periods is a goal of the presented contribution. It is expected that climate change in terms of global warming would amplify temporal frequency and spatial extension of extreme heat wave incidence in region of central Europe in the next few decades. The frequency of occurrence and amplitude of heat waves may be impacted by changes in the temperature regime. Heat waves can cause severe thermal environmental stress leading to higher hospital admission rates, health complications, and increased mortality. These effects arise because of one or more meteorology-related factors such as higher effective temperatures, sunshine, more consecutive hot days and nights, stagnation, increased humidity, increased pollutant emissions, and accelerated photochemical smog and particulate formation. Heat waves bring about higher temperatures, increased solar heating of buildings, inhibited ventilation, and a larger number of consecutive warm days and nights. All of these effects increase the thermal loads on buildings, reduce their ability to cool down, and increase indoor temperatures. The paper is focused to analysis of long-term and inter-decadal temporal variability of heat waves occurrence at meteorological station Hurbanovo (time-series of daily maximum air temperature available from at least 1901). We can characterize the heat waves by its magnitude and duration, hence both of these characteristics need to be investigated together using sophisticated statistical methods developed particularly for the analysis of extreme hydrological events. We investigated particular heat wave periods either from the severity point of view using HWI index. In the paper we also present the results of statistical analysis of daily maximum air temperature within 1901-2009 period. Apart from these investigation efforts we also focused on synoptic causes of heat wave

  6. Food Legumes and Rising Temperatures: Effects, Adaptive Functional Mechanisms Specific to Reproductive Growth Stage and Strategies to Improve Heat Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Sita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperatures are predicted to rise in the future owing to several reasons associated with global climate changes. These temperature increases can result in heat stress- a severe threat to crop production in most countries. Legumes are well-known for their impact on agricultural sustainability as well as their nutritional and health benefits. Heat stress imposes challenges for legume crops and has deleterious effects on the morphology, physiology, and reproductive growth of plants. High-temperature stress at the time of the reproductive stage is becoming a severe limitation for production of grain legumes as their cultivation expands to warmer environments and temperature variability increases due to climate change. The reproductive period is vital in the life cycle of all plants and is susceptible to high-temperature stress as various metabolic processes are adversely impacted during this phase, which reduces crop yield. Food legumes exposed to high-temperature stress during reproduction show flower abortion, pollen and ovule infertility, impaired fertilization, and reduced seed filling, leading to smaller seeds and poor yields. Through various breeding techniques, heat tolerance in major legumes can be enhanced to improve performance in the field. Omics approaches unravel different mechanisms underlying thermotolerance, which is imperative to understand the processes of molecular responses toward high-temperature stress.

  7. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willa, K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Diao, Z. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Laboratory of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Halmstad University, P.O. Box 823, SE-301 18 Halmstad, Sweden; Campanini, D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Welp, U. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Divan, R. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Hudl, M. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Islam, Z. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Kwok, W. -K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Rydh, A. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-delta crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  8. The combined effect of salinity and heat reveals a specific physiological, biochemical and molecular response in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Rosa M; Mestre, Teresa C; Mittler, Ron; Rubio, Francisco; Garcia-Sanchez, Francisco; Martinez, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have described the response mechanisms of plants to salinity and heat applied individually; however, under field conditions some abiotic stresses often occur simultaneously. Recent studies revealed that the response of plants to a combination of two different stresses is specific and cannot be deduced from the stresses applied individually. Here, we report on the response of tomato plants to a combination of heat and salt stress. Interestingly, and in contrast to the expected negative effect of the stress combination on plant growth, our results show that the combination of heat and salinity provides a significant level of protection to tomato plants from the effects of salinity. We observed a specific response of plants to the stress combination that included accumulation of glycine betaine and trehalose. The accumulation of these compounds under the stress combination was linked to the maintenance of a high K(+) concentration and thus a lower Na(+) /K(+) ratio, with a better performance of the cell water status and photosynthesis as compared with salinity alone. Our findings unravel new and unexpected aspects of the response of plants to stress combination and provide a proposed list of enzymatic targets for improving crop tolerance to the abiotic field environment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  10. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Conductivity and Specific Heat in a Single TDTR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fangyuan; Wang, Xinwei; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Tang, Dawei

    2018-01-01

    Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) technique is a powerful thermal property measurement method, especially for nano-structures and material interfaces. Thermal properties can be obtained by fitting TDTR experimental data with a proper thermal transport model. In a single TDTR experiment, thermal properties with different sensitivity trends can be extracted simultaneously. However, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity usually have similar trends in sensitivity for most materials; it is difficult to measure them simultaneously. In this work, we present a two-step data fitting method to measure the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity simultaneously from a set of TDTR experimental data at single modulation frequency. This method takes full advantage of the information carried by both amplitude and phase signals; it is a more convenient and effective solution compared with the frequency-domain thermoreflectance method. The relative error is lower than 5 % for most cases. A silicon wafer sample was measured by TDTR method to verify the two-step fitting method.

  11. The Effect of Listening to Specific Musical Genre Selections on Measures of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.

    2011-01-01

    University students (N = 30) individually listened to the Billboard 100 top-ranked musical selection for their most and least liked musical genre. Two minutes of silence preceded each musical listening condition, and heart rate variability (HRV) was recorded throughout. All HRV measures decreased during music listening as compared with silence.…

  12. Thermoluminescence glow curve for UV induced ZrO2:Ti phosphor with variable concentration of dopant and various heating rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Tiwari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the synthesis and characterization of Ti doped ZrO2 nanophosphors. The effects of variable concentration of titanium on thermoluminescence (TL behaviour are studied. The samples were prepared by combustion a synthesis technique which is suitable for less time taking techniques also for large scale production for nano phosphors. The starting material used for sample preparation are Zr(NO33 and Ti(NO33 and urea used as a fuel. The prepared sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD with variable concentration of Ti (0.05–0.5 mol% there is no any phase change found with increase the concentration of Ti. Sample shows cubic structure and the particle size calculated by Scherer's formula. The surface morphology of prepared phosphor was determined by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM technique for optimized concentration of dopant. The good connectivity with grains and the semi-sphere like structure was found by FEGSEM. The functional group analysis was determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The prepared phosphor examined by thermoluminescence technique. For recording TL glow curve every time 2 mg phosphor was irradiated by UV 254 nm source and fixed the heating rate at 5 °C s−1. Sample shows well resolved peak at 167 °C with a shoulder peak at 376 °C. The higher temperature peak shows the well stability and less fading in prepared phosphor. Also the effect of Ti concentration at fixed UV exposure time was studied. The effect of UV exposure time and dose versus intensity plot was studied. Sample shows linear response with dose and broaden peak with high temperature shows the more stability and less fading in TL glow curve. The linear dose response, high stability and less fading phenomenon shows the sample may be useful for thermoluminescence dosimetry application. Trapping parameters are calculated for every recorded glow curve. The

  13. Floral scent in food-deceptive orchids: species specificity and sources of variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, C C; Cozzolino, S; Schiestl, F P

    2007-11-01

    One third of all orchid species are deceptive and do not reward their pollinators. Such deceptive orchids are often characterised by unusually high variation in floral signals such as colour and scent. In this study, we investigated the scent composition of two Mediterranean food-deceptive orchids Orchis mascula, Orchis pauciflora, and their hybrid, O. x colemanii. Scent was collected IN SITU by headspace sorption and was subsequently analysed with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We compared variation of odour compounds within and between populations as well as species. We identified 35 floral scent compounds, mainly monoterpenes, which were shared by both species. Both quantitative and qualitative variability within and among populations was high. Many individuals within species could be classified to different "odour-types". In spite of high qualitative and quantitative intra- and inter-population variability, the species were clearly differentiated in their scent bouquets, whereas most hybrid individuals emitted an intermediate scent.

  14. Variability in sea ice cover and climate elicit sex specific responses in an Antarctic predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrousse, Sara; Sallée, Jean-Baptiste; Fraser, Alexander D; Massom, Rob A; Reid, Phillip; Hobbs, William; Guinet, Christophe; Harcourt, Robert; McMahon, Clive; Authier, Matthieu; Bailleul, Frédéric; Hindell, Mark A; Charrassin, Jean-Benoit

    2017-02-24

    Contrasting regional changes in Southern Ocean sea ice have occurred over the last 30 years with distinct regional effects on ecosystem structure and function. Quantifying how Antarctic predators respond to such changes provides the context for predicting how climate variability/change will affect these assemblages into the future. Over an 11-year time-series, we examine how inter-annual variability in sea ice concentration and advance affect the foraging behaviour of a top Antarctic predator, the southern elephant seal. Females foraged longer in pack ice in years with greatest sea ice concentration and earliest sea ice advance, while males foraged longer in polynyas in years of lowest sea ice concentration. There was a positive relationship between near-surface meridional wind anomalies and female foraging effort, but not for males. This study reveals the complexities of foraging responses to climate forcing by a poleward migratory predator through varying sea ice property and dynamic anomalies.

  15. Carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling improves exercise capacity following soccer-specific intermittent exercise performed in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, N D; Maclaren, D P M; Reilly, T; Drust, B

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of carbohydrate and reducing core body temperature pre-exercise, either separately or combined, may have ergogenic effects during prolonged intermittent exercise in hot conditions. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling on the physiological responses to soccer-specific intermittent exercise and the impact on subsequent high-intensity exercise performance in the heat. Twelve male soccer players performed a soccer-specific intermittent protocol for 90 min in the heat (30.5°C and 42.2% r.h.) on four occasions. On two occasions, the participants underwent a pre-cooling manoeuvre. During these sessions either a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHOc) or a placebo was consumed at (PLAc). During the remaining sessions either the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO) or placebo (PLA) was consumed. At 15-min intervals throughout the protocol participants performed a mental concentration test. Following the soccer-specific protocol participants performed a self-chosen pace test and a test of high-intensity exercise capacity. The period of pre-cooling significantly reduced core temperature, muscle temperature and thermal sensation (P carbohydrate during exercise enhances exercise capacity and helps maintain mental performance during intermittent exercise in hot conditions.

  16. A Comparison of Recurrent Non-specific Low Back Pain Patients and Healthy Subjects in Variability of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Hedayati

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to ivestigate of the postural strategies variability in low back pain patients, as a criterion in the adaptability evaluation of this system to the environmental demands and comparison of patients with healthy persons and also the importance of psychological factors associated with pain as an effective factor in postural disturbances was assessed. Materials & Methods: This analytical, cross-sectional and case-control study was performed on twenty one recurrent non-specific low back pain patients whom had been selected simply and conveniently and twenty one healthy persons whom had been matched with patients. The electromyographic activity of Deltoid, External Oblique, Transverse Abdominis / Internal Oblique and Erector Spinae muscles of each person was recorded in 75 rapid arm flexion with maximum acceleration. To study the patient’s avoidance belief and disability, two standard tools Fear-Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ and Roland-Morris Questionnaire were used respectively. Data were analyzed by MANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that chronic low back pain patients exhibit less variability in their anticipatory postural adjustments than the control group(P=0.047. However, the decrease in variability of the timing of anticipatory postural adjustments of External Oblique(P=0.45 and Erector Spinae(P=0.6 muscles was not significant. The correlation between the timing variability of anticipatory postural adjustments and fear-avoidance belief questionnaire scores was significant(P=0.006, however there was no significant correlation between this variable and disability(P=0.09 in the patients. Conclusion: There is a decrease in variability of postural control system of recurrent non-specific low back pain patients that can result in the persistence of pain and chronicity by decreasing the adaptability to environmental demands. The restoration of variability to

  17. Building America Case Study: Impact of Improved Duct Insulation on Fixed-Capacity (SEER 13) and Variable-Capacity (SEER 22) Heat Pumps, Cocoa, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Withers, J. Cummings, B. Nigusse, E. Martin

    2017-04-01

    A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40 to 118% of nominal full capacity); thus, staying 'on' for 60% to 100% more hours per day compared to fixed-capacity systems. Current Phase 4 experiments in an instrumented lab home with simulated occupancy evaluate the impact of duct R-value enhancement on the overall operating efficiency of the variable-capacity system compared to the fixed-capacity system.

  18. Forced convection heat transfer of power law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Botong; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Liangliang

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation of forced convection heat transfer in power-law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity. Three cases of different thermal conductivity models are considered: (i) thermal conductivity is a constant, (ii) thermal conductivity is a linear function of temperature, (iii) thermal conductivity is a power-law function of temperature gradient (Zheng's model). Governing equations are solved using the finite element method with the ‘ghost’ time introduced to the control equations, which does not affect the results because the velocity and temperature will remain unchanged when the steady state is reached. Results for the solutions of different variable models are presented as well as the analysis of the associated heat transfer characteristics. It is shown that the heat transfer behaviours are strongly dependent on the power-law index (n) in all models. For example, when n 1.

  19. Specific heat and phonon density of state of cubic phase of protonic conductor LaAlO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Anupam Deep, E-mail: dr.anupamdeep@yahoo.com [Sant Baba Bhag Singh University, Padhiana, Jalandhar (Punjab) – 144030 (India); Sinha, M. M. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology Longowal, Sangrur (Punjab) – 148106 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Perovskite oxides find wide range of applications like oxygen sensors, catalyst support, high frequency capacitors, high temperature superconducting microwave devices, solid state oxide fuel cell (SOFC) etc. LaAlO{sub 3} is one of such type of prominent perovskite oxides and very prominent material for protonic conductions. Therefore knowledge of the thermal properties of LaAlO{sub 3} is most significant. Hence in the present study we have studied phonon density of states and specific heat of LaAlO{sub 3} in cubic structure by applying lattice dynamical theoretical model. The calculated results are interpreted with existing experimental or theoretical results.

  20. Heat stress in pigs is accompanied by adipose tissue-specific responses that favor increased triglyceride storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, H; Yan, H; Lu, H; Donkin, S S; Ajuwon, K M

    2016-05-01

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects all aspects of performance in pigs. Although certain tissue-specific responses in the liver, skeletal muscle, and intestine are known, there is paucity of information on responses within the adipose tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to delineate adipose tissue responses during HS in pigs. Thirty crossbred (Ossabaw × Duroc × Landrace) pigs were assigned to 3 treatments for 7 d. Treatments were 1) control and libitum fed (CON) with room temperature set at 20°C ± 1°C, 2) pair fed (PF) with room temperature as the CON treatment but pair fed to HS pigs, and 3) HS with room temperature 35°C ± 1°C and ad libitum access to feed. Compared with CON pigs, HS pigs had decreased feed intake and elevated skin temperature and respiration rate ( Heat stress also caused increased heat shock protein 70 (HSP70; = 0.067) and CCAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP) content ( < 0.05) in the mesenteric fat compared with the CON treatment. In conclusion, induction of PCK1 expression in adipose tissue by HS suggests elevated glyceroneogenesis might be involved in the increased fat storage in pigs under HS.

  1. 16 kDa Heat Shock Protein from Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is a Homodimer – Suitability for Diagnostic Applications with Specific Llama VHH Monoclonals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh K.; Ruigrok, Vincent J. B.; Thompson, Natalie J.; Trilling, Anke K.; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Rijn, Cees; Beekwilder, Jules; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The 16 kDa heat shock protein (HSP) is an immuno-dominant antigen, used in diagnosis of infectious Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.) causing tuberculosis (TB). Its use in serum-based diagnostics is limited, but for the direct identification of M.tb. bacteria in sputum or cultures it may represent a useful tool. Recently, a broad set of twelve 16 kDa specific heavy chain llama antibodies (VHH) has been isolated, and their utility for diagnostic applications was explored. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify the epitopes recognized by the nine (randomly selected from a set of twelve 16 kDa specific VHH antibodies) distinct VHH antibodies, 14 overlapping linear epitopes (each 20 amino acid long) were characterized using direct and sandwich ELISA techniques. Seven out of 14 epitopes were recognized by 8 out of 9 VHH antibodies. The two highest affinity binders B-F10 and A-23 were found to bind distinct epitopes. Sandwich ELISA and SPR experiments showed that only B-F10 was suitable as secondary antibody with both B-F10 and A-23 as anchoring antibodies. To explain this behavior, the epitopes were matched to the putative 3D structure model. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine the higher order conformation. A homodimer model best explained the differential immunological reactivity of A-23 and B-F10 against heat-treated M.tb. lysates. Conclusions/Significance The concentrations of secreted antigens of M.tb. in sputum are too low for immunological detection and existing kits are only used for identifying M.tb. in cultures. Here we describe how specific combinations of VHH domains could be used to detect the intracellular HSP antigen. Linked to methods of pre-concentrating M.tb. cells prior to lysis, HSP detection may enable the development of protein-based diagnostics of sputum samples and earlier diagnosis of diseases. PMID:23737964

  2. 16 kDa heat shock protein from heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a homodimer - suitability for diagnostic applications with specific llama VHH monoclonals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 16 kDa heat shock protein (HSP is an immuno-dominant antigen, used in diagnosis of infectious Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb. causing tuberculosis (TB. Its use in serum-based diagnostics is limited, but for the direct identification of M.tb. bacteria in sputum or cultures it may represent a useful tool. Recently, a broad set of twelve 16 kDa specific heavy chain llama antibodies (VHH has been isolated, and their utility for diagnostic applications was explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify the epitopes recognized by the nine (randomly selected from a set of twelve 16 kDa specific VHH antibodies distinct VHH antibodies, 14 overlapping linear epitopes (each 20 amino acid long were characterized using direct and sandwich ELISA techniques. Seven out of 14 epitopes were recognized by 8 out of 9 VHH antibodies. The two highest affinity binders B-F10 and A-23 were found to bind distinct epitopes. Sandwich ELISA and SPR experiments showed that only B-F10 was suitable as secondary antibody with both B-F10 and A-23 as anchoring antibodies. To explain this behavior, the epitopes were matched to the putative 3D structure model. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine the higher order conformation. A homodimer model best explained the differential immunological reactivity of A-23 and B-F10 against heat-treated M.tb. lysates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The concentrations of secreted antigens of M.tb. in sputum are too low for immunological detection and existing kits are only used for identifying M.tb. in cultures. Here we describe how specific combinations of VHH domains could be used to detect the intracellular HSP antigen. Linked to methods of pre-concentrating M.tb. cells prior to lysis, HSP detection may enable the development of protein-based diagnostics of sputum samples and earlier diagnosis of diseases.

  3. Sex-Specific Effects of Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress: Implications for Mammalian Developmental Programming During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talyansky, Y.; Moyer, E. L.; Oijala, E.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    During adaptation to the microgravity environment, adult mammals experience stress mediated by the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis. In our previous studies of pregnant rats exposed to 2-g hypergravity via centrifugation, we reported decreased corticosterone and increased body mass and leptin in adult male, but not female, offspring. In this study, we utilized Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress to simulate the stressors of spaceflight by exposing dams to different stressors. Stress response modulation occurs via both positive and negative feedback in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary gland, and adrenal cortex resulting in the differential release of corticosterone (CORT), a murine analog to human cortisol.

