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Sample records for validated reproducible metrics

  1. INFORMATIVE ENERGY METRIC FOR SIMILARITY MEASURE IN REPRODUCING KERNEL HILBERT SPACES

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    Songhua Liu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, information energy metric (IEM is obtained by similarity computing for high-dimensional samples in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS. Firstly, similar/dissimilar subsets and their corresponding informative energy functions are defined. Secondly, IEM is proposed for similarity measure of those subsets, which converts the non-metric distances into metric ones. Finally, applications of this metric is introduced, such as classification problems. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Reproducibility of graph metrics in fMRI networks

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    Qawi K Telesford

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of graph metrics calculated in network analysis is essential to the interpretation of complex network organization. These graph metrics are used to deduce the small-world properties in networks. In this study, we investigated the test-retest reliability of graph metrics from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data collected for two runs in 45 healthy older adults. Graph metrics were calculated on data for both runs and compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC statistics and Bland-Altman (BA plots. ICC scores describe the level of absolute agreement between two measurements and provide a measure of reproducibility. For mean graph metrics, ICC scores were high for clustering coefficient (ICC=0.86, global efficiency (ICC=0.83, path length (ICC=0.79, and local efficiency (ICC=0.75; the ICC score for degree was found to be low (ICC=0.29. ICC scores were also used to generate reproducibility maps in brain space to test voxel-wise reproducibility for unsmoothed and smoothed data. Reproducibility was uniform across the brain for global efficiency and path length, but was only high in network hubs for clustering coefficient, local efficiency and degree. BA plots were used to test the measurement repeatability of all graph metrics. All graph metrics fell within the limits for repeatability. Together, these results suggest that with exception of degree, mean graph metrics are reproducible and suitable for clinical studies. Further exploration is warranted to better understand reproducibility across the brain on a voxel-wise basis.

  3. A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE: REPRODUCIBILITY AND VALIDITY

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    Nicolas Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the Quantification de L'Activite Physique en Altitude chez les Enfants (QAPACE supervised self-administered questionnaire reproducibility and validity on the estimation of the mean daily energy expenditure (DEE on Bogotá's schoolchildren. The comprehension was assessed on 324 students, whereas the reproducibility was studied on a different random sample of 162 who were exposed twice to it. Reproducibility was assessed using both the Bland-Altman plot and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. The validity was studied in a sample of 18 girls and 18 boys randomly selected, which completed the test - re-test study. The DEE derived from the questionnaire was compared with the laboratory measurement results of the peak oxygen uptake (Peak VO2 from ergo-spirometry and Leger Test. The reproducibility ICC was 0.96 (95% C.I. 0.95-0.97; by age categories 8-10, 0.94 (0.89-0. 97; 11-13, 0.98 (0.96- 0.99; 14-16, 0.95 (0.91-0.98. The ICC between mean TEE as estimated by the questionnaire and the direct and indirect Peak VO2 was 0.76 (0.66 (p<0.01; by age categories, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-16 were 0.89 (0.87, 0.76 (0.78 and 0.88 (0.80 respectively. The QAPACE questionnaire is reproducible and valid for estimating PA and showed a high correlation with the Peak VO2 uptake

  4. Validation of Metrics for Collaborative Systems

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    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe the new concepts of collaborative systems metrics validation. The paper define the quality characteristics of collaborative systems. There are proposed a metric to estimate the quality level of collaborative systems. There are performed measurements of collaborative systems quality using a specially designed software.

  5. Validation of Metrics for Collaborative Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ion IVAN; Cristian CIUREA

    2008-01-01

    This paper describe the new concepts of collaborative systems metrics validation. The paper define the quality characteristics of collaborative systems. There are proposed a metric to estimate the quality level of collaborative systems. There are performed measurements of collaborative systems quality using a specially designed software.

  6. Reproducibility of graph metrics of human brain functional networks.

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    Deuker, Lorena; Bullmore, Edward T; Smith, Marie; Christensen, Soren; Nathan, Pradeep J; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Bassett, Danielle S

    2009-10-01

    Graph theory provides many metrics of complex network organization that can be applied to analysis of brain networks derived from neuroimaging data. Here we investigated the test-retest reliability of graph metrics of functional networks derived from magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded in two sessions from 16 healthy volunteers who were studied at rest and during performance of the n-back working memory task in each session. For each subject's data at each session, we used a wavelet filter to estimate the mutual information (MI) between each pair of MEG sensors in each of the classical frequency intervals from gamma to low delta in the overall range 1-60 Hz. Undirected binary graphs were generated by thresholding the MI matrix and 8 global network metrics were estimated: the clustering coefficient, path length, small-worldness, efficiency, cost-efficiency, assortativity, hierarchy, and synchronizability. Reliability of each graph metric was assessed using the intraclass correlation (ICC). Good reliability was demonstrated for most metrics applied to the n-back data (mean ICC=0.62). Reliability was greater for metrics in lower frequency networks. Higher frequency gamma- and beta-band networks were less reliable at a global level but demonstrated high reliability of nodal metrics in frontal and parietal regions. Performance of the n-back task was associated with greater reliability than measurements on resting state data. Task practice was also associated with greater reliability. Collectively these results suggest that graph metrics are sufficiently reliable to be considered for future longitudinal studies of functional brain network changes.

  7. Validation of Metrics as Error Predictors

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    Mendling, Jan

    In this chapter, we test the validity of metrics that were defined in the previous chapter for predicting errors in EPC business process models. In Section 5.1, we provide an overview of how the analysis data is generated. Section 5.2 describes the sample of EPCs from practice that we use for the analysis. Here we discuss a disaggregation by the EPC model group and by error as well as a correlation analysis between metrics and error. Based on this sample, we calculate a logistic regression model for predicting error probability with the metrics as input variables in Section 5.3. In Section 5.4, we then test the regression function for an independent sample of EPC models from textbooks as a cross-validation. Section 5.5 summarizes the findings.

  8. Enhancing reproducibility in scientific computing: Metrics and registry for Singularity containers.

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    Vanessa V Sochat

    Full Text Available Here we present Singularity Hub, a framework to build and deploy Singularity containers for mobility of compute, and the singularity-python software with novel metrics for assessing reproducibility of such containers. Singularity containers make it possible for scientists and developers to package reproducible software, and Singularity Hub adds automation to this workflow by building, capturing metadata for, visualizing, and serving containers programmatically. Our novel metrics, based on custom filters of content hashes of container contents, allow for comparison of an entire container, including operating system, custom software, and metadata. First we will review Singularity Hub's primary use cases and how the infrastructure has been designed to support modern, common workflows. Next, we conduct three analyses to demonstrate build consistency, reproducibility metric and performance and interpretability, and potential for discovery. This is the first effort to demonstrate a rigorous assessment of measurable similarity between containers and operating systems. We provide these capabilities within Singularity Hub, as well as the source software singularity-python that provides the underlying functionality. Singularity Hub is available at https://singularity-hub.org, and we are excited to provide it as an openly available platform for building, and deploying scientific containers.

  9. Enhancing reproducibility in scientific computing: Metrics and registry for Singularity containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prybol, Cameron J.; Kurtzer, Gregory M.

    2017-01-01

    Here we present Singularity Hub, a framework to build and deploy Singularity containers for mobility of compute, and the singularity-python software with novel metrics for assessing reproducibility of such containers. Singularity containers make it possible for scientists and developers to package reproducible software, and Singularity Hub adds automation to this workflow by building, capturing metadata for, visualizing, and serving containers programmatically. Our novel metrics, based on custom filters of content hashes of container contents, allow for comparison of an entire container, including operating system, custom software, and metadata. First we will review Singularity Hub’s primary use cases and how the infrastructure has been designed to support modern, common workflows. Next, we conduct three analyses to demonstrate build consistency, reproducibility metric and performance and interpretability, and potential for discovery. This is the first effort to demonstrate a rigorous assessment of measurable similarity between containers and operating systems. We provide these capabilities within Singularity Hub, as well as the source software singularity-python that provides the underlying functionality. Singularity Hub is available at https://singularity-hub.org, and we are excited to provide it as an openly available platform for building, and deploying scientific containers. PMID:29186161

  10. ISS Logistics Hardware Disposition and Metrics Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Toneka R.

    2010-01-01

    I was assigned to the Logistics Division of the International Space Station (ISS)/Spacecraft Processing Directorate. The Division consists of eight NASA engineers and specialists that oversee the logistics portion of the Checkout, Assembly, and Payload Processing Services (CAPPS) contract. Boeing, their sub-contractors and the Boeing Prime contract out of Johnson Space Center, provide the Integrated Logistics Support for the ISS activities at Kennedy Space Center. Essentially they ensure that spares are available to support flight hardware processing and the associated ground support equipment (GSE). Boeing maintains a Depot for electrical, mechanical and structural modifications and/or repair capability as required. My assigned task was to learn project management techniques utilized by NASA and its' contractors to provide an efficient and effective logistics support infrastructure to the ISS program. Within the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) I was exposed to Logistics support components, such as, the NASA Spacecraft Services Depot (NSSD) capabilities, Mission Processing tools, techniques and Warehouse support issues, required for integrating Space Station elements at the Kennedy Space Center. I also supported the identification of near-term ISS Hardware and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) candidates for excessing/disposition prior to October 2010; and the validation of several Logistics Metrics used by the contractor to measure logistics support effectiveness.

  11. Validation and reproducibility of an Australian caffeine food frequency questionnaire.

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    Watson, E J; Kohler, M; Banks, S; Coates, A M

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to measure validity and reproducibility of a caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ) developed for the Australian population. The C-FFQ was designed to assess average daily caffeine consumption using four categories of food and beverages including; energy drinks; soft drinks/soda; coffee and tea and chocolate (food and drink). Participants completed a seven-day food diary immediately followed by the C-FFQ on two consecutive days. The questionnaire was first piloted in 20 adults, and then, a validity/reproducibility study was conducted (n = 90 adults). The C-FFQ showed moderate correlations (r = .60), fair agreement (mean difference 63 mg) and reasonable quintile rankings indicating fair to moderate agreement with the seven-day food diary. To test reproducibility, the C-FFQ was compared to itself and showed strong correlations (r = .90), good quintile rankings and strong kappa values (κ = 0.65), indicating strong reproducibility. The C-FFQ shows adequate validity and reproducibility and will aid researchers in Australia to quantify caffeine consumption.

  12. Transition questions in clinical practice - validity and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2008-01-01

    Transition questions in CLINICAL practice - validity and reproducibility Lauridsen HH1, Manniche C3, Grunnet-Nilsson N1, Hartvigsen J1,2 1   Clinical Locomotion Science, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e-mail: hlauridsen......@health.sdu.dk 2   Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Odense, Denmark 3   Backcenter Funen, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Ringe, Denmark   Abstract  Understanding a change score is indispensable for interpretation of results from clinical studies...... are reproducible in patients with low back pain and/or leg pain. Despite critique of several biases, our results have reinforced the construct validity of TQ’s as an outcome measure since only 1 hypothesis was rejected. On the basis of our findings we have outlined a proposal for a standardised use of transition...

  13. Validity and reproducibility of a Spanish dietary history.

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    Pilar Guallar-Castillón

    Full Text Available To assess the validity and reproducibility of food and nutrient intake estimated with the electronic diet history of ENRICA (DH-E, which collects information on numerous aspects of the Spanish diet.The validity of food and nutrient intake was estimated using Pearson correlation coefficients between the DH-E and the mean of seven 24-hour recalls collected every 2 months over the previous year. The reproducibility was estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients between two DH-E made one year apart.The correlations coefficients between the DH-E and the mean of seven 24-hour recalls for the main food groups were cereals (r = 0.66, meat (r = 0.66, fish (r = 0.42, vegetables (r = 0.62 and fruits (r = 0.44. The mean correlation coefficient for all 15 food groups considered was 0.53. The correlations for macronutrients were: energy (r = 0.76, proteins (r= 0.58, lipids (r = 0.73, saturated fat (r = 0.73, monounsaturated fat (r = 0.59, polyunsaturated fat (r = 0.57, and carbohydrates (r = 0.66. The mean correlation coefficient for all 41 nutrients studied was 0.55. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the two DH-E was greater than 0.40 for most foods and nutrients.The DH-E shows good validity and reproducibility for estimating usual intake of foods and nutrients.

  14. Optimizing the fMRI data-processing pipeline using prediction and reproducibility performance metrics: I. A preliminary group analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strother, Stephen C.; Conte, Stephen La; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We argue that published results demonstrate that new insights into human brain function may be obscured by poor and/or limited choices in the data-processing pipeline, and review the work on performance metrics for optimizing pipelines: prediction, reproducibility, and related empirical Receiver......, temporal detrending, and between-subject alignment) in a group analysis of BOLD-fMRI scans from 16 subjects performing a block-design, parametric-static-force task. Large-scale brain networks were detected using a multivariate linear discriminant analysis (canonical variates analysis, CVA) that was tuned...... of baseline scans have constant, equal means, and this assumption was assessed with prediction metrics. Higher-order polynomial warps compared to affine alignment had only a minor impact on the performance metrics. We found that both prediction and reproducibility metrics were required for optimizing...

  15. Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.

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    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

    2005-08-01

    With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

  16. A psychophysically validated metric for bidirectional texture data reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Chantler, M.J.; Green, P.R.; Haindl, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2008), s. 138:1-138:11 ISSN 0730-0301 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400750407; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Bidirectional Texture Functions * texture compression Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2008 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/RO/haindl-a psychophysically validated metric for bidirectional texture data reduction.pdf

  17. Development, Validation, and Implementation of a Medical Judgment Metric

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    Rami A. Ahmed DO, MHPE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical decision making is a critical, yet understudied, aspect of medical education. Aims: To develop the Medical Judgment Metric (MJM, a numerical rubric to quantify good decisions in practice in simulated environments; and to obtain initial preliminary evidence of reliability and validity of the tool. Methods: The individual MJM items, domains, and sections of the MJM were built based on existing standardized frameworks. Content validity was determined by a convenient sample of eight experts. The MJM instrument was pilot tested in four medical simulations with a team of three medical raters assessing 40 participants with four levels of medical experience and skill. Results: Raters were highly consistent in their MJM scores in each scenario (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.965 to 0.987 as well as their evaluation of the expected patient outcome (Fleiss’s Kappa 0.791 to 0.906. For each simulation scenario, average rater cut-scores significantly predicted expected loss of life or stabilization (Cohen’s Kappa 0.851 to 0.880. Discussion : The MJM demonstrated preliminary evidence of reliability and validity.

  18. Reproducibility of R-fMRI metrics on the impact of different strategies for multiple comparison correction and sample sizes.

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    Chen, Xiao; Lu, Bin; Yan, Chao-Gan

    2018-01-01

    Concerns regarding reproducibility of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) findings have been raised. Little is known about how to operationally define R-fMRI reproducibility and to what extent it is affected by multiple comparison correction strategies and sample size. We comprehensively assessed two aspects of reproducibility, test-retest reliability and replicability, on widely used R-fMRI metrics in both between-subject contrasts of sex differences and within-subject comparisons of eyes-open and eyes-closed (EOEC) conditions. We noted permutation test with Threshold-Free Cluster Enhancement (TFCE), a strict multiple comparison correction strategy, reached the best balance between family-wise error rate (under 5%) and test-retest reliability/replicability (e.g., 0.68 for test-retest reliability and 0.25 for replicability of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) for between-subject sex differences, 0.49 for replicability of ALFF for within-subject EOEC differences). Although R-fMRI indices attained moderate reliabilities, they replicated poorly in distinct datasets (replicability < 0.3 for between-subject sex differences, < 0.5 for within-subject EOEC differences). By randomly drawing different sample sizes from a single site, we found reliability, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) rose as sample size increased. Small sample sizes (e.g., < 80 [40 per group]) not only minimized power (sensitivity < 2%), but also decreased the likelihood that significant results reflect "true" effects (PPV < 0.26) in sex differences. Our findings have implications for how to select multiple comparison correction strategies and highlight the importance of sufficiently large sample sizes in R-fMRI studies to enhance reproducibility. Hum Brain Mapp 39:300-318, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Validation of a method for accurate and highly reproducible quantification of brain dopamine transporter SPECT studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter S; Ziebell, Morten; Skouboe, Glenna

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine brain imaging, it is important to delineate regions of interest (ROIs) so that the outcome is both accurate and reproducible. The purpose of this study was to validate a new time-saving algorithm (DATquan) for accurate and reproducible quantification of the striatal dopamine t...... transporter (DAT) with appropriate radioligands and SPECT and without the need for structural brain scanning....

  20. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire for dietary factors related to colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tollosa, Daniel Nigusse; Van Camp, John; Huybrechts, Inge; Huybregts, Lieven; Van Loco, Joris; De Smet, Stefaan; Sterck, Ellen; Rabai, Celine; Van Hecke, Thomas; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vossen, Els; Peeters, Marc; Lachat, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Dietary factors play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer. This study evaluated the reproducibility and validity of a 109-food item Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) to measure the consumption of foods and nutrients related to the development of colorectal cancer in a population aged 50 years in Flanders, Belgium. A semi-quantitative FFQ was administered two times in a period of two weeks to evaluate reproducibility (FFQ1 and FFQ2). The validity of the FFQ was asses...

  1. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire for adults of São Paulo, Brazil.

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    Selem, Soraya Sant'Ana de Castro; Carvalho, Aline Martins de; Verly-Junior, Eliseu; Carlos, Jackeline Venâncio; Teixeira, Juliana Araujo; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Fisberg, Regina Mara

    2014-12-01

    To assess the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire developed for estimating the food consumption of adults in São Paulo, Brazil, based population study. A sample of individuals aged above 20 years, of both genders, living in São Paulo, was used for the validation study (n = 77) and reproducibility study (n = 74) of the food frequency questionnaire. To verify the validity and reproducibility of energy and 19 nutrients were applied two food frequency questionnaires (60 items) and three 24-hour dietary recalls (24HR - reference method). The validity was verified by Spearman correlation coefficient (crude and de-attenuated) and weighted Kappa, and reproducibility by intraclass correlation coefficients and weighted kappa. In analyzes of validity de-attenuated correlation coefficients ranged from 0.21 (carbohydrate) to 0.74 (energy), and weighted kappa exceeded 0.40 for 30% of the nutrients. Polyunsaturated fat and folate did not show significant correlation and weighted kappa. In reproducibility correlation coefficients ranged from 0.36 (polyunsaturated fat) to 0.69 (calcium), and weighted kappa exceeded 0.40 for 80% of the nutrients. The food frequency questionnaire analyzed has good validity and reproducibility for estimating the food consumption of adults in São Paulo compared to the reference method, so it is an appropriate instrument to be used in epidemiological studies on similar populations. Estimates of polyunsaturated fat and folate should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Prospective validation of pathologic complete response models in rectal cancer: Transferability and reproducibility.

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    van Soest, Johan; Meldolesi, Elisa; van Stiphout, Ruud; Gatta, Roberto; Damiani, Andrea; Valentini, Vincenzo; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-09-01

    Multiple models have been developed to predict pathologic complete response (pCR) in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Unfortunately, validation of these models normally omit the implications of cohort differences on prediction model performance. In this work, we will perform a prospective validation of three pCR models, including information whether this validation will target transferability or reproducibility (cohort differences) of the given models. We applied a novel methodology, the cohort differences model, to predict whether a patient belongs to the training or to the validation cohort. If the cohort differences model performs well, it would suggest a large difference in cohort characteristics meaning we would validate the transferability of the model rather than reproducibility. We tested our method in a prospective validation of three existing models for pCR prediction in 154 patients. Our results showed a large difference between training and validation cohort for one of the three tested models [Area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC) cohort differences model: 0.85], signaling the validation leans towards transferability. Two out of three models had a lower AUC for validation (0.66 and 0.58), one model showed a higher AUC in the validation cohort (0.70). We have successfully applied a new methodology in the validation of three prediction models, which allows us to indicate if a validation targeted transferability (large differences between training/validation cohort) or reproducibility (small cohort differences). © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Validity and reproducibility of self-reported working hours among Japanese male employees

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Teppei; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Hiroko; Nishihara, Akiko; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Dohi, Seitaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Working long hours is a potential health hazard. Although self-reporting of working hours in various time frames has been used in epidemiologic studies, its validity is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the validity and reproducibility of self-reported working hours among Japanese male employees. Methods: The participants were 164 male employees of four large-scale companies in Japan. For validity, the Spearman correlation between self-reported working hours in th...

  4. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire for dietary factors related to colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tollosa, Daniel Nigusse; Van Camp, John; Huybrechts, Inge; Huybregts, Lieven; Van Loco, Joris; De Smet, Stefaan; Sterck, Ellen; Rabâi, Céline; Van Hecke, Thomas; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vossen, Els; Peeters, Marc; Lachat, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Dietary factors play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer. This study evaluated the reproducibility and validity of a 109-food item Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) to measure the consumption of foods and nutrients related to the development of colorectal cancer in a population aged ≥50 years in Flanders, Belgium. A semi-quantitative FFQ was administered two times in a period of two weeks to evaluate reproducibility (FFQ1 and FFQ2). The validity of the FFQ was assessed by co...

  5. Assessing Cognitive Performance in Badminton Players: A Reproducibility and Validity Study

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    van de Water Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast reaction and good inhibitory control are associated with elite sports performance. To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a newly developed Badminton Reaction Inhibition Test (BRIT, fifteen elite (25 ± 4 years and nine non-elite (24 ± 4 years Dutch male badminton players participated in the study. The BRIT measured four components: domain-general reaction time, badminton-specific reaction time, domain-general inhibitory control and badminton-specific inhibitory control. Five participants were retested within three weeks on the badminton-specific components. Reproducibility was acceptable for badminton-specific reaction time (ICC = 0.626, CV = 6% and for badminton-specific inhibitory control (ICC = 0.317, CV = 13%. Good construct validity was shown for badminton-specific reaction time discriminating between elite and non-elite players (F = 6.650, p 0.05. Concurrent validity for domain-general reaction time was good, as it was associated with a national ranking for elite (p = 0.70, p 0.05. In conclusion, reproducibility and validity of inhibitory control assessment was not confirmed, however, the BRIT appears a reproducible and valid measure of reaction time in badminton players. Reaction time measured with the BRIT may provide input for training programs aiming to improve badminton players’ performance.

  6. Assessing Cognitive Performance in Badminton Players: A Reproducibility and Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, Tanja; Huijgen, Barbara; Faber, Irene; Elferink-Gemser, Marije

    2017-01-01

    Fast reaction and good inhibitory control are associated with elite sports performance. To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a newly developed Badminton Reaction Inhibition Test (BRIT), fifteen elite (25 ± 4 years) and nine non-elite (24 ± 4 years) Dutch male badminton players participated in the study. The BRIT measured four components: domain-general reaction time, badminton-specific reaction time, domain-general inhibitory control and badminton-specific inhibitory control. Five participants were retested within three weeks on the badminton-specific components. Reproducibility was acceptable for badminton-specific reaction time (ICC = 0.626, CV = 6%) and for badminton-specific inhibitory control (ICC = 0.317, CV = 13%). Good construct validity was shown for badminton-specific reaction time discriminating between elite and non-elite players (F = 6.650, p 0.05). Concurrent validity for domain-general reaction time was good, as it was associated with a national ranking for elite (p = 0.70, p badminton-specific reaction time, nor both components of inhibitory control (p > 0.05). In conclusion, reproducibility and validity of inhibitory control assessment was not confirmed, however, the BRIT appears a reproducible and valid measure of reaction time in badminton players. Reaction time measured with the BRIT may provide input for training programs aiming to improve badminton players' performance.

  7. Reproducibility and validity of video screen measurements of gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, S.; van Kampen, P.M.; van der Krogt, M.M.; Brehm, M.A.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Becher, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the reproducibility and validity of video screen measurement (VSM) of sagittal plane joint angles during gait. Methods: 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy walked on a 10. m walkway. Videos were recorded and 3d-instrumented gait analysis was performed. Two investigators

  8. Reproducibility and validity of video screen measurements of gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, Sebastian; van Kampen, Petra J.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Doorenbosch, Caroline A. M.; Becher, Jules G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the reproducibility and validity of video screen measurement (VSM) of sagittal plane joint angles during gait. METHODS: 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy walked on a 10m walkway. Videos were recorded and 3d-instrumented gait analysis was performed. Two investigators

  9. Reproducibility and validity of the DynaPort KneeTest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokkink, L.B.; Terwee, C.B.; Slikke, van der R.M.; Lummel, van R.C.; Benink, R.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, de H.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the reproducibility and validity of the DynaPort KneeTest, a performance-based test that measures quality of movement of patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: A total of 92 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee performed the KneeTest twice on the

  10. Assessing Cognitive Performance in Badminton Players : A Reproducibility and Validity Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Water, Tanja; Huijgen, Barbara; Faber, Irene R.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije

    2017-01-01

    Fast reaction and good inhibitory control are associated with elite sports performance. To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a newly developed Badminton Reaction Inhibition Test (BRIT), fifteen elite (25 +/- 4 years) and nine non-elite (24 +/- 4 years) Dutch male badminton players

  11. Validity and Reproducibility of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Dietary Factors Related to Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollosa, Daniel Nigusse; Van Camp, John; Huybrechts, Inge; Huybregts, Lieven; Van Loco, Joris; De Smet, Stefaan; Sterck, Ellen; Rabâi, Céline; Van Hecke, Thomas; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vossen, Els; Peeters, Marc; Lachat, Carl

    2017-11-17

    Dietary factors play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer. This study evaluated the reproducibility and validity of a 109-food item Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) to measure the consumption of foods and nutrients related to the development of colorectal cancer in a population aged ≥50 years in Flanders, Belgium. A semi-quantitative FFQ was administered two times in a period of two weeks to evaluate reproducibility (FFQ1 and FFQ2). The validity of the FFQ was assessed by comparing FFQ1 against the 3-day diary method (3 DD). A total of 162 respondents (mean age 57.5 years) provided data for the FFQ, of whom 156 also participated in the validity assessment. Mean differences in the intake of foods and nutrients between FFQ1 and FFQ2 were, overall, small and statistically insignificant. However, a higher estimation was observed by FFQ1 as compared to the 3-DD method for the majority of food groups and nutrient intake in the validity assessment. A systematic mean difference (g/day) was observed for eight food groups in the Bland-Altman agreement test; the largest was for fruit intake. Regarding the nutrients, a systematic mean difference was observed in calcium, fat, and vitamin D intake. Overall, the reproducibility of the FFQ was good, and its validity could be satisfactory for estimating absolute food and nutrient intakes and ranking individuals according to high and low intake categories.

  12. Validity and Reproducibility of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Dietary Factors Related to Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nigusse Tollosa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dietary factors play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer. This study evaluated the reproducibility and validity of a 109-food item Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ to measure the consumption of foods and nutrients related to the development of colorectal cancer in a population aged ≥50 years in Flanders, Belgium. A semi-quantitative FFQ was administered two times in a period of two weeks to evaluate reproducibility (FFQ1 and FFQ2. The validity of the FFQ was assessed by comparing FFQ1 against the 3-day diary method (3 DD. A total of 162 respondents (mean age 57.5 years provided data for the FFQ, of whom 156 also participated in the validity assessment. Mean differences in the intake of foods and nutrients between FFQ1 and FFQ2 were, overall, small and statistically insignificant. However, a higher estimation was observed by FFQ1 as compared to the 3-DD method for the majority of food groups and nutrient intake in the validity assessment. A systematic mean difference (g/day was observed for eight food groups in the Bland–Altman agreement test; the largest was for fruit intake. Regarding the nutrients, a systematic mean difference was observed in calcium, fat, and vitamin D intake. Overall, the reproducibility of the FFQ was good, and its validity could be satisfactory for estimating absolute food and nutrient intakes and ranking individuals according to high and low intake categories.

