WorldWideScience

Sample records for variable radiation background

  1. Background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of background radiation, whether natural or caused by man's activities, are discussed. The known biological effects of radiation in causing cancers or genetic mutations are explained. The statement that there is a threshold below which there is no risk is examined critically. (U.K.)

  2. The natural radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggleby, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The components of the natural background radiation and their variations are described. Cosmic radiation is a major contributor to the external dose to the human body whilst naturally-occurring radionuclides of primordial and cosmogenic origin contribute to both the external and internal doses, with the primordial radionuclides being the major contributor in both cases. Man has continually modified the radiation dose to which he has been subjected. The two traditional methods of measuring background radiation, ionisation chamber measurements and scintillation counting, are looked at and the prospect of using thermoluminescent dosimetry is considered

  3. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The 20-ft horn-reflector antenna at Bell Laboratories is discussed in detail with emphasis on the 7.35 cm radiometer. The circumstances leading to the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation are explored

  4. Effects of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.; Gilman, E.A.; Kneale, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to measure the relationship between exposure to different levels of background gamma radiation in different parts of the country, and different Relative Risks for leukaemias and cancers in children. The investigation is linked to an earlier analysis of the effects of prenatal medical x-rays upon leukaemia and cancer risk; the prior hypothesis on which the background-study was based, is derived from the earlier results. In a third analysis, the authors attempted to measure varying potency of medical x-rays delivered at different stages of gestation and the results supply a link between the other two estimates. (author)

  5. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  6. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  7. Background radiation map of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angsuwathana, P.; Chotikanatis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The radioelement concentration in the natural environment as well as the radiation exposure to man in day-to-day life is now the most interesting topic. The natural radiation is frequently referred as a standard for comparing additional sources of man-made radiation such as atomic weapon fallout, nuclear power generation, radioactive waste disposal, etc. The Department of Mineral Resources commenced a five-year project of nationwide airborne geophysical survey by awarding to Kenting Earth Sciences International Limited in 1984. The original purpose of survey was to support mineral exploration and geological mapping. Subsequently, the data quantity has been proved to be suitable for natural radiation information. In 1993 the Department of Mineral Resources, with the assistance of IAEA, published a Background Radiation Map of Thailand at the scale of 1:1,000,000 from the existing airborne radiometric digital data. The production of Background Radiation Map of Thailand is the result of data compilation and correction procedure developed over the Canadian Shield. This end product will be used as a base map in environmental application not only for Thailand but also Southeast Asia region. (author)

  8. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The history is described of the discovery of microwave radiation of the cosmic background using the 20-foot horn antenna at the Bell Laboratories back in 1965. Ruby masers with travelling wave were used, featuring the lowest noise in the world. The measurement proceeded on 7 cm. In measuring microwave radiation from the regions outside the Milky Way continuous noise was discovered whose temperature exceeded the calculated contributions of the individual detection system elements by 3 K. A comparison with the theory showed that relict radiation from the Big Bang period was the source of the noise. The discovery was verified by measurements on the 20.1 cm wavelength and by other authors' measurements on 0.5 mm to 74 cm, and by optical measurements of the interstellar molecule spectrum. (Ha)

  9. Natural background radiation in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, M.N.S.

    1997-01-01

    An Airborne Gamma Ray survey has been accomplished for Jordan since 1979. A complete report has been submitted to the Natural Resources Authority along with field and processed data ''digital and analogue''. Natural radioelements concentration is not provided with this report. From the corrected count rate data for each natural radioelement, Concentrations and exposure rates at the ground level were calculated. Contoured maps, showing the exposure rates and the dose rates were created. Both maps reflect the surface geology of Jordan, where the Phosphate areas are very well delineated by high-level contours. In southeastern Jordan the Ordovician sandstone, which contain high percentage of Th (around 2000 ppm in some places) and a moderate percentage of U (about 300 ppm), also show high gamma radiation exposures compared with the surrounding areas. Comparing the values of the exposure rates given in (μR/h) to those obtained from other countries such as United States, Canada, Germany, etc. Jordan shows higher background radiation which reach two folds and even more than those in these countries. More detailed studies should be performed in order to evaluate the radiological risk limits on people who are living in areas of high radiation such that the area of the phosphatic belt which covers a vast area of Jordan high Plateau. (author)

  10. Natural background radiation in Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoud, M N.S. [National Resources Authority, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman (Jordan)

    1997-11-01

    An Airborne Gamma Ray survey has been accomplished for Jordan since 1979. A complete report has been submitted to the Natural Resources Authority along with field and processed data ``digital and analogue``. Natural radioelements concentration is not provided with this report. From the corrected count rate data for each natural radioelement, Concentrations and exposure rates at the ground level were calculated. Contoured maps, showing the exposure rates and the dose rates were created. Both maps reflect the surface geology of Jordan, where the Phosphate areas are very well delineated by high-level contours. In southeastern Jordan the Ordovician sandstone, which contain high percentage of Th (around 2000 ppm in some places) and a moderate percentage of U (about 300 ppm), also show high gamma radiation exposures compared with the surrounding areas. Comparing the values of the exposure rates given in ({mu}R/h) to those obtained from other countries such as United States, Canada, Germany, etc. Jordan shows higher background radiation which reach two folds and even more than those in these countries. More detailed studies should be performed in order to evaluate the radiological risk limits on people who are living in areas of high radiation such that the area of the phosphatic belt which covers a vast area of Jordan high Plateau. (author). 8 refs, 10 figs, 7 tabs.

  11. Natural background radiation exposures world-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The average radiation dose to the world's population from natural radiation sources has been assessed by UNSCEAR to be 2.4 mSv per year. The components of this exposure, methods of evaluation and, in particular, the variations in the natural background levels are presented in this paper. Exposures to cosmic radiation range from 0.26 mSv per year at sea level to 20 times more at an altitude of 6000 m. Exposures to cosmogenic radionuclides ( 3 H, 14 C) are relatively insignificant and little variable. The terrestrial radionuclides 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th and the decay products of the latter two constitute the remainder of the natural radiation exposure. Wide variations in exposure occur for these components, particularly for radon and its decay products, which can accumulate to relatively high levels indoors. Unusually high exposures to uranium and thorium series radionuclides characterize the high natural background areas which occur in several localized regions in the world. Extreme values in natural radiation exposures have been estimated to range up to 100 times the average values. (author). 15 refs, 3 tabs

  12. Natural background radiation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasty, R.L.; Carson, J.M.; Charbonneau, B.W.; Holman, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    Published airborne gamma ray survey data from 33 areas of Canada were used to compile information on the average ground level exposure from natural radiation. The exposures at ground level were calculated from the surface concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium. The highest levels of radioactivity were found in northern Canada and were generally related to granitic rocks; the lowest levels with the Athabasca sandstone. Summer outdoor exposure rates have a population-weighted average of 3.7 +- 2.3 μR.h -1 , of which 48 percent orginated from potassium, 43 percent from the thorium series and 9 percent from the uranium series. This low level of radioactivity, compared to worldwide data, has resulted from erosion of a geologically old continental crust in which radioactivity decreases with depth. When seasonal variations of soil moisture and snow cover are considered, the annual population-weighted average outdoor exposure rate decreases to 2.8 +- 1.7 μR.h -1 corresponding to an annual outdoor dose-equivalent of 150 +- 90 μSV. Factors increasing the annual outdoor dose-equivalent are cosmic radiation (320 +- 30 μSV) and the internal radioactivity of the body (190 μSV). Using the ratio between indoor and outdoor values for worldwide published data, the average annual Canadian whole-body dose-equivalent from all sources of natural radiation is estimated to be 690 +-130 μSV

  13. Electromagnetic wave collapse in a radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction, due to quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects between an electromagnetic pulse and a radiation background, is investigated by combining the methods of radiation hydrodynamics with the QED theory for photon-photon scattering. For the case of a single coherent electromagnetic pulse, we obtain a Zakharov-like system, where the radiation pressure of the pulse acts as a driver of acoustic waves in the photon gas. For a sufficiently intense pulse and/or background energy density, there is focusing and the subsequent collapse of the pulse. The relevance of our results for various astrophysical applications are discussed

  14. Low energy background radiation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    Spectral distribution of background radiation at 9 locations spread all over India has been measured. Specifications of the counting set-up standardised for measurement are given. At one of the places, the background spectrum was measured with four different types of detectors. A broad peak in 60-100 keV with differing intensity and standard deviation is observed in all the spectra. In the Kalpakkam area, the peak near the seashore is observed to be more intense than away from the shore. This could be due to the presence of monazite sands on the seashore. The natural background radiation is observed to have a steep rise below 20 keV. Peak intensity is found to be independent of both the location (i.e. the source of energy) and the type of detector used for measurement. The calculated spectra due to multiple scattered radiation (with a nominal source energy of 1 MeV) through paraffin wax and the measured background spectrum with the detector shielded with 20 cm wax show good agreement above 40 keV. This shows that 80 keV hump in the natural background radiation is a property of air. The peak, therefore, in the spectra of natural background radiation is essentially a property of medium and it is independent of location or detector. (M.G.B.)

  15. Background radiation levels and standards for protection from ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farai, I.

    1999-01-01

    Apart from the amount of radiation which a worker may receive while he performs his work, he is also exposed to radiation because of the nature of his environment. In other words, all individuals are subject to some irradiation even though they may not work with radioactive substances. This source of radiation exposure is often referred to as background radiation. In most environments, it is low-level and can be grouped into two natural and man-made. Background radiation provides the basis on which allowable exposure limits for workers are drawn

  16. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  17. Origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, F.W.; Puget, J.L.

    1974-05-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy formation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given. (U.S.)

  18. Spontaneous Radiation Background Calculation for LCLS

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of undulator radiation, not amplified by the FEL interaction, can be larger than the maximum FEL signal in the case of an X-ray FEL. In the commissioning of a SASE FEL it is essential to extract an amplified signal early to diagnose eventual misalignment of undulator modules or errors in the undulator field strength. We developed a numerical code to calculate the radiation pattern at any position behind a multi-segmented undulator with arbitrary spacing and field profiles. The output can be run through numerical spatial and frequency filters to model the radiation beam transport and diagnostic. In this presentation we estimate the expected background signal for the FEL diagnostic and at what point along the undulator the FEL signal can be separated from the background. We also discusses how much information on the undulator field and alignment can be obtained from the incoherent radiation signal itself.

  19. Natural background radiation and oncologic disease incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, P.I.

    1982-01-01

    Cause and effect relationships between oncologic disease incidence in human population and environmental factors are examined using investigation materials of Soviet and foreign authors. The data concerning US white population are adduced. The role and contribution of natural background radiation oncologic disease prevalence have been determined with the help of system information analysis. The probable damage of oncologic disease is shown to decrease as the background radiation level diminishes. The linear nature of dose-response relationspip has been established. The necessity to include the life history of the studied population along with environmental factors in epidemiological study under conditions of multiplicity of cancerogenesis causes is emphasized

  20. Epidemiological studies in high background radiation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    2012-01-01

    Below the doses of 100-200 mSv of radiation exposure, no acute health effect is observed, and the late health effects such as cancer are yet unclear. The problems making the risk evaluation of low dose radiation exposure difficult are the fact that the magnitude of expected health effects are small even if the risk is assumed to increase in proportion to radiation doses. As a result, studies need to be large particular when dealing with rare disease such as cancer. In addition, the expected health effects are so small that they can easily be masked by lifestyles and environmental factors including smoking. This paper will discuss cancer risk possibly associated with low-dose and low-dose rate radiation exposure, describing epidemiological studies on the residents in the high-background radiation areas. (author)

  1. Exposure to background radiation in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B. [Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The average effective dose received by the Australian population is estimated to be {approx}1.8 mSv / year. One half of this exposure arises from exposure from terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays, the remainder from radionuclides within the body and from inhalation of radon progeny. This paper reviews a number of research programmes carried out by the Australian Radiation Laboratory to study radiation exposure from natural background, particularly in the workplace and illustrate approaches to the quantification and management of exposure to natural radiation. The average radiation doses to the Australian population are relatively low; the average annual radon concentration ranged from 6 Bq m{sup -3} in Queensland to 16 Bq m{sup -3} in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Of more importance is the emerging issue of exposure to elevated background radiation in the workplace. Two situation are presented; the radiation exposure to air crues and show cave tour guides. Annual doses up to 3.8 mSv were estimated for international crew members while the highest estimate for show cave tour guides was 9 mSv per year. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  2. Exposure to background radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    The average effective dose received by the Australian population is estimated to be ∼1.8 mSv / year. One half of this exposure arises from exposure from terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays, the remainder from radionuclides within the body and from inhalation of radon progeny. This paper reviews a number of research programmes carried out by the Australian Radiation Laboratory to study radiation exposure from natural background, particularly in the workplace and illustrate approaches to the quantification and management of exposure to natural radiation. The average radiation doses to the Australian population are relatively low; the average annual radon concentration ranged from 6 Bq m -3 in Queensland to 16 Bq m -3 in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Of more importance is the emerging issue of exposure to elevated background radiation in the workplace. Two situation are presented; the radiation exposure to air crues and show cave tour guides. Annual doses up to 3.8 mSv were estimated for international crew members while the highest estimate for show cave tour guides was 9 mSv per year

  3. Controllable forms of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    RENA is a research programm into the controllable forms of natural background radiation, which cover the activities originating from the naturally occurring radionuclides enhanced by human intervention. In the RENA-program emphasis lays upon the policy aspects of environmental-hygienic, economical and governmental character. (H.W.). 15 refs.; 2 tabs

  4. Natural background radiation in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hussan, K.A.; Al-Suliman, K.M.; Wafa, N.F.

    1993-01-01

    Natural background radiation measurements have been made at numerous locations throughout the world. Little work in this field has been done in developing countries. In this study, the external exposure rates due to natural background radiation sources have been measured for different Saudi Arabian cities. Thermoluminescence dosimeters, CaF 2 Dy(TLD-200), has been used for field measurements. Exposure to TLD's response correlations were obtained for each TLD using a 137 Cs source. A correlation of TLD's response fading at a continuous radiation exposure environment was obtained and applied to correct field measurements. The measurements were taken every two months for a total of six intervals during the whole year. The average measurements of outdoor external exposure rates was found to vary between a minimum of 5.29 μR h -1 in Dammam city and a maximum of 11.59 μR h -1 in Al-Khamis city. (1 fig., 1 tab.)

  5. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed. Attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist

  6. Gamma-Ray Background Variability in Mobile Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, Timothy John

    Gamma-ray background radiation significantly reduces detection sensitivity when searching for radioactive sources in the field, such as in wide-area searches for homeland security applications. Mobile detector systems in particular must contend with a variable background that is not necessarily known or even measurable a priori. This work will present measurements of the spatial and temporal variability of the background, with the goal of merging gamma-ray detection, spectroscopy, and imaging with contextual information--a "nuclear street view" of the ubiquitous background radiation. The gamma-ray background originates from a variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. The dominant sources in the field are the primordial isotopes potassium-40, uranium-238, and thorium-232, as well as their decay daughters. In addition to the natural background, many artificially-created isotopes are used for industrial or medical purposes, and contamination from fission products can be found in many environments. Regardless of origin, these backgrounds will reduce detection sensitivity by adding both statistical as well as systematic uncertainty. In particular, large detector arrays will be limited by the systematic uncertainty in the background and will suffer from a high rate of false alarms. The goal of this work is to provide a comprehensive characterization of the gamma-ray background and its variability in order to improve detection sensitivity and evaluate the performance of mobile detectors in the field. Large quantities of data are measured in order to study their performance at very low false alarm rates. Two different approaches, spectroscopy and imaging, are compared in a controlled study in the presence of this measured background. Furthermore, there is additional information that can be gained by correlating the gamma-ray data with contextual data streams (such as cameras and global positioning systems) in order to reduce the variability in the background

  7. Anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, focusing on intrinsic anisotropies caused by primordial matter fluctuations. The basic elements of the CBR are outlined and the contributions to anisotropy at different angular scales are discussed. Possible fluctuation spectra that can generate the observed large-scale structure of the universe through gravitational instability and nonlinear evolution are examined and compared with observational searches for cosmic microwave anisotropies. 21 refs

  8. Cosmic thermalization and the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    A different origin of the microwave background radiation (MBR) is suggested in view of some of the difficulties associated with the standard interpretation. Extensive stellar-type nucleosynthesis could provide radiation with the requisite energy density of the MBR and its spectral features are guaranteed by adequate thermalization of the above radiation by an ambient intergalactic dust medium. This thermalization must have occurred in quite recent epochs, say around epochs of redshift z = 7. The model emerges with consistent limits on the cosmic abundance of helium, the general luminosity evolution of the extragalactic objects, the baryonic matter density in the Universe (or, equivalently the deceleration parameter) and the degree of isotropy of MBR. The model makes definite predictions on issues like the properties of the intergalactic thermalizers, the degree of isotropy of MBR at submillimetre wavelengths and cluster emission in the far infrared. (author)

  9. Interpretation of observed cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.; Mendis, A.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the observed cosmic microwave background radiation, which closely fits a 2.7 K black body spectrum, is generally claimed to be the strongest piece of evidence in support of hot big bang cosmologies by its proponents. It is here stated that the observed radiation corresponds to the distribution of dust in galaxies or protogalaxies with a temperature approximately 110 K at the epoch corresponding to Z approximately 40, and not to a plasma of temperature > approximately 3000 K at an earlier epoch (Z > approximately 1000), as indicated by the canonical model of big bang cosmologies. The claim that the latter lends strong support to hot big bang cosmologies is stated to be without foundation. It is concluded that the microwave background radiation must be explained not in terms of a coupling between matter and radiation at the present epoch, but in terms of a coupling in a previous epoch within the framework of an evolutionary cosmology. (U.K.)

  10. Natural background approach to setting radiation standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, H.I.; Federow, H.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The suggestion has often been made that an additional radiation exposure imposed on humanity as a result of some important activity such as electricity generation would be acceptable if the exposure was small compared to the natural background. In order to make this concept quantitative and objective, we propose that small compared with the natural background be interpreted as the standard deviation (weighted with the exposed population) of the natural background. This use of the variation in natural background radiation is less arbitrary and requires fewer unfounded assumptions than some current approaches to standard-setting. The standard deviation is an easily calculated statistic that is small compared with the mean value for natural exposures of populations. It is an objectively determined quantity and its significance is generally understood. Its determination does not omit any of the pertinent data. When this method is applied to the population of the United States, it suggests that a dose of 20 mrem/year would be an acceptable standard. This is comparable to the 25 mrem/year suggested as the maximum allowable exposure to an individual from the complete uranium fuel cycle

  11. EPR dosimetry of radiation background in the Urals region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Degteva, M.O.; Shved, V.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 48-A Vorovsky, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P.; Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Wieser, A. [GSF, Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Ingolstaedter Landstr (Germany); Ivanov, D.V.; Bayankin, S.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Knyazev, V.A.; Vasilenko, E.I.; Gorelov, M. [ZAO, Closed Corporation ' Company GEOSPETSECOLOGIA' (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Method of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is extensively applied to individual retrospective dosimetry. The background dose is unavoidable component of cumulative absorbed dose in the tooth enamel accumulated during the lifetime of donor. Estimation of incidental radiation dose using tooth enamel needs in extraction of background dose. Moreover, the variation of background doses in the population is a limited factor for reliable detection of additional irradiation especially for low dose level. Therefore the accurate knowledge of the natural background radiation dose is a critical element of EPR studies of exposed populations. In the Urals region the method applies for such two large cohorts as the workers of Mayak (Ozersk citizens) and Techa River riverside inhabitants (rural population). Current study aimed to investigate the Urals radiation background detected by EPR spectrometry. For this aim two group of unexposed Urals residents were separated, viz: citizens of Ozersk and rural inhabitants of Chelyabinsk region. Comparison of two investigated territories has demonstrated that from the point of view of radiation background it is impossible to assume the Urals population as uniform. The reliable difference between the urban and rural residents has been found. The average background doses of Ozersk donors is in average 50 mGy higher than those detected for rural residents. The individual variability of background doses for Osersk has been higher than in the rural results. The difference in background dose levels between two population results in different limits of accidental dose detection and individualization. The doses for 'Mayak' workers (Ozyorsk citizens) can be classed as anthropogenic if the EPR measurements exceed 120 mGy for teeth younger than 40 years, and 240 mGy for teeth older than 70 years. The anthropogenic doses for Techa River residents (rural population) would be higher than 95 mGy for teeth younger than 50 years and 270 mGy for

  12. EPR dosimetry of radiation background in the Urals region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Degteva, M.O.; Shved, V.A.; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.; Wieser, A.; Ivanov, D.V.; Bayankin, S.N.; Knyazev, V.A.; Vasilenko, E.I.; Gorelov, M.

    2006-01-01

    Method of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is extensively applied to individual retrospective dosimetry. The background dose is unavoidable component of cumulative absorbed dose in the tooth enamel accumulated during the lifetime of donor. Estimation of incidental radiation dose using tooth enamel needs in extraction of background dose. Moreover, the variation of background doses in the population is a limited factor for reliable detection of additional irradiation especially for low dose level. Therefore the accurate knowledge of the natural background radiation dose is a critical element of EPR studies of exposed populations. In the Urals region the method applies for such two large cohorts as the workers of Mayak (Ozersk citizens) and Techa River riverside inhabitants (rural population). Current study aimed to investigate the Urals radiation background detected by EPR spectrometry. For this aim two group of unexposed Urals residents were separated, viz: citizens of Ozersk and rural inhabitants of Chelyabinsk region. Comparison of two investigated territories has demonstrated that from the point of view of radiation background it is impossible to assume the Urals population as uniform. The reliable difference between the urban and rural residents has been found. The average background doses of Ozersk donors is in average 50 mGy higher than those detected for rural residents. The individual variability of background doses for Osersk has been higher than in the rural results. The difference in background dose levels between two population results in different limits of accidental dose detection and individualization. The doses for 'Mayak' workers (Ozyorsk citizens) can be classed as anthropogenic if the EPR measurements exceed 120 mGy for teeth younger than 40 years, and 240 mGy for teeth older than 70 years. The anthropogenic doses for Techa River residents (rural population) would be higher than 95 mGy for teeth younger than 50 years and 270 mGy for teeth older

  13. Annual radiation background in Isfahan city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad B.

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of environmental exposure is very important from different points of view. It is especially important for human health. It has been measured accurately in many countries. In Iran, it is also measured in some cities especially in high background areas such as Ramsar, but there is not any measurement in Isfahan. Measurement of background radiation in this study is performed using TLD method. The TLDs used are made from CaSO 4 :Dy, which is very sensitive. The locations under investigations in this research were 52 health centers distributed all around Isfahan city. Each TLD badge was put in a special plastic bag and left over the roofs of the selected health center for a month. The procedure was repeated for all 12 months of the year 1379(21 st March 2000 to 20 th March 2001). The results were used to obtain mean and SD in each month and at different places. The maximum and the minimum of obtained results for dose equivalent in different months and locations were 15.9x10 -2 and 6.5x10 -2 mSv. Obtained maximum and minimum of the means between all the locations were 10.5x10 -2 and 8.6x10 2 mSv for the whole year. Monthly mean and SD for Isfahan city for the whole year were 9.7x10 -2 and 1.5x10 -2 respectively therefore mean annual dose equivalent in Isfahan city is 1.16mSv. The results do not show any high background radiation area

  14. Background radiation and childhood cancer mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancer estimated an ''extra'' cancer risk of 572 per million man-rad of juvenile cancer deaths under 10 years of age. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki 36.9 juvenile cancers were expected out of 64,490 man-rad of exposed mothers. Observed cancer was, however, only one. The discrepancy was explained partly by possible overlapping of confidence intervals of two samples and partly by excessive doses received by exposed fetuses in Japan. If A-bomb radiation sterilized preleukemic cells induced in fetuses, it must also killed those cells in irradiated adults. Leukemogenic efficiency in adults, about 2.10 -5 per rad, is not different either in A-bomb survivors or in irradiated patients. We examined a dose-effect relationship in childhood cancer mortality (0 - 4 yrs) in Miyagi Prefecture Japan. Ninety two cancers were detected out of 1,214,157 children from 1968 to 1975. They were allocated to 8 districts with different background levels. Population at risk was calculated every year for every district. About 4 deaths occurred every 10,000 man-rad, which is comparable with 572 per million man-rad in Oxford Survey. One out of one thousand infants died from severe malformation in every year when they received 9.8 rad in embryonic stage, the doubling dose is estimated as 20 rad. Clinical and biological significance of the statistical data must be examined in future. Fetal death decreased significantly from 110/1,000 in 1962 to 55/1,000 in 1975. Background radiation plays no role in fetal death in Miyagi Prefecture. (author)

  15. Monitoring of external background radiation level in Asa dam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An external background ionizing radiation study has been carried out within the Asa Dam Industrial Layout of Ilorin in Kwara State. The study was carried out in 5 stations within the industrial area using two Digilert Nuclear Radiation Monitors. The study has revealed that the external background ionizing radiation is ...

  16. Background radiation study of Offa industrial area of Kwara State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the external background radiation in Offa industrial area of Kwara State is hereby reported. An in-situ measurement using two Digilert radiation monitors at five different stations were carried out. A mean exposure rate of 0.0132mR/hr, which represents 20% elevation from the standard background radiation, was ...

  17. TeV Blazars and Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The recent developments in studies of TeV radiation from blazars are highlighted and the implications of these results for derivation of cosmologically important information about the cosmic infrared background radiation are discussed.

  18. Chromosome Aberration on High Level Background Natural Radiation Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanti-Lusiyanti; Zubaidah-Alatas

    2001-01-01

    When the body is irradiated, all cells can suffer cytogenetic damage that can be seen as structural damage of chromosome in the lymphocytes. People no matter where they live in world are exposed to background radiation from natural sources both internal and external such as cosmic radiation, terrestrial radiation, cosmogenic radiation radon and thoron. Level of area natural ionizing radiation is varies depending on the altitude, the soil or rock conditions, particular food chains and the building materials and construction features. Level of normal areas of background exposure is annual effective dose 2.4 mSv and the high level areas of background exposure 20 mSv. This paper discuses the frequency of aberration chromosome especially dysenteries in several countries having high level radiation background. It seems that frequency of chromosome aberrations increase, generally with the increase of age of the people and the accumulated dose received. (author)

  19. Measurement of indoor background ionizing radiation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain types of building materials are known to be radioactive. Exposure to indoor ionizing radiation like exposure to any other type of ionizing radiation results in critical health challenges. Measurement of the background ionizing radiation profile within the Chemistry Research Laboratory and Physics Laboratory III all of ...

  20. measurement of indoor background ionizing radiation in some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Measurement of the background ionizing radiation profile within the. Chemistry Research Laboratory and Physics Laboratory III all of the. University of Jos and their immediate neighbourhood were carried out. These science laboratories also harbour a number of active radiation sources. The radiation levels were measured ...

  1. MEGA: A Low-Background Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazkaz, Kareem; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Gehman, Victor M.; Kephart, Jeremy; Miley, Harry S.

    2004-01-01

    The multiple-element gamma assay (MEGA) is a low-background detector designed to support environmental monitoring and national security applications. MEGA also demonstrates technology needed or Majorana, a next generation neutrino mass experiment. It will also exploit multicoincidence signatures to identify specific radioactive isotopes. MEGA is expected to begin testing in late 2003 for eventual installation at the Waste Isolation Plant, Carlsbad, NM

  2. Interaction of Socio-Demographic Background Variables with Inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interaction of Socio-Demographic Background Variables with Inter-Spousal Communication Among Married Couples in Alimosho Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria. ... marriage will increase from 20-24years to 25-29years due to the number of years of couple's educational pursuit in Lagos state of Nigeria.

  3. Beta activity measurements in high, variable gamma backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanga, D.; Sandu, E.; Craciun, L.

    1997-01-01

    In many cases beta activity measurements must be performed in high and variable gamma backgrounds. In such instances it is necessary to use well-shielded detectors but this technique is limited to laboratory equipment and frequently insufficient. In order to perform in a simple manner beta activity measurements in high and variable backgrounds a software-aided counting technique have been developed and a counting system have been constructed. This technique combines the different counting techniques with traditional method of successive measurement of the sample and background. The counting system is based on a programmable multi-scaler which is endowed with appropriate software and allow all operations to be performed via keyboard in an interactive fashion. Two large - area proportional detectors were selected in order to have the same background and the same gamma response within 5%. A program has been developed for the counting data analysis and beta activity computing. The software-aided counting technique has been implemented for beta activity measurement in high and variable backgrounds. (authors)

  4. On the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will try to give a pale idea to the reader of what could be the Cosmic Microwave Background (RCFM that, according to the traditional Big Bang model, was generated by a primordial explosion. With this purpose we find it very important to present a brief historical summary of how the Microcosm, based on the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics (MPPE, and the Macrocosm, based on the Standard Big Bang Model (MPBB, have evolved over time. In addition, in the final part of the article we will analyze the two physical processes presented in the literature that seek to explain the RCFM: Bariogenesis and Plasma Quark-Gluon.

  5. Cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. Current understandings and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray background radiation is one of the most fundamental observables in the gamma-ray band. Although the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation has been a mystery for a long time, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has recently measured it at 0.1-820 GeV and revealed that the cosmic GeV gamma-ray background is composed of blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies. However, Fermi still leaves the following questions. Those are dark matter contribution, origins of the cosmic MeV gamma-ray background, and the connection to the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events. In this proceeding, I will review the current understandings of the cosmic gamma-ray background and discuss future prospects of cosmic gamma-ray background radiation studies. (author)

  6. Development of natural radiation model for evaluation of background radiation in radiation portal monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jin Hyung; Moon, Myung Kook [Radioisotope Research and Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In ports and airports, radiation portal monitors (RPM) are deployed to detect illicit radioactive materials. Detected gamma rays in a RPM include background radiation and radiation from a freight. As a vehicle moves through the RPM, the vehicle causes the fluctuations in the natural background radiation signal, which ranges of up to 30%. The fluctuation increases the uncertainty of detection signal and can be a cause of RPM false alarm. Therefore, it is important to evaluate background radiation as well as radiation from a container. In this paper, a natural background radiation model was developed to evaluate RPM. To develop natural background radiation model, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed and compared with experimental measurements from a RPM for {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th series, and {sup 235}U series, which are major sources of natural background radiation. For a natural radiation source, we considered a cylindrical soil volume with 300 m radius and 1 m depth, which was estimated as the maximum range affecting the RPM by MCNP6 simulation. The volume source model was converted to surface source by using MCNP SSW card for computational efficiency. The computational efficiency of the surface source model was improved to approximately 200 times better than that of the volume source model. The surface source model is composed of a hemisphere with 20 m radius in which the RPM and container are modelled. The natural radiation spectrum from the simulation was best fitted to the experimental measurement when portions of {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th series, and {sup 235}U series were 0.75, 0.0636, and 0.0552 Bq·g{sup -1}, respectively. For gross counting results, the difference between simulation and experiment was around 5%. The background radiation model was used to evaluate background suppression from a 40 ft container with 7.2 m·s{sup -1} speed. In further study, background models and freight models for RPM in real container ports will be developed and applied to

  7. Method and apparatus for determining accuracy of radiation measurements made in the presence of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrocks, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A radioactivity measuring instrument, and a method related to its use, for determining the radioactivity of a sample measured in the presence of significant background radiation, and for determining an error value relating to a specific probability of accuracy of the result are presented. Error values relating to the measurement of background radiation alone, and to the measurement of sample radiation and background radiation together, are combined to produce a true error value relating to the sample radiation alone

  8. A Novel Approach to model EPIC variable background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, M.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D.; Belfiore, A.

    2017-10-01

    One of the main aim of the EXTraS (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) project is to characterise the variability of serendipitous XMM-Newton sources within each single observation. Unfortunately, 164 Ms out of the 774 Ms of cumulative exposure considered (21%) are badly affected by soft proton flares, hampering any classical analysis of field sources. De facto, the latest releases of the 3XMM catalog, as well as most of the analysis in literature, simply exclude these 'high background' periods from analysis. We implemented a novel SAS-indipendent approach to produce background-subtracted light curves, which allows to treat the case of very faint sources and very bright proton flares. EXTraS light curves of 3XMM-DR5 sources will be soon released to the community, together with new tools we are developing.

  9. Measurement of Background Gamma Radiation Levels at Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: An in-situ measurement of the background radiation level was carried out at the vicinity of three ... Soil contains small quantities of radioactive elements along with their progeny. .... assessment for soil samples from Kestanbol.

  10. Noncommutative black-body radiation: Implications on cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatollahi, A.H.; Hajirahimi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Including loop corrections, black-body radiation in noncommutative space is anisotropic. A direct implication of possible space non-commutativity on the cosmic microwave background map is argued. (authors)

  11. Background radiation levels and medical exposure levels in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, D.V.; Solomon, S.B.; Thomson, J.E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The average effective background dose received by the Australian population has been reassessed to be ∼1.5 millisievert (mSv) per year. Over half of this exposure arises from exposure from terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays, the remainder from radionuclides within the body and from inhalation of radon progeny. This background is to be compared with medical radiation, primarily diagnostic, which could add half as much again to the population exposure. This paper reviews research programmes carried out by the Australian Radiation Laboratory to study radiation exposure from natural background and from medical use. While the latter exposure is accepted to have a social benefit, there is a need to ensure that doses are no more than necessary to provide effective diagnosis and optimal treatment. Copyright (1999) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  12. Electromagnetic radiation in a time-varying background medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budko, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical solutions are presented for the electromagnetic radiation by an arbitrary pulsed source into a homogeneous time-varying background medium. In the constant-impedance case an explicit radiation formula is obtained for the synchronous permittivity and permeability described by any positive

  13. Nature of the Background Ultraviolet Radiation Field at High Redshifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, 19-27 .... to know the shape of the ionizing radiation to determine the ionization parameter from the C II to C IV ratio. ... different shapes of the background radiation spectrum as explained in the text. The solid lines.

  14. Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab

  15. Radiation background with the CMS RPCs at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, Silvia; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J.W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Park, S.K.; Pant, L.M.; Mohanty, A.K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W.V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J.P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J.C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M.I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O.M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H.S.; Morales, M.I.P.; Bernardino, S.C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.; Kim, M.S.

    2015-05-28

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are employed in the CMS experiment at the LHC as dedicated trigger system both in the barrel and in the endcap. This note presents results of the radiation background measurements performed with the 2011 and 2012 proton-proton collision data collected by CMS. Emphasis is given to the measurements of the background distribution inside the RPCs. The expected background rates during the future running of the LHC are estimated both from extrapolated measurements and from simulation.

  16. Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbelo, R.M.; Grinik, Eh.U.; Paliokha, M.I.; Orlinskij, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background in samples of polycrystalline nickel and iron irradiated by a fast neutron flux approximately 10 14 neutr/(cm 2 xs) at 350 deg C has been studied using the low-frequency unit of the reverse torsion pendulum type. It has been established experimentally that a high-temperature background of internal friction of iron and nickel samples decreases as accumulating radiation defects occurring under neutron irradiation. Assumptions on a possible mechanism of the effect have been proposed. Simple expression for the background magnitude evaluation has been suggested

  17. Health effects in residents of regions with high background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Possible health problems created by high natural levels of background radiation are hard to detect, partly because the health problems involved would exist to some degree irrespective of radiation exposure, partly because other factors affect the incidence of such problems, and partly because the differences between normal background radiation levels and radiation levels found in most high-radiation areas are not extreme. Nevertheless, the need to know about such health effects is evident, and so various studies conducted over the past 30 years have sought to determine whether those effects exist and what they are. Overall, however, the fragmentary and uncertain nature of many of these findings makes it hard to draw firm conclusions about the health risks involved or the desirability of countermeasures. So despite considerable efforts and some progress over the past three decades, the need for a clear quantitative assessment of the consequences is as great as ever

  18. Natural background radiation and population dose in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangzhi, C. (Ministry of Public Health, Beijing, BJ (China)); Ziqiang, P.; Zhenyum, H.; Yin, Y.; Mingqiang, G.

    On the basis of analyzing the data for the natural background radiation level in China, the typical values for indoor and outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation and effective dose equivalents from radon and thoron daughters are recommended. The annual effective dose equivalent from natural radiation to the inhabitant is estimated to be 2.3 mSv, in which 0.54 mSv is from terrestrial gamma radiation and about 0,8 mSv is from radon and its short-lived daughters. 55 Refs.

  19. Spectrum and isotropy of the submillimeter background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Two great astronomical discoveries have most shaped our present concept of the Big Bang universe. Like the Hubble recession of the galaxies, the discovery of the 3 0 K background radiation by Penzias and Wilson in 1965 has given rise to a line of research which is still very active today. Penzias and Wilson's universal microwave background at 7 cm was immediately interpreted by R.H. Dicke's group at Princeton as coming from the primordial fireball of incandescent plasma which filled the universe for the million years or so after its explosive birth. This interpretation gives rise to two crucial predictions as to the nature of the background radiation. Its spectrum should be thermal even after having been red shifted by a factor of approximately 1000 by the expansion of the universe, and the radiation should be isotropic - assuming that the universe itself is isotropic. If the background radiation is indeed from the primordial fireball it affords us the only direct view at the very young universe. This paper deals with the spectrum and then the isotropy of the background radiation, with emphasis on high frequency or submillimeter measurements. Prospects for the future are discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  20. Optimal Background Attenuation for Fielded Radiation Detection Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Kaye, William R.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation detectors are often placed in positions difficult to shield from the effects of terrestrial background. This is particularly true in the case of Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) systems, as their wide viewing angle and outdoor installations make them susceptible to terrestrial background from the surrounding area. A low background is desired in most cases, especially when the background noise is of comparable strength to the signal of interest. The problem of shielding a generalized RPM from terrestrial background is considered. Various detector and shielding scenarios are modeled with the Monte-Carlo N Particle (MCNP) computer code. Amounts of nominal-density shielding needed to attenuate the terrestrial background to varying degrees are given, along with optimal shielding geometry to be used in areas where natural shielding is limited, and where radiation detection must occur in the presence of natural background. Common shielding solutions such as steel plating are evaluated based on the signal to noise ratio and the benefits are weighed against the incremental cost.

  1. Imprints of relic gravitational waves in cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Polnarev, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    A strong variable gravitational field of the very early Universe inevitably generates relic gravitational waves by amplifying their zero-point quantum oscillations. We begin our discussion by contrasting the concepts of relic gravitational waves and inflationary 'tensor modes'. We explain and summarize the properties of relic gravitational waves that are needed to derive their effects on cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The radiation field is characterized by four invariants I, V, E, B. We reduce the radiative transfer equations to a single integral equation of Voltairre type and solve it analytically and numerically. We formulate the correlation functions C l XX ' for X, X ' =T, E, B and derive their amplitudes, shapes and oscillatory features. Although all of our main conclusions are supported by exact numerical calculations, we obtain them, in effect, analytically by developing and using accurate approximations. We show that the TE correlation at lower l's must be negative (i.e. an anticorrelation), if it is caused by gravitational waves, and positive if it is caused by density perturbations. This difference in TE correlation may be a signature more valuable observationally than the lack or presence of the BB correlation, since the TE signal is about 100 times stronger than the expected BB signal. We discuss the detection by WMAP of the TE anticorrelation at l≅30 and show that such an anticorrelation is possible only in the presence of a significant amount of relic gravitational waves (within the framework of all other common assumptions). We propose models containing considerable amounts of relic gravitational waves that are consistent with the measured TT, TE and EE correlations

  2. Measurement of natural background radiation intensity on a train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. F.; Lin, J. W.; Sheu, R. J.; Lin, U. T.; Jiang, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to measure different components of natural background radiation on a train. A radiation measurement system consisting of four types of radiation detectors, namely, a Berkeley Lab cosmic-ray detector, moderated 3He detector, high pressure ionisation chamber and NaI(Tl) spectrometer, associated with a global positioning system unit was established for this purpose. For the commissioning of the system, a test measurement on a train along the railway around the northern Taiwan coast from Hsinchu to Hualien with a distance of ∼275 km was carried out. No significant variation of the intensities of the different components of natural background radiation was observed, except when the train went underground or in the tunnels. The average external dose rate received by the crew of the train was estimated to be 62 nSv h -1 . (authors)

  3. Natural background radiation and population dose distribution in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambi, K.S.V.; Bapat, V.N.; David, M.; Sundaram, V.K.; Sunta, C.M.; Soman, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A country-wide survey of the outdoor natural background gamma radiation levels has been made using mailed thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The salient features of the results are: (1) The air-kerma levels and the population doses in various states follow log-normal and normal distributions respectively. (2) The national average value for the air dose (air-kerma) is 775 ± 370 (1σ)μGy/y. (3) The lowest air-kerma recorded is 0.23 mGy/y at Minicoy (Laccadive Islands) and the highest is 26.73 mGy/y at Chavra (monazite areas, Kerala). (4) There are significant temporal variation s (even as high as ± 40 per cent) of the background radiation level at many locations and at least in 10 locations where radon/thoron measurements are available, these could be associated with the seasonal variations in radon/thoron levels. (5) The mail control TLDs indicate a country-wide average value of 785 ± 225 μGy/y for the air-kerma which can be considered to provide a truly national average value for the natural background radiation level in India. (6) The mean natural radiation per caput for the country works out to be 690 ± 200 (1σ) Sv/y. (7) The natural radiation per caput seems to be maximum for Andhra Pradesh (1065 ± 325 μSv/y) and minimum for Maharashtra (370 ± 80 μSv/y). (8) The population dose from the external natural background radiation is estimated to be half a million person-Sievert. (9) Assuming 1 CRP risk factor, it can be estimated that just one out of the 43 cancer deaths occurring on an average per 100,000 population in India, can be attributed to the external natural background radiation. (author). 18 refs., 13 tabs., 9 figs

  4. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Bordner, Autumn S.; Crosswell, Danielle A.; Katz, Ainsley O.; Shah, Jill T.; Zhang, Catherine R.; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W.; Ruderman, Malvin A.

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-seven nuclear tests were conducted on two atolls in the northern Marshall Islands between 1946 and 1958. These tests produced radioactive fallout, which even today gives rise to radiation measurable above naturally occurring background levels. Rather than obtain new data, recent estimates of contamination levels in the northern Marshall Islands use measurements made decades ago to calculate present radiation levels. In contrast, we report on timely measurements on three different atolls...

  5. An intercomparison of detectors for measurement of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.P.; Boetter-Jensen, L.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the background radiation were made in 1978 at 14 locations with a high-pressure ionization chamber, thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD's), two NaI(Tl) detectors, and a Ge(Li) spectrometer system. Simultaneous measurements with the ionization chamber and the spectrometer system provide reliable estimates of the total background exposure rate, of the individual contributors to the terrestrial exposure rate, and of the exposure rate from the secondary cosmic radiation. The TLD results agree with those of the ionization chamber. The NaI(Tl) detector results show that accurate estimates of the terrestrial exposure rate can be obtained if empirical corrections are applied. (author)

  6. On the omnipresent background gamma radiation of the continuous spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjanac, R.; Maletić, D.; Joković, D., E-mail: yokovic@ipb.ac.rs; Veselinović, N.; Dragić, A.; Udovičić, V.; Aničin, I.

    2014-05-01

    The background spectrum of a germanium detector, shielded from the radiations arriving from the lower and open for the radiations arriving from the upper hemisphere, is studied by means of absorption measurements, both in a ground level and in an underground laboratory. The low-energy continuous portion of this background spectrum that peaks at around 100 keV, which is its most intense component, is found to be of very similar shape at the two locations. It is established that it is mostly due to the radiations of the real continuous spectrum, which is quite similar to the instrumental one. The intensity of this radiation is in our cases estimated to about 8000 photons/(m{sup 2}s·2π·srad) in the ground level laboratory, and to about 5000 photons/(m{sup 2}s·2π·srad) in the underground laboratory, at the depth of 25 m.w.e. Simulations by GEANT4 and CORSIKA demonstrate that this radiation is predominantly of terrestrial origin, due to environmental gamma radiations scattered off the materials that surround the detector (the “skyshine radiation”), and to a far less extent to cosmic rays of degraded energy. - Highlights: • We studied the low-energy part of continuous background spectra of germanium detectors. • The study was performed at the ground level and at the shallow underground sites. • The instrumental spectrum is due to radiations of the similar continuous spectrum. • The low-energy radiation is of both terrestrial and cosmic-ray origin. • In our study, we find that this radiation is of predominantly terrestrial origin.

  7. The natural background approach to setting radiation standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, H.I.; Federow, H.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The suggestion has often been made that an additional radiation exposure imposed on humanity as a result of some important activity such as electricity generation would be acceptable if the exposure was 'small' compared to the natural background. In order to make this concept quantitative and objective, we propose that 'small compared with the natural background' be interpreted as the standard deviation (weighted with the exposed population) of the natural background. We believe that this use of the variation in natural background radiation is less arbitrary and requires fewer unfounded assumptions than some current approaches to standard-setting. The standard deviation is an easily calculated statistic that is small compared with the mean value for natural exposures of populations. It is an objectively determined quantity and its significance is generally understood. Its determination does not omit any of the pertinent data. When this method is applied to the population of the USA, it implies that a dose of 20 mrem/year would be an acceptable standard. This is closely comparable to the 25 mrem/year suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency as the maximum allowable exposure to an individual in the general population as a result of the operation of the complete uranium fuel cycle. Other agents for which a natural background exists can be treated in the same way as radiation. In addition, a second method for determining permissible exposure levels for agents other than radiation is presented. This method makes use of the natural background radiation data as a primary standard. Some observations on benzo(a)pyrene, using this latter method, are presented. (author)

  8. Cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-11-01

    Modifying slightly the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. This new cosmological model is consistent with the Mach principle, Einsteinian general theory of relativity, and observations of the universe. The origin, structure, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published recently in a scientific journal: Progress in Physics. This paper explains the observed 2.725 K cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present universe with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses. According to the black hole universe model, the observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe, which can be considered as an ideal black body. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient materials and merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. A governing equation that expresses the possible thermal history of the black hole universe is derived from the Planck law of black body radiation and radiation energy conservation. The result obtained by solving the governing equation indicates that the radiation temperature of the present universe can be ˜2.725 K if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and is therefore consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. A smaller or younger black hole universe usually cools down faster. The characteristics of the original star-like or supermassive black hole are not critical to the physical properties of the black hole universe at present, because matter and radiation are mainly from the outside space, i.e., the mother universe.

  9. Acute myeloid leukaemia in relation to background radiation in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelson, O.; Flodin, U.

    1993-01-01

    A review is presented on the results of several studies performed since the late 1970s to elucidate the role of background gamma radiation in houses and the incidence of cancer, especially leukemia. The influence of exposure time is discussed and the age dependence of the latency period is outlined. Estimation of dose-response relationships are presented. (MG)

  10. Introduction to radiation backgrounds in a B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.

    1992-08-01

    Detector backgrounds in a B factory due to synchrotron radiation and beam-gas interactions are discussed and the computational tools to simulate these processes are outlined. As an example of their application, simulations and beam tests that preceded the installation of the ARGUS silicon vertex detector are described. (orig.)

  11. Setting up a station to monitor the background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    This paper gives a brief review of the sources of external background from nuclear radiations and presents methods of measurement that can be conveniently used to determine the components. The methods of calibration are considered in detail and some discussion of meteorological effects is included. (author)

  12. Angular anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation is reviewed. Anisotropy on large-scale (dipole and quadrupole) and on small scales is discussed. The smoothing effects of secondary ionization (fractional ionization x) are found to be unimportant over an angular scale greater than approx.= 5(OMEGAx)sup(1/3) degrees. (author)

  13. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  14. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  15. Position sensitive detection of neutrons in high radiation background field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrik, D; Jakubek, J; Pospisil, S; Vacik, J

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of a high-resolution position sensitive device for detection of slow neutrons in the environment of extremely high γ and e(-) radiation background. We make use of a planar silicon pixelated (pixel size: 55 × 55 μm(2)) spectroscopic Timepix detector adapted for neutron detection utilizing very thin (10)B converter placed onto detector surface. We demonstrate that electromagnetic radiation background can be discriminated from the neutron signal utilizing the fact that each particle type produces characteristic ionization tracks in the pixelated detector. Particular tracks can be distinguished by their 2D shape (in the detector plane) and spectroscopic response using single event analysis. A Cd sheet served as thermal neutron stopper as well as intensive source of gamma rays and energetic electrons. Highly efficient discrimination was successful even at very low neutron to electromagnetic background ratio about 10(-4).

  16. Cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies in brane worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2003-11-28

    We propose a new formulation to calculate the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum in the Randall-Sundrum two-brane model based on recent progress in solving the bulk geometry using a low energy approximation. The evolution of the anisotropic stress imprinted on the brane by the 5D Weyl tensor is calculated. An impact of the dark radiation perturbation on the CMB spectrum is investigated in a simple model assuming an initially scale-invariant adiabatic perturbation. The dark radiation perturbation induces isocurvature perturbations, but the resultant spectrum can be quite different from the prediction of simple mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations due to Weyl anisotropic stress.