  4. The variability of pulp-wood basic specific gravity of softwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Holan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, basic density of pulpwood of Norway spruce (Piceas abies /L./ Karst. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. was investigated. The variability of basic density and factors applied are out of concern. Factors are characterised by localization along the log, growing conditions defined by geographic area of Czech Republic, diameter of log, and the storing of logs within transport loading. Basic density was determined on cores taken by modified Pressler borer in the radial direction from bark to pith. The average basic density of Norway spruce is comparable to Scots pine, as well as the variation coefficient. Basic density of Norway spruce was found 443 kg.m-3 (Vx = 13.9% where as the Scots pine base density was 450 kg.m-3 (Vx = 15.5%. Basic density was significantly influenced by all factors assessed except the localization of cores along logs. The investigation demonstrated that basic density can be affected by locality of supply in comparison to within logs variability that have much lower importance.

  5. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phage exposure causes dynamic shifts in the expression states of specific phase-variable genes of Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidley, Jack; Holst Sørensen, Martine C.; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Phase variation (PV) creates phenotypic heterogeneity at high frequencies and in a reversible manner. This phenomenon allows bacteria to adapt to a variety of different environments and selective pressures. In Campylobacter jejuni this reversible adaptive process is mediated by mutations...... in homopolymeric G/C tracts. Many C. jejuni-specific phages are dependent on phase-variable surface structures for successful infection. We previously identified the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) moiety, MeOPN-GalfNAc, as a receptor for phage F336 and showed that phase-variable expression of the transferase...... for this CPS modification, cj1421, and two other phase-variable CPS genes generated phage resistance in C. jejuni. Here we investigate the population dynamics of C. jejuni NCTC11168 when exposed to phage F336 in vitro using a newly described method - the 28-locus-CJ11168 PV analysis. Dynamic switching...

  7. Patterns and processes of habitat-specific demographic variability in exploited marine species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, R.P.; Eggleston, D.B.; Pape, le O.; Tulp, I.Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    Population dynamics are governed by four demographic rates: births, deaths, immigration, and emigration. Variation in these rates and processes underlying such variation can be used to prioritize habitat conservation and restoration as well as to parameterize models that predict habitat-specific

  8. Evaluation of Specific Heat, Sound Velocity and Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Strained Nanocrystalline Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, D.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.; Takashiri, M.

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of strain on specific heat, sound velocity and lattice thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline bismuth antimony telluride thin films, we performed both experimental study and modeling. The nanocrystalline thin films had mostly preferred crystal orientation along c-axis, and strains in the both directions of c-axis and a- b-axis. It was found that the thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline thin films decreased greatly as compared with that of bulk alloys. To gain insight into the thermal transport in the strained nanocrystalline thin films, we estimated the lattice thermal conductivity based on the phonon transport model of full distribution of mean free paths accounting for the effects of grain size and strain which was influenced to both the sound velocity and the specific heat. As a result, the lattice thermal conductivity was increased when the strain was shifted from compressive to tensile direction. We also confirmed that the strain was influenced by the lattice thermal conductivity but the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity of thin films can be mainly attributed to the nano-size effect rather than the strain effect. Finally, it was found that the measured lattice thermal conductivities were in good agreement with modeling.

  9. Influence of tribomechanical micronization and hydrocolloids addition on enthalpy and apparent specific heat of whey protein model solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of thermophysical properties, especially the phase transitions temperature, specific heat and enthalpy, are essential in defining the freezing process parameters as well as storage conditions of frozen food. In this work thermophysical properties of 10% model solutions prepared with 60% whey protein concentrate (WPC with various hydrocolloids addition (HVEP, YO-EH, YO-L i YO-M were investigated. Powdered whey protein concentrate was treated in equipment for tribomechanical micronization and activation at 40000 rpm (Patent: PCT/1B99/00757 just before model solutions preparation. Particle size analysis was performed using Frich –laser particle sizer “analysette 22”. The phase transition temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA, while specific heat and enthalpy were calculated according to several mathematical equations. The results have shown that, due to tribomechanical treatment, certain changes in thermophysical and energetic properties of materials occurred. Tribomechanical treatment affects changes in granulometrical composition of WPC which result in higher abilities of reactions with hydrocolloids in model solutions and significant changes in thermophysical properties of the mentioned models.

  10. Determination of susceptibility and specific heat critical exponents for weak itinerant-electron ferromagnets from vibrating reed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Kaul, S. N.

    2002-04-01

    We report the observation of a linear relationship between the magnetic contribution to Young's modulus, ΔE/E0, and inverse magnetic susceptibility χ-1 for amorphous weak itinerant-electron ferromagnets Fe90Zr10 and Fe91Zr9 in the asymptotic critical region near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition. The proportionality ΔE(T)/E0~χ-1(T) is shown to provide as accurate a means of determining the asymptotic critical exponent γ and the leading ``correction-to-scaling'' amplitudes for susceptibilty from the ΔE/E0 data as a direct measurement of magnetic susceptibilty does. Similarly, the well-known relation between the magnetic contributions to sound velocity and specific heat is fully exploited to extract accurate estimates for the universal critical amplitude ratio A+/A- and the asymptotic critical exponents α+/- for the specific heat from the sound velocity data. The presently determined values of α+/- and γ, together with the reported value for spontaneous magnetization critical exponent β, not only obey the scaling equalities α+=α- and α+2β+γ=2 but also assert that the atomic magnetic moments in the alloys in question interact with one another through an attractive interaction which decays faster than 1/r5 with the interatomic spacing, r.

  11. Evaluation of high specific-heat ceramic for regenerator use at temperatures between 2-30 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Specific heat, thermal conductivity (both in the range 2-30 K), and microhardness data were measured on the ceramics labelled LS-8, LS-8A, and LS-8A doped with CsI, SnCl2, and AgCl. A work hardened sample of LS-8A was also studied in an effort to determine the feasibility of using these types of LS-8 materials to replace Pb spheres in the regenerator of the JPL cryocooler. The LS-8A materials are all more than an order of magnitude harder than Pb, and the dopants do not significantly improve the hardness. However, the SnCl2 dopant has a remarkable effect in improving the specific heat and thermal conductivity of LS-8A. The SnCl2 doping level which maximized the regenerator enthalpy change in going from an unloaded to a loaded condition was found to be 0.2 percent SnCl2 in LS-8A. It was also found that the enthalpy change for a regenerator employing the LS-8A material is more than three times larger than for the Pb spheres case. The use of rods, rather than spheres, of optimally doped LS-8A in regenerators is discussed.

  12. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrehedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    By investigating the properties of quasicrystals and quasicrystal-forming liquid alloys, we may determine the role of ordering of the liquid phase in the formation of quasicrystals, leading to a better fundamental understanding of both the quasicrystal and the liquid. A quasicrystal is solid characterized by a symmetric but non-periodic arrangement of atoms, usually in the form of an icosahedron (12 atoms, 20 triangular faces). It is theorized that the short-range order in liquids takes this same form. The degree of ordering depends on the temperature of the liquid, and affects many of the liquid s properties, including specific heat, viscosity, and electrical resistivity. The MSFC role in this project includes solidification studies, phase diagram determination, and thermophysical property measurements on the liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys, all by electrostatic levitation (ESL). The viscosity of liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys is measured by the oscillating drop method, both in the stable and undercooled liquid state. The specific heat of solid, undercooled liquid, and stable liquid are measured by the radiative cooling rate of the droplets.

  13. Unusual temperature dependence in the low-temperature specific heat of U3Ni5Al19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.; Bauer, E. D.; Ronning, F.

    2008-10-01

    Specific heat has been measured down to 0.053 K on a single crystal of the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet U3Ni5Al19 that orders at TN=23K . As has been previously reported, these data can be fitted between 0.4 and 4 K by the spin-fluctuation model of Moriya and Takimoto, which describes the contribution of weakly interacting critical spin fluctuations to the specific heat, C , where, as T→0 , C/T=γ0-a√T . However, below 0.35 K a noticeable divergence in C/ Ttilde logT dependence, consistent with the existence of strongly interacting fluctuations, is observed. This increase in the divergence of C/T at the lowest temperatures—which is contrary to the self-consistent renormalization theory of Moriya and Takimoto, which predicts √T dependence for C/T as T→0 and logT dependence at higher temperatures—has been measured as a function of magnetic field to further understand its origin. The field data in the low-temperature regime, where C/ Ttilde logT exhibit scaling with ΔB/T1.9 , further evidence that there exist strongly interacting fluctuations below 0.35 K in U3Ni5Al19 .

  14. Enhanced specific absorption rate of bi-magnetic nanoparticles for heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammad, Mohaned; Hempelmann, Rolf, E-mail: r.hempelmann@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2017-02-15

    Truncated octahedron bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles of Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with different size distributions have been synthesized, and their structural and magnetic properties have been studied. The structure and morphology of the core/shell nanostructures were established by using X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Dark field-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results confirmed the formation of bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The Curie temperature increases with the increase of particle size from 360 K to 394 K. The experimental results showed that core/shell nanoparticles have a higher specific absorption rate compared to the core ones. These nanoparticles are interfacial exchange coupled between hard and soft magnetic phases. We demonstrated that the specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. - Highlights: • Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by seed-mediated growth method. • Exchange-coupling between magnetic hard and soft phase of the magnetic nanoparticles affects the specific absorption rate. • The specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. • An increase of the core/shell magnetic nanoparticles size resulted in the increase of Curie temperature.

  15. Effect of Specific Drills through Table Tennis Ball Feeding Machine on Selected Skill Performance Variables of Non- Table Tennis Players

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M. Srinivasan; Ilangovan, P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of effect of specific drills through table tennis ball feeding machine on selected skill performance variables of non- table tennis players. To achieve the purpose 30 men non-table tennis players from faculty of general and adapted physical education and yoga, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University and Maruthi College of Physical Education, Coimbatore. The age of the subject’s was ranged from 23 to 28 years. the selected subjects were c...

  16. Magnetic field dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat of the doped plasticized polyaniline (PANI-DB3EPSA)0.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurado, D; Pron, A; Jacquot, J F; Travers, J P; Adriano, C; Vargas, J M; Pagliuso, P G; Rettori, C; Lesseux, G G; Fier, I; Walmsley, L

    2011-05-25

    Specific heat, magnetization and electron spin resonance (ESR) data obtained from a self-standing film of the doped plasticized polyaniline (PANI-DB3EPSA)(0.5) are shown. No long range magnetic order has been observed at zero magnetic field, above 2 K. For a magnetic field of 3.3 kOe applied perpendicular to the plane of the film, a clear signature of an induced ordered state can be seen in the specific heat data and ESR also reveals this antiferromagnetic order. An electronic contribution is detected from ESR, magnetization and specific heat; however, for T ≤ 5 K, the specific heat data show the existence of a gap. Magnetization data also show a low temperature dominant Curie behaviour which cannot be seen from ESR, probably due to a very large linewidth, suggesting short range correlations among spin 1/2 polarons.

  17. Combining in situ measurements and altimetry to estimate volume, heat and salt transport variability through the Faroe–Shetland Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berx

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available From 1994 to 2011, instruments measuring ocean currents (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers; ADCPs have been moored on a section crossing the Faroe–Shetland Channel. Together with CTD (Conductivity Temperature Depth measurements from regular research vessel occupations, they describe the flow field and water mass structure in the channel. Here, we use these data to calculate the average volume transport and properties of the flow of warm water through the channel from the Atlantic towards the Arctic, termed the Atlantic inflow. We find the average volume transport of this flow to be 2.7 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s–1 between the shelf edge on the Faroe side and the 150 m isobath on the Shetland side. The average heat transport (relative to 0 °C was estimated to be 107 ± 21 TW (1 TW = 1012 W and the average salt import to be 98 ± 20 × 106 kg s−1. Transport values for individual months, based on the ADCP data, include a large level of variability, but can be used to calibrate sea level height data from satellite altimetry. In this way, a time series of volume transport has been generated back to the beginning of satellite altimetry in December 1992. The Atlantic inflow has a seasonal variation in volume transport that peaks around the turn of the year and has an amplitude of 0.7 Sv. The Atlantic inflow has become warmer and more saline since 1994, but no equivalent trend in volume transport was observed.

  18. Heat transfer analysis on peristaltically induced motion of particle-fluid suspension with variable viscosity: Clot blood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M M; Zeeshan, A; Ellahi, R

    2016-12-01

    In this article, heat transfer analysis on clot blood model of the particle-fluid suspension through a non-uniform annulus has been investigated. The blood propagating along the whole length of the annulus was induced by peristaltic motion. The effects of variable viscosity and slip condition are also taken into account. The governing flow problem is modeled using lubrication approach by taking the assumption of long wavelength and creeping flow regime. The resulting equation for fluid phase and particle phase is solved analytically and closed form solutions are obtained. The physical impact of all the emerging parameters is discussed mathematically and graphically. Particularly, we considered the effects of particle volume fraction, slip parameter, the maximum height of clot, viscosity parameter, average volume flow rate, Prandtl number, Eckert number and fluid parameter on temperature profile, pressure rise and friction forces for outer and inner tube. Numerical computations have been used to determine the behavior of pressure rise and friction along the whole length of the annulus. The present study is also presented for an endoscope as a special case of our study. It is observed that greater influence of clot tends to rise the pressure rise significantly. It is also found that temperature profile increases due to the enhancement in Prandtl number, Eckert number, and fluid parameter. The present study reveals that friction forces for outer tube have higher magnitude as compared to the friction forces for an inner tube. In fact, the results for present study can also be reduced to the Newtonian fluid by taking ζ → ∞. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat waves frequency analysis and spatial-temporal variability of daily maximum temperature in southern Slovakia within the 1951, respectively 1961-2008 periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, J.; Faško, P.; Mikulová, K.; Šâstný, P.

    2009-09-01

    Heat waves temporal and spatial analysis at selected meteorological stations in southern part of Slovakia within the 1951, respectively 1961-2008 periods is a goal of the presented contribution. It is expected that climate change in terms of global warming would amplify temporal frequency and spatial extension of extreme heat wave incidence in region of central Europe in the next few decades. The frequency of occurrence and amplitude of heat waves may be impacted by changes in the temperature regime. Heat waves can cause severe thermal environmental stress leading to higher hospital admission rates, health complications, and increased mortality. These effects arise because of one or more meteorology-related factors such as higher effective temperatures, sunshine, more consecutive hot days and nights, stagnation, increased humidity, increased pollutant emissions, and accelerated photochemical smog and particulate formation. Heat waves bring about higher temperatures, increased solar heating of buildings, inhibited ventilation, and a larger number of consecutive warm days and nights. All of these effects increase the thermal loads on buildings, reduce their ability to cool down, and increase indoor temperatures. The paper deals with analysis of temporal and spatial variability of heat waves occurrence at meteorological station Hurbanovo (time series of daily maximum air temperature available from at least 1901) and some other climatological stations in lowlands of southern Slovakia (Žiharec, Bratislava-airport, Jaslovské Bohunice, Kráľová pri Senci, etc.). We can characterize the heat waves by its magnitude and duration, hence both of these characteristics need to be investigated together using sophisticated statistical methods developed particularly for the analysis of extreme hydrological events. These methods are quite similar to the intensity-duration-frequency approach often used in the analysis of extreme precipitation events. The HDF-curves (heatwave

  20. Numerical solution of Williamson fluid flow past a stretching cylinder and heat transfer with variable thermal conductivity and heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Malik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Williamson fluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching cylinder is discussed. The thermal conductivity is assumed to be vary linearly with temperature. Heat generation/absorption effects are also taken into account. Modeled partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential form by using appropriate transformations. Shooting method in conjunction with Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method is used to find the solution of the problem. Moreover, the effects of different flow parameters γ, λ, ϵ, β and Pr on velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically. Local Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient are shown in tabular and graphical form.

  1. Specific heat measurements of Ba0.68 K0.32 Fe2 As2 single crystals: evidence for a multiband strong-coupling superconducting state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovich, P.; Boris, A.V.; Dolgov, O.V.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Sun, S.L.; Lin, C.T.; Kremer, R.K.; Keimer, B.

    2010-01-01

    The specific heat of high-purity Ba0.68 K0.32 Fe2 As2 single crystals with the highest reported superconducting Tc =38.5  K was studied. The electronic specific heat Cp below Tc shows two gap features, with Δ1≈11  meV and Δ2≈3.5  meV obtained from an α-model analysis. The reduced gap value,

  2. Assessing the complex sponge microbiota: core, variable and species-specific bacterial communities in marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Susanne; Tsai, Peter; Bell, James; Fromont, Jane; Ilan, Micha; Lindquist, Niels; Perez, Thierry; Rodrigo, Allen; Schupp, Peter J; Vacelet, Jean; Webster, Nicole; Hentschel, Ute; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-03-01

    Marine sponges are well known for their associations with highly diverse, yet very specific and often highly similar microbiota. The aim of this study was to identify potential bacterial sub-populations in relation to sponge phylogeny and sampling sites and to define the core bacterial community. 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing was applied to 32 sponge species from eight locations around the world's oceans, thereby generating 2567 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the 97% sequence similarity level) in total and up to 364 different OTUs per sponge species. The taxonomic richness detected in this study comprised 25 bacterial phyla with Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Poribacteria being most diverse in sponges. Among these phyla were nine candidate phyla, six of them found for the first time in sponges. Similarity comparison of bacterial communities revealed no correlation with host phylogeny but a tropical sub-population in that tropical sponges have more similar bacterial communities to each other than to subtropical sponges. A minimal core bacterial community consisting of very few OTUs (97%, 95% and 90%) was found. These microbes have a global distribution and are probably acquired via environmental transmission. In contrast, a large species-specific bacterial community was detected, which is represented by OTUs present in only a single sponge species. The species-specific bacterial community is probably mainly vertically transmitted. It is proposed that different sponges contain different bacterial species, however, these bacteria are still closely related to each other explaining the observed similarity of bacterial communities in sponges in this and previous studies. This global analysis represents the most comprehensive study of bacterial symbionts in sponges to date and provides novel insights into the complex structure of these unique associations.