  13. Validity and Reproducibility of the Iodine Dietary Intake Questionnaire Assessment Conducted for Young Polish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malowaniec, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse a designed brief iodine dietary intake questionnaire based on a food frequency assessment (IOdine Dietary INtake Evaluation-Food Frequency Questionnaire—IODINE-FFQ), including the assessment of validity and reproducibility in a group of 90 Polish women aged 20–35 years. Participants collected 3-day dietary records and filled in the IODINE-FFQ twice (FFQ1—directly after the dietary record and FFQ2—6 weeks later). The analysis included an assessment of validity (comparison with the results of the 3-day dietary record) and of reproducibility (comparison of the results obtained twice—FFQ1 and FFQ2). In the analysis of validity, a Bland-Altman index of 5.5% and 4.4% was recorded, respectively for FFQ1 and FFQ2. In the analysis of reproducibility it was 6.7%, but the share of individuals correctly classified into tertiles was over 70% (weighted κ of 0.675). It was stated, that assessment of IODINE-FFQ revealed a satisfactory level of validity and reproducibility in the analysis of Bland-Alman plot. The IODINE-FFQ may be indicated as a tool for the assessment of iodine intake in the young women in Poland, however further studies should be considered in order to obtain the practical tool for public health specialists. Due to the lack of validated iodine-specific food frequency questionnaires for countries of Eastern Europe, the IODINE-FFQ may be adjusted for courtiers other than Poland including iodine-fortified products. PMID:28661461

  14. Reproducibility and validity of the Shanghai Women's Health Study physical activity questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Charles E; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Yang, Gong; Jin, Fan; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Liu, Dake; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2003-12-01

    In this investigation, the authors evaluated the reproducibility and validity of the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) physical activity questionnaire (PAQ), which was administered in a cohort study of approximately 75,000 Chinese women aged 40-70 years. Reproducibility (2-year test-retest) was evaluated using kappa statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Validity was evaluated by comparing Spearman correlations (r) for the SWHS PAQ with two criterion measures administered over a period of 12 months: four 7-day physical activity logs and up to 28 7-day PAQs. Women were recruited from the SWHS cohort (n = 200). Results indicated that the reproducibility of adolescent and adult exercise participation (kappa = 0.85 and kappa = 0.64, respectively) and years of adolescent exercise and adult exercise energy expenditure (ICC = 0.83 and ICC = 0.70, respectively) was reasonable. Reproducibility values for adult lifestyle activities were lower (ICC = 0.14-0.54). Significant correlations between the PAQ and criterion measures of adult exercise were observed for the first PAQ administration (physical activity log, r = 0.50; 7-day PAQ, r = 0.62) and the second PAQ administration (physical activity log, r = 0.74; 7-day PAQ, r = 0.80). Significant correlations between PAQ lifestyle activities and the 7-day PAQ were also noted (r = 0.33-0.88). These data indicate that the SWHS PAQ is a reproducible and valid measure of exercise behaviors and that it demonstrates utility in stratifying women by levels of important lifestyle activities (e.g., housework, walking, cycling).

  15. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  16. Reliability, Validity, Comparability and Practical Utility of Cybercrime-Related Data, Metrics, and Information

    OpenAIRE

    Nir Kshetri

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing pervasiveness, prevalence and severity of cybercrimes, various metrics, measures and statistics have been developed and used to measure various aspects of this phenomenon. Cybercrime-related data, metrics, and information, however, pose important and difficult dilemmas regarding the issues of reliability, validity, comparability and practical utility. While many of the issues of the cybercrime economy are similar to other underground and underworld industries, this economy ...

  17. Reproducibility and validity of the Shanghai Men's Health Study physical activity questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurj, Adriana L; Wen, Wanqing; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Matthews, Charles E; Liu, Dake; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2007-05-15

    Reproducibility and validity of the physical activity questionnaire (PAQ) used in the Shanghai Men's Health Study (2003-2006, People's Republic of China) was evaluated in a random sample of 196 participants aged 40-74 years. Participants completed a PAQ at baseline and again 1 year later, 12 monthly 7-day physical activity recalls, and four quarterly 1-week physical activity logs. Reproducibility was evaluated by using the two PAQs and validity by comparing the PAQs with 1-year averages of the two criterion measures: 7-day physical activity recall and physical activity log. The PAQ had moderate to high reproducibility for measuring adult exercise participation (kappa = 0.60) and energy expenditure (r(s) = 0.68), nonexercise activities (correlation coefficients = 0.42-0.68), and total daily energy expenditure (r(s) = 0.68, kappa(quartiles) = 0.47). Correlations between the PAQ and criterion measures of adult exercise were 0.45 (7-day physical activity recall) and 0.51 (physical activity log) for the first PAQ and 0.62 (7-day physical activity recall) and 0.71 (physical activity log) for the second PAQ. Correlations between PAQ nonexercise activities and the physical activity log and 7-day physical activity recall were 0.31-0.86. Correlations for total energy expenditure were high (0.62-0.77). Results indicate that the Shanghai Men's Health Study PAQ has reasonable reproducibility and validity for classifying men by their level of exercise and nonexercise activities in this cohort.

  18. Validity and reproducibility of self-reported working hours among Japanese male employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Teppei; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Hiroko; Nishihara, Akiko; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Dohi, Seitaro

    2016-07-22

    Working long hours is a potential health hazard. Although self-reporting of working hours in various time frames has been used in epidemiologic studies, its validity is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the validity and reproducibility of self-reported working hours among Japanese male employees. The participants were 164 male employees of four large-scale companies in Japan. For validity, the Spearman correlation between self-reported working hours in the second survey and the working hours recorded by the company was calculated for the following four time frames: daily working hours, monthly overtime working hours in the last month, average overtime working hours in the last 3 months, and the frequency of long working months (≥45 h/month) within the last 12 months. For reproducibility, the intraclass correlation between the first (September 2013) and second surveys (December 2013) was calculated for each of the four time frames. The Spearman correlations between self-reported working hours and those based on company records were 0.74, 0.81, 0.85, and 0.89 for daily, monthly, 3-monthly, and yearly time periods, respectively. The intraclass correlations for self-reported working hours between the two questionnaire surveys were 0.63, 0.66, 0.73, and 0.87 for the respective time frames. The results of the present study among Japanese male employees suggest that the validity of self-reported working hours is high for all four time frames, whereas the reproducibility is moderate to high.

  19. Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clare E; Boggess, May M; Watson, Jane F; Guest, Maya; Duncanson, Kerith; Pezdirc, Kristine; Rollo, Megan; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Burrows, Tracy L

    2014-10-01

    Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m(2), females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m(2). Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Validity and reproducibility of a short food frequency questionnaire among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affret, Aurélie; Wagner, Sandra; El Fatouhi, Douae; Dow, Courtney; Correia, Emmanuelle; Niravong, Maryvonne; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; De Chefdebien, Julie; Fouque, Denis; Stengel, Bénédicte; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy

    2017-09-15

    A balanced diet is essential to slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and managing the symptoms. Currently, no tool is available to easily and quickly assess energy and macronutrient intake in patients with non end-stage CKD. We aimed to develop and evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new short 49-item food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) adapted to patients with CKD. The CKD-REIN study is a prospective cohort that enrolled 3033 patients with moderate or advanced CKD from a national sample of nephrology clinics. A sub-sample of 201 patients completed the SFFQ twice, at a one-year interval and were included in the reproducibility study. During this interval, 127 patients also completed six 24-h recalls and were included in the validity study. Main nutrient and dietary intakes were computed. Validity was evaluated by calculating crude, energy-adjusted and de-attenuated correlation coefficients (CC) between FFQ and the mean of the 24-h recall results. Bland-Altman plots were performed and cross-classification into quintiles of consumption of each nutrient and food group was computed. Reproducibility between the two SFFQs was evaluated by intraclass CC (ICC). Regarding validity, CC ranged from 0.05 to 0.79 (unadjusted CC, median: 0.40) and 0.10 to 0.59 (de-attenuated CC, median: 0.35) for food group and nutrient intakes, respectively. Five of the most important nutrients of interest in CKD, i.e. protein, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium had de-attenuated CC of 0.46, 0.43, 0.39, 0.32, and 0.12, respectively. The median of classification into the same or adjacent quintiles was 68% and 65% for food and nutrient intakes, respectively, and ranged from 63% to 69% for the five nutrients mentioned before. Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement across the range of intakes. ICC ranged from 0.18 to 0.66 (median: 0.46). The CKD-REIN SFFQ showed acceptable validity and reproducibility in a sample of patients with CKD, notably for CKD

  1. Field assessment of balance in 10 to 14 year old children, reproducibility and validity of the Nintendo Wii board

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech; Junge, Tina

    2014-01-01

    and adults. When assessing static balance, it is essential to use objective, sensitive tools, and these types of measurement have previously been performed in laboratory settings. However, the emergence of technologies like the Nintendo Wii Board (NWB) might allow balance assessment in field settings....... As the NWB has only been validated and tested for reproducibility in adults, the purpose of this study was to examine reproducibility and validity of the NWB in a field setting, in a population of children. METHODS: Fifty-four 10-14 year-olds from the CHAMPS-Study DK performed four different balance tests...... of the reproducibility study. CONCLUSION: Both NWB and AMTI have satisfactory reproducibility for testing static balance in a population of children. Concurrent validity of NWB compared with AMTI was satisfactory. Furthermore, the results from the concurrent validity study were comparable to the reproducibility results...

  2. The Reproducibility and Comparative Validity of a Non-Nutritive Sweetener Food Frequency Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Myers

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to better assess non-nutritive sweetener (NNS consumption, measurement tools with greater utility are needed. The objective of this investigation is to determine the reproducibility and validity of a newly developed NNS food frequency questionnaire (NNS-FFQ that measures five types of NNS (saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame potassium, sucralose and erythritol. Adult participants (n = 123, 56% female, 75% Caucasian, mean age = 36.8 ± 16.6 completed the NNS-FFQ twice and had 24-h dietary recalls three times over a two-week study period. Reproducibility between two administrations of the NNS-FFQ was assessed via Bland–Altman plots, Spearman’s correlations (rs and paired samples t-tests. Bland–Altman plots, Cohen’s κ, Spearman’s correlations (rs, and paired samples t-tests compared NNS intake between the two methods for validity. For reproducibility analyses, Bland–Altman analyses revealed agreement levels above the 95% acceptance level for total NNS (99.2%, erythritol (99.2%, and aspartame (96.7%. Agreement levels for acesulfame potassium (94.3%, saccharin (94.3%, and sucralose (94.3% were slightly below the acceptable level. For validity analyses, Bland–Altman analyses revealed agreement levels above the 95% acceptance level for total NNS (95.1%, sucralose (95.9%, saccharin (95.9%, and erythritol (95.1%. Agreement levels for aspartame (94.3% and acesulfame potassium (92.7% were slightly below the acceptable level. Although less than desirable agreement was found between the methods for aspartame and acesulfame potassium, some variance was expected due to the habitual nature of the NNS-FFQ as compared to the recent intake reported by recalls. Within the context of this constraint, the NNS-FFQ demonstrates acceptable reproducibility and validity. The NNS-FFQ is a brief questionnaire that could be administered among diverse participants at the individual and population levels to measure habitual NNS intake.

  3. A Validation of Object-Oriented Design Metrics as Quality Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Victor R.; Briand, Lionel C.; Melo, Walcelio

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study in which we empirically investigated the suits of object-oriented (00) design metrics introduced in another work. More specifically, our goal is to assess these metrics as predictors of fault-prone classes and, therefore, determine whether they can be used as early quality indicators. This study is complementary to the work described where the same suite of metrics had been used to assess frequencies of maintenance changes to classes. To perform our validation accurately, we collected data on the development of eight medium-sized information management systems based on identical requirements. All eight projects were developed using a sequential life cycle model, a well-known 00 analysis/design method and the C++ programming language. Based on empirical and quantitative analysis, the advantages and drawbacks of these 00 metrics are discussed. Several of Chidamber and Kamerer's 00 metrics appear to be useful to predict class fault-proneness during the early phases of the life-cycle. Also, on our data set, they are better predictors than 'traditional' code metrics, which can only be collected at a later phase of the software development processes.

  4. Portuguese-language version of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire: a validity and reproducibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Graciane Laender; Pitta, Fábio; Ramos, Dionei; Nascimento, Cinthia Sousa Carvalho; Barzon, Danielle; Kovelis, Demétria; Colange, Ana Lúcia; Brunetto, Antonio Fernando; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo

    2009-08-01

    To determine the validity and reproducibility of a Portuguese-language version of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) in patients with COPD. A Portuguese-language version of the CRQ (provided by McMaster University, the holder of the questionnaire copyright) was applied to 50 patients with COPD (70 +/- 8 years of age; 32 males; FEV1 = 47 +/- 18% of predicted) on two occasions, one week apart. The CRQ has four domains (dyspnea, fatigue, emotional function, and mastery) and was applied as an interviewer-administered instrument. The Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), already validated for use in Brazil, was used as the criterion for validation. Spirometry and the six-minute walk test (6MWT) were performed to analyze the correlations with the CRQ scores. There were no significant CRQ test-retest differences (p > 0.05 for all domains). The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.98, 0.97, 0.98 and 0.95 for the dyspnea, fatigue, emotional function and mastery domains, respectively. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.91. The CRQ domains correlated significantly with the SGRQ domains (-0.30 < r < -0.67; p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations between spirometric variables and the CRQ domains or between the CRQ domains and the 6MWT, with the exception of the fatigue domain (r = 0.30; p = 0.04). The Portuguese-language version of the CRQ proved to be reproducible and valid for use in Brazilian patients with COPD.

  5. Numerical studies and metric development for validation of magnetohydrodynamic models on the HIT-SI experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, C., E-mail: hansec@uw.edu [PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Victor, B.; Morgan, K.; Hossack, A.; Sutherland, D. [HIT-SI Group, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Jarboe, T.; Nelson, B. A. [HIT-SI Group, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Marklin, G. [PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present application of three scalar metrics derived from the Biorthogonal Decomposition (BD) technique to evaluate the level of agreement between macroscopic plasma dynamics in different data sets. BD decomposes large data sets, as produced by distributed diagnostic arrays, into principal mode structures without assumptions on spatial or temporal structure. These metrics have been applied to validation of the Hall-MHD model using experimental data from the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection experiment. Each metric provides a measure of correlation between mode structures extracted from experimental data and simulations for an array of 192 surface-mounted magnetic probes. Numerical validation studies have been performed using the NIMROD code, where the injectors are modeled as boundary conditions on the flux conserver, and the PSI-TET code, where the entire plasma volume is treated. Initial results from a comprehensive validation study of high performance operation with different injector frequencies are presented, illustrating application of the BD method. Using a simplified (constant, uniform density and temperature) Hall-MHD model, simulation results agree with experimental observation for two of the three defined metrics when the injectors are driven with a frequency of 14.5 kHz.

  6. Intra-rater reproducibility and validity of Nintendo Wii Balance Tests in community-dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin; Læssøe, Uffe; Hendriksen, C

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the intrarater intersession reproducibility of the Nintendo Wii agility and stillness tests and explore the concurrent validity in relation to gold-standard force-plate analysis. Within-day intersession reproducibility was examined in 30 older adults ...

  7. Reproducibility and relative validity of a food frequency questionnaire to estimate intake of dietary phylloquinone and menaquinones.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwakenberg, S R; Engelen, A I P; Dalmeijer, G W; Booth, S L; Vermeer, C; Drijvers, J J M M; Ocke, M C; Feskens, E J M; van der Schouw, Y T; Beulens, J W J

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the reproducibility and relative validity of the Dutch food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), to estimate intake of dietary phylloquinone and menaquinones compared with 24-h dietary recalls (24HDRs) and plasma markers of vitamin K status.

  8. Reproducibility and relative validity of a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire in an adult population of Rosario, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    María Elisa Zapata; Romina Buffarini; Nadia Lingiardi; Ana Luiza Gonçalves-Soares

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dietary assessment of nutrients and food groups by food frequency questionnaire needs to be validated in each population. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the reproducibility and relative validity of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire among adults of Rosario, Argentina.Material and Methods: Two food frequency questionnaires and four 24-hour dietary recalls were applied in a sample of 88 adults. Reproducibility of food frequency questionna...

  9. Validity and Reproducibility of a Habitual Dietary Fibre Intake Short Food Frequency Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Genelle; Brough, Louise; Murphy, Rinki; Hedderley, Duncan; Butts, Chrissie; Coad, Jane

    2016-09-10

    Low dietary fibre intake has been associated with poorer health outcomes, therefore having the ability to be able to quickly assess an individual's dietary fibre intake would prove useful in clinical practice and for research purposes. Current dietary assessment methods such as food records and food frequency questionnaires are time-consuming and burdensome, and there are presently no published short dietary fibre intake questionnaires that can quantify an individual's total habitual dietary fibre intake and classify individuals as low, moderate or high habitual dietary fibre consumers. Therefore, we aimed to develop and validate a habitual dietary fibre intake short food frequency questionnaire (DFI-FFQ) which can quickly and accurately classify individuals based on their habitual dietary fibre intake. In this study the DFI-FFQ was validated against the Monash University comprehensive nutrition assessment questionnaire (CNAQ). Fifty-two healthy, normal weight male (n = 17) and female (n = 35) participants, aged between 21 and 61 years, completed the DFI-FFQ twice and the CNAQ once. All eligible participants completed the study, however the data from 46% of the participants were excluded from analysis secondary to misreporting. The DFI-FFQ cannot accurately quantify total habitual dietary fibre intakes, however, it is a quick, valid and reproducible tool in classifying individuals based on their habitual dietary fibre intakes.

  10. Development and validation of trauma surgical skills metrics: Preliminary assessment of performance after training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Stacy; Garofalo, Evan; Shalin, Valerie; Pugh, Kristy; Chen, Hegang; Pasley, Jason; Sarani, Babak; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark; Mackenzie, Colin F

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining trauma-specific surgical skills is an ongoing challenge for surgical training programs. An objective assessment of surgical skills is needed. We hypothesized that a validated surgical performance assessment tool could detect differences following a training intervention. We developed surgical performance assessment metrics based on discussion with expert trauma surgeons, video review of 10 experts and 10 novice surgeons performing three vascular exposure procedures and lower extremity fasciotomy on cadavers, and validated the metrics with interrater reliability testing by five reviewers blinded to level of expertise and a consensus conference. We tested these performance metrics in 12 surgical residents (Year 3-7) before and 2 weeks after vascular exposure skills training in the Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma (ASSET) course. Performance was assessed in three areas as follows: knowledge (anatomic, management), procedure steps, and technical skills. Time to completion of procedures was recorded, and these metrics were combined into a single performance score, the Trauma Readiness Index (TRI). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test compared pretraining/posttraining effects. Mean time to complete procedures decreased by 4.3 minutes (from 13.4 minutes to 9.1 minutes). The performance component most improved by the 1-day skills training was procedure steps, completion of which increased by 21%. Technical skill scores improved by 12%. Overall knowledge improved by 3%, with 18% improvement in anatomic knowledge. TRI increased significantly from 50% to 64% with ASSET training. Interrater reliability of the surgical performance assessment metrics was validated with single intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.7 to 0.98. A trauma-relevant surgical performance assessment detected improvements in specific procedure steps and anatomic knowledge taught during a 1-day course, quantified by the TRI. ASSET training reduced time to complete vascular

  11. [Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess lipid and phytochemical intake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Nilda R; Defago, Maria D; Aguinaldo, Anabel; Joekes, Silvia; Actis, Adriana B

    2015-01-01

    epidemiological studies have been related food intake with the incidence of non-transmissible chronic diseases. the purpose of the present study was to analyze the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) aimed at assessing lipid and phytochemical intake. FFQ was administered to 45 people of both sexes, aged between 20 and 72 years old and resident in Cordoba, Argentina. The FFQ included 257 questions referring to foods, their consumption frequency and portion size. Regarding consumption of fruit and vegetables, the season was also taken into account. The questionnaire was applied at two different periods (FFQ1 and FFQ2) with a break of six months in between. As a reference, the 24-hour dietary recall was used (24HDR) three times. The mid intake of FFQ1-FFQ2, the 24HDR-FFQ2 median intake, median difference, Mean Absolute Deviation from the median differences (MAD), Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Spearman rank order correlation coefficients were calculated to analyze the accuracy of the FFQ data. the correlation coefficients for FFQ1-FFQ2 varied from 0.52 for 20:5 n3 eicosapentanoic (EPA) fatty acid to 0.89 for 4:0 butyric fatty acid (p<0.05). For 24HDR-FFQ2, the values ranged from 0.19 for lycopene to 0.93 for EPA fatty acid (p<0.05). the analysis carried out showed an acceptable validity and reproducibility of the FFQ, thus enabling it to be used in research relating the intake of lipids and phytochemicals and the risk of non-transmissible diseases.

  12. Assessing the Validity and Reproducibility of an Iron Dietary Intake Questionnaire Conducted in a Group of Young Polish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Ślązak, Joanna; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse a designed brief iron dietary intake questionnaire based on a food frequency assessment (IRONIC-FFQ—IRON Intake Calculation-Food Frequency Questionnaire), including the assessment of validity and reproducibility in a group of 75 Polish women aged 20–30 years. Participants conducted 3-day dietary records and filled in the IRONIC-FFQ twice (FFQ1—directly after the dietary record and FFQ2—6 weeks later). The analysis included an assessment of validity (comparison with the results of the 3-day dietary record) and of reproducibility (comparison of the results obtained twice—FFQ1 and FFQ2). In the analysis of validity, the share of individuals correctly classified into tertiles was over 50% (weighted κ of 0.36), while analysis of correlation revealed correlation coefficients of almost 0.5. In the assessment of reproducibility, almost 80% of individuals were correctly classified and less than 3% were misclassified (weighted κ of 0.73), while a correlation coefficient higher than 0.85 was obtained. Both in the assessment of validity and of reproducibility, a Bland–Altman index of 6.7% was recorded (93.3% of compared pairs of results were in the acceptable range, attributed to differences within ± 2SD limit). Validation of the IRONIC-FFQ revealed a satisfactory level of validity and positively validated reproducibility. PMID:28264423

  13. Validity and reproducibility of crutch force and heart rate measurements to assess energy expenditure of paraplegic gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Baardman, Gert; van 't Hof, Martin A.; Boom, H.B.K.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the validity and reproducibility of heart rate (HR) and crutch force measurements to estimate energy expenditure during paraplegic walking. Usefulness of these outcome measures in comparative trials was assessed in terms of responsiveness. Design: Cross-sectional validity was

  14. Reproducibility and relative validity of a food frequency questionnaire developed for adults in Taizhou, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoqiang Zhuang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ developed to investigate the relationship between dietary factors and diseases in the adult Chinese population in East China.A total of 78 males and 129 females aged 30-75 years completed four inconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HRs, served as a reference method and two FFQs (FFQ1 and FFQ2 over a nine-month interval. The reproducibility of the FFQ was estimated with correlation coefficients, cross-classification, and weighted kappa statistic. The validity was assessed by comparing the data obtained from FFQ and 24-HRs.The median nutrient intakes assessed with FFQs were higher than the average of four 24-HRs. For the food groups, Spearman, Pearson, and intraclass correlation coefficients between FFQ1 and FFQ2 ranged from 0.23 to 0.61, 0.27 to 0.64, and 0.26 to 0.65, respectively. For total energy and nutrient intakes, the corresponding coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 0.61, 0.28 to 0.64, and 0.28 to 0.62, respectively. The correlations between FFQ1 and FFQ2 for most nutrients decreased after adjustment with total energy intake. More than 70% of the subjects were classified into the same and adjacent categories by both FFQs. For food groups, the crude, energy-adjusted, and de-attenuated Spearman correlation coefficients between FFQ2 and the 24-HRs ranged from 0.17 to 0.59, 0.10 to 0.57, and 0.11 to 0.64, respectively. For total energy and nutrient intakes, the corresponding coefficients ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, 0.08 to 0.54, and 0.09 to 0.56, respectively. More than 67% of the subjects were classified into the same and adjacent categories by both instruments. Both weighted kappa statistic and Bland-Altman Plots showed reasonably acceptable agreement between the FFQ2 and 24-HRs.The FFQ developed for adults in the Taizhou area is reasonably reliable and valid for assessment of most food and nutrient intakes.

  15. Reproducibility and relative validity of food group intake in a food frequency questionnaire developed for Nepalese diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Archana; Koju, Rajendra Prasad; Beresford, Shirley A A; Chan, Kwun Chuen Gary; Connell, Frederik A; Karmacharya, Biraj Man; Shrestha, Pramita; Fitzpatrick, Annette L

    2017-08-01

    We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) designed to measure the dietary practices of adult Nepalese. The present study examined the validity and reproducibility of the FFQ. To evaluate the reproducibility of the FFQ, 116 subjects completed two 115-item FFQ across a four-month interval. Six 24-h dietary recalls were collected (1 each month) to assess the validity of the FFQ. Seven major food groups and 23 subgroups were clustered from the FFQ based on macronutrient composition. Spearman correlation coefficients evaluating reproducibility for all food groups were greater than 0.5, with the exceptions of oil. The correlations varied from 0.41 (oil) to 0.81 (vegetables). All crude spearman coefficients for validity were greater than 0.5 except for dairy products, pizzas/pastas and sausage/burgers. The FFQ was found to be reliable and valid for ranking the intake of food groups for Nepalese dietary intake.

  16. Reproducibility and relative validity of a food-frequency questionnaire for French-speaking Swiss adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marques-Vidal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Due to the distinct cultural and language differences that exist in Switzerland, there is little information on the dietary intake among the general Swiss population. Adequately assessing dietary intake is thus paramount if nutritional epidemiological studies are to be conducted. Objective : To assess the reproducibility and validity of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ developed for French-speaking Swiss adults. Design : A total of 23 men and 17 women (43.1±2.0 years filled out one FFQ and completed one 24-hour dietary recall at baseline and 1 month afterward. Results : Crude Pearson's correlation coefficients between the first and the second FFQ ranged from 0.58 to 0.90, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC ranged between 0.53 and 0.92. Lin's concordance coefficients ranged between 0.55 and 0.87. Over 80% of participants were classified in the same or adjacent tertile using each FFQ. Macronutrient intakes estimated by both FFQs were significantly higher than those estimated from the 24-hour recall for protein and water, while no significant differences were found for energy, carbohydrate, fats (five groups, and alcohol. De-attenuated Pearson's correlation coefficients between the 24-hour recall and the first FFQ ranged between 0.31 and 0.49, while for the second FFQ the values ranged between 0.38 and 0.59. Over 40 and 95% of participants fell into the same or the adjacent energy and nutrient tertiles, respectively, using the FFQs and the 24-hour recall. Conclusions : This FFQ shows good reproducibility and can be used determining macronutrient intake in a French-speaking Swiss population in an epidemiological setting.

  17. Interpreting social network metrics in healthcare organisations: a review and guide to validating small networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adam G; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-04-01

    Social network analysis is an increasingly popular sociological method used to describe and understand the social aspects of communication patterns in the health care sector. The networks studied in this area are special because they are small, and for these sizes, the metrics calculated during analysis are sensitive to the number of people in the network and the density of observed communication. Validation is of particular value in controlling for these factors and in assisting in the accurate interpretation of network findings, yet such approaches are rarely applied. Our aim in this paper was to bring together published case studies to demonstrate how a proposed validation technique provides a basis for standardised comparison of networks within and across studies. A validation is performed for three network studies comprising ten networks, where the results are compared within and across the studies in relation to a standard baseline. The results confirm that hierarchy, centralisation and clustering metrics are highly sensitive to changes in size or density. Amongst the three case studies, we found support for some conclusions and contrary evidence for others. This validation approach is a tool for identifying additional features and verifying the conclusions reached in observational studies of small networks. We provide a methodological basis from which to perform intra-study and inter-study comparisons, for the purpose of introducing greater rigour to the use of social network analysis in health care applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability, Validity, Comparability and Practical Utility of Cybercrime-Related Data, Metrics, and Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Kshetri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing pervasiveness, prevalence and severity of cybercrimes, various metrics, measures and statistics have been developed and used to measure various aspects of this phenomenon. Cybercrime-related data, metrics, and information, however, pose important and difficult dilemmas regarding the issues of reliability, validity, comparability and practical utility. While many of the issues of the cybercrime economy are similar to other underground and underworld industries, this economy also has various unique aspects. For one thing, this industry also suffers from a problem partly rooted in the incredibly broad definition of the term “cybercrime”. This article seeks to provide insights and analysis into this phenomenon, which is expected to advance our understanding into cybercrime-related information.