  17. Long-range correlation in cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, M Sadegh; Ghasemi, F; Rahvar, Sohrab; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the statistical anisotropy and gaussianity of temperature fluctuations of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe survey, using the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Rescaled Range, and Scaled Windowed Variance methods. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis shows that CMB fluctuations has a long-range correlation function with a multifractal behavior. By comparing the shuffled and surrogate series of CMB data, we conclude that the multifractality nature of the temperature fluctuation of CMB radiation is mainly due to the long-range correlations, and the map is consistent with a gaussian distribution.

  18. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered.

  19. Natural radiation background in the ancient city of Palmyra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Al-Masri, M.S.; Hushari, M.; Raja, G.; Aissa, M.; Al-Hent, R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural radiation background has been determined for the Ancient City of Palmyra and its surrounding areas. Car-borne gamma spectrometry, indoor radon gas concentration and natural radionuclides levels in environmental samples (soil, water and plants) have been determined. Two types of dwelling were involved in this study, one with cancer cases, and the others without. The results showed that indoor radon gas concentrations and radiation exposure rates are within reported mean background levels in Syria (45 Bq m −3 and less than 0.1 μSv h −1 , respectively); no differences were noticed between the dwelling groups. In addition, the results did not indicate any relation between recorded cancers and measured natural radioactivity.

  20. Could unstable relic particles distort the microwave background radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, A.; Loeb, A.; Nussinov, S.

    1989-01-01

    Three general classes of possible scenarios for the recently reported distortion of the microwave background radiation (MBR) via decaying relic weakly interacting particles are analyzed. The analysis shows that such particles could not reheat the universe and cause the spectral distortion of the MBR. Gravitational processes such as the early formation of massive black holes may still be plausible energy sources for producing the reported spectral distortion of the MBR at an early cosmological epoch. 24 references

  1. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  2. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y

  3. Down syndrome and the high background radiation areas of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaikrishan, G.; Ramachandran, E.N.; Karuppasamy, C.V.; Sudheer, K.R.; Andrews, V.J.; Soren, D.C.; Anil Kumar, V.; Koya, P.K.M.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) or trisomy-21 is a complex human clinical entity compromising several functional, structural and developmental features with wide variation in expression levels. The diagnosis is confirmed in majority of the cases by an extra dose of chromosome 21 by cytogenetics and occasionally it may be due to either chromosomal translocation or mosaicism (different cell lines in the same individual). The extra chromosome 21 is usually formed by non-disjunction during meiosis and is the most common numerical chromosomal anomaly compatible with life, as chromosome 21 is one of the smallest with relatively fewer genes most of which are reckoned to be non lethal. Though exact causative factors and pathogenesis is not fully understood, a rise in maternal age at conception coupled with deleterious environmental influence on an ageing ovum is a recognized risk factor. The de novo nature of trisomy-21 and its relatively higher frequency makes it a reliable indicator to assess the role of chronic high background radiation in inducing germ line mutation and congenital malformation. Many other relatively common congenital malformations with multifactorial origin may not have this de novo property and associating its incidence with the prevailing natural background radiation become more complex. In vitro studies have shown association between high intensity radiation and genetics effects but such a relationship so far was not established between DS and radiation

  4. Assessment of Radiation Background Variation for Moving Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rennie, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toevs, James Waldo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Darrin J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abhold, Mark Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-13

    The introduction points out that radiation backgrounds fluctuate across very short distances: factors include geology, soil composition, altitude, building structures, topography, and other manmade structures; and asphalt and concrete can vary significantly over short distances. Brief descriptions are given of the detection system, experimental setup, and background variation measurements. It is concluded that positive and negative gradients can greatly reduce the detection sensitivity of an MDS: negative gradients create opportunities for false negatives (nondetection), and positive gradients create a potentially unacceptable FAR (above 1%); the location of use for mobile detection is important to understand; spectroscopic systems provide more information for screening out false alarms and may be preferred for mobile use; and mobile monitor testing at LANL accounts for expected variations in the background.

  5. Association of Radon Background and Total Background Ionizing Radiation with Alzheimer's Disease Deaths in U.S. States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Steven; Rheinstein, Peter H; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of the brain to ionizing radiation might promote the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analysis of AD death rates versus radon background radiation and total background radiation in U.S. states. Total background, radon background, cosmic and terrestrial background radiation measurements are from Assessment of Variations in Radiation Exposure in the United States and Report No. 160 - Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States. 2013 AD death rates by U.S. state are from the Alzheimer's Association. Radon background ionizing radiation was significantly correlated with AD death rate in 50 states and the District of Columbia (r = 0.467, p = 0.001). Total background ionizing radiation was also significantly correlated with AD death rate in 50 states and the District of Columbia (r = 0.452, p = 0.001). Multivariate linear regression weighted by state population demonstrated that AD death rate was significantly correlated with radon background (β= 0.169, p ionizing radiation is a risk factor for AD. Intranasal inhalation of radon gas could subject the rhinencephalon and hippocampus to damaging radiation that initiates AD. The damage would accumulate over time, causing age to be a powerful risk factor.

  6. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  7. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF THE IONIZING RADIATION BACKGROUND ON GALAXY EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambrick, D. Clay; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We find that the amount and nature of the assumed ionizing background can strongly affect galaxy formation and evolution. Galaxy evolution simulations typically incorporate an ultraviolet background which falls off rapidly above z = 3; e.g., that of Haardt and Madau. However, this decline may be too steep to fit the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe constraints on electron scattering optical depth or observations of intermediate redshift (z ∼ 2-4) Lyα forest transmission. As an alternative, we present simulations of the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with UV backgrounds that decline more slowly at high redshift: both a simple intensity rescaling and the background recently derived by Faucher-Giguere, which softens the spectrum at higher redshifts. We also test an approximation of the X-ray background with a similar z dependence. We find for the test galaxies that an increase in either the intensity or hardness of ionizing radiation generically pushes star formation toward lower redshifts: although overall star formation in the simulation boxes is reduced by 10%-25%, the galaxies show a factor of ∼2 increase in the fraction of stars within a 30 kpc radius that are formed after z = 1. Other effects include late gas inflows enhanced up to 30 times, stellar half-mass radii decreased by up to 30%, central velocity dispersions increased up to 40%, and a strong reduction in substructure. The magnitude of the effects depends on the environmental/accretion properties of the particular galaxy.

  9. Background radiation dose and leukemia mortality in north Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Masatoshi

    1978-01-01

    In 7 prefectures in north Japan where natural environment as well as socioeconomic status are similar, the relation of natural background dose rate and death rate caused by leukemia was examined. More than 2500 deaths were recorded in the last 10 years which distributed normally throughout the entire area with a mean of 3.68 and a SD of 1.14 per 10 5 per year. There are no significant, differences in the observed values of each prefecture in spite of having different population. Natural background radiation dose rate has also a normal distribution with a mean of 8.98 μR/h and a SD of 2.12. The highest dose rate in Niigata (10.44) was significantly higher than the lowest value in Aomori (6.48) whereas the death rates caused by leukemia were not different between the both prefectures. The null hypothesis that a positive regression exists between dose rate and death rate even in the smallest dose range was not supported in north Japan. Leukemogenic effect of background radiation, if any, seems to be within a practical threshold. (auth.)

  10. Health effects in residents of high background radiation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.; Komarov, E.

    1983-01-01

    Studies carried out in various countries and by the World Health Organization on health effects of exposure of populations to high levels of natural background radiation result in observations of different significance. There are indications of changes in chromosome aberration rate; Down's syndrome has been observed to be possibly related to radiation exposure; malignant neoplasms in bone apparently correspond to high concentrations of 226 Ra in drinking water. Although various researchers have looked for them, effects have not been demonstrated regarding cancer mortality (other than malignant neoplasms involving bone), gross congenital abnormalities, fertility index, growth and development, hereditary disease (other than the possibility of Down's syndrome), infant mortality, longevity, multiple births, sex ratio, or spontaneous abortion rate. On the basis of reported data clear quantitative conception of the risk of low-level radiation from natural sources could not be developed and feasibility studies of further epidemiological programmes should be organized. The possibility of reducing the collective population dose from natural sources could be further explored and a basis for necessary legal action on establishment of standards for possible sources of natural radiation, such as building materials, fertilizers, natural gas and water, might be developed. (author)

  11. The local contribution to the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecker, Jean-Claude; Narlikar, Jayant V.; Ochsenbein, Francois; Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The observed microwave background radiation (MBR) is commonly interpreted as the relic of an early hot universe, and its observed features (spectrum and anisotropy) are explained in terms of properties of the early universe. Here we describe a complementary, even possibly alternative, interpretation of MBR, first proposed in the early 20 th century, and adapt it to modern observations. For example, the stellar Hipparcos data show that the energy density of starlight from the Milky Way, if suitably thermalized, yields a temperature of ∼2.81 K. This and other arguments given here strongly suggest that the origin of MBR may lie, at least in a very large part, in re-radiation of thermalized galactic starlight. The strengths and weaknesses of this alternative radical explanation are discussed. (paper)

  12. Generalized Chaplygin gas and cosmic microwave background radiation constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.C.; Bertolami, O.; Sen, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    We study the dependence of the location of the cosmic microwave background radiation peaks on the parameters of the generalized Chaplygin gas model, whose equation of state is given by p=-A/ρ α , where A is a positive constant and 0<α≤1. We find, in particular, that observational data arising from Archeops, BOOMERANG, supernova and high-redshift observations allow constraining significantly the parameter space of the model. Our analysis indicates that the emerging model is clearly distinguishable from the α=1 Chaplygin case and the ΛCDM model

  13. Early reionization by decaying particles and cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuya, S.; Kawasaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    We study the reionization scenario in which ionizing UV photons emitted from decaying particle, in addition to usual contributions from stars and quasars, ionize the universe. It is found that the scenario is consistent with both the first year data of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the fact that the universe is not fully ionized until z∼6 as observed by Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Likelihood analysis revealed that rather broad parameter space can be chosen. This scenario will be discriminated by future observations, especially by the EE polarization power spectrum of cosmic microwave background radiation

  14. Radiation in the Einstein universe and the cosmic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, I.E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the cosmic background radiation is not at all uniquely or scientifically relatively economically indicative of a ''big bang.'' Specifically, essentially any temporally homogeneous theory in the Einstein universe is consistent with the existence of a cosmic background radiation (CBR) conforming to the Planck law; in particular, the chronometric cosmology is such. It is noted that the Einstein universe appears particularly natural as a habitat for photons by virtue of the absence of infrared divergences and of the absolute convergence of the trace for associated Gibbs-state density matrices. These features are connected with the closed character of space in the Einstein universe, and facilitate the use of the latter in modeling local phenomena, in place of Minkowski space with periodic boundary conditions or the like, with minimal loss of covariance or effect on the wave functions. In particular, the Einstein universe may be used in the analysis of the perturbation of a Planck-law spectrum due to a local nonvanishing isotropic angular momentum of the CBR, of whatever origin. The estimated distortion of the spectrum due to such a kinematically admissible effect is in very good agreement with that observed by Woody and Richards, which is opposite in direction to those earlier predicted by big-bang theories. The theoretical analysis involves a preliminary treatment of equilibria of linear quantum fields with supplementary quasilinear constraints

  15. The Local Contribution to the Microwave Background Radiation(MBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.; Pecker, Jean-Claude; Wickramasinghe, N. Ch.

    2010-11-01

    In the early fifties, from the early theories of the big bang universe, Gamow, Alpher & Herman have predicted the existence of a "cosmological" microwave background radiation, corresponding to a black body of a few Kelvins. When, in 1964, Penzias & Wilson, observed a radiation at 2.7K, the scientific world concluded quickly it was a proof, a final proof, of the big bang type cosmologies. But it should be realized that, in the beginning of the XX-th century, several authors, from Guillaume to Eddington, have predicted the same thing in a static Universe. We have redone the calculations of Eddington, and based them on the recent and very accurate photometric results from the satellite Hipparcos. In the absence of any expansion, of any big bang type behaviour, we compute the local temperature induced by the reradiation by local matter of stellar radiation, and we found it to be in excellent agreement with the observations. This result, completed by a careful discussion, could lead to a dramatic revision of the classical cosmological concepts.

  16. Characteristics of natural background external radiation and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The two sources of natural radiation - cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides - are described. The factors affecting radiation doses received from natural radiation and the calculation of effective dose equivalent due to natural radiation are discussed. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  18. Database on epidemiological survey in high background radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Sunyuan; Guo Furong; Liu Yusheng

    1992-01-01

    In order to store and check the data of the health survey in high background radiation area (HBRA) and control area in Guangdong Province, and to use these data in future, three databases were set up by using RBASE 5000 database software. (1) HD: the database based on the household registers especially established for the health survey from 1979 to 1986, covering more than 160000 subjects and 2200000 data. (2) DC: the database based on the registration cards of deaths from cancers and all other diseases during the period of 1975-1986 including more than 10000 cases and 260000 data. (3) MCC: the database for the case-control study on mutation-related factors for four kinds of cancers (liver, stomach, lung cancers and leukemia), embracing 626 subjects and close to 90000 data. The data in the databases were checked up with the original records and compared with the manual analytical results

  19. Interaction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonyan, F.A.; Kanevskij, B.L.; Vardanyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of the bump and black-body cutoff in the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum arising from the π-meson photoproduction reaction in collisions of CR protons with the microwave background radiation (MBR) photons is studied. A kinetic equation which describes CR proton propagation in MBR with account of a catastrophic of the π-meson photoproduction process is derived. The equilibrium CR proton spectrum obtained from the solution of the stationary kinetic equation is in general agreement with spectrum obtained under assumption of continuous energy loss approximation. However spectra from local sources especially for the times of propagation t>10 9 years differ noticeably from those obtained in the continuous loss approximation. 24 refs.; 5 figs

  20. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4 He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. (paper)

  1. On the anisotropies of cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The work gives a brief overview of the topic of cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies. Then is deals with the so-called Rees-Sciama affect; i.e. with the anisotropies arising between the last scattering surface and us due to transparent huge irregularities. Using the formulas of Special Theory of Relativity it is proven that in the neighbourhood of expanding spherical body the Meszaros calculation (Meszaros 1994) are correct; the inaccuracy is maximally of order 10 -12 . Then the profile of the blue shift of expansion caused by an expanding sphere is calculated for the case, when the radius of this sphere is much smaller that the relevant Hubble radius. Hence the profiles of the shifts of light periods through a void and through a supercluster are given in the most general cases. These cases contain all the three Friedmannian models and both the synchronous and asynchronous clusters. Then the obtained profiles are explicitly decomposed into the sum of the multipole terms, and it is shown that the observed difference between the measured direction of the maximum of dipole anisotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation and the result of Lauer and Postman (1994) is not explainable by the Rees-Sciama effect. This means that no alternative exists to the two possibilities for the explanation of the data of Lauer and Postman; either the either the huge system of Abell clusters is streaming, or the Friedmannian model is queried. The third possibility is, of course, that the data of observations of Lauer and Postman are incorrect. However, any of these three possibilities seem to be strange enough; hence, the problems coming from data of Lauer and Postman further holds. This is the key result of paper. As a further technical result it is also shown that in principle there is no upper limit of Rees-Sciama effect. (author)

  2. Spatial variability of POPs in European background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Halse

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive air samplers (PAS were deployed at 86 European background sites during summer 2006 in order (i to gain further insight into spatial patterns of persistent organic pollutants (POPs in European background air and, (ii to evaluate PAS as an alternative sampling technique under EMEP (Co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air pollutants in Europe. The samples were analyzed for selected PCBs, HCHs, DDTs, HCB, PAHs and chlordanes, and air concentrations were calculated on the basis of losses of performance reference compounds. Air concentrations of PCBs were generally lowest in more remote areas of northern Europe with elevated levels in more densely populated areas. γ-HCH was found at elevated levels in more central parts of Europe, whereas α-HCH, β-HCH and DDTs showed higher concentrations in the south-eastern part. There was no clear spatial pattern in the concentrations for PAHs, indicative of influence by local sources, rather than long range atmospheric transport (LRAT. HCB was evenly distributed across Europe, while the concentrations of chlordanes were typically low or non-detectable. A comparison of results obtained on the basis of PAS and active air sampling (AAS illustrated that coordinated PAS campaigns have the potential serve as useful inter-comparison exercises within and across existing monitoring networks. The results also highlighted limitations of the current EMEP measurement network with respect to spatial coverage. We finally adopted an existing Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART as recently modified to incorporate key processes relevant for POPs to evaluate potential source regions affecting observed concentrations at selected sites. Using PCB-28 as an example, the model predicted concentrations which agreed within a factor of 3 with PAS measurements for all except 1 out of the 17 sites selected for this analysis.

  3. Radioactivity in the groundwater of a high background radiation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabana, E I; Kinsara, A A

    2014-11-01

    Natural radioactivity was measured in groundwater samples collected from 37 wells scattered in an inhabited area of high natural background radiation, in a purpose of radiation protection. The study area is adjacent to Aja heights of granitic composition in Hail province, Saudi Arabia. Initial screening for gross α and gross β activities showed levels exceeded the national regulation limits set out for gross α and gross β activities in drinking water. The gross α activity ranged from 0.17 to 5.41 Bq L(-)(1) with an average value of 2.15 Bq L(-)(1), whereas gross β activity ranged from 0.48 to 5.16 Bq L(-)(1), with an average value of 2.60 Bq L(-)(1). The detail analyses indicated that the groundwater of this province is contaminated with uranium and radium ((226)Ra and (228)Ra). The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra and (228)Ra were 0.40, 0.77, 0.29 and 0.46 Bq L(-)(1), respectively. The higher uranium content was found in the samples of granitic aquifers, whereas the higher radium content was found in the samples of sandstone aquifers. Based on the obtained results, mechanism of leaching of the predominant radionuclides has been discussed in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of background radiation and associated anomalies in Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    In addition to examining anomalies and establishing the background gamma exposure rate range, the study presents a formula to convert thousand counts per minute (kcpm) from a gamma scintillator to microroentgen per hour (μRh) for the Rifle region. Also, a method is presented to identify contaminated areas containing excess 226 Ra, by using a GR-410 gamma spectrometer. This method is suggested to be applied to all property surveys in the Rifle area. The Wasatch Formation, which outcrops extensively in the Rifle area, was found to have a major influence on the background radiation. Varying potassium concentrations and naturally occurring uranium in this rock unit reveal varying gamma exposure rates. Examining RaTh ratios from laboratory analysis of soil samples or use of RaTh ratios from GR-410 gamma spectrometer readings on site allows discrimination between mill related contamination and naturally occuring radioactivity. Radioactive coal clinkers were found used as fill material throughout the Rifle region and have been determined to be a product of the mill and subject to remediation. Finally, windblown mill tailings contamination is addressed in some detail. Mill tailings redistributed from the Rifle uranium mill tailings piles by prevailing winds were detected extensively on vicinity properties in Rifle. Some radioactive components of the windblown tailings were found to have leached into the subsurface soil. The combination of Wasatch Formation, radioactive coal clinkers, and windblown tailings accounts for many of the anomalous gamma exposure rates observed by the radiological survey teams. 11 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  5. estimation of background radiation at rivers state university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    State University of Science and Technology was measured using a specialize digital, radiation meter type, radalert ... KEYWORDS: Radiation, Radalert-50, electronic devices, radiation limit ... electron gun and the back of CRT (Philip and pick,.

  6. Variability in regional background aerosols within the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Pey, J.; Cusack, M.; Pérez, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Theodosi, C.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Kubilay, N.; Koçak, M.

    2009-07-01

    The main objective of this study is the identification of major factors controlling levels and chemical composition of aerosols in the regional background (RB) along the Mediterranean Basin (MB). To this end, data on PM levels and speciation from Montseny (MSY, NE Spain), Finokalia (FKL, Southern Greece) and Erdemli (ERL, Southern Turkey) for the period 2001 to 2008 are evaluated. Important differences on PM levels and composition are evident when comparing the Western and Eastern MBs. The results manifest W-E and N-S PM10 and PM2.5 gradients along the MB, attributed to the higher frequency and intensity of African dust outbreaks in the EMB, while for PM1 very similar levels are encountered. PM in the EMB is characterized by higher levels of crustal material and sulphate as compared to WMB (and central European sites), however, RB nitrate and OC + EC levels are relatively constant across the Mediterranean and lower than other European sites. Marked seasonal trends are evidenced for PM levels, nitrate (WMB), ammonium and sulphate. Also relatively higher levels of V and Ni (WMB) are measured in the Mediterranean basin, probably as a consequence of high emissions from fuel-oil combustion (power generation, industrial and shipping emissions). Enhanced sulphate levels in EMB compared to WMB were measured. The high levels of sulphate in the EMB may deplete the available gas-phase NH3 so that little ammonium nitrate can form due to the low NH3 levels. This study illustrates the existence of three very important features within the Mediterranean that need to be accounted for when modeling climate effects of aerosols in the area, namely: a) the increasing gradient of dust from WMB to EMB; b) the change of hygroscopic behavior of mineral aerosols (dust) via nitration and sulfation; and c) the abundance of highly hygroscopic aerosols during high insolation (low cloud formation) periods.

  7. Report of the radiation group on radiation backgrounds and damage in the ISABELLE intersection regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Toohig, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Radiation Group was charged to examine radiation aspects of the current ISABELLE design and the projected experimental arrangements. Some samples of questions to be addressed were: (1) how does the overall shielding design impact the experimental design, (2) what backgrounds might be expected from the proposed beam scraping, shaving, etc. schemes, (3) what are the radiation damage considerations for experimental electronics near the beam, and (4) what backgrounds might be expected in an experiment from operation of another experiment in the same or the adjacent intersection region. A review is given based on the ISABELLE Proposal, The Proceedings of the 1975 ISABELLE Summer Study, and the estimate of ISABELLE shielding requirements by Stevens and Thorndike

  8. Measurement of the natural radiation background level of Riyadh City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Al-Haj, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    A gamma spectroscopy system was used to analyze the radionuclides in soil samples and to determine the cumulative radioactivity of terrestrial origin in the Riyadh City area. Minimal work has been done in the 1980s to measure the natural background radiation level in Saudi Arabia by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measurement of the natural radioactivity in the Riyadh area for the radionuclide concentration in becquerels per kilogram, the exposure rate arising from radionuclides in grays per hour, and the equivalent dose rate in sieverts per hour are the goals of this work. Soil samples were collected from 21 places in Riyadh City. Each site was sampled for two depth profiles, 0 to 5 cm and 5 to 15 cm. These measurements were taken before the Chernobyl accident, and in the absence of any measurements for that area in the past, this work can be considered in future work for a reference 137 Cs concentration in Riyadh soil to determine the 137 Cs increase in the soil after the Chernobyl accident

  9. Background outdoor radiation dose to inhabitants around Narwapahar mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.S.; Jha, V.N.; Topno, R.; Dandpat, B.L.; Patnaik, R.I.; Kumar, R.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Mining of uranium ore due to their inherent radiological characteristics may lead to release radionuclides into the environment. Monitoring of radiological parameters in the villages surrounding the mining areas are of significant concern for the evaluation of public exposure. The monitoring objectives will include the natural distribution of radionuclides in the environment as well as contribution of the source (mine), if any. Radon and its short lived progeny present in the environment contributes maximum natural background radiation dose due to inhalation. Apart from this, terrestrial radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th series and 40 K) present in trace level in earth crust are significant contributor of external exposure in the environment. The variation in the levels of these radionuclides depends on the geological strata of the area. Measured radiological parameters are comparable to the global average variation of exposure level due to these natural sources. Statistical treatment of the database reveals that the variation in radon and gamma level is natural and contribution of mining activities at the site is insignificant. The same is attributed to natural uranium mineralization of Singhbhum shear zone. Apart from this, seasonal variation in radon profile is globally reported

  10. A background radiation survey along the transcontinental railway in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Susumu; Kodaira, Kazuo; Ito, Masaru

    1995-01-01

    This article reports a survey, carried out during a period from October 31 to November 3, 1994 in Australia, as well as some basic techniques of train-borne measurements for estimating outdoor gamma-ray dose rates. Surface rock and bedrock data are presented for convenience for geological analysis. Cosmic-ray dose rates estimated from atmospheric pressure data are also presented for researchers who are interested in total background radiation dose rates. It was found that gamma levels can be high in the western area. The dose rate data were based on the shielding correction factor evaluated at platforms in many stations. To confirm the validity of this method, the data from train-borne surveys in central Japan were compared with the present Australian data. There were, to some extent, correlations between them. The present study suggests that the train-borne measurements are useful for surveying wide area in a short time with an error of about 20%. (N.K.)

  11. Cosmogenic radioberyllium and background radiation dose to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeschl, M.; Ohera, M.

    2008-01-01

    To discover the causes of the presence of abnormal Be concentrations (anthropogenic or natural or cosmogenic source) in the area of the Kralicky Sneznik mountain massive (in the northeast of the Czech Republic, altitude of about 800 m), concentrations of 7 Be and 10 Be were also assayed in selected environmental components in the years of 2005 - 2007. The 10 Be concentrations in soils (80.39x10 6 - 210.45x10 6 atom g -1 ) and activity concentrations of 7 Be in soils and wet deposition were very low (1.3 - 5.3 Bq kg -1 and 0.6 - 4.5 Bq l -1 , resp.). However, activities of 7 Be in birch leaves and grass (dry matter) reached relatively high values (up to 1000 Bq kg -1 ) and, in addition, showed out their significant seasonal growth. In the work the probable contribution of the cosmogenic 7 Be activities to background radiation dose to the general public is discussed. (authors)

  12. Cosmic background radiation spectral distortion and radiative decays of relic neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, Z.G.; Doroshkevich, A.G.; Khlopov, M.Yu.; Yurov, V.P.; Vysotskij, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    The recently observed excess of photons on a short wavelength side of the peak of a cosmic background radiation spectrum can be described by radiative decays of relic neutral particles. The lifetime and mass of a decaying particle must satisfy the following conditions: 2x10 9 s 14 s, 0.4 eV -9 -8x10 -8 ) μ b , and the interaction of new particles with the usual matter must be rather strong. The generalization of the standard SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) model is presented which includes new particles with the desired properties. 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Health effects in residents of high background radiation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Although the health effects of radiation doses in occupationally exposed persons had received attention, it was not until the 1950s, when the atmospheric atom bomb tests of the United States and the Soviet Union had raised the level of environmental radioactivity, that the long-term effects of low-level radiation dosage became a matter of popular concern throughout the world. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was created, and the World Health Organization (WHO) appointed an expert committee to provide advice concerning radiation and human health. In its first report, the WHO expert committee identified several areas of high natural radiation where studies of the exposed population might possibly provide information concerning the effects of chromic low-level radiation dosage

  14. Radiation dose in the high background radiation area in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, E P; Jojo, P J; Vaidyan, V K; Anilkumar, S; Eappen, K P

    2012-03-01

    A systematic radiological survey has been carried out in the region of high-background radiation area in Kollam district of Kerala to define the natural gamma-radiation levels. One hundred and forty seven soil samples from high-background radiation areas and five samples from normal background region were collected as per standard sampling procedures and were analysed for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K by gamma-ray spectroscopy. External gamma dose rates at all sampling locations were also measured using a survey meter. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K was found to vary from 17 to 3081 Bq kg(-1), 54 to 11976 Bq kg(-1) and BDL (67.4 Bq kg(-1)) to 216 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in the study area. Such heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the region may be attributed to the deposition phenomenon of beach sand soil in the region. Radium equivalent activities were found high in several locations. External gamma dose rates estimated from the levels of radionuclides in soil had a range from 49 to 9244 nGy h(-1). The result of gamma dose rate measured at the sampling sites using survey meter showed an excellent correlation with dose rates computed from the natural radionuclides estimated from the soil samples.

  15. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  16. Latent variable method for automatic adaptation to background states in motor imagery BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagaev, Nikolay; Volkova, Ksenia; Ossadtchi, Alexei

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are known to be vulnerable to variabilities in background states of a user. Usually, no detailed information on these states is available even during the training stage. Thus there is a need in a method which is capable of taking background states into account in an unsupervised way. Approach. We propose a latent variable method that is based on a probabilistic model with a discrete latent variable. In order to estimate the model’s parameters, we suggest to use the expectation maximization algorithm. The proposed method is aimed at assessing characteristics of background states without any corresponding data labeling. In the context of asynchronous motor imagery paradigm, we applied this method to the real data from twelve able-bodied subjects with open/closed eyes serving as background states. Main results. We found that the latent variable method improved classification of target states compared to the baseline method (in seven of twelve subjects). In addition, we found that our method was also capable of background states recognition (in six of twelve subjects). Significance. Without any supervised information on background states, the latent variable method provides a way to improve classification in BCI by taking background states into account at the training stage and then by making decisions on target states weighted by posterior probabilities of background states at the prediction stage.

  17. Solar Radiation Forecasting, Accounting for Daily Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Langella

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiation forecast accounting for daily and instantaneous variability was pursued by means of a new bi-parametric statistical model that builds on a model previously proposed by the same authors. The statistical model is developed with direct reference to the Liu-Jordan clear sky theoretical expression but is not bound by a specific clear sky model; it accounts separately for the mean daily variability and for the variation of solar irradiance during the day by means of two corrective parameters. This new proposal allows for a better understanding of the physical phenomena and improves the effectiveness of statistical characterization and subsequent simulation of the introduced parameters to generate a synthetic solar irradiance time series. Furthermore, the analysis of the experimental distributions of the two parameters’ data was developed, obtaining opportune fittings by means of parametric analytical distributions or mixtures of more than one distribution. Finally, the model was further improved toward the inclusion of weather prediction information in the solar irradiance forecasting stage, from the perspective of overcoming the limitations of purely statistical approaches and implementing a new tool in the frame of solar irradiance prediction accounting for weather predictions over different time horizons.

  18. On the role of natural radiation background in the initial development of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Vagabova, M.Eh.; Primak-Mirolyubov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain data on plant development under strictly controlled decreased natural radiation conditions, the experiment with radish seeds was conducted in a special chamber having a decreased natural radiation background. It has been shown that the development of seedlings in the course of the first 4-5 days in significantly delayed, and it normalizes when radiation sources, imitating the natural radiation background, are placed inside the chamber

  19. Research on cloud background infrared radiation simulation based on fractal and statistical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingrun; Xu, Qingshan; Li, Xia; Wu, Kaifeng; Dong, Yanbing

    2018-02-01

    Cloud is an important natural phenomenon, and its radiation causes serious interference to infrared detector. Based on fractal and statistical data, a method is proposed to realize cloud background simulation, and cloud infrared radiation data field is assigned using satellite radiation data of cloud. A cloud infrared radiation simulation model is established using matlab, and it can generate cloud background infrared images for different cloud types (low cloud, middle cloud, and high cloud) in different months, bands and sensor zenith angles.

  20. Measurements of Background Gamma Radiation on Some Localities of North-East Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    , G. Hodolli; , Y. Halimi; , R. Gashi; , Se. Kadiri; , B. Xhafa; , A. Jonuzaj

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of natural environmental radiations is one of the most important subjects in health physics. The main sources of background radiation are cosmic, terrestrial and cosmogenic radiation produced by reactions with cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei. Terrestrial radiation varies in different regions in the world. Generally the background dose rate from cosmic rays depends on the latitude and altitude. The dose rate range obtained in some northeast Kosovo, the dose rate varies from ...

  1. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven ... and geological structures of soil and rocks. (Florou and Kritids 1992, ... Selection of Sampling Points and location of. Field Dosimeters.

  2. Radiation induced mutants in elite genetic background for the augmentation of genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Bhagwat, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), an important food crop for India, shows large genetic diversity. However, despite the large genetic resource, high genetic similarity is reported in cultivated varieties indicating genetic erosion. Radiation induced mutations provide genetic variability in elite background. In the present study, twenty gamma ray induced mutants of rice variety WL112 (carrying sd-1 semi-dwarfing gene) were analysed for genetic diversity using microsatellite markers. The high range of genetic diversity among mutants indicated that the mutants possess potential for enhancing variability in rice. Cluster analysis showed presence of five clusters having small sub-clusters. Earliness, semi-dwarf stature or resistance to blast disease observed among the mutants showed that these will be useful in breeding programmes. (author)

  3. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222 Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  4. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  5. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case–control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case–control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors. PMID:19454802

  6. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santiago, Claudio P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  7. Microbiology of the surface water samples in the high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Zamani, Khosrow; Sedigh, Hadi; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Taeb, Shahram; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Soofi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Residents of high background radiation areas of Ramsar have lived in these areas for many generations and received radiation doses much higher than the dose limit recommended by ICRP for radiation workers. The radioactivity of the high background radiation areas of Ramsar is reported to be due to 226 Ra and its decay products, which have been brought to the surface by the waters of hot springs. Over the past years the department has focused on different aspects of the health effects of the elevated levels of natural radiation in Ramsar. This study was aimed to perform a preliminary investigation on the bioeffects of exposure to elevated levels of natural radiation on the microbiology of surface water samples. Water samples were collected from surface water streams in Talesh Mahalleh district, Ramsar as well as a nearby area with normal levels of background radiation. Only two strains of bacteria, that is, Providencia stuartii and Shimwellia blattae, could be isolated from the water samples collected from high background radiation areas, while seven strains (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter asburiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Buttiauxella agerstis, Tatumella punctuata and Raoultella ornithinolytica) were isolated from the water samples collected from normal background radiation areas. All the bacteria isolated from water samples of high and normal background radiation areas were sensitive to ultraviolet radiation, heat, betadine, alcohol, and deconex. Although other investigators have reported that bacteria isolated from hot springs show radioresistance, the results reported here do not reveal any adaptive response. (author)

  8. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Blessinger, Christopher S [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  9. World high background natural radiation areas: Need to protect public from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of findings on radiological measurements, radiobiological and epidemiological studies in some main world high background natural radiation (HBNR) areas such as in Brazil, China, India and Iran are presented and discussed with special regard to remediation of radiation exposure of inhabitants in such areas. The current radiation protection philosophy and recommendations applied to workers and public from operation of radiation and nuclear applications are based on the linear non-threshold (LNT) model. The inhabitants of HBNR and radon prone areas receive relatively high radiation doses. Therefore, according to the LNT concept, the inhabitants in HBNR areas and in particular those in Ramsar are considered at risk and their exposure should be regulated. The HBNR areas in the world have different conditions in terms of dose and population. In particular, the inhabitants in HBNR areas of Ramsar receive very high internal and external exposures. This author believes that the public in such areas should be protected and proposes a plan to remedy high exposure of the inhabitants of the HBNR areas of Ramsar, while maintaining these areas as they stand to establish a national environmental radioactivity park which can be provisionally called “Ramsar Research Natural Radioactivity Park” (RRNRP). The major HBNR areas, the public exposure and the need to remedy exposures of inhabitants are reviewed and discussed. - Highlights: ► Highlights of findings on studies in HBNR areas are reviewed and discussed. ► The need to protect HBNR area inhabitants and remedy public exposure is emphasized. ► A collective approach is proposed to remedy exposure of Ramsar HBNR area inhabitants. ► Relocation of HBNR area inhabitants and establishing a park at the location is proposed. ► The advantages and disadvantages of the methods are discussed and recommendations are made

  10. A geophysical tour of high background radiation areas of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, D.; Kher, R.K.; Nambi, K.S.V.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of the findings including health effects in four major high natural background areas of the world are given. Such high background areas could prove to be a radiation ecology laboratory gifted by nature and provide further insight in the relation of radiation, natural or otherwise and human health. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Genetic damage from low-level and natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftedal, P.

    1988-01-01

    Relevant predictions that have been made of possible low level biological effects on man are reviewed, and the estimate of genetic damage is discussed. It is concluded that in spite of a number of attempts, no clear-cut case of effects in human populations of radiation at natural levels has been demonstrated. The stability of genetic material is dynamic, with damage, repair and selection running as continuous processes. Genetic materials are well protected and are conservative in the extreme, not least because evolution by genetic adaptation is an expensive process: Substitution of one allele A 1 by another A 2 means the death of the whole A 1 population

  12. Diffuse material, background radiation and the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Observations that relate to a qualitative picture of how galaxies formed, and what the Universe was really like at still earlier times, are presented. Some lines of evidence on the universe at redshifts out to z approximately equal to 5 are discussed, concentrating on the evidence which suggests that intergalactic medium has evolved in a 'multi phase' fashion. Some aspects of the less recent history of the Universe (i.e z approximately greater than 100) are considered, particularly the microwave background and the spectrum of inhomogeneities. (Auth.)

  13. Attempt to measure the cosmic background radiation at high altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeyrie, Jacques; Le Boiteux, Henri

    1959-01-01

    Results are given of the measurement by G.M. tubes of hard component of cosmic background between o and 60 km of altitude, at 43 deg. N latitude, on january 27, 1959 (17 h. GMT). The counting rate starts at 0.3 pulses per second (sea level) reaches a maximum value of 15.6 (18 km) and remains constant at 5.7 above 40 km. Reprint of a paper published in Le Journal de Physique et le Radium, t. 20, p. 573, may 1959

  14. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  15. Vehicle-borne survey techniques for background radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    This paper presented methods for converting count rates measured inside cars and trains in the natural environment into outdoor terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates. First, (1) the method of calibration for a survey meter is described to be applicable to various geological terrains. Next, the regression formulas were acquired experimentally to correct (2) the shielding effects of cars and trains, and (3) the influence of pavements and ballasts. Furthermore, (4) a new method for removing interfering radiation components emitted from cliffs and tunnels was proposed, and the errors in the calculations were evaluated with numerical experiments. In addition, the degree of influence from the cliff was represented with the angle of elevation subtended to the detector. For the items (2)-(4), in particular, it could be explained with simple models that those methods are reasonable. The method for evaluating simply and accurately cosmic-ray dose rates by means of a portable barometer was also described. (author)

  16. Effects of deprivation of background environmental radiation on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, M.C.; Pinto, M.; Antonelli, F.; Balata, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present results from an experiment aimed at investigating whether living cells are influenced by background ionizing radiation. Parallel human cell cultures were set-up in two separate laboratories and maintained for several months under identical conditions but for a 80 x different level of background ionizing radiation. Periodically, the cell cultures were monitored for the onset of divergences in biochemical behavior, using two distinct cellular biology assays, namely micronuclei induction and activity of enzymes implicated in the management of oxidative stress. To reveal any subtle modifications, responses were also amplified by subjecting cell cultures to acute stress induced by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. Compared to reference radiation background conditions, cultures maintained in a reduced background radiation environment handled the consequences of acute stress with diminished efficacy.

  17. Pre operational background radiation monitoring around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site - a decade long experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, B.; George, Thomas; Sundara Rajan, P.; Selvi, B.S.; Balamurugan, M.; Pandit, G.G.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-operational environmental background radiation monitoring around nuclear power plants is very important to understand baseline values existing in the site and also to identify any hot spots of naturally occurring high background radiation areas and their sources. These baseline measurements will act as a benchmark for future comparison after the reactors go into operation. The radiation measurements are continued during the operational phase of the plant and the results are compared to see whether there is any impact of the operation of the plant on the environment. A comprehensive background radiation monitoring plan has been in vogue at site from 2004 to meet this objective. This paper describes the different monitoring strategies adopted around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site and throws light on the pre operational background radiation levels in the environment

  18. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  19. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  20. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  1. The cosmic background radiation circa ν2K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ω b , ω cdm , Ω tot , Ω Λ , n s , τ C , σ 8 }. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Ω tot = 1.08 ± 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n s 1.03 ± 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (ω b -Ω b h 2 0.030 ± 0.005 cf. 0.019 ± 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range (ω cdm 0.17±0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant (Ω Λ = 0.66 ± 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos

  2. Evaluation of the natural background radiation in City Sopron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaits, T.; Divos, F.; Kavasi, N.; Boka, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In the Postgraduate School of the Faculty of Forestry of the University of West Hungary a project with the topic Research of natural radioactive isotopes in our built and natural environs is being run. Preparing this map is an organic part of this PhD research. The measurements are being made in Sopron city and in its next surroundings, trying to estimate, which dose of radiation a citizen of Sopron is exposed, according to his age and lifestyle. The measurements completely cover the built-up area of Sopron, moreover they exceed the confines, so thus they provide information about the natural areas in the vicinity of the city. In figures, the detection carried out in an area of 24 square kilometres, working with a grid mesh of 200 metres. A sodium-iodide detector was used. We have faced several anomalies while mapping. These are the following: On Main Square (Foter), Ursulin Square (Orsolya ter), Paulites Square (Palosok tere, where a higher dose can be measured, due to granite cobbles, used to cover the pavements of the squares and streets. This was confirmed by the gamma spectrometric examination of the granite stones. In these areas, a triple of the mean dose-rate of 70-90 n Sv/h in Sopron was detected. The highest values of 400 n Sv/h were detected in the cinder-covered car-park of the paint store in Koszegi Street. The total gamma activity concentration of the cinder used in the car-park was nearly 2000 Bq/kg. A triple to a quadruple of the natural level was detected in the vicinity of the chimney of the former thermal power plant and the brick factory. The detection was carried out in four directions with raising range starting by the chimneys, which has spectacularly shown, that the sedimentation of the aerosols can be tracked is a function of distance. The measurements have also shown, that there is a significant difference between dose-levels of the natural areas beyond the eastern and western edge of the city, which can be explained with the different

  3. Low environmental radiation background impairs biological defence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to chemical radiomimetic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satta, L.; Augusti-Tocco, G.; Ceccarelli, R.; Paggi, P.; Scarsella, G.; Esposito, A.; Fiore, M.; Poggesi, I.; Ricordy, R.; Cundari, E.

    1995-01-01

    Background radiation is likely to constitute one of the factors involved in biological evolution since radiations are able to affect biological processes. Therefore, it is possible to hypothesize that organisms are adapted to environmental background radiation and that this adaptation could increase their ability to respond to the harmful effects of ionizing radiations. In fact, adaptive responses to alkylating agents and to low doses of ionizing radiation have been found in many organisms. In order to test for effects of adaptation, cell susceptibility to treatments with high doses of radiomimetic chemical agents has been studied by growing them in a reduced environmental radiation background. The experiment has been performed by culturing yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7) in parallel in a standard background environment and in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory, with reduced environmental background radiation. After a conditioning period, yeast cells were exposed to recombinogenic doses of methyl methanesulfonate. The yeast cells grown in the Gran Sasso Laboratory showed a higher frequency of radiomimetic induced recombination as compared to those grown in the standard environment. This suggests that environmental radiation may act as a conditioning agent

  4. Variability of Mediterranean aerosols properties at three regional background sites in the western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël.; Totems, Julien; Barragan, Rubén.; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Comerón, Adolfo; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Augustin, Patrick; Chazette, Patrick; Léon, Jean-François; Olmo-Reyes, Francisco José; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of the project ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), the variability of aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties is examined in three regional background sites on a southwest - northeast (SW-NE) straight line in the middle of the western Mediterranean Basin (WMB). The three sites are on the northward transport pathway of African dust: - Ersa, Corsica Island, France (43.00ºN, 9.36ºW, 80 m a.s.l), - Palma de Mallorca, Mallorca Island, Spain (39.55ºN, 2.62ºE, 10 m a.s.l) and - Alborán, Alboran Island, Spain (35.94ºN, 3.04ºW, 15 m a.s.l). AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun-photometer products are mainly used. A preliminary analysis shows that at Ersa and Palma sites the annual aerosol optical depth (AOD) has a similar trend with a peak around 0.2 in July. The winter/spring AOD is lower in Palma than in Ersa, while it is reverse in summer/autumn. The aerosol particle size distribution (and the coarse mode fraction) shows clearly the SW-NE gradient with a decreasing coarse mode peak (and a decreasing coarse mode fraction from 0.5 - 0.35 - 0.2 in July) along the axis Alborán - Palma de Mallorca - Ersa. In addition to the seasonal and annual variability analysis, the analysis of AERONET products is completed with a large variety of ground-based and sounding balloons remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Special Observation Period (SOP) of the ADRIMED campaign in June 2013. The second part of the presentation will focus on the comparison of the observations at Palma de Mallorca and Ersa of the same long-range transported airmasses. The observations include lidar vertical profiles, balloon borne OPC (Optical Particle Counter) and MSG/SEVIRI AOD, among others.

  5. The anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation from local dynamic density perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.C.; Ip, P.S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to the usual assumption, it is shown here that the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation need not be dominated by perturbations at the last scattering surface. The results of computer simulations are shown in which local dynamic density perturbations, in the form of Swiss cheese holes with finite, uniform density central lumps, are the main source of anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation. (author)

  6. THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, P. A.

    2002-02-25

    The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

  7. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation: early and recent measurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model

  8. The background of external γ radiation in the proportional counters in SAGE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Gorbachev, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of external γ radiation on the process of 71 Ge-decay counting in proportional counters in SAGE experiment of solar neutrino flux measurement is examined. One determines the systematic error of SAGE result, connected with radon decays inside the air volume surrounding the counters, and the background counting rate of proportional counters from γ radiation of passive and active shield [ru

  9. Estimation of natural radiation background level and population dose in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe in general the natural radiation background level in China, and based on available data present an estimated annual effective dose equivalent of the population to natural radiation that is some 2.3 mSv, of which about 0.54 mSv is from original γ radiation and about 0.8 mSv from radon and its short-lived daughters

  10. Radiobiological analysis of region with higher radiation background. The effect of the background on the isomorphism of some enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usunov, N.; Dojchinov, A.; Kamenov, D.

    1994-01-01

    An attempt is made to establish the the time when the prolong impact of slightly increased radiation background get over the compensator mechanisms of living systems. The object of investigation was the ecosystem of the Bay of Wromos (Black Sea, BG) and its surroundings where the flotation slack from an uranium mine was disposed. radioactivity. The following radiobiological picture of the site is obtained according to measurements performed: the alpha-activity of the beach sands is higher than one of the slack and is different in plants; the beta-activity is higher compared to controls in all samples investigated; the gamma spectra show high concentration of the members of U-238 and Th-232 series. The biological effect provoked by this heightened radiation background is studied by means of the isoenzymes as indicators of changes on molecular level. The isoenzyme spectra of lactate dehydrogenase and butyrol dehydrogenase is studied by vertical electrophoresis. The following species are tested: Tettigonia candata charp, Galliptumus italicus, Grillus campestris and Lumbicus terrestrial. An increase in activity and quantity of enzymes as well as changes of their isoenzyme spectra is observed. Calliptumus italicus could be used as a bio indicator of contamination, as it show better separation of the LDH and BDH-isoforms of LDH and BDH, and is more wide-spread. The increase in activity and quantity of some isoenzyme fractions in the conditions of this experiment is one of the possible mechanisms for increase in radioresistance of the living systems. 3 tabs., 2 figs., 8 refs

  11. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  12. Low risk of pulmonary tuberculosis of residents in high background radiation area, Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaojuan; Sun Quanfu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the pulmonary tuberculosis mortality risk of the residents in high background radiation area (HBRA), Yangjiang, China. Methods: A cohort including 89 694 persons in HBRA and 35 385 persons in control area (CA) has been established since 1979. Person-year tables based on classified variables including sex, attained age, follow-up calendar year, and dose-rate group (high, intermediate, and low in HBRA, and control group) were tabulated using DATAB in EPICURE. Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the relative risks (RR) of infectious and parasitic disease especially for pulmonary tuberculosis. Cumulative dose for each cohort member was obtained. Results: Two million person-years were accumulated by follow-up and 612 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis ascertained. Compared with risk in the control area, statistically significant lower risk of pulmonary tuberculosis was observed in HBRA among those who aged 60 years and over; markedly decreased risk occurred among males; no significant difference was found among the 6 follow-up stages, two subregions in the HBRA, or different diagnostic facilities. A statistically significantly negative dose-response was observed (P<0.001), the higher accumulative dose, the lower dose the pulmonary tuberculosis mortality risk. Its excess relative risk (ERR/Sv) was estimated to be -1.09 (95% CI: -1.34, -0.85). No established risk factors could explain this lower risk. Conclusions: The mortality of puhnonary tuberculosis among residents in HBRA who were chronically exposed to low-dose radiation was statistically significantly lower than that in the control area, and a significant dose-response relationship was observed, which probably resulted from the immunoenhancement of low dose radiation. (authors)

  13. Cytogenetic findings from inhabitants of different ages in high background radiation areas of Yangjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqing; Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between high background radiation and injurious effect on inhabitants. Method: Peripheral blood samples were collected from the inhabitants of 10, 40, 55 and 70 years old in high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang, Chromosome preparations were carried out with conventional whole-blood microculture. Results: The percentage of dicentric chromosome with fragments in inhabitants of HBRA was significantly higher than that in control areas (CA) (0.469% vs. 0.315%, P<0.01), and there was an increase in the aberration frequencies with age (or accumulated doses). Conclusion: Chromosome aberration is an extremely sensitive indicator of radiation damage and a good radio-biodosimeter

  14. Epidemiological studies in high-background radiation areas its potential contribution to evaluating risk of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori; Nair, R.K.; Nakamura, Seiichi; Mizuno, Shoich

    2008-01-01

    The health effect of low-level ionizing radiation is yet unclear. As pointed out by Upton in his review (Upton, 1989), low-level ionizing radiation seems to have different biological effects from what high-level radiation has. Its evaluation requires epidemiological studies of scale-large cohorts (ICRP 99, 2005) such of atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers. Epidemiological studies in high-background radiation (HBR) areas are also expected to make a significant contribution toward this end. Among several HBR areas in the world, Yangjiang, Guangdong Province in China, Karunagappally in Kerala State of India, Manawalakurichi and Koodankulam in Tamil Nadu of India, and Ramsar in Iran are important areas where epidemiological studies are possible, because of their relatively high background radiation levels and large population sizes. (author)

  15. Assessment of natural background radiation in one of the highest regions of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Mario; Chávez, Estefanía; Echeverría, Magdy; Córdova, Rafael; Recalde, Celso

    2018-05-01

    Natural background radiation was measured in the province of Chimborazo (Ecuador) with the following reference coordinates 1°40'00''S 78°39'00''W, where the furthest point to the center of the planet is located. Natural background radiation measurements were performed at 130 randomly selected sites using a Geiger Müller GCA-07W portable detector; these measurements were run at 6 m away from buildings or walls and 1 m above the ground. The global average natural background radiation established by UNSCEAR is 2.4 mSv y-1. In the study area measurements ranged from 0.57 mSv y-1 to 3.09 mSv y-1 with a mean value of 1.57 mSv y-1, the maximum value was recorded in the north of the study area at 5073 metres above sea level (m.a.s.l.), and the minimum value was recorded in the southwestern area at 297 m.a.s.l. An isodose map was plotted to represent the equivalent dose rate due to natural background radiation. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) between the data of the high and low regions of the study area showed a significant difference (p < α), in addition a linear correlation coefficient of 0.92 was obtained, supporting the hypothesis that in high altitude zones extraterrestrial radiation contributes significantly to natural background radiation.