  3. Fruit specific variability in capsaicinoid accumulation and transcription of structural and regulatory genes in Capsicum fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhaninejad, Neda; Curry, Jeanne; Romero, Joslynn; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissue of ripening chile (Capsicum spp.) fruit follows the coordinated expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes producing the substrates for capsaicin synthase. Transcription factors are likely agents to regulate expression of these biosynthetic genes. Placental RNAs from habanero fruit (C. chinense) were screened for expression of candidate transcription factors; with two candidate genes identified, both in the ERF family of transcription factors. Characterization of these transcription factors, Erf and Jerf, in nine chile cultivars with distinct capsaicinoid contents demonstrated a correlation of expression with pungency. Amino acid variants were observed in both ERF and JERF from different chile cultivars; none of these changes involved the DNA binding domains. Little to no transcription of Erf was detected in non-pungent C. annuum or C. chinense mutants. This correlation was characterized at an individual fruit level in a set of jalapeño (C. annuum) lines again with distinct and variable capsaicinoid contents. Both Erf and Jerf are expressed early in fruit development, 16–20 days post-anthesis, at times prior to the accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissues. These data support the hypothesis that these two members of the complex ERF family participate in regulation of the pungency phenotype in chile. PMID:24388515

  4. Quantitative Age-specific Variability of Plasma Proteins in Healthy Neonates, Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelosevic, Stefan; Pascovici, Dana; Ping, Hui; Karlaftis, Vasiliki; Zaw, Thiri; Song, Xiaomin; Molloy, Mark P; Monagle, Paul; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2017-05-01

    Human blood plasma is a complex biological fluid containing soluble proteins, sugars, hormones, electrolytes, and dissolved gasses. As plasma interacts with a wide array of bodily systems, changes in protein expression, or the presence or absence of specific proteins are regularly used in the clinic as a molecular biomarker tool. A large body of literature exists detailing proteomic changes in pathologic contexts, however little research has been conducted on the quantitation of the plasma proteome in age-specific, healthy subjects, especially in pediatrics. In this study, we utilized SWATH-MS to identify and quantify proteins in the blood plasma of healthy neonates, infants under 1 year of age, children between 1-5 years, and adults. We identified more than 100 proteins that showed significant differential expression levels across these age groups, and we analyzed variation in protein expression across the age spectrum. The plasma proteomic profiles of neonates were strikingly dissimilar to the older children and adults. By extracting the SWATH data against a large human spectral library we increased protein identification more than 6-fold (940 proteins) and confirmed the concentrations of several of these using ELISA. The results of this study map the variation in expression of proteins and pathways often implicated in disease, and so have significant clinical implication. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Effect of high energy electron beam (10MeV) on specific heat capacity of low-density polyethylene/hydroxyapatite nano-composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Z; Ziaie, F; Ghaffari, M; Beigzadeh, A M

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, thermal properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and its nano composites are investigated. For this purpose LDPE reinforced with different weight percents of hydroxyapatite (HAP) powder which was synthesized via hydrolysis method are produced. The samples were irradiated with 10MeV electron beam at doses of 75 to 250kGy. Specific heat capacity measurement have been carried out at different temperatures, i.e. 25, 50, 75 and 100°C using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) apparatus and the effect of three parameters include of temperature, irradiation dose and the amount of HAP nano particles as additives on the specific heat capacity of PE/HAP have been investigated precisely. The MTDSC results indicate that the specific heat capacity have decreased by addition of nano sized HAP as reinforcement for LDPE. On the other hand, the effect of radiation dose is reduction in the specific heat capacity in all materials including LDPE and its nano composites. The HAP nano particles along with cross-link junctions due to radiation restrain the movement of the polymer chains in the vicinity of each particle and improve the immobility of polymer chains and consequently lead to reduction in specific heat capacity. Also, the obtained results confirm that the radiation effect on the specific heat capacity is more efficient than the reinforcing effect of nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue-Specific Transcriptomics Reveals an Important Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in Maintaining Fertility upon Heat Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Yang, Hongxing; Ding, Lan; Song, Ze-Ting; Ma, Hong; Chang, Fang; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2017-05-01

    High temperatures have a great impact on plant reproductive development and subsequent fruit and seed set, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We used transcriptome profiling to investigate the effect of heat stress on reproductive development of Arabidopsis thaliana plants and observed distinct response patterns in vegetative versus reproductive tissues. Exposure to heat stress affected reproductive developmental programs, including early phases of anther/ovule development and meiosis. Also, genes participating in the unfolded protein response (UPR) were enriched in the reproductive tissue-specific genes that were upregulated by heat. Moreover, we found that the UPR-deficient bzip28 bzip60 double mutant was sensitive to heat stresses and had reduced silique length and fertility. Comparison of heat-responsive wild type versus bzip28 bzip60 plants identified 521 genes that were regulated by bZIP28 and bZIP60 upon heat stress during reproductive stages, most of which were noncanonical UPR genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing analyses revealed 133 likely direct targets of bZIP28 in Arabidopsis seedlings subjected to heat stress, including 27 genes that were also upregulated by heat during reproductive development. Our results provide important insights into heat responsiveness in Arabidopsis reproductive tissues and demonstrate the protective roles of the UPR for maintaining fertility upon heat stress. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of Heat Transfer Enhancement or Deterioration of Variable Properties Al2O3-EG-water Nanofluid in Buoyancy Driven Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khorasanizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural convection heat transfer of variable properties Al2O3-EG-water nanofluid in a differentially heated rectangular cavity has been investigated numerically. The governing equations, for a Newtonian fluid, have been solved numerically with a finite volume approach. The influences of the pertinent parameters such as Ra in the range of 103-107 and volume fraction of nanoparticles from 0 to 0.04 on heat transfer characteristics have been studied. The results verified by making overall comparison with some existing experimental results have shown that for Ra=103, for which conduction heat transfer is dominant, the average Nusselt number increases as volume fraction of nanoparticles increases, but for higher Ra numbers in contradiction with the constant properties cases it decreases. This reduction, which is associated with increased viscosity, is more severe at Ra of 104 compared to higher Ra numbers such that the least deterioration in heat transfer occurs for Ra=107. This is due to the fact that as Ra increases, the Brownian motion enhances; thus conductivity improves and becomes more important than viscosity increase. An scale analysis, performed to clarify the contradictory reports in the literature on the natural convection heat transfer enhancement or deterioration of nanofluids, showed that different kinds of evaluating the base fluid Rayleigh number has led to such a difference.

  8. Global design of a reversible air/water heat pump with variable power for the residential sector; Conception globale d'une pompe a chaleur air/eau inversable a puissance variable pour le secteur residentiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach-Malaspina, N.

    2004-10-15

    Variable power is one of the means to improve the seasonal energy efficiency of heat pump space heating systems. The dual compressors technology is energetically efficient and is available in Europe. The main results of this work are: 1 - the identification of the origin of cycling losses in heating and cooling mode of existing mono-compressor air/water systems. The standby consumption of the heat pump is the only element which can efficiently contribute to reduce the energy losses at partial load. 2 - The quantification of the energy gains by adapting the dual compressors technology to a prototype of reference heat pump. 3 - A dynamic model of calculation of the seasonal coefficient of performance has been developed. 4 - The optimization of compressors operation and of the unfreezing system has permitted to increase the seasonal coefficient of performance from 14.7% to 18.6% with respect to the outdoor temperature. To carry out this study, design, experimental and modeling works have been done. The design of a heat pump fitted with two compressors has required the development of a new partial load testing bench. The several experimental and standardized tests have permitted to characterize an existing heat pump and a dual compressor heat pump whatever the operation mode and the outdoor climate. The dynamical model obtained has permitted to optimize the energy efficiency of the system thanks to a better management of the unfreezing system and to a proper regulation of the compressors. Some ways of improvement concern the dimensioning of compressors and the management of exchangers flow rates for an additional improvement of seasonal coefficients of performance. (J.S.)

  9. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water-heat

  10. Effects of Variable Thermal Conductivity with Thermal Radiation on MHD Flow and Heat Transfer of Casson Liquid Film Over an Unsteady Stretching Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aziz, Mohamed Abd; Afify, Ahmed A.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, the hydromagnetic boundary layer flow and heat transfer of Casson fluid in a thin liquid film over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of variable thermal conductivity, thermal radiation, and viscous dissipation is investigated numerically. The Casson fluid model is applied to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Similarity equations are derived and then solved numerically by using a shooting method with fourth order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Comparisons with previous literature are accomplished and obtained an excellent agreement. The influences of parameters governing a thin liquid film of Casson fluid and heat transfer characteristics are presented graphically and analyzed. It is observed that the heat transfer rate diminishes with a rise in thermal conductivity parameter and Eckert number. Further, the opposite influence is found with an increase in radiation parameter.

  11. Constant-pressure specific heat to hemispherical total emissivity ratio for undercooled liquid nickel, zirconium, and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rulison, A.J.; Rhim, W.K. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Radiative cooling curves of nickel, zirconium, and silicon melts that were obtained using the high-temperature, high-vacuum electrostatic levitator (HTHVESL) have been analyzed to determine the ratio between the constant-pressure specific heat and the hemispherical total emissivity, c{sub p}(T)/{var_epsilon}{sub T}(T). This ratio determined over a wide liquid temperature range for each material allows one to determine c{sub p}(T) if {var_epsilon}{sub T}(T) is known or vice versa. Following the recipe, the hemispherical total emissivities for each sample at its melting temperature, {var_epsilon}{sub T}(T{sub m}), have been determined using c{sub p}(T{sub m}) values available in the literature. They are 0.15, 0.29, and 0.17, for Ni, Zr, and Si, respectively.

  12. Constant-pressure specific heat to hemispherical total emissivity ratio for undercooled liquid nickel, Zirconium, and Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1995-05-01

    Radiative cooling curves of nickel, zirconium, and silicon melts that were obtained using the high-temperature, high-vacuum electrostatic levitator (HTHVESL) have been analyzed to determine the ratio between the constant-pressure specific heat and the hemispherical total emissivity, c p(T)/∈T(T).This ratio determined over a wide liquid temperature range for each material allows us to determine c p(T) if ∈T (T) is known or vice versa.Following the recipe, the hemispherical total emissivities for each sample at its melting temperature, ∈T (T) m, have been determined using c p(Tm) values available in the literature. They are 0.15, 0.29, and 0.17, for Ni, Zr, and Si, respectively.

  13. Constant-Pressure Specific Heat to Hemispherical Total Emissivity Ratio for Undercooled Liquid Nickel, Zirconium, and Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1995-01-01

    Radiative cooling curves of nickel, zirconium, and silicon melts that were obtained using the high-temperature, high-vacuum electrostatic levitator (HTHVESL) have been analyzed to determine the ratio between the constant-pressure specific heat and the hemispherical total emissivity, c(sub p)(T)epsilon(sub T)(T). This ratio determined over a wide liquid temperature range for each material allows us to determine c(sub p)(T) if epsilon(sub T)(T) is known or vice versa. Following the recipe, the hemi-spherical total emissivities for each sample at its melting temperature, epsilon(sub T)(T(sub M)), have been determined using c(sub p)(T(sub m)) values available in the literature. They are 0.15, 0.29, and 0.17, for Ni, Zr, and Si, respectively.

  14. 3d X-Y scaling of the specific heat of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overend, Neil; Howson, Mark A.; Lawrie, Ian D.

    1994-12-01

    The specific heat of a single crystal sample of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) has been measured with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla applied parallel to the c-axis of the crystal. We analyse the data in terms of the Lowest Landau Level (LLL) and critical scaling theories. Recent measurements of magnetisation and resistivity have been unable to distinguish between the critical scaling and LLL regimes. We find that the data does not scale using the LLL theory and therefore conclude that the LLL theory is not applicable in magnetic fields less than 8 Tesla. However, we find that the data does scale using the 3-dimensional XY model. This provides strong evidence for the existence of a critical regime within which there is scaling behaviour characteristic of the 3-dimensional XY model with critical exponents consistent with those observed in superfluid 4He.

  15. Solid and liquid equation of state for initially porous aluminum where specific heat and γ/v are constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jerry W.; Lemar, E. R.; Brown, Mary

    2012-03-01

    A porous solid's initial state is off the thermodynamic surface of the solid to start with but when pressure is high enough to cause total pore collapse or crush up, the final states are on the thermodynamic surfaces. The Hugoniot for the fully compacted initially porous solid has pressure above the principal Hugoniot at the same v due to an additional thermal pressure contribution. There are a number of ways to define this hotter Hugoniot, which can be referenced to other thermodynamic paths on this thermodynamic surface. The choice here was to use the Rose-Vinet isotherm to define a consistent thermodynamic surface for the solid and melt phase of 6061 aluminum where specific heat is constant for the P-v-T space of interest. Analytical equations are developed for principal Hugoniots PH(v) and TH(v).

  16. Phage exposure causes dynamic shifts in the expression states of specific phase-variable genes of Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aidley, Jack; Holst Sørensen, Martine C.; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Phase variation (PV) creates phenotypic heterogeneity at high frequencies and in a reversible manner. This phenomenon allows bacteria to adapt to a variety of different environments and selective pressures. In Campylobacter jejuni this reversible adaptive process is mediated by mutations in homop......Phase variation (PV) creates phenotypic heterogeneity at high frequencies and in a reversible manner. This phenomenon allows bacteria to adapt to a variety of different environments and selective pressures. In Campylobacter jejuni this reversible adaptive process is mediated by mutations...... in homopolymeric G/C tracts. Many C. jejuni-specific phages are dependent on phase-variable surface structures for successful infection. We previously identified the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) moiety, MeOPN-GalfNAc, as a receptor for phage F336 and showed that phase-variable expression of the transferase...

  17. Colony-specific investigations reveal highly variable responses among individual corals to ocean acidification and warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi, Javid; Reimer, James Davis; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    As anthropogenic climate change is an ongoing concern, scientific investigations on its impacts on coral reefs are increasing. Although impacts of combined ocean acidification (OA) and temperature stress (T) on reef-building scleractinian corals have been studied at the genus, species and population levels, there are little data available on how individual corals respond to combined OA and anomalous temperatures. In this study, we exposed individual colonies of Acropora digitifera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica to four pCO2-temperature treatments including 400 μatm-28 °C, 400 μatm-31 °C, 1000 μatm-28 °C and 1000 μatm-31 °C for 26 days. Physiological parameters including calcification, protein content, maximum photosynthetic efficiency, Symbiodinium density, and chlorophyll content along with Symbiodinium type of each colony were examined. Along with intercolonial responses, responses of individual colonies versus pooled data to the treatments were investigated. The main results were: 1) responses to either OA or T or their combination were different between individual colonies when considering physiological functions; 2) tolerance to either OA or T was not synonymous with tolerance to the other parameter; 3) tolerance to both OA and T did not necessarily lead to tolerance of OA and T combined (OAT) at the same time; 4) OAT had negative, positive or no impacts on physiological functions of coral colonies; and 5) pooled data were not representative of responses of all individual colonies. Indeed, the pooled data obscured actual responses of individual colonies or presented a response that was not observed in any individual. From the results of this study we recommend improving experimental designs of studies investigating physiological responses of corals to climate change by complementing them with colony-specific examinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Variability in expression of antigens responsible for serotype specificity in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barturen, B; Bikandi, J; San Millán, R; Moragues, M D; Regulez, P; Quindós, G; Pontón, J

    1995-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) B9E, which reacts with a cell wall surface determinant of Candida albicans serotype A, and a polyclonal monospecific antiserum against the antigen 6 (IF6) were used to investigate the expression of the antigens responsible for the serotype specificity in C. albicans under different growth conditions. By indirect immunofluorescence, both antibodies reacted with the cell wall surface of serotype A yeast cells and germ tubes grown in vitro but no reactivity was observed with serotype B yeast cells. In some cases, only a weak reactivity restricted to a zone close to the parent yeast cell was observed in serotype B germ tubes stained with mAb B9E. Both antibodies reacted strongly with yeast cells and germ tubes present in kidney abscesses from rabbits infected with both serotypes, but only serotype A yeast cells and germ tubes present in smears from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis reacted with B9E and IF6 antibodies. The expression of antigens reactive with both antibodies was modulated by the pH of the environment in which the fungus was grown. Both antibodies showed a similar pattern of reactivity when studied with a spectrofluorometer. Serotype A yeast cells showed maximum reactivity when cells were grown on Sabouraud dextrose broth supplemented with yeast extract at pH 4.6. The lowest reactivity was observed in cells grown at pH 2.0. Conversely, the reactivity of serotype B yeast cells increased at alkaline pH values, the highest being in cells grown at pH values of 7.2 and 9.5.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Symmetric and asymmetric components of anomalous tropospheric-mean horizontal fluxes of latent and sensible heat associated with ENSO events of variable magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutta, Evan; Hubbart, Jason A.; Svoma, Bohumil M.; Eichler, Timothy; Lupo, Anthony R.

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) represents the dominant mode of global climate variability and is inherently nonlinear such that the linearity of the atmospheric response remains an area of ongoing research. The phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific North American (PNA) patterns of intra-annual climate variability are favored to be the same as the phase of ENSO resulting in important climate impacts across Europe and North America. Advanced understanding of the symmetry of this response at global scale using monthly composite analyses of anomalous horizontal sensible and latent heat fluxes at various ENSO event magnitudes quantified from ERA-Interim output (January 1979 through June 2016) will advance impact predictability. A linear relationship between ENSO, PNA, and NAO patterns was identified, particularly for strong ENSO events. The nonlinear component indicated general eastward (westward) shifts in anomalous heat fluxes during El Niño (La Niña) events such that the greatest impacts were implied across North America during Decembers and Januarys of strong El Niño and weak La Niña events. Analyses of anomalous latent heat fluxes indicated spatial patterns consistent with more frequent atmospheric river phenomena, especially during Decembers and Januarys of strong El Niño events. This work demonstrates that the symmetric component of anomalous horizontal, tropospheric-mean heat fluxes corresponding to ENSO events are effective for identifying north-south dipoles of anomalous circulations consistent with PNA or NAO patterns and connections between tropical heat source regions and the PNA and NAO regions. This work also demonstrates the asymmetric component identified differences in anomalous circulation position and whether El Niño or La Niña resulted in larger heat flux anomalies. Therefore, this work provides insight into impacts associated with future ENSO events, especially across North America during strong El Niño and weak La

  20. Characterization of structural variability sheds light on the specificity determinants of the interaction between effector domains and histone tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois, Sergi; Akizu, Naiara; de Xaxars, Gemma Mas; Vázquez, Iago; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2010-02-16

    Structural characterization of the interaction between histone tails and effector modules (bromodomains, chromodomains, PHD fingers, etc.) is fundamental to understand the mechanistic aspects of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In recent years many researchers have applied this approach to specific systems, thus providing a valuable but fragmentary view of the histone-effector interaction. In our work we use this information to characterize the structural features of the two main components of this interaction, histone peptides and the binding site of effector domains (focusing on those which target modified lysines), and increase our knowledge on its specificity determinants. Our results show that the binding sites of effectors are structurally variable, but some clear trends allow their classification in three main groups: flat-groove, narrow-groove and cavity-insertion. In addition, we found that even within these classes binding site variability is substantial. These results in context with the work from other researchers indicate that the there are at least two determinants of binding specificity in the binding site of effector modules. Finally, our analysis of the histone peptides sheds light on the structural transition experienced by histone tails upon effector binding, showing that it may vary depending on the local properties of the sequence stretch considered, thus allowing us to identify an additional specificity determinant for this interaction. Overall, the results of our analysis contribute to clarify the origins of specificity: different regions of the binding site and, in particular, differences in the disorder-order transitions experienced by different histone sequence stretches upon binding.