  19. Validation of the 3D Skin Comet assay using full thickness skin models: Transferability and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Kerstin; Blatz, Veronika; Brinkmann, Joep; Downs, Thomas R; Fischer, Anja; Henkler, Frank; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Krul, Cyrille; Liebsch, Manfred; Luch, Andreas; Pirow, Ralph; Reus, Astrid A; Schulz, Markus; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Recently revised OECD Testing Guidelines highlight the importance of considering the first site-of-contact when investigating the genotoxic hazard. Thus far, only in vivo approaches are available to address the dermal route of exposure. The 3D Skin Comet and Reconstructed Skin Micronucleus (RSMN) assays intend to close this gap in the in vitro genotoxicity toolbox by investigating DNA damage after topical application. This represents the most relevant route of exposure for a variety of compounds found in household products, cosmetics, and industrial chemicals. The comet assay methodology is able to detect both chromosomal damage and DNA lesions that may give rise to gene mutations, thereby complementing the RSMN which detects only chromosomal damage. Here, the comet assay was adapted to two reconstructed full thickness human skin models: the EpiDerm™- and Phenion ® Full-Thickness Skin Models. First, tissue-specific protocols for the isolation of single cells and the general comet assay were transferred to European and US-American laboratories. After establishment of the assay, the protocol was then further optimized with appropriate cytotoxicity measurements and the use of aphidicolin, a DNA repair inhibitor, to improve the assay's sensitivity. In the first phase of an ongoing validation study eight chemicals were tested in three laboratories each using the Phenion ® Full-Thickness Skin Model, informing several validation modules. Ultimately, the 3D Skin Comet assay demonstrated a high predictive capacity and good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility with four laboratories reaching a 100% predictivity and the fifth yielding 70%. The data are intended to demonstrate the use of the 3D Skin Comet assay as a new in vitro tool for following up on positive findings from the standard in vitro genotoxicity test battery for dermally applied chemicals, ultimately helping to drive the regulatory acceptance of the assay. To expand the database, the validation will

  20. Quantification of Dynamic Model Validation Metrics Using Uncertainty Propagation from Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Peck, Jeffrey A.; Stewart, Eric C.

    2018-01-01

    The Space Launch System, NASA's new large launch vehicle for long range space exploration, is presently in the final design and construction phases, with the first launch scheduled for 2019. A dynamic model of the system has been created and is critical for calculation of interface loads and natural frequencies and mode shapes for guidance, navigation, and control (GNC). Because of the program and schedule constraints, a single modal test of the SLS will be performed while bolted down to the Mobile Launch Pad just before the first launch. A Monte Carlo and optimization scheme will be performed to create thousands of possible models based on given dispersions in model properties and to determine which model best fits the natural frequencies and mode shapes from modal test. However, the question still remains as to whether this model is acceptable for the loads and GNC requirements. An uncertainty propagation and quantification (UP and UQ) technique to develop a quantitative set of validation metrics that is based on the flight requirements has therefore been developed and is discussed in this paper. There has been considerable research on UQ and UP and validation in the literature, but very little on propagating the uncertainties from requirements, so most validation metrics are "rules-of-thumb;" this research seeks to come up with more reason-based metrics. One of the main assumptions used to achieve this task is that the uncertainty in the modeling of the fixed boundary condition is accurate, so therefore that same uncertainty can be used in propagating the fixed-test configuration to the free-free actual configuration. The second main technique applied here is the usage of the limit-state formulation to quantify the final probabilistic parameters and to compare them with the requirements. These techniques are explored with a simple lumped spring-mass system and a simplified SLS model. When completed, it is anticipated that this requirements-based validation

  1. Healthy Food Intake Index (HFII – Validity and reproducibility in a gestational-diabetes-risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Meinilä

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to develop and validate a food-based diet quality index for measuring adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR in a pregnant population with high risk of gestational diabetes (GDM. Methods This study is a part of the Finnish Gestational Diabetes Prevention Study (RADIEL, a lifestyle intervention conducted between 2008 and 2014. The 443 pregnant participants (61 % of those invited, were either obese or had a history of GDM. Food frequency questionnaires collected at 1st trimester served for composing the HFII; a sum of 11 food groups (available score range 0–17 with higher scores reflecting higher adherence to the NNR. Results The average HFII of the participants was 10.2 (SD 2.8, range 2–17. Factor analysis for the HFII component matrix revealed three factors that explained most of the distribution (59 % of the HFII. As an evidence of the component relevance 9 out of 11 of the HFII components independently contributed to the total score (item-rest correlation coefficients <0.31. Saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, sucrose, and fiber intakes (among other nutrients showed linearity across the HFII categories (P ≤ 0.030 for all nutrients tested; the higher the HFII, the closer the nutrient intake to the recommended intake level. Educational attainment (P = 0.0045, BMI (P = 0.0098, smoking (P = 0.007, and leisure time physical exercise (P = 0.038 showed linearity across the HFII categories. Intra-class correlation coefficient for the HFII was 0.85 (CI 0.79, 0.90. Conclusions The HFII components reflect the food guidelines of the NNR, intakes of relevant nutrients, and characteristics known to vary with diet quality. It largely ignores energy intake, its components have independent contribution to the HFII, and it exhibits reproducibility. The main shortcomings are absence of red and processed meat component, and the validation in a

  2. The validity and reproducibility of food-frequency questionnaire–based total antioxidant capacity estimates in Swedish women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) provides an assessment of antioxidant activity and synergistic interactions of redox molecules in foods and plasma. We investigated the validity and reproducibility of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ)–based TAC estimates assessed by oxygen radical absorbance capaci...

  3. Field assessment of balance in 10 to 14 year old children, reproducibility and validity of the Nintendo Wii board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech; Junge, Tina; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-06-10

    Because body proportions in childhood are different to those in adulthood, children have a relatively higher centre of mass location. This biomechanical difference and the fact that children's movements have not yet fully matured result in different sway performances in children and adults. When assessing static balance, it is essential to use objective, sensitive tools, and these types of measurement have previously been performed in laboratory settings. However, the emergence of technologies like the Nintendo Wii Board (NWB) might allow balance assessment in field settings. As the NWB has only been validated and tested for reproducibility in adults, the purpose of this study was to examine reproducibility and validity of the NWB in a field setting, in a population of children. Fifty-four 10-14 year-olds from the CHAMPS-Study DK performed four different balance tests: bilateral stance with eyes open (1), unilateral stance on dominant (2) and non-dominant leg (3) with eyes open, and bilateral stance with eyes closed (4). Three rounds of the four tests were completed with the NWB and with a force platform (AMTI). To assess reproducibility, an intra-day test-retest design was applied with a two-hour break between sessions. Bland-Altman plots supplemented by Minimum Detectable Change (MDC) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) demonstrated satisfactory reproducibility for the NWB and the AMTI (MDC: 26.3-28.2%, CCC: 0.76-0.86) using Centre Of Pressure path Length as measurement parameter. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated satisfactory concurrent validity between the NWB and the AMTI, supplemented by satisfactory CCC in all tests (CCC: 0.74-0.87). The ranges of the limits of agreement in the validity study were comparable to the limits of agreement of the reproducibility study. Both NWB and AMTI have satisfactory reproducibility for testing static balance in a population of children. Concurrent validity of NWB compared with AMTI was satisfactory. Furthermore, the

  4. Intra-Rater Reproducibility and Validity of Nintendo Wii Balance Testing in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech; Laessoe, Uffe; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to (1) examine the intra-rater inter-session reproducibility of the Nintendo Wii Agility and Stillness tests and (2) explore the concurrent validity in relation to 'gold-standard' force plate analysis. Within-day inter-session reproducibility was examined in 30 ...... older adults (age 71.8±5.1 yrs.). No systematic test-retest differences were found for the Wii Stillness test, however, the Wii Agility test scores differed systematically between test sessions (p...

  5. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire focused on the Mediterranean diet for the Quebec population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, J; Latour, E; Ferland-Verry, R; Morales Salgado, S; Lambert, J; Faraj, M; Nigam, A

    2016-02-01

    Validated dietary assessment methods specific to population and food habits are needed to conduct randomized clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the reproducibility and the relative validity of a French language semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) focused on the Mediterranean diet within the population of Quebec. Fifty-three participants aged 19-86 years with and without coronary heart disease were recruited, and randomized in 3 groups in a crossover design where the sequence of administration of two FFQs and a dietary record (DR) differed in each group. The FFQ includes 157 food items and was designed to measure food intake over one month. It was administered twice 3-5 weeks apart to assess reproducibility and was compared to a 12-day DR to assess validity. For reproducibility (n = 47), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for energy and 33 nutrients ranged from 0.38 to 0.91 (mean 0.63). For validity, the Pearson's correlation coefficients between the DR and the FFQ pre-DR ranged from 0.26 to 0.84 (mean 0.55) and ICCs ranged from 0.25 to 0.84 (mean 0.54). As for the DR and the FFQ post-DR, the Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.36 to 0.83 (mean 0.55) and the ICCs ranged from 0.36 to 0.83 (mean 0.53). This FFQ demonstrates good reproducibility and validity for most key nutrients of the Mediterranean diet for the Quebec population. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Validity and reproducibility of the ErgomoPro power meter compared with the SRM and Powertap power meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Sebastien; Villerius, Vincent; Bertucci, William; Grappe, Frederic

    2007-09-01

    The ErgomoPro (EP) is a power meter that measures power output (PO) during outdoor and indoor cycling via 2 optoelectronic sensors located in the bottom bracket axis. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and the reproducibility of the EP compared with the SRM crank set and Powertap hub (PT). The validity of the EP was tested in the laboratory during 8 submaximal incremental tests (PO: 100 to 400 W), eight 30-min submaximal constant-power tests (PO = 180 W), and 8 sprint tests (PO > 750 W) and in the field during 8 training sessions (time: 181 +/- 73 min; PO: approximately 140 to 160 W). The reproducibility was assessed by calculating the coefficient of PO variation (CV) during the submaximal incremental and constant tests. The EP provided a significantly higher PO than the SRM and PT during the submaximal incremental test: The mean PO differences were +6.3% +/- 2.5% and +11.1% +/- 2.1% respectively. The difference was greater during field training sessions (+12.0% +/- 5.7% and +16.5% +/- 5.9%) but lower during sprint tests (+1.6% +/- 2.5% and +3.2% +/- 2.7%). The reproducibility of the EP is lower than those of the SRM and PT (CV = 4.1% +/- 1.8%, 1.9% +/- 0.4%, and 2.1% +/- 0.8%, respectively). The EP power meter appears less valid and reliable than the SRM and PT systems.

  7. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. The current innovation consists of a software- driven method of quantitatively evaluating a scratch profile. The profile consists of measuring the topographical features of a scratch along the length of the scratch instead of the width at one location. The digitized profile data is then fed into software code, which evaluates enough metrics of the scratch to reproduce the scratch from the evaluated metrics. There are three key differences between the current art and this innovation. First, scratch width does not quantify how far from the center of the scratch damage occurs (ZOI). Second, scratch width does not discern between material displacement and material removal from the scratch. Finally, several scratches may have the same width but different zones of interactions, different displacements, and different material removals. The current innovation allows quantitative assessment of all three.

  8. Reproducibility and Validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire Designed to Assess Diet in Children Aged 4-5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vioque, Jesus; Gimenez-Monzo, Daniel; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria; Garcia-de-la-Hera, Manuela; Gonzalez-Palacios, Sandra; Rebagliato, Marisa; Ballester, Ferran; Murcia, Mario; Iñiguez, Carmen; Granado, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) is the most efficient and cost-effective method to investigate the relationship between usual diet and disease in epidemiologic studies. Although FFQs have been validated in many adult populations worldwide, the number of valid FFQ in preschool children is very scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a semi-quantitative FFQ designed for children aged 4 to 5 years. In this study, we have included 169 children aged 4-5 years from the INMA project in Valencia, a population-based prospective cohort study of mothers and children in Spain. The 105-items FFQ was administered twice to the parents or care-givers of children over a 9-month period. Reproducibility was explored by comparing intake of nutrients by the FFQs, while validity was examined by comparing the nutrient values from the FFQs with the average nutrient values of three 24 hour dietary recall (24hDR) taken in the period, and also, with the concentration in blood specimens for several vitamins (carotenoids, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin C and α-tocopherol). Pearson correlation coefficients and de-attenuated correlation coefficients were calculated and we also evaluated misclassification by quintile distribution. All correlation coefficients for reproducibility for nutrients and major food groups were statistically significant; the average correlation coefficients for daily intake were 0.43 for food groups and 0.41 for nutrients. The average correlation coefficients for validity for daily intakes against 24hDR was r = 0.30, and the average for de-attenuated correlation coefficients was r = 0.44. When evaluating validity against the blood concentration of vitamins, statistically significant correlations were observed for vitamin C (0.35), lycopene (0.31), β-Cryptoxantin (0.40), and vitamin E (0.29); the average of correlation coefficients was r = 0.21. Despite some low to moderate correlations for reproducibility and validity

  9. Development, validation and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to measure flavonoid intake in older Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Katherine; Charlton, Karen E

    2018-02-01

    To develop and assess the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to measure total flavonoid intake, and individual flavonoid subclasses, in older adults. Retrospective analysis of flavonoid intake in older adults informed the development of a FFQ to measure flavonoid intake and determine the flavonoid subclasses consumed (anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavones, flavonols and flavanones). Older adults (n = 42, mean age 75.3 ± 8.6 years) attended two interviews 1 month apart where anthropometrics (height and weight), blood pressure (BP), demographic data and a 93-item self-administered FFQ were collected. A 4-day food record (FR) was randomly administered between the two interview dates, and each food item was assigned a flavonoid and flavonoid subclass content using the United States Department of Agriculture flavonoid database. The criterion validity and reproducibility of the FFQ was assessed against a 4-day FR using the Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test, Spearman's correlation coefficient (r), Bland-Altman Plots and Cohen's kappa. Total flavonoid intake was determined (median intake FFQ = 919.3 mg/day, FR = 781.4 mg/day). Tests of validity indicated that the FFQ consistently overestimated total flavonoid intake compared with the 4-day FR. There was a significant difference in estimates between the FFQ and the 4-day FR for total flavonoid intake (Wilcoxon signed-rank sum P tests of validity indicated greater discrepancy compared with 4-day FR. The FFQ showed high reproducibility for estimating total flavonoid intake (FFQ1vsFFQ2: Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test, P > 0.05; Spearman's r 0.91, P tests of reproducibility between FFQ1 and FFQ2 showed similarly high reproducibility. The developed FFQ appears suitable for satisfactorily ranking individuals according to total flavonoid intake. The FFQ shows limitations for estimating absolute total flavonoid intake and intake of flavonoid subclasses in comparison to a 4-day FR in terms of

  10. Relative Validity and Reproducibility of a Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Estimating Food Intakes among Flemish Preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Huybrechts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to assess the relative validity and reproducibility of a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ applied in a large region-wide survey among 2.5-6.5 year-old children for estimating food group intakes. Parents/guardians were used as a proxy. Estimated diet records (3d were used as reference method and reproducibility was measured by repeated FFQ administrations five weeks apart. In total 650 children were included in the validity analyses and 124 in the reproducibility analyses. Comparing median FFQ1 to FFQ2 intakes, almost all evaluated food groups showed median differences within a range of ± 15%. However, for median vegetables, fruit and cheese intake, FFQ1 was > 20% higher than FFQ2. For most foods a moderate correlation (0.5-0.7 was obtained between FFQ1 and FFQ2. For cheese, sugared drinks and fruit juice intakes correlations were even > 0.7. For median differences between the 3d EDR and the FFQ, six food groups (potatoes & grains; vegetables Fruit; cheese; meat, game, poultry and fish; and sugared drinks gave a difference > 20%. The largest corrected correlations (>0.6 were found for the intake of potatoes and grains, fruit, milk products, cheese, sugared drinks, and fruit juice, while the lowest correlations (<0.4 for bread and meat products. The proportion of subjects classified within one quartile (in the same/adjacent category by FFQ and EDR ranged from 67% (for meat products to 88% (for fruit juice. Extreme misclassification into the opposite quartiles was for all food groups < 10%. The results indicate that our newly developed FFQ gives reproducible estimates of food group intake. Overall, moderate levels of relative validity were observed for estimates of food group intake.

  11. Development, reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire among pregnant women adherent to the Mediterranean dietary pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Tatiana; Hout, Hala; Sibai, Darine; Helou, Nour; Younes, Hassan; El Osta, Nada; Khabbaz, Lydia Rabbaa

    2016-12-01

    Accurate dietary assessment tools are required to ensure that maternal diet supplies all the nutrients needed for fetal development. However, no dietary method could accurately estimate food intake during gestation. Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ), frequently used in epidemiological studies, estimate long term nutritional status of the target population. However, it is recommended to create and validate a FFQ compatible with the dietary habits of the studied population, to avoid cultural and social discrepancies. This study aimed to develop and test the reproducibility and the validity of a semi-quantitative FFQ compatible with the diet of Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern population, in a sample of Lebanese pregnant women. 128 women participated in the validation study, while 38 took part in the reproducibility phase, which was repeated in a time frame of 21 days. The FFQ was validated against a 24 h dietary recall (DR). The intra class correlation coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.935 for calcium to 0.984 for vitamin D (p value food items was culture specific and assessed the nutrient intake of our population. Administering this tool in future researches will help monitor the nutritional status of pregnant women, aiming at improving maternal and newborn health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Reporting to Improve Reproducibility and Facilitate Validity Assessment for Healthcare Database Studies V1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Shirley V.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Berger, Marc L.; Brown, Jeffrey; de Vries, Frank; Douglas, Ian; Gagne, Joshua J.; Gini, Rosa; Klungel, Olaf; Mullins, C. Daniel; Nguyen, Michael D.; Rassen, Jeremy A.; Smeeth, Liam; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Defining a study population and creating an analytic dataset from longitudinal healthcare databases involves many decisions. Our objective was to catalogue scientific decisions underpinning study execution that should be reported to facilitate replication and enable assessment of validity

  13. Reporting to Improve Reproducibility and Facilitate Validity Assessment for Healthcare Database Studies V1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Shirley V.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Berger, Marc L.; Brown, Jeffrey; de Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Douglas, Ian; Gagne, Joshua J.; Gini, Rosa; Klungel, Olaf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; Mullins, C. Daniel; Nguyen, Michael D.; Rassen, Jeremy A.; Smeeth, Liam; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Defining a study population and creating an analytic dataset from longitudinal healthcare databases involves many decisions. Our objective was to catalogue scientific decisions underpinning study execution that should be reported to facilitate replication and enable assessment of validity of

  14. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary fiber intake in Danish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuholm, Stine; Lorenzen, Janne K; Kristensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Differences in habitual dietary fiber intake may modify effects of dietary fiber interventions, thus measurement of habitual dietary fiber intake is relevant to apply in intervention studies on fiber-rich foods, and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) is a commonly used method. Rye bread is the major contributor of dietary fiber in the Danish population, and a nation-specific FFQ is therefore needed. The aim of this study was to assess the relative validity and reproducibility of a self-administered quantitative FFQ designed to assess total dietary fiber intake among Danish adults. In order to assess the relative validity of the FFQ, a total of 125 participants completed both a 7-day weighed dietary recording (DR) and an FFQ consisting of 60 questions. To evaluate the reproducibility of the FFQ, a sub-group of 12 participants subsequently completed an FFQ approximately 6 months later. Estimates of mean dietary fiber intake were 24.9±9.8 and 28.1±9.4 g/day when applying the FFQ and DR, respectively, where FFQ estimates were ~12% lower (pfiber intake of the two methods was r=0.63 (pfiber intake (g/day), adequate ranking of subjects according to their dietary fiber intake, and good reproducibility. The FFQ is therefore believed to be a valuable tool for epidemiology and screening in human interventions, where intake of dietary fibers is of specific interest.

  15. Reproducibility analysis to validate language processes involving Kanji and Chinese characters under different MRI scanner environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shensing Annabel; Matsuo, Kayako; Tseng Wenyih Isaac; Hue Chiwei; Nakai, Toshiharu; Bagarinao, E.; Ho Moonho Ringo; Liou Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Reading Japanese kanji is similar to reading Chinese characters in that orthography-to-phonology conversion is required. However, a notable difference between kanji and Chinese characters or alphabets is that the majority of kanji are heterophonic-homographic characters, id est (i.e.), one character is mapped to more than one pronunciation. With the goal of developing a standardized functional MRI language task for Japanese and Chinese, we conducted a series of homophone judgment tasks in both populations. Since the Japanese and Chinese data were acquired using MRI scanners with different magnetic field strengths (1.5 T and 3 T, respectively), direct comparison of the activation maps from the two populations using conventional statistical methods was not appropriate. Informal evaluation of the group activations for the homophonic-heterographic condition showed that this homophone judgment task with similar content and standardized design elicited common areas of activation for language in general for the two populations. Further, it is interesting to note that strong activations in the left posterior superior and middle temporal regions were found to be unique to the Taiwanese population. To further investigate this, we applied reproducibility analysis to verify the likelihood that this finding is unique to the Chinese population. The results are presented and the possibility of using reproducibility analysis to evaluate and compare data from different populations and with different scanner strengths is discussed. (author)

  16. Validation of the updated ArthroS simulator: face and construct validity of a passive haptic virtual reality simulator with novel performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfjeld Roberts, Patrick; Guyver, Paul; Baldwin, Mathew; Akhtar, Kash; Alvand, Abtin; Price, Andrew J; Rees, Jonathan L

    2017-02-01

    To assess the construct and face validity of ArthroS, a passive haptic VR simulator. A secondary aim was to evaluate the novel performance metrics produced by this simulator. Two groups of 30 participants, each divided into novice, intermediate or expert based on arthroscopic experience, completed three separate tasks on either the knee or shoulder module of the simulator. Performance was recorded using 12 automatically generated performance metrics and video footage of the arthroscopic procedures. The videos were blindly assessed using a validated global rating scale (GRS). Participants completed a survey about the simulator's realism and training utility. This new simulator demonstrated construct validity of its tasks when evaluated against a GRS (p ≤ 0.003 in all cases). Regarding it's automatically generated performance metrics, established outputs such as time taken (p ≤ 0.001) and instrument path length (p ≤ 0.007) also demonstrated good construct validity. However, two-thirds of the proposed 'novel metrics' the simulator reports could not distinguish participants based on arthroscopic experience. Face validity assessment rated the simulator as a realistic and useful tool for trainees, but the passive haptic feedback (a key feature of this simulator) is rated as less realistic. The ArthroS simulator has good task construct validity based on established objective outputs, but some of the novel performance metrics could not distinguish between surgical experience. The passive haptic feedback of the simulator also needs improvement. If simulators could offer automated and validated performance feedback, this would facilitate improvements in the delivery of training by allowing trainees to practise and self-assess.

  17. Reproducibility and Relative Validity of a Short Food Frequency Questionnaire in 9-10 Year-Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Pouya; Skeaff, Sheila A; Wong, Jyh Eiin; Skidmore, Paula M L

    2016-05-07

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility and validity of a non-quantitative 28-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Children aged 9-10 years (n = 50) from three schools in Dunedin, New Zealand, completed the FFQ twice and a four-day estimated food diary (4DEFD) over a two-week period. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Spearman's correlation coefficients (SCC) were used to determine reproducibility and validity of the FFQ, respectively. Weekly intakes were estimated for each food item and aggregated into 23 food items/groups. More than half of the food items/groups (52.2%) had an ICC ≥0.5. The median SCC between FFQ administrations was 0.66 (ranging from 0.40 for processed meat to 0.82 for sweets and non-dairy drinks). Cross-classification analysis between the first FFQ and 4DEFD for ranking participants into thirds showed that breakfast cereals had the highest agreement (54.0%) and pasta the lowest (34.0%). In validity analyses, 70% of food items/groups had a SCC ≥0.3. Results indicate that the FFQ is a useful tool for ranking children according to food items/groups intake. The low respondent burden and relative simplicity of the FFQ makes it suitable for use in large cohort studies of 9-10 year-old children in New Zealand.

  18. [Validity and reproducibility of Escala de Evaluación da Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Maria Aparecida; Slater, Betzabeth; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira

    2009-06-01

    To validate a body dissatisfaction scale for adolescents. The study included 386 female and male adolescents aged 10 to 17 years enrolled in a private elementary and middle school in the city of São Bernardo do Campo, southeastern Brazil, in 2006. 'Escala de Evaluación da Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes' (body dissatisfaction scale for adolescents) was translated and culturally adapted. The Portuguese instrument was evaluated for internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, factor analysis with Varimax rotation, discriminant validity by comparing score means according to nutritional status (low weight, normal weight, and at risk of overweight and obesity) using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Concurrent validity was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between scores and body mass index, waist-hip ratio and waist circumference. Reproducibility was evaluated using Wilcoxon test, and intraclass correlation coefficient. The translated and back-translated scale showed good agreement with the original one. The translated scale had good internal consistency in all subgroups studied (males and females in early and intermediate adolescence) and was able to discriminate adolescents according to their nutritional status. In the concurrent analysis, all three measures were correlated, except for males in early adolescence. Its reproducibility was ascertained. The 'Escala de Evaluación da Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes' was successfully translated into Portuguese and adapted to the Brazilian background and showed good results. It is recommended for the evaluation of the attitudinal component of body image in adolescents.

  19. The Dutch motor skills assessment as tool for talent development in table tennis: a reproducibility and validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Nijhuis-Van Der Sanden, Maria W G; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Oosterveld, Frits G J

    2015-01-01

    A motor skills assessment could be helpful in talent development by estimating essential perceptuo-motor skills of young players, which are considered requisite to develop excellent technical and tactical qualities. The Netherlands Table Tennis Association uses a motor skills assessment in their talent development programme consisting of eight items measuring perceptuo-motor skills specific to table tennis under varying conditions. This study aimed to investigate this assessment regarding its reproducibility, internal consistency, underlying dimensions and concurrent validity in 113 young table tennis players (6-10 years). Intraclass correlation coefficients of six test items met the criteria of 0.7 with coefficients of variation between 3% and 8%. Cronbach's alpha valued 0.853 for internal consistency. The principal components analysis distinguished two conceptually meaningful factors: "ball control" and "gross motor function." Concurrent validity analyses demonstrated moderate associations between the motor skills assessment's results and national ranking; boys r = -0.53 (P motor skills assessment seems to be a reproducible, objective part of a talent development programme, more longitudinal studies are required to investigate its predictive validity.