  16. Estimation of background radiation doses for the Peninsular Malaysia's population by ESR dosimetry of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodzi, Mohd; Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ohtaki, Megu; Ivannikov, Alexander; Bhattacharjee, Deborshi; Fukumura, Akifumi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2011-08-01

    Background radiation dose is used in dosimetry for estimating occupational doses of radiation workers or determining radiation dose of an individual following accidental exposure. In the present study, the absorbed dose and the background radiation level are determined using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method on tooth samples. The effect of using different tooth surfaces and teeth exposed with single medical X-rays on the absorbed dose are also evaluated. A total of 48 molars of position 6-8 were collected from 13 district hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. Thirty-six teeth had not been exposed to any excessive radiation, and 12 teeth had been directly exposed to a single X-ray dose during medical treatment prior to extraction. There was no significant effect of tooth surfaces and exposure with single X-rays on the measured absorbed dose of an individual. The mean measured absorbed dose of the population is 34 ± 6.2 mGy, with an average tooth enamel age of 39 years. From the slope of a regression line, the estimated annual background dose for Peninsular Malaysia is 0.6 ± 0.3 mGy y(-1). This value is slightly lower than the yearly background dose for Malaysia, and the radiation background dose is established by ESR tooth measurements on samples from India and Russia.

  17. Radiative Transfer Through Discs of Cataclysmic Variables

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korčáková, Daniela; Nagel, T.; Werner, K.; Suleimanov, V.; Votruba, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1273, - (2010), s. 350-353 ISSN 1551-7616. [European White Dwarf Workshop /17./. Tübingen, 16.08.2010-20.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : radiative transfer * Doppler effect, * accretion disks Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  18. On the contribution of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation to the timing noise of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a stochastic and isotropic background of gravitational radiation on timing measurements of pulsars is investigated, and it is shown that pulsar timing noise may be used to establish a significant upper limit of about 10 to the -10th on the total energy density of very long-wavelength stochastic gravitational waves. This places restriction on the strength of very long wavelength gravitational waves in the Friedmann model, and such a background is expected to have no significant effect on the approximately 3 K electromagnetic background radiation or on the dynamics of a cluster of galaxies.

  19. Geographically determined dependencies in the value of the constant natural radiation gamma-background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miloslavov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the assessment of the influence of natural gamma background changes on the population is discussed. It is considered that the populations in different geographic regions have adapted by evolution mechanisms to the respective unchanged (without human activities) radiation background. The background limits for each area form the 'radiation comfortable zone' which varies very much for the different geographic areas. Leaving the 'comfortable zone' leads to a triggering of adaptive mechanisms in the population including the natural selection in order to reach an equilibrium. Thus, the radiation impact exceeding the 'comfortable zone' is expected to cause harm for a part of the population which is preliminarily burden or uncapable to adapt. From this point of view the increased morbidity due to radiation factor in those cases remains hidden. As a conclusion it is pointed out that the proposed increase of the annual dose for the population might result with harmful consequences for the whole human population

  20. An evaluation of the effect of natural background radiation on cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Jerry J.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between levels of natural background radiation and cancer incidence indicate no significant correlation. This observation is shown to be consistent with certain predicted effect levels of ionizing radiation on malignancy production (BEIR, ICRP). Other theoretical predictions on the effects of ionizing radiation indicate induction rates to be as high as 8 x 10 -3 cancers/person-rem. Assuming this factor were correct, then roughly one-half of the cancer incidence in the USA could be attributed to exposure to natural background radiation. By statistically testing various hypothetically assigned cancer induction rates against observed data, it is possible to develop a probabilistic perspective on the cause-effect relationship. Tests have been performed using normalized (by age, death rate, etc.) cancer incidence by state against levels of background radiation. This evaluation allows for the determination of the probability of observing the actual data given that the hypotheses were correct. Graphic relationships between hypothetically assigned radiation induced cancer rates vs. the probability of observing the actual incidence are developed and presented. It is shown that if the cancer induction rate were in excess of ∼10 -3 cancers/person-rem, it would be highly improbable that there would, in fact, be a lack of correlation between the rates of natural background radiation and cancer incidence. (author)

  1. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  2. Motor skills in kindergarten: Internal structure, cognitive correlates and relationships to background variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberer, Nicole; Gashaj, Venera; Roebers, Claudia M

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to contribute to the discussion about the relation between motor coordination and executive functions in preschool children. Specifically, the relation between gross and fine motor skills and executive functions as well as the relation to possible background variables (SES, physical activity) were investigated. Based on the data of N=156 kindergarten children the internal structure of motor skills was investigated and confirmed the theoretically assumed subdivision of gross and fine motor skills. Both, gross and fine motor skills correlated significantly with executive functions, whereas the background variables seemed to have no significant impact on the executive functions and motor skills. Higher order control processes are discussed as an explanation of the relation between executive functions and motor skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-01-01

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash

  4. Estimation of effective dose to public from external exposure to natural background radiation in saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The effective dose values in sixteen cities in Saudi Arabia due to external exposure to natural radiation were evaluated. These doses are based on natural background components including external exposure to terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. The importance of evaluating the effective dose to the public due to external exposure to natural background radiation lies in its epidemiological and dosimetric importance and in forming a basis for the assessment of the level of radioactive contamination or pollution in the environment in the future. The exposure to terrestrial radiation was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The exposure from cosmic radiation was determined using empirical correlation. The values evaluated for the total annual effective dose in all cities were within the world average values. The highest total annual effective dose measured in Al-Khamis city was 802 μSv/y, as compared to 305 μSv/y in Dammam city, which was considered the lowest value

  5. Detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation by the Doppler tracking of spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashhoon, B.; Grishchuk, L.P.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of detection of an isotropic background gravitational radiation of a stochastic nature by the method of Doppler tracking of spacecraft is considered. In the geometrical optics limit, the general formula for the frequency shift of an electromagnetic signal in the gravitational radiation field is discussed, and it is shown to be gauge (or rather Lie) independent. A detailed examination of the propagation of a free electromagnetic wave in a gravitational radiation field shows that no resonance phenomena can be expected. Thus, the results valid in the geometrical optics limit are also approximately valid for any gravitational radiation spectrum dominated by wavelengths large compared to that of the electromagnetic signal. The ''Doppler noise'' due to a stochastic background is evaluated, and it is shown to depend on the total energy density of the background and a parameter that is a characteristic of the aradiation spectrum and the detection system used. A background gravitational radiation with an energy density comparable to the electromagnetic (approx.3 K) background and a spectrum dominated by wavelengths > or approx. =1 AU may be detectable in the near future by the Doppler tracking of interplanetary spacecraft

  6. Seasonal and spatial variability of surface ozone over China: contributions from background and domestic pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Both observations and a 3-D chemical transport model suggest that surface ozone over populated eastern China features a summertime trough and that the month when surface ozone peaks differs by latitude and region. Source-receptor analysis is used to quantify the contributions of background ozone and Chinese anthropogenic emissions on this variability. Annual mean background ozone over China shows a spatial gradient from 55 ppbv in the northwest to 20 ppbv in the southeast, corresponding with changes in topography and ozone lifetime. Pollution background ozone (annual mean of 12.6 ppbv shows a minimum in the summer and maximum in the spring. On the monthly-mean basis, Chinese pollution ozone (CPO has a peak of 20–25 ppbv in June north of the Yangtze River and in October south of it, which explains the peaks of surface ozone in these months. The summertime trough in surface ozone over eastern China can be explained by the decrease of background ozone from spring to summer (by −15 ppbv regionally averaged over eastern China. Tagged simulations suggest that long-range transport of ozone from northern mid-latitude continents (including Europe and North America reaches a minimum in the summer, whereas ozone from Southeast Asia exhibits a maximum in the summer over eastern China. This contrast in seasonality provides clear evidence that the seasonal switch in monsoonal wind patterns plays a significant role in determining the seasonality of background ozone over China.

  7. Improved radiological/nuclear source localization in variable NORM background: An MLEM approach with segmentation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penny, Robert D., E-mail: robert.d.penny@leidos.com [Leidos Inc., 10260 Campus Point Road, San Diego, CA (United States); Crowley, Tanya M.; Gardner, Barbara M.; Mandell, Myron J.; Guo, Yanlin; Haas, Eric B.; Knize, Duane J.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Ranta, Dale; Shyffer, Ryan [Leidos Inc., 10260 Campus Point Road, San Diego, CA (United States); Labov, Simon; Nelson, Karl; Seilhan, Brandon [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Valentine, John D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A novel approach and algorithm have been developed to rapidly detect and localize both moving and static radiological/nuclear (R/N) sources from an airborne platform. Current aerial systems with radiological sensors are limited in their ability to compensate for variable naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) background. The proposed approach suppresses the effects of NORM background by incorporating additional information to segment the survey area into regions over which the background is likely to be uniform. The method produces pixelated Source Activity Maps (SAMs) of both target and background radionuclide activity over the survey area. The task of producing the SAMs requires (1) the development of a forward model which describes the transformation of radionuclide activity to detector measurements and (2) the solution of the associated inverse problem. The inverse problem is ill-posed as there are typically fewer measurements than unknowns. In addition the measurements are subject to Poisson statistical noise. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization (MLEM) algorithm is used to solve the inverse problem as it is well suited for under-determined problems corrupted by Poisson noise. A priori terrain information is incorporated to segment the reconstruction space into regions within which we constrain NORM background activity to be uniform. Descriptions of the algorithm and examples of performance with and without segmentation on simulated data are presented.

  8. Measurement of gamma natural background radiation at Chamaraja Nagar, Karnataka state, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, K.M.; Chandrashekara, M.S.; Paramesh, L.

    2012-01-01

    The radioactive elements and their radiation are ubiquitous in the environment. The Influence of radiation on living organisms is imminent and very important to study. The ocean, the mountains, the air, and our food all expose us to small amounts of natural background radiation. Cosmic rays from outer space are another large contributor of natural background radiation. Much of the earth's natural background radiation is in the form of gamma radiation, a part of which comes from outer space. Some part of cosmic ray is filtered out by the presence of earth's atmosphere, so there are natural controls for the amount of radiation that people receive. The amount of radiation received by an individual depends on altitude, latitude type of building and the building construction materials. In the present study, measurements of natural background radiation were made in the temples, schools, dwellings, and hill stations in Chamaraja Nagar area, Karnataka state, India by using environmental dosimeter technique. The results show that, absorbed dose rate of background radiations at inside schools varies from 93.96 to 120.93 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 10.62 nGyh -1 and outside schools it varies from 60.9 to 113.1 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 15.1 nGyh -1 . In temples, the absorbed dose rate varies from 104.4 to 244.91 nGyh - 1 with a standard deviation of 48.34 nGyh -1 and outside the temples it varies from 87.9 to 176.61 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 30.896 nGyh -1 . The absorbed dose rate of background radiations at dwellings in indoor varies from 94.0 to 139.2 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 16.6 nGyh -1 and in outdoor it varies from 60.9 to 118.32 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 19.41 nGyh -1 . The measurements were also carried out in dwellings on hill stations in Chamaraja Nagar district. Indoor gamma dose rate varies from 103.53 to 236.64 nGyh -1 with a standard deviation of 59.8 nGyh -1 and outdoor gamma dose rate varies from 78.3 to 119

  9. Investigation on Down's syndrome in the children living in high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Yongru

    1989-01-01

    After the survey in 1975 and 1979 of Down's syndrome in the children living in high background radiation area, we made a follow-up investigation in 1985 and 1986. All the obtained data are analysed. 25258 children in high background radiation area were examined and 22 children with Down's syndrome were identified, the morbidity rate being 0.87%. 21837 children in control area were examined and four children with Down's syndrome were identified, the morbidity being 0.18%. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups. It was noted that the occurrence of Down's syndrome was related to the maternal age but there was no evidence suggesting a close relationship between high background radiation and the development of Down's syndrome

  10. Cancer occurrence in the high natural background radiation area of Kerala coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan Nair, M.; Sreedevi Amma, N.; Ramachandran, T.P.; Varghese Cherian; Jayalakshmy, P.; Mani, K.S.; Boban, T.G.; Jayadevan, S.; Gangadharan, P.

    1994-01-01

    In order to assess the health effects if any, in populations living in high background radiation areas, the Department of Atomic Energy has sanctioned a 5-year project to establish a Registry covering Karunagappally taluk. The study proposes to cover a population of about 1,00,000 persons living in high background radiation areas where the radiation levels range anywhere between 10 and 825 μR/h inside the houses; for comparison the study proposes to cover another 3,00,000 persons living in nearby normal areas where the natural radiation levels range between 6 and 200 μ R/h. The data collected so far in the first 2.5 years are presented in this paper which covers a population of about 1,10,000 persons living in three villages. No attempt is made to interpret the data at this preliminary stage. (author). 7 tabs

  11. Influence of biological variables on radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunsaku

    1989-01-01

    1. Age at exposure: Female B6C3F 1 mice were irradiated at day 17 of the prenatal age, or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 of the postnatal age with 1.9, 3.8 or 5.7 Gy of gamma-rays from 137 Cs. All mice were allowed to live through their entire lifespan under a specific pathogen free condition. It has become evident that mice of the late fetal period have susceptibility to induction of pituitary tumors, bone tumors, liver tumors, lung tumors, lymphocytic lymphomas and ovarian tumors. Neonatal mice were found to be more susceptible to induction of lymphocytic lymphomas, liver tumors and ovarian tumors than fetal mice. Irradiation of fetal or neonatal mice did not result in the excess development of myeloid leukemias and Harderian gland tumors, whereas these neoplasms were induced by irradiation at the adult period. 2. Combination effects of radiation and chemicals: Both sexes of B6WF 1 mice were exposed to X-rays at day 5 of postnatal age. After weaning, pellet diet containing 0.05 % phenobarbital was given until their natural death. It was rather surprising that life-shortening effect of X-irradiation was decreased by oral administration of phenobarbital. This effect seemed to be due to delayed development of neoplastic diseases. Administration of phenobarbital did not result in decrease in incidences of neoplasms. (author)

  12. Measurement of high natural background radiation levels by TLD at Cox's Bazar coastal areas in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.; Rahman, M.M.; Koddus, M.A.; Husain, S.R.; Malek, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    High natural background radiation levels at the Cox's Bazar coastal areas in Bangladesh were measured by LiF (TLD-100) dosemeters. The dose rates varied from 2621 to 35391 μGy.y -1 with a mean of 11968 μGy.y -1 . The average dose rate is found to significantly higher than the world average value. In order to formulate appropriate guidelines for radiation protection of the population in this area, the necessary recommendations are described. (author)

  13. Background of external γ radiation in the proportional counters of the SAGE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Gorbachev, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of external γ radiation on the process of counting 71 Ge decays in the proportional counters of the SAGE experiment measuring the solar-neutrino flux is considered. The systematic uncertainty in the SAGE result due to radon decays inside the air volume surrounding the counters is estimated. The background counting rate in the proportional counters that is caused by γ radiation from the enclosing shield is also determined

  14. A new possibility of separate the natural and industrial components of the ambient radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purghel, L.; Valcov, N.; Celarel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The ambient radiation background, sometimes considered as a gamma-ray background, is actually composed by a natural radiation field and an industrial radiation field, produced by nuclear facilities. This work presents a possibility to separate and to measure simultaneously both components by using the statistical discrimination method. As the statistical discrimination method is able to measure mixed radiation fields, characterized by essentially different statistical factors k = σ 2 / I (I - the mean value and σ 2 - the variance of the ionization current), this basic assumption of the method is checked, for the natural background and the gamma-ray checked, for natural background and the gamma-ray fields. The obtained value of the ratio k B / k γ = 9 has confirmed the validity of the statistical discrimination method as well as the assumption of a small contribution of the gamma-ray field to the ambient radiation background. Some estimations of the statistical uncertainties, associated with the measurement of two components of the ambient background field have been made. For a 10 liters, atmospheric pressure air - filled ionization chamber (or its equivalent, i.e. 2 liters, 5 atmospheres air -filled chamber) and a 30 s integration time constant, the minimum detectable absorbed dose rate of gamma-rays, for a 0.1 μ Gy / h natural background absorbed dose rate, is equal to 0.02 μ Gy / h. The statistical relative uncertainty of measurement for a 0.5 μ Gy / h absorbed dose rate gamma-ray field, corresponding to the admissible value of the equivalent dose rate of 0.6 μ Sv / h, for non-professional population is about 4 %. (authors)

  15. Investigation and analysis of etiology of down's syndrome in children of high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Yongru

    1985-01-01

    In order to find out what caused the differences in incidences of Down's syndrome between the children in high background radiation area and those in control area, investigation and analysis were carried ou in 5 aspects based on the original data and the information from the previous survey. These are: the incidences of congenital malformations in normal areas, the age distribution of children examined, the maternal age, the dates of birth of afflicted children, and the radiation exposure of mothers. The results suggested that the higher incidence of Down's syndrome in high background area might be related to the materal age. Further studies are needed to arrive at a conclusion

  16. Policy implications with regard to controllable forms of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijningen, R.J.J. van; Bartels, J.H.M.; Ackers, J.G.; Hogeweg, B.; Rijn, H.T.U. de; Walle, F.B. de

    1988-04-01

    The RENA (Regulable forms of Natural Background radiation) has started in order to broaden the technical-scientific insights in the domain of the natural background radiation and to continue the SAWORA-study. With regard to the policy implications it has appeared to be desirable to define more detailed the environment-protectional economical and governmental aspects and to consider their mutual relationships in order to prepare a coherent programme which is directed at policy actions to be undertaken as well as at the supporting study needed. (author). 34 refs.; 3 figs.; 11 tabs

  17. Background radiation in two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties within the Palo Duro Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Data on external background radiation doses resulting from cosmic, terrestrial, and fallout sources and on concentrations of radioactivity in environmental media are presented and discussed. Doses to individuals located at the approximate centers of two locations in Texas, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, are given, as are the population doses to people residing within 50 miles of each of the approximate centers. No adjustments have been made for the effects of buildings on radiation doses - that is, the shielding from external radiation afforded by the buildings and radiation from building materials are not accounted for. Concentrations of radioactivity in air, water, and milk in the region are also given. Because of the lack of specific information on background radiation at the locations, the external-dose rates to people and the radioactivity levels in environmental media for the region have been taken from the literature. A background radiation survey will be conducted in the Palo Duro Basin to obtain additional data. 26 references, 3 figures, 15 tables

  18. A Robust Algorithm to Determine the Topology of Space from the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Jeffrey R.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the cosmic microwave back-ground radiation will soon provide an opportunity to test whether the universe is multiply connected. This paper presents a new algorithm for deducing the topology of the universe from the microwave background data. Unlike an older algorithm, the new algorithm gives the curvature of space and the radius of the last scattering surface as outputs, rather than requiring them as inputs. The new algorithm is also more tolerant of erro...

  19. Natural radioactivity and associated radiation characteristic of the new high background radiation area of lambwe east southern Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achola, S.O.; Patel, J.P.; Angeyo, H.K.; Mustapha, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    Rocks and soils from a number of areas underlined by carbonatite rocks in Kenya have been associated with high levels of natural background radioactivity. People in such high background radiation areas (HBRA), are exposed to abnormally high annual absorbed dose (that have health implications) than the global normal 1 mSvyr-1. In this paper, results of field background radiation measurements, activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides in (mainly carbonatite rock and soil) matrices, and estimated annual external effective dose rates are presented for South and North Ruri hills in Lambwe East location of Suba District, which lies roughly between latitudes 0°30'S and 1°00'S, bounded on the east by longitude 34°30'E and on the west by the shores of Lake Victoria 16 and Winnam Gulf. Altitudes in the region range from about 1000 m on the shores of Lake Victoria to above 1800 m on top of the Ruri hills. The main geological features are carbonatite formations. Twenty one samples were analyzed using high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer. The activity concentrations ranged 14.18 - 6559.99 Bqkg-1 (average: 1396.85 Bqkg-1) for Th-232; 2.73 - 499.24 Bqkg-1 (average: 178.69 Bqkg-1) for U-238; and 56.67 - 1454.73 Bqkg-1 (average: 508.67 Bqkg-1) for K-40. The variability in Th distribution could be due to another contributing factor apart from carbonatite: Homa hills geothermal field fluids might be responsible for delivery of Th to surface rocks; some hot spots have travertine deposits. Measured absorbed dose rates in air outdoors range 700 - 6000.00 nGyh-1 (mean: 2325.84 nGy h-1); assuming 0.4 occupancy factor, these values correspond to individual annual effective dose rates of 1.717 - 14.717 mSvyr-1 (mean: 5.705 mSv yr-1). Measured absorbed dose rates are higher than calculated values since they include the contribution of cosmic rays. The natural radioactivity is fractionated with higher levels in the soils than carbonatite rocks

  20. Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in lymphocytes of inhabitants in high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinsheng; Zheng Qiaoling

    1985-01-01

    Blood samples were taken from 126 students of 15-16 years old, living in the high background radiation area, and from 124 controls of the same age range, living in the normal background radiation area. All students were interviewed for evaluation of their health status. Whole blood cultures were done with RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum and antibiotics, The culture were incubated for 54-56 h in the presence of BrdU (10 μg/ml). Metaphases were stained for SCE using a modified techniqu of perry and Wolff. From each person 20 second division metaphases were analysed for SCEs. The average frequencies of SCEs observed in the high background group and the control group are presented. More SCEs were observed in the high background group than in the control with a statistically signigicant difference. In regard to the sex factor, it was found that the SCE frequencies in both sexes of the high background group were slightly higher than those in the control group. These findings suggest that continuous low-level irradiation by the high background radiation may induce increased frequency of SCEs

  1. High background radiation area: an important source of exploring the health effects of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Luxin

    1997-01-01

    Objective: For obtaining more effective data from epidemiological investigation in high background radiation areas, it is necessary to analyze the advantages, disadvantages, weak points and problems of this kind of radiation research. Methods: For epidemiological investigation of population health effects of high background radiation, the author selected high background radiation areas of Yangjiang (HBRA) and a nearby control area (CA) as an instance for analysis. The investigation included classification of dose groups, comparison of the confounding factors in the incidence of mutation related diseases, cancer mortalities and the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations between HBRA and CA. This research program has become a China-Japan cooperative research since 1991. Results: The confounding factors above-mentioned were comparable between HBRA and CA, and within the dose groups in HBRA, based on a systematic study for many years. The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations increased with the increase of cumulative dose, but not for children around or below 10 years of age. The relative risks (RR) of total and site-specific cancer mortalities for HBRA were lower or around 1.00, compared with CA. The incidence of hereditary diseases and congenital deformities in HBRA were in normal range. The results were interpreted preliminarily by the modified 'dual radiation action' theory and the 'benefit-detriment competition' hypothesis. Conclusions: The author emphasizes the necessity for continuing epidemiological research in HBRA, especially for international cooperation. He also emphasizes the importance of combination of epidemiology and radiobiology

  2. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  3. Design and Modeling of a Variable Heat Rejection Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Berisford, Daniel F.; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Variable Heat Rejection Radiator technology needed for future NASA human rated & robotic missions Primary objective is to enable a single loop architecture for human-rated missions (1) Radiators are typically sized for maximum heat load in the warmest continuous environment resulting in a large panel area (2) Large radiator area results in fluid being susceptible to freezing at low load in cold environment and typically results in a two-loop system (3) Dual loop architecture is approximately 18% heavier than single loop architecture (based on Orion thermal control system mass) (4) Single loop architecture requires adaptability to varying environments and heat loads

  4. Optimised polarimeter configurations for measuring the Stokes parameters of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Couchot, F.; Delabrouille, J.; Kaplan, J.; Revenu, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present configurations of polarimeters which measure the three linear Stokes parameters of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation with a nearly diagonal error matrix, independent of the global orientation of the polarimeters in the focal plane. These configurations also provide the smallest possible error box volume.

  5. New limits to the small scale fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.I.; Fomalont, E.B.; Wall, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    The VLA has been used at 4.9 GHz to observe a small region of sky in order to extend the radio source count to low flux density (Fomalont et al., these proceedings) and to look for small scale fluctuations in the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. (Auth.)

  6. Distortions in the Rayleigh-Jeans region of the cosmic background radiation spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zotti, G.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of the origin and evolution of distortions in the Rayleigh-Jeans region of the cosmic background radiation spectrum is reviewed. Some proposed experiments, designed to substantially improve our knowledge of that portion of the spectrum, are briefly described. (author)

  7. Superposition of Planckian spectra and the distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanian, M.

    1982-01-01

    A fit of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) by means of a positive linear superposition of Planckian spectra implies an upper bound to the photon spectrum. The observed spectrum of the CMB gives a weighting function with a normalization greater than unity

  8. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6.3 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.

    1984-01-01

    We present results of a measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at a wavelength of 6.3 cm. We obtained the value T/sub CBR/ = 2.71 +- 0.20 K. This is in good agreement with, and has a smaller error than, any previous measurement at equal or longer wavelengths

  9. Study of solar radiation prediction and modeling of relationships between solar radiation and meteorological variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Huaiwei; Zhao, Na; Zeng, Xiaofan; Yan, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate relationships between solar radiation and meteorological variables. • A strong relationship exists between solar radiation and sunshine duration. • Daily global radiation can be estimated accurately with ARMAX–GARCH models. • MGARCH model was applied to investigate time-varying relationships. - Abstract: The traditional approaches that employ the correlations between solar radiation and other measured meteorological variables are commonly utilized in studies. It is important to investigate the time-varying relationships between meteorological variables and solar radiation to determine which variables have the strongest correlations with solar radiation. In this study, the nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable–generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMAX–GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time-series approaches were applied to investigate the associations between solar radiation and several meteorological variables. For these investigations, the long-term daily global solar radiation series measured at three stations from January 1, 2004 until December 31, 2007 were used in this study. Stronger relationships were observed to exist between global solar radiation and sunshine duration than between solar radiation and temperature difference. The results show that 82–88% of the temporal variations of the global solar radiation were captured by the sunshine-duration-based ARMAX–GARCH models and 55–68% of daily variations were captured by the temperature-difference-based ARMAX–GARCH models. The advantages of the ARMAX–GARCH models were also confirmed by comparison of Auto-Regressive and Moving Average (ARMA) and neutral network (ANN) models in the estimation of daily global solar radiation. The strong heteroscedastic persistency of the global solar radiation series was revealed by the AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (ARCH) and Generalized Auto

  10. Reprocessing WFC3/IR Exposures Affected by Time-Variable Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, G.

    2016-11-01

    The background seen in WFC3/IR observations frequently shows strong time-dependent behavior above the constant flux expected for zodiacal continuum light. This is often caused by an emission line of helium at 1.083 μm excited in the sun-illuminated upper atmosphere, when seen in the filters (F105W, F110W) and grisms (G102, G141) sensitive to the feature. The default behavior of the calwf3 pipeline assumes constant source-plus-background fluxes when it performs up-the-ramp fitting to identify cosmic rays and determine the average count rate within a MULTIACCUM IR exposure. calwf3 provides undesirable results in the presence of strongly variable backgrounds, primarily in the form of elevated and non-Gaussian noise in the FLT products. Here we describe methods to improve the noise properties of the reduced products. In the first, we simply turn off the calwf3 crcorr step, treating the IR detector as if it were a CCD, i.e., accumulating flux and reading it out at the end of the exposure. Next, we artificially flatten the ramps in the IMA products and then allow calwf3 to proceed as normal fitting the ramp and identifying CRs. Either of these procedures enable recovery of datasets otherwise corrupted beyond repair and have no discernible effects on photometry of sources in deep combined images.

  11. A flat Universe from high-resolution maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernardis P; Ade; Bock; Bond; Borrill; Boscaleri; Coble; Crill; De Gasperis G; Farese; Ferreira; Ganga; Giacometti; Hivon; Hristov; Iacoangeli; Jaffe; Lange; Martinis; Masi; Mason; Mauskopf; Melchiorri; Miglio; Montroy; Netterfield

    2000-04-27

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K cosmic microwave background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the Universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole Ipeak = (197 +/- 6), with an amplitude delta T200 = (69 +/- 8) microK. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favoured by standard inflationary models.

  12. Infrared radiation scene generation of stars and planets in celestial background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Hong, Yaohui; Xu, Xiaojian

    2014-10-01

    An infrared (IR) radiation generation model of stars and planets in celestial background is proposed in this paper. Cohen's spectral template1 is modified for high spectral resolution and accuracy. Based on the improved spectral template for stars and the blackbody assumption for planets, an IR radiation model is developed which is able to generate the celestial IR background for stars and planets appearing in sensor's field of view (FOV) for specified observing date and time, location, viewpoint and spectral band over 1.2μm ~ 35μm. In the current model, the initial locations of stars are calculated based on midcourse space experiment (MSX) IR astronomical catalogue (MSX-IRAC) 2 , while the initial locations of planets are calculated using secular variations of the planetary orbits (VSOP) theory. Simulation results show that the new IR radiation model has higher resolution and accuracy than common model.

  13. Investigation of background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, G.H.; Foutz, W.L.; Lesperance, L.R.

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed radiological surveys on 435 vicinity properties (VPs) in the Durango area. This study was undertaken to establish the background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in the Durango VP area. During the months of May through June, 1986, extensive radiometric measurements and surface soil samples were collected in the Durango VP area by personnel from ORNL's Grand Junction Office. A majority of the Durango VP surveys were conducted at sites underlain by Quaternary alluvium, older Quaternary gravels, and Cretaceous Lewis and Mancos shales. These four geologic units were selected to be evaluated. The data indicated no formation anomalies and established regional background radiation levels. Durango background radionuclide concentrations in surface soil were determined to be 20.3 ± 3.4 pCi/g for 40 K, 1.6 ± 0.5 pCi/g for 226 Ra, and 1.2 ± 0.3 pCi/g for 232 Th. The Durango background gamma exposure rate was found to be 16.5 ± 1.3 μR/h. Average gamma spectral count rate measurements for 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th were determined to be 553, 150, and 98 counts per minute (cpm), respectively. Geologic unit profiles and Durango background radiation measurements are presented and compared with other areas. 19 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Thyroid nodularity and chromosome aberrations among women in areas of high background radiation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Wei, L.X.; Beebe, G.W.; Zha, Y.R.; Kaplan, M.M.; Tao, Z.F.; Maxon, H.R. III; Zhang, S.Z.; Schneider, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid nodularity following continuous low-dose radiation exposure in China was determined in 1,001 women aged 50-65 years who resided in areas of high background radiation (330 mR/yr) their entire lives, and in 1,005 comparison subjects exposed to normal levels of radiation (114 mR/yr). Cumulative doses to the thyroid were estimated to be of the order of 14 cGy and 5 cGy, respectively. Personal interviews and physical examinations were conducted, and measurements were made of serum thyroid hormone levels, urinary iodine concentrations, and chromosome aberrations in circulating lymphocytes. For all nodular disease, the prevalences in the high background and control areas were 9.5% and 9.3%, respectively. For single nodules, the prevalences were 7.4% in the high background area and 6.6% in the control area (prevalence ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.82-1.55). There were no differences found in serum levels of thyroid hormones. Women in the high background region, however, had significantly lower concentrations of urinary iodine and significantly higher frequencies of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations. Increased intake of allium vegetables such as garlic and onions was associated with a decreased risk of nodular disease, which seems consistent with experimental studies suggesting that allium compounds can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation. The prevalence of mild diffuse goiter was higher in the high background radiation region, perhaps related to a low dietary intake of iodine. These data suggest that continuous exposure to low-level radiation throughout life is unlikely to appreciably increase the risk of thyroid cancer. However, such exposure may cause chromosomal damage

  15. The contribution of accreting black holes to the background radiation density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Black holes could generate radiation as a result of accretion. The requirement that this radiation should not have a density exceeding the observed background density places an interesting limit on the number of black holes, depending on the wavelength at which the radiation is generated and the efficiency with which it is produced from accreted material. Consideration of the radiation produced in the present epoch already constrains the mass range in which black holes could have a significant cosmological density. For pregalactic black holes, which may have been accreting more rapidly in the past, the constraint could be even stronger. However, because pregalactic accretion will in general increase the matter temperature of the Universe, it is a self-limiting process. For this reason the pregalactic accretion limit is not as strong as one might naively expect and it is generally weaker than the present epoch limit. (author)

  16. Problems Concerning Dose Assessments in Epidemiology of High Background Radiation Areas of Yangjiang, China (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.X.; Yuan, Y.L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study on radiation levels and dose assessments in the epidemiology of a high background radiation area (HBRA) and the control area (CA) is to respond to the needs of epidemiology in these areas, where the inhabitants are continuously exposed to low dose, low dose rate ionising radiation. A brief description is given of how the research group evaluated the feasibility of the investigation by analysing the population size and the radiation levels, how simple reliable methods were used to get the individual annual dose for every cohort member, and how the cohort members were classified into various dose groups for dose-effect relationship analysis. Finally, the use of dose group classification for cancer mortality studies is described. (author)

  17. Assessment of background gamma radiation levels around Tummalapalle uranium mining and processing facility, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.K.; Dhumale, M.R.; Molla, Samim; Rao, K.B.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Sahu, S.K.

    2018-01-01

    Natural environmental radioactivity and the associated external exposure due to gamma radiation depend primarily on the geological and geographical conditions, and appear at different levels in the soil of each region in the world. The dose received by the population in a region comprises of (i) external gamma radiation dose due to cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides; (ii) inhalation dose due to radon, thoron and their progeny, and (iii) ingestion dose due to the intake of radionuclides through the consumption of food, milk, water, etc. In this study, background gamma radiation level around Tummalapalle uranium mining and processing site was estimated by using radiation survey meter and deploying environmental TLDs. The generated data can be served as baseline for this area for future comparison for prolonged operation of the plant, for the upcoming adjacent projects and during decommissioning phase of the mine, mill and tailings pond

  18. Hermite- Padé projection to thermal radiative and variable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The combined effect of variable thermal conductivity and radiative heat transfer on steady flow of a conducting optically thin viscous fluid through a channel with sliding wall and non-uniform wall temperatures under the influence of an externally applied homogeneous magnetic field are analyzed in the present study.

  19. Influence of Variable Fluid Properties and Radiative Heat loss on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, comparative analysis is also performed on the wall shear stress and local heat transfer of the present study with the available results.The results show that the inclusion variable viscosity and thermal conductivity, and radiative heat loss mechanism cause significant effects on the fluid flow velocity, temperature ...

  20. Biological effects of low-dose radiation on human population living in high-background radiation areas of Kerala coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    High-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) of Kerala coast is densely populated and known for its wide variation in background radiation dose levels due to uneven distribution of monazite in the beach sand. The background radiation dose varies from 1 to 45 mGv/y. The areas with >1.5mGy/y is considered as HLNRA. Human population inhabiting in this area are exposed to low-dose chronic radiation since generations. Hence, this population provides an ideal situation to study dose response and adaptive response, if any, due to natural chronic low-dose exposure. It has been investigated extensively to study the biological and health effects of long-term low-dose/low-dose radiation exposure. So far over 150, 000 newborns monitored from hospital-based study did not reveal any significant difference in the incidence of any of the malformations and stillbirth between HLNRA and adjacent control areas. A case-control study on cleft lip/palate and mental retardation did not show any association with background radiation dose. Cytogenetic investigation of over 27,000 newborns did not show any significant increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations and karyotype anomalies. DNA damage endpoints, such as micronuclei, telomere length and DNA strand breaks, did not reveal any significant difference between control and exposed population. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed efficient repair of DNA strand breaks in HLNRA individuals. Molecular studies using high throughput microarray analysis indicated a large number of genes involved in various molecular and cellular pathways. Indications of in vivo radioadaptive response due to natural chronic low-dose exposure in this population have important implications to human health. (author)

  1. Review of epidemiological and cytogenetic studies on high background radiation area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2008-01-01

    Emerging scientific knowledge in the field of radiation biology has put into question the generic use of a simple linear extrapolation of radiation effects from high to low dose or dose rate. Though the direct information of biological effects at low dose or low dose rate has been accumulated, it is still immature to mention health effects as the consequence of biological effects. As epidemiological data have been the main sources of direct information on human health effects, studies of the health of population exposed by low dose or low dose rate ionizing radiation will help to improve our understanding. In this meaning, the epidemiological studies of residents in high background radiation areas (HBRA), which are supported by us, will provide important direct information on the biological and health effects of chronic low dose rate ionizing radiation. The epidemiological results in HBRA in China showed there are no significant increases of cancer risks caused by the high background levels of ionizing radiation. From the results which come from cytogeneticl studies, the frequencies of unstable chromosomal aberrations have shown good correlation with cumulative doses in their lifetimes, which indicated it is a sensitive and informative biomarker. On the other hand, the frequencies of stable chromosomal aberrations have shown no significant difference and the frequency was much higher than that of unstable type aberrations. It suggests that mutagenic factors other than radiation contribute more than the elevated level of radiation to the induction of DNA rearrangements which could lead to the increase of cancer risk in HBRA in China. (author)

  2. Down's syndrome and related abnormalities in an area of high background radiation in coastal Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochupillai, N.; Verma, I.C.; Grewal, M.S.; Ramalingaswami, V.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that in a coastal area of Kerala, Southern India, the background radiation is between 1500 and 3000 mR/yr, this being due to the presence of Th-containing monazite mineral in the soil. During an epidemiological study of modular lesions of the thyroid in this area an apparently high prevalence of Down's syndrome and other forms of severe mental retardation was observed. A house-to-house survey of relevant abnormalities in this area was made, and also in a comparable control area without high background radiation. The frequency of chromosome aberrations in a sample of the population in the study and control areas was also investigated. The observations support the view that radiation induces genetic anomalies occur with above average frequency in the population living in the area with high background radiation. Only gross abnormalities evident in clinical examination were recorded. The study and control populations were similar in age and sex structure and general sociologic conditions. Severe mental retardation was the commonest abnormality encountered, and 85% of the abnormalities detected in the study population were genetic in origin, compared with 56% in the control population. Prevalence of Down's syndrome was 0.93 per 1000 in the study population. (U.K.)

  3. Prospects of detecting gravitational background radiation by Doppler tracking interplanetary spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertotti, B.; Carr, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    We examine the theoretical and experimental prospects of detecting a low-frequency, continuous, stochastic background of gravitational waves by Doppler tracking interplanetary spacecraft. From a theoretical standpoint, such a background may have been generated by various postgalactic processes or by pregalactic black hole formation; there could also exist a primordial background which goes back to the beginning of the universe. We review the characteristic frequency and density ranges which one might anticipate for these backgrounds. From an experimental standpoint, one's ability to detect a background is limited by the finite length of the record available and by an imperfect knowledge of the spectrum of various sources of noise. The fundamental contribution to the noise comes from the clock which regulates the frequency of the tracking waves. If one uses a hydrogen maser clock, this noise becomes progressively less important with decreasing frequency: one might hope to detect a critical density of background radiation at frequencies below 10 -2 Hz and a background with 10 -4 times the critical density at frequencies below 10 -5 Hz. It is encouraging that some of the sorts of background which we anticipate from theoretical considerations fall within the observable regime. We discuss the extent to which other sources of noise may exceed the clock noise and the degree to which they can be eliminated

  4. On background radiation gradients – the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients. -- Highlights: • We present a simple method to account for gradients in the natural background radiation. • Gradients in the natural radiation background can be modelled at the ground level using AGS data. • The number of false positives due to background gradients can be reduced by using airborne data

  5. Childhood cancers in the UK and their relation to background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Stewart, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter shows the results of including two independent data sets in a study of several factors with cancer associations including background radiation. One data set came from the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers (OSCC); the other from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) and findings are compatible with background radiation being the single most important cause of juvenile neoplasms. It also emerged that these neoplasms have a strongly clustered distribution. No obvious cause of clusters was found, but they had associations with prenatal and postnatal illnesses as well as background radiation. Therefore, since there is mounting sensitivity to infections during the latent phase of leukaemia, cancer clusters might be the result of competing causes of death having an epidemic distribution. The findings as a whole are compatible with all man-made additions to background (including leakages of radioactivity from a reprocessing plant) adding to risk of an early cancer death. Proof that certain leukaemia clusters in the vicinity of two reprocessing plants were caused in this way must await collection of data. (author)

  6. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  7. Analysis of signal to background ratio in synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Gohshi, Yohichi; Iida, Atsuo.

    1988-01-01

    The signal to background (S/B) ratio in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SR) was quantitatively analyzed. The S/B ratio, which has been significantly improved by taking advantage of the polarized nature of SR, was found to be strongly dependent on geometrical factors of the measurement system. From the analysis on the origin of the scattered background, the dependence of the S/B ratio on the geometry was quantitatively explained, mainly by the polarization properties of SR. Experimental conditions could be optimized by adjusting the degree of polarization of the incident beam and the detector solid angle. (author)

  8. Determination of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of background radiation counting system, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is the third report of the progress report series on studies of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of low background radiation counting system. In Part I some characteristics of a low beta-gamma coincidence spectrometer are described -- counter system, electronics, background spectra, counting efficiencies -- and studies on radioactive impurities in materials for scientific research are also described. In Part II, suitable solvents for a large scale liquid scintillation counter were examined and best combinations of solvents, solutes and naphthalene are shown. In Part III, miscellaneous topics are reported. (auth.)

  9. Natural background radiation at flight altitudes; Natuerliche Strahlenexposition in Flughoehen durch kosmische Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissmann, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany). FB Ionenbeschleuniger und Referenzstrahlungsfelder

    2006-12-15

    At sea level, the background radiation of about 40 nSv/h consists of about 80 percent of muons and electrons and about 0 percent of neutrons. The picture is different at an altitude of 10 km. Here, the background dose equivalent of about 5000 nSv/h (= 5 {mu}Sv/h) consists of about 60 percent of neutrons and about 25 percent of muons and electrons. Protons account for about 15 percent. This particle composition makes dosimetric measurements difficult. In addition, the energy emitted by the particles is far beyond the the measuring range of conventional radiation protection dosemeters. For these reasons, conventional dosemeters are not suited for applications in aeroplanes and such. The PTB method for measuring local dose rates uses a proportional counter whose wall consists of a tissue equivalent material and which is operated with tissue equivalent counting gas at very low pressure (about 40 hPa). (orig.)

  10. Exploring the Large Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at 170 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Kenneth Matthew

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, data from the Far Infra-Red Survey (FIRS), a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the large scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation, are analyzed. The FIRS operates in four frequency bands at 170, 280, 480, and 670 GHz, using an approximately Gaussian beam with a 3.8 deg full-width-at-half-maximum. A cross-correlation with the COBE/DMR first-year maps yields significant results, confirming the DMR detection of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Analysis of the FIRS data alone sets bounds on the amplitude of anisotropy under the assumption that the fluctuations are described by a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum and further analysis sets limits on the index of the primordial density fluctuations for an Einstein-DeSitter universe. Galactic dust emission is discussed and limits are set on the magnitude of possible systematic errors in the measurement.

  11. Distortions in the cosmic background radiation and big-bang 4He nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Alhassid, Y.; Fuller, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    The observed distortion of the cosmic background radiation is analyzed in the framework of information theory to derive a simple form of the photon occupation probability. Taking this distribution function as indicative of the Lagrange parameters which might characterize the era of nucleosynthesis during the big bang, and assuming equilibrium among the constituents present, we find that the primordial 4 He abundance may be reduced by as much as 15% from the standard big-bang prediction

  12. Pulsed neutron well logging apparatus having means for determining background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron generator in a well logging instrument is periodically pulsed and has an off period between pulses of 1000 microseconds. A neutron detector is gated on at intervals of 400 to 500, 550 to 650, and 700 to 800 microseconds, respectively, following the termination of each burst of fast neutrons. Circuitry is provided for determining the background radiation and for determining the macroscopic absorption. 3 claims

  13. Radiation after-effects in daughter generations of barley grown under conditions of enhanced radioactive background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, O.N.; Shershunova, V.I.; Taskaev, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Stimulation of growth and development was observed in the first daughter generation of barley plants grown under conditions simulating an enhanced radioactive background. The stimulatory effect was partially reproduced in the second generation, and signs of depression of initial growth of plants were found in the third generation. A great number of alterations and their regular occurrence allow to refer them to lingering modifications originating under the effect of a radiation factor on vegetating plants

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals a stress response of Shewanella oneidensis deprived of background levels of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoping; Schilkey, Faye; Smith, Geoffrey B.

    2018-01-01

    Natural ionizing background radiation has exerted a constant pressure on organisms since the first forms of life appeared on Earth, so that cells have developed molecular mechanisms to avoid or repair damages caused directly by radiation or indirectly by radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional effect of depriving Shewanella oneidensis cultures of background levels of radiation by growing the cells in a mine 655 m underground, thus reducing the dose rate from 72.1 to 0.9 nGy h-1 from control to treatment, respectively. RNASeq transcriptome analysis showed the differential expression of 4.6 and 7.6% of the S. oneidensis genome during early- and late-exponential phases of growth, respectively. The greatest change observed in the treatment was the downregulation of ribosomal proteins (21% of all annotated ribosomal protein genes during early- and 14% during late-exponential) and tRNA genes (14% of all annotated tRNA genes in early-exponential), indicating a marked decrease in protein translation. Other significant changes were the upregulation of membrane transporters, implying an increase in the traffic of substrates across the cell membrane, as well as the up and downregulation of genes related to respiration, which could be interpreted as a response to insufficient oxidants in the cells. In other reports, there is evidence in multiple species that some ROS not just lead to oxidative stress, but act as signaling molecules to control cellular metabolism at the transcriptional level. Consistent with these reports, several genes involved in the metabolism of carbon and biosynthesis of amino acids were also regulated, lending support to the idea of a wide metabolic response. Our results indicate that S. oneidensis is sensitive to the withdrawal of background levels of ionizing radiation and suggest that a transcriptional response is required to maintain homeostasis and retain normal growth. PMID:29768440

  15. Cytogenetic studies on newborns from high level natural background radiation areas of Kerala coast, South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherian, V.D.; Kurien, C.J.; Das, Birajalaxmi

    1997-01-01

    The human population residing in the monazite bearing high level natural background radiation (HLNBR) areas of Kerala, along the South-West coast of India provides unique opportunities of assessing directly in man, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure. The per capita dose received by this population is nearly four times the normal background radiation level. While this is the average dose, the radiation levels prevailing in these HLNBR areas are in the range of 1 to over 35 mGy per year. Chromosomal aberration studies in the lymphocytes of newborns and adults from these areas have been in progress for two decades. So far, 4156 newborn babies from HLNBR and 7321 from normal background radiation (NBR) areas have been screened for the incidence of chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics and rings). The mean frequency of dicentrics and rings did not show any significant difference between the newborns in the control and the HLNBRA population. Assessment of the frequency of micronuclei in cytochalasin-B blocked binucleated lymphocytes of 49 newborns from control areas and 131 newborns from radioactive areas also showed similar values. While an age-dependent increase in chromosome aberration frequency was observed in the adult samples from control and the study areas, the regression analysis of the data indicated a marginally higher slope for the samples from HLNBRA. Karyotype anomalies recorded so far among the newborns have not revealed any significant difference in the incidence of numerical (including Down syndrome) and structural alterations between the control and the exposed populations. A noteworthy observation, herein reported for the first time from any HLNBR area is that there is no discernible increase in the incidence of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral lymphocytes of newborn babies hailing from HLNBR areas, where their ancestral generations have lived for several hundreds of years. (author)

  16. Autonomous low-noise system for broadband measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the digital side implementation of a new suborbital experiment for the measurement of broadband radiation emissions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy. The system has been used in campaign mode for initial mapping of the galactic radiation power received at a single frequency. The recorded galactic sky map images are subsequently being used to forecast the emitted radiation at neighboring frequencies. A planned second campaign will verify the prediction algorithms efficiency in an autonomous manner. The system has reached an advanced stage in terms of hardware and software combined operation and intelligence, where other Space Physics measurements are performed autonomously depending on the burst event under investigation. The system has been built in a modular manner to expedite hardware and software upgrades. Such an upgrade has recently occurred mainly to expand the frequency range of space observations.