  1. Local nutrient regimes determine site-specific environmental triggers of cyanobacterial and microcystin variability in urban lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinang, S. C.; Reichwaldt, E. S.; Ghadouani, A.

    2015-05-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms in urban lakes present serious health hazards to humans and animals and require effective management strategies. Managing such blooms requires a sufficient understanding of the controlling environmental factors. A range of them has been proposed in the literature as potential triggers for cyanobacterial biomass development and cyanotoxin (e.g. microcystin) production in freshwater systems. However, the environmental triggers of cyanobacteria and microcystin variability remain a subject of debate due to contrasting findings. This issue has raised the question of whether the relevance of environmental triggers may depend on site-specific combinations of environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the site-specificity of environmental triggers for cyanobacterial bloom and microcystin dynamics in three urban lakes in Western Australia. Our study suggests that cyanobacterial biomass, cyanobacterial dominance and cyanobacterial microcystin content variability were significantly correlated to phosphorus and iron concentrations. However, the correlations were different between lakes, thus suggesting a site-specific effect of these environmental factors. The discrepancies in the correlations could be explained by differences in local nutrient concentration. For instance, we found no correlation between cyanobacterial fraction and total phosphorous (TP) in the lake with the highest TP concentration, while correlations were significant and negative in the other two lakes. In addition, our study indicates that the difference of the correlation between total iron (TFe) and the cyanobacterial fraction between lakes might have been a consequence of differences in the cyanobacterial community structure, specifically the presence or absence of nitrogen-fixing species. In conclusion, our study suggests that identification of significant environmental factors under site-specific conditions is an important strategy to enhance successful outcomes

  2. Population of computational rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models for investigating sources of variability in cellular repolarisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Philip; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca; Quinn, T Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A systematic exploration of the effects of simultaneously varying the magnitude of six transmembrane current conductances (transient outward, rapid and slow delayed rectifier K(+), inward rectifying K(+), L-type Ca(2+), and Na(+)/K(+) pump currents) in two rabbit-specific ventricular action potential models (Shannon et al. and Mahajan et al.) at multiple cycle lengths (400, 600, 1,000 ms) was performed. This was accomplished with distributed computing software specialised for multi-dimensional parameter sweeps and grid execution. An initial population of 15,625 parameter sets was generated for both models at each cycle length. Action potential durations of these populations were compared to experimentally derived ranges for rabbit ventricular myocytes. 1,352 parameter sets for the Shannon model and 779 parameter sets for the Mahajan model yielded action potential duration within the experimental range, demonstrating that a wide array of ionic conductance values can be used to simulate a physiological rabbit ventricular action potential. Furthermore, by using clutter-based dimension reordering, a technique that allows visualisation of multi-dimensional spaces in two dimensions, the interaction of current conductances and their relative importance to the ventricular action potential at different cycle lengths were revealed. Overall, this work represents an important step towards a better understanding of the role that variability in current conductances may play in experimentally

  3. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  4. Mirror-drawing skill in children with specific language impairment: Improving generalization by incorporating variability into the practice session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmottes, Lise; Maillart, Christelle; Meulemans, Thierry

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) by using a mirror-drawing task, a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm that does not involve sequence learning and has never before been used in SLI. A total of 30 school-aged children with SLI matched to 30 typically developing (TD) control children had to trace several figures seen only in mirror-reversed view in two practice sessions separated by a one-week interval. Two practice conditions were compared: a constant condition in which children had to trace the same figure throughout the learning trials, and a variable one in which they had to trace different figures in each trial. The results revealed a similar learning pattern between SLI and TD children in both practice conditions, suggesting that initial learning for a non-sequential procedural task is preserved in SLI. However, the children with SLI generalized the mirror-drawing skill in the same way as the TD children only if there was variability in the way the material was trained (variable practice). No significant schedule effects were observed in the control group.

  5. Fatigue in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: prevalence and relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissaoui, N; Rostom, S; Hakkou, J; Berrada Ghziouel, K; Bahiri, R; Abouqal, R; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the frequency of fatigue in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and its relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance. A cross-sectional study included patients fulfilled the modified New York classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis. To assess fatigue, the first item of Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the multidimensional assessment of fatigue (MAF) was used. The evaluation included the activity of the disease (BASDAI), global well-being (Bath ankylosing spondylitis global index), functional status (Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index), metrologic measurements (Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrological index), and visual analog scale of axial or joint pain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were measured. To assess psychological status, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was used. Sleep disturbance was assessed by the fourth item of Hamilton anxiety scale. One hundred and ten patients were included, of average age 38.0 years ± 12.6. In our data, 66.4% experienced severe fatigue (BASDAI fatigue ≥ 5). The mean total score of MAF was 26 ± 12.77. The disease-specific variables contributed significantly with both BASDAI fatigue and MAF as dependent variables, accounting for 71.3 and 65.6% of the variance, respectively. The contribution of the depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance were 24.9, 18.4 and 15.4%, respectively. This study state the importance of fatigue in AS patients. Even though disease activity was the most powerful predictor of fatigue, the effects of psychogenic factors and sleep disturbance, should be taken into consideration in the management of AS.

  6. Influence of Pacific trade winds on recent changes in SST and ocean heat content: external forcing and internal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, A. R.; Gastineau, G.; Khodri, M.; Vialard, J.

    2016-02-01

    The tropical Pacific SST warmed at a slower rate in the first decade of the 21st century than previous decades. It has been proposed that increased trade winds associated with a strengthened Walker Circulation may explain such relative SST cooling, via increased upwelling near the surface and heat uptake in the subsurface. We designed an ensemble of partial coupling experiments using IPSL-CM5A-LR to quantify the influence of the trade winds on ocean heat content and SST, and to compare these impacts to those of external forcing for the recent decades. In the first ensemble, we prescribe the daily surface wind over the tropical Pacific to observed values. In the second ensemble, we apply daily climatological observed surface winds. Both simulations use historical external forcings, and are compared to the fully-coupled historical runs. Both ensembles are also compared with the signature of the internally-generated Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation in the IPSL-CM5A-LR. We examine the SST responses to the prescribed trade winds, as well the responses of the vertical ocean temperature structure. Furthermore, the heat budgets of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans will be studied to follow the heat perturbations due to greenhouse gases emissions. We will compare them to the changes due to observed trade winds, in order to attribute the recent changes observed in the heat content and sea level height.

  7. Natural convection of nanofluid in a wavy cavity in the presence of magnetic field on variable heat surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaherdeh, Korosh; Moslemi, Mehdi; Shahbazi, Mona [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A numerical analysis has been performed to investigate the laminar natural convection heat characteristics in a wavy cavity filled with CuO/water nanofluid. One of the sinusoidal walls (BC) is at the volatile high temperature and the opposite wavy surface is at a stable low temperature and the two other walls are considered flat and insulated while the uniform magnetic field is considered. Performing the analysis, the governing equations are given in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. In order to solve the nondimensionalized equations, discretizing with second-order accurate central difference method is performed then the successive under relaxation method with appropriate boundary conditions is considered. To validate the numerical model, various comparisons with previously published studies have been conducted and the results are in a good agreement. The main objective is to survey the effects of the Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, and nanoparticles volume fraction on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are illustrated in contours of stream function, constant temperature, and Nusselt number. The results show that the presence of the magnetic field the local Nusselt number decreases at the hot wall. Moreover, the enhancement in the heat transfer performance increases with an increasing nanoparticle concentration. However, for all values of Rayleigh number, the presence of nanoparticles leads to significant enhancement in heat transfer and the increase of Rayleigh number causes the heat transfer mechanism to change from conduction to convection.

  8. Effect of Al₂O₃ nanoparticle dispersion on the specific heat capacity of a eutectic binary nitrate salt for solar power applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y.; Y. He; Z.; Zhang; Wen, D

    2017-01-01

    Molten salts can be used as heat transfer fluids or thermal storage materials in a concentrated solar power plant. Improving the thermal properties can influence the utilization efficiency of solar energy. In this study, the effect of doping eutectic binary salt solvent with Al₂O₃ nanoparticles on its specific heat capacity (cp) was investigated. The effects of the mass fraction of nanoparticles on the cp of the composite nanofluid were analyzed, using both differential scanning calorimetry m...

  9. Dual solutions in hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer towards a stretching/shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink and variable surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El-Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The steady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a viscous, incompressible and heat generating/absorbing fluid over a shrinking sheet in the presence of a non-uniform heat source/sink is considered. The system of partial differential equations was transformed to a system of ordinary differential equations, which was solved numerically. Numerical results were obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the surface temperature as well as the velocity and temperature profiles for some values of the governing parameters. The study reveals that the range of velocity ratio parameter for which the solution exists increases as the magnetic field increase.

  10. Quantifying urban heat island effects and human comfort for cities of variable size and urban morphology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Koopmans, S.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Hove, van B.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the canopy layer urban heat island (UHI) and human comfort in a range of small to large cities and villages in the Netherlands. So far, this subject has not been substantially studied in the Netherlands, since it has a relatively mild Cfb climate and impact was assumed to be

  11. Variability in heat strain in fully encapsulated impermeable suits in different climates and at different work loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Rubenstein, C.D.; Deaton, A.S.; Bogerd, C.P.

    2017-01-01

    A major concern for responders to hazardous materials (HazMat) incidents is the heat strain that is caused by fully encapsulated impermeable (NFPA 1991) suits. In a research project, funded by the US Department of Defense, the thermal strain experienced when wearing these suits was studied. Forty

  12. Feature-expression heat maps - A new visual method to explore complex associations between two variable sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarman, Bartholomeus C. M. (Benno); Riemersma-Van der Lek, Rixt F.; Nolen, Willem A.; Mendes, R.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Burger, Huibert

    Introduction: Existing methods such as correlation plots and cluster heat maps are insufficient in the visual exploration of multiple associations between genetics and phenotype, which is of importance to achieve a better understanding of the pathophysiology of psychiatric and other illnesses. The

  13. A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A VARIABLE SPEED, MIXED REFRIGERANT HEAT PUMP. SUMMARY. EPA/600/SR-92/053

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of an innovative heat pump, equipped with a distillation column to shift the composition of a zeotropic refrigerant mixture, was evaluated. The results of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) rating tests and seasonal energy calcuations are reported with the main cycl...

  14. Selection of a set of specific primers for the identification of Tuber rufum: a truffle species with high genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Mirco; Amicucci, Antonella; Bonito, Gregory; Bonuso, Enrico; Stocchi, Vilberto; Zambonelli, Alessandra

    2007-12-01

    Tuber rufum is a truffle widely distributed throughout Europe, which forms mycorrhizal associations with numerous species of broadleaf and coniferous trees. The possibility of T. rufum contamination in commercial truffle-infected plants makes its detection important. To facilitate the identification of T. rufum from mycorrhiza and fruitbodies, species-specific primers were designed and tested. To overcome the high intraspecific genetic variability within the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of T. rufum, as demonstrated by phylogenetic analysis, two forward primers, Ru1f and Ru2f, located on the ITS1 region were designed to be used in concert with the reverse primer ITS4. Only T. rufum was amplified with this primer combination, while DNA of Tuber magnatum, Tuber brumale, Tuber maculatum, Tuber borchii, Tuber excavatum and Tuber melanosporum was not. These primers give a specific amplicon ranging between 566 and 572 bp and are able to discriminate between T. rufum, T. borchii and T. magnatum in multiplex PCR. In addition, T. rufum-specific amplicons were obtained from both spore suspensions and mycorrhiza by direct PCR. Tuber rufum mycorrhiza obtained in the greenhouse using mycelial inoculation techniques had morphological features similar to those of other species of Tuber, stressing the importance of molecular tools for their identification.

  15. Specific aspects of cognitive and language proficiency account for variability in neural indices of semantic and syntactic processing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton Wray, Amanda; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2013-07-01

    The neural activity mediating language processing in young children is characterized by large individual variability that is likely related in part to individual strengths and weakness across various cognitive abilities. The current study addresses the following question: How does proficiency in specific cognitive and language functions impact neural indices mediating language processing in children? Thirty typically developing seven- and eight-year-olds were divided into high-normal and low-normal proficiency groups based on performance on nonverbal IQ, auditory word recall, and grammatical morphology tests. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were elicited by semantic anomalies and phrase structure violations in naturally spoken sentences. The proficiency for each of the specific cognitive and language tasks uniquely contributed to specific aspects (e.g., timing and/or resource allocation) of neural indices underlying semantic (N400) and syntactic (P600) processing. These results suggest that distinct aptitudes within broader domains of cognition and language, even within the normal range, influence the neural signatures of semantic and syntactic processing. Furthermore, the current findings have important implications for the design and interpretation of developmental studies of ERPs indexing language processing, and they highlight the need to take into account cognitive abilities both within and outside the classic language domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Final Report: Cooling Seasonal Energy and Peak Demand Impacts of Improved Duct Insulation on Fixed-Capacity (SEER 13) and Variable-Capacity (SEER 22) Heat Pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, C. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, J. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Nigusse, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of full variable-capacity, central, ducted air-conditioning (AC) and heat pump units has come on the market, and they promise to deliver increased cooling (and heating) efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40% to 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying “on” for up to twice as many hours per day compared to fixed-capacity systems of the same nominal capacity. The heating and cooling capacity is varied by adjusting the indoor fan air flow rate, compressor, and refrigerant flow rate as well as the outdoor unit fan air flow rate. Note that two-stage AC or heat pump systems were not evaluated in this research effort. The term dwell is used to refer to the amount of time distributed air spends inside ductwork during space-conditioning cycles. Longer run times mean greater dwell time and therefore greater exposure to conductive gains and losses.

  17. Final Report: Cooling Seasonal Energy and Peak Demand Impacts of Improved Duct Insulation on Fixed-Capacity (SEER 13) and Variable-Capacity (SEER 22) Heat Pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, C. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, J. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Nigusse, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-09-08

    A new generation of full variable-capacity, central, ducted air-conditioning (AC) and heat pump units has come on the market, and they promise to deliver increased cooling (and heating) efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40% to 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying “on” for up to twice as many hours per day compared to fixed-capacity systems of the same nominal capacity. The heating and cooling capacity is varied by adjusting the indoor fan air flow rate, compressor, and refrigerant flow rate as well as the outdoor unit fan air flow rate. Note that two-stage AC or heat pump systems were not evaluated in this research effort. The term dwell is used to refer to the amount of time distributed air spends inside ductwork during space-conditioning cycles. Longer run times mean greater dwell time and therefore greater exposure to conductive gains and losses.

  18. HEAT RECUPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery is an effective method of shortening specific energy consumption. new constructions of recuperators for heating and cupola furnaces have been designed and successfully introduced. two-stage recuperator with computer control providing blast heating up to 600 °C and reducing fuel consumption by 30% is of special interest.

  19. Hyper-variable regions in 18S rDNA of Strongyloides spp. as markers for species-specific diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Hayashida, Shotaro; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Four hyper-variable regions (HVR-I to -IV) found in 18S ribosomal DNA sequences were compared among 34 isolates of 15 species of the genus Strongyloides to evaluate their diagnostic value. HVR-I to -III were short, and plural species exhibit the same nucleotide arrangement. Meanwhile, HVR-IV had 23 to 39 nucleotides, showing species-specific arrangements, except Strongyloides ransomi and Strongyloides venezuelensis, which had the same nucleotide sequence in HVR-IV but were readily distinguished by the difference in HVR-I and -III. Isolates of Strongyloides stercoralis from humans of USA, Japan, and Philippines, chimpanzees, and dogs had an identical sequence in this region. Meanwhile, intraspecific polymorphism in HVR-IV nucleotide arrangement was observed among isolates of Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides callosciureus, presumably reflecting process of geographical dispersal and adaptation to the hosts.

  20. Effect of crystallinity and irradiation on thermal properties and specific heat capacity of LDPE and LDPE/EVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borhani zarandi, Mahmoud, E-mail: mborhani@yazduni.ac.ir [Physics Department, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrollahi Bioki, Hojjat; Mirbagheri, Zahra-alsadat [Physics Department, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabbakh, Farshid [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirjalili, Ghazanfar [Physics Department, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper a series of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends with different percentages (10%, 20%, and 30%) of EVA and sets of low-density polyethylene sheets were prepared. This set consists of four subsets, which were made under different cooling methods: fast cooling in liquid nitrogen, cooling with cassette, exposing in open air, and cooling in oven, to investigate the crystallinity effects. All of the samples were irradiated with 10 MeV electron-beam in the dose range of 0-250 kGy using a Rhodotron accelerator system. The variation of thermal conductivity (k) and specific heat capacity (C{sub p}) of all of the samples were measured. We found that, for the absorption dose less than 150 kGy, k of the LDPE samples at a prescribed temperature range decreased by increasing the amount of dose, but then the change is insignificant. With increasing the crystallinity, k of the LDPE samples increased, whereas C{sub p} of this material is decreased. In the case of LDPE/EVA blends, for the dose less than 150 kGy, C{sub p} (at 40 Degree-Sign C) and k (in average) decreased, but then the change is insignificant. With increasing the amount of additive (EVA), C{sub p} and k increased.

  1. Probing the nodal structures of heavy electron superconductors by means of specific heat measurements in magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, T. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277 8581 (Japan)], E-mail: sakaki@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Custers, J. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Yano, K.; Yamada, A.; Tayama, T. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277 8581 (Japan); Aoki, Y.; Sato, H. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192 0397 (Japan); Sugawara, H. [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770 8502 (Japan); Amitsuka, H. [Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060 0810 (Japan); Yokoyama, M. [Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito 310 8512 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of the angle-resolved specific heat C(H,{theta}) have been performed on PrOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} in order to examine their superconducting gap structures. In the filled skutterudite PrOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, a clear fourfold angular dependence is observed with H rotated in the (1 0 0) planes, whose field variation suggests gap minima along [1 0 0] directions. Interestingly, a reversed angular oscillation of C(H,{theta}) has been observed in the normal state above H{sub c2} which continues to grow as the high-field antiferroquadrupole phase is approached. In URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, C(H,{theta}) with H rotated around the tetragonal c-axis suggests that the nodal structure has rotational symmetry. Comparison between the C(H) data for a- and c-axes indicates the existence of point nodes along the [0 0 1] direction.

  2. Alternating current calorimeter for specific heat capacity measurements at temperatures below 10 K and pressures up to 10 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeo, Kazunori, E-mail: kumeo@sci.hiroshima-u.ac [Cryogenics and Instrumental Analysis Division, N-BARD, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    A developed alternating current calorimeter for measuring the absolute value of specific heat C of a very small sample under a pressure up to 10 GPa and low temperature below 10 K is described. A Bridgman anvil cell made of tungsten carbide with a top diameter of 3 mm is used. A hollow at the top prevents expansion of the sample space over the anvil top. Two chip resistors, which act as a thermometer and a heater, are mounted on the outer part of a copper–beryllium gasket with a frying pan-like shape. Thus, the thermometer is not pressurized. In order to isolate the gasket from the anvil thermally, diamond powder with a grain size of 0.25 μm is placed on the anvil top. Two jumps of C at the superconducting transitions of Pb (3.3 mg) and In (5.0 mg) are observed under various pressures up to 9 GPa, as clearly as those at the ambient pressure.