  20. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary assessment in Malay adolescents in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Foo, Leng Huat

    2012-01-01

    Food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) must be tailored to the target populations because dietary habits vary within the populations due to differences in cultural and lifestyles practices. Limited information is available to assess the validity of FFQ used among Malaysian adolescents. To construct the validity and reproducibility of a newly developed FFQ in assessing habitual nutrients intake over the past year of 170 Malay adolescent boys and girls in Kelantan, Malaysia. The FFQ that consisted of 124 food items was assessed, whereas three days of 24-hours dietary recalls (DR) was administered as the standard criteria method. Estimated mean intake for most nutrients assessed by the FFQ were higher as compared to the three DRs (pcross classification of quartile analysis showed that most nutrients were classified into the same or adjacent quartiles (median=52.7%). For the reproducibility of FFQ, the correlation of nutrients ranged from 0.43 for carotene to 0.86 for total fat intake (median=0.67), after adjusting for total energy intake. The newly developed dietary FFQ is a relatively good and valid tool in assessing habitual nutrients intake for the past year among Malay adolescents in Malaysia.

  1. Reproducibility and validity of a diet quality index for children assessed using a FFQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huybrechts, I.; Vereecken, C.; Bacquer, De D.; Vandevijvere, S.; Oyen, van H.; Maes, L.; Vanhauwaert, E.; Temme, E.H.M.; Backer, De G.; Henauw, de S.

    2010-01-01

    The diet quality index (DQI) for preschool children is a new index developed to reflect compliance with four main food-based dietary guidelines for preschool children in Flanders. The present study investigates: (1) the validity of this index by comparing DQI scores for preschool children with

  2. Validation of network communicability metrics for the analysis of brain structural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Andreotti

    Full Text Available Computational network analysis provides new methods to analyze the brain's structural organization based on diffusion imaging tractography data. Networks are characterized by global and local metrics that have recently given promising insights into diagnosis and the further understanding of psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Most of these metrics are based on the idea that information in a network flows along the shortest paths. In contrast to this notion, communicability is a broader measure of connectivity which assumes that information could flow along all possible paths between two nodes. In our work, the features of network metrics related to communicability were explored for the first time in the healthy structural brain network. In addition, the sensitivity of such metrics was analysed using simulated lesions to specific nodes and network connections. Results showed advantages of communicability over conventional metrics in detecting densely connected nodes as well as subsets of nodes vulnerable to lesions. In addition, communicability centrality was shown to be widely affected by the lesions and the changes were negatively correlated with the distance from lesion site. In summary, our analysis suggests that communicability metrics that may provide an insight into the integrative properties of the structural brain network and that these metrics may be useful for the analysis of brain networks in the presence of lesions. Nevertheless, the interpretation of communicability is not straightforward; hence these metrics should be used as a supplement to the more standard connectivity network metrics.

  3. Validating hospital antibiotic purchasing data as a metric of inpatient antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlie; Ritchie, Michael; Alldred, Jason; Daneman, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic purchasing data are a widely used, but unsubstantiated, measure of antibiotic consumption. To validate this source, we compared purchasing data from hospitals and external medical databases with patient-level dispensing data. Antibiotic purchasing and dispensing data from internal hospital records and purchasing data from IMS Health were obtained for two hospitals between May 2013 and April 2015. Internal purchasing data were validated against dispensing data, and IMS data were compared with both internal metrics. Scatterplots of individual antimicrobial data points were generated; Pearson's correlation and linear regression coefficients were computed. A secondary analysis re-examined these correlations over shorter calendar periods. Internal purchasing data were strongly correlated with dispensing data, with correlation coefficients of 0.90 (95% CI = 0.83-0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.95-0.99) at hospitals A and B, respectively. Although dispensing data were consistently lower than purchasing data, this was attributed to a single antibiotic at both hospitals. IMS data were favourably correlated with, but underestimated, internal purchasing and dispensing data. This difference was accounted for by eight antibiotics for which direct sales from some manufacturers were not included in the IMS database. The correlation between purchasing and dispensing data was consistent across periods as short as 3 months, but not at monthly intervals. Both internal and external antibiotic purchasing data are strongly correlated with dispensing data. If outliers are accounted for appropriately, internal purchasing data could be used for cost-effective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, and external data sets could be used for surveillance and research across geographical regions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  4. Reproducibility, validity, and responsiveness of the hip outcome score in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naal, Florian D; Impellizzeri, Franco M; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Mannion, Anne F; Leunig, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate reproducibility, validity, and responsiveness of the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. In a cohort of 157 consecutive patients (mean age 66 years; 79 women) undergoing total hip replacement, the HOS was tested for the following measurement properties: feasibility (percentage of evaluable questionnaires), reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] and standard error of measurement [SEM]), construct validity (correlation with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC], Oxford Hip Score [OHS], Short Form 12 health survey, and University of California, Los Angeles activity scale), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), factorial validity (factor analysis), floor and ceiling effects, and internal and external responsiveness at 6 months after surgery (standardized response mean and change score correlations). Missing items occurred frequently. Five percent to 6% of the HOS activities of daily living (ADL) subscales and 20-32% of the sport subscales could not be scored. ICCs were 0.92 for both subscales. SEMs were 1.8 points (ADL subscale) and 2.3 points (sport subscale). Highest correlations were found with the OHS (r = 0.81 for ADL subscale and r = 0.58 for sport subscale) and the WOMAC physical function subscale (r = 0.83 for ADL subscale and r = 0.56 for sport subscale). Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and 0.88 for the ADL and sport subscales, respectively. Neither unidimensionality of the subscales nor the 2-factor structure was supported by factor analysis. Both subscales showed good internal and external responsiveness. The HOS is reproducible and responsive when assessing patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis in whom the items are relevant. However, based on the large proportion of missing data and the findings of the factor analysis, we cannot recommend this questionnaire for routine use in this target group. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Reproducibility and validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board for measuring shoulder sensorimotor control in prone lying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshoj, H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Jørgensen, Rene Gam Bender; Søgaard, Karen

    2017-02-01

    For the lower limbs, the Nintendo Wii Balance Board (NWBB) has been widely used to measure postural control. However, this has not been performed for upper limb measurements. Further, the NWBB has shown to produce more background noise with decreasing loads, which may be of concern when used for upper limb testing. The aim was to investigate reproducibility and validity of the NWBB. A test-retest design was performed with 68 subjects completing three different prone lying, upper limb weight-bearing balance tasks on a NWBB: two-arms, eyes closed (1) one-arm, non-dominant/non-injured (2) and one-arm, dominant/injured (3). Each task was repeated three times over the course of two test sessions with a 30-min break in between. Further, the level of background noise from a NWBB was compared with a force platform through systematic loading of both boards with increasing deadweights ranging from 5 to 90kg. Test-retest reproducibility was high with ICCs ranging from 0.95 to 0.97 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.98). However, systematic bias and tendencies for funnel effects in the Bland Altman plots for both one-armed tests were present. The concurrent validity of the NWBB was low (CCC 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.22)) due to large differences between the NWBB and force platform in noise sensitivity at low deadweights (especially below 50kg). The NWBB prone lying, shoulder sensorimotor control test was highly reproducible. Though, concurrent validity of the NWBB was poor compared to a force platform. Further investigation of the impact of the background noise, especially at low loads, is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reproducibility and validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board for measuring shoulder sensorimotor control in prone lying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshøj, Henrik; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Gam Bender Jørgensen, René

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For the lower limbs, the Nintendo Wii Balance Board (NWBB) has been widely used to measure postural control. However, this has not been performed for upper limb measurements. Further, the NWBB has shown to produce more background noise with decreasing loads, which may be of concern...... when used for upper limb testing. The aim was to investigate reproducibility and validity of the NWBB. METHODS: A test-retest design was performed with 68 subjects completing three different prone lying, upper limb weight-bearing balance tasks on a NWBB: two-arms, eyes closed (1) one-arm, non...

  7. The validation index: a new metric for validation of segmentation algorithms using two or more expert outlines with application to radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Evans, Philp M; Harris, Emma J

    2013-08-01

    Validation is required to ensure automated segmentation algorithms are suitable for radiotherapy target definition. In the absence of true segmentation, algorithmic segmentation is validated against expert outlining of the region of interest. Multiple experts are used to overcome inter-expert variability. Several approaches have been studied in the literature, but the most appropriate approach to combine the information from multiple expert outlines, to give a single metric for validation, is unclear. None consider a metric that can be tailored to case-specific requirements in radiotherapy planning. Validation index (VI), a new validation metric which uses experts' level of agreement was developed. A control parameter was introduced for the validation of segmentations required for different radiotherapy scenarios: for targets close to organs-at-risk and for difficult to discern targets, where large variation between experts is expected. VI was evaluated using two simulated idealized cases and data from two clinical studies. VI was compared with the commonly used Dice similarity coefficient (DSCpair - wise) and found to be more sensitive than the DSCpair - wise to the changes in agreement between experts. VI was shown to be adaptable to specific radiotherapy planning scenarios.

  8. Reproducibility and validity of the French version of the long international physical activity questionnaire in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinière, Lise; Lhommet, Claire; Caille, Agnes; Giraudeau, Bruno; Lecomte, Pierre; Couet, Charles; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Jacobi, David

    2011-08-01

    Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary time are cornerstones in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few instruments available to measure physical activity in this population. We translated the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-L) into French and studied its reproducibility and validity in patients with T2DM. Reproducibility was studied by 2 telephone administrations, 8 days apart. Concurrent validity was tested against pedometry for 7 days during habitual life. One-hundred forty-three patients with T2DM were recruited (59% males; age: 60.9 ± 10.5 years; BMI: 31.2 ± 5.2 kg/m2; HbA1c: 7.4 ± 1.2%). Intraclass correlation coefficients (95% CI) for repeated administration (n = 126) were 0.74 (0.61-0.83) for total physical activity, 0.72 (0.57-0.82) for walking, and 0.65 (0.51-0.78) for sitting time. Total physical activity and walking (MET-min·week-1) correlated with daily steps (Spearman r = .24 and r = .23, respectively, P physical activity and sedentary time in patients with T2DM, confirming previous data in nonclinical populations.

  9. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire as a measure of recent dietary intake in young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Hebden

    Full Text Available This research assessed the relative validity and reproducibility of the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies (DQESV2 over one month in young adults, given the lack of concise and convenient instruments for assessing recent dietary intake in this population. Participants were recruited from a large Australian university (N = 102; 35% male; age 18-34 years; body mass index 16-37 kg/m(2. Five one-day weighed food records (WFR were administered over one month followed by the DQESV2. Estimates for nutrients (energy, protein, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, dietary fibre, and alcohol and fruit and vegetable servings were compared between methods using correlation coefficients, 95% limits of agreement, and quintile classifications. One week later, a second DQESV2 was completed by n = 77 of the participants to assess reproducibility using intra-class correlations (ICC and weighted kappa. Comparing methods, all nutrients and fruit and vegetable servings showed significant positive correlations (P<0.05 except protein intake in males; over 60% of participants were within one quintile classification except total fat and dietary fibre intakes in males (55% and 56%, respectively; and differences in nutrient and food intakes between methods were all within +/-20% of the mean WFR values except alcohol intake in females. Between first and second administrations of the DQESV2 all ICC coefficients were positive (P<0.01 and weighted kappa coefficients ranged from 0.54 for fruit servings (including fruit juice in males to 0.91 for protein intake in females. Over a one month period, the DQESV2 demonstrated good reproducibility for the studied nutrients and for fruit and vegetable servings and provided a valid measure of the studied nutrients, except alcohol in females, and of fruit servings (including fruit juice in both genders, at the group level in this young adult population.

  10. Reproducibility and validity of the Dutch translation of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) used by physiotherapists in older patients with knee or Hip osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jans, M.P.; Slootweg, V.C.; Boot, C.R.; Morton, N.A. de; Sluis, G. van der; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reproducibility, construct validity, and unidimensionality of the Dutch translation of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI), a performance-based measure of mobility for older patients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Rehabilitation center (reproducibility study) and

  11. Validation of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Busuioc, Aristita

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX is the European branch of the international CORDEX initiative that aims to provide improved regional climate change projections for Europe. The main objective of this paper is to document the performance of the individual models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania. Here three EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) ensemble (scenario RCP4.5) are analysed and inter-compared: DMI-HIRHAM5, KNMI-RACMO2.2 and MPI-REMO. Compared to previous studies, when the RCM validation regarding the Romanian climate has mainly been made on mean state and at station scale, a more quantitative approach of precipitation extremes is proposed. In this respect, to have a more reliable comparison with observation, a high resolution daily precipitation gridded data set was used as observational reference (CLIMHYDEX project). The comparison between the RCM outputs and observed grid point values has been made by calculating three extremes precipitation indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Indices (ETCCDI), for the 1976-2005 period: R10MM, annual count of days when precipitation ≥10mm; RX5DAY, annual maximum 5-day precipitation and R95P%, precipitation fraction of annual total precipitation due to daily precipitation > 95th percentile. The RCMs capability to reproduce the mean state for these variables, as well as the main modes of their spatial variability (given by the first three EOF patterns), are analysed. The investigation confirms the ability of RCMs to simulate the main features of the precipitation extreme variability over Romania, but some deficiencies in reproducing of their regional characteristics were found (for example, overestimation of the mea state, especially over the extra Carpathian regions). This work has been realised within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian

  12. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire for identifying the dietary patterns of toddlers in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Virginia C; Skidmore, Paula M L; Watson, Emily O; Taylor, Rachael W; Fleming, Elizabeth A; Heath, Anne-Louise M

    2015-04-01

    Dietary patterns provide insight into relationships between diet and disease. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) can identify dietary patterns in adults, but similar analyses have not been performed for toddlers. The aim of the Eating Assessment in Toddlers study was to evaluate the relative validity and reproducibility of dietary patterns from an FFQ developed for toddlers aged 12 to 24 months. Participants were 160 toddlers aged 12 to 24 months and their primary caregiver who completed an FFQ twice, approximately 5 weeks apart (FFQ1 and FFQ2). A 5-day weighed food record was collected on nonconsecutive days between FFQ administrations. Principal component analysis identified three major dietary patterns similar across FFQ1, FFQ2, and the 5-day weighted food record. The sweet foods and fries pattern was characterized by high intakes of sweet foods, fries and roast potato and kumara (sweet potato), butter and margarines, processed meat, sweet drinks, and fruit or milk drinks. The vegetables and meat pattern was characterized by high intakes of vegetables, meat, eggs and beans, and fruit. The milk and fruit pattern was characterized by high intakes of milk and milk products and fruit, and low intakes of breastmilk and infant and follow-up formula. The FFQ (FFQ1) correctly classified 43.1% to 51.0% of toddlers into the same quartile of pattern score as the 5-day weighted food record, and Pearson correlations ranged from 0.56 to 0.68 for the three patterns. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.71 to 0.72 for all three dietary patterns. the Eating Assessment in Toddlers study FFQ shows acceptable relative validity and high reproducibility for identifying dietary patterns in toddlers. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reproducibility and relative validity of a food frequency questionnaire developed for female adolescents in Suihua, North China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ developed for female adolescents in the Suihua area of North China. The FFQ was evaluated against the average of 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HRs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 168 female adolescents aged 12 to 18 completed nine three consecutive 24-HRs (one three consecutive 24 HRs per month and two FFQs over nine months. The reproducibility of the FFQ was estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs, and its relative validity was assessed by comparing it with the 24-HRs. The mean values of the 24-HRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein (in FFQ1 and iron (in FFQ2. The ICCs for all nutrients and food groups in FFQ1 and FFQ2 were moderately correlated (0.4-0.8. However, all the ICCs decreased after adjusting for energy. The weighted κ statistic showed moderate agreement (0.40-0.6 for all nutrients and food groups, except for niacin and calcium, which showed poor agreement (0.35. The relative validity results indicate that the crude Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ1 and the 24-HRs ranged from 0.41 (for Vitamin C to 0.65 (for fruit. The coefficients of each nutrient and food group in FFQ2 and the 24-HRs were higher than those in FFQ1 and the 24-HRs, indicating good correlation. Although all energy-adjusted Spearman's correlation coefficients were lower than the crude coefficients, de-attenuation to correct for intra-individual variability improved the correlation coefficients. The weighted κ coefficients of nutrients and food groups ranged from 0.32 for beans to 0.52 for riboflavin in FFQ1 and the 24-HRs, and 0.32 for Vitamin C to 0.54 for riboflavin in FFQ2 and the 24-HRs. CONCLUSION: The FFQ developed for female adolescents in the Suihua area is a reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study.

  14. Reproducibility and Relative Validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire Developed for Female Adolescents in Suihua, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Sun, Caihong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Jiajia; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lijie

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aims to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) developed for female adolescents in the Suihua area of North China. The FFQ was evaluated against the average of 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HRs). Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 168 female adolescents aged 12 to 18 completed nine three consecutive 24-HRs (one three consecutive 24 HRs per month) and two FFQs over nine months. The reproducibility of the FFQ was estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and its relative validity was assessed by comparing it with the 24-HRs. The mean values of the 24-HRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein (in FFQ1) and iron (in FFQ2). The ICCs for all nutrients and food groups in FFQ1 and FFQ2 were moderately correlated (0.4–0.8). However, all the ICCs decreased after adjusting for energy. The weighted κ statistic showed moderate agreement (0.40–0.6) for all nutrients and food groups, except for niacin and calcium, which showed poor agreement (0.35). The relative validity results indicate that the crude Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ1 and the 24-HRs ranged from 0.41 (for Vitamin C) to 0.65 (for fruit). The coefficients of each nutrient and food group in FFQ2 and the 24-HRs were higher than those in FFQ1 and the 24-HRs, indicating good correlation. Although all energy-adjusted Spearman's correlation coefficients were lower than the crude coefficients, de-attenuation to correct for intra-individual variability improved the correlation coefficients. The weighted κ coefficients of nutrients and food groups ranged from 0.32 for beans to 0.52 for riboflavin in FFQ1 and the 24-HRs, and 0.32 for Vitamin C to 0.54 for riboflavin in FFQ2 and the 24-HRs. Conclusion The FFQ developed for female adolescents in the Suihua area is a reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study. PMID:21589932

  15. Validity and reproducibility of the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) questionnaire for the measurement of the physical activity level in patients after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolszak, Sylvain; Casartelli, Nicola C; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2014-02-20

    The need for valid and reproducible questionnaires to routinely assess the physical activity level of patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of particular concern in clinical settings. Aims of this study were to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of the physical activity scale for the elderly (PASE) questionnaire in TKA patients, with a particular view on gender differences. A total of 50 elderly patients (25 women and 25 men aged 70 ± 6 years) following primary unilateral TKA were recruited. The reproducibility was evaluated by administering the PASE questionnaire during two occasions separated by 7 days. The construct (criterion) validity was investigated by comparing the physical activity level reported by patients in the PASE questionnaire to that measured by accelerometry. Reproducibility was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC3,1) for reliability and standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC) for agreement, while validity was investigated with Pearson correlation coefficients. Reliability of the PASE total score was acceptable for men (ICC = 0.77) but not for women (ICC = 0.58). Its agreement was low for both men and women, as witnessed by high SEM (32% and 35%, respectively) and SDC (89% and 97%, respectively). Construct validity of the PASE total score was low in both men (r = 0.45) and women (r = 0.06). The PASE questionnaire has several validity and reproducibility shortcomings, therefore its use is not recommended for the assessment of physical activity level in patients after TKA, particularly in women.

  16. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire used in pregnant women from a rural area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Bjerregaard, Anne A; Che, Yan; Mao, Yanyan; Hu, Wenfu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Weijin; Olsen, Sjúrdur F; Strøm, Marin

    2014-11-01

    Food frequency questionnaires are relatively inexpensive, easy and quick to administer, but the construction of a food frequency questionnaire that can capture Chinese food habits is challenging given the diverse lifestyle and eating habits in different parts of the country. The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reproducibility of a self-administered food frequency questionnaire against a 3-day dietary recall in a rural region of western China. Prospective cohort study. Chinese maternal and child healthcare hospital. A total of 168 healthy pregnant women. Pregnant women completed a food frequency questionnaire at 16-24 weeks gestation, and again at 29-31 weeks; during weeks 26-27 they completed a 3-day dietary recall. In general, mean intake was higher when assessed with food frequency questionnaires compared with dietary recall. Spearman and intra-class correlation coefficients between the two food frequency questionnaires ranged from 0.31 to 0.69 and from 0.27 to 0.79, respectively. For the second food frequency questionnaire and the dietary recall, the crude and de-attenuated Spearman correlations ranged from 0.12 to 0.55 and 0.14 to 0.58, respectively. The correlation both between the two food frequency questionnaires and between the second food frequency questionnaire and the dietary recall decreased after adjustment for energy. Ranking women, 31-57% and 1-8% were classified into the same and the opposite quartile, respectively, by both food frequency questionnaires; 30-45% and 1-11% were classified into the same and the opposite quartile respectively for the second food frequency questionnaire and dietary recall. The food frequency questionnaire showed good reproducibility and correlations with dietary recall; it is useful for ranking study participants according to dietary intake, which is of great importance to future etiological studies in this cohort. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Reproducibility and validity of the food frequency questionnaire for estimating habitual dietary intake in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A previous study reported the development a 75-item food frequency questionnaire for Japanese children (CFFQ). The first aim was to examine the reproducibility and validity of the CFFQ in order to assess dietary intake among two groups; 3-11 year old children (YC group) and 12-16 year old children (AD group). The second aim was to use the CFFQ and the FFQ for adults (AFFQ), and to determine which was better suited for assessing the intake of children in each group. Methods A total of the 103 children participated in this study. The interval between the first CFFQ and AFFQ and the second CFFQ and AFFQ was one month. Four weighted dietary records (WDRs) were conducted once a week. Pearson's correlation coefficients between the first and second FFQs were calculated to test the reproducibility of each FFQ. Pearson's correlation coefficients between WDRs and the second FFQ were calculated for the unadjusted value and sex-, age-, and energy-adjusted values to determine the validity of each FFQ. Results The final number of subjects participating in the analysis was 89. The median correlation coefficients between the first and second CFFQs and AFFQs were 0.76 and 0.73, respectively. There was some over/underestimation of nutrients in the CFFQ of the YC group and in the AFFQ of the AD group. The medians of the sex-, age-, and energy-adjusted correlation coefficients were not different between the YC and AD groups for each FFQ. The correlation coefficient in sex-, age-, and energy-adjusted value revealed that the largest number of subject with high (0.50 or more) value was obtained by the CFFQ in the YC group. Conclusions This study indicated that the CFFQ might be a useful tool for assessing habitual dietary intake of children in the YC group. Although the CFFQ agreed moderately with habitual intake, it was found to underestimate intake in theAD group. However, for the AFFQ, the ability to rank habitual intake was low. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new

  18. Is outdoor use of the six-minute walk test with a global positioning system in stroke patients' own neighbourhoods reproducible and valid?

    OpenAIRE

    Wevers, L.E.; Kwakkel, G.; Port, van de, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reproducibility, responsiveness and concurrent validity of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) when tested outdoors in patients' own neighbourhoods using a global positioning system (GPS) or a measuring wheel. Methods: A total of 27 chronic stroke patients, discharged to their own homes, were tested twice, within 5 consecutive days. The 6MWT was conducted using a GPS and an measuring wheel simultaneously to determine walking distance. Reproducibility was determined as te...

  19. TH-CD-207B-11: Multi-Vendor Phantom Study of CT Lung Density Metrics: Is a Reproducibility of Less Than 1 HU Achievable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Mayer, H [National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Judy, P [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Fain, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hoppel, B [Toshiba Medical Research Institute USA, Inc, Vernon Hills, IL (United States); Lynch, D [Nation Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Fuld, M [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To standardize the calibration procedures of CT lung density measurements using low-density reference foams in a phantom, and to demonstrate a reproducibility of less than 1 HU for lung equivalent foam densities measured across CT vendor platforms and protocols. Methods: A phantom study was conducted on CT scanner models from 4 vendors at 100, 120, and 135/140 kVp and 1.5, 3, and 6 mGy dose settings, using a lung density phantom containing air, water, and 3 reference foams (indirectly calibrated) with discrete densities simulating a 5-cm slice of the human chest. Customized segmentation software was used to analyze the images and generate a mean HU and variance for each of the density for the 22 vendor/protocols. A 3-step calibration process was devised to remove a scanner-dependent parameter using linear regression of the HU value vs the relative electron density. The results were mapped to a single energy (80 keV) for final comparison. Results: The heterogeneity across vendor platforms for each density assessed by a random effects model was reduced by 50% after re-calibration, while the standard deviation of the mean HU values also improved by about the same amount. The 95% CI of the final HU value was within +/−1 HU for all 3 reference foam densities. For the backing lung foam in the phantom (served as an “unknown”), this CI is +/− 1.6 HU. The kVp and dose settings did not appear to have significant contributions to the variability. Conclusion: With the proposed calibration procedures, the inter-scanner reproducibility of better than 1 HU is demonstrated in the current phantom study for the reference foam densities, but not yet achieved for a test density. The sources of error are being investigated in the next round of scanning with a certified Standard Reference Material for direct calibration. Fain: research funding from GE Healthcare to develop pulmonary MRI techniques. Hoppel: employee of Toshiba Medical Research Institute USA

  20. Global Rating Scales and Motion Analysis Are Valid Proficiency Metrics in Virtual and Benchtop Knee Arthroscopy Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Justues; Banaszek, Daniel C; Gambrel, Jason; Bardana, Davide

    2016-04-01

    -5] versus 6 ± 1 [95% CI, 5-7], p = 0.001). GRS scores between virtual and benchtop models were very strongly correlated (ρ = 0.93, p virtual GRS (ρ = 0.8, p evaluate performance on both virtual and benchtop knee simulators. We have shown that subjective GRS scores and objective motion analysis metrics and procedure time are valid measures to distinguish arthroscopic skill on both virtual and benchtop modalities. Performance on both modalities is well correlated. We believe that training on artificial models allows acquisition of skills in a safe environment. Future work should compare different modalities in the efficiency of skill acquisition, retention, and transferability to the operating room.

  1. Reproducibility and validity of the Dutch translation of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) used by physiotherapists in older patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Marielle P; Slootweg, Vera C; Boot, Cecile R; de Morton, Natalie A; van der Sluis, Geert; van Meeteren, Nico L

    2011-11-01

    To examine the reproducibility, construct validity, and unidimensionality of the Dutch translation of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI), a performance-based measure of mobility for older patients. Cross-sectional study. Rehabilitation center (reproducibility study) and hospital (validity study). Patients (N=28; age >65y) after orthopedic surgery (reproducibility study) and patients (N=219; age >65y) waiting for total hip or total knee arthroplasty (validity study). Not applicable. Not applicable. The intraclass correlation coefficient for interrater reliability was high (.85; 95% confidence interval, 71-.93), and minimal detectable change with 90% confidence was 7 on the 100-point DEMMI scale. Rasch analysis identified that the Dutch translation of the DEMMI is a unidimensional measure of mobility in this population. DEMMI scores showed high correlations with scores on other performance-based measures of mobility (Timed Up and Go test, Spearman r=-.73; Chair Rise Time, r=-.69; walking test, r=.74). A lower correlation of .44 was identified with the self-report measure Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The Dutch translation of the DEMMI is a reproducible and valid performance-based measure for assessing mobility in older patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative validity and reproducibility of a parent-administered semi-quantitative FFQ for assessing food intake in Danish children aged 3-9 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Andersen, Tine; Perez-Cueto, Armando; Toft, Ulla Marie Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative validity and reproducibility of the semi-quantitative FFQ (SFFQ) applied in the evaluation of a community intervention study, SoL-Bornholm, for estimating food intakes. DESIGN: The reference measure was a 4 d estimated food record. The SFFQ was completed two time...