  17. Cytogenetic investigation in a population living in the high background radiation area in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deqing, C.

    1980-04-01

    On the basis of the previous investigation, 24,000 metaphases of the lymphocytes of 120 inhabitants from Tongyou region, where the highest individual cummulative exposure per year of 372 mR in weighted average was recorded in the high background radiation area selected, have been analysed with the method recommended by WHO in 1973, in order to determine the extent of human chromosome aberrations induced by the high background radiation of various levels. The results show that the difference between the total number of chromosome breakages in the individuals living in the high background radiation area and that in the control area (0.32x10/sup -2/ and 0.27x10/sup -2/ per cell respectively) is not significant whereas that between the numbers of two-hite aberrations (mainly dicentric) in the same two groups (0.042x10/sup -2/ and 0.0048x10/sup -2/ per cell) is significant (X/sup 2/ = 6.1475, P<0.05). In addition, the normal value of the chromosome aberrations of human lymphocytes was analyzed.

  18. Growth retardation of paramecium and mouse cells by shielding them from background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Masanobu; Okuyama, Katsuyuki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Matsuda, Yatsuka; Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Yonezawa, Morio; Yagi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Planel et al. reported that the growth of paramecia was decreased by shielding them from background radiation. In the 1990s, Takizawa et al. found that mouse cells displayed a decreased growth rate under shielded conditions. The purpose of the present study was to confirm that growth is impaired in organisms that have been shielded from background radiation. Radioprotection was produced with a shielding chamber surrounded by a 15 cm thick iron wall and a 10 cm thick paraffin wall that reduced the γ ray and neutron levels in the chamber to 2% and 25% of the background levels, respectively. Although the growth of Paramecium tetraurelia was not impaired by short-term radioprotection (around 10 days), which disagreed with the findings of Planel et al., decreased growth was observed after long-term (40-50 days) radiation shielding. When mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were incubated inside or outside of the shielding chamber for 7 days, the number of cells present on the 6th and 7th days under the shielding conditions was significantly lower than that present under the non-shielding conditions. These inhibitory effects on cell growth were abrogated by the addition of a 137 Cs γ-ray source disk to the chamber. Furthermore, no growth retardation was observed in XRCC4-deficient mouse M10 cells, which display impaired DNA double strand break repair. (author)

  19. Radioactivity in food crops from high background radiation area in southwest area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, G.; Maniyan, C.G.; Allan Gnana Raj, G.; Thampi Thanka Kumaran, J.

    2009-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate radioactive concentration in food crops grown in naturally high-background radiation areas in southwest India. Seventeen varieties of food crops were collected from different parts of Kanyakumari district. The gross alpha and beta activities of the collected samples were measured using alpha scintillation counter and low beta counter respectively. The alpha activity was maximum in tapioca (497± 72 Bq kg -1 ) and the beta activity was maximum in paddy grain (10,946±583 Bq kg -1 ). The gamma activity of the food samples was studied by measuring the activity concentration of the radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Th, 238 U, 40 K) in the food crops. The radioactivity content of the food crops from high-background radiation area was higher when compared to similar samples collected from low-background radiation area. The daily radionuclide intake from the food crops grown and consumed by the public was 127.696 Bq and daily internal dose resulting from ingestion of radionuclides in food was 2.34 μSv. (author)

  20. Modeling background radiation using geochemical data: A case study in and around Cameron, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Kara E; Burnley, Pamela C; Adcock, Christopher T; Haber, Daniel A; Malchow, Russell L; Hausrath, Elisabeth M

    2016-12-01

    This study compares high resolution forward models of natural gamma-ray background with that measured by high resolution aerial gamma-ray surveys. The ability to predict variations in natural background radiation levels should prove useful for those engaged in measuring anthropogenic contributions to background radiation for the purpose of emergency response and homeland security operations. The forward models are based on geologic maps and remote sensing multi-spectral imagery combined with two different sources of data: 1) bedrock geochemical data (uranium, potassium and thorium concentrations) collected from national databases, the scientific literature and private companies, and 2) the low spatial resolution NURE (National Uranium Resource Evaluation) aerial gamma-ray survey. The study area near Cameron, Arizona, is located in an arid region with minimal vegetation and, due to the presence of abandoned uranium mines, was the subject of a previous high resolution gamma-ray survey. We found that, in general, geologic map units form a good basis for predicting the geographic distribution of the gamma-ray background. Predictions of background gamma-radiation levels based on bedrock geochemical analyses were not as successful as those based on the NURE aerial survey data sorted by geologic unit. The less successful result of the bedrock geochemical model is most likely due to a number of factors including the need to take into account the evolution of soil geochemistry during chemical weathering and the influence of aeolian addition. Refinements to the forward models were made using ASTER visualizations to create subunits of similar exposure rate within the Chinle Formation, which contains multiple lithologies and by grouping alluvial units by drainage basin rather than age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Zhejiang Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yifang; Chen Guopei; Wang Zanxin; Ma Mingqiang

    1994-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Zhejiang Province was measured and the dose to population was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average values of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization were 3.0 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 2.7 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial γ-radiation were 9.1 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 14.9 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 17.2 Bq· -3 indoors and 12.7 Bq·m -8 outdoors. The contents of natural radionuclides in food and water were measured. The total annual individual average effective dose from natural background radiation was about 2.0 mSv. The contributions of cosmic rays, terrestrial radiation radon and thoron daughters exposure in air and internal exposure within the body were about 0.24, 0.77, 0.67 and 0.35 mSv, respectively. The annual collective effective dose to population in the province was estimated to be 8.5 x 10 4 man Sv·a -1

  2. Preliminary study on the measurement of background radiation dose at Antarctica during 32nd expedition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakshi, A.K.; Pal, Rupali; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Dhar, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    A significant proportion (10%) of the natural background radiation is of cosmic origin. Cosmic ray consists of gamma, protons, electrons, pions, muons, neutrons and low Z nuclei. Due to the geomagnetic effect, cosmic radiation levels at poles are higher. As a consequence, personnel working in Antarctica (or Arctic) are subjected to high level of cosmic radiation. The present study gives the details of the estimation of background radiation (neutrons, gamma and electrons) dose rate around the Indian station at Antarctica named 'Bharati' measured during 32 nd Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica (32 nd INSEA). The measurement was carried out by passive dosimeters such as TLDs and CR-39 and active dosimeter such as RadEye G portable gamma survey meter. Gamma and electron components were measured using TLDs and survey meter, whereas CR-39 SSNTDs and neutron sensitive TLDs were used for neutron measurements. These detectors were deployed at few selected locations around Bharati station for about 2½ months during summer expedition. The neutron detectors used in the study were pre-calibrated with 241 Am-Be fast/thermal neutron source. The fast neutron dose rate measured based on CR-39 detector was found to about 140-420 nSv/h. The gamma dose rate evaluated by TLDs/survey meter are in the range of 290-400 nSv/h. (author)

  3. A survey of senile dementia in the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jia; Su Gasaki, H.; Yang Yuhua

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term low dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposure on the prevalence rate of senile dementia, further assess the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on central nervous system and study the pathogen of senile dementia, and provide direct observational data of human beings. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of senile dementia was carried out in high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China. The survey was conducted in two stages. For the initial screening, Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS) was used for all subjects. In the second stage, the stage of diagnosis, special questionnaires of healthy state of old people were sued. The final diagnoses were made according to the third revised edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III-R) of American Psychiatric Association. Results: 1018 inhabitants aged 65 years and over, including 513 persons in HBRA and 505 in CA were observed. According to DSM III-R, 61 cases (31 cases in HBRA and 30 cases in CA) of senile dementia were diagnosed. The prevalence rates of senile dementia are 6.04% in HBRA and 5.94% in CA, the total prevalence rate being 5.99%. Conclusion: No significant statistical difference in the prevalence rate of senile dementia between the two areas was found, suggesting that the prevalence rate of senile dementia in these areas is not associated with the high background radiation exposure

  4. Further investigation on chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of inhabitants in high background radiation area in Yangjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqing; Zhang Chaoyang; Yao Suyan

    1985-01-01

    Blood samples were taken from 122 healthy secondary school students at the age of 15 to 16 living in a high background radiation region and from 99 controls, All subjects from both areas had lived there since their births; they were non-smokers and without history of exposure to medical X-rays. The youngsters of 15 to 16 years old who were native-born and grew up in the high background radiation area received approximately 3.5 rad more cumulative γ-ray exposure than those in the control area. For each individual 200 M-1 cells were analysed. The frequency of chromosome aberrations in the high background group was 0.47/100 cells, while that in the control group was 0.33/100 cells, the diffrence being statistically significant. The frequencies of acentrics (fragment, acentric ring and minute), dicentrics and stable aberrations (inversion and translocation) were 0.41, 0.021 and 0.045/100 cells respectively in the high background group, and 0.30, 0.020 and 0.005/100 cells respectively in the control group. Only the difference of stable aberrations between the two groups was significant

  5. Non-primordial origin of the cosmic background radiation and pregalactic density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, H.E.; Mueller, V.; Oleak, H.

    1984-01-01

    Assumptions of a tepid Universe and a smaller primordial contribution to the 3 K background are made to show that Pop III stars may be responsible for the 3 K background and cosmic ray entropy. The 3 K background would be caused by thermalized stellar radiation produced by metallized intergalactic dust formed in first generation stars. A range of mass scales and amplification factors of density perturbations in the early Universe is examined below the Jeans mass for gravitational instabilities. The density perturbations that could have been present at small enough mass scales could have survived and generated sonic modes that propagated through the plasma era and, when combined with additional gravitationally unstable entropy disturbances after recombination, triggered the formation of Pop III stars. 13 references

  6. Background radiation measurements at 400 meter underground for dark matter search study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Won, E.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; So, W. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Recently we have performed measurements of background radiation, which is crucial for any dark matter search experiments. We measured muons, neutrons, and gamma backgrounds at approximately 400 meter underground tunnel in the electric generating facility located about 120 km east of Seoul. We believe this may be the first measurement at this depth in Korea. The muon flux measured with triple coincidence between 3 scintillating plates was reduced by a factor of 10 4 compared with the flux at ground level as expected at this depth. The unshielded gamma background measured with 15% relative efficiency germanium detector was rather high due to the surrounding rocks. Shielded with 15 cm normal lead and 2.5 cm electrode copper gave about 0.5 counts/second. (author)

  7. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of the 36Cl deposition flux in central Japan: natural background levels and seasonal variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaki, Yuki; Tase, Norio; Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nagashima, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Essential parameters for the applications of 36 Cl as a tracer in groundwater studies include the initial 36 Cl/Cl ratio, at the time of recharge, and/or the natural background deposition flux of 36 Cl in the recharge area. To facilitate the hydrological use of 36 Cl in central Japan, this study aimed to obtain a precise estimate of the long-term average local 36 Cl flux and to characterize its seasonal variability. The 36 Cl in precipitation was continuously monitored in Tsukuba, central Japan over a period of >5 years. The 36 Cl flux showed a clear seasonal variation with an annual peak during the spring, which was attributed to the seasonal variability of tropopause height. The long-term average 36 Cl flux (32 ± 2 atoms m −2 s −1 ), estimated from the measured data, was consistent with the prediction from the 36 Cl latitudinal fallout model scaled using the global mean production rate of 20 atoms m −2 s −1 . The initial 36 Cl/Cl ratio was estimated to be (41 ± 6) × 10 −15 , which is similar to that of pre-bomb groundwater in the Tsukuba Upland. An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36 Cl flux during the solar minimum. - Highlights: ► We monitored 36 Cl in precipitation in central Japan over a period of >5 years. ► The 36 Cl flux varied seasonally, with a peak in spring. ► The long-term average 36 Cl flux and the initial 36 Cl/Cl ratio were 32 ± 2 atoms m −2 s −1 and (41 ± 6) × 10 −15 , respectively. ► An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36 Cl flux during the solar minimum.

  9. Localities With Elevated Radiation Background in the High Karst Zone of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukotic, P.; Svrkota, R.; Andjelic, T.; Zekic, R.; Antovic, N.

    2011-01-01

    Research aimed to find localities in Montenegro with an elevated terrestrial gamma background was conducted during the period 2008-2009. For this purpose, 138 localities which have geological formations known to contain minerals with potentially high concentrations of U, Th and K, were selected throughout the country for a dosimetric survey. There are four distinctive geotectonic units in Montenegro: the Adriatic-Ionian Zone (JZ), the Budva-Cukali Zone (BZ), the High Karst Zone (VK), and the Durmitor Tectonic Unit (DTJ). The central and southern parts of Montenegro belong to the VK zone, whose geological structure is predominated by Mesozoic carbonate sediments, with occurrences of red and white bauxite formations, Triassic volcanic rocks, Paleogene flysch sediments and Quaternary sediments. In total, 38 localities belonging to the VK zone were selected for field investigations of terrestrial radiation. Knowing from earlier investigations that in Montenegro the average absorbed dose-rate in the air, 1 m above the ground, is 55 nGy/h, it was arbitrarily adopted that only localities with absorbed doses at least 50 % above this average value would be considered as having a relatively elevated radiation background. Field measurements have shown that 12 of the surveyed localities in the VK zone have such elevated dose values, five of them being with the highest dose rates in Montenegro. Among these five sites, the highest dose rate (192 nGy/h) was found at a locality which lies on andesite volcanic rock, while the other four localities (131 - 149 nGy/h) lie on bauxite deposits. Compared to the other areas in the world known to have a high natural radiation background, all of these localities in Montenegro have a moderately elevated radiation level. From the 12 localities with a relatively elevated radiation background, soil samples have been collected and analyzed by gamma spectrometry to determine activity concentrations of 40K, 232Th, 235U, 238U, 226Ra and 137Cs

  10. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero; Fragos, Tassos

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass-metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H II bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He I photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H II cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H II bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic hydrogen

  11. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fragos, Tassos [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Chemin des Maillettes 51, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass–metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H ii bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He i photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H ii cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H ii bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic

  12. Origin and variability in volatile organic compounds observed at an Eastern Mediterranean background site (Cyprus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Cécile; Sauvage, Stéphane; Gros, Valérie; Sciare, Jean; Pikridas, Michael; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Salameh, Thérèse; Leonardis, Thierry; Gaudion, Vincent; Depelchin, Laurence; Fronval, Isabelle; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Baisnée, Dominique; Bonsang, Bernard; Savvides, Chrysanthos; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Locoge, Nadine

    2017-09-01

    More than 7000 atmospheric measurements of over 60 C2 - C16 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were conducted at a background site in Cyprus during a 1-month intensive field campaign held in March 2015. This exhaustive dataset consisted of primary anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs, including a wide range of source-specific tracers, and oxygenated VOCs (with various origins) that were measured online by flame ionization detection-gas chromatography and proton transfer mass spectrometry. Online submicron aerosol chemical composition was performed in parallel using an aerosol mass spectrometer. This study presents the high temporal variability in VOCs and their associated sources. A preliminary analysis of their time series was performed on the basis of independent tracers (NO, CO, black carbon), meteorological data and the clustering of air mass trajectories. Biogenic compounds were mainly attributed to a local origin and showed compound-specific diurnal cycles such as a daily maximum for isoprene and a nighttime maximum for monoterpenes. Anthropogenic VOCs as well as oxygenated VOCs displayed higher mixing ratios under the influence of continental air masses (i.e., western Asia), indicating that long-range transport significantly contributed to the VOC levels in the area. Source apportionment was then conducted on a database of 20 VOCs (or grouped VOCs) using a source receptor model. The positive matrix factorization and concentration field analyses were hence conducted to identify and characterize covariation factors of VOCs that were representative of primary emissions as well as chemical transformation processes. A six-factor PMF solution was selected, namely two primary biogenic factors (relative contribution of 43 % to the total mass of VOCs) for different types of emitting vegetation; three anthropogenic factors (short-lived combustion source, evaporative sources, industrial and evaporative sources; 21 % all together), identified as being either of local origin

  13. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  14. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, A.S.; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  15. Spinning projectile's attitude measurement with LW infrared radiation under sea-sky background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Miaomiao; Bu, Xiongzhu; Yu, Jing; He, Zilu

    2018-05-01

    With the further development of infrared radiation research in sea-sky background and the requirement of spinning projectile's attitude measurement, the sea-sky infrared radiation field is used to carry out spinning projectile's attitude angle instead of inertial sensors. Firstly, the generation mechanism of sea-sky infrared radiation is analysed. The mathematical model of sea-sky infrared radiation is deduced in LW (long wave) infrared 8 ∼ 14 μm band by calculating the sea surface and sky infrared radiation. Secondly, according to the movement characteristics of spinning projectile, the attitude measurement model of infrared sensors on projectile's three axis is established. And the feasibility of the model is analysed by simulation. Finally, the projectile's attitude calculation algorithm is designed to improve the attitude angle estimation accuracy. The results of semi-physical experiments show that the segmented interactive algorithm estimation error of pitch and roll angle is within ±1.5°. The attitude measurement method is effective and feasible, and provides accurate measurement basis for the guidance of spinning projectile.

  16. [Being online without a purpose -- study of background variables of problematic internet use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prievara, Dóra Katalin; Pikó, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    These days, use of the Internet is unavoidable for the younger generations. The online world is the primary source of infomation and quick communication, and these activities can take many hours per day. The main goal of the present study was to examine the correlations among problematic internet use, social factors, stress and life satisfaction. Data collection was going online during the first semester of the year 2014 (N= 386 girls). The anonymous questionnaire contained items on perceived social support and the amount of online activites beyond sociodemographics. After descriptive statistics, factor, correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were applied to detect interrelationships. According to our data, 78% of the participants spent daily at least 2 hours, 40% more than 4 hours online. Using factor analysis, four factors of online activities were identified: Social networking-surfing, News-information, Risky and Lonely game factors. Only the News-information factor was not related to the problematic internet use. Based on multiple regression analyses, we may conclude that shyness, stress, loneliness and two factors, the Social networking-surfing and the Risky factors acted as background variables for problematic internet use. As a summary we may conclude that the internet has an important role in the everyday life of the participants. In case of the direct aim of the online activities the problematic use did not appear. These activities were mostly searching for information and news. In introduction of prevention, education about the correct use of the internet may be reasonable as early as possible.

  17. Comparative analysis of female physicists in the physical sciences: Motivation and background variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2014-06-01

    The majority of existing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) research studies compare women to men, yet a paucity of research exists that examines what differentiates female career choice within the physical sciences. In light of these research trends and recommendations, this study examines the following question: On average, do females who select physics as compared to chemistry doctoral programs differ in their reported personal motivations and background factors prior to entering the field? This question is analyzed using variables from the Project Crossover Survey data set through a subset of female physical science doctoral students and scientists (n =1137). A logistic regression analysis and prototypical odds ratio uncover what differentiates women in the physical sciences based on their academic achievement and experiences ranging from high school through undergraduate education. Results indicate that females who have negative undergraduate chemistry experiences as well as higher grades and positive experiences in undergraduate physics are more likely to pursue a career in physics as opposed to chemistry. Conclusions suggest that a greater emphasis should be placed on the classroom experiences that are provided to females in gateway physics courses. Analyses show that women are not a single entity that should only be examined as a whole group or in comparison to men. Instead women can be compared to one another to see what influences their differences in educational experiences and career choice in STEM-based fields as well as other academic areas of study.

  18. Comparative analysis of female physicists in the physical sciences: Motivation and background variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The majority of existing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM research studies compare women to men, yet a paucity of research exists that examines what differentiates female career choice within the physical sciences. In light of these research trends and recommendations, this study examines the following question: On average, do females who select physics as compared to chemistry doctoral programs differ in their reported personal motivations and background factors prior to entering the field? This question is analyzed using variables from the Project Crossover Survey data set through a subset of female physical science doctoral students and scientists (n=1137. A logistic regression analysis and prototypical odds ratio uncover what differentiates women in the physical sciences based on their academic achievement and experiences ranging from high school through undergraduate education. Results indicate that females who have negative undergraduate chemistry experiences as well as higher grades and positive experiences in undergraduate physics are more likely to pursue a career in physics as opposed to chemistry. Conclusions suggest that a greater emphasis should be placed on the classroom experiences that are provided to females in gateway physics courses. Analyses show that women are not a single entity that should only be examined as a whole group or in comparison to men. Instead women can be compared to one another to see what influences their differences in educational experiences and career choice in STEM-based fields as well as other academic areas of study.

  19. Biochemical and biological responses in V79 cells grown in different background radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amicarelli, F.; Colafarina, S.; Ara, C.; Antonelli, F.; Balata, M.; Belli, M.; Simone, G.; Satta, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In order to investigate the influence of a low background radiation environment on the biochemical and biological responses of mammalian cells cultured in vitro, a cell culture laboratory has been set up at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), located under the Gran Sasso d'Italia mountain, where cosmic rays are reduced by a factor of 10 6 and neutrons by a factor of 10 3 respect to the outside environment. Chinese hamster V79 cells were grown in parallel for up to nine months at LNGS and at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS). At the LNGS the exposure due to radon was reduced by a factor of about 25 with respect to the ISS. The biological end points addressed concerned cells proliferation, the expression of enzymes specific for the reduction of superoxydes, mutation induction by gamma-rays at the hprt locus and apoptotic sensitivity. After 9 months of culture, the cells grown at the LNGS, compared to the cells grown at the ISS, exhibit: i) a significant increase of the cell density at confluence; ii) a significantly higher capacity to scavenge organic and inorganic hydroperoxydes but a reduced scavenging capacity towards superoxide anions; iii) an increase in both the basal hprt mutation frequency and the sensitivity to the mutagenic effect of gamma-rays. The cells grown at the LNGS also show greater apoptotic sensitivity at the third month of culture that is no longer detected after nine months. Overall, these data suggest that cell response to ionizing radiation may be more complex than that predicted by a linear relationship with the dose and are consistent with the occurrence of an adaptive response related to the background radiation. However, other possibilities cannot be excluded such as the selection, in the two cultures, of clones having different characteristics, independently of the different radiation background. Work is in progress to better elucidate this point

  20. Research And Investigation To Establish The Database Of Environment Radiation Background For Vietnam (Phase 2009 -2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Van Giap; Nguyen Huu Quyet; Nguyen Quang Long; Bui Dac Dung; Vuong Thu Bac; Le Dinh Cuong; Chu Vu Long; Le Ngoc Thiem; Truong Y; Nguyen Van Mai; Nguyen Ba Tien

    2013-01-01

    Setting up data base of natural radiation background serves for planning socio-economics development in a province as well as the whole country and estimating annual effective dose of population. Beside external irradiation dose caused by the natural radioisotopes in the series 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in soil, population has been received internal dose caused by the above radioisotopes taken in the body from several ways. In order to complete the database of national radiation background and go to estimate annual effective radiation dose of population in the whole country, this project focus to carry out the works as following: (i) Setting up database of radiation background in the whole country: 150 soil samples that collected in the districts of 46 provinces have been analyzed. The average activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K are 37.86 Bq/kg, 58.88 Bq/kg and 462.78 Bq/kg, respectively. The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses are calculated: 0.087±0.036 mSv; 0.488±0.202 mSv and 0.576± 0.240 mSv, respectively. (ii) Setting up database of radiation background of province Ninh Thuan and Quang Nam: The detailed database of radiation background of all villages in Ninh Thuan and Quang Nam has been established. 84 soil samples in Ninh Thuan and 311 in Quang Nam were collected for analyze. The indoor and outdoor radon concentration at sampling positions has been measured. The average activities of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, and 222 Rn isotopes in Ninh Thuan are reported: 33.50 Bq/kg, 55.43 Bq/kg, 701.12 Bq/kg and 12.1 Bq/m 3 , 9.5 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses in Ninh Thuan are calculated: 0.095±0.029 mSv; 0.529±0.162 mSv and 0.624± 0.382 mSv, respectively. The average activities of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, and 222 Rn isotopes in Quang Nam are reported: 44.47 Bq/kg, 52.68 Bq/kg, 459.33 Bq/kg, 18.0 Bq/m 3 . The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses are calculated: 0.086±0.039 mSv; 0.482±0.216 m

  1. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Heilongjiang province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yicheng; Wang Lu; He Yongjiang

    1992-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Heilongjiang Province was measured and the population dose was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average values of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization were 3.3 ± 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 3.0 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 11.3 Bq·m -3 outdoors and 20.8 Bq·m -3 indoors. The average concentrations of natural radionuclides U, Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K were 6.1 x 10 -2 , 1.1 x 10 -2 , 8.4 x 10 -2 , and 68.9 Bq·kg -1 respectively in food, and 4.8 x 10 -2 , 2.0 x 10 -4 , 1.2 x 10 -2 and 4.6 x 10 -2 Bq·L -1 respectively in drinking water. The total annual individual average effective dose equivalents from natural background radiation were about 2200 μSv. Among them the contributions of cosmic rays, terrestrial radiation, radon and thoron daughters exposure in air, internal exposure within the body were about 320, 630, 860, and 390 μSv, respectively

  2. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Jilin Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wanxi; Chen Huiying; Ju Cuixiang; Li Fulin; Li Xianggao

    1994-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Jilin Province was measured and the population dose was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average value of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization was 3.2 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 . The average absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial γ radiation were 7.7 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 9.8 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 8.7 Bq·m -3 outdoors and 5.8 Bq·m -3 indoors. The average concentration of natural radionuclides U, Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K were 3.7 x 10 -2 , 2.4 x 10 -2 , 14.7 x 10 -2 and 81.5 Bq·kg -1 in food, and 2.3, 0.1, 1.1 and 0.3 Bq·L -1 in drinking water, respectively. The total annual individual average effective dose equivalent from natural background radiation was about 1.5 mSv

  3. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha (India))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Rautela, B. S.; Sagar, D. V.; Prasad, G.; Shahoo, S. K.; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Janik, M.; Sorimachi, A.; Tokonami, S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to radon, 222 Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, 220 Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to 220 Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of 220 Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha (India)) presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  4. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha (India))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S [Dept. of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal Univ., Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249199 (India); Sagar, D V [Health Physics Unit EAD, BARC, IRE, OSCOM, Matikhalo, Ganjam, Odisha 761 045 (India); Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S [Inst. of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki Univ., Aomori 036-8564 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to radon, {sup 222}Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, {sup 220}Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to {sup 220}Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of {sup 220}Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha (India)) presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  5. Background radiation measurements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnema, D.M.; Brewer, L.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of background radiation measurements was performed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico. The survey consisted of gross gamma and gamma spectral measurements of the radiation fields, soil and salt grab sample gamma analysis, and radon and working level measurements. The survey included locations at the surface and also within the mine itself. Background radiation levels on the surface were measured to average 7.65 microR/hour, and 0.7 microR/hour within the mine. Radon and working levels were at or below detection levels at all locations, and the radon concentration was estimated to be about 0.01 pCi/liter on the surface based on spectral measurements. The spectral measurements were performed using an intrinsic germanium spectrometer, and calculations from the spectra indicated that potassium-40 contributed about 28% to the surface level dose rates, natural uranium daughters contributed about 64%, and cesium-137 from weapons testing fallout contributed about 8%. In the mine potassium-40 was the only identifiable contributor to the dose rate

  6. Cytogenetic study of stable chromosome aberrations in residents of a high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wang Chunyan; Chen Deqing; Wei Lvxin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of high background radiation on the induction of stable chromosome aberrations. Methods: By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique chromosome Nos. 1, 2 and 4 were painted using specific biotin-labeled whole chromosome painting probes. Peripheral blood specimens were taken from 31 individuals living in the high background radiation area (HRBA) and 29 individuals in the control area. Results: No significant difference was found in the frequencies of translocations between HBRA and the control (P>0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) for both children and elderly individuals. On the other hand, correlation between age and translocation frequencies was significant at the 1% level (r s =0.388 with 56DF). Conclusion: There are no differences in the frequencies of translocations between HBRA and the control area. The present result indicates that the contribution of an elevated level of natural radiation in HBRA in China to the induction rate of stable type aberrations (translocations) dose not have a significant effect compared with the contributions from all other sources such as chemical mutagens and(or) metabolic factors. (authors)

  7. Epidemiological investigation of radiological effects in high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Luxin; Zha, Yongru; Tao, Zufan; He, Weihui; Chen, Deqing; Yuan, Yongling

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide some information for providing whether any detrimental effects exist in a large population whose families have been continuously exposed to a low dose rate radiation. Two areas in Yangjiang Country, characterized by high background radiation (HBR) with environmental gamma exposure, large population size and long-term inhabitants, were selected for evaluation of late effects of HBR. The areas with normal radiation background close to the Yangjiang Country were selected as control areas. Up to 1986 approximately one million person-years in each area in both HBR and control areas have been observed. No increase of cancer mortality was found in the HBR areas; on the contrary, cancer mortality tended to be lower in the HBR areas than the control areas. The prevalence of hereditary diseases and congenital defects was similar in both HBR and control areas, but the frequency of Down's syndrome was higher in the HBR areas (through within the normal range) than the control areas. A possible explanation is the difference of age of maternity between the HBR and control areas, and the extremely low frequency in the control areas. Possible factors influencing the incidence of mutationbased diseases were comparable in the HBR and control groups. However, the cultural and educational levels were somewhat different, probably affecting health status and family planning. It is likely that there may be a dose threshold for cancer incidence, but this remains to be determined by further research. (N.K.)

  8. Variability of the contrail radiative forcing due to crystal shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Witek, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    determined. Two cases are discussed here: a 1% homogeneous contrail cover and the contrail cover provided by Rädel and Shine (2008). In the second distribution case, a more realistic contrail cover is taken into account. This model combines the AERO2K flight inventory with meteorological data and normalizes it with respect to the contrail cover derived from satellite observations. Simulations performed by the Fu-Liou model show significant variability of the shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing with crystal shape. The nonspherical crystals have smaller net forcing in contrary to spherical particles. The differences in net radiative forcing between optical models reach up to 50%. The hexagonal column and hexagonal plate particles show the smallest net radiative forcing while the largest forcing is obtained for the spheres. The global and annual mean shortwave, longwave, and net contrail radiative forcing, average over all crystal models and assuming an optical depth of 0.3 at visible wavelengths, is -5.7, 16.8, and 11.1 mW/m2, respectively. A ratio of the radiative forcings' standard deviation to the mean value, derived using 10 different ice particle models, is about 0.2 for the shortwave, 0.14 for the longwave, and 0.23 for the net radiation.

  9. Background radiation in the Sydney metropolitan area scientific reality and public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Very little information if any, is available to the public about the ubiquitous nature of low-level background radiation -both from terrestrial and cosmic sources - in our highly urbanised or predominantly agrarnian societies. Public perception has naively accepted that the combustion of precious oxygen by air breathing engines is both natural and societally acceptable. Little thought has been given to the fact that on the one planet known to be able to sustain life based on oxygen, this is a recipe for disaster. On the other hand, since the evolution or creation of our universe, billions of tonnes of radioactive material within the crust of planet earth together with radiation from the thermonuclear powers station of the solar system, the sun, have sustained life, assisted in its evolution and, through photosynthesis and energy deposition, have ensured its propagation. In this on-going student project, employing wide-band, sensitive scintillation radiation detectors, careful statistical analysis and an understanding of the physics of radium-uranium decay chain and the production of radon gas and its daughter products, fluctuation in the radiation fields of large cities is clearly demonstrated. The work is usually carried out by the author and his final year thesis and students have great educational value for the public, civic authorities, school teachers, the media and political decision makers

  10. Effect of background radiation shielding on natural radioactivity distribution measurement with imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, C.; Suzuki, T.; Koido, S.; Uritani, A.; Miyahara, H.; Yanagida, K.; Miyahara, J.; Takahashi, K.

    1996-01-01

    Distribution images of natural radioactivity contained in various natural materials such as vegetable, animal meat and pottery work can be obtained with an imaging plate which has high sensitivity for nuclear radiations. For such very low levels of radioactivity, natural background radiations must be reduced using a shielding box. The lining, on the inside of the box, with low atomic number material such as acrylic resin is very effective in reducing electrons, β-rays and low energy X- and γ-rays emitted from the inner surface of the shielding material. Some images of natural radioactivity distribution were obtained and the radioactivity, mainly 40 K, contained in natural materials was measured by using an HPGe detector and also the imaging plate itself. (orig.)

  11. Background radiation can stimulate the proliferation of mouse-L-5178Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Y.; Yamashita, J.; Wakizaka, A.; Tanooka, H.

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate biological effects on cell proliferation of background radiation. Experiments are carried out on L-5178Y cells which were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS at 5 % CO 2 . Cultures were placed in the shielded reactor made from lead and identical reactor surrounded by polystyrene at a room set to maintained at 37degC. Radiation dose rates were ca. 0.05mR/day for the shielded reactor and ca. 0.15mR/day for control reactor, respectively. As the results, the cell growth rate of the shielded cultures was lower than that of control cultures with significant difference. The incorporation of [ 3 H] thymidine into DNA in the shielded culture was clearly low as compared with the control culture. (author)

  12. Isotropization of the cosmic background radiation due to galactic gravitational screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Kenji.

    1988-04-01

    The primordial objects with the masses of galaxies or their clusters formed at early stages such as z > 10 can play a powerful role of gravitational lenses and their random multiple scattering brings an effective screening for the cosmic background radiation. In a cold-dark-matter dominant model with the white-noise spectrum of initial density perturbations, it is shown that, if the primordial objects with the masses 10 12 h -1 (solar mass) are in the nonlinear stage at the epochs 1 + z = 10 ∼ 20, the objects with 6 x 10 14 h -1 (solar mass) are in the nonlinear stage at 1 + z = 6.3 ∼ 14, and accordingly the small-scale anisotropy of the radiation may be smoothed-out within 13 ∼ 28 minutes by this gravitational screening, where the Hubble constant H o = 100 h km s -1 Mpc -1 . (author)

  13. Origin and variability in volatile organic compounds observed at an Eastern Mediterranean background site (Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Debevec

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 7000 atmospheric measurements of over 60 C2 − C16 volatile organic compounds (VOCs were conducted at a background site in Cyprus during a 1-month intensive field campaign held in March 2015. This exhaustive dataset consisted of primary anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs, including a wide range of source-specific tracers, and oxygenated VOCs (with various origins that were measured online by flame ionization detection–gas chromatography and proton transfer mass spectrometry. Online submicron aerosol chemical composition was performed in parallel using an aerosol mass spectrometer. This study presents the high temporal variability in VOCs and their associated sources. A preliminary analysis of their time series was performed on the basis of independent tracers (NO, CO, black carbon, meteorological data and the clustering of air mass trajectories. Biogenic compounds were mainly attributed to a local origin and showed compound-specific diurnal cycles such as a daily maximum for isoprene and a nighttime maximum for monoterpenes. Anthropogenic VOCs as well as oxygenated VOCs displayed higher mixing ratios under the influence of continental air masses (i.e., western Asia, indicating that long-range transport significantly contributed to the VOC levels in the area. Source apportionment was then conducted on a database of 20 VOCs (or grouped VOCs using a source receptor model. The positive matrix factorization and concentration field analyses were hence conducted to identify and characterize covariation factors of VOCs that were representative of primary emissions as well as chemical transformation processes. A six-factor PMF solution was selected, namely two primary biogenic factors (relative contribution of 43 % to the total mass of VOCs for different types of emitting vegetation; three anthropogenic factors (short-lived combustion source, evaporative sources, industrial and evaporative sources; 21 % all together, identified

  14. Southern Hemisphere Measurement of the Anisotropy in the CosmicMicrowave Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George F.; Lubin, Phil M.

    1979-06-01

    A recent measurement of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation from the southern hemisphere (Lima, Peru) is essentially in agreement with previous measurements from the northern hemisphere. The net anisotropy can be described as a first order spherical harmonic (Doppler) anisotropy of amplitude 3.1 {+-} 0.4 m{sup o}K with a quadrupole anisotropy of less than 1 m{sup o}K. In addition, measurements of the linear polarization yield an upper limit of 1 m{sup o}K, or one part in 3000, at 95% C.L. for the amplitudes of any spherical harmonic through third order.

  15. Nature of gamma rays background radiation in new and old buildings of Qatar University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Houty, L.; Abou-Leila, H.; El-Kameesy, S.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and analysis of gamma-background radiation spectrum in four different places of Qatar University campus were performed at the energy range 10 keV-3 MeV using hyper pure Ge-detector. The dependence of the detector absolute photopeak efficiency on gamma-ray energies was determined and correction of the data for that was also done. The absorbed dose for each gamma line was calculated and an estimation of the total absorbed dose for the detected gamma lines in the four different places was obtained. Comparison with other results was also performed

  16. Dynamics of voids and clusters and fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpeter, E.E.

    1983-01-01

    The author summarizes briefly calculations on spherically symmetric models without dissipation for the dynamical development of large voids and galaxy (super)clusters from small underdensities and overdensities, respectively, at the recombination era. Implications are mentioned and conjectures for more complex geometries are discussed. He infers the density fluctuations which must have been present just after the recombination era to produce some present-day configuration. Fluctuations in the present-day cosmic background radiation are related to this and their inferred amplitude depends very strongly on the present-day value of the cosmological density parameter. The relation to observed upper limits on these fluctuations are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Background suppression by the DRAGON radiative capture facility at TRIUMF/ISAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, D.; Buchmann, L.; Chen, A.A.; D'Auria, J.M.; Davis, C.A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Ottewell, D.F.; Ouellet, C.V.; Parikh, A.; Parker, P.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2008-01-01

    The DRAGON facility at TRIUMF/ISAC detects reaction products following radiative capture of a hydrogen or helium target nucleus by an accelerated heavy ion. Capture reactions of interest in nuclear astrophysics may have reaction rates 10-14 orders of magnitude lower than the intensity of the incident beam: as well as efficiently transporting the heavy reaction product from the target to a suitable particle detector, the separator must provide most of the suppression of unreacted beam. We describe the features of beam background encountered in a range of proton- and alpha-capture experiments at the DRAGON facility.

  18. The impact of cosmic-origin background radiation on human survival in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podolská, Kateřina; Rychtaříková, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2017), s. 132-149 ISSN 0011-8265 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : mortality * incidence * solid cancer * lifetime attributable risk * age at exposure * solar activity * natural background radiation dose Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences https://www.czso.cz/documents/10180/46203818/clanek+3_Podolska-Rychtarikova.pdf/1454147e-8a44-40ca-b76c-d1fe6e7b822c?version=1.0

  19. Second dip as a signature of ultrahigh energy proton interactions with cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, V; Gazizov, A; Kachelrieb, M

    2006-12-08

    We discuss as a new signature for the interaction of extragalactic ultrahigh energy protons with cosmic microwave background radiation a spectral feature located at E= 6.3 x 10(19) eV in the form of a narrow and shallow dip. It is produced by the interference of e+e(-)-pair and pion production. We show that this dip and, in particular, its position are almost model-independent. Its observation by future ultrahigh energy cosmic ray detectors may give the conclusive confirmation that an observed steepening of the spectrum is caused by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect.

  20. Theoretical investigations of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    In this work, the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation is calculated within the context of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The results of the calculations for different initial conditions are compared to the observational data available in order to try to learn more about conditions in the early universe. It is found that a model which has isothermal fluctuations superimposed on the standard model can explain all of the observations so far. In fact, a range of models with different initial densities can explain the observations. There is not enough information at present to choose among these models, but more data should be available in the near future

  1. Small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and multiple gravitational lensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that multiple gravitational lensing of the microwave background radiation (MBR) by static compact objects significantly attenuates small-scale fluctuations in the MBR. Gravitational lensing, by altering trajectories of MBR photons reaching an observer, leads to (phase) mixing of photons from regions with different initial fluctuations. As a result of this diffusion process the original fluctuations are damped on scales up to several arcmin. An equation that describes this process and its general solution are given. It is concluded that the present upper limits on the amplitude of the MBR fluctuations on small scales cannot constrain theories of galaxy formation. 25 references

  2. Constraining neutrino physics with big bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.H.; Melchiorri, A.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.

    2002-01-01

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the recent results on the anisotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation from the BOOMERanG and DASI experiments to show that they single out an effective number of neutrinos in good agreement with standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We also consider degenerate big bang nucleosynthesis to provide new bounds on effective relativistic degrees of freedom N ν and, in particular, on the neutrino chemical potential ξ α . When including supernova type Ia data we find, at 2σ, N ν ≤7 and -0.01≤ξ e ≤0.22, vertical bar ξ μ,τ vertical bar ≤2.6

  3. Can the anisotropy of microwave background radiation be discovered at present?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurzadyan, V.G.; Kocharyan, A.A.

    1990-10-01

    An effect leading to a decrease of perturbations of Microwave Background Radiation after recombination epoch is investigated. Behaviour of correlation functions for null geodesics flow enables one to evaluate the role of this effect based purely on geometrical and topological properties of the Universe. Possible anisotropy of MwB in open Friedmannian Universe is shown to decrease due to this effect to a level far below present experimental accuracy. The fractal nature of the large scale structure of the Universe is also discussed. (author). 20 refs

  4. Ralph A. Alpher, Robert C. Herman, and the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpher, Victor S.

    2012-09-01

    Much of the literature on the history of the prediction and discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is incorrect in some respects. I focus on the early history of the CMBR, from its prediction in 1948 to its measurement in 1964, basing my discussion on the published literature, the private papers of Ralph A. Alpher, and interviews with several of the major figures involved in the prediction and measurement of the CMBR. I show that the early prediction of the CMBR continues to be widely misunderstood.

  5. Pulsed neutron well logging apparatus having means for determining background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron generator in a well logging instrument is periodically pulsed and has an off period between pulses of 1000 microseconds. A neutron detector is gated on at intervals of 400 to 500, 550 to 650, and 700 to 800 microseconds, respectively, following the termination of each burst of fast neutrons. Circuitry is provided for determining the background radiation by the equation: B = N 1 X N 3 - N 2 2 /N 1 + N 3 - 2N 2 where B is the background, and N 1 , N 2 and N 3 are the counts observed during the three gates, respectively. Circuitry is also provided for determining the macroscopic absorption (Σ) from the equation: Σ = 1/VΔt Log [N 1 - B/N 2 - B] where V is the velocity of thermal neutrons, being a constant and Δt represents an increment of time

  6. Heat Rejection from a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Radiator Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Gibson, M. A.; Hervol, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    A titanium-water heat pipe radiator having an innovative proprietary evaporator configuration was evaluated in a large vacuum chamber equipped with liquid nitrogen cooled cold walls. The radiator was manufactured by Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT), Lancaster, PA, and delivered as part of a Small Business Innovative Research effort. The radiator panel consisted of five titanium-water heat pipes operating as thermosyphons, sandwiched between two polymer matrix composite face sheets. The five variable conductance heat pipes were purposely charged with a small amount of non-condensable gas to control heat flow through the condenser. Heat rejection was evaluated over a wide range of inlet water temperature and flow conditions, and heat rejection was calculated in real-time utilizing a data acquisition system programmed with the Stefan-Boltzmann equation. Thermography through an infra-red transparent window identified heat flow across the panel. Under nominal operation, a maximum heat rejection value of over 2200 Watts was identified. The thermal vacuum evaluation of heat rejection provided critical information on understanding the radiator s performance, and in steady state and transient scenarios provided useful information for validating current thermal models in support of the Fission Power Systems Project.

  7. Radiation exposure map based on fuzzy logic for the representation of areas with high natural background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Wagner Eustaquio de; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    The identification of areas with high concentrations of natural radionuclides is an important task in classifying these areas in relation to the health risk for residents in the region. The aim of this work is to identify areas of high exposure to nuclear radiation using a geographic representation based on the theory of fuzzy sets. Radiometric data obtained from previous works developed in a region of high concentrations in natural uranium were used to create a fuzzy map of the local radiation levels. During the image processing, a nonlinear filter was applied to eliminate noise i.e. to reduce isolated pixels that would eventually cause major uncertainties in the results. A resulting image was geographically positioned (WGS40) and obtained in gray scale. This image was fuzzified for membership functions that represent linguistic variables as low exposure, medium exposure and high exposure. After representing the membership grade in a RGB (red, green and blue) image it was possible to visualize the radiation level in the area of exposure. When compared to data from the region, results demonstrated the good efficiency of the technique here employed for the representation of areas with high radioactivity levels. The image obtained also provided important information about those areas where exposure to radiation is more pronounced. Hence, the fuzzy map can be applied in decision-making of experts when a risk situation is identified. (author)

  8. Contribution of solar radiation to decadal temperature variability over land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaicun; Dickinson, Robert E

    2013-09-10

    Global air temperature has become the primary metric for judging global climate change. The variability of global temperature on a decadal timescale is still poorly understood. This paper examines further one suggested hypothesis, that variations in solar radiation reaching the surface (Rs) have caused much of the observed decadal temperature variability. Because Rs only heats air during the day, its variability is plausibly related to the variability of diurnal temperature range (daily maximum temperature minus its minimum). We show that the variability of diurnal temperature range is consistent with the variability of Rs at timescales from monthly to decadal. This paper uses long comprehensive datasets for diurnal temperature range to establish what has been the contribution of Rs to decadal temperature variability. It shows that Rs over land globally peaked in the 1930s, substantially decreased from the 1940s to the 1970s, and changed little after that. Reduction of Rs caused a reduction of more than 0.2 °C in mean temperature during May to October from the 1940s through the 1970s, and a reduction of nearly 0.2 °C in mean air temperature during November to April from the 1960s through the 1970s. This cooling accounts in part for the near-constant temperature from the 1930s into the 1970s. Since then, neither the rapid increase in temperature from the 1970s through the 1990s nor the slowdown of warming in the early twenty-first century appear to be significantly related to changes of Rs.

  9. Modelling of the indirect radiation effect due to background aerosols in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosols and greenhouse gases are the two most important contributors to the anthropogenic climate change. The indirect aerosol effect is simulated in this study. The effects of black carbon are investigated. Usually, models use measured aerosol data as input, and their predictions are compared to cloud parameters measured independently from the aerosol measurements. The model developed in this study uses simultaneously measured values for the aerosol and the subsequent cloud. This way, more realistic predictions for the indirect aerosol effect can be expected. The model uses data from an earlier intensive measurement campaign at an Austrian background site. The aerosol and cloud data are taken from the FWF project P 131 43 - CHE and had been collected in 2000 at a measurement site on a mountain in the proximity of Vienna (Rax, 1680 m a.s.l.). The simulation model consists of two parts, a cloud droplet growth model and a radiative model. The growth model for cloud droplets computes the cloud droplet distribution originating from a measured aerosol distribution. The calculated cloud droplet size distributions that are used for further calculations are selected according to the measured liquid water content of the real-world cloud. The radiative model then computes the radiative forcing using the calculated cloud droplet size distribution. The cloud model is a cloud parcel model which describes an ascending air parcel containing the droplets. Turbulent diffusion (important for stratiform clouds) is realized through a simple approach. The model includes nucleation, condensation, coagulation and radiative effects. Because of radiative heating/cooling of the cloud droplets the temperature and the critical super-saturation of the droplets can change. For radiative transfer calculations, the radiative transfer code of the public domain program 'Streamer' was adapted for this study. 'Streamer' accounts for scattering and absorption of radiation in the whole spectral region

  10. Gravitational perturbation of the cosmic background radiation by density concentrations. [Swiss cheese model universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, C C [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Theoretical Astronomy

    1976-05-01

    The gravitational effect of density concentrations in the Universe on the temperature distribution of the cosmic blackbody background radiation is considered, using the Swiss cheese model universe, and supposing each hole to contain an expanding, homogeneous dust sphere at its centre. The temperature profile across such a hole differs in an essential way from that obtained earlier by Rees et al (Nature; 217:511 (1968)). The evolution of this effect with the expansion of the Universe is considered for 'relatively increasing' density contrasts emerging from the same initial singular state as the rest of the Universe. This effect becomes comparable to the bremsstrahlung and Compton effects on the isotropy of the background radiation for masses of about 10/sup 19/ times the mass of the sun, and exceeds these other effects as about Msup(2/3) for larger masses. If large-scale condensations of the Universe can be found for z approximately 1 to 5, delineated, maybe, by the clustering of quasars, etc., then this effect may be observable.