  3. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystal and Polytetrahedral-Phase Forming Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, Anup K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, T. J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2003-01-01

    From extensive ground based work on the phase diagram and undercooling studies of Ti-Zr-Ni alloys, have clearly identified the composition of three different phases with progressively increasing polytetrahedral order such as, (Ti/Zr), the C14 Laves phase, and the i-phase, that nucleate directly from the undercooled liquid. The reduced undercooling decreases progressively with increasing polytetrahedral order in the solid, supporting Frank s hypothesis. A new facility for direct measurements of the structures and phase transitions in undercooled liquids (BESL) was developed and has provided direct proof of the primary nucleation of a metastable icosahedral phase in some Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. The first measurements of specific heat and viscosity in the undercooled liquid of this alloy system have been completed. Other than the importance of thermo-physical properties for modeling nucleation and growth processes in these materials, these studies have also revealed some interesting new results (such as a maximum of C(sup q, sub p) in the undercooled state). These ground-based results have clearly established the necessary background and the need for conducting benchmark nucleation experiments at the ISS on this alloy system.

  4. Association of Seasonal Climate Variability and Age-Specific Mortality in Northern Sweden before the Onset of Industrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacim Rocklöv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Little is known about health impacts of climate in pre-industrial societies. We used historical data to investigate the association of temperature and precipitation with total and age-specific mortality in Skellefteå, northern Sweden, between 1749 and 1859. Methods: We retrieved digitized aggregated population data of the Skellefteå parish, and monthly temperature and precipitation measures. A generalized linear model was established for year to year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal average temperature and cumulative precipitation using a negative binomial function, accounting for long-term trends in population size. The final full model included temperature and precipitation of all four seasons simultaneously. Relative risks (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated for total, sex- and age-specific mortality. Results: In the full model, only autumn precipitation proved statistically significant (RR 1.02; CI 1.00–1.03, per 1cm increase of autumn precipitation, while winter temperature (RR 0.98; CI 0.95–1.00, per 1 °C increase in temperature and spring precipitation (RR 0.98; CI 0.97–1.00 per 1 cm increase in precipitation approached significance. Similar effects were observed for men and women. The impact of climate variability on mortality was strongest in children aged 3–9, and partly also in older children. Infants, on the other hand, appeared to be less affected by unfavourable climate conditions. Conclusions: In this pre-industrial rural region in northern Sweden, higher levels of rain during the autumn increased the annual number of deaths. Harvest quality might be one critical factor in the causal pathway, affecting nutritional status and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Autumn rain probably also contributed to the spread of air-borne diseases in crowded living conditions. Children beyond infancy appeared most vulnerable to climate impacts.

  5. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  6. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudała, Janina; Nádudvari, Ádám; Bronder, Joachim; Fudała, Marta

    2018-01-01

    One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI). To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI) and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  7. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudała Janina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI. To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  8. Heart rate variability and heat sensation during CT coronary angiography: Low-osmolar versus iso-osmolar contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Anders; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Aspelin, Peter; Cederlund, Kerstin; Brismar, B. Torkel (Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Div. of Medical Imaging and Technology and Dept. of Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: anders.svensson@karolinska.se; Rueck, Andreas (Div. of Cardiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    Background: During computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) unexpected changes in heart rate while scanning may affect image quality. Purpose: To evaluate whether an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol) and a low-osmolar contrast medium (LOCM, iomeprol) affect heart rate and experienced heat sensation differently. Material and Methods: One hundred patients scheduled for CTCA were randomized to receive either iodixanol 320 mgI/ml or iomeprol 400 mgI/ml. Depending on their heart rate, the patients were assigned to one of five scanning protocols, each optimized for different heart rate ranges. During scanning the time between each heart beat (hb) was recorded, and the corresponding heart rate was calculated. For each contrast medium (CM) the average heart rate, the variation in heart rate from individual mean heart rate, and the mean deviation from the predefined scanning protocol were calculated. Experience of heat was obtained immediately after scanning by using a visual analog scale (VAS). Examination quality was rated by two radiologists on a three-point scale. Results: The mean variation in heart rate after IOCM was 1.4 hb/min and after LOCM it was 4.4 hb/min (NS). The mean deviations in heart rate from that in the predefined scanning protocol were 2.0 hb/min and 4.7 hb/min, respectively (NS). A greater number of arrhythmic hb were observed after LOCM compared with IOCM (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in image quality. The LOCM group reported a stronger heat sensation after CM injection than the IOCM group (VAS =36 mm and 18 mm, P<0.05). Conclusion: At clinically used concentrations the IOCM, iodixanol 320 mgI/ml, does not increase the heart rate during CTCA and causes less heart arrhythmia and less heat sensation than the LOCM, iomeprol 400 mgI/ml

  9. Assessment of thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat of nanofluids in single phase laminar indernal forced convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluids are considered for improving the heat exchange in forced convective flow. In literature, the benefit of nanofluids compared to the corresponding base fluid is represented by several figures-of-merit in which the heat transfer benefit and the cost of pumping the fluid are considered. These

  10. Momentum, sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficient variability: what can we learn from 20 years of continuous eddy covariance measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Heinesch, Bernard; De Ligne, Anne; Vincke, Caroline; Aubinet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Long-term data series of carbon dioxide and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere become more and more numerous. Long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) an ICOS candidate site located in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardenne. Fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide and sensible heat have been continuously measured there by eddy covariance for more than 20 years. During this period, changes in canopy height and measurement height occurred. The correlation coefficients (for momemtum, sensible heat and CO2) and the normalized standard deviations measured for the past 20 years at the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) were analysed in order to define how the fluxes, independently of climate conditions, were affected by the surrounding environment evolution, including tree growth, forest thinning and tower height change. A relationship between canopy aerodynamic distance and the momentum correlation coefficient was found which is characteristic of the roughness sublayer, and suggests that momentum transport processes were affected by z-d. In contrast, no relationship was found for sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficients, suggesting that the z-d variability observed did not affect their turbulent transport. There were strong differences in these coefficients, however, between two wind sectors, characterized by contrasted stands (height differences, homogeneity) and different hypotheses were raised to explain it. This study highlighted the importance of taking the surrounding environment variability into account in order to ensure the spatio

  11. A Note on Variable Viscosity and Chemical Reaction Effects on Mixed Convection Heat and Mass Transfer Along a Semi-Infinite Vertical Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A. A. Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an analysis is carried out to study the variable viscosity and chemical reaction effects on the flow, heat, and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity transformations. The transformed coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by using the shooting method. The effects of different parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are shown graphically. In addition, tabulated results for the local skin-friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number, and the local Sherwood number are presented and discussed.

  12. Level of tissue differentiation influences the activation of a heat-inducible flower-specific system for genetic containment in poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Nunna, Suneetha; Reinhardt, Richard; Jeltsch, Albert; Briones, Valentina; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Differentiation level but not transgene copy number influenced activation of a gene containment system in poplar. Heat treatments promoted CRE gene body methylation. The flower-specific transgene deletion was confirmed. Gene flow between genetic modified trees and their wild relatives is still motive of concern. Therefore, approaches for gene containment are required. In this study, we designed a novel strategy for achieving an inducible and flower-specific transgene removal from poplar trees but still expressing the transgene in the plant body. Hence, pollen carrying transgenes could be used for breeding purposes under controlled conditions in a first phase, and in the second phase genetic modified poplars developing transgene-free pollen grains could be released. This approach is based on the recombination systems CRE/loxP and FLP/frt. Both gene constructs contained a heat-inducible CRE/loxP-based spacer sequence for in vivo assembling of the flower-specific FLP/frt system. This allowed inducible activation of gene containment. The FLP/frt system was under the regulation of a flower-specific promoter, either CGPDHC or PTD. Our results confirmed complete CRE/loxP-based in vivo assembling of the flower-specific transgene excision system after heat treatment in all cells for up to 30 % of regenerants derived from undifferentiated tissue cultures. Degradation of HSP::CRE/loxP spacer after recombination but also persistence as extrachromosomal DNA circles were detected in sub-lines obtained after heat treatments. Furthermore, heat treatment promoted methylation of the CRE gene body. A lower methylation level was detected at CpG sites in transgenic sub-lines showing complete CRE/loxP recombination and persistence of CRE/loxP spacer, compared to sub-lines with incomplete recombination. However, our results suggest that low methylation might be necessary but not sufficient for recombination. The flower-specific FLP/frt-based transgene deletion was confirmed in 6.3 % of

  13. Abbreviation as a Reflection of Terms Variability in Language for Specific Purposes: Translational Features (Terminology Case Study in German, English, Kazakh, and Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisembayeva, Gulshat Z.; Yeskindirova, Manshuk Z.; Tulebayeva, Samal A.

    2016-01-01

    The range of modern dynamic social changes, globalization of world powers' economic cooperation, acceleration of technocratic processes have widespread impact on term systems' variability in language, in particular, on terminological variability for specific purposes. This globalized extra-linguistic factor provokes avalanche growth of…

  14. Specific heat of a localized magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host: A spectral density method for the Anderson–Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, Ch. Narasimha; Chatterjee, Ashok, E-mail: acsp@uohyd.ernet.in

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electron–phonon interaction on the spectral function of a magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host metal is studied within the framework of the Anderson–Holstein model using a spectral density method. The impurity contribution to the specific heat of the host metal is also calculated.

  15. Specific heat of a localized magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host: A spectral density method for the Anderson-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ch. Narasimha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function of a magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host metal is studied within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using a spectral density method. The impurity contribution to the specific heat of the host metal is also calculated.

  16. Genetic variability of microcystin biosynthesis genes in Planktothrix as elucidated from samples preserved by heat desiccation during three decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Ostermaier

    Full Text Available Historic samples of phytoplankton can provide information on the abundance of the toxigenic genotypes of cyanobacteria in dependence on increased or decreased eutrophication. The analysis of a time-series from preserved phytoplankton samples by quantitative PCR (qPCR extends observation periods considerably. The analysis of DNA from heat-desiccated samples by qPCR can be aggravated by point substitutions or the fragmentation of DNA introduced by the high temperature. In this study, we analyzed whether the heat desiccation of the cellular material of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. introduced potential errors to the template DNA that is used for qPCR within (i 16S rDNA and phycocyanin genes and (ii the mcyA gene indicative of the incorporation of either dehydrobutyrine (Dhb or N-methyl-dehydroalanine (Mdha in position 7, and (ii the mcyB gene, which is indicative of homotyrosine (Hty in position 2 of the microcystin (MC molecule. Due to high temperature desiccation, the deterioration of the DNA template quality was rather due to fragmentation than due to nucleotide substitutions. By using the heat-desiccated samples of Lake Zürich, Switzerland the abundance of the Dhb, Mdha and Hty genotypes was determined during three decades (1977-2008. Despite major changes in the trophic state of the lake resulting in a major increase of the total Planktothrix population density, the proportion of these genotypes encoding the synthesis of different MC congeners showed high stability. Nevertheless, a decline of the most abundant mcyA genotype indicative of the synthesis of Dhb in position 7 of the MC molecule was observed. This decline could be related to the gradual incline in the proportion of a mutant genotype carrying a 1.8kbp deletion of this gene region. The increase of this mcyA (Dhb gene deletion mutant has been minor so far, however, and likely did not affect the overall toxicity of the population.

  17. Heat and hydration status: Predictors of repeated measures of urine specific gravity among Tsimane' adults in the Bolivian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinger, Asher

    2015-12-01

    Hydration status is critical to physiological and cognitive health, yet it is unclear how populations living in hot-humid environments experiencing lifestyle transitions manage this underexplored facet of heat adaptation. This study assesses the predictors of repeated measures of hydration status for adults from two villages (close and distant from a market town) in the Bolivian Amazon. Interviews and focal follows were conducted with 36 Tsimane' (50% male). Urine samples, temperature, activity levels, and anthropometrics were measured pre-interview and post-follow and yielded a small panel (72 observations). Urine samples were analyzed for urine specific gravity (USG), a biomarker of hydration, with a refractometer. The mean USG was 1.020 g/ml (SD ± 0.008) with men (1.022 ± 0.008) slightly more dehydrated than women (1.018 ± 0.007). Using 1.020 as the criteria for clinical dehydration, 42% of the participants were dehydrated at both intervals and 21% were extremely dehydrated. Controlling for activity level, village membership, and covariates in random-effects linear regression models, each degree centigrade increase was associated with a USG increase of 0.0008 g/ml (P = 0.000). Adults from the village closer to the market town had significantly higher USG (B = 0.0041; P = 0.04) than those in the distant village. Dehydration was predicted to occur at 29°C, just above the thermoneutral range, and extreme dehydration at 37°C. These findings suggest that hotter temperatures coupled with lifestyle transitions may create conditions that increase vulnerability to dehydration among rural populations through landscape modifications and diet changes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  19. SPECIES-SPECIFIC FOREST VARIABLE ESTIMATION USING NON-PARAMETRIC MODELING OF MULTI-SPECTRAL PHOTOGRAMMETRIC POINT CLOUD DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bohlin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent development in software for automatic photogrammetric processing of multispectral aerial imagery, and the growing nation-wide availability of Digital Elevation Model (DEM data, are about to revolutionize data capture for forest management planning in Scandinavia. Using only already available aerial imagery and ALS-assessed DEM data, raster estimates of the forest variables mean tree height, basal area, total stem volume, and species-specific stem volumes were produced and evaluated. The study was conducted at a coniferous hemi-boreal test site in southern Sweden (lat. 58° N, long. 13° E. Digital aerial images from the Zeiss/Intergraph Digital Mapping Camera system were used to produce 3D point-cloud data with spectral information. Metrics were calculated for 696 field plots (10 m radius from point-cloud data and used in k-MSN to estimate forest variables. For these stands, the tree height ranged from 1.4 to 33.0 m (18.1 m mean, stem volume from 0 to 829 m3 ha-1 (249 m3 ha-1 mean and basal area from 0 to 62.2 m2 ha-1 (26.1 m2 ha-1 mean, with mean stand size of 2.8 ha. Estimates made using digital aerial images corresponding to the standard acquisition of the Swedish National Land Survey (Lantmäteriet showed RMSEs (in percent of the surveyed stand mean of 7.5% for tree height, 11.4% for basal area, 13.2% for total stem volume, 90.6% for pine stem volume, 26.4 for spruce stem volume, and 72.6% for deciduous stem volume. The results imply that photogrammetric matching of digital aerial images has significant potential for operational use in forestry.

  20. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  1. Thermophoresis and thermal radiation with heat and mass transfer in a magnetohydrodynamic thin-film second-grade fluid of variable properties past a stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noor Saeed; Gul, Taza; Islam, Saeed; Khan, Waris

    2017-01-01

    The influences of thermophoresis and thermal radiation of a magnetohydrodynamic two-dimensional thin-film second-grade fluid with heat and mass transfer flow in the presence of viscous dissipation past a stretching sheet are analyzed. The main focus of the study is to discuss the significant roll of the fluid variable properties like thermal conductivity and viscosity under the variation of the thin film. The thermal conductivity varies directly as a linear function of temperature showing the property that expresses the ability of a material to transfer heat, and the viscosity is assumed to vary inversely as a linear function of temperature showing that viscous forces become weak at increasing temperature. Thermophoresis occurs to discuss the mass deposition at the surface of the stretching sheet while thermal radiation occurs, especially, at high temperature. The basic governing equations for the velocity, temperature and concentration of the fluid flow have been transformed to high nonlinear coupled differential equations with physical conditions by invoking suitable similarity transformations. The solution of the problem has been obtained by using HAM (Homotopy Analysis Method). The heat and mass transfer flow behaviors are affected significantly by the thin film. The physical influences of thin film parameter and all other parameters have been studied graphically and illustrated. The residual graphs and residual error table elucidate the authentication of the present work.