  3. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility of linear measurements on digital models obtained from intraoral and cone-beam computed tomography scans of alginate impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiranto, Matthew G.; Engelbrecht, W. Petrie; Nolthenius, Heleen E. Tutein; van der Meer, W. Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Digital 3-dimensional models are widely used for orthodontic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of digital models obtained from the Lava Chairside Oral scanner (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and cone-beam computed tomography scans

  4. Is outdoor use of the six-minute walk test with a global positioning system in stroke patients' own neighbourhoods reproducible and valid?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, L.E.; Kwakkel, G.; van de Port, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reproducibility, responsiveness and concurrent validity of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) when tested outdoors in patients' own neighbourhoods using a global positioning system (GPS) or a measuring wheel. Methods: A total of 27 chronic stroke patients, discharged to their

  5. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busquet, F.; Strecker, R.; Rawlings, J.M.; Belanger, S.E.; Braunbeck, T.; Carr, G.J.; Cenijn, P.H.; Fochtman, P.; Gourmelon, A.; Hübler, N.; Kleensang, A.; Knöbel, M.; Kussatz, C.; Legler, J.; Lillicrap, A.; Martínez-Jerónimo, F.; Polleichtner, C.; Rzodeczko, H.; Salinas, E.; Schneider, K.E.; Scholz, S.; van den Brandhof, E.J.; van der Ven, L.T.; Walter-Rohde, S.; Weigt, S.; Witters, H.; Halder, M.

    2014-01-01

    A The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were

  6. Validity and reproducibility of resting metabolic rate measurements in rural Bangladeshi women: comparison of measurements obtained by Medgem and by Deltatrac device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, D.S.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Roordink, D.; Meltzer, M.; Yunus, M.; Salam, M.A.; Raaij, van J.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To assess reproducibility and validity of resting metabolic rate (RMR) of Bangladeshi women as measured with the MedGem device and using the Deltatrac metabolic monitor as a reference; and (2) to evaluate the FAO/WHO/UNU basal metabolic rate (BMR)-prediction equations. Design:In each of

  7. Validity and reproducibility of a physical activity questionnaire for older adults: questionnaire versus accelerometer for assessing physical activity in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebeling, Lara; Wiebers, Sarah; Beem, Leo; Puhan, Milo A.; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) is important in older adults for the maintenance of functional ability. Assessing PA may be difficult. Few PA questionnaires have been compared to activity monitors. We examined reproducibility and validity of the self-administered Longitudinal Ageing Study

  8. On various metrics used for validation of predictive QSAR models with applications in virtual screening and focused library design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kunal; Mitra, Indrani

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have important applications in drug discovery research, environmental fate modeling, property prediction, etc. Validation has been recognized as a very important step for QSAR model development. As one of the important objectives of QSAR modeling is to predict activity/property/toxicity of new chemicals falling within the domain of applicability of the developed models and QSARs are being used for regulatory decisions, checking reliability of the models and confidence of their predictions is a very important aspect, which can be judged during the validation process. One prime application of a statistically significant QSAR model is virtual screening for molecules with improved potency based on the pharmacophoric features and the descriptors appearing in the QSAR model. Validated QSAR models may also be utilized for design of focused libraries which may be subsequently screened for the selection of hits. The present review focuses on various metrics used for validation of predictive QSAR models together with an overview of the application of QSAR models in the fields of virtual screening and focused library design for diverse series of compounds with citation of some recent examples.

  9. Field assessment of balance in 10 to 14 year old children, reproducibility and validity of the Nintendo Wii board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Because body proportions in childhood are different to those in adulthood, children have a relatively higher centre of mass location. This biomechanical difference and the fact that children’s movements have not yet fully matured result in different sway performances in children and adults. When assessing static balance, it is essential to use objective, sensitive tools, and these types of measurement have previously been performed in laboratory settings. However, the emergence of technologies like the Nintendo Wii Board (NWB) might allow balance assessment in field settings. As the NWB has only been validated and tested for reproducibility in adults, the purpose of this study was to examine reproducibility and validity of the NWB in a field setting, in a population of children. Methods Fifty-four 10–14 year-olds from the CHAMPS-Study DK performed four different balance tests: bilateral stance with eyes open (1), unilateral stance on dominant (2) and non-dominant leg (3) with eyes open, and bilateral stance with eyes closed (4). Three rounds of the four tests were completed with the NWB and with a force platform (AMTI). To assess reproducibility, an intra-day test-retest design was applied with a two-hour break between sessions. Results Bland-Altman plots supplemented by Minimum Detectable Change (MDC) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) demonstrated satisfactory reproducibility for the NWB and the AMTI (MDC: 26.3-28.2%, CCC: 0.76-0.86) using Centre Of Pressure path Length as measurement parameter. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated satisfactory concurrent validity between the NWB and the AMTI, supplemented by satisfactory CCC in all tests (CCC: 0.74-0.87). The ranges of the limits of agreement in the validity study were comparable to the limits of agreement of the reproducibility study. Conclusion Both NWB and AMTI have satisfactory reproducibility for testing static balance in a population of children. Concurrent validity of NWB compared

  10. Inter-regional metric disadvantages when comparing countries’ happiness on a global scale. A Rasch based consequential validity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Rojas-Gualdrón

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurement confounding due to socioeconomic differences between world regions may bias the estimations of countries’ happiness and global inequality. Potential implications of this bias have not been researched. In this study, the consequential validity of the Happy Planet Index, 2012 as an indicator of global inequality is evaluated from the Rasch measurement perspective. Differential Item Functioning by world region and bias in the estimated magnitude of inequalities were analyzed. The recalculated measure showed a good fit to Rasch model assumptions. The original index underestimated relative inequalities between world regions by 20%. DIF had no effect on relative measures but affected absolute measures by overestimating world average happiness and underestimating its variance. These findings suggest measurement confounding by unmeasured characteristics. Metric disadvantages must be adjusted to make fair comparisons. Public policy decisions based on biased estimations could have relevant negative consequences on people’s health and well-being by not focusing efforts on real vulnerable populations.

  11. The relative validity and reproducibility of an iron food frequency questionnaire for identifying iron-related dietary patterns in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kathryn L; Kruger, Rozanne; Conlon, Cathryn A; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Coad, Jane; Matthys, Christophe; Jones, Beatrix; Stonehouse, Welma

    2012-08-01

    Using food frequency data to identify dietary patterns is a newly emerging approach to assessing the relationship between dietary intake and iron status. Food frequency questionnaires should be assessed for validity and reproducibility before use. We aimed to investigate the relative validity and reproducibility of an iron food frequency questionnaire (FeFFQ) specifically designed to identify iron-related dietary patterns. Participants completed the FeFFQ at baseline (FeFFQ1) and 1 month later (FeFFQ2) to assess reproducibility. A 4-day weighed diet record (4DDR) was completed between these assessments to determine validity. Foods appearing in the 4DDR were classified into the same 144 food groupings as the FeFFQ. Factor analysis was used to determine dietary patterns from FeFFQ1, FeFFQ2, and the 4DDR. A convenience sample of women (n=115) aged 18 to 44 years living in Auckland, New Zealand, during 2009. Agreement between diet pattern scores was compared using correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman analysis, cross-classification, and the weighted κ statistic. A "healthy" and a "sandwich and drinks" dietary pattern were identified from all three dietary assessments. Correlation coefficients between FeFFQ1 and the 4DDR diet pattern scores (validity) were 0.34 for the healthy, and 0.62 for the sandwich and drinks pattern (both Ps50% of participants into the correct tertile and <10% into the opposite tertile for both the healthy and sandwich and drinks diet pattern scores when compared with the 4DDR and FeFFQ2. The FeFFQ appears to be a reproducible and relatively valid method for identifying dietary patterns, and could be used to investigate the relationship between dietary patterns and iron status. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Online physician review websites poorly correlate to a validated metric of patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennwood; Presson, Angela; Zhang, Chong; Ray, David; Finlayson, Samuel; Glasgow, Robert

    2018-07-01

    Physician review websites such as Vitals and Healthgrades are becoming an increasingly popular tool for patients to choose providers. We hypothesized that the scores of these surveys poorly represent the true value of patient satisfaction when compared to a validated survey instrument. Answers from Vitals and Healthgrades online surveys were compared to the Press Ganey Medical Practice Survey (PGMPS) for 200 faculty members at a university hospital for FY15. Weighted Pearson's correlation was used to compare Healthgrades and Vitals to PGMPS. While statistically significant, both Vitals and Healthgrades had very low correlations with the PGMPS with weighted coefficients of 0.18 (95% confidence interval: 0.02-0.34, P = 0.025) and 0.27 (95% confidence interval: 0.12-0.42, P Online physician rating websites such as Vitals and Healthgrades poorly correlate with the PGMPS, a validated measure of patient satisfaction. Patients should be aware of these limitations and, consequently, should have access to the most accurate measure of patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reproducibility and validity of patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in Parkinson’s Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiel Zwarts; Johanna Kalf; Bastiaan Bloem; George Borm; Marten Munneke; Bert de Swart

    2012-01-01

    To report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Radboud Oral Motor Inventory for Parkinson's Disease (ROMP), a newly developed patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate reproducibility, 60 patients

  14. Microcomputer-based tests for repeated-measures: Metric properties and predictive validities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Baltzley, Dennis R.; Dunlap, William P.; Wilkes, Robert L.; Kuntz, Lois-Ann

    1989-01-01

    A menu of psychomotor and mental acuity tests were refined. Field applications of such a battery are, for example, a study of the effects of toxic agents or exotic environments on performance readiness, or the determination of fitness for duty. The key requirement of these tasks is that they be suitable for repeated-measures applications, and so questions of stability and reliability are a continuing, central focus of this work. After the initial (practice) session, seven replications of 14 microcomputer-based performance tests (32 measures) were completed by 37 subjects. Each test in the battery had previously been shown to stabilize in less than five 90-second administrations and to possess retest reliabilities greater than r = 0.707 for three minutes of testing. However, all the tests had never been administered together as a battery and they had never been self-administered. In order to provide predictive validity for intelligence measurement, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wonderlic Personnel Test were obtained on the same subjects.

  15. Relative Validity and Reproducibility of an Interviewer Administered 14-Item FFQ to Estimate Flavonoid Intake Among Older Adults with Mild-Moderate Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Katherine; Charlton, Karen

    2017-01-01

    There is a large burden on researchers and participants when attempting to accurately measure dietary flavonoid intake using dietary assessment. Minimizing participant and researcher burden when collecting dietary data may improve the validity of the results, especially in older adults with cognitive impairment. A short 14-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to measure flavonoid intake, and flavonoid subclasses (anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavones, flavonols, and flavanones) was developed and assessed for validity and reproducibility against a 24-hour recall. Older adults with mild-moderate dementia (n = 49) attended two interviews 12 weeks apart. With the assistance of a family carer, a 24-h recall was collected at the first interview, and the flavonoid FFQ was interviewer-administered at both time-points. Validity and reproducibility was assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman Plots, and Cohen's kappa. Mean flavonoid intake was determined (FFQ1 = 795 ± 492.7 mg/day, 24-h recall = 515.6 ± 384.3 mg/day). Tests of validity indicated the FFQ was better at estimating total flavonoid intake than individual flavonoid subclasses compared with the 24-h recall. There was a significant difference in total flavonoid intake estimates between the FFQ and the 24-h recall (Wilcoxon signed-rank sum p Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test showed no significant difference, Spearman's correlation coefficient indicated excellent reliability (r = 0.75, p < 0.001), Bland-Altman plots visually showed small, nonsignificant bias and wide limits of agreement, and Cohen's kappa indicated fair agreement (κ = 0.429, p < 0.001). A 14-item FFQ developed to easily measure flavonoid intake in older adults with dementia demonstrates fair validity against a 24-h recall and good reproducibility.

  16. Novel Use of the Nintendo Wii Board for Measuring Isometric Lower Limb Strength: A Reproducible and Valid Method in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronbech Jorgensen, Martin; Andersen, Stig; Ryg, Jesper; Masud, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Portable, low-cost, objective and reproducible assessment of muscle strength in the lower limbs is important as it allows clinicians to precisly track progression of patients undergoing rehabilitation. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) is portable, inexpensive, durable, available worldwide, and may serve the above function. The purpose of the study was to evaluate (1) reproducibility and (2) concurrent validity of the WBB for measuring isometric muscle strength in the lower limb. A custom hardware and software was developed to utilize the WBB for assessment of isometric muscle strength. Thirty older adults (69.0 ± 4.2 years of age) were studied on two separate occasions on both the WBB and a stationary isometric dynamometer (SID). On each occasion, three recordings were obtained from each device. For the first recording, means and maximum values were used for further analysis. The test-retest reproducibility was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Standard Error of Measurement (SEM), and limits of agreement (LOA). Bland-Altman plots (BAP) and ICC's were used to explore concurrent validity. No systematic difference between test-retest was detected for the WBB. ICC within-device were between 0.90 and 0.96 and between-devices were from 0.80 to 0.84. SEM ranged for the WBB from 9.7 to 13.9%, and for the SID from 11.9 to 13.1%. LOA ranged for the WBB from 20.3 to 28.7% and for the SID from 24.2 to 26.6%. The BAP showed no relationship between the difference and the mean. A high relative and an acceptable absolute reproducibility combined with a good validity was found for the novel method using the WBB for measuring isometric lower limb strength in older adults. Further research using the WBB for assessing lower limb strength should be conducted in different study-populations.

  17. Novel Use of the Nintendo Wii Board for Measuring Isometric Lower Limb Strength: A Reproducible and Valid Method in Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gronbech Jorgensen

    Full Text Available Portable, low-cost, objective and reproducible assessment of muscle strength in the lower limbs is important as it allows clinicians to precisly track progression of patients undergoing rehabilitation. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB is portable, inexpensive, durable, available worldwide, and may serve the above function.The purpose of the study was to evaluate (1 reproducibility and (2 concurrent validity of the WBB for measuring isometric muscle strength in the lower limb.A custom hardware and software was developed to utilize the WBB for assessment of isometric muscle strength. Thirty older adults (69.0 ± 4.2 years of age were studied on two separate occasions on both the WBB and a stationary isometric dynamometer (SID. On each occasion, three recordings were obtained from each device. For the first recording, means and maximum values were used for further analysis. The test-retest reproducibility was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, Standard Error of Measurement (SEM, and limits of agreement (LOA. Bland-Altman plots (BAP and ICC's were used to explore concurrent validity.No systematic difference between test-retest was detected for the WBB. ICC within-device were between 0.90 and 0.96 and between-devices were from 0.80 to 0.84. SEM ranged for the WBB from 9.7 to 13.9%, and for the SID from 11.9 to 13.1%. LOA ranged for the WBB from 20.3 to 28.7% and for the SID from 24.2 to 26.6%. The BAP showed no relationship between the difference and the mean.A high relative and an acceptable absolute reproducibility combined with a good validity was found for the novel method using the WBB for measuring isometric lower limb strength in older adults. Further research using the WBB for assessing lower limb strength should be conducted in different study-populations.

  18. Validation of Interobserver Agreement in Lung Cancer Assessment: Hematoxylin-Eosin Diagnostic Reproducibility for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilley-Olson, Juneko E.; Hayes, D. Neil; Moore, Dominic T.; Leslie, Kevin O.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Qaqish, Bahjat F.; Hayward, Michele C.; Cabanski, Christopher R.; Yin, Xiaoying; Socinski, Mark A.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Allen, Timothy Craig; Banks, Peter M.; Beasley, Mary B.; Borczuk, Alain C.; Cagle, Philip T.; Christensen, Rebecca; Colby, Thomas V.; Deblois, Georgean G.; Elmberger, Göran; Graziano, Paolo; Hart, Craig F.; Jones, Kirk D.; Maia, Diane M.; Miller, C. Ryan; Nance, Keith V.; Travis, William D.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Context Precise subtype diagnosis of non–small cell lung carcinoma is increasingly relevant, based on the availability of subtype-specific therapies, such as bevacizumab and pemetrexed, and based on the subtype-specific prevalence of activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. Objectives To establish a baseline measure of inter-observer reproducibility for non–small cell lung carcinoma diagnoses with hematoxylin-eosin for the current 2004 World Health Organization classification, to estimate interobserver reproducibility for the therapeutically relevant squamous/nonsquamous subsets, and to examine characteristics that improve interobserver reproducibility. Design Primary, resected lung cancer specimens were converted to digital (virtual) slides. Based on a single hematoxylin-eosin virtual slide, pathologists were asked to assign a diagnosis using the 2004 World Health Organization classification. Kappa statistics were calculated for each pathologist-pair for each slide and were summarized by classification scheme, pulmonary pathology expertise, diagnostic confidence, and neoplastic grade. Results The 12 pulmonary pathology experts and the 12 community pathologists each independently diagnosed 48 to 96 single hematoxylin-eosin digital slides derived from 96 cases of non–small cell lung carcinoma resection. Overall agreement improved with simplification from the comprehensive 44 World Health Organization diagnoses (κ = 0.25) to their 10 major header subtypes (κ = 0.48) and improved again with simplification into the therapeutically relevant squamous/nonsquamous dichotomy (κ = 0.55). Multivariate analysis showed that higher diagnostic agreement was associated with better differentiation, better slide quality, higher diagnostic confidence, similar years of pathology experience, and pulmonary pathology expertise. Conclusions These data define the baseline diagnostic agreement for hematoxylin-eosin diagnosis of non–small cell lung carcinoma

  19. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess dietary fiber intake in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuholm, Stine; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Kristensen, Mette Bredal

    2014-01-01

    months later. Results: Estimates of mean dietary fiber intake were 24.999.8 and 28.199.4 g/day when applying the FFQ and DR, respectively, where FFQ estimates were 12% lower (pB0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient between the estimated dietary fiber intake of the two methods was r0.63 (pB0......: The developed FFQ showed moderate underestimation of dietary fiber intake (g/day), adequate ranking of subjects according to their dietary fiber intake, and good reproducibility. The FFQ is therefore believed to be a valuable tool for epidemiology and screening in human interventions, where intake of dietary...

  20. Sixteen-row multislice computed tomography in the assessment of pulmonary veins prior to ablative treatment: validation vs conventional pulmonary venography and study of reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimovic, R.; Cademartiri, F.; Pattynama, P.M.T. [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Scholten, M; Jordaens, L.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Cardiology

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate multislice computed tomography (MSCT) venography measurements of pulmonary vein (PV) diameters vs conventional pulmonary venography (CPV), and to assess the reproducibility of MSCT data. The study included 21 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation who were planned for cryothermal ablation of PVs. One day before ablation, all patients underwent CPV and contrast-enhanced non-gated MSCT venography. The MSCT was repeated 3 months after ablation. The CPV images of the treated PVs (n=40) were analyzed and compared with the results of MSCT measurements. Reproducibility of MSCT venography-based data was assessed by interobserver (n=84 PVs) and interexamination (n=44 PVs) variability. Pre-treatment PV diameters on MSCT and CPV showed good correlation (r=0.87, p<0.01; 18.9{+-}2.3 mm, 188.5{+-}2.4 mm, respectively). Interobserver agreement and interexamination reproducibility were good (r=0.91, r=0.82, respectively, p<0.01), with narrow limits of agreement (Bland and Altman method). The MSCT venography allows accurate and reproducible assessment of PVs. It can be used both in non-invasive planning of treatment for ablative therapy and in the follow-up of patients.

  1. Population Health Metrics Research Consortium gold standard verbal autopsy validation study: design, implementation, and development of analysis datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Summer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal autopsy methods are critically important for evaluating the leading causes of death in populations without adequate vital registration systems. With a myriad of analytical and data collection approaches, it is essential to create a high quality validation dataset from different populations to evaluate comparative method performance and make recommendations for future verbal autopsy implementation. This study was undertaken to compile a set of strictly defined gold standard deaths for which verbal autopsies were collected to validate the accuracy of different methods of verbal autopsy cause of death assignment. Methods Data collection was implemented in six sites in four countries: Andhra Pradesh, India; Bohol, Philippines; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Mexico City, Mexico; Pemba Island, Tanzania; and Uttar Pradesh, India. The Population Health Metrics Research Consortium (PHMRC developed stringent diagnostic criteria including laboratory, pathology, and medical imaging findings to identify gold standard deaths in health facilities as well as an enhanced verbal autopsy instrument based on World Health Organization (WHO standards. A cause list was constructed based on the WHO Global Burden of Disease estimates of the leading causes of death, potential to identify unique signs and symptoms, and the likely existence of sufficient medical technology to ascertain gold standard cases. Blinded verbal autopsies were collected on all gold standard deaths. Results Over 12,000 verbal autopsies on deaths with gold standard diagnoses were collected (7,836 adults, 2,075 children, 1,629 neonates, and 1,002 stillbirths. Difficulties in finding sufficient cases to meet gold standard criteria as well as problems with misclassification for certain causes meant that the target list of causes for analysis was reduced to 34 for adults, 21 for children, and 10 for neonates, excluding stillbirths. To ensure strict independence for the validation of

  2. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (ptalent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  3. Online dietary intake estimation: reproducibility and validity of the Food4Me food frequency questionnaire against a 4-day weighed food record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallaize, Rosalind; Forster, Hannah; Macready, Anna L; Walsh, Marianne C; Mathers, John C; Brennan, Lorraine; Gibney, Eileen R; Gibney, Michael J; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2014-08-11

    Advances in nutritional assessment are continuing to embrace developments in computer technology. The online Food4Me food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was created as an electronic system for the collection of nutrient intake data. To ensure its accuracy in assessing both nutrient and food group intake, further validation against data obtained using a reliable, but independent, instrument and assessment of its reproducibility are required. The aim was to assess the reproducibility and validity of the Food4Me FFQ against a 4-day weighed food record (WFR). Reproducibility of the Food4Me FFQ was assessed using test-retest methodology by asking participants to complete the FFQ on 2 occasions 4 weeks apart. To assess the validity of the Food4Me FFQ against the 4-day WFR, half the participants were also asked to complete a 4-day WFR 1 week after the first administration of the Food4Me FFQ. Level of agreement between nutrient and food group intakes estimated by the repeated Food4Me FFQ and the Food4Me FFQ and 4-day WFR were evaluated using Bland-Altman methodology and classification into quartiles of daily intake. Crude unadjusted correlation coefficients were also calculated for nutrient and food group intakes. In total, 100 people participated in the assessment of reproducibility (mean age 32, SD 12 years), and 49 of these (mean age 27, SD 8 years) also took part in the assessment of validity. Crude unadjusted correlations for repeated Food4Me FFQ ranged from .65 (vitamin D) to .90 (alcohol). The mean cross-classification into "exact agreement plus adjacent" was 92% for both nutrient and food group intakes, and Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement for energy-adjusted macronutrient intakes. Agreement between the Food4Me FFQ and 4-day WFR varied, with crude unadjusted correlations ranging from .23 (vitamin D) to .65 (protein, % total energy) for nutrient intakes and .11 (soups, sauces and miscellaneous foods) to .73 (yogurts) for food group intake. The mean cross

  4. Reproducibility and relative validity of a brief quantitative food frequency questionnaire for assessing fruit and vegetable intakes in North-African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, E; Gartner, A; Bour, A; McCullough, F; Delpeuch, F; Holdsworth, M

    2014-04-01

    In the context of a rapidly increasing prevalence of noncommunicable diseases, fruit and vegetables could play a key preventive role. To date, there is no rapid assessment tool available for measuring the fruit and vegetable intakes of North-African women. The present study aimed to investigate the reproducibility and relative validity of an eight-item quantitative food frequency questionnaire that measures the fruit and vegetable intakes (FV-FFQ) of Moroccan women. During a 1-week period, 100 women, living in the city of Rabat, Morocco (aged 20-49 years) completed the short FV-FFQ twice: once at baseline (FV-FFQ1) and once at the end of the study (FV-FFQ2). In the mean time, participants completed three 24-h dietary recalls. All questionnaires were administered by interviewers. Reproducibility was assessed by computing Spearman's correlation coefficients, intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients and kappa statistics. Relative validity was assessed by computing Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Spearman's correlation coefficients, as well as by performing Bland-Altman plots. In terms of reproducibility, Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.56; ICC coefficient was 0.68; and weighted kappa was 0.35. In terms of relative validity, compared with the three 24-h recalls, the FV-FFQ slightly underestimated mean fruit and vegetable intakes (-10.9%; P = 0.006); Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.69; at the individual level, intakes measured by the FV-FFQ were between 0.39 and 2.19 times those measured by the 24-h recalls. The brief eight-item FV-FFQ is a reliable and relatively valid tool for measuring mean fruit and vegetable intakes at the population level, although this is not the case at the individual level. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Development of the Japanese version of the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire and its simplified versions, and evaluation of their reliability, validity, and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yuko; Okumura, Keiko; Kumagai, Yoshiko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Kim, Hunkyung; Morishita, Shiho; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2017-11-01

    Because few Japanese questionnaires assess the elderly's appetite, there is an urgent need to develop an appetite questionnaire with verified reliability, validity, and reproducibility. We translated and back-translated the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ), which has eight items, into Japanese (CNAQ-J), as well as the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ-J), which includes four CNAQ-J-derived items. Using structural equation modeling, we examined the CNAQ-J structure based on data of 649 Japanese elderly people in 2013, including individuals having a certain degree of cognitive impairment, and we developed the SNAQ for the Japanese elderly (SNAQ-JE) according to an exploratory factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analyses on the appetite questionnaires were conducted to probe fitting to the model. We computed Cronbach's α coefficients and criterion-referenced/-related validity figures examining associations of the three appetite battery scores with body mass index (BMI) values and with nutrition-related questionnaire values. Test-retest reproducibility of appetite tools was scrutinized over an approximately 2-week interval. An exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the CNAQ-J was constructed of one factor (appetite), yielding the SNAQ-JE, which includes four questions derived from the CNAQ-J. The three appetite instruments showed almost equivalent fitting to the model and reproducibility. The CNAQ-J and SNAQ-JE demonstrated satisfactory reliability and significant criterion-referenced/-related validity values, including BMIs, but the SNAQ-J included a low factor-loading item, exhibited less satisfactory reliability and had a non-significant relationship to BMI. The CNAQ-J and SNAQ-JE may be applied to assess the appetite of Japanese elderly, including persons with some cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ClinicalCodes: an online clinical codes repository to improve the validity and reproducibility of research using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springate, David A; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Ashcroft, Darren M; Olier, Ivan; Parisi, Rosa; Chamapiwa, Edmore; Reeves, David

    2014-01-01

    Lists of clinical codes are the foundation for research undertaken using electronic medical records (EMRs). If clinical code lists are not available, reviewers are unable to determine the validity of research, full study replication is impossible, researchers are unable to make effective comparisons between studies, and the construction of new code lists is subject to much duplication of effort. Despite this, the publication of clinical codes is rarely if ever a requirement for obtaining grants, validating protocols, or publishing research. In a representative sample of 450 EMR primary research articles indexed on PubMed, we found that only 19 (5.1%) were accompanied by a full set of published clinical codes and 32 (8.6%) stated that code lists were available on request. To help address these problems, we have built an online repository where researchers using EMRs can upload and download lists of clinical codes. The repository will enable clinical researchers to better validate EMR studies, build on previous code lists and compare disease definitions across studies. It will also assist health informaticians in replicating database studies, tracking changes in disease definitions or clinical coding practice through time and sharing clinical code information across platforms and data sources as research objects.

  7. Finite Element Based Pelvic Injury Metric Creation and Validation in Lateral Impact for a Human Body Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Caitlin; Baker, Alexander; Davis, Matthew; Miller, Anna; Stitzel, Joel D

    2018-02-20

    Pelvic fractures are serious injuries resulting in high mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study is to develop and validate local pelvic anatomical, cross-section-based injury risk metrics for a finite element (FE) model of the human body. Cross-sectional instrumentation was implemented in the pelvic region of the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC M50-O) 50th percentile detailed male FE model (v4.3). In total, 25 lateral impact FE simulations were performed using input data from cadaveric lateral impact tests performed by Bouquet et al. The experimental force-time data was scaled using five normalization techniques, which were evaluated using log rank, Wilcoxon rank sum, and correlation and analysis (CORA) testing. Survival analyses with Weibull distribution were performed on the experimental peak force (scaled and unscaled) and the simulation test data to generate injury risk curves (IRCs) for total pelvic injury. Additionally, IRCs were developed for regional injury using cross-sectional forces from the simulation results and injuries documented in the experimental autopsies. These regional IRCs were also evaluated using the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Based on the results of the all the evaluation methods, the Equal Stress Equal Velocity (ESEV) and ESEV using effective mass (ESEV-EM) scaling techniques performed best. The simulation IRC shows slight under prediction of injury in comparison to these scaled experimental data curves. However, this difference was determined to not be statistically significant. Additionally, the ROC curve analysis showed moderate predictive power for all regional IRCs.