  11. Effect of the Great Attractor on the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertschinger, E [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics; Gorski, K M [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Dekel, A [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics

    1990-06-07

    ANISOTROPY in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is expected as a result of fluctuations in gravitational potential caused by large-scale structure in the Universe. The background radiation is redshifted as it climbs out of gravitational wells. Here we present a map of the anisotropy in CMB temperature {Delta}T/T of our region of the Universe as viewed by a distant observer, predicted on the basis of the gravitational potential field. We calculate this field in the vicinity of the Local Group of galaxies from the observed peculiar (non-Hubble) velocities of galaxies, under the assumption that the peculiar motions are induced by gravity. If the cosmological density parameter {Omega} is 1, the gravitational potential field of the Great Attractor and surrounding regions produces a maximum Sachs-Wolfe anisotropy of {Delta}T/T=(1.7{plus minus}0.3) x 10{sup -5} on an angular scale of 1deg. Doppler and adiabatic contributions to this anisotropy are expected to be somewhat larger. If similar fluctuations in the gravitational potential are present elsewhere in the Universe, the anisotropy present when the CMB was last scattered should be visible from the Earth, and should be detectable in current experiments. A fundamental test of whether gravity is responsible for the generation of structure in the Universe can be made by looking for the imprint in the CMB of deep potential wells similar to those found in our neighbourhood, (author).

  12. Measurements of environmental background radiation levels by TLD in and around the Jahangirnagar University Campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.; Aleya Begum; Idris Miah, M.; Yunus, Afrozi

    1997-01-01

    The background radiation levels at 30 locations in and around the Jahangirnagar University Campus (JUC) were measured using a LiF(TLD-100) thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). In addition, dose rates at three pre-selected locations were measured on a monthly as well as quarterly basis for one year period (July 1993 - June 1994). The dose rate ranges from 1016 to 2167 μSv.y -1 (101.6 to 216.7 mrem.y -1 ) with a mean value of 1595 μSv.y -1 (159.5 mrem.y -1 ). These values are comparable with those of pre- and post-operational values for the reactor site. The estimated average annual effective dose equivalent to the inhabitants at the study areas was found to be 1276 μSv (127.6 mrem). Variation of background radiation level with meteorological parameters, namely, temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and pressure was also studied. The influence on the dose rate of the meteorological parameters was observed. (author)

  13. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  14. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  15. Gamma radiation induced and natural variability for nodulation in legumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maherchandani, N; Rana, O P.S. [Haryana Agricultural Univ., Hissar (India). Dept. of Genetics

    1977-09-01

    Gamma radiation induced variability for nodulation was studied in 112 M4 mutant lines of cowpea variety C-15-2. Ten lines superior in nodulation to the original variety have been identified. Natural variability for nodulation and plant growth was investigated in 75 genotypes of chickpea. A number of genotype were found to be superior to cultivated variety C-235 for nodulation characters. Nodule characters were found to be related to dry matter accumulation but not to grain yield. Another experiment on 10 varieties of chick pea conducted under aseptic conditions revealed that host genotypes showed specificity for Rhizobial strains and different Rhizobial strains differed in their effectiveness on different host genotypes. H 551 and H 355 were the most responsive varieties.

  16. PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND RESCATTERED ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon [Basic Science Research Institute, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Trippe, Sascha, E-mail: ki13130@gmail.com, E-mail: trippe@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-20

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  17. Detection of hot gas in clusters of galaxies by observation of the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gull, S.F.; Northover, K.J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that satellite observations have indicated that many rich clusters are powerful sources of x-rays. This has been interpreted as due to either thermal bremsstrahlung from very hot gas filling the clusters or as inverse Compton scattering of photons by relativistic electrons. Spectral evidence appears to favour a thermal origin for the radiation, implying the existence of large amounts of hot gas. This gas may be a major constituent of the Universe, and independent confirmation of its existence is very important. Observations are here reported of small diminutions in the cosmic microwave background radiation in the direction of several rich clusters of galaxies. This is considered to confirm the existence of large amounts of very hot gas in these clusters and to indicate that the x-radiation is thermal bremsstrahlung and not inverse Compton emission. The observations were made in 1975/1976 using the 25m. telescope at the SRC Appleton Laboratory at a frequency of 10.6 GH2, and details are given of the technique employed. (U.K.)

  18. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  19. Chromosome translocation in residents of the high background radiation areas in southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayata, Isamu; Minamihisamatsu, Masako; Wang Chunyan; Wei Zhang; Chen Deqing; Morishima, Hiroshige; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    We performed a cytogenetical study using chromosome painting analysis on 9 residents of the naturally high background radiation areas (HBRA) and 8 residents of the control areas in southern China. The estimated dose (air kerma) of each resident measured by an electric pocket dosimeter showed 2.20-4.23 mGy/year in HBRA and 0.56-0.70 mGy/year in the control areas. A total of 14,096 cells (1,566 cells/case) in the former and 17,522 cells (2,190 cells/case) in the latter were analyzed. Children, both in HBRA and in the control areas, had translocations at low frequencies. The frequency of translocations among elder individuals varied widely and it was not possible to detect dose effect although it was detected in dicentrics. The effect of radiation on the induction of chromosome aberrations, which have a statistically potential risk of causing malignant or congenital diseases, seems to be less significant than those of metabolic factors and/or mutagenic agents (excluding radiation) even in HBRA in China. (author)

  20. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  1. Poster - 17: Characterization and correction of radiation induced background in scanning water tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Elsayed [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To characterize and correct for radiation-induced background (RIB) observed in the signals from a class of scanning water tanks. Methods: A method was developed to isolate the RIB through detector measurements in the background-free linac console area. Variation of the RIB against a large number of parameters was characterized, and its impact on basic clinical data for photon and electron beams was quantified. Different methods to minimize and/or correct for the RIB were proposed and evaluated. Results: The RIB is due to the presence of the electrometer and connection box in a low background radiation field (by design). The absolute RIB current with a biased detector is up to 2 pA, independent of the detector size, which is 0.6% and 1.5% of the central axis reference signal for a standard and a mini scanning chamber, respectively. The RIB monotonically increases with field size, is three times smaller for detectors that do not require a bias (e.g., diodes), is up to 80% larger for positive (versus negative) polarity, decreases with increasing photon energy, exhibits a single curve versus dose rate at the electrometer location, and is negligible for electron beams. Data after the proposed field-size correction method agree with point measurements from an independent system to within a few tenth of a percent for output factor, head scatter, depth dose at depth, and out-of-field profile dose. Manufacturer recommendations for electrometer placement are insufficient and sometimes incorrect. Conclusions: RIB in scanning water tanks can have a non-negligible effect on dosimetric data.

  2. Background levels and radiation dose yield of o-tyrosine in chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of o-tyrosine levels in poultry meat is a potential method for postirradiation dosimetry of poultry. The validity of using o-tyrosine for this purpose has not yet been established. As part of the validation process, the o-tyrosine content in unirradiated chicken meat, the radiation dose response curve, and the effects of postirradiation storage on o-tyrosine levels are examined. In 18 individual samples, the mean background level of o-tyrosine was 0.18 +/- 0.11 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture), and the most frequent background level (60% of the cases) was between 0.05 and 0.15 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture). In pooled samples of 10 chickens, the mean background level was 0.12 +/- 0.03 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture). The levels were not significantly affected by storage at 5 degrees C (7 d) or by freezing the sample. The radiation dose response curve was linear within the dose range studied (0 to 10 kGy), with a slope of 0.127 + 0.003 ppm (wet weight)/kGy. Although there was some variation in the intercept (0.132 + 0.013), the slope was the same in all samples tested. Postirradiation storage at either 4 or 8 degrees C until spoilage did not affect the levels of o-tyrosine. These data indicate that o-tyrosine level may be useful for determining the absorbed dose in chicken meat gamma-irradiated to doses greater than 0.6 kGy. Further validation studies are continuing

  3. International recommendations[General radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, Bo [Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection (Sweden)

    1986-07-01

    Full text: This short presentation will indicate the general radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances. A number of international organizations are involved in various aspects of radiation protection, for example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Two international organizations, however, provide the basic background. These are the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). UNSCEAR provides the scientific information on radiation levels and effects. It consists of 21 member countries, with truly international coverage. It issues reports to the UN General Assembly, including comprehensive scientific annexes. Its latest comprehensive report was issued in 1982, the next is expected to be published in 1988. That report will include an assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The ICRP is a non-governmental organization. It has issued recommendations on radiation protection since 1928. The postulated biological basis for radiation protection recommendations involves two types of biological effects. The so-called non-stochastic effects, mainly due to cell death, appear only when the radiation doses exceed a certain threshold value. These effects, therefore, can only appear after high accidental exposures. After the Chernobyl accident, they only affected about 200 individuals involved in fire extinction and rescue work at the damaged nuclear power plant. Stochastic effects, with some simplification, may be seen as the result of initial changes in the genetic code of some surviving cells. If these cells are germ cells, this may lead to hereditary harm. If they are somatic cells, the result could be cancer

  4. Background radiation fields as a probe of the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy

    1982-03-01

    A 'Swiss Cheese' model is used to calculate to order of magnitude the temperature fluctuation of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) in a lumpy universe. The calculations are valid in a Friedmann background of arbitrary ..cap omega.. provided that matter has been dominant since the photons were last scattered. The inhomogeneities may be larger than the curvature scale, as is required to deal with fluctuations on a large angular scale in a low-density universe. This model is combined with observational limits on the fluctuations in the CMB to yield an upper limit to the present spectrum of inhomogeneities. The absence of any quadrupole anisotropy approximately > 3 x 10/sup -4/ sets a limit on the amplitude of lumps on scales very much greater than the present horizon. It is seen that, as shown by Peebles, for ..cap omega.. = 1 and a simple (Poisson) model the predicted ..delta..T/T(theta) is in remarkable accord with the recent measurements of quadrupole and 6/sup 0/ anisotropy. For a low-density model the predicted ..delta..T/T(theta) for large angles is markedly different. The limits on inhomogeneity from the isotropy of the X-ray background are briefly considered and they are found to be consistent with the microwave limits.

  5. Background radiation fields as a probe of the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.

    1982-01-01

    A 'Swiss Cheese' model is used to calculate to order of magnitude the temperature fluctuation of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) in a lumpy universe. The calculations are valid in a Friedmann background of arbitrary Ω provided that matter has been dominant since the photons were last scattered. The inhomogeneities may be larger than the curvature scale, as is required to deal with fluctuations on a large angular scale in a low-density universe. This model is combined with observational limits on the fluctuations in the CMB to yield an upper limit to the present spectrum of inhomogeneities. The absence of any quadrupole anisotropy approximately > 3 x 10 -4 sets a limit on the amplitude of lumps on scales very much greater than the present horizon. It is seen that, as shown by Peebles, for Ω = 1 and a simple (Poisson) model the predicted ΔT/T(theta) is in remarkable accord with the recent measurements of quadrupole and 6 0 anisotropy. For a low-density model the predicted ΔT/T(theta) for large angles is markedly different. The limits on inhomogeneity from the isotropy of the X-ray background are briefly considered and they are found to be consistent with the microwave limits. (author)

  6. Epidemiological and radio-biological studies in high background radiation areas of Kerala coast: implications in radiation protection science and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi

    2018-01-01

    Till date, Linear No Threshold hypothesis (LNT) is well accepted in radiation protection science in spite of its limitations. However, dose response studies using multiple biological end points from high-background radiation areas have challenged the linearity. Radio-biological and epidemiological studies from high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast showed non-linearity as well as efficient repair of DNA damage in HLNRA indicating that dose limits for public exposure needs to be revisited which may have implications in radiation protection science, human health and low dose radiation biology. However, further studies using high throughput approach is required to identify chronic radiation signatures in human population exposed to elevated level of natural background radiation

  7. Children with language problems in a speech and hearing clinic : Background variables and extent of language problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keegstra, A.L.; Knijff, W.A.; Post, W.J.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S.M.

    Objective: Analysis of a clinical population referred for language analysis in terms of background variables and extent of language problems. Design: Descriptive study. Materials and methods: Children referred to a speech and hearing clinic because of assumed language problems were analyzed with

  8. Study of the CMS RPC detector performance in high radiation background conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel Colin, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    The RPC system at the CMS Detector is operating successfully from beginning of the data taking. The high instantaneous luminosity causes an extremely high flux of ionizing particles. The long period of operation (Run1 and Run2) in a huge radiation background conditions, gives the opportunity to study the operation capability of the RPCs and also to predict a data-driven extrapolation about the expecting particle rates at HL LHC (High Luminosity) scenario. The obtained results in terms of measured rate, currents and integrated charged will be presented in the poster. When it is possible they will be compared to the relevant results obtained from the dedicated study where a set of test chambers have been irradiated at GIF++ laboratory setup.

  9. Radon-thoron exposures in high background radiation areas: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambi, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The radon-thoron measurements reported in literature for the high background radiation areas (HBRAs) of the world are summarised here. The most important areas covered are the Radon Spas and the thorium bearing monazite deposits. Special mention is made of the ongoing programmes of radon-thoron survey in the monazite beach areas of India; preliminary measurements indicate significant levels of thoron exposures. The diurnal and seasonal variations are quite wide underscoring the importance of carrying out integrated measurements for meaningful assessments of population exposures. Radon-thoron inhalation dose rates upto 30 mSv/y have been measured in lran as well as India. It has been generally observed that the cumulative population doses due to radon-thoron inhalation are as high as those due to the external exposures in these HBRAs. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  10. Ribbons on the Cosmic Background Radiation Sky: A Powerful Test of a Baryon Symmetric Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, W.H.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Turner, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    If the Universe consists of domains of matter and antimatter, annihilations at domain interfaces leave a distinctive imprint on the cosmic background radiation (CBR) sky. The signature is anisotropies in the form of long, thin ribbons of width θ W ∼0.1 circ , separated by angle θ L ≅1 circ (L/100h -1 Mpc) (L is the characteristic domain size) and with distortion parameter y∼10 -6 . Such a pattern could potentially be detected by the high-resolution CBR anisotropy experiments planned for the next decade, and such experiments may finally settle the question of whether or not our Hubble volume is baryon symmetric. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. The cosmic microwave background radiation and the dog in the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, R. B.

    The spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are characterized, summarizing the results of recent observations. The emphasis is on null experiments which have established upper limits on anisotropies and spectral distortion. The benefits and pitfalls of null experiments are recalled; the generally observed isotropy of the CMBR and the possible ways anisotropy could be introduced are discussed; and data from searches for anisotropy on arcmin, degree, and arcsec scales are presented in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail. The observed CMBR spectrum is shown to be generally consistent with a black body at temperature 2.75 + or - 0.04 K at wavelengths from 0.1 to 12 cm, although some recent data (Kogut et al., 1988) seem to confirm the presence of distortion due to the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect at wavelength 3.0 cm.

  12. Measurement of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation at 3.0 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) has been measured at a wavelength of 3.0 cm as part of a program to measure th Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths between 0.33 cm and 12 cm. The instrument used is a dual-antenna Dicke-switched radiometer with a double-sideband noise temperature of 490 K and a sensitivity of 46 mK/Hz/sup 1/2/. The entire radiometer is mounted on bearings. The atmospheric emission was measured by rotating the radiometer, and thus directing one antenna to zenith angles of +- 30 0 and +- 40 0 . 61 references, 24 figures, 18 tables

  13. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  14. Constraints on nonconformal couplings from the properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Morrice, Jack; Vu, Susan

    2013-10-18

    Certain modified gravity theories predict the existence of an additional, nonconformally coupled scalar field. A disformal coupling of the field to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is shown to affect the evolution of the energy density in the radiation fluid and produces a modification of the distribution function of the CMB, which vanishes if photons and baryons couple in the same way to the scalar. We find the constraints on the couplings to matter and photons coming from the measurement of the CMB temperature evolution and from current upper limits on the μ distortion of the CMB spectrum. We also point out that the measured equation of state of photons differs from w(γ)=1/3 in the presence of disformal couplings.

  15. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies, cosmic microwave background radiation and cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Presence of the hot (kTe ~ 3 - 10 KeV) rarefied gas in the clusters of galaxies (most massive gravitationally bound objects in the Universe) leads to the appearance of  "shadows"  in the angular distribution of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation and permits to measure the peculiar velocities of these clusters relative to the unique coordinate frame where CMB is isotropic. I plan to describe the physics leading to these observational effects. Planck spacecraft, ground based South Pole and Atacama Cosmology Telescopes discovered recently more than two thousand of unknown before Clusters of Galaxies at high redshifts detecting these "shadows" and traces of kinematic effect, demonstrating the correlation of the hot gas velocities with mass concentrations on large scales. Giant ALMA interferometer in Atacama desert resolved recently strong shocks between merging clusters of galaxies. Newly discovered clusters of galaxies permit to study the rate of growth of the large scale structur...

  16. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7 0 +- 1.8 0 declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables

  17. Relation between cancer incidence or mortality and external natural background radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis was performed on the relationships between the organ dose-equivalent rate due to natural background radiation (mSv/a) and three parameters of cancer risk: the age-adjusted cancer incidence (patients x 10 5 persons x a -1 ) in 13 large areas, the standardized mortality ratio of cancers in 46 large areas, and the cancer mortality in the population aged more than 40 years old (cancer deaths x 10 5 persons x a -1 ) in 649 small areas. The age-adjusted liver cancer incidence in males fitted the exponential model significantly (p<0.01) and the relationship of stomach cancer mortality of aged males in small areas fitted the linear model significantly (p<0.05). No relationship was observed with regard to female cancer in either case. The relationships between the three parameters and various other cancers of both sexes were not statistically significant. (author)

  18. Measurement of anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation on a large angular scale at 33 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.V.

    1978-11-01

    Results of a measurement of anisotropy in the 3 0 K cosmic background radiation on a large-angular-scale are presented. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern celestial hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of +- 46m 0 K/√Hz. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the motion of the earth relative to the sources of the radiation; the anisotropy is well fit by a cosine distribution of amplitude 3.61 +- 0.54 millireverse arrowreverse arrow-degrees Kelvin (m 0 K), one part in 800 of 3 0 K, implying a velocity of 361 +- 54 km/sec toward the direction 11.23 +- 0.46 hours right ascension, and 19.0 +- 7.5 0 declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole (cos theta) and quadrupole (cos 2 theta) angular distributions places a 1 m 0 K limit on the amplitude of most components of quadruple anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 m 0 K limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 0 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 0 . This thesis describes the equipment development through three engineering flights and the data acquisition in eleven additional flights. The astrophysical results are then presented from the statistical analysis of the reduced data

  19. Influence of NORMs on the natural background radiation level in petroleum-producing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) which are found in the Earth's crust, in the form of 226 Ra and 228 Ra and their associated radionuclides, are brought to the surface of the ground as a result of oil production processes, and are known under the name of technologically enhanced natural radioactivity (TENR). These represent a potential hazard of significant scale. 226 Ra, an α emitter, represents a potential internal radiation exposure hazard to both workers and members of the public, arising from the inhalation and ingestion of the dust produced during cleaning operations for the descaling of pipes and separator tanks. In addition to this, a higher than normal background γ exposure rate is to be observed both around and directly at the areas where the mud from the separator tanks and pipe cleaning operations was routinely dumped. Therefore, the aim of this work was to present the data on radiation levels measured in contaminated areas located near to a number of oilfields in Egypt and in Syria. The decontamination processes undertaken and the precautions necessary to ensure elimination of the possible transport mechanisms for contaminated dust into public areas by wind are presented. (orig.)

  20. Profiles of doses to the population living in the high background radiation areas in Kerala, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chougaonkar, M.P. E-mail: mpckar@hotmail.com; Eappen, K.P.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Shetty, P.G.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sadasivan, S.; Venkat Raj, V

    2004-07-01

    A sample study of the profiles of radiation exposures to the populations living in the high background radiation areas (HBRAs) of the monazite-bearing region in Kerala, India, has been conducted by monitoring 200 dwellings selected from two villages in this region. Each of these dwellings was monitored for 1 year and the study lasted for a period of 2 years. The indoor gamma ray dose measurements were carried out using thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and the inhalation doses due to radon, thoron and their progenies were monitored using solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) based twin-cup dosimeters. Outdoor gamma ray dose measurements were carried out using Geiger Muller (GM) tube based survey meters. Annual effective doses were computed, using occupancy factors of 0.8 and 0.2, respectively, for indoor and outdoor, by adding the three components. Occupants of 41.6% of the houses surveyed were observed to receive the annual effective doses ranging between 0.5 and 5 mSv/a, 41.6% between 5 and 10 mSv/a, 10.2% between 10 and 15 mSv/a and 6.6% greater than 15 mSv/a. The inhalation component was generally smaller than the external gamma ray component and on an average it was found to constitute about 30% of the total dose. The paper presents the details of the methodology adopted and the analysis of the results.

  1. The excess flux in the cosmic submillimeter background radiation and the primordial deuterium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Guessoum, N.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) show an enhanced flux in the submillimeter regime, compared to the spectrum of a 2.7 K blackbody. Thermal Comptonization of the relic radiation by a hot nonrelativistic plasma has long been known to produce distortions in the CBR spectrum, similar to what has now been observed. Heating of the primeval plasma to temperatures T ∼ 10 6 - 10 8 K could result from the injection of subcosmic ray protons at epoch z ∼ 10--100. The intensity of the subcosmic ray flux that provide conditions needed to explain the submillimeter excess by thermal Comptonization also leads to the production of cosmologically significant amounts of deuterium in collisions between subcosmic ray protons and primordial protons and α-particles. However, the amount of lithium produced through α-α reactions is in conflict with the observed Li abundance. If lithium is depleted, for example, by processing through Population II stars, arguments for the baryon content of the universe based on primordial deuterium and He abundances are weakened. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Preliminary indoor thoron measurements in high radiation background area of southeastern coastal Orissa (India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, G.; Gusain, G. S.; Rautela, B. S.; Choubey, V. M.; Vidya Sagar, D.; Tokonami, S.; Sorimachi, A.; Sahoo, S. K.; Janik, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of radon and thoron measurements in the houses of Chhatrapur area of southeastern coast of Orissa (India). This area is one of the high radiation background radiation areas in India, which consists of monazite sand as the source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations were measured in the houses of Chhatrapur area using twin cup radon dosemeters, RAD7 and radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). Thoron progeny concentration was also measured in the houses using deposition rate measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations in the houses of study area were found to vary from 8 to 47 Bq m -3 and the below detection level to 77 Bq m -3 , respectively. While thoron progeny concentration in these houses ranges between 0.17 and 4.24 Bq m -3 , preliminary investigation shows that the thoron concentration is higher than radon concentration in the houses of the study area. The thoron progeny concentration was found to be comparatively higher, which forms a base for further study in the area. The comparison between the results of various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  3. Preliminary indoor thoron measurements in high radiation background area of southeastern coastal Orissa (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, G; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S [Dept. of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal Univ., Badshahi Thaul, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Choubey, V M [Wadia Inst. of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248 001 (India); Vidya Sagar, D [Health Physics Unit (EAD, BARC), IRE, OSCOM, Matikhalo, Dt. Ganjam, Orissa 761 045 (India); Tokonami, S; Sorimachi, A; Sahoo, S K; Janik, M; Ishikawa, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263 8555 (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of radon and thoron measurements in the houses of Chhatrapur area of southeastern coast of Orissa (India). This area is one of the high radiation background radiation areas in India, which consists of monazite sand as the source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations were measured in the houses of Chhatrapur area using twin cup radon dosemeters, RAD7 and radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). Thoron progeny concentration was also measured in the houses using deposition rate measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations in the houses of study area were found to vary from 8 to 47 Bq m{sup -3} and the below detection level to 77 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. While thoron progeny concentration in these houses ranges between 0.17 and 4.24 Bq m{sup -3}, preliminary investigation shows that the thoron concentration is higher than radon concentration in the houses of the study area. The thoron progeny concentration was found to be comparatively higher, which forms a base for further study in the area. The comparison between the results of various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  4. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  5. Perceptions of a Housespouse: The Effects of Sex, Economic Productivity, and Subject Background Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Shirley M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Two studies were performed investigating college students' attitudes toward male and female housespouse whose primary duties were childcare and major household tasks and whose economic contributions were earnings from writing. Housespouse's sex and pursuit of outside activities as well as subject's parental background were related to students'…

  6. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control.We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples.Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

  7. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 238 U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 μR/h, with an US average of 8.5 μR/h. The nationwide average concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 238 U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively

  8. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  9. Ingestion of polonium ((210)Po) via dietary sources in high background radiation areas of south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi; Baskaran, Kamesh Viswanathan; Rao, D D; Sathyapriya, R; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar; Kuruva, Jaya Krishna; Hari, Shanmugamsundaram

    2014-10-01

    To study the distribution of Polonium ((210)Po) activity in dietary sources in the high background radiation zone of Puttetti in southern Tamil Nadu. (210)Po was analyzed in the food materials consumed by the male and female individual representatives living in the high background areas by 24-h Duplicate Diet Study (DDS) and Market Basket Study (MBS). The MBS was performed by collecting the food samples such as, cereals, fruits, leafy vegetables, roots and tubers, other vegetables, fish, meat and milk grown in the high background radiation zone of southern Tamil Nadu as a part of baseline study in this region. The DDS was done by collecting the food materials consumed including the beverages in 24 h from different age groups of male and female individuals living in the village of Puttetti. The intake and ingestion dose of the radionuclide (210)Po was estimated. The average concentration of (210)Po in DDS (n = 33) was found to be 74 mBq.kg(- 1) of fresh weight. The MBS was collected based on food consumption representing more than 85-95% of annual supply, and were divided into eight food groups. The average concentration of (210)Po in the eight food groups namely leafy vegetables was 2176 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 3), vegetables 55 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 10), roots and tubers 251 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 4), fruits 65 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 5), fish 345 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 2), meat food 117 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 3), milk 20 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 1) and cereal 290 (n = 1) mBq.kg(- 1) of fresh weight, respectively. The annual intake and ingestion dose due to (210)Po was estimated by DDS and MBS in adults, adolescents and children. The overall results showed that the MBS was moderately higher than the DDS in all age groups. Moreover, a DDS approach may even be more realistic, as cooked foodstuffs are used for dietary exposure assessment. The study confirms that the current levels of (210)Po do not pose a significant radiological risk to the local inhabitants.

  10. Radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population exceeding the background as a result of mining and processing of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonchev, L.; Vasilev, G.

    1999-01-01

    The nearly 50-year-long history of researches, mining and processing and closure of uranium industry of researches, mining and processing and the closure of uranium industry sites in the country as well necessitate reassessment of the radiation exposure of the human population in the regions nearby such projects. Proceeding from the available data from expert examination reports the radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population in excess of the background as a result of mining and processing of uranium ores is analysed. The study covers about 135000 persons. The mean value of exposure above the background, attributable to the technologically increased background amounts to 3.04 mSv/a at effective background dose about 2.3 mSv/a. The collective effective dose is 410 mSv/a and represents about 5 per cent of the overall radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population

  11. Effects of reduced natural background radiation on Drosophila melanogaster growth and development as revealed by the FLYINGLOW program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Patrizia; Iorio, Roberto; Iovino, Daniela; Cipressa, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Porrazzo, Antonella; Satta, Luigi; Alesse, Edoardo; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Cenci, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Natural background radiation of Earth and cosmic rays played a relevant role during the evolution of living organisms. However, how chronic low doses of radiation can affect biological processes is still unclear. Previous data have indicated that cells grown at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, L'Aquila) of National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) of Italy, where the dose rate of cosmic rays and neutrons is significantly reduced with respect to the external environment, elicited an impaired response against endogenous damage as compared to cells grown outside LNGS. This suggests that environmental radiation contributes to the development of defense mechanisms at cellular level. To further understand how environmental radiation affects metabolism of living organisms, we have recently launched the FLYINGLOW program that aims at exploiting Drosophila melanogaster as a model for evaluating the effects of low doses/dose rates of radiation at the organismal level. Here, we will present a comparative data set on lifespan, motility and fertility from different Drosophila strains grown in parallel at LNGS and in a reference laboratory at the University of L'Aquila. Our data suggest the reduced radiation environment can influence Drosophila development and, depending on the genetic background, may affect viability for several generations even when flies are moved back to normal background radiation. As flies are considered a valuable model for human biology, our results might shed some light on understanding the effect of low dose radiation also in humans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Variable transformation of calibration equations for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    For radiation dosimetry, dosimetric equipment must be calibrated by using known doses. The calibration is done to determine an equation that relates the absorbed dose to a physically measurable quantity. Since the calibration equation is accompanied by unavoidable uncertainties, the doses estimated with such equations suffer from inherent uncertainties. We presented mathematical formulation of the calibration when the calibration relation is either linear or nonlinear. We also derived equations for the uncertainty of the estimated dose as a function of the uncertainties of the parameters in the equations and the measured physical quantity. We showed that a dosimeter with a linear calibration equation with zero dose-offset enables us to perform relative dosimetry without calibration data. Furthermore, a linear equation justifies useful data manipulations such as rescaling the dose and changing the dose-offset for comparing dose distributions. Considering that some dosimeters exhibit linear response with a large dose-offset or often nonlinear response, we proposed variable transformations of the measured physical quantity, namely, linear- and log-transformation methods. The proposed methods were tested with Kodak X-Omat V radiographic film and BANG (registered) polymer gel dosimeter. We demonstrated that the variable transformation methods could lead to linear equations with zero dose-offset and could reduce the uncertainty of the estimated dose

  13. Characteristics of background radiation behind one-dimensional radiation shielding of high-energy particle beams; Kharakteristiki fonovogo izlucheniya za odnomernymi radiatsionnymi zashchitami puchkov vysokoehnergeticheskikh chastits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbatkov, D V; Kryuchkov, V P

    1994-12-31

    The calculational investigations of component, spatial and energy distributions of background radiation behind radiation shielding of high-energy hadron beams were carried out. The relations between different ingredients of radiation have been obtained. The numerous data of spatial and energy distribution of protons, neutrons, pions and photons in homogeneous and heterogeneous shielding from concrete and iron, presented in the paper, can be used as a reference data. 23 refs., 50 figs.

  14. High repetition rate laser-driven MeV ion acceleration at variable background pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ngirmang, Gregory; Orban, Chris; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John; Frische, Kyle; Chowdhury, Enam; Roquemore, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) can produce highly energetic photons, electrons, and ions with numerous potential real-world applications. Many of these applications will require repeatable, high repetition targets that are suitable for LPI experiments. Liquid targets can meet many of these needs, but they typically require higher chamber pressure than is used for many low repetition rate experiments. The effect of background pressure on the LPI has not been thoroughly studied. With this in mind, the Extreme Light group at the Air Force Research Lab has carried out MeV ion and electron acceleration experiments at kHz repetition rate with background pressures ranging from 30 mTorr to >1 Torr using a submicron ethylene glycol liquid sheet target. We present these results and provide two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results that offer insight on the thresholds for the efficient acceleration of electrons and ions. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under LRIR Project 17RQCOR504 under the management of Dr. Riq Parra and Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier. Support was also provided by the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  15. Case-control study of cancer deaths in high background radiation areas of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Cha Yongru; Zhou Shunyuan

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a case-control study of deaths from liver, stomach and lung cancers in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang County and neighboring control areas (CA). The purpose of this study was to explore the probable relationship between the cancer deaths and the environmental mutation-related factors in the two areas, so that the role of elevated natural radiation in cancer mortality could be properly ascertained. The studied numbers of cases of liver, stomach and lung cancers were 64, 28 and 17 in HBRA, and 75, 36 and 13 in CA, respectively. The proportion of the number of cases to that of the controls was 1:1 for liver cancer and 1:2 for cancers of stomach and lung. The factors studied included pesticide, smoking, alcohol consumption, medical X-ray exposure, diet, and the socioeconomic status, such as occupation, education, economic income, living space etc. The data for this study were collected through interviewing. The data collected were analysed by methods of matched and unmatched studies. The results expressed by odds ratio (OR) show that there is no significant between most factors studied and cancer deaths, although the associations of desths from stomach cancer with drinking water of nonwell source and of lung cancer with alcohol consumption in HBRA, and the associations of liver cancer deaths with occupations involving poisonous and noxious substances, pesticide and alcohol, and of lung cancer with pesticide and lower family income in CA can be found. This study has provided some clues for explaining the difference in cancer mortalities between HBRA and CA

  16. Radiative Transfer in a Translucent Cloud Illuminated by an Extended Background Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Davide; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Robberto, Massimo

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the radiative transfer theory for translucent clouds illuminated by an extended background source. First, we derive a rigorous solution based on the assumption that multiple scatterings produce an isotropic flux. Then we derive a more manageable analytic approximation showing that it nicely matches the results of the rigorous approach. To validate our model, we compare our predictions with accurate laboratory measurements for various types of well-characterized grains, including purely dielectric and strongly absorbing materials representative of astronomical icy and metallic grains, respectively, finding excellent agreement without the need to add free parameters. We use our model to explore the behavior of an astrophysical cloud illuminated by a diffuse source with dust grains having parameters typical of the classic ISM grains of Draine & Lee and protoplanetary disks, with an application to the dark silhouette disk 114-426 in Orion Nebula. We find that the scattering term modifies the transmitted radiation, both in terms of intensity (extinction) and shape (reddening) of the spectral distribution. In particular, for small optical thickness, our results show that scattering makes reddening almost negligible at visible wavelengths. Once the optical thickness increases enough and the probability of scattering events becomes close to or larger than 1, reddening becomes present but is appreciably modified with respect to the standard expression for line-of-sight absorption. Moreover, variations of the grain refractive index, in particular the amount of absorption, also play an important role in changing the shape of the spectral transmission curve, with dielectric grains showing the minimum amount of reddening.

  17. Radiative Transfer in a Translucent Cloud Illuminated by an Extended Background Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Davide [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria Dept. of Science and High Technology Via Valleggio, 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Potenza, Marco A. C. [Universitá degli Studi di Milano Dept. of Physics Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Robberto, Massimo, E-mail: robberto@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the radiative transfer theory for translucent clouds illuminated by an extended background source. First, we derive a rigorous solution based on the assumption that multiple scatterings produce an isotropic flux. Then we derive a more manageable analytic approximation showing that it nicely matches the results of the rigorous approach. To validate our model, we compare our predictions with accurate laboratory measurements for various types of well-characterized grains, including purely dielectric and strongly absorbing materials representative of astronomical icy and metallic grains, respectively, finding excellent agreement without the need to add free parameters. We use our model to explore the behavior of an astrophysical cloud illuminated by a diffuse source with dust grains having parameters typical of the classic ISM grains of Draine and Lee and protoplanetary disks, with an application to the dark silhouette disk 114–426 in Orion Nebula. We find that the scattering term modifies the transmitted radiation, both in terms of intensity (extinction) and shape (reddening) of the spectral distribution. In particular, for small optical thickness, our results show that scattering makes reddening almost negligible at visible wavelengths. Once the optical thickness increases enough and the probability of scattering events becomes close to or larger than 1, reddening becomes present but is appreciably modified with respect to the standard expression for line-of-sight absorption. Moreover, variations of the grain refractive index, in particular the amount of absorption, also play an important role in changing the shape of the spectral transmission curve, with dielectric grains showing the minimum amount of reddening.

  18. Stress induction in the bacteria Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans in response to below-background ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Hugo; Schoderbek, Donald; Dulal, Santosh; Escobar, Gabriela; Wood, Jeffrey; Nelson, Roger; Smith, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The 'Linear no-threshold' (LNT) model predicts that any amount of radiation increases the risk of organisms to accumulate negative effects. Several studies at below background radiation levels (4.5-11.4 nGy h(-1)) show decreased growth rates and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. The purpose of our study is to obtain molecular evidence of a stress response in Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans grown at a gamma dose rate of 0.16 nGy h(-1), about 400 times less than normal background radiation. Bacteria cultures were grown at a dose rate of 0.16 or 71.3 nGy h(-1) gamma irradiation. Total RNA was extracted from samples at early-exponential and stationary phases for the rt-PCR relative quantification (radiation-deprived treatment/background radiation control) of the stress-related genes katB (catalase), recA (recombinase), oxyR (oxidative stress transcriptional regulator), lexA (SOS regulon transcriptional repressor), dnaK (heat shock protein 70) and SOA0154 (putative heavy metal efflux pump). Deprivation of normal levels of radiation caused a reduction in growth of both bacterial species, accompanied by the upregulation of katB, recA, SOA0154 genes in S. oneidensis and the upregulation of dnaK in D. radiodurans. When cells were returned to background radiation levels, growth rates recovered and the stress response dissipated. Our results indicate that below-background levels of radiation inhibited growth and elicited a stress response in two species of bacteria, contrary to the LNT model prediction.

  19. Assessment of background gamma radiation and determination of excess lifetime cancer risk in Sabzevar City, Iran in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Eslami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background gamma radiation levels vary in different locations and depended on many factors such as radiation properties of soil, building materials as well as construction types which human lives on it. People are always exposed to ionizing radiation, which could badly influence their health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the background gamma-ray dose rate and the estimated annual effective dose equivalent and determination of excess lifetime cancer risk in Sabzevar City, Iran. Methods: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the dose rate of background gamma radiation in outdoor an indoor areas, 26 stations were selected using the map of the Sabzevar City. The amount of gamma radiation was measured at 4 months (September to January in 2014 year. The dosimeter used in this study was a survey meter, that is designed for monitoring radiation of x, gamma and beta rays. Results: The obtained results show that there are significant differences between the indoor and outdoor exposures (P> 0.05. We did not observe significant differences between the time of sampling and sampling locations, (P<0.05. The minimum and maximum values of dose rate were found 66±20 nSvh-1 and 198±28 nSvh-1. The annual effective dose for Sabzevar residents was estimated to be 0.85 mSv and also the amount of excess lifetime cancer risk was estimated 3.39×10-3. Conclusion: According to the results, the excess lifetime cancer risk and the annual effective dose for the Sabzavar City residents due to the background gamma radiation was higher than the global average (0.5 mSv. The epidemiological studies have been proposed to evaluate the risk of chronic diseases associated with natural radiation exposure among residents.

  20. Characterizing the spatial variability of local and background concentration signals for air pollution at the neighbourhood scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shairsingh, Kerolyn K.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wang, Jonathan M.; Evans, Greg J.

    2018-06-01

    Vehicle emissions represent a major source of air pollution in urban districts, producing highly variable concentrations of some pollutants within cities. The main goal of this study was to identify a deconvolving method so as to characterize variability in local, neighbourhood and regional background concentration signals. This method was validated by examining how traffic-related and non-traffic-related sources influenced the different signals. Sampling with a mobile monitoring platform was conducted across the Greater Toronto Area over a seven-day period during summer 2015. This mobile monitoring platform was equipped with instruments for measuring a wide range of pollutants at time resolutions of 1 s (ultrafine particles, black carbon) to 20 s (nitric oxide, nitrogen oxides). The monitored neighbourhoods were selected based on their land use categories (e.g. industrial, commercial, parks and residential areas). The high time-resolution data allowed pollutant concentrations to be separated into signals representing background and local concentrations. The background signals were determined using a spline of minimums; local signals were derived by subtracting the background concentration from the total concentration. Our study showed that temporal scales of 500 s and 2400 s were associated with the neighbourhood and regional background signals respectively. The percent contribution of the pollutant concentration that was attributed to local signals was highest for nitric oxide (NO) (37-95%) and lowest for ultrafine particles (9-58%); the ultrafine particles were predominantly regional (32-87%) in origin on these days. Local concentrations showed stronger associations than total concentrations with traffic intensity in a 100 m buffer (ρ:0.21-0.44). The neighbourhood scale signal also showed stronger associations with industrial facilities than the total concentrations. Given that the signals show stronger associations with different land use suggests that

  1. Leisure time physical activity, screen time, social background, and environmental variables in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Jorge; Gomes, Helena; Almeida, Mariana; Ribeiro, José Carlos; Santos, Maria Paula

    2007-08-01

    This study analyzes the relationships between leisure time physical activity (LTPA), sedentary behaviors, socioeconomic status, and perceived environmental variables. The sample comprised 815 girls and 746 boys. In girls, non-LTPA participants reported significantly more screen time. Girls with safety concerns were more likely to be in the non-LTPA group (OR = 0.60) and those who agreed with the importance of aesthetics were more likely to be in the active-LTPA group (OR = 1.59). In girls, an increase of 1 hr of TV watching was a significant predictor of non-LTPA (OR = 0.38). LTPA for girls, but not for boys, seems to be influenced by certain modifiable factors of the built environment, as well as by time watching TV.

  2. Exploring domestic energy-saving: The role of environmental concern and background variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Jan; Ščasný, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate whether residents' environmental concern has any effect on their energy-saving curtailments and efficiency investments. The novelty of the present work lies in the fact that it seeks to investigate this topic in a multi-country setting, exploiting data from nine OECD countries (Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Italy, South Korea, Netherlands, Norway and Sweden), and also in that it employs a latent variable model which allows us to examine the conditions necessary for the results to be comparable across different countries. Novel in this paper is also the focus on the role of environmental concern as a factor of several curtailments and efficiency investments. Our results suggest that people with higher environmental concern are on average more likely to perform energy-saving curtailments and also are more likely to have some energy-efficiency retrofits installed in dwellings. Most of the socio-economic and demographic variables have mixed effects on efficiency investments and curtailments. However, some interesting patterns emerged with respect to the age of respondents, household income, education and gender of respondents, and also the size of household. - Highlights: ► People with higher environmental concern are more likely to perform energy-saving curtailments. ► People with higher environmental concern are more likely to introduce some energy efficiency retrofits. ► Older people are more concerned about environmental problems, invest in efficiency and curtail more. ► Formal level of education does not play prominent role with respect to domestic energy-saving. ► Wealthier people are more likely to invest in energy efficiency but less likely to curtail.

  3. Nutrition status in residents in the high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Shujie; Li Xiaojuan; Sun Quanfu; Wei Lvxin; Gen Jiwu; Wen Cuiju; Tan Huizhen; Zou Jianmin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the current status of nutrition and examine the difference between inhabitants in the high background radiation area (HBRA) and the control area (CA). Methods: Sixty and sixty-five male farmers aged 50 and over were randomly selected from HBRA and CA, respectively. Information on dwelling history, history of disease, medical treatment and X-ray examination were collected by interview. Body height and weight were measured, and BMIs were calculated. Serum levels of total protein, albumin and globulin, triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low- density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), Apo A1 and Apo B were measured. Results: There was difference in BMI distribution between the two groups. Averages of total biochemistry indexes measured were in normal range in the two groups. With adjustment to age distribution, the serum levels of total protein, albumin and triacylglycerol (TG) of residents in CA were higher than those in HBRA; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was higher in HBRA than that in CA. Conclusions: This serum assay of nutrients in HBRA and CA residents confirmed the results obtained from previous surveys. Both HBRA and CA residents have similar nutrition status, residents in CA consumed more animal protein and fat compared with those in HBRA. (authors)

  4. Simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We present two simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy in inflationary models; one method uses a time-dependent transfer function, the other methods uses an approximate gravity-mode function which is a simple combination of the lowest order spherical Bessel functions. We compare the CBR anisotropy tensor multipole spectrum computed using our methods with the previous result of the highly accurate numerical method, the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote method. Our time-dependent transfer function is more accurate than the time-independent transfer function found by Turner, White, and Lindsey; however, we find that the transfer function method is only good for l approx-lt 120. Using our approximate gravity-wave mode function, we obtain much better accuracy; the tensor multipole spectrum we find differs by less than 2% for l approx-lt 50, less than 10% for l approx-lt 120, and less than 20% for l≤300 from the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote result. Our approximate graviton mode function should be quite useful in studying tensor perturbations from inflationary models. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Background radiation and individual dosimetry in the coastal area of Tamil Nadu (India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, N.; Brahmanandhan, G. M.; Yoshida, M.; Takamura, N.; Suyama, A.; Koguchi, Y.; Juto, N.; Raj, Y. L.; Winsley, G.; Selvasekarapandian, S.

    2011-01-01

    South coast of India is known as the high-level background radiation area (HBRA) mainly due to beach sands that contain natural radionuclides as components of the mineral monazite. The rich deposit of monazite is unevenly distributed along the coastal belt of Tamil Nadu and Kerala. An HBRA site that laid in 2x7 m along the sea was found in the beach of Chinnavillai, Tamil Nadu, where the maximum ambient dose equivalent reached as high as 162.7 mSv y -1 . From the sands collected at the HBRA spot, the high-purity germanium semi-conductor detector identified six nuclides of thorium series, four nuclides of uranium series and two nuclides belonging to actinium series. The highest radioactivity observed was 43.7 Bq g -1 of Th-228. The individual dose of five inhabitants in Chinnavillai, as measured by the radiophotoluminescence glass dosimetry system, demonstrated the average dose of 7.17 mSv y -1 ranging from 2.79 to 14.17 mSv y -1 . (authors)

  6. Study of thorium uptake by inhabitants of a high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, D.R.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Juliao, L.M.Q.C.; Lourenco, M.C.; Lauria, D.

    2002-01-01

    Buena, located in the North of Rio de Janeiro, is characterized by its high natural radiation background, due to large deposits of monazite sand. The foodstuffs consumed by the population are basically composed of local products, which contain significant amounts of thorium. The analysis of complete cooked meals have shown an average daily intake of 18 mBq.d -1 of 232 Th and 189 mBq.d -1 of 228 Th. The average urine to feces ratio of 232 Th from samples of volunteers was found equal to 7.5x10 -2 . The comparison of the experimental data with the predicted urine to feces ratios derived using the biokinetic model for thorium described by the ICRP publication 69 and simulating inhalation and ingestion separately, lead to the conclusion that the thorium intake is a combination of inhalation and ingestion. The clearance rate of thorium of monazite in lungs has apparently behaved as Type M compound. Inhalation is the biggest contributor for the committed effective dose due to thorium internal exposure. (author)

  7. A measurement of the medium-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Inman, C. A.; Kowitt, M. S.; Meyer, S. S.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J. L.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Observations from the first flight of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM) are analyzed to place limits on Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). This instrument chops a 30 min beam in a three-position pattern with a throw of +/- 40 min; the resulting data is analyzed in statistically independent single- and double-difference sets. We observe in four spectral channels at 5.6, 9.0, 16.5, and 22.5/cm, allowing the separation of interstellar dust emission from CMBR fluctuations. The dust component is correlated with the IRAS 100 micron map. The CMBR component has two regions where the signature of an unresolved source is seen. Rejecting these two source regions, we obtain a detection of fluctuations which match CMBR in our spectral bands of 0.6 x 10(exp -5) is less than Delta (T)/T is less than 2.2 x 10(exp -5) (90% CL interval) for total rms Gaussian fluctuations with correlation angle 0.5 deg, using the single-difference demodulation. Fore the double difference demodulation, the result is 1.1 x 10(exp -5) is less than Delta(T)/T is less than 3.1 x 10(exp -5) (90% CL interval) at a correlation angle of 0.3 deg.

  8. A limit of the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation on arc minute scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Readhead, A.C.S.; Lawrence, C.R.; Myers, S.T.; Sargent, W.L.W.; Hardebeck, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    After adjustment for observational parameters, various models predict an upper anisotropy limit of microwave background radiation of delta T/T less than 0.00017 at the 95 percent confidence level for uncorrelated patches of sky that are uniform on a 2-arcsec scale. This limit is more than a factor of 2 lower than previous limits on comparable angular scales. Results obtained assuming Gaussian fluctuations place useful constraints on models of galaxy formation based on adiabatic or isocurvature fluctuations in baryonic matter, provided that any reionization of the intergalactic medium occurred at z less than 40. Adiabatic models are ruled out with greater than 95 percent confidence, and isocurvature models with Omega less than 0.8 are inconsistent with the measured limits. Nonbaryonic models with early reionization predict anisotropy levels up to a factor of 3 below the present limit. The lowest predictions come from models with biased galaxy formation, nonbaryonic matter, and early reionization and are as much as a factor of 10 below the present sensitivity limit. The predictions of most popular contending theories of galaxy formation are within reach of the techniques used in this study. 112 refs

  9. Concentrations of radionuclides in cassava growing in high background radiation area and their transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jialin, Huang; Yongru, Zha; Yicao, Guo

    1985-04-01

    The concentrations of several natural radionuclides in common cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) growing in Yangjiang County, a high background radiation area in Guangdong Province, and their uptake from soil and distribution in the plant were investigated. The results show that the concentrations of natural uranium and thorium in cassava root are of the order of 10/sup -6/ g/kg, and those of radium-226, radium-228, lead-210 and polonium-210 are of the order of 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg. The highest level is 9.30 +- 0.30 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg (lead-210), and the lowest is 3.99 +- 0.20 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg (radium-226). The levels of natural uranium, thorium, radium-226 and polonium-210 in cassava are below the limits stipulated by the regulations for food hygiene in China, while the lead-210 level approaches the limit. It is noticeable that the highest level of radium-228 is 7.28 +- 1.03 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg, 10.4 times higher than the limit. The transfer of all the nuclides from soil to different parts of cassava shows a pattern contrary to that of he nuclides in the other regions where uranium-and radium-containing waste water and phosphate fertilizer are used in agriculture.