  2. Variable crustal thickness beneath Thwaites Glacier revealed from airborne gravimetry, possible implications for geothermal heat flux in West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Theresa M.; Jordan, Tom A.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Young, Duncan A.; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2014-12-01

    Thwaites Glacier has one of the largest glacial catchments in West Antarctica. The future stability of Thwaites Glacier's catchment is of great concern, as this part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has recently been hypothesized to already be en route towards collapse. Although an oceanic trigger is thought to be responsible for current change at the grounding line of Thwaites Glacier, in order to determine the effects of this coastal change further in the interior of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet it is essential to also better constrain basal conditions that control the dynamics of fast glacial flow within the catchment itself. One major contributor to fast glacial flow is the presence of subglacial water, the production of which is a result of both glaciological shear heating and geothermal heat flux. The primary goal of our study is to investigate the crustal thickness beneath Thwaites Glacier, which is an important contributor to regional-scale geothermal heat flux patterns. Crustal structure is an indicator of past tectonic events and hence provides a geophysical proxy for the thermal status of the crust and mantle. Terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity disturbances are used here to estimate depths to the Moho and mid-crustal boundary. The thin continental crust we reveal beneath Thwaites Glacier supports the hypothesis that the West Antarctic Rift System underlies the region and is expressed topographically as the Byrd Subglacial Basin. This rifted crust is of similar thickness to that calculated from airborne gravity data beneath neighboring Pine Island Glacier, and is more extended than crust in the adjacent Siple Coast sector of the Ross Sea Embayment. A zone of thinner crust is also identified near the area's subaerial volcanoes lending support to a recent interpretation predicting that this part of Marie Byrd Land is a major volcanic dome, likely within the West Antarctic Rift System itself. Near-zero Bouguer gravity disturbances for the subglacial highlands

  3. The Effect of Moisture Content and Temperature on the Specific Heat Capacity of Nut and Kernel of Two Iranian Pistachio Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Salari Kia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pistachio has a special ranking among Iranian agricultural products. Iran is known as the largest producer and exporter of pistachio in the world. Agricultural products are imposed under different thermal treatments during storage and processing. Designing all these processes requires thermal parameters of the products such as specific heat capacity. Regarding the importance of pistachio processing as an exportable product, in this study the specific heat capacity of nut and kernel of two varieties of Iranian pistachio (Kalle-Ghochi and Badami were investigated at four levels of moisture content (initial moisture content (5%, 15%, 25% and 40% w.b. and three levels of temperature (40, 50 and 60°C. In both varieties, the differences between the data were significant at the 1% of probability; however, the effect of moisture content was greater than that of temperature. The results indicated that the specific heat capacity of both nuts and kernels increase logarithmically with increase of moisture content and also increase linearly with increase of temperature. This parameter has altered for nut and kernel of Kalle-Ghochi and Badami varieties within the range of 1.039-2.936 kJ kg-1 K-1, 1.236-3.320 kJ kg-1 K-1, 0.887-2.773 kJ kg-1 K-1 and 0.811-2.914 kJ kg-1 K-1, respectively. Moreover, for any given level of temperature, the specific heat capacity of kernels was higher than that of nuts. Finally, regression models with high R2 values were developed to predict the specific heat capacity of pistachio varieties as a function of moisture content and temperature

  4. Requirement of extracellular Ca2+binding to specific amino acids for heat-evoked activation of TRPA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurganov, Erkin; Saito, Shigeru; Tanaka Saito, Claire; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-04-15

    We found that extracellular Ca 2+ , but not other divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Ba 2+ ) or intracellular Ca 2+ , is involved in heat-evoked activation of green anole (ga) TRPA1. Heat-evoked activation of chicken (ch) and rat snake (rs) TRPA1 does not depend solely on extracellular Ca 2+ . Neutralization of acidic amino acids on the outer surface of TRPA1 by extracellular Ca 2+ is important for heat-evoked large activation of gaTRPA1, chTRPA1 and rsTRPA1. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a homotetrameric non-selective cation-permeable channel that has six transmembrane domains and cytoplasmic N- and C-termini. The N-terminus is characterized by an unusually large number of ankyrin repeats. Although the 3-dimensional structure of human TRPA1 has been determined, and TRPA1 channels from insects to birds are known to be activated by heat stimulus, the mechanism for temperature-dependent TRPA1 activation is unclear. We previously reported that extracellular Ca 2+ , but not intracellular Ca 2+ , plays an important role in heat-evoked TRPA1 activation in green anole lizards (gaTRPA1). Here we focus on extracellular Ca 2+ -dependent heat sensitivity of gaTRPA1 by comparing gaTRPA1 with heat-activated TRPA1 channels from rat snake (rsTRPA1) and chicken (chTRPA1). In the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ , rsTRPA1 and chTRPA1 are activated by heat and generate small inward currents. A comparison of extracellular amino acids in TRPA1 identified three negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamate and aspartate) near the outer pore vestibule that are involved in heat-evoked TRPA1 activation in the presence of extracellular Ca 2+ . These results suggest that neutralization of acidic amino acids by extracellular Ca 2+ is important for heat-evoked activation of gaTRPA1, chTRPA1, and rsTRPA1, which could clarify mechanisms of heat-evoked channel activation. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  5. Physiological and performance adaptations to an in-season soccer camp in the heat: Associations with heart rate and heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchheit, M; Voss, S C; Nybo, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between adaptive responses to an in-season soccer training camp in the heat and changes in submaximal exercising heart rate (HRex, 5-min run at 9 ¿km/h), postexercise HR recovery (HRR) and HR variability (HRV). Fifteen well-trained...... but non-heat-acclimatized male adult players performed a training week in Qatar (34.6¿±¿1.9°C wet bulb globe temperature). HRex, HRR, HRV (i.e. the standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability measured from Poincaré plots SD1, a vagal-related index), creatine kinase (CK......) activity, plasma volume (PV) changes, and post-5-min run rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected at six occasions in temperate environmental conditions (22°C). Players also performed the yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) in the same environmental conditions (22°C), both...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic thin film and heat transfer of power law fluids over an unsteady stretching sheet with variable thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yanhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the MHD thin film flow and heat transfer of a power law fluid over an unsteady stretching sheet. The effects of power law viscosity on a temperature field are taken into account with a modified Fourier’s law Proposed by Zheng by assuming that the temperature field is similar to the velocity field. The governing equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The numerical solutions are obtained by using the shooting method coupled with the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of the Hartmann number, the power law exponent, the unsteadiness parameter, the thickness parameter and the generalized Prandtl number on the velocity and temperature fields are presented graphically and analyzed. Moreover, the critical formula for parameters are derived which indicated that the magnetic field has no effect on the critical value.

  7. Stage and cell-specific expression and intracellular localization of the small heat shock protein Hsp27 during oogenesis and spermatogenesis in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Katerina; Kotsiliti, Elena; Mintzas, Anastassios C

    2017-01-01

    The cell-specific expression and intracellular distribution of the small heat protein Hsp27 was investigated in the ovaries and testes of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (medfly), under both normal and heat shock conditions. For this study, a gfp-hsp27 strain was used to detect the chimeric protein by confocal microscopy. In unstressed ovaries, the protein was expressed throughout egg development in a stage and cell-specific pattern. In germarium, the protein was detected in the cytoplasm of the somatic cells in both unstressed and heat-shocked ovaries. In the early stages of oogenesis of unstressed ovaries, the protein was mainly located in the perinuclear region of the germ cells and in the cytoplasm of the follicle cells, while in later stages (9-10) it was distributed in the cytoplasm of the germ cells. In late stages (12-14), the protein changed localization pattern and was exclusively associated with the nuclei of the somatic cells. In heat shocked ovaries, the protein was mainly located in the nuclei of the somatic cells throughout egg chamber's development. In unstressed testes, the chimeric protein was detected in the nuclei of primary spermatocytes and in the filamentous structures of spermatid bundles, called actin cones. Interestingly, after a heat shock, the protein presented the same cell-specific localization pattern as in unstressed testes. Furthermore, the protein was also detected in the nuclei of the epithelial cells of the deferent duct, the accessory glands and the ejaculatory bulb. Our data suggest that medfly Hsp27 may have cell-specific functions, especially in the nucleus. Moreover, the association of this protein to actin cones during spermatid individualization, suggests a possible role of the protein in the formation and stabilization of actin cones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Heat and Cold on Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in Vadu HDSS--A Rural Setting in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingole, Vijendra; Rocklöv, Joacim; Juvekar, Sanjay; Schumann, Barbara

    2015-12-02

    Many diseases are affected by changes in weather. There have been limited studies, however, which have examined the relationship between heat and cold and cause-specific mortality in low and middle-income countries. In this study, we aimed to estimate the effects of heat and cold days on total and cause-specific mortality in the Vadu Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) area in western India. We used a quasi-Poisson regression model allowing for over-dispersion to examine the association of total and cause-specific mortality with extreme high (98th percentile, >39 °C) and low temperature (2nd percentile, Heat was significantly associated with daily deaths by non-infectious diseases (RR = 1.57; CI: 1.18-2.10). There was an increase in the risk of total mortality in the age group 12-59 years on lag 0 day (RR = 1.43; CI: 1.02-1.99). A high increase in total mortality was observed among men at lag 0 day (RR = 1.38; CI: 1.05-1.83). We did not find any short-term association between total and cause-specific mortality and cold days. Deaths from neither infectious nor external causes were associated with heat or cold. Our results showed a strong and rather immediate relationship between high temperatures and non-infectious disease mortality in a rural population located in western India, during 2003-2012. This study may be used to develop targeted interventions such as Heat Early Warning Systems in the area to reduce mortality from extreme temperatures.

  9. Specific gravity of hybrid poplars in the north-central region, USA: within-tree variability and site × genotype effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Headlee; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Richard B. Hall; Edmund O. Bauer; Bradford Bender; Bruce A. Birr; Raymond O. Miller; Jesse A. Randall; Adam H. Wiese

    2013-01-01

    Specific gravity is an important consideration for traditional uses of hybrid poplars for pulp and solid wood products, as well as for biofuels and bioenergy production. While specific gravity has been shown to be under strong genetic control and subject to within-tree variability, the role of genotype × environment interactions is poorly understood. Most...

  10. Heat distribution and the future competitiveness of district heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Urban; Werner, Sven [School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad University, PO Box 823, SE-30118 Halmstad (Sweden)

    2011-03-15

    The competitiveness of present and future district heating systems can be at risk when residential and service sector heat demands are expected to decrease in the future. In this study, the future competitiveness of district heating has been examined by an in depth analysis of the distribution capital cost at various city characteristics, city sizes, and heat demands. Hereby, this study explores an important market condition often neglected or badly recognised in traditional comparisons between centralised and decentralised heat supply. By a new theoretical approach, the traditional and empirical expression for linear heat density is transformed into an analytical expression that allows modelling of future distribution capital cost levels also in areas where no district heating exists today. The independent variables in this new analytical expression are population density, specific building space, specific heat demand and effective width. Model input data has primarily been collected from national and European statistical sources on heat use, city populations, city districts and residential living areas. Study objects were 83 cities in Belgium, Germany, France, and the Netherlands. The average heat market share for district heat within these cities was 21% during 2006. The main conclusion is that the future estimated capital costs for district heat distribution in the study cities are rather low, since the cities are very dense. At the current situation, a market share of 60% can be reached with a marginal distribution capital cost of only 2.1 EUR/GJ, corresponding to an average distribution capital cost of 1.6 EUR/GJ. The most favourable conditions appear in large cities and in inner city areas. In the future, there is a lower risk for reduced competitiveness due to reduced heat demands in these areas, since the increased distribution capital cost is low compared to the typical prices of district heat and competing heat supply. However, district heating will lose

  11. Weld heat-affected zone in Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Part 1: Computer simulation of the effect of weld variables on the thermal cycles in the HAZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.K. [Naval Dockyard, Bombay (India). Naval Chemical and Metallurgical Lab.; Kulkarni, S.D.; Gopinathan, V. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Krishnan, R. [Gas Turbine Research Establishment, Bangalore (India)

    1995-09-01

    The weld thermal cycles encountered in the HAZ of titanium alloys have been characterized using modified Rosenthal equations. The results are shown in the form of axonometric plots depicting the effect of two weld variables keeping the other variables fixed. Computer simulation results show that the heat input and the plate thickness are the major variables affecting the thermal cycles in the HAZ. The effects of changes in welding speed are reflecting in the variation in the heat input. The electrode radius has minimal effect and can be termed as the minor variable. Preheat or interpass temperatures have an intermediate effect. An increase in electrode radius or decrease in plate thickness requires large apparent displacement of the heat source above the plate surface to be incorporated in the analytical solutions. The melt pool width increases sharply with an increase in the heat input (a/v) or a decrease in plate thickness (d); however, preheat temperature (T{sub 0}) has negligible effect. The effect of weld variables on the effective heat input is also similar. The t{sub 8/5} parameter increases sharply with reducing plate thickness or increasing heat input.

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - the TPRC Data Series. Volume 6S. Specific Heat - Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    1200 0.725 1300 0.728 1400 0.731 1500 0.733 CHLORINE TRIFLUORIDE CIF, - G 250 0.655 0 Theor 401 273.16 0.680 298.16 0.704 300 0.705 400 0.772 500...CYMENE Liquid: 22724 CHLORINE OXIDE Gas: 10530 10718 10928 17036 24959 D CHLORINE TRIFLUORIDE Gas: 1799 1809 7001 10� DEUTERIUM, MONATOMIC Liquid...01799 THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES Of CHLORINE TRIFLUORIDE SCHEER MILTON D 01562 HEAT CAPACITIES OF LIQUIDS. I. HEAT CAPACITY Of J CHER PHS 4 AENZNE

  13. Targeted gene expression without a tissue-specific promoter: creating mosaic embryos using laser-induced single-cell heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, M. S.; Kose, H.; Chiba, A.; Keshishian, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a method to target gene expression in the Drosophila embryo to a specific cell without having a promoter that directs expression in that particular cell. Using a digitally enhanced imaging system to identify single cells within the living embryo, we apply a heat shock to each cell individually by using a laser microbeam. A 1- to 2-min laser treatment is sufficient to induce a heat-shock response but is not lethal to the heat-shocked cells. Induction of heat shock was measured in a variety of cell types, including neurons and somatic muscles, by the expression of beta-galactosidase from an hsp26-lacZ reporter construct or by expression of a UAS target gene after induction of hsGAL4. We discuss the applicability of this technique to ectopic gene expression studies, lineage tracing, gene inactivation studies, and studies of cells in vitro. Laser heat shock is a versatile technique that can be adapted for use in a variety of research organisms and is useful for any studies in which it is desirable to express a given gene in only a distinct cell or clone of cells, either transiently or constitutively, at a time point of choice.

  14. Assessment of the intensity and spatial variability of urban heat islands over the Indian cities for Regional Climate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, S.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Urban heat island (UHI) in general developed over cities, due to the drastic changes in land use and land cover (LULC), has profound impact on the atmospheric circulation patterns due to the changes in the energy transport mechanism which in turn affect the regional climate. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the intensity of UHI, and to identify the pockets of UHI over cities during last decade over fast developing cosmopolitan Indian cities such as New Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata. For this purpose, Landsat TM and ETM+ images during winter period, in about 5 year intervals from 2002 to 2013, has been selected to retrieve the brightness temperatures and land use/cover, from which Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been estimated using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Normalized Difference Build-up Index (NDBI) and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) are estimated to extract build-up areas and bare land from the satellite images to identify the UHI pockets over the study area. For this purpose image processing and GIS tools were employed. Results reveal a significant increase in the intensity of UHI and increase in its area of influence over all the three cities. An increase of 2 to 2.5 oC of UHI intensity over the study regions has been noticed. The range of increase in UHI intensity is found to be more over New Delhi compared to Mumbai and Kolkata which is more or less same. The number of hotspot pockets of UHI has also been increased as seen from the spatial distribution of LST, NDVI and NDBI. This result signifies the impact of rapid urbanization and infrastructural developments has a direct consequence in modulating the regional climate over the Indian cities.

  15. A study of the hourly variability of the urban heat island effect in the Greater Athens Area during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Rapsomanikis, S; Amiridis, V; Keramitsoglou, I; Hooyberghs, H; Maiheu, B; Melas, D

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of air temperature and humidity in the urban canopy layer during July 2009 in 26 sites in Athens, Greece, allowed for the mapping of the hourly spatiotemporal evolution of the urban heat island (UHI) effect. City districts neighboring to the mountains to the east were the hottest during the afternoon, while being among the coolest during the early morning hours. While during the early morning some coastal sites were the hottest, the warm air plume slowly moved to the densely urbanized center of the city until 14:00-15:00, moving then further west, to the Elefsis industrial area in the afternoon. Results from the UrbClim model agree fairly well with the observations. Satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) data from AATSR, ASTER, AVHRR and MODIS, for pixels corresponding to ground stations measuring Tair, showed that LST can be up to 5K lower than the respective Tair during nighttime, while it can be up to 15K higher during the rest of the day. Generally, LST during late afternoon as acquired from AATSR is very near to Tair for all stations and all days, i.e., the AATSR LST afternoon retrieval can be used as a very good approximation of Tair. The hourly evolution of the spatial Tair distribution was almost the same during days with NE Etesian flow as in days with sea breeze circulation, indicating that the mean wind flow was not the main factor controlling the diurnal UHI evolution, although it influenced the temperatures attained. No unambiguous observation of the urban moisture excess (UME) phenomenon could be made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific heat measurements on (Nd{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}){sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in applied magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbeta, V.B. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Inst. of Pure and Applied Physical Sciences; Allenspach, P. [Labor.-fuer Neutronenstreuung, ETH Zuerich, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Maple, M.B. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Inst. of Pure and Applied Physical Sciences; Jardim, R.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 20516, 01452-990 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1995-03-01

    Low-temperature specific heat measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples of (Nd{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. All samples show an anomaly at low temperatures characterized by a maximum in the specific heat, as previously reported for the pure compounds, which has been associated with a transition to an ordered state of the rare earth ion. The results at zero field show that there are two different mechanisms involved in the rare earth ordering process in the mixed compounds. Measurements on these samples in applied magnetic fields reveal that the temperature at which the maximum occurs decreases slightly with increasing field for Sm-rich samples and increases for Nd-rich samples. ((orig.)).

  17. A study of the disorder in heavily doped Ba1-xLaxF2+x by neutron scattering, ionic conductivity and specific heat measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Hessel; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    The ionic disorder in single crystals of the fluorite-type solid solutions Ba1-xLaxF2+x (with x=0.209 and x=0.492) has been studied in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 degrees C by diffuse neutron scattering, ionic conductivity, and specific heat measurements. From the diffuse...... neutron scattering it was found that the disorder was dominated by 222 clusters, which at low temperatures (T>10-10s), in agreement with NMB results which suggest a jump frequency below 75 MHz. The temperatures at which the steepest slopes are found in the loss of correlations and in the conductivity...... coincide at approximately 650 degrees C. At this temperature no clear anomaly is observed in the specific heat. Based on these findings the authors propose a conduction mechanisms where F- ions are moving through the lattice by means of rearrangements of the 222 clusters....

  18. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film over an Unsteady Stretching Surface in the Presence of Thermosolutal Capillarity and Variable Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat and mass transfer characteristics of a liquid film which contain thermosolutal capillarity and a variable magnetic field over an unsteady stretching sheet have been investigated. The governing equations for momentum, energy, and concentration are established and transformed to a set of coupled ordinary equations with the aid of similarity transformation. The analytical solutions are obtained using the double-parameter transformation perturbation expansion method. The effects of various relevant parameters such as unsteady parameter, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, thermocapillary number, and solutal capillary number on the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are discussed and presented graphically. Results show that increasing values of thermocapillary number and solutal capillary number both lead to a decrease in the temperature and concentration fields. Furthermore, the influences of thermocapillary number on various fields are more remarkable in comparison to the solutal capillary number.

  19. Functional regions of HpaXm as elicitors with specific heat tolerance induce the hypersensitive response or plant growth promotion in nonhost plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Liu, Wenbo; Xiong, Xiaohui; Lv, Chuyang; Zhou, Xiang; Miao, Weiguo

    2018-01-01

    HpaXm produced by the cotton leaf blight bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum is a novel harpin elicitor of the induced hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. We investigated whether fragments of HpaXm, compared with fragments of Hpa1Xoo, are sufficient for HR or plant growth promotion (PGP) elicitation using four synthetic peptides (HpaXm35-51, HpaXm10-39, Hpa1Xoo36-52 and Hpa1Xoo10-40). We also heated the fragments to determine the heat tolerance of the functional fragments. HpaXm35-51 and Hpa1Xoo36-52 induced hypersensitive response (HR). Bursts of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) induced by HpaXm35-51 and Hpa1Xoo36-52 were earlier and stronger than those induced by HpaXm and Hpa1Xoo. In plants treated with HpaXm35-51 or Hpa1Xoo36-52, the expression of the HR marker genes Hin1 and Hsr203J and the active oxygen metabolism related gene AOX were significantly upregulated. These findings suggest that the predicted α-helical structures of the HpaXm35-51 and Hpa1Xoo36-52 fragments are crucial for HR. PGP result by soaking seeds in unheated/heated HpaXm10-39 or Hpa1Xoo10-40 solution prior to transfer, which obviously enhances root growth and the aerial parts of plants. The PGP related gene NtEXP6 was greatly enhanced when plants were sprayed with a solution of HpaXm10-39 or Hpa1Xoo10-40; heated fragment treatments induced higher levels of NtEXP6 expression than unheated HpaXm fragments. In addition, HR marker genes induced by the heated fragments had lower expression levels than when induced with unheated HpaXm fragments. Moreover, the expression levels of HR marker genes and PGP related genes induced by treatment with Hpa1Xoo fragments before or after heating were the opposite of those induced by HpaXm fragments. Different functional fragments of harpin and different harpins with the same functional region have different degrees of heat tolerance. Therefore, the heat resistance of harpin is conservative, but the degree of heat tolerance of the

  20. The specific heat of ErxY1-xRh1.1Sn3.6 for x=0.4, 0.8 and 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekers, R.W.; Bosch, W.A.; Meijer, H.C.; Bakker, S.J.M.; Postma, H.; Flokstra, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    Specific heat measurements between 50 and 800 mK of the three magnetic superconductors ErxY1-xRh1.1Sn3.6 With x = 0.4, 0.8 and 1, respectively, are presented. For these compounds broad anomalies with maxima at 245, 360 and 435 mK, respectively, were observed. No sharp peaks were detected. This means

  1. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  2. Integrating distributed temperature sensing and geological characterization to quantify spatiotemporal variability in subsurface heat transport within the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. F. F.; Stumpf, A.; Luo, Y.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    data show that the temperature variations in amplitudes and trends are correlated with previous characterizations of the geology and hydrogeological properties. Through continuous collection of data, we hope to understand how subsurface heat transport is correlated with climate change and agricultural practices on a larger temporal scale.