  8. Validity and reproducibility of HOMA-IR, 1/HOMA-IR, QUICKI and McAuley's indices in patients with hypertension and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafidis, P A; Lasaridis, A N; Nilsson, P M; Pikilidou, M I; Stafilas, P C; Kanaki, A; Kazakos, K; Yovos, J; Bakris, G L

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, its reciprocal (1/HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and McAuley's index in hypertensive diabetic patients. In 78 patients with hypertension and type II diabetes glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels were determined after a 12-h fast to calculate these indices, and insulin sensitivity (IS) was measured with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Two weeks later, subjects had again their glucose, insulin and triglycerides measured. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis were applied to assess the validity of these indices compared to clamp IS and coefficients of variation between the two visits were estimated to assess their reproducibility. HOMA-IR index was strongly and inversely correlated with the basic IS clamp index, the M-value (r=-0.572, PHOMA-IR and QUICKI indices were positively correlated with the M-value (r=0.342, PHOMA-IR was the best fit of clamp-derived IS. Coefficients of variation between the two visits were 23.5% for HOMA-IR, 19.2% for 1/HOMA-IR, 7.8% for QUICKI and 15.1% for McAuley's index. In conclusion, HOMA-IR, 1/HOMA-IR and QUICKI are valid estimates of clamp-derived IS in patients with hypertension and type II diabetes, whereas the validity of McAuley's index needs further evaluation. QUICKI displayed better reproducibility than the other indices.

  9. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R Faber

    Full Text Available This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years from national (n = 13, regional (n = 11 and local training centres (n = 19 participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05. The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001. Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions. Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  10. Questionable validity of the catheter-associated urinary tract infection metric used for value-based purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Lindsay E; Kavanagh, Kevin T; Rice, Mara K

    2015-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) occur in 290,000 US hospital patients annually, with an estimated cost of $290 million. Two different measurement systems are being used to track the US health care system's performance in lowering the rate of CAUTIs. Since 2010, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) metric has shown a 28.2% decrease in CAUTI, whereas the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention metric has shown a 3%-6% increase in CAUTI since 2009. Differences in data acquisition and the definition of the denominator may explain this discrepancy. The AHRQ metric analyzes chart-audited data and reflects both catheter use and care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention metric analyzes self-reported data and primarily reflects catheter care. Because analysis of the AHRQ metric showed a progressive change in performance over time and the scientific literature supports the importance of catheter use in the prevention of CAUTI, it is suggested that risk-adjusted catheter-use data be incorporated into metrics that are used for determining facility performance and for value-based purchasing initiatives. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Validity and reproducibility of an Internet-based questionnaire (Web-CAAFE) to evaluate the food consumption of students aged 7 to 15 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Gilmar Mercês de; Assis, Maria Alice Altenburg de; Kupek, Emil

    2017-06-05

    The study evaluated the validity and reproducibility of the food consumption section of the questionnaire Food Intake and Physical Activity of School Children (Web-CAAFE), an Internet-based software for the qualitative measurement of food consumption by recalling the previous day. A total of 390 students in grades 2 to 5 (7 to 15 years) of a semi-integral public school participated in the study. The validity was tested by comparing the report in the Web-CAAFE and the direct observation of food consumed in the school in the previous day. The reproducibility was evaluated in a sub-sample of 92 schoolchildren, by comparing repeated reports in the Web-CAAFE on the same day. Probabilities of accuracy in the Web-CAAFE report in relation to the observation (matches, omissions and intrusions and respective 95% confidence intervals) among seven food groups were estimated through multinomial logistic regression. The average for the match rate was 81.4% (variation: 62% sweets and 98% beans); for the omission rate was 16.2% (variation between 2.1% dairy products and 28.5% sweets); for the intrusion rate was 7.1% (variation between 1.3% beans and 13.8% cereals). Sweets, cereals and processed foods, snack foods and fried foods simultaneously exhibited higher rates of omission and intrusion. Students 10 years of age or older had lower probabilities of intruding food items. There were no significant variations in the accuracy of the report between repeated measures. The Web-CAAFE was a valid and reliable instrument for the evaluation of food consumption, when applied to students in grades 2 to 5 of public schools.

  12. Reproducibility and Validity of Dietary Patterns Assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire Used in the 5-Year Follow-Up Survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nanri, Akiko; Shimazu, Taichi; Ishihara, Junko; Takachi, Ribeka; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of dietary pattern is increasingly popular in nutritional epidemiology. However, few studies have examined the validity and reproducibility of dietary patterns. We assessed the reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns identified by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study (JPHC Study). Methods The participants were a subsample (244 men and 254 women) from the JPHC Study. Princ...

  13. Reproducibility and Validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Assessing Dietary Consumption via the Dietary Pattern Method in a Chinese Rural Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Xiaorong; Lin, Sihao; Song, Qingkun; Lao, Xiangqian; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that was developed to assess the overall dietary consumption via dietary pattern method in a rural population in southwest China. A total of 179 participants aged between 40 and 70 years old were included in this study. Participants administered FFQ at baseline (FFQ1) and one year later (FFQ2) to assess the reproducibility. Six 3-day 24-hour recalls (24HRs) were completed between the administrations of two FFQs to determine the validity. Dietary patterns from three separate dietary sources were derived by using principle component factor analysis. Comparisons between dietary pattern scores were made by using Pearson or intraclass correlation coefficient, cross-classification analysis, weighted kappa (κ) statistic and Bland-Altman analysis. The de-attenuated method was adopted to correct the monthly and seasonally variation and the partial correlation analysis was used correct the influence by total energy intake. Two major dietary factors, labeled as prudent pattern and processed food pattern, were identified. The prudent pattern was characterized by higher factor loadings of wheat, rice, fresh vegetables, bean products, nuts, red meat, white meat and fresh eggs; and the processed food pattern was characterized by higher factor loadings of pickled vegetables, preserved vegetables and salted meat. Between Two FFQs, intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.57 for prudent pattern and 0.55 for processed food pattern, partial Pearson correlation coefficients were 0.51 for the prudent pattern and 0.56 for the processed food pattern; weighted κ statistic ranged from 0.45 (for the prudent pattern) to 0.56 (for the processed food pattern). Between FFQs and 24HRs, de-attenuated correlation coefficients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 for the prudent pattern and from 0.55 to 0.61 for the processed food pattern; partial Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.41 to 0

  14. Reproducibility and Validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Assessing Dietary Consumption via the Dietary Pattern Method in a Chinese Rural Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liu

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ that was developed to assess the overall dietary consumption via dietary pattern method in a rural population in southwest China.A total of 179 participants aged between 40 and 70 years old were included in this study. Participants administered FFQ at baseline (FFQ1 and one year later (FFQ2 to assess the reproducibility. Six 3-day 24-hour recalls (24HRs were completed between the administrations of two FFQs to determine the validity. Dietary patterns from three separate dietary sources were derived by using principle component factor analysis. Comparisons between dietary pattern scores were made by using Pearson or intraclass correlation coefficient, cross-classification analysis, weighted kappa (κ statistic and Bland-Altman analysis. The de-attenuated method was adopted to correct the monthly and seasonally variation and the partial correlation analysis was used correct the influence by total energy intake.Two major dietary factors, labeled as prudent pattern and processed food pattern, were identified. The prudent pattern was characterized by higher factor loadings of wheat, rice, fresh vegetables, bean products, nuts, red meat, white meat and fresh eggs; and the processed food pattern was characterized by higher factor loadings of pickled vegetables, preserved vegetables and salted meat. Between Two FFQs, intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.57 for prudent pattern and 0.55 for processed food pattern, partial Pearson correlation coefficients were 0.51 for the prudent pattern and 0.56 for the processed food pattern; weighted κ statistic ranged from 0.45 (for the prudent pattern to 0.56 (for the processed food pattern. Between FFQs and 24HRs, de-attenuated correlation coefficients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 for the prudent pattern and from 0.55 to 0.61 for the processed food pattern; partial Pearson correlation coefficients ranged

  15. Comparative validity and reproducibility study of various landmark-oriented reference planes in 3-dimensional computed tomographic analysis for patients receiving orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Chuang, Ya-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ling; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging has become popular in clinical evaluation, treatment planning, surgical simulation, and outcome assessment for maxillofacial intervention. The purposes of this study were to investigate whether there is any correlation among landmark-based horizontal reference planes and to validate the reproducibility and reliability of landmark identification. Preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomographic images of patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery were collected. Landmark-oriented reference planes including the Frankfort horizontal plane (FHP) and the lateral semicircular canal plane (LSP) were established. Four FHPs were defined by selecting 3 points from the orbitale, porion, or midpoint of paired points. The LSP passed through both the lateral semicircular canal points and nasion. The distances between the maxillary or mandibular teeth and the reference planes were measured, and the differences between the 2 sides were calculated and compared. The precision in locating the landmarks was evaluated by performing repeated tests, and the intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver reliability were assessed. A total of 30 patients with facial deformity and malocclusion--10 patients with facial symmetry, 10 patients with facial asymmetry, and 10 patients with cleft lip and palate--were recruited. Comparing the differences among the 5 reference planes showed no statistically significant difference among all patient groups. Regarding intraobserver reproducibility, the mean differences in the 3 coordinates varied from 0 to 0.35 mm, with correlation coefficients between 0.96 and 1.0, showing high correlation between repeated tests. Regarding interobserver reliability, the mean differences among the 3 coordinates varied from 0 to 0.47 mm, with correlation coefficients between 0.88 and 1.0, exhibiting high correlation between the different examiners. The 5 horizontal reference planes were reliable and

  16. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancing the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) Approach for Estimating Landscape ET: Validation with the METRIC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Budde, Michael E.; Verdin, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) can be derived from satellite data using surface energy balance principles. METRIC (Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration) is one of the most widely used models available in the literature to estimate ET from satellite imagery. The Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model is much easier and less expensive to implement. The main purpose of this research was to present an enhanced version of the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model and to evaluate its performance using the established METRIC model. In this study, SSEB and METRIC ET fractions were compared using 7 Landsat images acquired for south central Idaho during the 2003 growing season. The enhanced SSEB model compared well with the METRIC model output exhibiting an r2 improvement from 0.83 to 0.90 in less complex topography (elevation less than 2000 m) and with an improvement of r2 from 0.27 to 0.38 in more complex (mountain) areas with elevation greater than 2000 m. Independent evaluation showed that both models exhibited higher variation in complex topographic regions, although more with SSEB than with METRIC. The higher ET fraction variation in the complex mountainous regions highlighted the difficulty of capturing the radiation and heat transfer physics on steep slopes having variable aspect with the simple index model, and the need to conduct more research. However, the temporal consistency of the results suggests that the SSEB model can be used on a wide range of elevation (more successfully up 2000 m) to detect anomalies in space and time for water resources management and monitoring such as for drought early warning systems in data scarce regions. SSEB has a potential for operational agro-hydrologic applications to estimate ET with inputs of surface temperature, NDVI, DEM and reference ET.

  18. Semantic metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Bo; Kalfoglou, Yannis; Dupplaw, David; Alani, Harith; Lewis, Paul; Shadbolt, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the Semantic Web, many ontology-related operations, e.g. ontology ranking, segmentation, alignment, articulation, reuse, evaluation, can be boiled down to one fundamental operation: computing the similarity and/or dissimilarity among ontological entities, and in some cases among ontologies themselves. In this paper, we review standard metrics for computing distance measures and we propose a series of semantic metrics. We give a formal account of semantic metrics drawn from a...

  19. SU-E-T-789: Validation of 3DVH Accuracy On Quantifying Delivery Errors Based On Clinical Relevant DVH Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T; Kumaraswamy, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Detection of treatment delivery errors is important in radiation therapy. However, accurate quantification of delivery errors is also of great importance. This study aims to evaluate the 3DVH software’s ability to accurately quantify delivery errors. Methods: Three VMAT plans (prostate, H&N and brain) were randomly chosen for this study. First, we evaluated whether delivery errors could be detected by gamma evaluation. Conventional per-beam IMRT QA was performed with the ArcCHECK diode detector for the original plans and for the following modified plans: (1) induced dose difference error up to ±4.0% and (2) control point (CP) deletion (3 to 10 CPs were deleted) (3) gantry angle shift error (3 degree uniformly shift). 2D and 3D gamma evaluation were performed for all plans through SNC Patient and 3DVH, respectively. Subsequently, we investigated the accuracy of 3DVH analysis for all cases. This part evaluated, using the Eclipse TPS plans as standard, whether 3DVH accurately can model the changes in clinically relevant metrics caused by the delivery errors. Results: 2D evaluation seemed to be more sensitive to delivery errors. The average differences between ECLIPSE predicted and 3DVH results for each pair of specific DVH constraints were within 2% for all three types of error-induced treatment plans, illustrating the fact that 3DVH is fairly accurate in quantifying the delivery errors. Another interesting observation was that even though the gamma pass rates for the error plans are high, the DVHs showed significant differences between original plan and error-induced plans in both Eclipse and 3DVH analysis. Conclusion: The 3DVH software is shown to accurately quantify the error in delivered dose based on clinically relevant DVH metrics, where a conventional gamma based pre-treatment QA might not necessarily detect

  20. Design and validation of a consistent and reproducible manufacture process for the production of clinical-grade bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codinach, Margarita; Blanco, Margarita; Ortega, Isabel; Lloret, Mireia; Reales, Laura; Coca, Maria Isabel; Torrents, Sílvia; Doral, Manel; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Requena-Montero, Miriam; Vives, Joaquim; Garcia-López, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have achieved a notable prominence in the field of regenerative medicine, despite the lack of common standards in the production processes and suitable quality controls compatible with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Herein we describe the design of a bioprocess for bone marrow (BM)-derived MSC isolation and expansion, its validation and production of 48 consecutive batches for clinical use. BM samples were collected from the iliac crest of patients for autologous therapy. Manufacturing procedures included: (i) isolation of nucleated cells (NC) by automated density-gradient centrifugation and plating; (ii) trypsinization and expansion of secondary cultures; and (iii) harvest and formulation of a suspension containing 40 ± 10 × 10(6) viable cells. Quality controls were defined as: (i) cell count and viability assessment; (ii) immunophenotype; and (iii) sterility tests, Mycoplasma detection, endotoxin test and Gram staining. A 3-week manufacturing bioprocess was first designed and then validated in 3 consecutive mock productions, prior to producing 48 batches of BM-MSC for clinical use. Validation included the assessment of MSC identity and genetic stability. Regarding production, 139.0 ± 17.8 mL of BM containing 2.53 ± 0.92 × 10(9) viable NC were used as starting material, yielding 38.8 ± 5.3 × 10(6) viable cells in the final product. Surface antigen expression was consistent with the expected phenotype for MSC, displaying high levels of CD73, CD90 and CD105, lack of expression of CD31 and CD45 and low levels of HLA-DR. Tests for sterility, Mycoplasma, Gram staining and endotoxin had negative results in all cases. Herein we demonstrated the establishment of a feasible, consistent and reproducible bioprocess for the production of safe BM-derived MSC for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validity and reproducibility of an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire in Austrian adults at risk of or with overt diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farukuoye, Michaela; Strassburger, Klaus; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Giani, Guido; Roden, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) provide an inexpensive tool for dietary assessment. Given the scarcity of data on their validity for nutritional analysis in persons with overt diabetes mellitus or with increased risk of diabetes (relatives of patients with diabetes), this study tests the hypothesis that an FFQ, adapted to local dietary habits, yields a reliable estimate of nutrient intake when compared with 7-day food record (7DR) in healthy, prediabetes, and diabetes cohorts. One hundred three volunteers (50 persons with overt diabetes mellitus, 24 relatives of patients with diabetes, and 29 nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes) completed both FFQ and 7DR. A second FFQ was completed by 100 of these volunteers after 3 months to evaluate its reproducibility. Data were compared by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Across the entire group, estimates for gram intakes of nutrients and total energy were associated with wide limits of agreement between FFQ and 7DR (correlation coefficients, 0.23-0.72; P < .02). Compared with 7DR, the FFQ overestimated intakes of saturated fat in the entire group (+6.6 ± 14 g; P < .001) and in persons with overt diabetes mellitus (+7.6 ± 15 g; P < .001) but underestimated protein intake in relatives of patients with diabetes (-16.36 ± 31 g; P = .01). The repeated FFQ revealed variable agreement (correlation coefficients, 0.34-0.72; P < .001) and underestimated (P < .01) macronutrient and total energy intakes, with slightly better performance in persons with overt diabetes mellitus and relatives of patients with diabetes than in nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes. Hence, the FFQ allows measuring intakes of total energy and macronutrients in prediabetes and diabetes cohorts but reveals limitations when assessing dietary composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Objective Methodology to Assess Meaningful Research Productivity by Orthopaedic Residency Departments: Validation Against Widely Distributed Ranking Metrics and Published Surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Louis B; Goel, Sameer; Hung, Leroy Y; Graves, Matthew L; Spitler, Clay A; Russell, George V; Bergin, Patrick F

    2018-04-01

    The mission of any academic orthopaedic training program can be divided into 3 general areas of focus: clinical care, academic performance, and research. Clinical care is evaluated on clinical volume, patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and becoming increasingly focused on data-driven quality metrics. Academic performance of a department can be used to motivate individual surgeons, but objective measures are used to define a residency program. Annual in-service examinations serve as a marker of resident knowledge base, and board pass rates are clearly scrutinized. Research productivity, however, has proven harder to objectively quantify. In an effort to improve transparency and better account for conflicts of interest, bias, and self-citation, multiple bibliometric measures have been developed. Rather than using individuals' research productivity as a surrogate for departmental research, we sought to establish an objective methodology to better assess a residency program's ability to conduct meaningful research. In this study, we describe a process to assess the number and quality of publications produced by an orthopaedic residency department. This would allow chairmen and program directors to benchmark their current production and make measurable goals for future research investment. The main goal of the benchmarking system is to create an "h-index" for residency programs. To do this, we needed to create a list of relevant articles in the orthopaedic literature. We used the Journal Citation Reports. This publication lists all orthopaedic journals that are given an impact factor rating every year. When we accessed the Journal Citation Reports database, there were 72 journals included in the orthopaedic literature section. To ensure only relevant, impactful journals were included, we selected journals with an impact factor greater than 0.95 and an Eigenfactor Score greater than 0.00095. After excluding journals not meeting these criteria, we were left with 45

  3. Encounters in an online brand community: development and validation of a metric for value co-creation by customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in service marketing have demonstrated the potential value co-creation by customers who participate in online brand communities (OBCs). Therefore, this study forecasts the co-created value by understanding the participation/behavior of customers in a multi-stakeholder OBC. This six-phase qualitative and quantitative investigation conceptualizes, constructs, refines, and tests a 12-item three-dimensional scale for measuring key factors that are related to the experience, interpersonal interactions, and social relationships that affect the value co-creation by customers in an OBC. The scale captures stable psychometric properties, measured using various reliability and validity tests, and can be applied across various industries. Finally, the utility implications and limitations of the proposed scale are discussed, and potential future research directions considered.

  4. Metric learning

    CERN Document Server

    Bellet, Aurelien; Sebban, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Similarity between objects plays an important role in both human cognitive processes and artificial systems for recognition and categorization. How to appropriately measure such similarities for a given task is crucial to the performance of many machine learning, pattern recognition and data mining methods. This book is devoted to metric learning, a set of techniques to automatically learn similarity and distance functions from data that has attracted a lot of interest in machine learning and related fields in the past ten years. In this book, we provide a thorough review of the metric learnin

  5. Adaptive metric kernel regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used non-parametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this contribution, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate...... regression by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms...

  6. Adaptive Metric Kernel Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used nonparametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate regression...... by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows one to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the standard...

  7. Deep Transfer Metric Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junlin Hu; Jiwen Lu; Yap-Peng Tan; Jie Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Conventional metric learning methods usually assume that the training and test samples are captured in similar scenarios so that their distributions are assumed to be the same. This assumption does not hold in many real visual recognition applications, especially when samples are captured across different data sets. In this paper, we propose a new deep transfer metric learning (DTML) method to learn a set of hierarchical nonlinear transformations for cross-domain visual recognition by transferring discriminative knowledge from the labeled source domain to the unlabeled target domain. Specifically, our DTML learns a deep metric network by maximizing the inter-class variations and minimizing the intra-class variations, and minimizing the distribution divergence between the source domain and the target domain at the top layer of the network. To better exploit the discriminative information from the source domain, we further develop a deeply supervised transfer metric learning (DSTML) method by including an additional objective on DTML, where the output of both the hidden layers and the top layer are optimized jointly. To preserve the local manifold of input data points in the metric space, we present two new methods, DTML with autoencoder regularization and DSTML with autoencoder regularization. Experimental results on face verification, person re-identification, and handwritten digit recognition validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  8. Metrication manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, A.F.A.; Digby, R.B.; Thong, S.P.; Lacey, F.

    1978-04-01

    In April 1978 a meeting of senior metrication officers convened by the Commonwealth Science Council of the Commonwealth Secretariat, was held in London. The participants were drawn from Australia, Bangladesh, Britain, Canada, Ghana, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Trinidad and Tobago. Among other things, the meeting resolved to develop a set of guidelines to assist countries to change to SI and to compile such guidelines in the form of a working manual

  9. Validation of mathematical models for the prediction of organs-at-risk dosimetric metrics in high-dose-rate gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Cormack, Robert A. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Given the complicated nature of an interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy treatment plan, the use of a quantitative tool to evaluate the quality of the achieved metrics compared to clinical practice would be advantageous. For this purpose, predictive mathematical models to predict the D{sub 2cc} of rectum and bladder in interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy are discussed and validated.Methods: Previous plans were used to establish the relationship between D2cc and the overlapping volume of the organ at risk with the targeted area (C0) or a 1-cm expansion of the target area (C1). Three mathematical models were evaluated: D{sub 2cc}=α*C{sub 1}+β (LIN); D{sub 2cc}=α– exp(–β*C{sub 0}) (EXP); and a mixed approach (MIX), where both C{sub 0} and C{sub 1} were inputs of the model. The parameters of the models were optimized on a training set of patient data, and the predictive error of each model (predicted D{sub 2cc}− real D{sub 2cc}) was calculated on a validation set of patient data. The data of 20 patients were used to perform a K-fold cross validation analysis, with K = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20.Results: MIX was associated with the smallest mean prediction error <6.4% for an 18-patient training set; LIN had an error <8.5%; EXP had an error <8.3%. Best case scenario analysis shows that an error ≤5% can be achieved for a ten-patient training set with MIX, an error ≤7.4% for LIN, and an error ≤6.9% for EXP. The error decreases with the increase in training set size, with the most marked decrease observed for MIX.Conclusions: The MIX model can predict the D{sub 2cc} of the organs at risk with an error lower than 5% with a training set of ten patients or greater. The model can be used in the development of quality assurance tools to identify treatment plans with suboptimal sparing of the organs at risk. It can also be used to improve preplanning and in the development of real-time intraoperative planning tools.

  10. Commercial broth microdilution panel validation and reproducibility trials for NVP PDF-713 (LBM 415), a novel inhibitor of bacterial peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, T R; Moet, G J; Jones, R N

    2004-09-01

    NVP PDF-713 (LBM 415) is a peptide deformylase inhibitor being progressed into clinical trials. Dry-form broth microdilution panels of NVP PDF-713 were compared to reference MIC panels of 552 recent clinical isolates. Most (99.2%) dry-form MIC results were within +/- 1 log(2) dilution of the reference panel MICs. Of the bacteria tested, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae showed a bias towards higher and lower MICs, respectively. Same-day and between-day reproducibility tests showed that 98.9% and 96.7% of MIC values, respectively, were within +/- 1 log(2) dilution step, thereby demonstrating a high degree of reliability of the dry-form MIC product for clinical studies.

  11. Validity and reproducibility of a revised semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ) for women of age-group 12-44 years in Chengdu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Liu, Ying; Xu, Liangzhi; Jia, Yujian; Shan, Dan; Li, Wenjuan; Pan, Xin; Kang, Deying; Huang, Chengyu; Li, Xiaosong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Ying; Konglin, Lingli; Zhuang, Jing

    2015-03-01

    To find a credible nutritional screening tool for evaluating relationship between nutritional status and diseases in Chengdu female residents, the reliability and validity of a revised semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ) were tested. The validity was assessed by comparing the SQFFQ with the 'standard' method of 3 days' dietary recall, and the reliability was assessed by comparing the first SQFFQ with the second SQFFQ at 4 weeks interval. Correlation analysis showed that, for reliability, the average correlation coefficient (CC) of 22 kinds of nutrients was 0.66 and reduced to 0.60 after adjusting for energy; the average of intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) was 0.65. For validity, the average CC was 0.35 and remained stable after adjusting for CC of energy or nutrients. Validity of 17 nutrients in SQFFQ survey had correlation with result of 3 days' dietary recall. The results showed that the revised SQFFQ can be used for investigating the role of nutrients in development of disease in Chengdu female residents.

  12. Cuestionario de frecuencia de consumo de alimentos para estimación de ingestión de folato en México Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to estimate folate intake in a Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Galván-Portillo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la reproducibilidad y validez de la ingestión de folato (IF,estimada a partir de un cuestionario de frecuencia de consumo (CFC, considerando el factor de retención (FR correspondiente al método de preparación empleado. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Al inicio del estudio se entrevistó a 497 adultos sanos; un año después se realizó una segunda entrevista a una muestra de 100 individuos seleccionados aleatoriamente,quenohubieran modificadosudietadurante el año previo; adicionalmente, para evaluar la validez de la IF, mediante radioinmunoensayo,se determinaron los niveles de folato sérico (FS. RESULTADOS: La reproducibilidad de la IF fue de 0.36 y 0.34 para el folato sin y con FR,respectivamente. Se observó una correlación significativa entre la IF y el FS de 0.18 con FR y 0.21 sin FR (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of folate intake (FI estimated from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ, taking into account the retention factor (RF associated with meal preparation processes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 497 healthy adult participants were interviewed with a FFQ.A second interview was performed one year later of a sample of 100 randomly selected individuals who had not modified their diet during the previous year. In addition,serum folate (SF concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay to evaluate the validity of FI. RESULTS: Reproducibility of IF was 0.36 and 0.34 for folate without FR and with FR, respectively. SF concentration significantly correlated with FI (0.18 with RF; 0.21 without RF, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Incorporating the folate RF in estimates of FI does not improve the reproducibility and validity of those estimates.