  10. Concentrations of radionuclides in cassava growing in high background radiation area and their transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jialin; Zha Yongru; Guo Yicao

    1985-01-01

    The concentrations of several natural radionuclides in common cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) growing in Yangjiang County, a high background radiation area in Guangdong Province, and their uptake from soil and distribution in the plant were investigated. The results show that the concentrations of natural uranium and thorium in cassava root are of the order of 10 -6 g/kg, and those of radium-226, radium-228, lead-210 and polonium-210 are of the order of 10 -11 Ci/kg. The highest level is 9.30 +- 0.30 x 10 -11 Ci/kg (lead-210), and the lowest is 3.99 +- 0.20 x 10 -11 Ci/kg (radium-226). The levels of natural uranium, thorium, radium-226 and polonium-210 in cassava are below the limits stipulated by the regulations for food hygiene in China, while the lead-210 level approaches the limit. It is noticeable that the highest level of radium-228 is 7.28 +- 1.03 x 10 -11 Ci/kg, 10.4 times higher than the limit. The transfer of all he nuclides from soil to different parts of cassava shows a pattern contrary to that of he nuclides in the other regions where uranium-and radium-containing waste water and phosphate fertilizer are used in agriculture

  11. The variable colours of the fiddler crab Uca vomeris and their relation to background and predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Jan M; Marshall, Justin; Pix, Waltraud; Vorobyev, Misha; Zeil, Jochen

    2006-10-01

    Colour changes in fiddler crabs have long been noted, but a functional interpretation is still lacking. Here we report that neighbouring populations of Uca vomeris in Australia exhibit different degrees of carapace colours, which range from dull mottled to brilliant blue and white. We determined the spectral characteristics of the mud substratum and of the carapace colours of U. vomeris and found that the mottled colours of crabs are cryptic against this background, while display colours provide strong colour contrast for both birds and crabs, but luminance contrast only for a crab visual system. We tested whether crab populations may become cryptic under the influence of bird predation by counting birds overflying or feeding on differently coloured colonies. Colonies with cryptically coloured crabs indeed experience a much higher level of bird presence, compared to colourful colonies. We show in addition that colourful crab individuals subjected to dummy bird predation do change their body colouration over a matter of days. The crabs thus appear to modify their social signalling system depending on their assessment of predation risk.

  12. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  13. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  14. A statistical, task-based evaluation method for three-dimensional x-ray breast imaging systems using variable-background phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Subok; Jennings, Robert; Liu Haimo; Badano, Aldo; Myers, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    estimates and comparisons. For the assessment of 3D systems, to accurately determine trade offs between image quality and radiation dose, it is critical to incorporate randomness arising from the imaging chain including background variability into system performance calculations.

  15. Variable discrete ordinates method for radiation transfer in plane-parallel semi-transparent media with variable refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvari, S. M. Hosseini

    2017-09-01

    The traditional form of discrete ordinates method is applied to solve the radiative transfer equation in plane-parallel semi-transparent media with variable refractive index through using the variable discrete ordinate directions and the concept of refracted radiative intensity. The refractive index are taken as constant in each control volume, such that the direction cosines of radiative rays remain non-variant through each control volume, and then, the directions of discrete ordinates are changed locally by passing each control volume, according to the Snell's law of refraction. The results are compared by the previous studies in this field. Despite simplicity, the results show that the variable discrete ordinate method has a good accuracy in solving the radiative transfer equation in the semi-transparent media with arbitrary distribution of refractive index.

  16. Shape Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) for Variable Heat Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology leverages the temperature dependent phase change of shape memory alloys (SMAs) to drive the shape of a flexible radiator panel. The opening/closing of the radiator panel, as a function of temperature, passively adapts the radiator's rate of heat rejection in response to a vehicle's needs.

  17. Radioecology teaching: evaluation of the background radiation levels from areas with high concentrations of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R M; Okuno, E; Gomes, P R S; Veiga, R; Estellita, L; Mangia, L; Uzeda, D; Soares, T; Facure, A; Brage, J A P; Mosquera, B; Carvalho, C; Santos, A M A

    2004-01-01

    The study of environmental radioactivity is a topic which is not usually included in physics courses in Brazilian and Latin American universities. Consequently, high-school teachers are not able to show experimentally or discuss with their students the effects of exposure to terrestrial radiation. This paper presents a laboratory experiment in a teaching programme on the physics of ionizing radiation. It is based on the evaluation of the background radiation levels from areas with high concentrations of natural or artificial radionuclides in the soil. A brief analysis of the theory behind the technique and a description of some measurements, including their interpretations, are presented

  18. Real-time airborne gamma-ray background estimation using NASVD with MLE and radiation transport for calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, J.A., E-mail: Jonathan.Kulisek@pnnl.gov; Schweppe, J.E.; Stave, S.C.; Bernacki, B.E.; Jordan, D.V.; Stewart, T.N.; Seifert, C.E.; Kernan, W.J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this challenge, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements without the need for human analyst intervention. The method can be calibrated using radiation transport simulations along with data from previous flights over areas for which the isotopic composition need not be known. Over the examined measured and simulated data sets, the method generated accurate background estimates even in the presence of a strong, {sup 60}Co source. The potential to track large and abrupt changes in background spectral shape and magnitude was demonstrated. The method can be implemented fairly easily in most modern computing languages and environments.

  19. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-01-01

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness ∼24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10 -3 the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches

  20. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable.

  1. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the background radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable

  2. Seasonal variability of carbonaceous aerosols in an urban background area in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, D.; Merico, E.; Dinoi, A.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Contini, D.

    2018-02-01

    Organic (OC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are important components of atmospheric aerosol particles, playing a key role in climate system and potentially affecting human health. There is a lack of data reported for Southern Italy and this work aims to fill this gap, focusing the attention on the long-term trends of OC and EC concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10, and on atmospheric processes and sources influencing seasonal variability. Measurements were taken at the Environmental-Climate Observatory of Lecce (SE Italy, 40°20‧8″N-18°07‧28″E, 37 m a.s.l.), regional station of the Global Atmosphere Watch program (GAW-WMO). Daily PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected between July 2013 and July 2016. In addition, starting in December 2014, simultaneous equivalent Black Carbon (eBC) concentrations in PM10 were measured using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer. A subset of 722 PM samples (361 for each size fraction) was analysed by using a thermo-optical method with a Sunset Laboratory OC/EC analyser, to determine elemental and organic carbon concentrations. The average PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were 28.8 μg/m3 and 17.5 μg/m3. The average OC and EC concentrations in PM10 were 5.4 μg/m3 and 0.8 μg/m3, in PM2.5 these were 4.7 μg/m3 and 0.6 μg/m3. Carbonaceous content was larger during cold season with respect to warm season as well as secondary organic carbon (SOC) that was evaluated using the OC/EC minimum ratio method. SOC was mainly segregated in PM2.5 and represented 53% - 75% of the total OC. A subset of EC data was compared with eBC measurements, showing a good correlation (R2 = 0.80), however, eBC concentrations were higher than EC concentrations of an average factor of 1.95 (+/- 0.55 standard deviation). This could be explained by the presence of a contribution of Brown Carbon (BrC), for example from biomass burning, in eBC measurements. Weekly patterns showed a slight decrease of carbon content during weekends with respect to weekdays especially

  3. Patterns of dose variability in radiation prescription of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Chee-Wai, Cheng; Fein, Douglas A.; Fowble, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Radiation dose distribution varies with breast size, beam energy, beam modifiers (wedge, bolus), and beam weights. A dose variation as low as ± 5% has been observed to change outcome of the radiation treatment. Various reports suggest that radiation dose >50 Gy and dose inhomogeneity >10% have unfavorable cosmesis. It is difficult to estimate treatment outcome and compare data in various protocols due to the variability of dose prescriptions. A retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose prescription and intercomparison of various protocols is presented for the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: In this study, five prescription points were chosen to represent the commonly used protocols for breast irradiation. All these points lie on a line of height, h, of the breast apex from the posterior non-divergent beam edge at half the chest-wall separation,s . The points are located at a distance 1.5 cm, chest wall-lung interface (2-3 cm), (h(3)), (h(2)), and at isocenter. One hundred consecutive patients treated with intact breast irradiation following excisional biopsy were selected. For analysis, treatment planning was carried out without lung correction with a 6 MV beam for all patients, even though some of the patients were treated with high energy beams. Dose distributions were optimized with proper wedges and beam weights to provide a symmetrical dose distribution on the central axis plane. A multivariate analysis of the different parameters, s,h , dose at the hot spot, and doses at various prescription points were carried out. The patients were divided into three groups based on the chest-wall separations: small ( 22.0 cm). The dose distributions related to various prescription points used in different protocols were analyzed for three groups of the patients. Results: The magnitudes of the hot spots varied from +5% to +27% among the patient population, were directly related to s, and appeared to be independent of h. The hot spots

  4. Characterization of gaseous detectors at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility: GEM performance in presence of high background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097588

    Muon detection is an efficient tool to recognize interesting physics events over the high background rate expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The muon systems of the LHC experiments are based on gaseous ionization detectors. In view of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade program, the increasing of background radiation could affect the gaseous detector performance, especially decreasing the efficiency and shortening the lifetime through ageing processes. The effects of charge multiplication, materials and gas composition on the ageing of gaseous detectors have been studied for decades, but the future upgrade of LHC requires additional studies on this topic. At the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++), a radioactive source of cesium-137 with an activity of 14 TBq is used to reproduce reasonably well the expected background radiation at HL-LHC. A muon beam has been made available to study detector performance. The characterization of the beam trigger will be discussed in the present w...

  5. Radiative corrections to the background of μ → e γ decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, A.B.; Kuraev, Eh.A.; Magar, E.; Shajkhatdenov, B.G.; Krehl, O.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative muon decay in the kinematics similar to the neutrinoless decay μ → e γ is considered. Radiative corrections due to one-loop virtual photons and emission of additional soft or hard photons are taken into account. Analytical expressions and numerical estimations are presented

  6. Fluctuations in radiation backgrounds at high redshift and the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbauer, Lauren Nicole

    The first stars to light up our universe are as yet unseen, but there have been many attempts to elucidate their properties. The characteristics of these stars (`Population/Pop III' stars) that we do know lie mostly within theory; they formed out of metal-free hydrogen and helium gas contained in dark matter minihalos at redshifts z 20-30. The extent to which Pop III star formation reached into later times is unknown. Current and near future instruments are incapable of resolving individual Pop III stars. Consequently, astronomers must devise creative means with which to indirectly predict and measure and their properties. In this thesis, we will investigate a few of those means. We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos that is necessary for star formation. By using a variation of the `halo model', which describes the spatial distribution and clustering of halos, we can efficiently generate power spectra for these backgrounds. Spatial fluctuations in the LW and (indirectly) the Lyman-alpha BG can tell us about the transition from primordial star formation to a more metal-enriched mode that marks the beginning of the second generation of stars in our Universe. The Near Infrared Background (NIRB) has for some time been considered a potential tool with which to indirectly observe the first stars. Ultraviolet (UV) emission from these stars is redshifted into the NIR band, making the NIRB amenable for hunting Pop III stellar signatures. There have been several measurements of the NIRB and subsequent theoretical studies attempting to explain them in recent years. Though controversial, residual levels of the mean NIRB intensity and anisotropies have been

  7. Unruh effect in a real scalar field with the Higgs potential on a dynamically variable background space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Shingo [Naresuan University, The Institute for Fundamental Study ' ' The Tah Poe Academia Institute' ' , Phitsanulok (Thailand)

    2015-09-15

    It is predicted that an accelerating electron performs a Brownian motion in the inertial frame. This Brownian motion in the inertial frame has its roots in the interaction with the thermal excitation given by the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. If such a prediction is possible, correspondingly we propose a prediction in this study that the thermal radiation is emitted in the inertial frame from an electron heated due to the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. The point in our prediction is, although the Unruh effect is limited in the accelerating frame, as well as that the Brownian motion rooted in the Unruh effect appears in the inertial frame, the heat of the particle appears in the inertial frame. Based on such a prediction in this paper, we investigate phenomena in the neighborhood of an accelerating electron in the inertial frame. The model we consider is the four-dimensional Klein-Gordon real scalar field model with the Higgs potential term at the finite temperature identified with the Unruh temperature on the de Sitter space-time. We calculate the one-loop effective potential in the inertial frame with the corrections by the thermal radiation rooted in the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. In this calculation, we take into account that the background space-time is deformed due to the field theory's corrected one-loop effective potential. Based on such an analysis, we illustrate the restoration of the spontaneous symmetry breaking and the dynamical variation of the background space-time, and we examine the accelerating particle's world-line and the amount of the energy corresponding to the change of the acceleration. (orig.)

  8. Unruh effect in a real scalar field with the Higgs potential on a dynamically variable background space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    It is predicted that an accelerating electron performs a Brownian motion in the inertial frame. This Brownian motion in the inertial frame has its roots in the interaction with the thermal excitation given by the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. If such a prediction is possible, correspondingly we propose a prediction in this study that the thermal radiation is emitted in the inertial frame from an electron heated due to the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. The point in our prediction is, although the Unruh effect is limited in the accelerating frame, as well as that the Brownian motion rooted in the Unruh effect appears in the inertial frame, the heat of the particle appears in the inertial frame. Based on such a prediction in this paper, we investigate phenomena in the neighborhood of an accelerating electron in the inertial frame. The model we consider is the four-dimensional Klein-Gordon real scalar field model with the Higgs potential term at the finite temperature identified with the Unruh temperature on the de Sitter space-time. We calculate the one-loop effective potential in the inertial frame with the corrections by the thermal radiation rooted in the Unruh effect in the accelerating frame. In this calculation, we take into account that the background space-time is deformed due to the field theory's corrected one-loop effective potential. Based on such an analysis, we illustrate the restoration of the spontaneous symmetry breaking and the dynamical variation of the background space-time, and we examine the accelerating particle's world-line and the amount of the energy corresponding to the change of the acceleration. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of impact of urbanisation on background radiation exposure and human health risk estimation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Hassan, W M S W; Lee, M H; Izham, A; Said, M N; Wagiran, H; Heryanshah, A

    2017-07-01

    Kuala Lumpur has been undergoing rapid urbanisation process, mainly in infrastructure development. The opening of new township and residential in former tin mining areas, particularly in the heavy mineral- or tin-bearing alluvial soil in Kuala Lumpur, is a contentious subject in land-use regulation. Construction practices, i.e. reclamation and dredging in these areas are potential to enhance the radioactivity levels of soil and subsequently, increase the existing background gamma radiation levels. This situation is worsened with the utilisation of tin tailings as construction materials apart from unavoidable soil pollutions due to naturally occurring radioactive materials in construction materials, e.g. granitic aggregate, cement and red clay brick. This study was conducted to assess the urbanisation impacts on background gamma radiation in Kuala Lumpur. The study found that the mean value of measured dose rate was 251±6nGyh -1 (156-392nGyh -1 ) and 4 times higher than the world average value. High radioactivity levels of 238 U (95±12Bqkg -1 ), 232 Th (191±23Bqkg -1 ,) and 40 K (727±130Bqkg -1 ) in soil were identified as the major source of high radiation exposure. Based on statistical ANOVA, t-test, and analyses of cumulative probability distribution, this study has statistically verified the dose enhancements in the background radiation. The effective dose was estimated to be 0.31±0.01mSvy -1 per man. The recommended ICRP reference level (1-20mSvy -1 ) is applicable to the involved existing exposure situation in this study. The estimated effective dose in this study is lower than the ICRP reference level and too low to cause deterministic radiation effects. Nevertheless based on estimations of lifetime radiation exposure risks, this study found that there was small probability for individual in Kuala Lumpur being diagnosed with cancer and dying of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fabrication and performance analysis of MEMS-based Variable Emissivity Radiator for Space Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changwook; Oh, Hyung-Ung; Kim, Taegyu

    2014-01-01

    All Louver was typically representative as the thermal control device. The louver was not suitable to be applied to small satellite, because it has the disadvantage of increase in weight and volume. So MEMS-based variable radiator was developed to support the disadvantage of the louver MEMS-based variable emissivity radiator was designed for satellite thermal control. Because of its immediate response and low power consumption. Also MEMS- based variable emissivity radiator has been made smaller by using MEMS process, it could be solved the problem of the increase in weight and volume, and it has a high reliability and immediate response by using electrical control. In this study, operation validation of the MEMS radiator had been carried out, resulting that emissivity could be controlled. Numerical model was also designed to predict the thermal control performance of MEMS-based variable emissivity radiator

  11. Environmental radiation monitoring results for the period 1984-95 in and around Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.S.; Khasnabis, B.K.; Bar, M.

    1997-04-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron (VEC) located at Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta is being used for accelerating charged particles and does not contribute to any radioactive releases to the environment. However, it being a nuclear facility, the area surrounding the facility is being routinely monitored for background radiation exposure using thermoluminescent dosimeters. This report gives the summary of the results of the survey carried out over a period of 12 years, 1984-1995. It is observed that the general radiation background in areas far removed from the facility (up to 25 km) is higher than that existing within the boundaries of VEC centre (160±21 mR/year as against 121±20 mR/year)

  12. Remedial action in areas of enhanced natural background radiation levels (with particular emphasis in areas with mineral sand mining residues)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    In areas where individuals may receive doses from natural background sources which are higher than those received in areas of normal background radiation, it may be considered desirable that some remedial action be taken to reduce those doses. Contributions to these higher doses may be through high gamma ray fields from the ground or from the use of local building materials, the intake of food or water derived from the areas or of food covered with dust from the areas, the ingestion of dirt and the inhalation of dust, and radon or thoron. Guidelines for remedial action in areas where residues from mineral sand mining and processing have been deposited are given

  13. Cellular and molecular effects of natural background radiation on human population in Kerala coast, India: from chromosome ends to transcriptome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Jain, Vinay; Saini, Divyalakshmi; Ghosh, Anu; Seshadri, M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Medical Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Sandhya Kiran, P. [Ocimum Biosolutions India Limited, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Venous blood samples of 32 male volunteers (age group 35-45 years) from different background dose groups. Factors like life style, smoking, drinking alcohol, chewing, previous exposure to radiation and medical history etc. were properly recorded. Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix FlGU133 plus 2.0 chip and the expression level of 54,675 genes were obtained for each sample. In order to assess the effect of chronic natural background radiation we have categorized our samples into four groups. To derive genes that are differentially regulated between these four groups, 'Exposed group versus Control' was set up and the linear model was fitted to each gene using the expression data on samples. A fold change threshold of 1.3, 1.5 and 2.0 and an adjusted p-value threshold of 0.05 was set in the study. Analysis was done using 'limma' library of R and Genowiz.

  14. Cellular and molecular effects of natural background radiation on human population in Kerala coast, India: from chromosome ends to transcriptome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Jain, Vinay; Saini, Divyalakshmi; Ghosh, Anu; Seshadri, M.; Sandhya Kiran, P.

    2010-01-01

    Venous blood samples of 32 male volunteers (age group 35-45 years) from different background dose groups. Factors like life style, smoking, drinking alcohol, chewing, previous exposure to radiation and medical history etc. were properly recorded. Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix FlGU133 plus 2.0 chip and the expression level of 54,675 genes were obtained for each sample. In order to assess the effect of chronic natural background radiation we have categorized our samples into four groups. To derive genes that are differentially regulated between these four groups, 'Exposed group versus Control' was set up and the linear model was fitted to each gene using the expression data on samples. A fold change threshold of 1.3, 1.5 and 2.0 and an adjusted p-value threshold of 0.05 was set in the study. Analysis was done using 'limma' library of R and Genowiz

  15. Non-cancer disease mortality among inhabitants in the high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China (1979-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quanfu; Akiba, Suminori; Zou Jianming

    2008-01-01

    Much is still unknown about the health effects of low-level radiation on human health, particularly on the risk of non-cancer diseases. A review by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) scientists has concluded that the association of atomic-bomb radiation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is almost certain since the relationship was shown by incidence and prevalence studies of various endpoints of atherosclerosis. In addition to the studies of atomic bomb survivors, the association of CVD with radiation exposure was observed in several other studies, including the follow-up study of patients treated for Hodgkin lymphoma, ankylosing spondilitis, peptic ulcer and scoliosis as well as nuclear workers. The inhabitants in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China receive the external radiation doses of 1.33 mSv in excess every year, mainly from exposure to terrestrial gamma ray, when compared to the residents in the neighboring control area (CA). Our most recent analysis of cancer mortality among residents in the HBRA and the CA showed no evident difference between the two areas. It should be of note that the crude cancer mortality rate in the study population was 60/100,000 person-years, which is much lower than cancer mortality in developed countries. On the other hand, non cancer deaths accounted for 90% of all deaths. In this report, we present the results of mortality analysis for non-cancer diseases during the period 1979-1998. (author)

  16. Temporal variability of the bioaerosol background at a subway station: concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar; Blatny, Janet Martha

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 10(3) CFU m(-3) and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents.

  17. Temporal Variability of the Bioaerosol Background at a Subway Station: Concentration Level, Size Distribution, and Diversity of Airborne Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 103 CFU m−3 and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents. PMID:24162566

  18. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey S; Cleaver, Gerald B

    2017-10-01

    In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n) random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established.

  19. Social economical and psychological considerations in conveying potential radiation risks from high level natural background radiation to the residents of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ghiassi-nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    X-rays and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago but the need for protection against very low doses of ionizing radiation and especially different levels of natural radiation is still among the most controversial matters in radiobiology and radiation protection. According to formal reports, some areas in Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, are the inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation studied so far. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy y''-1 and the highest recorded external gamma dose rates are about 130 mGy y''-1. We have previously shown that in high background radiation areas (HBRAs), cultured human lymphocytes of the inhabitants whose cumulative radiation doses were as much as 170 times more than those of a control area when subjected to 1.5 Gy challenge dose,were significantly more radioresistant compared to the residents of the control area (Mortazavi et al. 2002a,b, Mortazavi and Karam 2002, Ghiassi-Najed et al. 2002). The people who live in these areas are usually unaware of the high levels of natural radiation in their environment. Studies performed on the residents of these areas have indicated that the effective dose of the inhabitants, in some cases, is much higher than the dose limits for occupational irradiation. Considering recent policies of ICRP regarding suggesting dose limits for exposure to natural sources of ionizing including radon, it seems that the inhabitants should become familiar with the possible risks of the exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. They should also realize that studies performed over the past years have indicated no detrimental effect. On the other hand, according to ICRP suggestions and considering the experiences in other countries, especially evacuation of the residents of contaminated areas after Chernobyl accident, setting any radiation protection regulation for the inhabitants without considering social, economic and

  20. Historical background and overview of epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Recognition of the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation dates from the early part of this century, when an increased frequency of skin cancer and leukemia was first reported in radiologists. In the interim, systematic epidemiological studies have disclosed additional carcinogenic effects in radiation workers, A-bomb survivors, patients exposed to diagnostic or therapeutic radiation, and other groups. The studies have provided sufficient data on dose-incidence relationships, the distribution of cancer in relation to age at irradiation and time after exposure, and organ-variations in susceptibility to enable attempts at quantitative assessment of the risks of low-level irradiation. Such assessments, although tentative and controversial, have exerted an important influence on developments in radiological protection

  1. Hybrid radiation background monitoring in operational control and forecasting of environmental contamination by nuclear power station discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermeev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.A.; Makarov, Y.A.; Matueev, V.V.; Zhernov, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid developments in nuclear power have stimulated research on monitoring and forecasting environmental radiation pollution (ERP), and in particular the amounts, compositions, and distributions of radionuclides in the environment. A conceptual model is presented for hybrid environmental radiation pollution monitoring. When there is an emergency, the model operates in a fashion most closely corresponding to the actual meteorological conditions, and the ERP data given by the model enable one to distinguish changes due to the man-made component from random fluctuations in the natural background. The measurement system in general includes mobile and stationary data-acquisition facilities linked by wire or radio to the central point. The system also accumulates and stores data on the radiation environment, which are edited on the basis of radioactive, chemical, and other transformations. The purpose of hybrid monitoring is ultimately to analyze trends in order to detect elevated discharges and thus to output data to the regional monitoring system

  2. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  3. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  4. Biological effects of high level natural background radiation on human population residing in Kerala coast, South West India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    The populations residing in Kerala coast are exposed to elevated natural background radiation since many generations. Extensive studies conducted by Bio-Medical group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center have generated wealth of data from this area dealing with epidemiology, monitoring the newborns for malformations, Health Audit Survey, Dosimetry and biological studies using cytogenetic and molecular biology techniques. Our studies on congenital malformations and chromosomal anomalies in children born to parents residing in High Level Natural Radiation Areas in Kerala have not shown any significant difference from normal radiation areas. Screening of over 1,25,000 consecutively born children showed an incidence rate which is comparable in both areas. Other factors such as consanguinity, maternal age and gravida status are more significant contributors than radiation dose to the risk for having malformation in child. Radiation prevalent in the HLNRA is in the dose range of above 1.5 to about 50 mGy per year which translates to doses in the range of nGy per hour. This clearly indicate the number of cells exposed to radiations will be one in few thousand or ten thousands. This throws up challenges in our capability to investigate the effects of radiation on cells. It has become imperative to develop and exploit techniques which will detect responses in single cells and would be able screen large number of cells at a time. Developments in cell biology and molecular biology are now giving us these capabilities. Use of flowcytometer and next generation sequencing would enable us to address many of these questions and provide meaningful approaches to understand the effects of such low dose radiation

  5. Investigation of natural radiation background and assessment of its population dose in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the nationwide survey in 1984-1988 of environmental external radiation by integrating measurements, and the assessment of population doses from obtained data. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) model ETLD-80 with CaSO 4 : Dy were used. The survey was conducted in two different scales. In general survey, TLDs were distributed in whole area of every investigated provinces; and in local survey, one city and one village within each province were selected and investigated for the purpose of comparison of the natural radiation levels between the rural and urban areas. A marked characteristics was noted that the level of natural environmental radiation in south China seems to be higher than that in north China. It may be attributed to the geological difference in both parts. The annual individual average and collective effective dose equivalents to population of China from natural environmental radiation were estimated to be 780 μSv and 8.1 x 10 5 man. Sv, based on the model recommended by UNSCEAR 1988 Report

  6. The Very High Background Radiation Area in Ramsar, Iran: Public Health Risk or Signal for a Regulatory Paradigm Shift?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, P. Andrew [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Mortazavi, S.M. Javad [Rafsanjan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Medical Physics Dept.

    2001-07-01

    Ramsar, a city on the Caspian Sea in northern Iran hosts the highest measured natural background radiation levels in the world. These are due to the local geology and hydrogeology and, in some places, deliver radiation doses far in excess of those recommended for radiation workers. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy/yr and the highest recorded doses are about 260 mGy/yr. These high radiation levels are due to the deposition of {sup 226}Ra in local rocks and, because these rocks are used in the construction of many local houses, interior radiation levels are often similar to those found outside. The presence of areas such as Ramsar raises an interesting public health policy question: Is it necessary to relocate the inhabitants to areas of lower natural background radiation levels in the interests of public health? According to the linear, no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, there is no doubt that relocating the population of Ramsar will result in a reduction in cancer incidence. Therefore, under any reasonable policy based on the LNT hypothesis, the public health is best served by relocating many of Ramsar's inhabitants to other areas along the Caspian Sea. At present, there is no reliable epidemiological data on cancer incidence among the inhabitants of Ramsar's high background radiation areas (HBRAs), but local physicians feel that local cancer incidence rates are lower than in neighboring cities. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that there is a statistically significant radio adaptation in the inhabitants of Ramsar. Interestingly, it seems that the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the lymphocytes of the inhabitants of Ramsar is no higher than the control areas. This important finding suggests that the cancer rate in Ramsar should be no higher than in other comparable parts of Iran. In other HBRAs such as Yangjiang, China it has been reported that mortality from all cancers and those from

  7. The Very High Background Radiation Area in Ramsar, Iran: Public Health Risk or Signal for a Regulatory Paradigm Shift?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, P. Andrew; Mortazavi, S.M. Javad

    2001-01-01

    Ramsar, a city on the Caspian Sea in northern Iran hosts the highest measured natural background radiation levels in the world. These are due to the local geology and hydrogeology and, in some places, deliver radiation doses far in excess of those recommended for radiation workers. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy/yr and the highest recorded doses are about 260 mGy/yr. These high radiation levels are due to the deposition of 226 Ra in local rocks and, because these rocks are used in the construction of many local houses, interior radiation levels are often similar to those found outside. The presence of areas such as Ramsar raises an interesting public health policy question: Is it necessary to relocate the inhabitants to areas of lower natural background radiation levels in the interests of public health? According to the linear, no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, there is no doubt that relocating the population of Ramsar will result in a reduction in cancer incidence. Therefore, under any reasonable policy based on the LNT hypothesis, the public health is best served by relocating many of Ramsar's inhabitants to other areas along the Caspian Sea. At present, there is no reliable epidemiological data on cancer incidence among the inhabitants of Ramsar's high background radiation areas (HBRAs), but local physicians feel that local cancer incidence rates are lower than in neighboring cities. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that there is a statistically significant radio adaptation in the inhabitants of Ramsar. Interestingly, it seems that the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the lymphocytes of the inhabitants of Ramsar is no higher than the control areas. This important finding suggests that the cancer rate in Ramsar should be no higher than in other comparable parts of Iran. In other HBRAs such as Yangjiang, China it has been reported that mortality from all cancers and those from leukemia, breast and

  8. Radiation levels at the boundaries of the Frascati center and natural background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucci, F.; Pelliccioni, M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of dosimetric controls carried out with thermoluminescent dosimeters along the boundaries of the Frascati Center since 1969 are presented. The average yearly exposure observed during the period 1969-1974 is 206mR/y, while no significant tendency is evident. In particular neither effects of accelerator shutdowns nor seasonal ones are noticed. The measurements at the boundary are also compared with measurements of natural background carried out near Frascati and in Rome, Thus we can estimate that the machine contribution to the total dose along the boundaries is equal to a small fraction of either the natural background or the general population dose limit [fr

  9. Probing reionization with the cross-power spectrum of 21 cm and near-infrared radiation backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcmao@bao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-08-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross-power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then, the intensity of the NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find that the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolute value of the cross-power spectrum is |Δ{sub 21,NIR}{sup 2}|∼10{sup −4} mK nW m{sup –2} sr{sup –1}, reached at ℓ ∼ 1000 when the mean fraction of ionized hydrogen is x-bar{sub i}∼0.9. We find that Square Kilometer Array can measure the 21 cm-NIR cross-power spectrum in conjunction with mild extensions to the existing CIBER survey, provided that the integration time independently adds up to 1000 and 1 hr for 21 cm and NIR observations, and that the sky coverage fraction of the CIBER survey is extended from 4 × 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Measuring the cross-correlation signal as a function of redshift provides valuable information on reionization and helps confirm the origin of the 'missing' NIR background.

  10. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige [Kinki Univ., Atomic Energy Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tatsumi, Kusuo [Kinki Univ., Life Science Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan); Yuan Yongling [Labor Hygiene Institute of Hunan Prov. (China); Wei Luxin [Laboratory of Industorial Hygiene, Ministry of Health (China)

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. (2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  11. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. 2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  12. Moessbauer radiation dynamical diffraction in crystals being subjected to the action of external variable fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskii, V.G.; Skadorov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    A dynamical theory is developed of the Moessbauer radiation diffraction by crystals being subjected to an variable external field action. Equations describing the dynamical diffraction by nonstationary crystals are obtained. It is shown that the resonant interaction between Moessbauer radiation and shift field induced in the crystal by a variable external field giving rise to an effective conversion of the incident wave into a wave with changed frequency. (author)

  13. HYPERION NET - a distributed measurement system for monitoring background ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saponjic, Dj.; Zigic, A.; Arandjelovic, V.

    2003-01-01

    The distributed measurement system - HYPERION NET, based on the concept of FieldBus technology, has been developed, implemented, and tested as a pilot project, the first WEB enabled on-line networked ionizing radiation monitoring and measurement system. The Net has layered the structure, tree topology, and is based on the Internet infrastructure and TCP/IP communication protocol. The Net's core element is an intelligent GM transmitter, based on GM tube, used for measuring the absorbed dose in air, in the range of 0.087 to 720 μGy/h. The transmitter makes use of an advanced count rate measurement algorithm capable of suppressing the statistical fluctuations of the measured quantity, which significantly improves its measurement performance mailing it suitable for environmental radiation measurements. (author)

  14. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  15. Radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT examinations: how to manage the radiation dose variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Dore, Antonio; Aringhieri, Giacomo; Caramella, Davide

    2018-03-01

    To assess the variability of radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT (computed tomography) examinations and to evaluate the influence of different scan parameters on the overall radiation dose. A series of 34 patients (12 men and 22 women with a median age of 34.4 years) with lymphoma, after the initial staging CT underwent repeat follow-up CT examinations. For each patient and each repeat examination, age, sex, use of AEC system (Automated Exposure Control, i.e. current modulation), scan length, kV value, number of acquired scans (i.e. number of phases), abdominal size diameter and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. The radiation dose of just one venous phase was singled out from the DLP of the entire examination. All scan data were retrieved by our PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) by means of a dose monitoring software. Among the variables we considered, no significant difference of radiation dose was observed among patients of different ages nor concerning tube voltage. On the contrary the dose delivered to the patients varied depending on sex, scan length and usage of AEC. No significant difference was observed depending on the behaviour of technologists, while radiologists' choices had indirectly an impact on the radiation dose due to the different number of scans requested by each of them. Our results demonstrate that patients affected by lymphoma who undergo repeat whole body CT scanning may receive unnecessary overexposure. We quantified and analyzed the most relevant variables in order to provide a useful tool to manage properly CT dose variability, estimating the amount of additional radiation dose for every single significant variable. Additional scans, incorrect scan length and incorrect usage of AEC system are the most relevant cause of patient radiation exposure.

  16. Seasonal and interannual variability of solar radiation at Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity landing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Martinez, G.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.; Martin, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we characterize the radiative environment at the landing sites of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions. We use opacity values obtained at the surface from direct imaging of the Sun and our radiative transfer model COMIMART to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of the daily irradiation at the MER and MSL landing sites. In addition, we analyze the behavior of the direct and diffuse components of the solar radiation at these landing sites. (Author)

  17. Inclusion of Radiation Environment Variability in Total Dose Hardness Assurance Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Phan, A.; McClure, S. S.; Ladbury, R. L.; Pellish, J. A.; Campola, M. J.; LaBel, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to parts categorization for total dose hardness assurance methods. It is shown that it can have a significant impact. A modified approach is developed that uses current environment models more consistently and replaces the radiation design margin concept with one of failure probability during a mission.

  18. A prospective study on congenital malformations in the high background radiation areas of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaikrishan, G.; Sudheer, K.R.; Andrews, V.J.; Koya, P.K.M.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hospital based epidemiological study on congenital anomalies carried out in the high level natural radiation (HLNR) areas of southern Kerala since 1995 to assess the hereditary effects, if any, of HLNR is reported here. Thorium, Uranium to a limited extent, and corresponding decay products in the natural deposits of monazite sand is the source of radiation. HLNR and normal level natural radiation (NLNR) areas are interwoven due to the patchy and non-uniform distribution of monazite in the region. Areas with a mean dose of more than 1.5 mGy/year were treated as HLNR areas and those with 1.5 mGy/year or less, as NLNR. High population density, limited migration, ethnic diversity, good literacy, health awareness, institutionalized births and acceptance of small family norm are some of the key features of the population. The comparison of individual malformation in HLNR and NLNR areas are presented and efforts are on to accrue sufficient sample size to enable the comparison

  19. Variability of individual normal tissue radiation sensitivity. An international empirical evaluation of endogenous and exogenous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J.S.; Kumpf, L.; Kimmig, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The variability of normal-tissue response is of major concern for radiation therapy. Multiple endogenous and exogenous factors are qualitatively known to alter the acute and late tissue response. Which of them are regarded most important by the European radiation oncologists and what is, empirically, their quantitative influence on the acute or late tissue tolerance? Methods: In August 1997, we sent a questionnaire to 255 European radiation oncology departments. Among others, the questionnaire asked for endogenous and exogenous factors modifying the tissue response to radiation therapy and their quantitative influence on the acute and late radiation morbidity (TD5/5). Fifty-five questionnaires (21.5%) were answered. Results: Empirically, the most important endogenous factors to modify the acute tissue tolerance are (a) metabolic/other diseases with macro- or microangiopathia (17 answers [a]/32% mean decrease of tissue tolerance), (b) collagen diseases (9 a/37%) and (c) immune diseases (5 a/53%). As endogenous response modifiers for the TD5/5 are recognized (a) metabolic or other diseases leading to marcro- or microangiopathia (15 a/31%), (b) collagen diseases (11 a/38%) and (c) immune diseases (2 a/50%). Inflammations from any reason are assumed to alter the acute tissue tolerance by (6 a/26%) and the TD5/5 by (10 a/24%). Exogenous modifiers of the acute tissue response mentioned are (a) smoking (34 a/44%), (b) alcohol (23 a/45%), (c) nutrition/diets (16 a/45%), (d) hygiene (9 a/26%) and (e) medical therapies (10 a/37%). Exogenous factors assumed to influence the TD5/5 are (a) smoking (22 a/40%), (b) alcohol (15 a/38%), (c) nutrition/diets (9 a/48%), (d) hygiene (5 a/34%) and (e) medical therapies (10 a/30%). Conclusions: Exogenous factors are regarded more important by number and extent on the acute and late tissue response than endogenous modifiers. Both may have an important influence on the individual expression of normal tissue response. (orig

  20. Sensitivity to Antibiotics of Bacteria Exposed to Gamma Radiation Emitted from Hot Soils of the High Background Radiation Areas of Ramsar, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Javad Mortazavi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past several years our laboratories have investigated different aspects of the challenging issue of the alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics induced by physical stresses. Objective: To explore the bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics in samples of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae after exposure to gamma radiation emitted from the soil samples taken from the high background radiation areas of Ramsar, northern Iran. Methods: Standard Kirby-Bauer test, which evaluates the size of the zone of inhibition as an indicator of the susceptibility of different bacteria to antibiotics, was used in this study. Results: The maximum alteration of the diameter of inhibition zone was found for K. pneumoniae when tested for ciprofloxacin. In this case, the mean diameter of no growth zone in non-irradiated control samples of K. pneumoniae was 20.3 (SD 0.6 mm; it was 14.7 (SD 0.6 mm in irradiated samples. On the other hand, the minimum changes in the diameter of inhibition zone were found for S. typhimurium and S. aureus when these bacteria were tested for nitrofurantoin and cephalexin, respectively. Conclusion: Gamma rays were capable of making significant alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. It can be hypothesized that high levels of natural background radiation can induce adaptive phenomena that help microorganisms better cope with lethal effects of antibiotics.

  1. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deva Jayanthi, D., E-mail: d.devajayanthi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Women' s Christian College, Nagercoil 629001 (India); Maniyan, C.G. [Environmental Assessment Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Perumal, S. [Department of Physics and Research Centre, S.T.Hindu College, Nagercoil 629002 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: {yields} The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. {yields} The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. {yields} As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. {yields} Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. {yields} These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  2. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deva Jayanthi, D.; Maniyan, C.G.; Perumal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: → The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. → The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. → As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. → Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. → These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  3. Non-Gaussian signatures in the cosmic background radiation from warm inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Heavens, A.F.; Berera, A.; Matarrese, S.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the bispectrum of the gravitational field fluctuations generated during warm inflation, where dissipation of the vacuum potential during inflation is the mechanism for structure formation. The bispectrum is nonzero because of the self-interaction of the scalar field. We compare the predictions with those of standard, or 'supercooled', inflationary models, and consider the detectability of these levels of non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background. We find that the levels of non-Gaussianity for warm and supercooled inflation are comparable, and overridden by the contribution to the bispectrum due to other physical effects. We also conclude that the resulting bispectrum values will be undetectable in the cosmic microwave background for both the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites

  4. Variability of sub-micrometer particle number size distributions and concentrations in the Western Mediterranean regional background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cusack

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the daily and seasonal variability of particle number size distributions and concentrations, performed at the Montseny (MSY regional background station in the western Mediterranean from October 2010 to June 2011. Particle number concentrations at MSY were shown to be within range of various other sites across Europe reported in literature, but the seasonality of the particle number size distributions revealed significant differences. The Aitken mode is the dominant particle mode at MSY, with arithmetic mean concentrations of 1698 cm3, followed by the accumulation mode (877 cm−3 and the nucleation mode (246 cm−3. Concentrations showed a strong seasonal variability with large increases in particle number concentrations observed from the colder to warmer months. The modality of median size distributions was typically bimodal, except under polluted conditions when the size distribution was unimodal. During the colder months, the daily variation of particle number size distributions are strongly influenced by a diurnal breeze system, whereby the Aitken and accumulation modes vary similarly to PM1 and BC mass concentrations, with nocturnal minima and sharp day-time increases owing to the development of a diurnal mountain breeze. Under clean air conditions, high levels of nucleation and lower Aitken mode concentrations were measured, highlighting the importance of new particle formation as a source of particles in the absence of a significant condensation sink. During the warmer months, nucleation mode concentrations were observed to be relatively elevated both under polluted and clean conditions due to increased photochemical reactions, with enhanced subsequent growth owing to elevated concentrations of condensable organic vapours produced from biogenic volatile organic compounds, indicating that nucleation at MSY does not exclusively occur under clean air conditions. Finally, mixing of air masses between polluted and non

  5. The influence of non-radiation induced ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes for dosimetry in the radiotherapy dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Lettau, C.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The yield of radicals induced by ionizing radiation in the amino acid alanine and its quantification by ESR spectroscopy has proven excellent reproducibility. Those radicals trapped in the crystal lattice are prevented from recombination providing a thermally very stable system. This allows alanine to be applied as a transfer dosemeter. With paraffin-alanine probes ESR dosimetry can be performed with a standard deviation of ± 0.5% in the dose range from 20 Gy up to 100 kGy. At 1 Gy dose level the error increases to ± 6%. This dose level is three orders of magnitude higher than the calculated detection threshold for alanine with modern X-band ESR spectrometers. It was found that the poor standard deviation at the 1 Gy dose level, is not mainly produced by a bad signal-to-noise ratio but by a variable non-radiation induced ESR background signal from the alanine probes within a batch. In the present study the main sources of error for ESR dosimetry in the dose range below 20 Gy were analyzed. The influences of the production process, UV light and humidity upon the ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes were investigated. Measurements are shown indicating a second stable structure of the alanine radical at room temperature. (author)

  6. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  7. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  8. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with Variable-delay Polarization Modulators for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; CLASS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The search for inflationary primordial gravitational waves and the optical depth to reionization, both through their imprint on the large angular scale correlations in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), has created the need for high sensitivity measurements of polarization across large fractions of the sky at millimeter wavelengths. These measurements are subjected to instrumental and atmospheric 1/f noise, which has motivated the development of polarization modulators to facilitate the rejection of these large systematic effects.Variable-delay polarization modulators (VPMs) are used in the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) telescopes as the first element in the optical chain to rapidly modulate the incoming polarization. VPMs consist of a linearly polarizing wire grid in front of a moveable flat mirror; varying the distance between the grid and the mirror produces a changing phase shift between polarization states parallel and perpendicular to the grid which modulates Stokes U (linear polarization at 45°) and Stokes V (circular polarization). The reflective and scalable nature of the VPM enables its placement as the first optical element in a reflecting telescope. This simultaneously allows a lock-in style polarization measurement and the separation of sky polarization from any instrumental polarization farther along in the optical chain.The Q-Band CLASS VPM was the first VPM to begin observing the CMB full time in 2016. I will be presenting its design and characterization as well as demonstrating how modulating polarization significantly rejects atmospheric and instrumental long time scale noise.

  9. Excess relative risk of solid cancer mortality after prolonged exposure to naturally occurring high background radiation in Yangjiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Quanfu; Tao Zufan [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China). Lab. of Industrial Hygiene; Akiba, Suminori (and others)

    2000-10-01

    A study was made on cancer mortality in the high-background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China. Based on hamlet-specific environmental doses and sex- and age-specific occupancy factors, cumulative doses were calculated for each subject. In this article, we describe how the indirect estimation was made on individual dose and the methodology used to estimate radiation risk. Then, assuming a linear dose response relationship and using cancer mortality data for the period 1979-1995, we estimate the excess relative risk per Sievert for solid cancer to be -0.11 (95% CI, -0.67, 0.69). Also, we estimate the excess relative risks of four leading cancers in the study areas, i.e., cancers of the liver, nasopharynx, lung and stomach. In addition, we evaluate the effects of possible bias on our risk estimation. (author)

  10. The Study of Radiation of Gamma-Ray Background at Sedimentology Laboratorium, P3TIR, BATAN, Using Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, Ali Arman; Aliyanta, Barokah; Darman

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of background radiation of gamma-ray has been done at Sedimentology Laboratory, SDAL building, P3TIR, BATAN using gamma spectrometer. The measurement was done without shielding with the range of energy between 50 keV and 1500 keV. The identified radiations are coming from environmental radionuclide and man-made radionuclide as well with 32 energy peaks. The environmental radionuclides are from Uranium series, Thorium series, and 4 0 K having dose rate of 12.510 ± O.980, 36.408 ± 3.243, 9.455 ±O.016 n Sv/day, respectively, whilst man-made radionuclide is 6 O C o having dose rate of O.136 ±O.078 n Sv/day

  11. Reduction of radioactive backgrounds in electroformed copper for ultra-sensitive radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, E.W., E-mail: eric.hoppe@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Aalseth, C.E.; Farmer, O.T.; Hossbach, T.W.; Liezers, M.; Miley, H.S.; Overman, N.R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reeves, J.H. [Reeves and Son LLC, 10 Albert Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-11-11

    Ultra-pure construction materials are required for the next generation of neutrino physics, dark matter and environmental science applications. These materials are also important for use in high-purity germanium spectrometers used in screening materials for radiopurity. The next-generation science applications require materials with radiopurity levels at or below 1 μBq/kg {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. Yet radiometric analysis lacks sensitivity below ∼10 μBq/kg for the U and Th decay chains. This limits both the selection of clean materials and the validation of purification processes. Copper is an important high-purity material for low-background experiments due to the ease with which it can be purified by electrochemical methods. Electroplating for purification into near-final shapes, known as electroforming, is one such method. Continued refinement of the copper electroforming process is underway, for the first time guided by an ICP-MS based assay method that can measure {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U near the desired purity levels. An assay of electroformed copper at a μBq/kg level has been achieved and is described. The implications of electroformed copper at or better than this purity on next-generation low-background experiments are discussed.

  12. Assessment of immune surveillance among inhabitants of high natural background radiation areas in Ramsar-Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sileh, Sajad Borzouei; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Mostafazade, Amrollah; Abedian, Said

    2010-01-01

    In this study by Multi-parameter flow cytometry, immunologic analyze is performed on peripheral blood, NK cells, most effective cells in innate immune and the proportion of TCD8/TCD4 cells that is effective in cellular immune system will be determined. Lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1 or CD107a) is used as a functional marker for the identification of natural killer cell activity. Immune surveillance and immune system role in tumoral defense in Ramsar inhabitants will be determined. Radiation dose rate in Talesh mahalle is very high and was many times greater than Chaparsar (another region in Ramsar). Immune surveillance and immune system role in tumoral defense in Talesh mahalle inhabitants will be compared to Chaparsar inhabitants. If this doesn't have significant difference, we should think about some other aspects such as free radical scavengers that will study later

  13. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established. Keywords: Particle physics, Computer science, Mathematics, Astrophysics

  14. A case-control study of nasopharyngeal carcinoma among inhabitants in high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianming; Sun Quanfu; Yuan Yongling

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to confirm and explore main risk factors of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in cohort members of the investigated areas, and evaluate effects of confounding factors on cancer risk associated with exposure to high background radiation. Methods: The deceased cases of NPC during the period of 1987-1995 were selected as study subjects for each of whom two controls were randomly selected from potential control subjects who died from causes other than malignant tumors and external causes, and matched for sex and years of birth and death (within 5 years). Using structure questionnaire, the relevant information including socioeconomic status, dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, history of illness, agricultural use of pesticide, medical X-ray exposure and familial history of NPC were collected. The odds ratio (OR) was used as a measure of association between NPC and the risk factors. Results: 102 cases and 202 controls were successfully investigated. Single factor conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of NPC was closely positively associated with intake of salted fish, pickles, fermented soybeans, cured meats, history of chronic rhinitis and familial history of NPC. Further multiple conditional logistic regression analysis turned out that intake of salted fish, history of chronic rhinits and familial history of NPC were the independent risk factors of NPC. After controlling for history of chronic rhinits and familial history of NPC, the results based on multiple conditional logistic regression analysis from high background radiation, intake of salted fish and fermented soybeans, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption showed that only intake of salted fish was a significant risk factor (OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.52-5.18), tobacco smoking (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.65-2.22), alcohol consumption (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.38-1.78) and exposure to high background radiation (OR= 0.86, 95% CI 0.44-1.68) did not

  15. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0 deg 3 min to 3 deg. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1 m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3 (90), 6 (180), 9 (270), and 12 (360) cm(exp -1) (GHz). The telescope was flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of Delta(T)/T(sub CMB) is approximately equal to 10(exp -5) with detectors operated at T = 0.3 K.