  3. Thermal radiation effects on magnetohydrodynamic free convection heat and mass transfer from a sphere in a variable porosity regime

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Vallampati Ramachandra Ramachandra

    2012-02-01

    A mathematical model is presented for multiphysical transport of an optically-dense, electrically-conducting fluid along a permeable isothermal sphere embedded in a variable-porosity medium. A constant, static, magnetic field is applied transverse to the cylinder surface. The non-Darcy effects are simulated via second order Forchheimer drag force term in the momentum boundary layer equation. The surface of the sphere is maintained at a constant temperature and concentration and is permeable, i.e. transpiration into and from the boundary layer regime is possible. The boundary layer conservation equations, which are parabolic in nature, are normalized into non-similar form and then solved numerically with the well-tested, efficient, implicit, stable Keller-box finite difference scheme. Increasing porosity (ε) is found to elevate velocities, i.e. accelerate the flow but decrease temperatures, i.e. cool the boundary layer regime. Increasing Forchheimer inertial drag parameter (Λ) retards the flow considerably but enhances temperatures. Increasing Darcy number accelerates the flow due to a corresponding rise in permeability of the regime and concomitant decrease in Darcian impedance. Thermal radiation is seen to reduce both velocity and temperature in the boundary layer. Local Nusselt number is also found to be enhanced with increasing both porosity and radiation parameters. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Thermophysical Properties of Cold- and Vacuum Plasma-Sprayed Cu-Cr-X Alloys, NiAl and NiCrAlY Coatings II: Specific Heat Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    Part I of the paper discussed the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivities, thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivities and total hemispherical emissivities of several vacuum plasma-sprayed (VPS) and cold-sprayed (CS) copper alloy monolithic coatings, VPS NiAl, VPS NiCrAlY, extruded GRCop-84 and as-cast Cu-17(wt.%)Cr-5%Al. Part II discusses the temperature dependencies of the constant-pressure specific heat capacities, C P, of these coatings. The data were empirically regression-fitted with the equation: \\varvec{C}_{P} = AT^{4} + BT^{3} + CT^{2} + DT + \\varvec{E} where T is the absolute temperature and A, B, C, D and E are regression constants. The temperature dependencies of the molar enthalpy, molar entropy and Gibbs molar free energy determined from experimental values of molar specific heat capacity are reported. Calculated values of C P using the Neumann-Kopp (NK) rule were in poor agreement with experimental data. Instead, a modification of the NK rule was found to predict values closer to the experimental data with an absolute deviation less than 6.5%. The specific molar heat capacities for all the alloys did not agree with the Dulong-Petit law, and C P > 3R, where R is the universal gas constant, were measured for all the alloys except NiAl for which C P < 3R at all temperatures.

  5. Thermophysical Properties of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Cu-Cr-X Alloys, NiAl and NiCrAlY Coatings. Part 2; Specific Heat Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Part I of the paper discussed the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivities, thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivities and total hemispherical emissivities of several vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) and cold sprayed copper alloy monolithic coatings, VPS NiAl, VPS NiCrAlY, extruded GRCop-84 and as-cast Cu-17(wt.%)Cr-5%Al. Part II discusses the temperature dependencies of the constant pressure specific heat capacities, CP, of these coatings. The data were empirically were regression-fitted with the equation: CP = AT4 + BT3 + CT2 + DT +E where T is the absolute temperature and A, B, C, D and E are regression constants. The temperature dependencies of the molar enthalpy, molar entropy and Gibbs molar free energy determined from experimental values of molar specific heat capacity are reported. Calculated values of CP using the Neumann-Kopp (NK) rule were in poor agreement with experimental data. Instead, a modification of the Neumann-Kopp rule was found to predict values closer to the experimental data with an absolute deviation less than 6.5%. The specific molar heat capacities for all the alloys did not agree with the Dulong-Petit law, and CP is greater than 3R, where R is the universal gas constant, were measured for all the alloys except NiAl for which CP is less than 3R at all temperatures.

  6. Specific heat of a DyBa 2Cu 3O 7- y single crystal in magnetic fields up to 8 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, N. J.; Howson, M. A.; Yang, G.; Abell, S.

    1999-08-01

    The specific heat of a twinned DyBa 2Cu 3O 7- y (DyBCO) single crystal has been measured in magnetic fields up to 8 T near Tc. The measurements were performed on a small single crystal with an a.c. calorimetry technique. We have scaled the specific heat both by the method of removing a non-singular background and by the method of scaling the magnetic field derivative of the specific heat. Both lowest Landau level (LLL) scaling and 3D XY scaling have been tested by these methods. We find that by the method of field derivative scaling, the two models give similar results, but by the method of removing a non-singular background, the LLL scaling fails in fields below 2 T. On the low temperature side of the transition, small steps are observed in low fields which turn into small peaks (∼0.3% of C/ T) for higher fields. The position of these peaks is consistent with the vortex melting line and gives a melting entropy of 0.3 K B per vortex per CuO 2 bi-layer in an applied magnetic field of 5 T.

  7. Thermophysical Properties of Cold- and Vacuum Plasma-Sprayed Cu-Cr-X Alloys, NiAl and NiCrAlY Coatings II: Specific Heat Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Part I of the paper discussed the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivities, thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivities and total hemispherical emissivities of several vacuum plasma-sprayed (VPS) and cold-sprayed (CS) copper alloy monolithic coatings, VPS NiAl, VPS NiCrAlY, extruded GRCop-84 and as-cast Cu-17(wt.%)Cr-5%Al. Part II discusses the temperature dependencies of the constant-pressure specific heat capacities, C P, of these coatings. The data were empirically regression-fitted with the equation: \\varvec{C}_{P} = {AT}^{4} + {BT}^{3} + {CT}^{2} + DT + \\varvec{E}where T is the absolute temperature and A, B, C, D and E are regression constants. The temperature dependencies of the molar enthalpy, molar entropy and Gibbs molar free energy determined from experimental values of molar specific heat capacity are reported. Calculated values of C P using the Neumann-Kopp (NK) rule were in poor agreement with experimental data. Instead, a modification of the NK rule was found to predict values closer to the experimental data with an absolute deviation less than 6.5%. The specific molar heat capacities for all the alloys did not agree with the Dulong-Petit law, and C P > 3 R, where R is the universal gas constant, were measured for all the alloys except NiAl for which C P < 3 R at all temperatures.

  8. Exposure of Lactating Dairy Cows to Acute Pre-Ovulatory Heat Stress Affects Granulosa Cell-Specific Gene Expression Profiles in Dominant Follicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Vanselow

    Full Text Available High environmental temperatures induce detrimental effects on various reproductive processes in cattle. According to the predicted global warming the number of days with unfavorable ambient temperatures will further increase. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of acute heat stress during the late pre-ovulatory phase on morphological, physiological and molecular parameters of dominant follicles in cycling cows during lactation. Eight German Holstein cows in established lactation were exposed to heat stress (28°C or thermoneutral conditions (15°C with pair-feeding for four days. After hormonal heat induction growth of the respective dominant follicles was monitored by ultrasonography for two days, then an ovulatory GnRH dose was given and follicular steroid hormones and granulosa cell-specific gene expression profiles were determined 23 hrs thereafter. The data showed that the pre-ovulatory growth of dominant follicles and the estradiol, but not the progesterone concentrations tended to be slightly affected. mRNA microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed distinct expression profiles in granulosa cells derived from heat stressed compared to pair-fed animals. Among the 255 affected genes heatstress-, stress- or apoptosis associated genes were not present. But instead, we found up-regulation of genes essentially involved in G-protein coupled signaling pathways, extracellular matrix composition, and several members of the solute carrier family as well as up-regulation of FST encoding follistatin. In summary, the data of the present study show that acute pre-ovulatory heat stress can specifically alter gene expression profiles in granulosa cells, however without inducing stress related genes and pathways and suggestively can impair follicular growth due to affecting the activin-inhibin-follistatin system.

  9. CHNO Energetic Polymer Specific Heat Prediction From The Proposed Nominal/Generic (N/G) CP Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    HMX can exist in different solid polymorphic forms. At a certain temperature, TT, one form may change to another form if the heat energy of...TR ideas were demonstrated for HMX and HNS which are also important basic secondary explosive compounds. The impact shock response of these seven...other. In Reference 3, it was demonstrated that the CP for HNS was very close to that for TATB, and the CP for HMX was somewhat less than the TATB CP at

  10. The calculation of specific heats for some important solid components in hydrogen production process based on CuCl cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Avsec Jurij

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy sources of the future enabling direct production of power and heat in fuel cells, hydrogen engines or furnaces with hydrogen burners. One of the last remainder problems in hydrogen technology is how to produce a sufficient amount of cheap hydrogen. One of the best options is large scale thermochemical production of hydrogen in combination with nuclear power plant. copper-chlorine (CuCl) cycle is the most promissi...

  11. Sex- and limb-specific differences in the nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Greaney, Jody L; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    Local heating of the skin is commonly used to assess cutaneous microvasculature function. Controversy exists as to whether there are limb or sex differences in the nitric oxide (NO)-dependent contribution to this vasodilation, as well as the NO synthase (NOS) isoform mediating the responses. We tested the hypotheses that 1) NO-dependent vasodilation would be greater in the calf compared with the forearm; 2) total NO-dependent dilation would not be different between sexes within limb; and 3) women would exhibit greater neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent vasodilation in the calf. Two microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the ventral forearm and the calf of 19 (10 male and 9 female) young (23 ± 1 yr) adults for the local delivery of Ringer solution (control) or 5 mM N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA; nNOS inhibition). Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) at each site, after which 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) was perfused for within-site assessment of NO-dependent vasodilation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside, 43°C). Total NO-dependent vasodilation in the calf was lower compared with the forearm in both sexes (Ringer: 42 ± 5 vs. 62 ± 4%; P 0.05). These data suggest that the NO-dependent component of local heating-induced cutaneous vasodilation is lower in the calf compared with the forearm. Contrary to our original hypothesis, there was no contribution of nNOS to NO-dependent vasodilation in either limb during local heating. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Gaseous pollutants in Beijing urban area during the heating period 2007–2008: variability, sources, meteorological, and chemical impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lin

    2011-08-01

    NO level for the destruction of O3. The concentrations of SO2, CO, and NOx are strongly correlated among each other, indicating that they are emitted by some common sources. Multiple linear regression analysis is applied to the concentrations of NOy, SO2, and CO and empirical equations are obtained for the NOy concentration. Based the equations, the relative contributions from mobile and point sources to NOy is estimated to be 66 ± 30 % and 40 ± 16 %, respectively, suggesting that even in the heating period, mobile sources in Beijing contribute more to NOy than point sources.

  13. Socio-Ecological Variables Associated with Context-Specific Sitting Time in Belgian Older Adults: A One-Year Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschaert, Cedric; Scherrens, Anne-Lore; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle; De Cocker, Katrien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge about variables associated with context-specific sitting time in older adults is limited. Therefore, this study explored cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of socio-demographic, social-cognitive, physical-environmental and health-related variables with sitting during TV viewing, computer use and motorized transport in older adults. Methods A sample of Belgian older adults completed structured interviews on context-specific sitting time and associated variables using a longitudinal study design. Objective measurements of grip strength and physical performance were also completed. Complete baseline data were available of 258 participants (73.98±6.16 years) of which 229 participants remained in the study at one year follow-up (retention rate: 91.60%). Cross-sectional correlates (baseline data) and longitudinal predictors (change-scores in relation with change in sitting time) were explored through multiple linear regression analyses. Results Per context-specific sitting time, most of the cross-sectional correlates differed from the longitudinal predictors. Increases over time in enjoyment of watching TV (+one unit), encouragement of partner to watch less TV (+one unit) and TV time of partner (+30.0 min/day) were associated with respectively 9.1 min/day (pvariables predicted changes in context-specific sitting time. Variables at the social-cognitive level were most frequently related to context-specific sitting. PMID:27997603

  14. The ratio of specific heats for postshock plasmas of a detached bow shock - An MHD model. [in solar wind-earth interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. K.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The empirical relationship between the standoff distance of a detached bow shock (generated by the flow of a supersonic gas past an impenetrable obstacle), the size of the obstacle, the Mach number of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats has been generalized to include the magnetic field. The value of the ratio of specific heats (gamma-prime) in the postshock plasma has been calculated in terms of the preshock Alfvenic and sonic Mach numbers and orientation of the magnetic field. The empirical relationship is further generalized by taking into consideration the normal momentum and energy flux due to waves and/or turbulence and/or heat flow in association with high Mach number shocks. The computed value of gamma prime is substantially modified in comparison with that given by the MHD or the gas dynamic model. For this generalized model the computed gamma prime can be considered to be a more precise thermodynamic quantity, since the macroscopic parameters of the plasma have been separated out. Application of this empirical relationship to the earth's bow shock has been given.

  15. Species-specific interactions between algal endosymbionts and coral hosts define their bleaching response to heat and light stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrego, David; Ulstrup, Karin E; Willis, Bette L

    2008-01-01

    The impacts of warming seas on the frequency and severity of bleaching events are well documented, but the potential for different Symbiodinium types to enhance the physiological tolerance of reef corals is not well understood. Here we compare the functionality and physiological properties...... and a potential role for host factors in determining the physiological performance of reef corals....... of juvenile corals when experimentally infected with one of two homologous Symbiodinium types and exposed to combined heat and light stress. A suite of physiological indicators including chlorophyll a fluorescence, oxygen production and respiration, as well as pigment concentration consistently demonstrated...

  16. SPECIFIC DEGRADATION STRUCTURE FEATURES AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FURNACE AND HEAT POWER EQUIPMENT ELEMENTS AFTER LONG-TERM OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Panteleenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on structure and mechanical properties of technological equipment elements made of heat-resistant steels. A scale of chrome and molybdenum steel microstructure degradation based on evaluation of  coagulated carbide size and material mechanical properties (a point from 0-operation without time limits, up to 4-operation prohibition has been proposed in the paper. It has been  established that an analysis of  steel microstructure directly on equipment elements by means of a portable microscope is an efficient express method for evaluation of equipment condition and structures due to control of material structure degradation rate of a diagnosed object.

  17. Chapter 18: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romberger, Jeff [SBW Consulting, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2017-06-21

    An adjustable-speed drive (ASD) includes all devices that vary the speed of a rotating load, including those that vary the motor speed and linkage devices that allow constant motor speed while varying the load speed. The Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol presented here addresses evaluation issues for variable-frequency drives (VFDs) installed on commercial and industrial motor-driven centrifugal fans and pumps for which torque varies with speed. Constant torque load applications, such as those for positive displacement pumps, are not covered by this protocol.

  18. Understanding variability in hospital-specific costs of coronary artery bypass grafting represents an opportunity for standardizing care and improving resource use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Arman; Shah, Ashish S; Conte, John V; Mandal, Kaushik; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E; Whitman, Glenn J R

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine interhospital variability in inpatient costs of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify isolated CABGs performed between 2005 and 2008 in the United States. Charges for inpatient care were supplied by the data set, and hospital charge-to-cost ratios were used to derive inpatient costs for each patient and aggregated at the hospital level. Mixed-effect linear regression models were created to evaluate variability in costs between hospitals adjusting for 34 patient, operative, complication, and hospital-related variables. A total of 633 hospitals performed isolated CABG in 183,973 patients. In unadjusted analysis, there was significant baseline variability in average inpatient costs of CABG between hospitals (SD, $12,130; P cost of performing CABG per hospital ($40,424). After risk adjustment, significant variability in average costs between hospitals persisted (P costs compared with the hospital effect. There is a wide variation in the cost of performing CABG in the United States. We determined that individual hospital centers, independent of multiple patient- and outcome-specific factors, are drivers of these differences. Comparison of hospital-specific behavior with identification of the causes of cost discrepancies represents an opportunity for standardization of care and improvement in resource use. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Temporal Variability of Source-Specific Solvent-Extractable Organic Compounds in Coastal Aerosols over Xiamen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqin Tao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an analysis of ambient aerosols in a southeastern coastal city of China (Xiamen in order to assess the temporal variability in the concentrations and sources of organic aerosols (OA. Molecular-level measurements based on a series of solvent extractable lipid compounds reveal inherent heterogeneity in OA, in which the concentration and relative contribution of at least three distinct components (terrestrial plant wax derived, marine/microbial and fossil fuel derived organic matter (OM exhibited distinct and systematic temporal variability. Plant wax lipids and associated terrestrial OM are influenced by seasonal variability in plant growth; marine/microbial lipids and associated marine OM are modulated by sea spill and temperature change, whereas fossil fuel derived OM reflects the anthropogenic utilization of fossil fuels originated from petroleum-derived sources and its temporal variation is strongly controlled by meteorological conditions (e.g., the thermal inversion layer, which is analogous to other air organic pollutions. A comparative study among different coastal cities was applied to estimate the supply of different sources of OM to ambient aerosols in different regions, where it was found that biogenic OM in aerosols over Xiamen was much lower than that of other cities; however, petroleum-derived OM exhibited a high level of contribution with a higher concentration of unresolved complex matters (UCM and higher a ratio between UCM and resolved alkanes (UCM/R.