  13. Prospective validation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility of a new point shear wave elasto graphic technique for assessing liver stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Su Joa; Lee, Jeong Min; Chang, Won; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Hyo Jin; Yang, Hyun Kyung; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Park, Sae Jin; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To assess intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of a new point shear wave elastography technique (pSWE, S-Shearwave, Samsung Medison) and compare its accuracy in assessing liver stiffness (LS) with an established pSWE technique (Virtual Touch Quantification, VTQ). Thirty-three patients were enrolled in this Institutional Review Board-approved prospective study. LS values were measured by VTQ on an Acuson S2000 system (Siemens Healthineer) and S-Shearwave on an RS-80A (Samsung Medison) in the same session, followed by two further S-Shearwave sessions for inter- and intra-observer variation at 8-hour intervals. The technical success rate (SR) and reliability of the measurements of both pSWE techniques were compared. The intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of S-Shearwave was determined by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). LS values were measured by both methods of pSWE. The diagnostic performance in severe fibrosis (F ≥ 3) and cirrhosis (F = 4) was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis and the Obuchowski measure with the LS values of transient elastography as the referenced standard. The VTQ (100%, 33/33) and S-Shearwave (96.9%, 32/33) techniques did not display a significant difference in technical SR (p = 0.63) or reliability of LS measurements (96.9%, 32/33; 93.9%, 30/32, respectively, p = 0.61). The inter- and intra-observer agreement for LS measurements using the S-Shearwave technique was excellent (ICC = 0.98 and 0.99, respectively). The mean LS values of both pSWE techniques were not significantly different and exhibited a good correlation (r = 0.78). To detect F ≥ 3 and F = 4, VTQ and S-Shearwave showed comparable diagnostic accuracy as indicated by the following outcomes: areas under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) = 0.87 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.70–0.96), 0.89 for VTQ (95% CI 0.74–0.97), respectively; and AUROC = 0.84 (95% CI 0.67–0.94), 0.94 (95% CI 0.80–0.99) for S

  14. Reliability versus reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Defect detection and reproducibility of results are two separate but closely related subjects. It is axiomatic that a defect must be detected from examination to examination or reproducibility of results is very poor. On the other hand, a defect can be detected on each of subsequent examinations for higher reliability and still have poor reproducibility of results

  15. The Need for Reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-06-27

    The purpose of this presentation is to consider issues of reproducibility, specifically it determines whether bitwise reproducible computation is possible, if computational research in DOE improves its publication process, and if reproducible results can be achieved apart from the peer review process?

  16. Experiential space is hardly metric

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šikl, Radovan; Šimeček, Michal; Lukavský, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2008, č. 37 (2008), s. 58-58 ISSN 0301-0066. [European Conference on Visual Perception. 24.08-28.08.2008, Utrecht] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/07/1676 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : visual space perception * metric and non-metric perceptual judgments * ecological validity Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  17. Prospective, Multicenter Validation Study of Magnetic Resonance Volumetry for Response Assessment After Preoperative Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer: Can the Results in the Literature be Reproduced?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Milou H., E-mail: mh.martens@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heeswijk, Miriam M. van [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Broek, Joris J. van den [Department of Surgery, Medical Center Alkmaar, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Rao, Sheng-Xiang [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Vandecaveye, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Vliegen, Roy A. [Department of Radiology, Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen (Netherlands); Schreurs, Wilhelmina H. [Department of Surgery, Medical Center Alkmaar, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To review the available literature on tumor size/volume measurements on magnetic resonance imaging for response assessment after chemoradiotherapy, and validate these cut-offs in an independent multicenter patient cohort. Methods and Materials: The study included 2 parts. (1) Review of the literature: articles were included that assessed the accuracy of tumor size/volume measurements on magnetic resonance imaging for tumor response assessment. Size/volume cut-offs were extracted; (2) Multicenter validation: extracted cut-offs from the literature were tested in a multicenter cohort (n=146). Accuracies were calculated and compared with reported results from the literature. Results: The review included 14 articles, in which 3 different measurement methods were assessed: (1) tumor length; (2) 3-dimensonial tumor size; and (3) whole volume. Study outcomes consisted of (1) complete response (ypT0) versus residual tumor; (2) tumor regression grade 1 to 2 versus 3 to 5; and (3) T-downstaging (ypTvalidation of the whole-volume measurements, in particular for the outcome ypT0 (accuracy 44%-80%), with the optimal cut-offs being 1.6 cm{sup 3} (after chemoradiation therapy) and a volume reduction of Δ80% to 86.6%. Accuracies for whole-volume measurements to assess tumor regression grade 1 to 2 were 52% to 61%, and for T-downstaging 51% to 57%. Overall accuracies for tumor length ranged between 48% and 53% and for 3D size measurement between 52% and 56%. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance volumetry using whole-tumor volume measurements can be helpful in rectal cancer response assessment with selected cut-off values. Measurements of tumor length or 3-dimensional tumor size are not helpful. Magnetic resonance volumetry is mainly accurate to assess a complete tumor response (ypT0) after chemoradiation therapy (accuracies up to 80%).

  18. Skin perfusion pressure measured with a photo sensor in an air-filled plastic balloon: validity and reproducibility on the lower leg in normal subjects and patients suspected of obliterative arterial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Steen Levin; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Vind, Susanne Haase; Thomassen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable small plastic bag including a photo sensor was constructed for measurement of skin perfusion pressure avoiding the rim of the photo sensor over bony and tendineous surfaces of the tibia below the knee, at the ankle, and on the dorsal forefoot. Compression was obtained using a conical blood pressure cuff with continuous decrease from suprasystolic arm pressure. The validity of skin perfusion pressure with the new device was compared to that of isotope washout below the knee in normal subjects and in patients with an ischemic forefoot with acceptable agreement. The method had a high reproducibility within and between days in normal subjects. Compared to systolic arterial pressure measured using a strain gauge with a cuff on the ankle in normal subjects and patients with intermittent claudication the new device showed blood pressure in the skin closer to the diastolic pressure. The new pressure device thus had acceptable validity and reproducibility for estimation of the skin perfusion pressure and can be used on bony and tendineous sites on the lower limb in regions where critical wound healing is frequent, e.g. ankle and forefoot

  19. Considerations on development, validation, application, and quality control of immuno(metric) biomarker assays in clinical cancer research: an EORTC-NCI working group report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweep, C.G.J.; Fritsche, H.A.; Gion, M.; Klee, G.G.; Schmitt, M.

    2003-01-01

    A major dilemma associated with immuno(metric) assays for biomarkers is that various kits employing antibodies with differing specificities and binding affinities may generate non-equivalent test results. Also, variation in sample processing and the use of different standards (reference material)

  20. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  1. Validity and Reproducibility of a Self-Administered Semi-Quantitative Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Estimating Usual Daily Fat, Fibre, Alcohol, Caffeine and Theobromine Intakes among Belgian Post-Menopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Bolca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ was developed and validated to assess the usual daily fat, saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid, fibre, alcohol, caffeine, and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women participating in dietary intervention trials with phyto-oestrogens. The relative validity of the FFQ was estimated by comparison with 7 day (d estimated diet records (EDR, n 64 and its reproducibility was evaluated by repeated administrations 6 weeks apart (n 79. Although the questionnaire underestimated significantly all intakes compared to the 7 d EDR, it had a good ranking ability (r 0.47-0.94; weighted κ 0.25-0.66 and it could reliably distinguish extreme intakes for all the estimated nutrients, except for saturated fatty acids. Furthermore, the correlation between repeated administrations was high (r 0.71-0.87 with a maximal misclassification of 7% (weighted κ 0.33-0.80. In conclusion, these results compare favourably with those reported by others and indicate that the FFQ is a satisfactorily reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study population.

  2. Validity and reproducibility of a self-administered semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire for estimating usual daily fat, fibre, alcohol, caffeine and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolca, Selin; Huybrechts, Inge; Verschraegen, Mia; De Henauw, Stefaan; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A novel food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed and validated to assess the usual daily fat, saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid, fibre, alcohol, caffeine, and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women participating in dietary intervention trials with phyto-oestrogens. The relative validity of the FFQ was estimated by comparison with 7 day (d) estimated diet records (EDR, n 64) and its reproducibility was evaluated by repeated administrations 6 weeks apart (n 79). Although the questionnaire underestimated significantly all intakes compared to the 7 d EDR, it had a good ranking ability (r 0.47-0.94; weighted kappa 0.25-0.66) and it could reliably distinguish extreme intakes for all the estimated nutrients, except for saturated fatty acids. Furthermore, the correlation between repeated administrations was high (r 0.71-0.87) with a maximal misclassification of 7% (weighted kappa 0.33-0.80). In conclusion, these results compare favourably with those reported by others and indicate that the FFQ is a satisfactorily reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study population.

  3. Skin perfusion pressure measured with a photo sensor in an air-filled plastic balloon: validity and reproducibility on the lower leg in normal subjects and patients suspected of obliterative arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Levin; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Vind, Susanne Haase

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable small plastic bag including a photo sensor was constructed for measurement of skin perfusion pressure avoiding the rim of the photo sensor over bony and tendineous surfaces of the tibia below the knee, at the ankle, and on the dorsal forefoot. Compression was obtained using a conical...... blood pressure cuff with continuous decrease from suprasystolic arm pressure. The validity of skin perfusion pressure with the new device was compared to that of isotope washout below the knee in normal subjects and in patients with an ischemic forefoot with acceptable agreement. The method had a high...... reproducibility within and between days in normal subjects. Compared to systolic arterial pressure measured using a strain gauge with a cuff on the ankle in normal subjects and patients with intermittent claudication the new device showed blood pressure in the skin closer to the diastolic pressure. The new...

  4. VALIDITY AND REPRODUCIBILITY OF MEASURING THE KINEMATIC COUPLING BEHAVIOR OF CALCANEAL PRONATION/SUPINATION AND SHANK ROTATION DURING WEIGHT BEARING USING AN OPTICAL THREE-DIMENSIONAL MOTION ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Edo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It’s important to understand the kinematic coupling of calcaneus and shank to optimize the pathological movement of the lower extremity. However, the quantitative indicator to show the kinematic coupling hasn’t been clarified. We measured the angles of calcaneal pronation-to-supination and shank rotation during pronation and supination of both feet in standing position and devised a technique to quantify the kinematic coupling behavior of calcaneal pronation/supination and shank rotation as the linear regression coefficient (kinematic chain ratio: KCR of those measurements. Therefore, we verified the validity and reproducibility of this technique. Methods: This study is a non-comparative cross-sectional study. The KCR, which is an outcome, was measured using an optical three-dimensional motion analysis system in 10 healthy subjects. The coefficient of determination (R² was calculated for the linear regression equation of the angle of calcaneal pronation-to-supination and angle of shank rotation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC [1,1] was calculated for the KCR during foot pronation and foot supination and for the KCR measured on different days. And also, skin movement artifacts were investigated by measurement of the displacement of bone and body surface markers in one healthy subject. Results: The linear regression equation of calcaneal pronation/supination and the angle of shank rotation included R²≥0.9 for all subjects. The KCR on foot pronation and supination had an ICC(1,1 of 0.95. The KCR measured on different days had an ICC(1,1 of 0.72. Skin movement artifacts were within the allowable range. Conclusion: The validity and reproducibility of this technique were largely good, and the technique can be used to quantify kinematic coupling behavior.

  5. Analytical Validation of a Highly Quantitative, Sensitive, Accurate, and Reproducible Assay (HERmark® for the Measurement of HER2 Total Protein and HER2 Homodimers in FFPE Breast Cancer Tumor Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Larson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the results of the analytical validation of assays that measure HER2 total protein (H2T and HER2 homodimer (H2D expression in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE breast cancer tumors as well as cell line controls. The assays are based on the VeraTag technology platform and are commercially available through a central CAP-accredited clinical reference laboratory. The accuracy of H2T measurements spans a broad dynamic range (2-3 logs as evaluated by comparison with cross-validating technologies. The measurement of H2T expression demonstrates a sensitivity that is approximately 7–10 times greater than conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC (HercepTest. The HERmark assay is a quantitative assay that sensitively and reproducibly measures continuous H2T and H2D protein expression levels and therefore may have the potential to stratify patients more accurately with respect to response to HER2-targeted therapies than current methods which rely on semiquantitative protein measurements (IHC or on indirect assessments of gene amplification (FISH.

  6. Metrics of quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhihao; Chen Jingling

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study metrics of quantum states, which are natural generalizations of the usual trace metric and Bures metric. Some useful properties of the metrics are proved, such as the joint convexity and contractivity under quantum operations. Our result has a potential application in studying the geometry of quantum states as well as the entanglement detection.

  7. $\\eta$-metric structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gaba, Yaé Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss recent results about generalized metric spaces and fixed point theory. We introduce the notion of $\\eta$-cone metric spaces, give some topological properties and prove some fixed point theorems for contractive type maps on these spaces. In particular we show that theses $\\eta$-cone metric spaces are natural generalizations of both cone metric spaces and metric type spaces.

  8. Complexity Metrics for Workflow Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard; van der Aalst, Wil M.P.

    2009-01-01

    analysts have difficulties grasping the dynamics implied by a process model. Recent empirical studies show that people make numerous errors when modeling complex business processes, e.g., about 20 percent of the EPCs in the SAP reference model have design flaws resulting in potential deadlocks, livelocks......, etc. It seems obvious that the complexity of the model contributes to design errors and a lack of understanding. It is not easy to measure complexity, however. This paper presents three complexity metrics that have been implemented in the process analysis tool ProM. The metrics are defined...... for a subclass of Petri nets named Workflow nets, but the results can easily be applied to other languages. To demonstrate the applicability of these metrics, we have applied our approach and tool to 262 relatively complex Protos models made in the context of various student projects. This allows us to validate...

  9. Preserve specimens for reproducibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krell, F.-T.; Klimeš, Petr; Rocha, L. A.; Fikáček, M.; Miller, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 539, č. 7628 (2016), s. 168 ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reproducibility * specimen * biodiversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v539/n7628/full/539168b.html

  10. Versão em português do Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire: estudo da validade e reprodutibilidade Portuguese-language version of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire: a validity and reproducibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciane Laender Moreira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade e a reprodutibilidade de uma versão em português do Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ em pacientes com DPOC. MÉTODOS: A versão em português do CRQ (fornecida pela Universidade de McMaster, detentora dos direitos do questionário foi aplicada a 50 pacientes portadores de DPOC (32 homens; 70 ± 8 anos; VEF1 = 47 ± 18% predito em dois momentos, com intervalo de uma semana. O CRQ tem quatro domínios (dispneia, fadiga, função emocional e autocontrole e foi aplicado em formato de entrevista. O Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, já validado em português, foi utilizado como o critério de validação. A espirometria e o teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6 foram realizados para a análise das correlações com os valores do CRQ. RESULTADOS: Não foram observadas diferenças significativas entre a aplicação e a reaplicação do CRQ (p > 0.05 para todos os domínios. O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse entre a aplicação e a reaplicação foi de 0,98; 0,97; 0,98 e 0,95 para os domínios dispneia, fadiga, função emocional e autocontrole, respectivamente. O coeficiente alfa de Cronbach foi 0,91. Os domínios do CRQ se correlacionaram significativamente com os domínios do SGRQ (-0.30 OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity and reproducibility of a Portuguese-language version of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ in patients with COPD. METHODS: A Portuguese-language version of the CRQ (provided by McMaster University, the holder of the questionnaire copyright was applied to 50 patients with COPD (70 ± 8 years of age; 32 males; FEV1 = 47 ± 18% of predicted on two occasions, one week apart. The CRQ has four domains (dyspnea, fatigue, emotional function, and mastery and was applied as an interviewer-administered instrument. The Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, already validated for use in Brazil, was used as the criterion for validation. Spirometry and the six

  11. Tackling the Reproducibility Problem in Systems Research with Declarative Experiment Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Ivo [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Maltzahn, Carlos [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Lofstead, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mohror, Kathryn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Arpaci-Dusseau, Andrea [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Validating experimental results in the field of computer systems is a challenging task, mainly due to the many changes in software and hardware that computational environments go through. Determining if an experiment is reproducible entails two separate tasks: re-executing the experiment and validating the results. Existing reproducibility efforts have focused on the former, envisioning techniques and infrastructures that make it easier to re-execute an experiment. In this work we focus on the latter by analyzing the validation workflow that an experiment re-executioner goes through. We notice that validating results is done on the basis of experiment design and high-level goals, rather than exact quantitative metrics. Based on this insight, we introduce a declarative format for specifying the high-level components of an experiment as well as describing generic, testable conditions that serve as the basis for validation. We present a use case in the area of storage systems to illustrate the usefulness of this approach. We also discuss limitations and potential benefits of using this approach in other areas of experimental systems research.

  12. Validez y reproducibilidad de un cuestionario de actividad e inactividad física para escolares de la ciudad de México Validity and reproducibility of a physical activity and inactivity questionnaire for Mexico City's schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Hernández

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la validez y reproducibilidad de un cuestionario autoaplicado de actividad e inactividad física en escolares de 10 a 14 años de la ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se desarrolló un cuestionario autoaplicado sobre la actividad e inactividad física que se aplicó dos veces a una muestra de 114 estudiantes, de 10 a 14 años de edad, en una población de bajos y medianos ingresos de la ciudad de México, entre mayo y diciembre de 1996. Las madres de los estudiantes llenaron el mismo cuestionario, mientras que aquéllos completaron dos recordatorios de actividad física de 24 horas, que se usaron como criterio de comparación. Se calcularon medidas de tendencia central y de dispersión y se estimó correlación de Pearson. RESULTADOS: Las correlaciones entre las horas al día dedicadas a la actividad e inactividad física del cuestionario de los estudiantes y las de los recordatorios de 24 horas ajustadas por edad, sexo, zona de residencia y enfermedad anterior a la administración del cuestionario fueron de 0.03 para la actividad moderada, de 0.15 para la actividad vigorosa y de 0.51 (p=0.001 para el tiempo dedicado a ver televisión. Al comparar con los recordatorios de 24 horas, el cuestionario sobrestimó el tiempo de ver televisión, leer o participar en actividades vigorosas, y subestimó el tiempo de actividad moderada. Se observaron coeficientes de reproducibilidad en seis meses aceptables para el tiempo de ver televisión (r=0.53, dormir (r=0.40, actividad moderada (r=0.38 y actividad vigorosa (r=0.55 (pOBJECTIVE: To assess the validity and reproducibility of a self-reported questionnaire on physical activity and inactivity, developed for children aged 10-14 in Mexico City. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between May and December 1996, a self-reported physical activity and inactivity questionnaire was developed and applied twice to a sample of 114 students aged 10 to 14, from a low and middle income population of Mexico

  13. Reproducibility of ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.-C.; Thomas, Andre; Launay, J.-P.; Martin, Pierre

    The reproducibility of amplitude quotations for both artificial and natural reflectors was studied for several combinations of instrument/search unit, all being of the same type. This study shows that in industrial inspection if a range of standardized equipment is used, a margin of error of about 6 decibels has to be taken into account (confidence interval of 95%). This margin is about 4 to 5 dB for natural or artificial defects located in the central area and about 6 to 7 dB for artificial defects located on the back surface. This lack of reproducibility seems to be attributable first to the search unit and then to the instrument and operator. These results were confirmed by analysis of calibration data obtained from 250 tests performed by 25 operators under shop conditions. The margin of error was higher than the 6 dB obtained in the study [fr

  14. hdm: High-dimensional metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Chernozhukov, Victor; Hansen, Christian; Spindler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this article the package High-dimensional Metrics (\\texttt{hdm}) is introduced. It is a collection of statistical methods for estimation and quantification of uncertainty in high-dimensional approximately sparse models. It focuses on providing confidence intervals and significance testing for (possibly many) low-dimensional subcomponents of the high-dimensional parameter vector. Efficient estimators and uniformly valid confidence intervals for regression coefficients on target variables (e...

  15. METRIC context unit architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    METRIC is an architecture for a simple but powerful Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC). Its speed comes from the simultaneous processing of several instruction streams, with instructions from the various streams being dispatched into METRIC's execution pipeline as they become available for execution. The pipeline is thus kept full, with a mix of instructions for several contexts in execution at the same time. True parallel programming is supported within a single execution unit, the METRIC Context Unit. METRIC's architecture provides for expansion through the addition of multiple Context Units and of specialized Functional Units. The architecture thus spans a range of size and performance from a single-chip microcomputer up through large and powerful multiprocessors. This research concentrates on the specification of the METRIC Context Unit at the architectural level. Performance tradeoffs made during METRIC's design are discussed, and projections of METRIC's performance are made based on simulation studies.

  16. Magnet stability and reproducibility

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, N

    2010-01-01

    Magnet stability and reproducibility have become increasingly important as greater precision and beams with smaller dimension are required for research, medical and other purpose. The observed causes of mechanical and electrical instability are introduced and the engineering arrangements needed to minimize these problems discussed; the resulting performance of a state-of-the-art synchrotron source (Diamond) is then presented. The need for orbit feedback to obtain best possible beam stability is briefly introduced, but omitting any details of the necessary technical equipment, which is outside the scope of the presentation.

  17. Reproducible research in palaeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The reproducibility of research findings is attracting increasing attention across all scientific disciplines. In palaeomagnetism as elsewhere, computer-based analysis techniques are becoming more commonplace, complex, and diverse. Analyses can often be difficult to reproduce from scratch, both for the original researchers and for others seeking to build on the work. We present a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program designed to make reproducibility easier. Part of the problem is the divide between interactive and scripted (batch) analysis programs. An interactive desktop program with a graphical interface is a powerful tool for exploring data and iteratively refining analyses, but usually cannot operate without human interaction. This makes it impossible to re-run an analysis automatically, or to integrate it into a larger automated scientific workflow - for example, a script to generate figures and tables for a paper. In some cases the parameters of the analysis process itself are not saved explicitly, making it hard to repeat or improve the analysis even with human interaction. Conversely, non-interactive batch tools can be controlled by pre-written scripts and configuration files, allowing an analysis to be 'replayed' automatically from the raw data. However, this advantage comes at the expense of exploratory capability: iteratively improving an analysis entails a time-consuming cycle of editing scripts, running them, and viewing the output. Batch tools also tend to require more computer expertise from their users. PuffinPlot is a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program which aims to bridge this gap. First released in 2012, it offers both an interactive, user-friendly desktop interface and a batch scripting interface, both making use of the same core library of palaeomagnetic functions. We present new improvements to the program that help to integrate the interactive and batch approaches, allowing an analysis to be interactively explored and refined

  18. Decision Analysis for Metric Selection on a Clinical Quality Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Rebecca M; Storey, Patricia E; Vitale, Michael; Markan-Aurora, Sumita; Gordon, Randolph; Prevost, Traci Q; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Woeltje, Keith F

    2016-09-01

    Clinical quality scorecards are used by health care institutions to monitor clinical performance and drive quality improvement. Because of the rapid proliferation of quality metrics in health care, BJC HealthCare found it increasingly difficult to select the most impactful scorecard metrics while still monitoring metrics for regulatory purposes. A 7-step measure selection process was implemented incorporating Kepner-Tregoe Decision Analysis, which is a systematic process that considers key criteria that must be satisfied in order to make the best decision. The decision analysis process evaluates what metrics will most appropriately fulfill these criteria, as well as identifies potential risks associated with a particular metric in order to identify threats to its implementation. Using this process, a list of 750 potential metrics was narrowed to 25 that were selected for scorecard inclusion. This decision analysis process created a more transparent, reproducible approach for selecting quality metrics for clinical quality scorecards. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. The independence of software metrics taken at different life-cycle stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafura, D.; Canning, J.; Reddy, G.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years a large number of software metrics have been proposed and, in varying degrees, a number of these metrics have been subjected to empirical validation which demonstrated the utility of the metrics in the software development process. Attempts to classify these metrics and to determine if the metrics in these different classes appear to be measuring distinct attributes of the software product are studied. Statistical analysis is used to determine the degree of relationship among the metrics.

  20. Marketing communication metrics for social media

    OpenAIRE

    Töllinen, Aarne; Karjaluoto, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing communications. Specifically, we study whether the existing marketing communications performance metrics are still valid in the changing digitalised communications landscape, or whether it is time to rethink them, or even to devise entirely new metrics. Recent advances in information technology and marketing bring a need to re-examine measurement models. We combine two im...

  1. Metric diffusion along foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Szymon M

    2017-01-01

    Up-to-date research in metric diffusion along compact foliations is presented in this book. Beginning with fundamentals from the optimal transportation theory and the theory of foliations; this book moves on to cover Wasserstein distance, Kantorovich Duality Theorem, and the metrization of the weak topology by the Wasserstein distance. Metric diffusion is defined, the topology of the metric space is studied and the limits of diffused metrics along compact foliations are discussed. Essentials on foliations, holonomy, heat diffusion, and compact foliations are detailed and vital technical lemmas are proved to aide understanding. Graduate students and researchers in geometry, topology and dynamics of foliations and laminations will find this supplement useful as it presents facts about the metric diffusion along non-compact foliation and provides a full description of the limit for metrics diffused along foliation with at least one compact leaf on the two dimensions.

  2. Metric modular spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chistyakov, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    Aimed toward researchers and graduate students familiar with elements of functional analysis, linear algebra, and general topology; this book contains a general study of modulars, modular spaces, and metric modular spaces. Modulars may be thought of as generalized velocity fields and serve two important purposes: generate metric spaces in a unified manner and provide a weaker convergence, the modular convergence, whose topology is non-metrizable in general. Metric modular spaces are extensions of metric spaces, metric linear spaces, and classical modular linear spaces. The topics covered include the classification of modulars, metrizability of modular spaces, modular transforms and duality between modular spaces, metric  and modular topologies. Applications illustrated in this book include: the description of superposition operators acting in modular spaces, the existence of regular selections of set-valued mappings, new interpretations of spaces of Lipschitzian and absolutely continuous mappings, the existe...

  3. Prognostic Performance Metrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This chapter presents several performance metrics for offline evaluation of prognostics algorithms. A brief overview of different methods employed for performance...

  4. Overview of journal metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihong Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of metrics used for the quantitative evaluation of scholarly journals are reviewed. The impact factor and related metrics including the immediacy index and the aggregate impact factor, which are provided by the Journal Citation Reports, are explained in detail. The Eigenfactor score and the article influence score are also reviewed. In addition, journal metrics such as CiteScore, Source Normalized Impact per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank, h-index, and g-index are discussed. Limitations and problems that these metrics have are pointed out. We should be cautious to rely on those quantitative measures too much when we evaluate journals or researchers.

  5. Brand metrics that matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntinga, D.; Bernritter, S.

    2017-01-01

    Het merk staat steeds meer centraal in de organisatie. Het is daarom essentieel om de gezondheid, prestaties en ontwikkelingen van het merk te meten. Het is echter een uitdaging om de juiste brand metrics te selecteren. Een enorme hoeveelheid metrics vraagt de aandacht van merkbeheerders. Maar welke

  6. Privacy Metrics and Boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper aims at defining a set of privacy metrics (quantitative and qualitative) in the case of the relation between a privacy protector ,and an information gatherer .The aims with such metrics are: -to allow to assess and compare different user scenarios and their differences; for

  7. Avaliação da reprodutibilidade e validade de questionário de atividade física para gestantes Evaluation of the reproducibility and validity of a physical activity questionnaire for pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Yuri Takito

    2008-04-01

    resultados obtidos pelo freqüêncímetro não mostrou graus de concordância adequados.INTRODUCTION: Physical activity practice has been encouraged by several national and international entities aiming health promotion. However, there is no consensus concerning the influence and optimal intensity of physical activity during pregnancy, probably due to difficulties to measure and classify the level of physical activity by questionnaires. It has not been identified any validation study of physical activity questionnaire on Brazilian pregnant women. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the reliability and concurrent validity of a physical activity questionnaire for pregnant women. METHODS: A sample of 68 women in the second trimester of pregnancy has been interviewed by the elaborated questionnaire. Reliability was assessed after approximately a week and in the postpartum. The subjects used a heart rate monitor between the two first interviews (n=38. RESULTS: Reproducibility analyses were adapted with interclass correlation coefficients varying from 0.54 to 0.85. The analysis of categorical variables, with subjective questions of self-perception of physical activity, resulted in wider range of kappa coefficients, with values between 0.29 and 0.76 for application of the questionnaire within one week of interval, and between 0.08 and 0.70 when compared with the postpartum. The validity analyses had a satisfactory result considering the average of differences seen through Bland-Altman graphics comparing questionnaire and the heart rate monitors. However, the dispersion interval was not adequate, since it varied in more than seven hours for light activities and almost eleven hours per day for moderate activities. Analyses of current study seem to assure the reliability of the physical activity questionnaire for pregnant women. However, concerning validation, the comparison with results obtained by heart rate monitors did not show adequate degrees of agreement.