  16. Survey of Gamma Dose and Radon Exhalation Rate from Soil Surface of High Background Natural Radiation Areas in Ramsar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a radioactive gas and the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer after smoking. Ramsar is known for having the highest levels of natural background radiation on earth. Materials and Methods: In this research study, 50 stations of high radioactivity areas of Ramsar were selected in warm season of the year. Then gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were measured.Results: Results showed that gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were in the range of 51-7100 nSv/hr and 9-15370 mBq/m2s, respectively.Conclusion: Compare to the worldwide average 16 mBq/m2s, estimated average annual effective of Radon exhalation rate in the study area is too high.

  17. The impact of selected organizational variables and managerial leadership on radiation therapists' organizational commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akroyd, Duane; Legg, Jeff; Jackowski, Melissa B.; Adams, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of selected organizational factors and the leadership behavior of supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations. The population for this study consists of all full time clinical radiation therapists registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in the United States. A random sample of 800 radiation therapists was obtained from the ARRT for this study. Questionnaires were mailed to all participants and measured organizational variables; managerial leadership variable and three components of organizational commitment (affective, continuance and normative). It was determined that organizational support, and leadership behavior of supervisors each had a significant and positive affect on normative and affective commitment of radiation therapists and each of the models predicted over 40% of the variance in radiation therapists organizational commitment. This study examined radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations and found that affective (emotional attachment to the organization) and normative (feelings of obligation to the organization) commitments were more important than continuance commitment (awareness of the costs of leaving the organization). This study can help radiation oncology administrators and physicians to understand the values their radiation therapy employees hold that are predictive of their commitment to the organization. A crucial result of the study is the importance of the perceived support of the organization and the leadership skills of managers/supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to the organization.

  18. The impact of selected organizational variables and managerial leadership on radiation therapists' organizational commitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akroyd, Duane [Department of Adult and Community College Education, College of Education, Campus Box 7801, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)], E-mail: duane_akroyd@ncsu.edu; Legg, Jeff [Department of Radiologic Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Jackowski, Melissa B. [Division of Radiologic Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine 27599 (United States); Adams, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine 27599 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of selected organizational factors and the leadership behavior of supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations. The population for this study consists of all full time clinical radiation therapists registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in the United States. A random sample of 800 radiation therapists was obtained from the ARRT for this study. Questionnaires were mailed to all participants and measured organizational variables; managerial leadership variable and three components of organizational commitment (affective, continuance and normative). It was determined that organizational support, and leadership behavior of supervisors each had a significant and positive affect on normative and affective commitment of radiation therapists and each of the models predicted over 40% of the variance in radiation therapists organizational commitment. This study examined radiation therapists' commitment to their organizations and found that affective (emotional attachment to the organization) and normative (feelings of obligation to the organization) commitments were more important than continuance commitment (awareness of the costs of leaving the organization). This study can help radiation oncology administrators and physicians to understand the values their radiation therapy employees hold that are predictive of their commitment to the organization. A crucial result of the study is the importance of the perceived support of the organization and the leadership skills of managers/supervisors on radiation therapists' commitment to the organization.

  19. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  20. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  1. Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

  2. Measurement-based climatology of aerosol direct radiative effect, its sensitivities, and uncertainties from a background southeast US site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, James P.; McComiskey, Allison

    2018-03-01

    Aerosol optical properties measured at Appalachian State University's co-located NASA AERONET and NOAA ESRL aerosol network monitoring sites over a nearly four-year period (June 2012-Feb 2016) are used, along with satellite-based surface reflectance measurements, to study the seasonal variability of diurnally averaged clear sky aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) and radiative efficiency (RE) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. Aerosol chemistry and loading at the Appalachian State site are likely representative of the background southeast US (SE US), home to high summertime aerosol loading and one of only a few regions not to have warmed during the 20th century. This study is the first multi-year ground truth DRE study in the SE US, using aerosol network data products that are often used to validate satellite-based aerosol retrievals. The study is also the first in the SE US to quantify DRE uncertainties and sensitivities to aerosol optical properties and surface reflectance, including their seasonal dependence.Median DRE for the study period is -2.9 W m-2 at the TOA and -6.1 W m-2 at the surface. Monthly median and monthly mean DRE at the TOA (surface) are -1 to -2 W m-2 (-2 to -3 W m-2) during winter months and -5 to -6 W m-2 (-10 W m-2) during summer months. The DRE cycles follow the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is 9 to 10 times larger in summer than in winter. Aerosol RE is anti-correlated with DRE, with winter values 1.5 to 2 times more negative than summer values. Due to the large seasonal dependence of aerosol DRE and RE, we quantify the sensitivity of DRE to aerosol optical properties and surface reflectance, using a calendar day representative of each season (21 December for winter; 21 March for spring, 21 June for summer, and 21 September for fall). We use these sensitivities along with measurement uncertainties of aerosol optical properties and surface reflectance to calculate DRE uncertainties. We also estimate

  3. Sensitivity to Antibiotics of Bacteria Exposed to Gamma Radiation Emitted from Hot Soils of the High Background Radiation Areas of Ramsar, Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Zarei, Samira; Taheri, Mohammad; Tajbakhsh, Saeed; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza; Ranjbar, Sahar; Momeni, Fatemeh; Masoomi, Samaneh; Ansari, Leila; Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi; Taeb, Shahram; Zarei, Sina; Haghani, Masood

    2017-04-01

    Over the past several years our laboratories have investigated different aspects of the challenging issue of the alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics induced by physical stresses. To explore the bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics in samples of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium ( S. typhimurium ), Staphylococcus aureus , and Klebsiella pneumoniae after exposure to gamma radiation emitted from the soil samples taken from the high background radiation areas of Ramsar, northern Iran. Standard Kirby-Bauer test, which evaluates the size of the zone of inhibition as an indicator of the susceptibility of different bacteria to antibiotics, was used in this study. The maximum alteration of the diameter of inhibition zone was found for K. pneumoniae when tested for ciprofloxacin. In this case, the mean diameter of no growth zone in non-irradiated control samples of K. pneumoniae was 20.3 (SD 0.6) mm; it was 14.7 (SD 0.6) mm in irradiated samples. On the other hand, the minimum changes in the diameter of inhibition zone were found for S. typhimurium and S. aureus when these bacteria were tested for nitrofurantoin and cephalexin, respectively. Gamma rays were capable of making significant alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. It can be hypothesized that high levels of natural background radiation can induce adaptive phenomena that help microorganisms better cope with lethal effects of antibiotics.

  4. Background radiation in inelastic X-ray scattering and X-ray emission spectroscopy. A study for Johann-type spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes Mellone, O. A.; Bianco, L. M.; Ceppi, S. A.; Goncalves Honnicke, M.; Stutz, G. E.

    2018-06-01

    A study of the background radiation in inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) based on an analytical model is presented. The calculation model considers spurious radiation originated from elastic and inelastic scattering processes along the beam paths of a Johann-type spectrometer. The dependence of the background radiation intensity on the medium of the beam paths (air and helium), analysed energy and radius of the Rowland circle was studied. The present study shows that both for IXS and XES experiments the background radiation is dominated by spurious radiation owing to scattering processes along the sample-analyser beam path. For IXS experiments the spectral distribution of the main component of the background radiation shows a weak linear dependence on the energy for the most cases. In the case of XES, a strong non-linear behaviour of the background radiation intensity was predicted for energy analysis very close to the backdiffraction condition, with a rapid increase in intensity as the analyser Bragg angle approaches π / 2. The contribution of the analyser-detector beam path is significantly weaker and resembles the spectral distribution of the measured spectra. Present results show that for usual experimental conditions no appreciable structures are introduced by the background radiation into the measured spectra, both in IXS and XES experiments. The usefulness of properly calculating the background profile is demonstrated in a background subtraction procedure for a real experimental situation. The calculation model was able to simulate with high accuracy the energy dependence of the background radiation intensity measured in a particular XES experiment with air beam paths.

  5. Intrinsic and extrinsic variables affecting sensitivity to radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhas, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models relating observed yield of cancers vs administered radiation dose have become popular in recent years, especially as means of predicting hazards associated with exposure conditions which are beyond the realm of practical experimentation. While the validity of these predictions remains a controversy, these models, especially the αD + βD 2 model, have more recently been used to infer the mechanism(s) underlying the carcinogenic process. Through the analysis of simple experimental systems, we demonstrate in this report that aD + bD 2 kinetics can result from injury to the cells which eventually develop into the cancer (target cells) or from injury to those cells which affect target cell survival. Further, these kinetics can fail to predict the consequences of dose protraction, largely due to the fact that transformation increases with dose, while survival decreases. The role of these models in helping to develop an understanding of mechanisms should be restricted, therefore, to the formulation of basic hypotheses which are subject to direct testing in the laboratory

  6. Intercomparison of natural and technologically enhanced background radiation levels in Micronesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, N.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The United States Pacific Nuclear Testing Program resulted in local and regional fallout contamination of islands in the central Pacific basin, in an area which is generically known as Micronesia. Since all of the Marshall Islands are low coral islands or atolls, the natural radioactivity content of their soil is among the lowest on earth. In contrast, the high islands of the Caroline groups, to the west of the Marshalls, are characterized by volcanic soils having a significant complement of radionuclides of the uranium and thorium chains. Several field trips between 1975 and 1980 have afforded opportunities to study the natural radiation environments of the coral atolls of the Marshalls and several high islands in the Carolines. The results of these studies have indicated that significant contributions from radioactive fallout can be evaluated in-situ with relative ease on coral islands. In contrast, the higher natural radioactivity content of high island soils, as well as the greater distance of these islands from the test areas, combine to make evaluations of local fallout contributions from US Pacific tests indistinguishable from the contributions of the world-wide fallout

  7. Compton scattering of microwave background radiation by gas in galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, R.J.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Based on data on the X-ray spectrum of the Coma cluster, interpreted as thermal bremsstrahlung, the expected brightness depletion from Compton scattering of the microwave background in the direction of the cluster is computed. The calculated depletion is about one-third that recently observed by Gull and Northover, and the discrepancy is discussed. In comparing the observed microwave depletion in the direction of other clusters which are X-ray sources it is found that there is no correlation with the cluster X-ray luminosity, while a dependence proportional to L/sub x//sup 1/2/ is expected. Consequently, the microwave depletion observations cannot yet be taken as good evidence for a thermal bremsstrahlung origin for the X-ray emission. The perturbation from Compton scattering of photons on the high-frequency (Wien) tail of the blackbody distribution is computed and found to be much larger than predicted in previous calculations. In the Wien tail the effect is a relative increase in the blackbody intensity that is appreciably greater in magnitude than the depletion in the Rayleigh-Jeans domain

  8. Nested case-control study on the risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianming; Sun Quanfu; Yuan Yongling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To identify the major determinants of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the high-background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang, China. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted based on 106517 subjects. 98 cases that died of NPC were detected during a follow-up program for 9 years. Univariate analysis and multivariate non-conditional logistic regression were used to analyze associations between the exposure factors and NPC. Results: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that education levels, salted fish intake, the history of chronic rhinitis and the family history of NPC were independent risk factors of NPC. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption were not significantly related to NPC risk. The ORs of NPC risk comparing HBRA and a nearby control area before and after adjustment for the major risk determinants identified in the present study was 0.86 and 0.87, respectively. Conclusion: Salted fish intake was a strong risk factor of NPC. Education, the history of chronic rhinitis and the family history of NPC were also related to NPC risk. The exposure to high background radiation in HBRA of Yangjiang was not related to NPC risk with or without the adjustment for those major risk determinants of NPC

  9. Final report and evaluation of the SAWORA research program on background radiation levels from natural origin in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogeweg, B.

    1986-09-01

    In order to study the various factors which determine the dose resulting from background radiation, in particular for the indoor situation, the SAMORA-programme was initiated in 1982. The various aspects studied were: 1) a determination of the current background radiation level, for the indoor as well as the outdoor situation; 2) an inventory of the radioactivity of the building materials; 3) the radioecological aspects from fly-ash and gypsum deposits; 4) a risk estimation of lung tumour induction at low doses and for low dose rates; 5) technical factors determining the effective dose equivalent. In this report the connection of the results derived in the different studies will be discussed. From the study on radioconcentration it became clear that the indoor concentration is strongly determined by the concentration in the crawl space. On the basis of the results of the programme an estimation of the lung tumour risk for the Dutch population is presented. For the current levels it is calculated that the risk is approximately 2.1 lung tumours per 100.000 persons. Since in 1982 the mean lung tumour death rate for the Dutch population was 56.8 per 100.000, this result demonstrates that the calculated contribution is relatively low (4%). Furthermore it is calculated that the maximum increase of this contribution as a result of the introduction of active gypsum building materials will be of the order of 1%. (Auth.)

  10. Long-term TLD measurements of environmental background radiation in the New York City Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiello, M.

    1994-11-01

    The results of month-long TLD measurements at seven locations within 150 km of New York City are reported for 12 years at a few locations and for up to 18 years at others. At some locations, multiple dosimeters were deployed to acquire concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements. The sites were varied and include an urban high-rise residence, three suburban backyards, a rural hillside, and the wooded outskirts of a nuclear power plant (nonoperational). Long-term mean dose rates in air ranged from 50.8 to 123.1 nGy h -1 (5.8 to 14.1 μR h -1 ) across the area. The typical seasonal dose rate in air variations are presented for two of the sites and are briefly discussed in terms of soil conditions. The data indicate that it is possible to achieve monthly variations from the long-term mean as high as 20 to 40%. One of these locations was monitored for indoor (2 floors) and outdoor air dose rates. This allowed for a time series comparison to be performed illustrating the changing contribution of terrestrial radiation to the total dose rate relative to the steady building material-derived radioactivity. This site also permitted the calculation of indoor/outdoor ratios for two floors. Another suburban location yielded an indoor/outdoor ratio using ground floor dose-rate-in-air measurements. Also presented are mean annual dose rates in air showing a long-term decrease at some locations. A statistical Kendall test was performed to quantify the magnitude of the decrease. A definitive explanation of this trend requires further study

  11. Natural background radiation intensity inside and outside a highland Tibetan private house (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Kunikazu; Kudo, Itsuro; Okano, Masaharu

    1998-01-01

    The radiation exposure rates were measured inside and outside a private house in the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China. As far as seen from the cosmic ray exposure rate and the gamma ray exposure rate, the indoor exposure rates can be classified into 3 groups: the 2nd floor, entrance to the 1st floor and in the rest of the 1st floor. In the 1st group, the mean cosmic ray exposure rate was 4.079 nC/kg/h (15.81 μR/h) and the mean gamma ray exposure rate was 4.515 nC/kg/h (17.50 μR/h). In the 3rd group, the mean cosmic ray exposure rate was 2.740 nC/kg/h (10.62 μR/h) and the mean gamma ray exposure rate was 5.284 nC/kg/h (20.48 μR/h). The reason why the cosmic ray exposure rate in the 3rd group is lower than in the 1st group is believed to be that cosmic rays are cut off by the construction materials. The reasons why the gamma ray exposure rate in the 3rd group is higher than in the 1st group are believed to be that the 3rd group is nearer to the ground than the 1st group and the stones of which the 1st floor walls are made have a higher concentration of natural radionuclides than the earth of which the 2nd floor walls are made. Both the cosmic ray exposure rate and the gamma ray exposure rate in the 2nd group are between those of the 1st group and the 3rd group. Furthermore, the authors calculated the air absorbed dose rates inside and outside a Tibetan private house and compared them with those of private houses in the world. (author)

  12. Study of the natural radiation background affected on the human body in some areas of Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Van Thanh

    2008-01-01

    The author had studied the natural radiation background in 68 districts belong 40 provinces and cities of Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. The estimated results clearly show that the average external irradiation dose levels and the average annual external radiation equivalent dose affected on the human body are 0.181± 0.0189 μSv/h and 1599 ± 171.8 μSv/year respectively, both are in normal limit; the highest levels are in Lai Chau district (Lai Chau province); the lowest levels are in Buon Ma Thuot city (DakLak province), Phuoc Son district (Quang Nam province), Tan An district (Long An province). The radon concentration in the human being and the average annual internal inhalation irradiation equivalent dose affected on the human beings are 26.9 ± 15.89 Bq/m 3 and 392.88 ± 231.99 μSv/year respectively; the maximums are in Nha Trang city (Khanh Hoa province), Bac Binh district (Binh Phuoc province); the minimums are in Vung Tau city (Ba Ria- Vung Tau province), Tan An district (Long An province), Rach Gia district (Kien Giang province). The terrestrial radionuclide concentrations in the cereals, foodstuffs (rice, meat, vegetables), water, earth and the average annual internal irradiation equivalent dose are 829.2 ± 38.06 Bq/kg and 229.3 ± 67.70 μSv/year respectively; the highest levels are in Phong Tho district (Lai Chau province), Dien Bien city; the lowest levels are in Dong Xoai district (Binh Phuoc province), Tan An district (Long An province). The average total annual natural radiation background effective equivalent dose level affected on the human body is 2206.9 ± 529.30 μSv/year; the highest levels are in Lai Chau district (Lai Chau province); the lowest levels are in Tan An district (Long An province). The 14 maps of Natural Radiation Background in several localized regions belong 40 provinces and cities of Viet Nam had been set up. These results can reserve for serviceman and public health in the both wartime and peacetime. (author)

  13. Starspot variability as an X-ray radiation proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhypov, Oleksiy V.; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Lammer, Helmut; Güdel, Manuel; Lüftinger, Teresa; Johnstone, Colin P.

    2018-05-01

    Stellar X-ray emission plays an important role in the study of exoplanets as a proxy for stellar winds and as a basis for the prediction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux, unavailable for direct measurements, which in their turn are important factors for the mass-loss of planetary atmospheres. Unfortunately, the detection thresholds limit the number of stars with the directly measured X-ray fluxes. At the same time, the known connection between the sunspots and X-ray sources allows using of the starspot variability as an accessible proxy for the stellar X-ray emission. To realize this approach, we analysed the light curves of 1729 main-sequence stars with rotation periods 0.5 X-ray to bolometric luminosity ratio Rx. As a result, the regressions for stellar X-ray luminosity Lx(P, Teff) and its related EUV analogue LEUV were obtained for the main-sequence stars. It was shown that these regressions allow prediction of average (over the considered stars) values of log (Lx) and log (LEUV) with typical errors of 0.26 and 0.22 dex, respectively. This, however, does not include the activity variations in particular stars related to their individual magnetic activity cycles.

  14. Evaluation of thyroid function in female subjects living in the high natural background radiation area of Karunagappally, Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, A.; Nair, Raghu Ram K.; Jayalakshmi, P.; Sebastian, P.; Akiba, S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation exposure has been reported to cause non cancer thyroid abnormalities like diffuse goiter and thyroid nodules. The present study was undertaken to see if there are any morphological and functional changes taking place in the thyroid due to chronic low level radiation exposure. 257 female subjects living in the four high background radiation panchayats of Chavara, Neendakara, Alappad and Panmana were selected for the study after getting informed consent. 5 ml of blood was drawn from these subjects for assessing thyroid function. The subjects were all staying in the same area since their birth and had not moved out for more than one year at a stretch. The average age of the subjects was 40.5y with a range of 17-66y. The cumulative dose had a mean of 226.3 mGy and a range of 20.6-937.8 mGy. 95 subjects from the low background area of Oachira and Thevalakkara were selected as controls in the age group of 18-63y with a mean age of 47.1y. The mean cumulative dose of this group was 35.9 mGy with a minimum of 5.3 mGy and a maximum of 106.8 mGy. 5 ml blood was collected from these subjects for thyroid function studies. All the subjects underwent ultrasound examination of the thyroid using a 10 MHz frequency linear probe. The following parameters were studied to assess thyroid function: Free T4, TSH, Antithyroglobulin antibody (ATG), Parathyroid hormone. Ultrasound images showed the following common features: Normal - 171, Suggestive of Thyroiditis - 106, Multinodular Goitre - 63, Diffuse Goitre - 5, Solitary Nodule - 31. 73 subjects had elevated TSH and 190 subjects had raised ATG. A significant numbers of subjects had features of thyroiditis. A comparative evaluation with control subjects will be done to assess its significance with reference to cumulative dose

  15. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  16. Fruit Flies Provide New Insights in Low-Radiation Background Biology at the INFN Underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Patrizia; Cipressa, Francesca; Porrazzo, Antonella; Esposito, Giuseppe; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Cenci, Giovanni

    2018-06-04

    Deep underground laboratories (DULs) were originally created to host particle, astroparticle or nuclear physics experiments requiring a low-background environment with vastly reduced levels of cosmic-ray particle interference. More recently, the range of science projects requiring an underground experiment site has greatly expanded, thus leading to the recognition of DULs as truly multidisciplinary science sites that host important studies in several fields, including geology, geophysics, climate and environmental sciences, technology/instrumentation development and biology. So far, underground biology experiments are ongoing or planned in a few of the currently operating DULs. Among these DULs is the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), where the majority of radiobiological data have been collected. Here we provide a summary of the current scenario of DULs around the world, as well as the specific features of the LNGS and a summary of the results we obtained so far, together with other findings collected in different underground laboratories. In particular, we focus on the recent results from our studies of Drosophila melanogaster, which provide the first evidence of the influence of the radiation environment on life span, fertility and response to genotoxic stress at the organism level. Given the increasing interest in this field and the establishment of new projects, it is possible that in the near future more DULs will serve as sites of radiobiology experiments, thus providing further relevant biological information at extremely low-dose-rate radiation. Underground experiments can be nicely complemented with above-ground studies at increasing dose rate. A systematic study performed in different exposure scenarios provides a potential opportunity to address important radiation protection questions, such as the dose/dose-rate relationship for cancer and non-cancer risk, the possible existence of dose/dose-rate threshold(s) for different biological systems and

  17. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing.

  18. Seasonal and interannual variability of solar radiation at Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity landing sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Martinez, G.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.; Martin, M.L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we characterize the radiative environment at the landing sites of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions. We use opacity values obtained at the surface from direct imaging of the Sun and our radiative transfer model COMIMART to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of the daily irradiation at the MER and MSL landing sites. In addition, we analyze the behavior of the direct and diffuse components of the solar radiation at these landing sites. (Author)

  19. A case-control study of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Jianming; Zha Yongru [Guangdong Inst. of Prevention and Treatment of Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou (China); Sun Quanfu; Akiba, Suminori; Yuan Yongling; Tao Zufan; Wei Luxin; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-10-01

    The main purposes of this study were to identify the major determinants of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the high-background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang, China and to evaluate their potential confounding effects on the NPC risk associated with exposure to high background radiation. A matched case-control study was conducted using those who died of NPC during the period 1987-1995. Two controls were randomly selected for each case from those who died from causes other than malignancies and external causes. Cases and their controls were matched with respect to sex and the years of birth and death ({+-}5 years). Study subjects' next-of-kin were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire to collect information on socioeconomic status, dietary habits, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, disease history, pesticide use, medical X-ray exposure, the family history of NPC and so on. We succeeded in interviewing 97 cases and 192 controls. Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed that NPC risk was associated with the consumption of salted fish, homemade pickles, and fermented soy beans, education levels, the history of chronic rhinitis, and the family history of NPC. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that education levels (Odds ratio (OR) for middle school or higher levels vs. no school education=3.8, 95% CI=1.2 to 11.8), salted fish intake (OR=3.2, 95% CI=1.7 to 6.1), the history of chronic rhinitis (OR=3.6, 95% CI=1.3 to 10.1), and the family history of NPC (OR=14.2, 95% CI=2.7 to 73.4) were independent risk factors of NPC. Tobacco smoking (OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.7 to 2.1), and alcohol consumption (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.5 to 1.9) were not significantly related to NPC risk. The ORs of NPC risk comparing HBRA and a nearby control area before and after adjustment for the major risk determinants identified in the present study were 0.86 (95% CI=0.50 to 1.50) and 0.87 (95% CI=0.45 to 1.67), respectively. Salted fish

  20. A case-control study of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianming; Zha Yongru; Sun Quanfu; Akiba, Suminori; Yuan Yongling; Tao Zufan; Wei Luxin; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to identify the major determinants of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the high-background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang, China and to evaluate their potential confounding effects on the NPC risk associated with exposure to high background radiation. A matched case-control study was conducted using those who died of NPC during the period 1987-1995. Two controls were randomly selected for each case from those who died from causes other than malignancies and external causes. Cases and their controls were matched with respect to sex and the years of birth and death (±5 years). Study subjects' next-of-kin were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire to collect information on socioeconomic status, dietary habits, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, disease history, pesticide use, medical X-ray exposure, the family history of NPC and so on. We succeeded in interviewing 97 cases and 192 controls. Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed that NPC risk was associated with the consumption of salted fish, homemade pickles, and fermented soy beans, education levels, the history of chronic rhinitis, and the family history of NPC. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that education levels (Odds ratio (OR) for middle school or higher levels vs. no school education=3.8, 95% CI=1.2 to 11.8), salted fish intake (OR=3.2, 95% CI=1.7 to 6.1), the history of chronic rhinitis (OR=3.6, 95% CI=1.3 to 10.1), and the family history of NPC (OR=14.2, 95% CI=2.7 to 73.4) were independent risk factors of NPC. Tobacco smoking (OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.7 to 2.1), and alcohol consumption (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.5 to 1.9) were not significantly related to NPC risk. The ORs of NPC risk comparing HBRA and a nearby control area before and after adjustment for the major risk determinants identified in the present study were 0.86 (95% CI=0.50 to 1.50) and 0.87 (95% CI=0.45 to 1.67), respectively. Salted fish intake was

  1. On the variably-charged black holes in general relativity: Hawking's radiation and naked singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibohal, Ng

    2002-01-01

    In this paper variably-charged non-rotating Reissner-Nordstrom and rotating Kerr-Newman black holes are discussed. Such a variable charge e with respect to the polar coordinate r in the field equations is referred to as an electrical radiation of the black hole. It is shown that every electrical radiation e(r) of the non-rotating black hole leads to a reduction in its mass M by some quantity. If one considers such electrical radiation taking place continuously for a long time, then a continuous reduction of the mass may take place in the black-hole body and the original mass of the black hole may be evaporated completely. At that stage, the gravity of the object may depend only on the electromagnetic field, not on the mass. Immediately after the complete evaporation of the mass, if the next radiation continues, there may be creation of a new mass leading to the formation of a negative mass naked singularity. It appears that this new mass of the naked singularity would never decrease, but might increase gradually as the radiation continues forever. A similar investigation is also discussed in the case of a variably-charged rotating Kerr-Newman black hole. Thus, it has been shown by incorporating Hawking's evaporation of radiating black holes in the form of spacetime metrics, every electrical radiation of variably-charged rotating and non-rotating black holes may produce a change in the mass of the body without affecting the Maxwell scalar

  2. Estimation of thorium intake due to consumption of vegetables by inhabitants of high background radiation area by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyapriya, R.S.; Suma Nair; Prabhath, R.K.; Madhu Nair; Rao, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the thorium concentration in locally grown vegetables in high background radiation area (HBRA) of southern coastal regions of India. Locally grown vegetables were collected from HBRA of southern coastal regions of India. Thorium concentration was quantified using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The samples were irradiated at CIRUS reactor and counted using a 40% relative efficiency HPGe detector coupled to MCA. The annual intake of thorium was evaluated using the consumption data provided by National Nutrition Monitoring Board. The daily intake of 232 Th from the four food categories (green leafy vegetables, others vegetables, roots and tubers, and fruits) ranged between 0.27 and 5.352 mBq d -1 . The annual internal dose due to ingestion of thorium from these food categories was 46.8 x 10 -8 for female and 58.6 x 10 -8 Sv y -1 for male. (author)

  3. The great wall in the CfA survey: Its origin and imprint on the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Great Wall (GW) found in the latest CfA survey has clearly started out as an aspherical overdense region. We model its evolution after recombination and the imprint its time-dependent gravitational potential leaves on the microwave background radiation (MBR). We approximate GW as an oblate ellipsoid and show that it started at recombination with an almost spherical shape, but with an initial density contrast, δ i , much smaller than it had to be in the spherical model in order to reach the observed GW density contrast of q∝5. The resultant δ i is compatible with the r.m.s. value of δρ/ρ on the GW scale at recombination for models with the n -6 -5 depending on Ω and q. Therefore, MBR observations in that direction can further constrain Ω and the bias factor of the light distribution. (orig.)

  4. Anthropogenic radiative forcing of southern African and Southern Hemisphere climate variability and change

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, FA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available of stratospheric ozone, greenhouse gasses, aerosols and sulphur dioxide, can improve the model's skill to simulate inter-annual variability over southern Africa. The paper secondly explores the role of different radiative forcings of future climate change over...

  5. An introductory overview of the epidemiological study on the population at the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Luxin [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China). Lab. of Industrial Hygiene; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-10-01

    The epidemiological study on the residents of the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China was started by Chinese scientists in 1972 and continued until 1986. In 1991, Japanese scientists recognized the importance of the work and a joint feasibility study was conducted with revised protocols. The feasibility study matured to a cooperative project involving both Chinese and Japanese scientists in 1992, which currently is still in progress. The project was divide into three phases; the first being from 1992 to 1995, the second from 1995-1998 and the third from 1998 to 2001. The results of the first phase were reported previously in 1996. The present paper is a historical overview of the studies before the cooperation and the first two phases. Remarks are made on the detailed data on dosimetry, cytogenetic studies and cancer epidemiology of a series of the papers in this supplemental issue. Some problems such as paradoxical observations between cytogenetic results and cancer mortality, and the importance of the high background study in risk assessment are discussed. (author)

  6. An introductory overview of the epidemiological study on the population at the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Luxin; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The epidemiological study on the residents of the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China was started by Chinese scientists in 1972 and continued until 1986. In 1991, Japanese scientists recognized the importance of the work and a joint feasibility study was conducted with revised protocols. The feasibility study matured to a cooperative project involving both Chinese and Japanese scientists in 1992, which currently is still in progress. The project was divide into three phases; the first being from 1992 to 1995, the second from 1995-1998 and the third from 1998 to 2001. The results of the first phase were reported previously in 1996. The present paper is a historical overview of the studies before the cooperation and the first two phases. Remarks are made on the detailed data on dosimetry, cytogenetic studies and cancer epidemiology of a series of the papers in this supplemental issue. Some problems such as paradoxical observations between cytogenetic results and cancer mortality, and the importance of the high background study in risk assessment are discussed. (author)

  7. Re-Searching Secondary Teacher Trainees in Distance Education and Face-to-Face Mode: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mamta; Gakhar, Sudesh

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and…

  8. Influence of Flat-Panel Fluoroscopic Equipment Variables on Cardiac Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickoloff, Edward L.; Lu Zhengfeng; Dutta, Ajoy; So, James; Balter, Stephen; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the influence of physician-selectable equipment variables on the potential radiation dose reductions during cardiac catheterization examinations using modern imaging equipment. Materials. A modern bi-plane angiography unit with flat-panel image receptors was used. Patients were simulated with 15-30 cm of acrylic plastic. The variables studied were: patient thickness, fluoroscopy pulse rates, record mode frame rates, image receptor field-of-view (FoV), automatic dose control (ADC) mode, SID/SSD geometry setting, automatic collimation, automatic positioning, and others. Results. Patient radiation doses double for every additional 3.5-4.5 cm of soft tissue. The dose is directly related to the imaging frame rate; a decrease from 30 pps to 15 pps reduces the dose by about 50%. The dose is related to [(FoV) -N ] where 2.0 < N < 3.0. Suboptimal positioning of the patient can nearly double the dose. The ADC system provides three selections that can vary the radiation level by 50%. For pediatric studies (2-5 years old), the selection of equipment variables can result in entrance radiation doses that range between 6 and 60 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 15 and 140 cGy for interventional cases. For adult studies, the equipment variables can produce entrance radiation doses that range between 13 and 130 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 30 and 400 cGy for interventional cases. Conclusions. Overall dose reductions of 70-90% can be achieved with pediatric patients and about 90% with adult patients solely through optimal selection of equipment variables

  9. Variability in effective radiating area and output power of new ultrasound transducers at 3 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Lennart D; Straub, Stephen J; Howard, Samuel M

    2007-01-01

    Spatial average intensity (SAI) is often used by clinicians to gauge therapeutic ultrasound dosage, yet SAI measures are not directly regulated by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards. Current FDA guidelines permit a possible 50% to 150% minimum to maximum range of SAI values, potentially contributing to variability in clinical outcomes. To measure clinical values that describe ultrasound transducers and to determine the degree of intramanufacturer and intermanufacturer variability in effective radiating area, power, and SAI when the transducer is functioning at 3 MHz. A descriptive and interferential approach was taken to this quasi-experimental design. Measurement laboratory. Sixty-six 5-cm(2) ultrasound transducers were purchased from 6 different manufacturers. All transducers were calibrated and then assessed using standardized measurement techniques; SAI was normalized to account for variability in effective radiating area, resulting in an nSAI. Effective radiating area, power, and nSAI. All manufacturers with the exception of Omnisound (P = .534) showed a difference between the reported and measured effective radiating area values (P nSAI (P < .05) than all other manufacturers functioning at 3 MHz. Intramanufacturer variability in SAI ranged from 16% to 35%, and intermanufacturer variability ranged from 22% to 61%. Clinicians should consider treatment values of each individual transducer, regardless of the manufacturer. In addition, clinicians should scrutinize the power calibration and recalibration record of the transducer and adjust clinical settings as needed for the desired level of heating. Our data may aid in explaining the reported heating differences among transducers from different manufacturers. Stricter FDA standards regarding effective radiating area and total power are needed, and standards regulating SAI should be established.

  10. Interobserver variability of radiation therapists aligning to fiducial markers for prostate radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Timothy; Owen, Rebecca; Holt, Tanya; Roberts, Lisa; Biggs, Jennifer; McCarthy, Alicia; Parfitt, Matthew; Fielding, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    As the use of fiducial markers (FMs) for the localisation of the prostate during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has become part of routine practice, radiation therapists (RTs) have become increasingly responsible for online image interpretation. The aim of this investigation was to quantify the limits of agreement (LoA) between RTs when localising to FMs with orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) imaging. Six patients receiving prostate EBRT utilising FMs were included in this study. Treatment localisation was performed using kV imaging prior to each fraction. Online stereoscopic assessment of FMs, performed by the treating RTs, was compared with the offline assessment by three RTs. Observer agreement was determined by pairwise Bland-Altman analysis. Stereoscopic analysis of 225 image pairs was performed online at the time of treatment, and offline by three RT observers. Eighteen pairwise Bland-Altman analyses were completed to assess the level of agreement between observers. Localisation by RTs was found to be within clinically acceptable 95% LoAs. Small differences between RTs, in both the online and offline setting, were found to be within clinically acceptable limits. RTs were able to make consistent and reliable judgements when matching FMs on planar kV imaging. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Interplanner variability in carrying out three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fimmell, N.; Laferlita, C.; Everitt, S.; Schneider-Kolsky, M.; Budd, R.; Kron, T.; Reynolds, J.; Ball, D.; Mac Manus, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the variability among six radiation therapy planners in planning radiation treatment for four patients with lung cancer using two treatment protocols. The interplanner variability for target conformity and homogeneity was smaller than the variability among the patients and planning approaches. The same was found for the dose volume indices achieved for most critical structures, indicating that interplanner variability is not likely to be an important source of variation in radiotherapy studies if concise treatment protocols are followed.

  12. Preliminary analysis of data (1987-1990) from investigation of cancer mortality in high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Sun Quanfu; Zhang Shouzhi

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The cancer mortality study conducted in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, China, was started in 1972. The major objective of the study was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low level radiation exposure in HBRA. Since 1991, the cancer mortality data were collected from a fixed cohort instead of a dynamic one as in the previous stage. The purpose of the study in the current stage was to accumulate further person-years (Pyr) of observation for improving the statistical power of test in the estimates of cancer risk associated with the natural radiation exposure and to see the reproducibility of the previous results. Methods: The collection of cancer mortality data consisted of two phases, the survey of demography and the ascertainment of death causes. The estimates of relative risk (RR) were calculated by AMFIT in Epicure (Hirosoft International Corp., 1988-1992). Results: During the period of 1987-1990 there were 231 cancer deaths among 421640 Pyr at risk in the cohort of 106517 subjects, which were classified into four groups based on the hamlet-specific average annual gamma ray absorbed doses: three groups (high , medial and low doses) from HBRA and control group from CA. The RRs adjusted for sex and age for each dose group in HBRA compared with the control group for overall cancers and for all cancers except leukemia were less than 1 except for the low dose group, and there seemed to be a trend of RR decrease with the increase of exposure dose from natural radiation, though there was no statistically significant difference. As for the site-specific cancer studied, the cancers of lungs, liver, stomach, nasopharynx and leukemia, the RRs were also less than 1 except for nasopharynx cancer and for leukemia in the high dose group. The analysis of combined data ( 1979-1990) showed similar results. Conclusion: Although the sample size was not large enough to make definite conclusion statistically, the observation of current

  13. Radiation effects on flow past an impulsively started vertical plate with variable temperature and mass flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is performed to study the thermal radiation effects on unsteady free convective flow over a moving vertical plate in the presence of variable temperature and uniform mass flux. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The temperature is raised linearly with time and the concentration level near the plate are raised linearly with time. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace transform technique. The velocity and skinfriction are studied for different parameters like the radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing radiation parameter.

  14. The estimation of doses to the inhabitants arising from natural radiation source in the high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling; Shen Hong; Morishima, H.; Wei Lvxin; Jian Yuannu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purposes is to estimate the average annual effective dose of the inhabitants and absorbed dose in some human tissues and organs arising from natural radiation sources in the High Background Radiation Area (HBRA) of Yangjiang and in the neighboring Control Area (CA). In order to provide more effective evidence for analyzing the dose-effect relationships among the cohort members in the investigated areas, authors divided the local inhabitant into different dose-groups. Methods: The authors measured the environmental gamma external radiation levels and individual accumulated doses of 5293 people in the investigated areas. The concentrations for 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their decay products in air were also surveyed. The authors estimated the internal doses of natural radionuclides based on the results obtained from measurements in food, in drinking water, in human teeth, in several human tissues, in human placenta, and in activity concentration of exhaled 222 Rn and 220 Rn of the residents living in the investigated areas. Results: The estimation of average annual effective doses in HBRA and CA based on the data of environmental measurements of radiation level respectively are 2.12 ± 0.29 mSv a -1 and 0.69 ± 0.09 mSv a -1 . The sources of higher background radiation in HBRA are mainly contributed from terrestrial gamma radiation. The estimation of average annual effective doses to the residents arising from inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their decay products was 3.28 mSv a -1 in HBRA, while that in CA was 1.03 mSv a -1 . The values of the absorbed dose of the residents in their trachea-bronchial tree and lung in HBRA arising from inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their decay products are 5.40 mGy a -1 and 1.08 mGy a -1 respectively, which are about four times of the values of the absorbed dose in CA. The estimation of average annual effective doses to the inhabitants caused by 226 Ra and 228 Ra in HBRA and CA were 281.88 μSv a -1 and 84.54 μSv a -1

  15. Basic design of radiation-resistant LVDTs: Linear Variable Differential Transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-02-15

    A LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer) for measuring the pressure level was used to measure the pressure of a nuclear fuel rod during the neutron irradiation test in a research reactor. A LVDT for measuring the elongation was also used to measure the elongation of nuclear fuels, and the creep and fatigue of materials during a neutron irradiation test in a research reactor. In this report, the basic design of two radiation-resistant LVDTs for measuring the pressure level and elongation are described. These LVDTs are used a under radiation environment such as a research reactor. In the basic design step, we analyzed the domestic and foreign technical status for radiation-resistant LVDTs, made part and assembly drawings and established simple procedures for their assembling. Only a few companies in the world can produce radiation-resistant LVDTs. Not only these are extremely expensive, but the prices are continuously rising. Also, it takes a long time to procure a LVDT, as it can only be bought about by an order-production. The localization of radiation-resistant LVDTs is necessary in order to provide them quickly and at a low cost. These radiation-resistant LVDTs will be used at neutron irradiation devices such as instrumented fuel capsules, special purpose capsules and a fuel test loop in research reactors. We expect that the use of neutron irradiation tests will be revitalized by the localization of radiation-resistant LVDTs.

  16. Genetic-background modulation of core and variable autistic-like symptoms in Fmr1 knock-out mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Pietropaolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No animal models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD with good construct validity are currently available; using genetic models of pathologies characterized by ASD-like deficits, but with known causes, may be therefore a promising strategy. The Fmr1-KO mouse is an example of this approach, modeling Fragile X syndrome, a well-known genetic disorder presenting ASD symptoms. The Fmr1-KO is available on different genetic backgrounds (FVB versus C57BL/6, which may explain some of the conflicting results that have been obtained with these mutants up till now. METHODS: Fmr1 KO and their wild-type littermates on both the FVB and C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds were examined on a battery of tests modeling the clinical symptoms of ASD, including the triad of core symptoms (alterations in social interaction and communication, presence of repetitive behaviors, as well as the secondary symptoms (disturbances in sensori-motor reactivity and in circadian patterns of activity, epileptic events. RESULTS: Fmr1-KO mice displayed autistic-like core symptoms of altered social interaction and occurrence of repetitive behaviors with additional hyperactivity. The genetic background modulated the effects of the Fmr1 deletion and it appears that the C57BL/6 background may be more suitable for further research on core autistic-like symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The Fmr1-mouse line does not recapitulate all of the main core and secondary ASD symptoms, but still can be useful to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying specific ASD-like endophenotypes.

  17. Analysis of data (1987-1995) from investigation of cancer mortality in high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Akiba, S.; Zha Yongru

    1999-01-01

    Objective: This investigation is a special project of High Background Radiation Research Group. The objective of the cancer mortality study in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, China, which was started in 1972, was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low level radiation exposure of average annual effective dose of 6.4 mSv in HBRA. Since 1991, the study has been conducted collaboratively by Chinese and Japanese scientists with the purpose of accumulating further person years (Pyr) of observation for improving the statistical precision and seeing the reproducibility of the previous results. Methods: The cancer mortality data of 1987-1995 covered in the current cooperative study were collected by a retrospective and/or prospective survey from a fixed cohort. The mortality investigation on the spot consisted of two steps, i.e. the follow-up of members in the cohort and the ascertainment of the death causes. Based on the hamlet-specific average annual external dose, the members of the cohort in HBRA were classified into three groups: high, medial and low dose groups. Risk comparisons between each of the three dose groups with the control group from control area (CA) were conducted by means of relative risk (RR). The RR and the excess relative risk coefficient (ERR per sievert) and their y 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using AMFIT program in Epicure. Results: During the period 1987-1995, there were 5161 total deaths and 557 cancer deaths among 926238 Pyr at risk in the cohort of 106517 subjects. The RR (95% CI) adjusted for sex and age group for all cancers of whole HBRA was 0.96 (0.80-1.15). As for the site-specific cancer of whole HBRA, the RRs for leukemia, cancers of nasopharynx, esophagus and intestine were larger than one, while the RRs for cancers of stomach, liver, lungs, female breast, thyroid and lymphoma were less than one. However, all of them were not statistically different from one (P>0.05 for all). The

  18. Interobserver variability of radiation therapists aligning to fiducial markers for prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deegan, Timothy; Owen, Rebecca; Holt, Tanya; Roberts, Lisa; Biggs, Jennifer; McCarthy, Alicia; Parfitt, Matthew; Fielding, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As the use of fiducial markers (FMs) for the localisation of the prostate during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has become part of routine practice, radiation therapists (RTs) have become increasingly responsible for online image interpretation. The aim of this investigation was to quantify the limits of agreement (LoA) between RTs when localising to FMs with orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) imaging. Six patients receiving prostate EBRT utilising FMs were included in this study. Treatment localisation was performed using kV imaging prior to each fraction. Online stereoscopic assessment of FMs, performed by the treating RTs, was compared with the offline assessment by three RTs. Observer agreement was determined by pairwise Bland-Altman analysis. Stereoscopic analysis of 225 image pairs was performed online at the time of treatment, and offline by three RT observers. Eighteen pairwise Bland-Altman analyses were completed to assess the level of agreement between observers. Localisation by RTs was found to be within clinically acceptable 95% LoAs. Small differences between RTs, in both the online and offline setting, were found to be within clinically acceptable limits. RTs were able to make consistent and reliable judgements when matching FMs on planar kV imaging.

  19. Reducing the uncertainty in background marine aerosol radiative properties using CAM5 model results and CALIPSO-retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Gantt, B.; Dawson, K.; Johnson, M. S.; Gasso, S.

    2012-12-01

    Abundance of natural aerosols in the atmosphere strongly affects global aerosol optical depth (AOD) and influences clouds and the hydrological cycle through its ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Because the anthropogenic contribution to climate forcing represents the difference between the total forcing and that from natural aerosols, understanding background aerosols is necessary to evaluate the influences of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud reflectivity and persistence (so-called indirect radiative forcing). The effects of marine aerosols are explored using remotely sensed data obtained by Cloud-aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.0), coupled with the PNNL Modal Aerosol Model. CALIPSO-provided high resolution vertical profile information about different aerosol subtypes (defined as clean continental, marine, desert dust, polluted continental, polluted dust, and biomass burning), particulate depolarization ratio (or particle non-sphericity), reported aerosol color ratio (the ratio of aerosol backscatter at the two wavelengths) and lidar ratios over different parts of the oceans are compared to model-simulations to help evaluate the contribution of biogenic aerosol to CCN budget in the marine boundary layer. Model-simulations show that over biologically productive ocean waters primary organic aerosols of marine origin can contribute up to a 20% increase in CCN (at a supersaturation of 0.2%) number concentrations. Corresponding changes associated with cloud properties (liquid water path and droplet number) can decrease global annual mean indirect radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosol (less cooling) by ~0.1 Wm-2 (7%). This study suggests ignoring the complex chemical composition and size distribution of sea spray particles could result in considerable uncertainties in predicted anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect.

  20. Genetical variability of Gladioli as the result of gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakota, L.I.; Murin, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the starting material of Gladioli, got in the result of Y-radiation, the forms with white spots on the petals were observed. The Gladioli form 165-81 is distinguished by low growth and middle early flowering. The flower form is triangular. Basic pigmentation is red. White spots of different size on the petals were observed. The investigation was made in 1992 in the field of genetical variability of Gladioli. The Gladioli form 165-81 was irradiated with gamma-radiation dose 30 Gr. As a result the depression of biometric indicators was observed. Consequently, 30 Gr is a mutant dose for Gladioli

  1. Radiative mixed convection over an isothermal cone embedded in a porous medium with variable permeability

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Ebrahiem, N.A.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mixed convection with thermal radiation of an optical dense viscous fluid adjacent to an isothermal cone imbedded in a porous medium with Rosseland diffusion approximation incorporating the variation of permeability and thermal conductivity is numerically investigated. The transformed conservation laws are solved numerically for the case of variable surface temperature conditions. Numerical results are given for the dimensionless temperature profiles and the local Nusselt number for various values of the mixed convection parameter , the cone angle parameter ?, the radiation-conduction parameter R d, and the surface temperature parameter H. Copyright 2011 M. F. El-Amin et al.

  2. O(α2L2) radiative corrections to deep inelastic ep scattering for different kinematical variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1994-03-01

    The QED radiative corrections are calculated in the leading log approximation up to O(α 2 ) for different definitions of the kinematical variables using jet measurement, the 'mixed' variables, the double angle method, and a measurement based on θ e and y JB . Higher order contributions due to exponentiation of soft radiation are included. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of radiation background level of Shandong basin in east line of northward rerouting of southern river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Daping; Xu Jiaang; Zhu Jianguo; Chen Yingmin; Lu Feng; Song Gang; Cao Jingli

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the radiation background levels of Shandong basin in east line of northward rerouting of southern river. Methods: The activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137 Cs, 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, 226 Ra and 90 Sr in the samples were measured by national standard methods respectively. The values of the dose conversion factor given by UNSCEAR 2000 were adopted for dose estimation. Results: The average activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137 Cs, 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, 226 Ra and 90 Sr in the samples were pooled in order to analyze dose estimation. The committed effective doses of the 226 Ra, 238 U, 90 Sr, 232 Th and 137 Cs from lake water for residents are 1.46, 4.95 x 10 -1 , 1.24 x 10 -1 , 2.58 x 10 -2 and 7.93 x 10 -3 μSv per year respectively. The committed effective doses of the 226 Ra, 238 U and 90 Sr from cyprinoid fish are 5.49 x 10 -2 , 3.69 x 10 -2 and 1.77 x 10 -2 μSv per year respectively. Conclusions: The results show that the average activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137 Cs, 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K, 226 Ra and 90 Sr in the samples from Shandong basin of northward rerouting of southern river are within the background levels. And in the main lake basin, the estimated exposures of public caused by the radionuclide in water and cyprinoid fish are so low that they can be ignored unless there ate some radioactive contamination in the future. (authors)

  4. Contribution to the G0 experiment about parity violation: calculation and simulation of radiative corrections, study of the background noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guler, H.