  20. Crystal-field study of magnetization and specific heat properties of frustrated pyrochlore Pr{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, J.; Jana, Y.M., E-mail: yatramohan@yahoo.com; Biswas, A. Ali

    2016-10-15

    The experimental results of temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility, field dependent isothermal magnetization, magnetic specific heat and entropy of the pyrochlore Pr{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are simulated and analyzed using appropriate D{sub 3d} crystal-field (CF) and anisotropic molecular field tensors at Pr-sites in the self-consistent mean-field approach involving four magnetically non-equivalent rare-earth spins on the tetrahedral unit of the pyrochlore structure. CF level pattern and wave-functions of the ground {sup 3}H{sub 4} multiplet of the Pr{sup 3+} ions are obtained considering intermediate coupling between different Russell-Saunders terms of the 4f{sup 2} electronic configurations of Pr-ion and J-mixing effects. CF analysis shows that the CF ground-state of the Pr{sup 3+} ion in Pr{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} is a well-isolated doublet, with significant admixtures of terms coming from |M{sub J}=±4〉 and |M{sub J}=±1〉, and the Pr-spins are effectively Ising-like along the local <111> axes. Magnetic specific heat in zero-field is simulated by considering a temperature dependence of the exchange splitting of the ground doublet. - Highlights: • Full CF diagonalization using intermediate coupling and J-mixing. • Pr-spins are Ising-like along local [111] axis. • Magnetic specific heat is due to temperature dependence exchange splitting of ground CF doublet.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of the heat budget parameters and currents in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, D.P.; Rao, V.S.

    Analysis of the thermal structure in coastal waters off Visakhapatnam revealed sub-surface inversions during October. In postmonsoon, a good association existed between wind stress (tau) and total heat loss (Qe+Qs) and between SST and heat content...

  2. Self consistently calibrated photopyroelectric calorimeter for the high resolution simultaneous absolute measurement of the specific heat and of the thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Zammit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature resolution study of the specific heat and of the thermal conductivity over the smecticA-nematic and nematic-isotropic phase transitions in octylcynobephenyl liquid crystal using a new photopyroelectric calorimetry configuration are reported, where, unlike previously adopted ones, no calibration is required other than the procedure used during the actual measurement. This makes photopyroelectric calorimetry suitable for “absolute” measurements of the thermal parameters like most other existing conventional calorimetric techniques where, however, the thermal conductivity cannot be measured.

  3. SPECIFIC HEAT STUDY OF FERROMAGNETIC ORDERING IN [Cr (NH3)6-n (H2O)n] [Cr (CN)6

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro, F.; Bartolomé, J.; Burriel, R.; Pons, J.; Casabó, J.; Nugteren, P.

    1988-01-01

    Specific heat measurements below 1 K on [Cr(NH3)6] [Cr(CN)6] and [Cr(NH3)5 (H2O)] [Co(CN)6] are reported. The first compound orders as a Heisenberg bcc S = 3/2 ferromagnet. The second remains paramagnetic showing only a crystal field Schottky behaviour. Previous results on [Cr(NH3)5 (H2O)] [Cr(CN)6], where the water molecule is randomly localized, are interpreted within a bond-dilution scheme.

  4. Pressure data from a 64A010 airfoil at transonic speeds in heavy gas media of ratio of specific heats from 1.67 to 1.12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A. R.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A NACA 64A010 pressure-instrumented airfoil was tested at transonic speeds over a range of angle of attack from -1 to 12 degrees at various Reynolds numbers ranging from 2 to 6 million in air, argon, Freon 12, and a mixture of argon and Freon 12 having a ratio of specific heats corresponding to air. Good agreement of results is obtained for conditions where compressibility is not significant and for the air and comparable argon-Freon 12 mixture. Comparison of heavy gas results with air, when adjusted for transonic similarity, show improved, but less than desired agreement.

  5. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  6. Simultaneous specific heat, thermal conductivity and imaging evaluations in thin samples of 8CB liquid crystal dispersed with microemulsion of DDAB/water micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Zammit, U.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we use a photopyroelectric calorimetric set up to analyze the transformations occurring in thin samples of liquid crystal-microemulsion system by combining the results of the simultaneously performed high temperature resolution polarization microscopy observations and the temperature dependence of the specific heat, and of the thermal conductivity. This enabled an accurate direct correlation of the observations concerning the different measured quantities for a most comprehensive interpretation of the obtained results. It is found that the I-N conversion progresses in the entire nematic range because of the micelles expelled from the nucleating nematic volumes remaining confined in the residual isotropic material. A hysteretic behavior is observed in the nematic range between cooling and heating run because of the different micelle content in the material during the cooling and heating runs. A moderate hysteresys also over the N-A transition indicated an additional material refinement from micelles during the transition. Finally in samples with different micelle concentration the same maximum micelle content is retained in the nematic and smectic phases.

  7. The calculation of specific heats for some important solid components in hydrogen production process based on CuCl cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsec Jurij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy sources of the future enabling direct production of power and heat in fuel cells, hydrogen engines or furnaces with hydrogen burners. One of the last remainder problems in hydrogen technology is how to produce a sufficient amount of cheap hydrogen. One of the best options is large scale thermochemical production of hydrogen in combination with nuclear power plant. copper-chlorine (CuCl cycle is the most promissible thermochemical cycle to produce cheap hydrogen.This paper focuses on a CuCl cycle, and the describes the models how to calculate thermodynamic properties. Unfortunately, for many components in CuCl cycle the thermochemical functions of state have never been measured. This is the reason that we have tried to calculate some very important thermophysical properties. This paper discusses the mathematical model for computing the thermodynamic properties for pure substances and their mixtures such as CuCl, HCl, Cu2OCl2 important in CuCl hydrogen production in their fluid and solid phase with an aid of statistical thermodynamics. For the solid phase, we have developed the mathematical model for the calculation of thermodynamic properties for polyatomic crystals. In this way, we have used Debye functions and Einstein function for acoustical modes and optical modes of vibrations to take into account vibration of atoms. The influence of intermolecular energy we have solved on the basis of Murnaghan equation of state and statistical thermodynamics.

  8. Page 1 s l i. i. i 118 E Gmelin et al 2. Experimental Specific heat and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study was performed with two single Crystals with a total Weight of 2764 mg. An adiabatic microcalorimeter (Brill and Gmelin 1987), high temperature scanning calorimeters (Netsch DSC404, Perkin-Elmer DSC-2) and a sensitive Faraday balance magnetometer (using a field of B = 2 Tesla) were used to determine specific ...

  9. Effects of canopy structural variables on retrieval of leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area from remotely sensed data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.M.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Skidmore, A.K.; van Duren, I.C.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) are two important traits in measuring biodiversity. To use remote sensing for the estimation of these traits, it is essential to understand the underlying factors that influence their relationships with canopy reflectance. The effect of

  10. The Relationship between Institutional, Departmental and Program-Specific Variables and the Academic Performance of Division I FBS Football Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrot, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the connection between the academic evaluation of Division I FBS football programs and the various social settings that influenced these student-athletes. These social settings were classified as: institutional, departmental and program-specific. The experience of the student-athlete is thought to be impacted by all three…

  11. Thermal expansion and specific heat of a superior IR-SOFC cathode material Sr1-xCexCoO3-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Archana; Thakur, Rasna; Gaur, N. K.

    2017-05-01

    We present the specific heat (Cv) and thermal expansion (α) of lightly doped Sr1-xCexCoO3-δ (x=0.0-0.15) using Modified Rigid Ion Model (MRIM) and a novel atomistic approach of Atom in Molecules(AIM) theory. We partial replaced the A-site Strontium cation by other element (Cerium) of different size, valence and mass. The effect of Cerium doping on lattice specific heat (Cv)lat, thermal expansion(α) of Sr1-xCexCoO3-δ (x = 0.0-0.15) as a function of temperature (20K≤T≤ 1000K) is reported probably for the first time. The results indicate better thermal compatibility of Sr0.95Ce0.05CoO3 with Samaria doped Ceria (SDC) electrolyte than other studied compounds. The Debye temperature of these perovskite material as cathode for Intermediate Range Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IR-SOFC) is also predicted.

  12. Specific heat of Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} in the low cerium concentration limit (x {<=} 0.03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, M. A., E-mail: anisimov.m.a@gmail.com; Glushkov, V. V.; Bogach, A. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Mitsen, K. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Levchenko, A. V.; Filippov, V. B. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Problems of Materials Science (Ukraine); Gabani, S.; Flachbart, K. [IEP SAS, Centre of Low Temperature Physics (Slovakia); Sluchanko, N. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The specific heat of high-quality Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03) single crystals is studied in the temperature range 0.4-300 K. LaB{sub 6} samples with various boron isotope compositions ({sup 10}B, {sup 11}B, {sup nat}B) are analyzed to estimate the effect of boron vacancies. The experimental data are used to take into account the electron component correctly under the renormalization of the density of states at T < 8 K, the contribution of the quasi-local vibrational mode of a rare-earth ion with the Einstein temperature {Theta}{sub E} Almost-Equal-To 152 K, the Debye contribution from the rigid cage of boron atoms with the Debye temperature {Theta}{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 1160 K, and the low-temperature Schottky contribution related to the presence of 1.5-2.3% boron vacancies in the rare-earth hexaborides. The detected low-temperature anomalies in the specific heat are shown to be interpreted in terms of the formation of two-level systems with an energy {Delta}E = 92-98 K caused by the displacement of rare-earth ions from their centrosymmetric positions. A scenario of heavy fermion formation that is alternative to the Kondo mechanism is proposed for the systems with a magnetic impurity.

  13. Specific heats and thermodynamic critical fields in Zn-doped YBa2Cu3O(7-x) according to an induced-pairing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic specific heats and thermodynamic critical fields are calculated in a mean-field version of an induced-pairing model for superconductivity, and compared with results of Loram et al. (1990) on YBa2(Cu(1-y)Zn(y))3O(7-x). This model involves induction of pairing of holes in a wideband by strongly bound electronlike pairs. It is assumed that the planar hole concentration for no Zn addition is close to, but slightly higher than, that for the maximum Tc, and that it increases by 0.015 per planar Cu ion for each increase of y by 0.01. Parameters of the model are taken to be the same as in a previous publication in which energy gaps were discussed, except that an effective hybridization parameter is adjusted for each Zn concentration to give agreement with the observed Tc. Results are presented for y = 0.0, 0.01, and 0.03. The agreement with experiment is good for thermodynamic critical fields, and is fair for specific heats. For specimens with larger y, with relatively low T(c)s, it is argued that the model should be supplemented to include effects of a BCS-type interaction amongst the wideband carriers.

  14. An Experimental Parametric Study of Geometric, Reynolds Number, and Ratio of Specific Heats Effects in Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    1993-01-01

    Since mission profiles for airbreathing hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane include single-stage-to-orbit requirements, real gas effects may become important with respect to engine performance. The effects of the decrease in the ratio of specific heats have been investigated in generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweep angles of 30 and 70 degrees. The effects of a decrease in ratio of specific heats were seen by comparing data from two facilities in two test gases: in the Langley Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel in tetrafluoromethane (where gamma=1.22) and in the Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel in perfect gas air (where gamma=1.4). In addition to the simulated real gas effects, the parametric effects of cowl position, contraction ratio, leading-edge sweep, and Reynolds number were investigated in the 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The models were instrumented with a total of 45 static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls and baseplate. Surface streamline patterns were examined via oil flow, and schlieren videos were made of the external flow field. The results of these tests have significant implications to ground based testing of inlets in facilities which do not operate at flight enthalpies.

  15. The specific heat loss combined with the thermoelastic effect for an experimental analysis of the mean stress influence on axial fatigue of stainless steel plain specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Meneghetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy dissipated to the surroundings as heat in a unit volume of material per cycle, Q, was recently proposed by the authors as fatigue damage index and it was successfully applied to correlate fatigue data obtained by carrying out fully reversed stress- and strain-controlled fatigue tests on AISI 304L stainless steel plain and notched specimens. The use of the Q parameter to analyse the experimental results led to the definition of a scatter band having constant slope from the low- to the high-cycle fatigue regime. In this paper the energy approach is extended to analyse the influence of mean stress on the axial fatigue behaviour of unnotched cold drawn AISI 304L stainless steel bars. In view of this, stress controlled fatigue tests on plain specimens at different load ratios R (R=-1; R=0.1; R=0.5 were carried out. A new energy parameter is defined to account for the mean stress effect, which combines the specific heat loss Q and the relative temperature variation due to the thermoelastic effect corresponding to the achievement of the maximum stress level of the stress cycle. The new two-parameter approach was able to rationalise the mean stress effect observed experimentally. It is worth noting that the results found in the present contribution are meant to be specific for the material and testing condition investigated here.

  16. The ingestion of combined carbohydrates does not alter metabolic responses or performance capacity during soccer-specific exercise in the heat compared to ingestion of a single carbohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, N D; Campbell, I T; Drust, B; Evans, L; Reilly, T; Maclaren, D P M

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ingesting a glucose plus fructose solution on the metabolic responses to soccer-specific exercise in the heat and the impact on subsequent exercise capacity. Eleven male soccer players performed a 90 min soccer-specific protocol on three occasions. Either 3 ml · kg(-1) body mass of a solution containing glucose (1 g · min(-1) glucose) (GLU), or glucose (0.66 g · min(-1)) plus fructose (0.33 g · min(-1)) (MIX) or placebo (PLA) was consumed every 15 minutes. Respiratory measures were undertaken at 15-min intervals, blood samples were drawn at rest, half-time and on completion of the protocol, and muscle glycogen concentration was assessed pre- and post-exercise. Following the soccer-specific protocol the Cunningham and Faulkner test was performed. No significant differences in post-exercise muscle glycogen concentration (PLA, 62.99 ± 8.39 mmol · kg wet weight(-1); GLU 68.62 ± 2.70; mmol · kg wet weight(-1) and MIX 76.63 ± 6.92 mmol · kg wet weight(-1)) or exercise capacity (PLA, 73.62 ± 8.61 s; GLU, 77.11 ± 7.17 s; MIX, 83.04 ± 9.65 s) were observed between treatments (P > 0.05). However, total carbohydrate oxidation was significantly increased during MIX compared with PLA (P carbohydrate does not influence metabolism during soccer-specific intermittent exercise or affect performance capacity after exercise in the heat.

  17. Componentes de la variabilidad espacial en el manejo por sitio específico en banano Components of the spatial variability in site-specific management in banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Antonio Castañeda Sánchez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la variabilidad espacial de la producción de banano en función de variables físicas y químicas del suelo y de las características fisiográficas de la finca, con miras a seleccionar aquellas con mayor potencial de uso en programas de manejo por sitio específico. Se georreferenciaron 130 unidades productivas de banano clon Williams (Cavendish AAA distribuidas en cuatro lotes de la finca y tres unidades de suelo. Se determinó el peso del racimo y la cantidad de raíz funcional, para cada planta, y 35 variables físicas y químicas del suelo. Se relacionó la variabilidad espacial de la producción en función de las variables del suelo, a partir de cuatro estrategias: ejes coordenados como covariables; variables físicas y químicas del suelo y raíz funcional como covariables; división del análisis por lotes; y división del análisis por unidades de suelo. La división por lotes resultó ser la mejor estrategia para modelar la variabilidad espacial de la producción de banano. El análisis por este modelo permitió establecer grupos de variables del suelo que se relacionaron significativamente y explicaron más del 69% del peso de los racimos de banano dentro de cada lote. Estos grupos de variables son los de mayor potencial para el establecimiento de un programa de manejo por sitio específico.The objective of this work was to evaluate the spatial variability of banana production, in function of physical and chemical variables of soil and of farm physiographic characteristics, in order to select those with the greatest potential for use in site-specific management program. One hundred thirty productive units of banana clone Williams (Cavendish AAA distributed in four lots and tree soils units of the farm were georeferenced. The bunch weight and root functionality were determined for each plant, as well as 35 physical and chemical soil variables. The spatial variability of the production was

  18. General and Specific Contributions of RAN to Reading and Arithmetic Fluency in First Graders: A Longitudinal Latent Variable Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hornung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we opted for a longitudinal design and examined rapid automatized naming (RAN performance from two perspectives. In a first step, we examined the structure of RAN performance from a general cognitive perspective. We investigated whether rapid naming measures (e.g., digit RAN and color RAN reflect a mainly domain-general factor or domain-specific factors. In a second step, we examined how the best fitting RAN model was related to reading and arithmetic outcomes, assessed several months later. Finally in a third step we took a clinical perspective and investigated specific contributions of RAN measures to reading and arithmetic outcomes. While RAN has emerged as a promising predictor of reading, the relationship between RAN and arithmetic has been less examined in the past. Hundred and twenty-two first graders completed seven RAN tasks, each comprising visually familiar stimuli such as digits, vowels, consonants, dice, finger-numeral configurations, objects, and colors. Four months later the same children completed a range of reading and arithmetic tasks. From a general descriptive perspective, structural equation modeling supports a one-dimensional RAN factor in 6- to -7-year-old children. However, from a clinical perspective, our findings emphasize the specific contributions of RANs. Interestingly, alphanumeric RANs (i.e., vowel RAN were most promising when predicting reading skills and number-specific RANs (i.e., finger-numeral configuration RAN were most promising when predicting arithmetic fluency. The implications for clinical and educational practices will be discussed.

  19. Optimization of operating variables for production of ultra-fine talc in a stirred mill. Specific surface area investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toraman Oner Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its properties such as chemical inertness, softness, whiteness, high thermal conductivity, low electrical conductivity and adsorption properties talc has wide industrial applications in paper, cosmetics, paints, polymer, ceramics, refractory materials and pharmaceutical. The demand for ultra-fine talc is emerging which drives the mineral industry to produce value added products. In this study, it was investigated how certain grinding parameters such as mill speed, ball filling ratio, powder filling ratio and grinding time of dry stirred mill affect grindability of talc ore (d97=127 μm. A series of laboratory experiments using a 24 full factorial design was conducted to determine the optimal operational parameters of a stirred mill in order to minimize the specific surface area. The main and interaction effects on the volume specific surface area (SV, m2.cm−3 of the ground product were evaluated using the Yates analysis. Under the optimal conditions at the stirrer speed of 600 rpm, grinding time of 20 min, sample mass of 5% and ball ratio of 70%, the resulting talc powder had larger volume specific surface area (i.e., 3.48 m2.cm−3 than the starting material (i.e., 1.84 m2.cm−3.

  20. Evaluation of specific heat peak and half-width for magnetic regenerative materials (RCuO) of 4K refrigerator; 4K reitoki yo jisei chikureizai kagobutsu (RCuO) no hinetsu piku to hannehaba no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, S.; Nakane, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Sakagami, H. [Kogakuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Okamura, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Numazawa, T. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    For material selection in the multistory structure regeneration vessel of the GM refrigerating machine, we have the meaning in which specific heat peak value and half-value width of material are important. It announced specific heat peak-half-value width characteristics of rare earth magnetic material RSb. For the purpose of searching new regeneration material it improves a refrigerating capacity of refrigerating machine for 4K, it evaluated R{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} mainly noticed as superconducting material and R{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} specific heat peak and half-value width as a magnetic material, which covered the specific heat characteristics of helium in low temperature. (NEDO)