    2003-12-01

    In the framework of quantum chromodynamics, the nucleon is made of three valence quarks surrounded by a sea of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. Only the only lightest quarks (u, d and s) contribute significantly to the nucleon properties. In G 0 we use the property of weak interaction to violate parity symmetry, in order to determine separately the contributions of the three types of quarks to nucleon form factors. The experiment, which takes place at Thomas Jefferson laboratory (USA), aims at measuring parity violation asymmetry in electron-proton scattering. By doing several measurements at different momentum squared of the exchanged photons and for different kinematics (forward angle when the proton is detected and backward angle it will be the electron) will permit to determine separately strange quarks electric and magnetic contributions to nucleon form factors. To extract an asymmetry with small errors, it is necessary to correct all the beam parameters, and to have high enough counting rates in detectors. A special electronics was developed to treat information coming from 16 scintillator pairs for each of the 8 sectors of the G 0 spectrometer. A complete calculation of radiative corrections has been done and Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT program has permitted to determine the shape of the experimental spectra including inelastic background. This work will allow to do a comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations based on the Standard Model. (author)

  5. Establishment of immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines of old residents in high background radiation area in Guangdong, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xue; Feng Jiangbing; Chen Deqing; Liu Qingjie; Cha Yongru; Zou Jianming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish the immortalized cell lines of peripheral blood lymphocytes for old male residents in high background radiation area (HBRA) in Guangdong, China, in order to preserve the specific genomic resources of residents in HBRA for the further genetic and molecular biological study on HBRA. Methods: The peripheral blood samples of 20 old male residents in HBRA were collected after informed consent. The immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines, 2 fox each resident, were established with Epstein-Barr virus. After being frozen and recovered, the cell viability, the contamination of bacterium and mycoplasma were analyzed. The stabilization of cell lines was decided by comparing the karyotypes of the peripheral blood lymphocytes and the cell lines. Results: 40 cell lines for 20 residents in HBRA were successfully established.. The recovery rate of cell lines after being frozen was 100% . All the cell viablity after recovery was higher than 90%, and no contamination of bacteria and mycoplasma occurred. The karyotypes of the 20th generation cell lines were not change. Conclusion: The immortalized cell lines established in this study could provide biological resources for further study on genetics and molecular biology in HBRA. (authors)

  6. Measurement of 222Rn, 220Rn and their decay products in high background radiation area in Yangjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling

    2000-01-01

    The investigators have measured concentrations of Rn-222, rn-220 and their decay products in high background radiation area (HBRA) and the neighboring control area (CA), as well as the equilibrium factor F for Rn-222. The average concentrations of Rn-222 in the air indoors and outdoors in the HBRA are 42.6 and 17.3 Bq/m 3 respectively, and CA, 13.2 and 11.7 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The average α-potential energy concentrations for daughters of Rn-222 indoors and outdoors in HBRA are 0.109 and 0.051 μJ/m 3 , CA, 0.045 and 0.041 μJ/m 3 , respectively. The average α-potential energy values for daughters of Rn-220 indoor and outdoor in HBRA are 0.249 and 0.053 μJ/m 3 , CA, 0.051 and 0.025 μJ/m 3 , respectively. With regard to equilibrium factor F for Rn-222, the authors have also measured 52 points of 10 hamlets in HBRA (indoor 31, outdoor 21), 9 points of 2 hamlets in CA (indoor 5, outdoor 4), respectively. These figures are 0.46, 0.53, 0.62 and 0.64, respectively

  7. Study of radiation background at various high altitude locations in preparation for rare event search in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Dey, S.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Syam, D., E-mail: rupamoy@gmail.com, E-mail: dey_s2001@yahoo.com, E-mail: sanjay@jcbose.ac.in, E-mail: atanu.maulik@jcbose.ac.in, E-mail: sibaji.raha@jcbose.ac.in, E-mail: syam.debapriyo@gmail.com [Centre for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Block-EN, Sector-V, Kolkata-700091 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Various phenomenological models presented over the years have hinted at the possible presence of strangelets, which are nuggets of Strange Quark Matter (SQM), in cosmic rays. One way to search for such rare events is through the deployment of large area Nuclear Track Detector (NTD) arrays at high mountain altitudes. Before the deployment of any such array can begin, a detailed study of the radiation background is essential. Also, a proper understanding of the response of detectors exposed to extreme weather conditions is necessary. With that aim, pilot studies were carried out at various high altitude locations in India such as Darjeeling (2200 m a.m.s.l), Ooty (2200 m a.m.s.l) and Hanle (4500 m a.m.s.l). Small arrays of CR-39 as well as high threshold Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) detectors were given open air exposures for periods ranging from three months to two years. The findings of such studies are reported in this paper.

  8. Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Flynn, Daniel F.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an

  9. Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Lynn D [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Flynn, Daniel F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States); Haffty, Bruce G [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an

  10. Drivers of solar radiation variability in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obryk, Maciej; Fountain, Andrew G.; Doran, Peter; Lyons, Berry; Eastman, Ryan

    2018-01-01

    Annually averaged solar radiation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica has varied by over 20 W m−2 during the past three decades; however, the drivers of this variability are unknown. Because small differences in radiation are important to water availability and ecosystem functioning in polar deserts, determining the causes are important to predictions of future desert processes. We examine the potential drivers of solar variability and systematically eliminate all but stratospheric sulfur dioxide. We argue that increases in stratospheric sulfur dioxide increase stratospheric aerosol optical depth and decrease solar intensity. Because of the polar location of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (77–78°S) and relatively long solar ray path through the stratosphere, terrestrial solar intensity is sensitive to small differences in stratospheric transmissivity. Important sources of sulfur dioxide include natural (wildfires and volcanic eruptions) and anthropogenic emission.

  11. Spatiotemporal variability analysis of diffuse radiation in China during 1981-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X.L.; Zhou, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); He, H.L.; Zhang, L.; Yu, G.R.; Fan, J.W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research

    2013-03-01

    Solar radiation is the primary driver of terrestrial plant photosynthesis and the diffuse component can enhance canopy light use efficiency (LUE), which in turn influences the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. In this study we calculated the spatial data of diffuse radiation in China from 1981 to 2010, using a radiation decomposition model and spatial interpolation method based on observational data. Furthermore, we explored the spatiotemporal characteristics of diffuse radiation using GIS and trend analysis techniques. The results show the following: (1) The spatial patterns of perennial average of annual diffuse radiation during 1981-2010 are complex and inhomogeneous in China, generally lower in the north and higher in the south and west. The perennial average ranges from 1730.20 to 3064.41 MJm{sup -2}yr{sup -1} across the whole country. (2) There is an increasing trend of annual diffuse radiation in China from 1981 to 2010 on the whole, with mean increasing amplitude of 7.03 MJm{sup -2}yr{sup -1} per decade. Whereas a significant downtrend was observed in the first 10 years, distinct anomalies in 1982, 1983, 1991 and 1992 occurred due to the eruptions of El Chinchon and Pinatubo. (3) The spatial distribution of the temporal variability of diffuse radiation showed significant regional heterogeneity in addition to the seasonal differences. Northwestern China has the most evident downtrend, with highest decreasing rate of 6% per decade, while the Tibetan Plateau has the most evident uptrend, with highest increasing rate of up to 9% per decade. Such quantitative spatiotemporal characteristics of diffuse radiation are essential in regional scale modeling of terrestrial carbon dynamics. (orig.)

  12. Exact solution of thermal radiation on vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on unsteady flow past an infinite vertical oscillating plate in the presence of variable temperature and uniform mass flux is considered. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The plate temperature is raised linearly with time and the mass is diffused from the plate to the fluid at an uniform rate. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace transform technique. The velocity, concentration and temperature are studied for different physical parameters like the phase angle, radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing phase angle ωt.

  13. The interaction of thermal radiation on vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on unsteady free convective flow of a viscous incompressible flow past an infinite vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion has been studied. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The plate temperature is raised linearly with respect to time and the concentration level near the plate is also raised linearly with respect to time. An exact solution to the dimensionless governing equations has been obtained by the Laplace transform method, when the plate is oscillating harmonically in its own plane. The effects of velocity, temperature and concentration are studied for different parameters like phase angle, radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time are studied. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing phase angle ωt. .

  14. Spatial variability of shortwave radiative fluxes in the context of snowmelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Ma, Yingtao; Hinkelman, Laura; Lundquist, Jessica

    2014-05-01

    Snow-covered mountain ranges are a major source of water supply for run-off and groundwater recharge. Snowmelt supplies as much as 75% of surface water in basins of the western United States. Factors that affect the rate of snow melt include incoming shortwave and longwave radiation, surface albedo, snow emissivity, snow surface temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes, ground heat flux, and energy transferred to the snowpack from deposited snow or rain. The net radiation generally makes up about 80% of the energy balance and is dominated by the shortwave radiation. Complex terrain poses a great challenge for obtaining the needed information on radiative fluxes from satellites due to elevation issues, spatially-variable cloud cover, rapidly changing surface conditions during snow fall and snow melt, lack of high quality ground truth for evaluation of the satellite based estimates, as well as scale issues between the ground observations and the satellite footprint. In this study we utilize observations of high spatial resolution (5-km) as available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) to derive surface shortwave radiative fluxes in complex terrain, with attention to the impact of slopes on the amount of radiation received. The methodology developed has been applied to several water years (January to July during 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2009) over the western part of the United States, and the available information was used to derive metrics on spatial and temporal variability in the shortwave fluxes. It is planned to apply the findings from this study for testing improvements in Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) estimates.

  15. Abrupt millennial variability and interdecadal-interstadial oscillations in a global coupled model: sensitivity to the background climate state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzel, Olivier [The University of New South Wales, Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC), Sydney (Australia); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Laboratoire de Physique des Oceans (LPO), Brest (France); England, Matthew H. [The University of New South Wales, Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC), Sydney (Australia); Verdiere, Alain Colin de; Huck, Thierry [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Laboratoire de Physique des Oceans (LPO), Brest (France)

    2012-07-15

    The origin and bifurcation structure of abrupt millennial-scale climate transitions under steady external solar forcing and in the absence of atmospheric synoptic variability is studied by means of a global coupled model of intermediate complexity. We show that the origin of Dansgaard-Oeschger type oscillations in the model is caused by the weaker northward oceanic heat transport in the Atlantic basin. This is in agreement with previous studies realized with much simpler models, based on highly idealized geometries and simplified physics. The existence of abrupt millennial-scale climate transitions during glacial times can therefore be interpreted as a consequence of the weakening of the negative temperature-advection feedback. This is confirmed through a series of numerical experiments designed to explore the sensitivity of the bifurcation structure of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels under glacial boundary conditions. Contrasting with the cold, stadial, phases of millennial oscillations, we also show the emergence of strong interdecadal variability in the North Atlantic sector during warm interstadials. The instability driving these interdecadal-interstadial oscillations is shown to be identical to that found in ocean-only models forced by fixed surface buoyancy fluxes, that is, a large-scale baroclinic instability developing in the vicinity of the western boundary current in the North Atlantic. Comparisons with modern observations further suggest a physical mechanism similar to that driving the 30-40 years time scale associated with the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation. (orig.)

  16. Thermal stratification effects on MHD radiative flow of nanofluid over nonlinear stretching sheet with variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of thermal stratification, applied electric and magnetic fields, thermal radiation, viscous dissipation and Joules heating are numerically studied on a boundary layer flow of electrical conducting nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet with variable thickness. The governing equations which are partial differential equations are converted to a couple of ordinary differential equations with suitable similarity transformation techniques and are solved using implicit finite difference scheme. The electrical conducting nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled. The effects of the emerging parameters on the electrical conducting nanofluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration volume fraction with skin friction, heat transfer characteristics are examined with the aids of graphs and tabular form. It is observed that the variable thickness enhances the fluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration volume fraction. The heat and mass transfer rate at the surface increases with thermal stratification resulting to a reduction in the fluid temperature. Electric field enhances the nanofluid velocity which resolved the sticking effects caused by a magnetic field which suppressed the profiles. Radiative heat transfer and viscous dissipation are sensitive to an increase in the fluid temperature and thicker thermal boundary layer thickness. Comparison with published results is examined and presented. Keywords: MHD nanofluid, Variable thickness, Thermal radiation, Similarity solution, Thermal stratification

  17. Reanalysis of noncancer deaths (1987-1995) among residents in high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianming; Zha Yongru; Sun Quanfu; Liu Yusheng; Li Jia; Tao Zufan; Wei Lvxin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To further analyze non-cancer mortality rates and relevant influencing factors among the residents in high background radiation area(HBRA) and its control area (CA). Methods: The data for the period 1987-1995 were obtained from a fixed cohort by prospective survey. The mortality investigation on the spot consisted of two steps, i.e. the follow-up of the cohort members and the ascertainment of causes of death. On the basis of the hamlet-specific average of annual external dose, the cohort members were classified into four groups for internal comparison: high, medial and low dose groups in HBRA and control group in CA. Relative risk (RR), excess relative risk(ERR/Sv) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using AMFIT program in Epicure. Results: During the period 1987-1995, the noncancer mortality in HBRA increased by 9% compared with that in the control group, and the relative risk of noncancer diseases was 1.09 (P=0.01), indicating a statistically significant excess mortality in the HBRA. The significantly increased noncancer death was caused by diseases of digestive system, with a RR of 1.46(P=0.006); the relative risk of chronic liver diseases including cirrhosis was 1.98(P=0.004). The significantly decreased noncancer death rates were observed for the infectious and parasitic diseases, the RR being 0.81(P=0.04); for pulmonary tuberculosis, RR 0.58(P<0.001). The homogeneity tests of risks across the four dose-groups revealed that the RRs for diseases of digestive system and for liver cirrhosis were significantly different, P values being 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. The ERR(95% CI)/Sv for diseases of digestive system and liver cirrhosis were 2.18(0.22, 7.64) and 10.94(1.34, NA), respectively. Conclusion: The death rates from diseases of digestive system, especially chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis were statistically significantly higher, and that from pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly lower in the HBRA than those in the control

  18. Study of natural background radiation levels with special reference to the granite industries and quarries in some places of Karnataka State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannappa, J.; Srilatha; Ningappa, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation is present all around us which may be also called natural background radiation. It is divided into natural and anthropogenic. The sources of natural radiation are extra terrestrial (cosmic ray) radiation and terrestrial radiation; it arises due to naturally occurring radionuclides present in soil, rocks and building materials. Whereas anthropogenic radiation sources includes X rays used for medical diagnosis nuclear weapon testing nuclear power plants radioisotopes used in varies fields, other industry applications and scientific research. Out of the total radiation exposure nearly 97.7% is from natural sources and remaining 2.3% is due to artificial sources. Nature has gifted several geological material to mankind for building purposes. The granite rocks are used as building material, these rocks are quite rich in radioactive nuclides. The radiation from these nuclides are exposed to mankind and the rocks are exploited and extracted by miners to construct the buildings. Natural radiation is of importance because it accounts for the largest contributor of radiation exposure to the world population from all natural sources (UNSCEAR 2008). Understanding the magnitude of natural sources of radiation and their distribution in the living environment may help any one to develop a pragmatic approach towards radiation and its effects. This article provides a radiation levels measured in granite quarries and industries and assessment of health effects to the workers and publics of the study area. The total occupational dose to the workers is lower than ICRP recommended value and the total dose for the public is slightly higher than the global average value. There is no regulation control for the granite mining. As per the IAEA report regulatory control is needed for mining and processing of granite rocks The study area is granite region of Bangaluru rural district, Tumkur and Mysore. (author)

  19. Temporal variability of the quality of Taraxacum officinale seed progeny from the East-Ural radioactive trace: is there an interaction between low level radiation and weather conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozolotina, Vera N; Antonova, Elena V

    2017-03-01

    The multiple stressors, in different combinations, may impact differently upon seed quality, and low-level doses of radiation may enhance synergistic or antagonistic effects. During 1991-2014 we investigated the quality of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s.l.) seed progeny growing under low-level radiation exposure at the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT) area (result of the Kyshtym accident, Russia), and in plants from areas exposed to background radiation. The viability of the dandelion seed progeny was assessed according to chronic radiation exposure, accounting for the variability of weather conditions among years. Environmental factors (temperature, precipitation, and their ratio in different months) can modify the radiobiological effects. We found a wide range of possible responses to multiple stressors: inhibition, stimulation, and indifferent effects in different seasons. The intraspecific variability of the quality of dandelion seed progeny was greatly increased under conditions of low doses of chronic irradiation. Temperature was the most significant factor for seed progeny formation in the EURT zone, whereas the sums of precipitation and ratios of precipitation to temperature dominantly affected organisms from the background population.

  20. Investigation of Contributions of Cosmic Radiation to Background Dose with Altitude at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwaechia, F.C.; Zakari, Y.I.; Ibeanu, I.G.E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the contributions of cosmic radiation to background dose at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria using two portable survey meters (Rados -120 and FH 40F2 ). The work was conducted in two phases (dry and rainy seasons).The recorded gamma dose rates were observed to proportionally increase with increase in altitude, that is from ground floor (altitude 3.52 m above sea level) to the eight floor (altitude 30.08 m above sea level). In a similar manner, there were observed variations in the seasonal results-the dry season data were consistently higher than the rainy season data. The mean measured indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates for the two seasons (rainy and dry seasons) were 210.0nSv/h and 279.4nSv/h, and 231.3nSv/h and 368.8nSv/h at the ground floor and the eight floor, respectively. The rainy season result repeated itself on a particular very heavy rainy day with a mean measured gamma dose rate of 204.4nSv/h and 267.4nSv/h at the ground floor and eight floor, respectively. The annual indoor and outdoor mean effective dose for a 1000hour working period was calculated as 0.32 μSv and 0.35 μSv at the ground floor and 0.68 μSv and 0.76 μSv the 8 th floor, respectively (for inside and outside the building).

  1. Study of cancer mortality among inhabitants in the high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China (1979-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Sun Quanfu; Li Jia; Liu Yusheng; Wei Lvxin; Zou Jianming; Zha Yongru; Yuan Yongling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to explore cancer risk associated with the low-level radiation exposure of average annual effective dose of 6.4 mSv occurring in the high background radiation area (HBRA) in Yangjiang of Guangdong Province, China. Methods: The data of cancer mortality for period of 1979-1986 were collected in prospective follow-up survey of dynamic populations and those of 1987-1998 were obtained from a fixed cohort in the same method. Record linkage was used to combine the two data sets. The external dose received by the inhabitants was estimated on the basis of hamlet-specific environmental doses and sex-age-specific occupancy factors, and the fixed values of internal dose regardless of sex and age was assumed. Relative risk (RR) and excess relative risk coefficient (ERR/Sv) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the AMFIT in Epicure. Results: During the period of 1979-1998, the follow-up for 125 079 subjects accumulated 1 992 940 person-years and identified 12 444 deaths, including 1202 cancer deaths. The RR of mortality of all cancers in whole HBRA was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.89-1.14) showing no statistical difference between the HBRA and the control area (CA). The RRs of all cancers in low, intermediate and high dose groups in the HBRA did not show statistical difference from the control group, either. The region (Yangdong and Yangxi) and the follow-up period(1979-1986 and 1987-1998) did not evidently modify the results, and the restriction of cancer cases to those with pathology information made no statistically significant change in RRs. In site-specific cancer analysis, only the RR of esophageal cancer showed statistical excess in the HBRA, the others did not show statistical difference between the HBRA and the CA. The comparison of RRs of site-specific cancer mortality among different dose groups and the dose-response analysis of site-specific cancer mortality related to cumulative individual lifetime dose did not give

  2. On Day-to-Day Variability of Global Lightning Activity as Quantified from Background Schumann Resonance Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Among the palette of methods (satellite, VLF, ELF) for monitoring global lightning activity, observations of the background Schumann resonances (SR) provide a unique prospect for estimating the integrated activity of global lightning activity in absolute units (coul2 km2/sec). This prospect is ensured by the SR waves' low attenuation, with wavelengths commensurate with the dimensions of dominant regional lightning "chimneys", and by the accumulating methodology for background SR techniques. Another benefit is the reduction of SR measurements into a compact set of resonance characteristics (modal frequencies, intensities, and quality factors). Suggested and tested in numerical simulations by T.R. Madden in the 1960s, the idea to invert the SR characteristics for the global lightning source has been farther developed, statistically substantiated, and practically realized here on the basis of the computing power and the quantity of experimental material way beyond what the SR pioneers had at their disposal. The critical issue of the quality of the input SR parameters is addressed by implementing a statistically substantiated sanitizing procedure to dispose of the fragments of the observed time series containing unrepresentative elements - local interference of various origin and strong ELF transients originating outside the major "chimneys" represented in the source model. As a result of preliminary research, a universal empirical sanitizing criterion has been established. Due to the fact that the actual observations have been collected from a set of individually organized ELF stations with various equipment sets and calibration techniques, the relative parameters in both input (the intensities) and output (the "chimney" activities) are being used as far as possible in the inversion process to avoid instabilities caused by calibration inconsistencies. The absolute regional activities - and so the sought for global activity in absolute units - is determined in the

  3. On the intrinsic timescales of temporal variability in measurements of the surface solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2018-01-01

    This study is concerned with the intrinsic temporal scales of the variability in the surface solar irradiance (SSI). The data consist of decennial time series of daily means of the SSI obtained from high-quality measurements of the broadband solar radiation impinging on a horizontal plane at ground level, issued from different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) ground stations around the world. First, embedded oscillations sorted in terms of increasing timescales of the data are extracted by empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Next, Hilbert spectral analysis is applied to obtain an amplitude-modulation-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) representation of the data. The time-varying nature of the characteristic timescales of variability, along with the variations in the signal intensity, are thus revealed. A novel, adaptive null hypothesis based on the general statistical characteristics of noise is employed in order to discriminate between the different features of the data, those that have a deterministic origin and those being realizations of various stochastic processes. The data have a significant spectral peak corresponding to the yearly variability cycle and feature quasi-stochastic high-frequency variability components, irrespective of the geographical location or of the local climate. Moreover, the amplitude of this latter feature is shown to be modulated by variations in the yearly cycle, which is indicative of nonlinear multiplicative cross-scale couplings. The study has possible implications on the modeling and the forecast of the surface solar radiation, by clearly discriminating the deterministic from the quasi-stochastic character of the data, at different local timescales.

  4. Impact of physiological variables and genetic background on myocardial frequency-resistivity relations in the intact beating murine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maricela; Steinhelper, Mark E; Alvarez, Jorge A; Escobedo, Daniel; Pearce, John; Valvano, Jonathan W; Pollock, Brad H; Wei, Chia-Ling; Kottam, Anil; Altman, David; Bailey, Steven; Thomsen, Sharon; Lee, Shuko; Colston, James T; Oh, Jung Hwan; Freeman, Gregory L; Feldman, Marc D

    2006-10-01

    Conductance measurements for generation of an instantaneous left ventricular (LV) volume signal in the mouse are limited, because the volume signal is a combination of blood and LV muscle, and only the blood signal is desired. We have developed a conductance system that operates at two simultaneous frequencies to identify and remove the myocardial contribution to the instantaneous volume signal. This system is based on the observation that myocardial resistivity varies with frequency, whereas blood resistivity does not. For calculation of LV blood volume with the dual-frequency conductance system in mice, in vivo murine myocardial resistivity was measured and combined with an analytic approach. The goals of the present study were to identify and minimize the sources of error in the measurement of myocardial resistivity to enhance the accuracy of the dual-frequency conductance system. We extended these findings to a gene-altered mouse model to determine the impact of measured myocardial resistivity on the calculation of LV pressure-volume relations. We examined the impact of temperature, timing of the measurement during the cardiac cycle, breeding strain, anisotropy, and intrameasurement and interanimal variability on the measurement of intact murine myocardial resistivity. Applying this knowledge to diabetic and nondiabetic 11- and 20- to 24-wk-old mice, we demonstrated differences in myocardial resistivity at low frequencies, enhancement of LV systolic function at 11 wk and LV dilation at 20-24 wk, and histological and electron-microscopic studies demonstrating greater glycogen deposition in the diabetic mice. This study demonstrated the accurate technique of measuring myocardial resistivity and its impact on the determination of LV pressure-volume relations in gene-altered mice.

  5. Role of light and heavy minerals on natural radioactivity level of high background radiation area, Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, V; Sundarrajan, M; Suresh, G; Paramasivam, K; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2014-02-01

    Natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) concentrations and eight different radiological parameters have been analyzed for the beach sediments of Kerala with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazards. Activity concentrations ((238)U and (232)Th) and all the radiological parameters in most of the sites have higher values than recommended values. The Kerala beach sediments pose significant radiological threat to the people living in the area and tourists going to the beaches for recreation or to the sailors and fishermen involved in their activities in the study area. In order to know the light mineral characterization of the present sediments, mineralogical analysis has been carried out using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The eight different minerals are identified and they are characterized. Among the various observed minerals, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, kaolinite and calcite are major minerals. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction co-efficient and the values show that the amount of quartz is higher than calcite and much higher than microcline feldspar. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz present in the sediments. Heavy mineral separation analysis has been carried out to know the total heavy mineral (THM) percentage. This analysis revealed the presence of nine heavy minerals. The minerals such as monazite, zircon, magnetite and illmenite are predominant. Due to the rapid and extreme changes occur in highly dynamic environments of sandy beaches, quantities of major light and heavy minerals are widely varied from site to site. Granulometric analysis shows that the sand is major content. Multivariate statistical (Pearson correlation, cluster and factor) analysis has been carried out to know the effect of mineralogy on radionuclide concentrations. The present study concluded that heavy minerals induce the (238)U and (232)Th

  6. Atmospheric radiative feedbacks associated with transient climate change and climate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, Robert A.; Power, Scott B. [Bureau of Meteorology, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, GPO Box 1289, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    This study examines in detail the 'atmospheric' radiative feedbacks operating in a coupled General Circulation Model (GCM). These feedbacks (defined as the change in top of atmosphere radiation per degree of global surface temperature change) are due to responses in water vapour, lapse rate, clouds and surface albedo. Two types of radiative feedback in particular are considered: those arising from century scale 'transient' warming (from a 1% per annum compounded CO{sub 2} increase), and those operating under the model's own unforced 'natural' variability. The time evolution of the transient (or 'secular') feedbacks is first examined. It is found that both the global strength and the latitudinal distributions of these feedbacks are established within the first two or three decades of warming, and thereafter change relatively little out to 100 years. They also closely approximate those found under equilibrium warming from a 'mixed layer' ocean version of the same model forced by a doubling of CO{sub 2}. These secular feedbacks are then compared with those operating under unforced (interannual) variability. For water vapour, the interannual feedback is only around two-thirds the strength of the secular feedback. The pattern reveals widespread regions of negative feedback in the interannual case, in turn resulting from patterns of circulation change and regions of decreasing as well as increasing surface temperature. Considering the vertical structure of the two, it is found that although positive net mid to upper tropospheric contributions dominate both, they are weaker (and occur lower) under interannual variability than under secular change and are more narrowly confined to the tropics. Lapse rate feedback from variability shows weak negative feedback over low latitudes combined with strong positive feedback in mid-to-high latitudes resulting in no net global feedback - in contrast to the dominant negative low

  7. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  8. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Mark P; Wakeford, Richard; Kendall, Gerald M

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily upon studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionising radiation, including to ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. In a recent paper (Wakeford et al 2009 Leukaemia 23 770-6) we estimated the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain attributable to natural background radiation to be about 20%. In this paper we employ the two sets of published leukaemia risk models used previously, but use recently published revised estimates of natural background radiation doses received by the red bone marrow of British children to update the previous results. Using the newer dosimetry we calculate that the best estimate of the proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain predicted to be attributable to this source of exposure is 15-20%, although the uncertainty associated with certain stages in the calculation (e.g. the nature of the transfer of risk between populations and the pertinent dose received from naturally occurring alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides) is significant. The slightly lower attributable proportions compared with those previously derived by Wakeford et al (Leukaemia 2009 23 770-6) are largely due to the lower doses (and in particular lower high LET doses) for the first year of life.

  9. Estimation and comparison of baseline frequencies of micronuclei among the new-borns from natural high background radiation and control areas of Kerala coast in south India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Karuppasamy, C.V.; Thampi, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the studies it is concluded that the elevated level of natural radiation has no significant effect of micronucleus formation in high background radiation area (HBRA) new-borns as compared to control area. It is also in agreement with the results of cytogenetic investigations on new-borns from HBRA and control area using chromosome aberration analysis method. The significance, if any, of the slightly lower micronuclei (MN) frequency observed in HBRA, is not clear at this stage. Further investigations on a larger number of new-borns from both the areas are necessary in order to draw firm conclusions. It appears that, this is the first attempt to estimate the baseline frequency of MN among the new-borns from a natural high background radiation area. (author). 9 refs

  10. Gamma background radiation monitoring results (1990-95) in the environs around IRE OSCOM, Orissa using TLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, N K; Bapat, V N; Nambi, K S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Environmental Assessment Div.; Saha, S C [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.

    1997-09-01

    Quarterly environmental radiation monitoring data using TLDs in about 28 locations in and around IRE-OSCOM covering a six year period 1990-95 is presented in the report. While the indoor radiation levels in beach areas having monazite deposits recorded annual average of 653{+-}230 mR/y, that in IRE residential colony gave a value of 240 {+-}30 mR/y. The radiation levels recorded inside the OSCOM plant are well within the limits prescribed for occupational radiation exposures. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Gamma background radiation monitoring results (1990-95) in the environs around IRE OSCOM, Orissa using TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, N.K.; Bapat, V.N.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Saha, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Quarterly environmental radiation monitoring data using TLDs in about 28 locations in and around IRE-OSCOM covering a six year period 1990-95 is presented in the report. While the indoor radiation levels in beach areas having monazite deposits recorded annual average of 653±230 mR/y, that in IRE residential colony gave a value of 240 ±30 mR/y. The radiation levels recorded inside the OSCOM plant are well within the limits prescribed for occupational radiation exposures. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  12. Variability Among Breast Radiation Oncologists in Delineation of the Postsurgical Lumpectomy Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, Daniel M.; Luo Weixiu; Song Jun; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Gelman, Rebecca; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Results: Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS ≥3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter ≥5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Conclusions: Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined

  13. Quantification of DNA repair capacity (DRC) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals from natural high background radiation areas of Kerala, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Kumar, P.R.; Seshadri, M.

    2011-01-01

    Human populations residing in the coastal areas of Kerala from Neendakara in south to Purakkad in north receive high level natural background radiation primarily due to the presence of thorium ( 232 Th) in the monazite containing beach sand. This provides a unique opportunity to investigate the health effects of natural high level radiation on humans. Earlier studies from our laboratory in newborns for incidence of congenital malformations, structural and numerical chromosome aberrations failed to show any significant health or biological effects due to high level natural radiation exposure. The current study used alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay due to its sensitivity, speed, flexibility and low cost. Biological effects of low level natural radiation was studied by assessing individual's DNA Repair Capacity (DRC), which is essential for maintaining the genome integrity. DNA damage was estimated in terms of DNA strand breaks per million base pairs (SB/106 bp). In our earlier study using comet assay, DNA SBs increased with age in subjects from normal background radiation area (NBRA). However, significant inverse correlation was observed in subjects from high background radiation area (HBRA). Further, spontaneous DNA SBs in elderly subjects (? 41 years) from HBRA was significantly lower compared to the subjects from NBRA. The present study was carried out in 90 healthy adult male subjects of which, 63 subjects belonged to HBRA and 27 subjects from NBRA. The annual effective dose in HBRA subjects was 5.87 ± 4.17 mSv year-1 (Mean ± S.D., range 1.07-17.41) and in NBRA subjects was ? 1mSv year-1. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from these individuals were irradiated with 4Gy of 60 Co gamma rays (1.4Gy/minute, Low dose irradiator 2000, BRIT, India) and DNA repair was assessed at 30 minutes. As the results were not normally distributed, the data were log transformed to normalize variance. Regression analysis was carried out to determine the relative

  14. Interannual Variability in Dust Deposition, Radiative Forcing, and Snowmelt Rates in the Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.; Deems, J. S.; Barrett, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    Dust in snow accelerates snowmelt through its direct reduction of albedo and its further reduction of albedo by accelerating the growth of snow effective grain size. Since the Anglo expansion and disturbance of the western US that began in the mid 19th century, the mountain snow cover of the Colorado River Basin has been subject to five-fold greater dust loading. Here we present the impacts of dust deposition onto alpine snow cover using a 7-year energy balance record at the alpine and subalpine towers in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado, USA. We assess the radiative and hydrologic impacts with a two-layer point snow energy balance snowmelt model that calculates snowmelt and predicts point runoff using measured inputs of energy exchanges and snow properties. By removing the radiative forcing due to dust, we can determine snowmelt under observed dusty and modeled clean conditions. Additionally, we model the relative response of melt rates to simulated increases in air temperature. Our modeling results indicate that the number of days that dust advances retreat of snow cover and cumulative radiative forcing are linearly related to total dust concentration. The greatest dust radiative impact occurred in 2009, when the highest observed end of year dust concentrations reduced visible albedo to less than 0.35 during the last three weeks of snowcover and snow cover duration was shortened by 50 days. This work also shows that dust radiative forcing has a markedly greater impact on snow cover duration than increases in temperature in terms of acceleration of snowmelt. We have completed the same analysis over a 2-year energy balance record at the Grand Mesa Study plot (GMSP) in west central Colorado, 150 km north of SBBSA. This new location allows us to assess site variability. For example, at SBBSA 2010 and 2011 were the second and third highest dust deposition years, respectively, but 2010 was a larger year with 3

  15. Background radiation accumulation and lower limit of detection in thermoluminescent beta-gamma dosimeters used by the centralized external dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.; Ahmed, A.B.

    1991-12-01

    A value for ''average background radiation'' of 0.75 mR/week has been determined from a total of 1680 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) exposed in 70 houses for periods up to one year. The distribution of results indicates a rather large variation among houses, with a few locations exhibiting backgrounds double the general average. Some discrepancies in the short-term background accumulation of TLD's have been explained as being due to light leakage through the dosimeter cases. In addition the lower limit of detection (L D ) for deep and shallow dose equivalents has been determined for these dosimeters. The L D for occupational exposure depends strongly on the time a dosimeter is exposed to background radiation in the field. The L D can vary from a low of 2.4 mrem for high energy gamma rays when the background accumulation period is less than a few weeks to values as high as 66 mrem for uranium beta particles when background has been allowed to accumulate for more than 21 weeks

  16. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  17. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocke, David

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  18. Effects of radiation and thermal diffusivity on heat transfer over a stretching surface with variable heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddeek, M.A.; Abdelmeguid, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of radiation and thermal diffusivity on heat transfer over a stretching surface with variable heat flux has been studied. The thermal diffusivity is assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature. The governing partial differential equations have been transformed to ordinary differential equations. The exact analytical solution for the velocity and the numerical solution for the temperature field are given. Numerical solutions are obtained for different values of variable thermal diffusivity, radiation, temperature parameter and Prandtl number

  19. Interpopulational variability of molecular responses to ionizing radiation in freshwater bivalves Anodonta anatina (Unionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falfushynska, H. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Department of General Chemistry, I.Ya. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, 1, Maidan Voli, Ternopil 46001 (Ukraine); Gnatyshyna, L. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Department of General Chemistry, I.Ya. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, 1, Maidan Voli, Ternopil 46001 (Ukraine); Yurchak, I.; Stoliar, O. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Sokolova, I.M., E-mail: isokolova@uncc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors including chemical pollution and warming that can affect health of the resident organisms and their responses to novel challenges. We investigated the of in situ exposure history on molecular responses to a novel stressor, ionizing radiation, in unionid mollusks Anodonta anatina. Males from pristine (F-), agricultural (A-) sites and a cooling reservoir of a nuclear power plant (N-site) were exposed to acute low dose (2 mGy) X-ray radiation followed by 14 days of recovery (R-groups) or to control conditions (C-groups). Biomarkers of oxidative stress, geno-, cyto- and neurotoxicity were used to assess cellular injury and stress. Control group from the cooling reservoir (CN) had higher background levels of caspase-3 activity, metallothionein concentrations and nuclear lesions and lower levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione in the gills compared to other control groups (CF and CA). Irradiation induced cellular damage in mussels from all three sites including increased levels of nuclear lesions in hemocytes, depletion of caspase-3, suppression of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, an increase of the lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione levels, as well as down-regulation of cholinesterase indicating neurotoxicity. The up-regulation of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in the digestive gland and vitellogenin-like protein level in gonads were also found in radiation-exposed groups indicating feminization of males and disturbances of xenobiotic metabolism. The RA-group showed the greatest magnitude of radiation-induced stress responses compared to the other two groups. Overall, unionid mollusks, particularly those from a chronically polluted agricultural site, were highly sensitive to low-dose radiation (2 mGy) indicating limitations of stress protection mechanisms to deal with multiple stressors. - Highlights: • Habitat-specific effects of irradiation were studied

  20. Interpopulational variability of molecular responses to ionizing radiation in freshwater bivalves Anodonta anatina (Unionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falfushynska, H.; Gnatyshyna, L.; Yurchak, I.; Stoliar, O.; Sokolova, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors including chemical pollution and warming that can affect health of the resident organisms and their responses to novel challenges. We investigated the of in situ exposure history on molecular responses to a novel stressor, ionizing radiation, in unionid mollusks Anodonta anatina. Males from pristine (F-), agricultural (A-) sites and a cooling reservoir of a nuclear power plant (N-site) were exposed to acute low dose (2 mGy) X-ray radiation followed by 14 days of recovery (R-groups) or to control conditions (C-groups). Biomarkers of oxidative stress, geno-, cyto- and neurotoxicity were used to assess cellular injury and stress. Control group from the cooling reservoir (CN) had higher background levels of caspase-3 activity, metallothionein concentrations and nuclear lesions and lower levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione in the gills compared to other control groups (CF and CA). Irradiation induced cellular damage in mussels from all three sites including increased levels of nuclear lesions in hemocytes, depletion of caspase-3, suppression of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, an increase of the lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione levels, as well as down-regulation of cholinesterase indicating neurotoxicity. The up-regulation of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in the digestive gland and vitellogenin-like protein level in gonads were also found in radiation-exposed groups indicating feminization of males and disturbances of xenobiotic metabolism. The RA-group showed the greatest magnitude of radiation-induced stress responses compared to the other two groups. Overall, unionid mollusks, particularly those from a chronically polluted agricultural site, were highly sensitive to low-dose radiation (2 mGy) indicating limitations of stress protection mechanisms to deal with multiple stressors. - Highlights: • Habitat-specific effects of irradiation were studied

  1. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  2. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Gruel

    Full Text Available Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This

  3. Design of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.

    2012-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company (Webster, TX), is a unique propulsion system that could change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduces the propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station (ISS). The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster core generates 27 kW of waste heat during its 15 minute firing time. The rocket core will be maintained between 283 and 573 K by a pumped thermal control loop. The design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient-based radiator design. The paper will describe the radiator design option selected for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS, and how the system relates to future exploration vehicles.

  4. Design Analysis of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.; Cassady, Leonard D.

    2011-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company, is a unique propulsion system that can potentially change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduce propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station. The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster unit has a unique heat rejection requirement of about 27 kW over a firing time of 15 minutes. In order to control rocket core temperatures, peak operating temperatures of about 300 C are expected within the thermal control loop. Design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient based radiator design. The paper will describe radiator design options for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS as well as future exploration vehicles.

  5. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, A.V.; Kozlov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with K p index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  6. Spatiotemporal Variability of Earth's Radiation Balance Components from Russian Radiometer IKOR-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, M.

    2016-12-01

    The radiometer IKOR-M was created in National Research Saratov State University for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such information can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts, in researches of climate change trends and in calculation of absorbed solar radiation values and albedo of the Earth-atmosphere system. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October 2009 to August 2014 and second - from August 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" No 1 measurement in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" No 2. The scale relationship of the IKOR-M radiometers on "Meteor - M" No 1 and No 2 satellites found by comparing of the global distribution maps for monthly averaged albedo values. The seasonal and interannual variations of OSR, albedo and ASR were discussed. The variations between SW radiation budget components seem to be within observational uncertainty and natural variability governed by cloudiness, water vapor and aerosol variations. It was assessed spatial and temporal variations of albedo and the absorbed solar radiation over different regions. Latitudinal distributions of albedo and ASR were estimated in more detail. Meridional cross sections over oceans and land were used separately for this estimation. It was shown that the albedo and ASR data received from the radiometer IKOR-M can be used to detect El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. The reported study was funded by

  7. Interanual variability os solar radiation in Peninsula Iberica; Variabilidad interanual de la radiacion solar en la Peninsula Iberica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Tovar-Pescador, J.; Gamiz-Fortis, S.; Esteban-Parra, M.; Castro-Diez, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The NAO climatic phenomenon is the main responsible for the interanual cloud cover variability in Europe. We explore the relationship between the NAO and the solar radiation spatio-temporal variability in Europe during winter. Measured monthly sums of sunshine duration and short-wave downward solar flux reanalysis data have been used. Correlation analysis between the NAO index and the measured sunshine duration shows a maximum positive value (+0.75) over the Iberian Peninsula. Accordingly, solar radiation in this area undergoes an interanual variability that can reach up to 30%, with the derived consequences for a reliable solar energy resources evaluation. (Author)

  8. The response of bean plants to UV-B radiation under different irradiances of background visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen, Y.P.; Bornman, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Stella) were grown in controlled conditions under three different irradiances of visible light with or without UV-B (280–320nm) radiation. The biologically effective UV-B radiation (UV-BBE) was 6.17 kJ m −2 d −1 , and simulated a c. 5% decrease in stratospheric ozone at 55.7°N, 13.4°E. The photon flux densities of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) were either 700 μmol m −2−1 (HL), 500, μmol m −2 s −1 (ML) or 230 μmol m −2 s −1 PAR (LL). Under high light (HL) conditions plus UV-B radiation, bean plants appeared most resistant to the enhanced levels of UV-B radiation, and responded only by increasing leaf thickness by c. 18%. A small increase in UV screening pigments was also observed. Both the lower irradiances (ML and LL) increased the sensitivity of the plants to UV-B radiation. Changes in leaf structure were also observed. Photosystem II was inhibited under ML and LL together with UV-B radiation, as determined by Chi fluorescence induction and calculation of the fluorescence half-rise times. Leaf reflectivity measurements showed that the amount of PAR able to penetrate leaves of UV-B treated plants was reduced, and that a possible correlation may exist between the reduced PAR levels, loss of Chi and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially for LL +UV-B grown plants, where surface reflection from leaves was highest. Changes in leaf chlorophyll content were mostly confined to plants grown under LL + UV-B, where a decrease of c. 20% was found. With regard to protective pigments (the carotenoids and UV screening pigments) plants subjected to different visible light conditions responded differently. Among the growth parameters measured, there was a substantial decrease in leaf area, particularly under LL + UV-B (c. 47% relative to controls), where leaf dry weight was also reduced by c. 25%. (author)

  9. Surface Variability of Short-wavelength Radiation and Temperature on Exoplanets around M Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin; Tian, Feng [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Yuwei [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0B9 (Canada); Dudhia, Jimy; Chen, Ming, E-mail: tianfengco@tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-03-10

    It is a common practice to use 3D General Circulation Models (GCM) with spatial resolution of a few hundred kilometers to simulate the climate of Earth-like exoplanets. The enhanced albedo effect of clouds is especially important for exoplanets in the habitable zones around M dwarfs that likely have fixed substellar regions and substantial cloud coverage. Here, we carry out mesoscale model simulations with 3 km spatial resolution driven by the initial and boundary conditions in a 3D GCM and find that it could significantly underestimate the spatial variability of both the incident short-wavelength radiation and the temperature at planet surface. Our findings suggest that mesoscale models with cloud-resolving capability be considered for future studies of exoplanet climate.

  10. Regularized variable metric method versus the conjugate gradient method in solution of radiative boundary design problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowsary, F.; Pooladvand, K.; Pourshaghaghy, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an appropriate distribution of the heating elements' strengths in a radiation furnace is estimated using inverse methods so that a pre-specified temperature and heat flux distribution is attained on the design surface. Minimization of the sum of the squares of the error function is performed using the variable metric method (VMM), and the results are compared with those obtained by the conjugate gradient method (CGM) established previously in the literature. It is shown via test cases and a well-founded validation procedure that the VMM, when using a 'regularized' estimator, is more accurate and is able to reach at a higher quality final solution as compared to the CGM. The test cases used in this study were two-dimensional furnaces filled with an absorbing, emitting, and scattering gas

  11. Full characterisation of a background limited antenna coupled KID over an octave of bandwidth for THz radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueno, J.; Yurduseven, O.; Yates, S. J. C.; Llombart, N.; Murugesan, V.; Thoen, D. J.; Baryshev, A. M.; Neto, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and full characterisation (sensitivity, beam pattern, and frequency response) of a background limited broadband antenna coupled kinetic inductance detector covering the frequency range from 1.4 to 2.8 THz. This device shows photon noise limited performance with a

  12. Modeling the variability of solar radiation data among weather stations by means of principal components analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzo, Manuel; Marti, Pau

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: →Principal components analysis was applied to R s data recorded at 30 stations. → Four principal components explain 97% of the data variability. → The latent variables can be fitted according to latitude, longitude and altitude. → The PCA approach is more effective for gap infilling than conventional approaches. → The proposed method allows daily R s estimations at locations in the area of study. - Abstract: Measurements of global terrestrial solar radiation (R s ) are commonly recorded in meteorological stations. Daily variability of R s has to be taken into account for the design of photovoltaic systems and energy efficient buildings. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to R s data recorded at 30 stations in the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Due to equipment failures and site operation problems, time series of R s often present data gaps or discontinuities. The PCA approach copes with this problem and allows estimation of present and past values by taking advantage of R s records from nearby stations. The gap infilling performance of this methodology is compared with neural networks and alternative conventional approaches. Four principal components explain 66% of the data variability with respect to the average trajectory (97% if non-centered values are considered). A new method based on principal components regression was also developed for R s estimation if previous measurements are not available. By means of multiple linear regression, it was found that the latent variables associated to the four relevant principal components can be fitted according to the latitude, longitude and altitude of the station where data were recorded from. Additional geographical or climatic variables did not increase the predictive goodness-of-fit. The resulting models allow the estimation of daily R s values at any location in the area under study and present higher accuracy than artificial neural networks and some conventional approaches

  13. Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline 1934 : Richard Tolman shows that blackbody radiation in an will have a blackbody cosmic microwave background with temperature about 5 K 1955: Tigran Shmaonov anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, this strongly supports the big bang model with gravitational

  14. Influence factors of risk perception of radiation and its background. Questionnaire survey for reclamation project in the uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Kaoru; Gofuku, Akio; Tanaka, Masaru; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    To obtain public understanding on the uranium mining sites reclamation at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, it is necessary to conduct appropriate Risk Communication (RC). In this study, to discuss the appropriate Risk communication method on the uranium mining sites reclamation, we conducted questionnaire survey and text analysis. The results of the text analysis are as follows: (1) The main elements of the concern of radiation are the uneasiness to oncogenesis or a health effect. (2) The trusts for technology or scientists are the main elements of the reliance for the standard of radiation, in the group which shows low-sense of ownership, hatred for radioactive ray has a strong impact relatively. (author)

  15. Tracking the dose distribution in radiation therapy by accounting for variable anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Kempe, J A; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this research is to calculate the daily and cumulative dose distribution received by the radiotherapy patient while accounting for variable anatomy, by tracking the dose distribution delivered to tissue elements (voxels) that move within the patient. Non-linear image registration techniques (i.e., thin-plate splines) are used along with a conventional treatment planning system to combine the dose distributions computed for each 3D computed tomography (CT) study taken during treatment. For a clinical prostate case, we demonstrate that there are significant localized dose differences due to systematic voxel motion in a single fraction as well as in 15 cumulative fractions. The largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 29%, 2% and 24%, respectively, after the first fraction of radiation treatment compared to the planned dose. After 15 cumulative fractions, the largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 23%, 32% and 18%, respectively, compared to the planned dose. A sensitivity analysis of control point placement is also presented. This method provides an important understanding of actual delivered doses and has the potential to provide quantit