  8. Holographic Spherically Symmetric Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Michael

    The holographic principle (HP) conjectures, that the maximum number of degrees of freedom of any realistic physical system is proportional to the system's boundary area. The HP has its roots in the study of black holes. It has recently been applied to cosmological solutions. In this article we apply the HP to spherically symmetric static space-times. We find that any regular spherically symmetric object saturating the HP is subject to tight constraints on the (interior) metric, energy-density, temperature and entropy-density. Whenever gravity can be described by a metric theory, gravity is macroscopically scale invariant and the laws of thermodynamics hold locally and globally, the (interior) metric of a regular holographic object is uniquely determined up to a constant factor and the interior matter-state must follow well defined scaling relations. When the metric theory of gravity is general relativity, the interior matter has an overall string equation of state (EOS) and a unique total energy-density. Thus the holographic metric derived in this article can serve as simple interior 4D realization of Mathur's string fuzzball proposal. Some properties of the holographic metric and its possible experimental verification are discussed. The geodesics of the holographic metric describe an isotropically expanding (or contracting) universe with a nearly homogeneous matter-distribution within the local Hubble volume. Due to the overall string EOS the active gravitational mass-density is zero, resulting in a coasting expansion with Ht = 1, which is compatible with the recent GRB-data.

  9. Bad Behavior: Improving Reproducibility in Behavior Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Anne M; Cheng, Xinyi; Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan

    2018-01-24

    Systems neuroscience research is increasingly possible through the use of integrated molecular and circuit-level analyses. These studies depend on the use of animal models and, in many cases, molecular and circuit-level analyses. Associated with genetic, pharmacologic, epigenetic, and other types of environmental manipulations. We illustrate typical pitfalls resulting from poor validation of behavior tests. We describe experimental designs and enumerate controls needed to improve reproducibility in investigating and reporting of behavioral phenotypes.

  10. Probabilistic metric spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schweizer, B

    2005-01-01

    Topics include special classes of probabilistic metric spaces, topologies, and several related structures, such as probabilistic normed and inner-product spaces. 1983 edition, updated with 3 new appendixes. Includes 17 illustrations.

  11. Tracker Performance Metric

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Teresa; Lee, Harry; Sanders, Johnnie

    2002-01-01

    .... We have developed the Tracker Performance Metric (TPM) specifically for this purpose. It was designed to measure the output performance, on a frame-by-frame basis, using its output position and quality...

  12. Reproducibility in a multiprocessor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofatto, Ralph A; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W; Eisley, Noel A; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M; Haring, Rudolf A; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V; Liebsch, Thomas A; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D; Senger, Robert M; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-11-26

    Fixing a problem is usually greatly aided if the problem is reproducible. To ensure reproducibility of a multiprocessor system, the following aspects are proposed; a deterministic system start state, a single system clock, phase alignment of clocks in the system, system-wide synchronization events, reproducible execution of system components, deterministic chip interfaces, zero-impact communication with the system, precise stop of the system and a scan of the system state.

  13. IT Project Management Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many software and IT projects fail in completing theirs objectives because different causes of which the management of the projects has a high weight. In order to have successfully projects, lessons learned have to be used, historical data to be collected and metrics and indicators have to be computed and used to compare them with past projects and avoid failure to happen. This paper presents some metrics that can be used for the IT project management.

  14. Mass Customization Measurements Metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev; Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey has indicated that 17 % of companies have ceased mass customizing less than 1 year after initiating the effort. This paper presents measurement for a company’s mass customization performance, utilizing metrics within the three fundamental capabilities: robust process design, choice...... navigation, and solution space development. A mass customizer when assessing performance with these metrics can identify within which areas improvement would increase competitiveness the most and enable more efficient transition to mass customization....

  15. Crowdsourcing metrics of digital collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuula Pääkkönen

    2015-12-01

    achieve more. Based on our current initial experiences, we feel that crowdsourcing gives an opportunity for a library context to get closer to the user base and to obtain insight into the numerous opportunities, which the digitized content provides for them and for the library. Gathering the first prototype qualitative and quantitative metrics for this particular crowdsourcing case gives information on how to further improve both the service and the metrics so that they can give valid information for decision-making.

  16. Fault Management Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  17. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-07

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility.

  18. Cyber threat metrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Jason Neal; Veitch, Cynthia K.; Mateski, Mark Elliot; Michalski, John T.; Harris, James Mark; Trevino, Cassandra M.; Maruoka, Scott

    2012-03-01

    Threats are generally much easier to list than to describe, and much easier to describe than to measure. As a result, many organizations list threats. Fewer describe them in useful terms, and still fewer measure them in meaningful ways. This is particularly true in the dynamic and nebulous domain of cyber threats - a domain that tends to resist easy measurement and, in some cases, appears to defy any measurement. We believe the problem is tractable. In this report we describe threat metrics and models for characterizing threats consistently and unambiguously. The purpose of this report is to support the Operational Threat Assessment (OTA) phase of risk and vulnerability assessment. To this end, we focus on the task of characterizing cyber threats using consistent threat metrics and models. In particular, we address threat metrics and models for describing malicious cyber threats to US FCEB agencies and systems.

  19. Metric inhomogeneous Diophantine approximation in positive characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    We obtain asymptotic formulae for the number of solutions to systems of inhomogeneous linear Diophantine inequalities over the field of formal Laurent series with coefficients from a finite fields, which are valid for almost every such system. Here `almost every' is with respect to Haar measure...... of the coefficients of the homogeneous part when the number of variables is at least two (singly metric case), and with respect to the Haar measure of all coefficients for any number of variables (doubly metric case). As consequences, we derive zero-one laws in the spirit of the Khintchine-Groshev Theorem and zero...

  20. Metric inhomogeneous Diophantine approximation in positive characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S.

    We obtain asymptotic formulae for the number of solutions to systems of inhomogeneous linear Diophantine inequalities over the field of formal Laurent series with coefficients from a finite fields, which are valid for almost every such system. Here 'almost every' is with respect to Haar measure...... of the coefficients of the homogeneous part when the number of variables is at least two (singly metric case), and with respect to the Haar measure of all coefficients for any number of variables (doubly metric case). As consequences, we derive zero-one laws in the spirit of the Khintchine--Groshev Theorem and zero...

  1. An inheritance complexity metric for object-oriented code: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Computer Engineering, Atilim University, 06836, Ankara, Turkey ... applied our metric on a real project for empirical validation and compared it with ... being insufficiently generalized or too implementation technology dependent.

  2. Metrical Phonology and SLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Bradley S.

    Metrical phonology, a linguistic process of phonological stress assessment and diagrammatic simplification of sentence and word stress, is discussed as it is found in the English language with the intention that it may be used in second language instruction. Stress is defined by its physical and acoustical correlates, and the principles of…

  3. Engineering performance metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delozier, R.; Snyder, N.

    1993-03-01

    Implementation of a Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to engineering work required the development of a system of metrics which would serve as a meaningful management tool for evaluating effectiveness in accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. A team effort was chartered with the goal of developing a system of engineering performance metrics which would measure customer satisfaction, quality, cost effectiveness, and timeliness. The approach to developing this system involved normal systems design phases including, conceptual design, detailed design, implementation, and integration. The lessons teamed from this effort will be explored in this paper. These lessons learned may provide a starting point for other large engineering organizations seeking to institute a performance measurement system accomplishing project objectives and in achieving improved customer satisfaction. To facilitate this effort, a team was chartered to assist in the development of the metrics system. This team, consisting of customers and Engineering staff members, was utilized to ensure that the needs and views of the customers were considered in the development of performance measurements. The development of a system of metrics is no different than the development of any type of system. It includes the steps of defining performance measurement requirements, measurement process conceptual design, performance measurement and reporting system detailed design, and system implementation and integration.

  4. Metrics for Probabilistic Geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosi, Alessandra; Hauberg, Søren; Vellido, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    the distribution over mappings is given by a Gaussian process. We treat the corresponding latent variable model as a Riemannian manifold and we use the expectation of the metric under the Gaussian process prior to define interpolating paths and measure distance between latent points. We show how distances...

  5. Metrics for energy resilience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roege, Paul E.; Collier, Zachary A.; Mancillas, James; McDonagh, John A.; Linkov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Energy lies at the backbone of any advanced society and constitutes an essential prerequisite for economic growth, social order and national defense. However there is an Achilles heel to today's energy and technology relationship; namely a precarious intimacy between energy and the fiscal, social, and technical systems it supports. Recently, widespread and persistent disruptions in energy systems have highlighted the extent of this dependence and the vulnerability of increasingly optimized systems to changing conditions. Resilience is an emerging concept that offers to reconcile considerations of performance under dynamic environments and across multiple time frames by supplementing traditionally static system performance measures to consider behaviors under changing conditions and complex interactions among physical, information and human domains. This paper identifies metrics useful to implement guidance for energy-related planning, design, investment, and operation. Recommendations are presented using a matrix format to provide a structured and comprehensive framework of metrics relevant to a system's energy resilience. The study synthesizes previously proposed metrics and emergent resilience literature to provide a multi-dimensional model intended for use by leaders and practitioners as they transform our energy posture from one of stasis and reaction to one that is proactive and which fosters sustainable growth. - Highlights: • Resilience is the ability of a system to recover from adversity. • There is a need for methods to quantify and measure system resilience. • We developed a matrix-based approach to generate energy resilience metrics. • These metrics can be used in energy planning, system design, and operations

  6. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  7. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J.; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J.; Reinero, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher’s degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed “hidden moderators”) between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility. PMID:27217556

  8. Relevance of motion-related assessment metrics in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, Ignacio; Chmarra, Magdalena K; Sánchez-González, Patricia; Lamata, Pablo; Rodrigues, Sharon P; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Jansen, Frank-Willem; Dankelman, Jenny; Gómez, Enrique J

    2013-06-01

    Motion metrics have become an important source of information when addressing the assessment of surgical expertise. However, their direct relationship with the different surgical skills has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevance of motion-related metrics in the evaluation processes of basic psychomotor laparoscopic skills and their correlation with the different abilities sought to measure. A framework for task definition and metric analysis is proposed. An explorative survey was first conducted with a board of experts to identify metrics to assess basic psychomotor skills. Based on the output of that survey, 3 novel tasks for surgical assessment were designed. Face and construct validation was performed, with focus on motion-related metrics. Tasks were performed by 42 participants (16 novices, 22 residents, and 4 experts). Movements of the laparoscopic instruments were registered with the TrEndo tracking system and analyzed. Time, path length, and depth showed construct validity for all 3 tasks. Motion smoothness and idle time also showed validity for tasks involving bimanual coordination and tasks requiring a more tactical approach, respectively. Additionally, motion smoothness and average speed showed a high internal consistency, proving them to be the most task-independent of all the metrics analyzed. Motion metrics are complementary and valid for assessing basic psychomotor skills, and their relevance depends on the skill being evaluated. A larger clinical implementation, combined with quality performance information, will give more insight on the relevance of the results shown in this study.

  9. Cross Validated Temperament Scale Validities Computed Using Profile Similarity Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral & Social Sciences 6000 6TH Street (Bldg. 1464 / Mail...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral & Social Sciences 6000 6TH...respondent’s scale score is equal to the mean of the non-reversed and recoded-reversed items. Table 1 portrays the conventional scoring algorithm on

  10. A Framework for Reproducible Latent Fingerprint Enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasso, Alfred S

    2014-01-01

    Photoshop processing of latent fingerprints is the preferred methodology among law enforcement forensic experts, but that appproach is not fully reproducible and may lead to questionable enhancements. Alternative, independent, fully reproducible enhancements, using IDL Histogram Equalization and IDL Adaptive Histogram Equalization, can produce better-defined ridge structures, along with considerable background information. Applying a systematic slow motion smoothing procedure to such IDL enhancements, based on the rapid FFT solution of a Lévy stable fractional diffusion equation, can attenuate background detail while preserving ridge information. The resulting smoothed latent print enhancements are comparable to, but distinct from, forensic Photoshop images suitable for input into automated fingerprint identification systems, (AFIS). In addition, this progressive smoothing procedure can be reexamined by displaying the suite of progressively smoother IDL images. That suite can be stored, providing an audit trail that allows monitoring for possible loss of useful information, in transit to the user-selected optimal image. Such independent and fully reproducible enhancements provide a valuable frame of reference that may be helpful in informing, complementing, and possibly validating the forensic Photoshop methodology.

  11. Reproducibility of 201Tl myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, P.R.; Martin, R.P.; Doherty, P.; Daspit, S.; Goris, M.; Haskell, W.; Lewis, S.; Kriss, J.P.; Harrison, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    Seventy-six thallium-201 myocardial perfusion studies were performed on twenty-five patients to assess their reproducibility and the effect of varying the level of exercise on the results of imaging. Each patient had a thallium-201 study at rest. Fourteen patients had studies on two occasions at maximum exercise, and twelve patients had studies both at light and at maximum exercise. Of 70 segments in the 14 patients assessed on each of two maximum exercise tests, 64 (91 percent) were reproducible. Only 53 percent (16/30) of the ischemic defects present at maximum exercise were seen in the light exercise study in the 12 patients assessed at two levels of exercise. Correlation of perfusion defects with arteriographically proven significant coronary stenosis was good for the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries, but not as good for circumflex artery disease. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging at maximum exercise is reproducible within acceptable limits, but careful attention to exercise technique is essential for valid comparative studies

  12. Testing Reproducibility in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, M. A.; Dudill, A. R.; Frey, P.; Venditti, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Reproducibility represents how closely the results of independent tests agree when undertaken using the same materials but different conditions of measurement, such as operator, equipment or laboratory. The concept of reproducibility is fundamental to the scientific method as it prevents the persistence of incorrect or biased results. Yet currently the production of scientific knowledge emphasizes rapid publication of previously unreported findings, a culture that has emerged from pressures related to hiring, publication criteria and funding requirements. Awareness and critique of the disconnect between how scientific research should be undertaken, and how it actually is conducted, has been prominent in biomedicine for over a decade, with the fields of economics and psychology more recently joining the conversation. The purpose of this presentation is to stimulate the conversation in earth sciences where, despite implicit evidence in widely accepted classifications, formal testing of reproducibility is rare.As a formal test of reproducibility, two sets of experiments were undertaken with the same experimental procedure, at the same scale, but in different laboratories. Using narrow, steep flumes and spherical glass beads, grain size sorting was examined by introducing fine sediment of varying size and quantity into a mobile coarse bed. The general setup was identical, including flume width and slope; however, there were some variations in the materials, construction and lab environment. Comparison of the results includes examination of the infiltration profiles, sediment mobility and transport characteristics. The physical phenomena were qualitatively reproduced but not quantitatively replicated. Reproduction of results encourages more robust research and reporting, and facilitates exploration of possible variations in data in various specific contexts. Following the lead of other fields, testing of reproducibility can be incentivized through changes to journal

  13. Enterprise Sustainment Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    are negatively impacting KPIs” (Parmenter, 2010: 31). In the current state, the Air Force’s AA and PBL metrics are once again split . AA does...must have the authority to “take immediate action to rectify situations that are negatively impacting KPIs” (Parmenter, 2010: 31). 3. Measuring...highest profitability and shareholder value for each company” (2014: 273). By systematically diagraming a process, either through a swim lane flowchart

  14. Symmetries of the dual metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, D.

    1998-01-01

    The geometric duality between the metric g μν and a Killing tensor K μν is studied. The conditions were found when the symmetries of the metric g μν and the dual metric K μν are the same. Dual spinning space was constructed without introduction of torsion. The general results are applied to the case of Kerr-Newmann metric

  15. RAAK PRO project: measuring safety in aviation : concept for the design of new metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karanikas, Nektarios; Kaspers, Steffen; Roelen, Alfred; Piric, Selma; van Aalst, Robbert; de Boer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Following the completion of the 1st phase of the RAAK PRO project Aviation Safety Metrics, during which the researchers mapped the current practice in safety metrics and explored the validity of monotonic relationships of SMS, activity and demographic metrics with safety outcomes, this report

  16. Kerr metric in cosmological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, P C [Gujarat Univ., Ahmedabad (India). Dept. of Mathematics

    1977-06-01

    A metric satisfying Einstein's equation is given which in the vicinity of the source reduces to the well-known Kerr metric and which at large distances reduces to the Robertson-Walker metric of a nomogeneous cosmological model. The radius of the event horizon of the Kerr black hole in the cosmological background is found out.

  17. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  18. Reproducibility of brain ADC histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Buchem, M.A. van; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Schaap, J.A.; Hoogenraad, F.G.C.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.M.; Tofts, P.S.; Cessie, S. le

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of differences in acquisition technique on whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters, as well as to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in 7 healthy subjects with b-values 0-800, 0-1000, and 0-1500 s/mm 2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DWI with b-values 0-1000 s/mm 2 . All sequences were repeated with and without repositioning. The peak location, peak height, and mean ADC of the ADC histograms and mean ADC of a region of interest (ROI) in the white matter were compared using paired-sample t tests. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using paired-sample t tests, and repeatability coefficients were reported. With increasing maximum b-values, ADC histograms shifted to lower values, with an increase in peak height (p<0.01). With FLAIR DWI, the ADC histogram shifted to lower values with a significantly higher, narrower peak (p<0.01), although the ROI mean ADC showed no significant differences. For scan-rescan reproducibility, no significant differences were observed. Different DWI pulse sequences give rise to different ADC histograms. With a given pulse sequence, however, ADC histogram analysis is a robust and reproducible technique. Using FLAIR DWI, the partial-voluming effect of cerebrospinal fluid, and thus its confounding effect on histogram analyses, can be reduced

  19. High-Dimensional Metrics in R

    OpenAIRE

    Chernozhukov, Victor; Hansen, Chris; Spindler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The package High-dimensional Metrics (\\Rpackage{hdm}) is an evolving collection of statistical methods for estimation and quantification of uncertainty in high-dimensional approximately sparse models. It focuses on providing confidence intervals and significance testing for (possibly many) low-dimensional subcomponents of the high-dimensional parameter vector. Efficient estimators and uniformly valid confidence intervals for regression coefficients on target variables (e.g., treatment or poli...

  20. A Metrics Approach for Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents different types of collaborative systems, their structure and classification. This paper defines the concept of virtual campus as a collaborative system. It builds architecture for virtual campus oriented on collaborative training processes. It analyses the quality characteristics of collaborative systems and propose techniques for metrics construction and validation in order to evaluate them. The article analyzes different ways to increase the efficiency and the performance level in collaborative banking systems.

  1. Learning Low-Dimensional Metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Lalit; Mason, Blake; Nowak, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the theoretical foundations of metric learning, focused on three key questions that are not fully addressed in prior work: 1) we consider learning general low-dimensional (low-rank) metrics as well as sparse metrics; 2) we develop upper and lower (minimax)bounds on the generalization error; 3) we quantify the sample complexity of metric learning in terms of the dimension of the feature space and the dimension/rank of the underlying metric;4) we also bound the accuracy ...

  2. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  3. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m∙min-1 cutting speed and 0......). Process reproducibility was assessed as the ability of different operators to ensure a consistent rating of individual lubricants. Absolute average values as well as experimental standard deviations of the evaluation parameters were calculated, and uncertainty budgeting was performed. Results document...... a built-up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognize systematic error distorting the performance test....

  4. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m•min−1 cutting speed and 0......). Process reproducibility was assessed as the ability of different operators to ensure a consistent rating of individual lubricants. Absolute average values as well as experimental standard deviations of the evaluation parameters were calculated, and uncertainty budgeting was performed. Results document...... a built–up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognise systematic error distorting the performance test....

  5. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Duffy, Chris; Arheimer, Berit

    2017-04-01

    Reproducibility is a foundational principle in scientific research. The ability to independently re-run an experiment helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings, and evolve (or reject) hypotheses and models of how environmental systems function, and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. Yet in computational hydrology (and in environmental science more widely) the code and data that produces published results are not regularly made available, and even if they are made available, there remains a multitude of generally unreported choices that an individual scientist may have made that impact the study result. This situation strongly inhibits the ability of our community to reproduce and verify previous findings, as all the information and boundary conditions required to set up a computational experiment simply cannot be reported in an article's text alone. In Hutton et al 2016 [1], we argue that a cultural change is required in the computational hydrological community, in order to advance and make more robust the process of knowledge creation and hypothesis testing. We need to adopt common standards and infrastructures to: (1) make code readable and re-useable; (2) create well-documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; (3) make code and workflows available, easy to find, and easy to interpret, using code and code metadata repositories. To create change we argue for improved graduate training in these areas. In this talk we reflect on our progress in achieving reproducible, open science in computational hydrology, which are relevant to the broader computational geoscience community. In particular, we draw on our experience in the Switch-On (EU funded) virtual water science laboratory (http://www.switch-on-vwsl.eu/participate/), which is an open platform for collaboration in hydrological experiments (e.g. [2]). While we use computational hydrology as

  6. Metrics with vanishing quantum corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coley, A A; Hervik, S; Gibbons, G W; Pope, C N

    2008-01-01

    We investigate solutions of the classical Einstein or supergravity equations that solve any set of quantum corrected Einstein equations in which the Einstein tensor plus a multiple of the metric is equated to a symmetric conserved tensor T μν (g αβ , ∂ τ g αβ , ∂ τ ∂ σ g αβ , ...,) constructed from sums of terms, the involving contractions of the metric and powers of arbitrary covariant derivatives of the curvature tensor. A classical solution, such as an Einstein metric, is called universal if, when evaluated on that Einstein metric, T μν is a multiple of the metric. A Ricci flat classical solution is called strongly universal if, when evaluated on that Ricci flat metric, T μν vanishes. It is well known that pp-waves in four spacetime dimensions are strongly universal. We focus attention on a natural generalization; Einstein metrics with holonomy Sim(n - 2) in which all scalar invariants are zero or constant. In four dimensions we demonstrate that the generalized Ghanam-Thompson metric is weakly universal and that the Goldberg-Kerr metric is strongly universal; indeed, we show that universality extends to all four-dimensional Sim(2) Einstein metrics. We also discuss generalizations to higher dimensions

  7. Sharp metric obstructions for quasi-Einstein metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jeffrey S.

    2013-02-01

    Using the tractor calculus to study smooth metric measure spaces, we adapt results of Gover and Nurowski to give sharp metric obstructions to the existence of quasi-Einstein metrics on suitably generic manifolds. We do this by introducing an analogue of the Weyl tractor W to the setting of smooth metric measure spaces. The obstructions we obtain can be realized as tensorial invariants which are polynomial in the Riemann curvature tensor and its divergence. By taking suitable limits of their tensorial forms, we then find obstructions to the existence of static potentials, generalizing to higher dimensions a result of Bartnik and Tod, and to the existence of potentials for gradient Ricci solitons.

  8. Completion of a Dislocated Metric Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sumati Kumari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a construction for the completion of a dislocated metric space (abbreviated d-metric space; we also prove that the completion of the metric associated with a d-metric coincides with the metric associated with the completion of the d-metric.

  9. Reproducibility in Research: Systems, Infrastructure, Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Crick

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The reproduction and replication of research results has become a major issue for a number of scientific disciplines. In computer science and related computational disciplines such as systems biology, the challenges closely revolve around the ability to implement (and exploit novel algorithms and models. Taking a new approach from the literature and applying it to a new codebase frequently requires local knowledge missing from the published manuscripts and transient project websites. Alongside this issue, benchmarking, and the lack of open, transparent and fair benchmark sets present another barrier to the verification and validation of claimed results. In this paper, we outline several recommendations to address these issues, driven by specific examples from a range of scientific domains. Based on these recommendations, we propose a high-level prototype open automated platform for scientific software development which effectively abstracts specific dependencies from the individual researcher and their workstation, allowing easy sharing and reproduction of results. This new e-infrastructure for reproducible computational science offers the potential to incentivise a culture change and drive the adoption of new techniques to improve the quality and efficiency – and thus reproducibility – of scientific exploration.

  10. Metric adjusted skew information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    ) that vanishes for observables commuting with the state. We show that the skew information is a convex function on the manifold of states. It also satisfies other requirements, proposed by Wigner and Yanase, for an effective measure-of-information content of a state relative to a conserved observable. We...... establish a connection between the geometrical formulation of quantum statistics as proposed by Chentsov and Morozova and measures of quantum information as introduced by Wigner and Yanase and extended in this article. We show that the set of normalized Morozova-Chentsov functions describing the possible......We extend the concept of Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew information to something we call "metric adjusted skew information" (of a state with respect to a conserved observable). This "skew information" is intended to be a non-negative quantity bounded by the variance (of an observable in a state...

  11. Reproducibility of isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, D.

    1981-01-01

    The use of an accelerator as part of a mass spectrometer has improved the sensitivity for measuring low levels of long-lived radionuclides by several orders of magnitude. However, the complexity of a large tandem accelerator and beam transport system has made it difficult to match the precision of low energy mass spectrometry. Although uncertainties for accelerator measured isotope ratios as low as 1% have been obtained under favorable conditions, most errors quoted in the literature for natural samples are in the 5 to 20% range. These errors are dominated by statistics and generally the reproducibility is unknown since the samples are only measured once

  12. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted with the goal of quantifying auditory attributes which underlie listener preference for multichannel reproduced sound. Short musical excerpts were presented in mono, stereo and several multichannel formats to a panel of forty selected listeners. Scaling of auditory attributes......, as well as overall preference, was based on consistency tests of binary paired-comparison judgments and on modeling the choice frequencies using probabilistic choice models. As a result, the preferences of non-expert listeners could be measured reliably at a ratio scale level. Principal components derived...

  13. The metric system: An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, S.M.

    1995-05-01

    On July 13, 1992, Deputy Director Duane Sewell restated the Laboratory`s policy on conversion to the metric system which was established in 1974. Sewell`s memo announced the Laboratory`s intention to continue metric conversion on a reasonable and cost effective basis. Copies of the 1974 and 1992 Administrative Memos are contained in the Appendix. There are three primary reasons behind the Laboratory`s conversion to the metric system. First, Public Law 100-418, passed in 1988, states that by the end of fiscal year 1992 the Federal Government must begin using metric units in grants, procurements, and other business transactions. Second, on July 25, 1991, President George Bush signed Executive Order 12770 which urged Federal agencies to expedite conversion to metric units. Third, the contract between the University of California and the Department of Energy calls for the Laboratory to convert to the metric system. Thus, conversion to the metric system is a legal requirement and a contractual mandate with the University of California. Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770 are discussed in more detail later in this section, but first they examine the reasons behind the nation`s conversion to the metric system. The second part of this report is on applying the metric system.

  14. Attack-Resistant Trust Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levien, Raph

    The Internet is an amazingly powerful tool for connecting people together, unmatched in human history. Yet, with that power comes great potential for spam and abuse. Trust metrics are an attempt to compute the set of which people are trustworthy and which are likely attackers. This chapter presents two specific trust metrics developed and deployed on the Advogato Website, which is a community blog for free software developers. This real-world experience demonstrates that the trust metrics fulfilled their goals, but that for good results, it is important to match the assumptions of the abstract trust metric computation to the real-world implementation.

  15. The metric system: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Susan M.

    On 13 Jul. 1992, Deputy Director Duane Sewell restated the Laboratory's policy on conversion to the metric system which was established in 1974. Sewell's memo announced the Laboratory's intention to continue metric conversion on a reasonable and cost effective basis. Copies of the 1974 and 1992 Administrative Memos are contained in the Appendix. There are three primary reasons behind the Laboratory's conversion to the metric system. First, Public Law 100-418, passed in 1988, states that by the end of fiscal year 1992 the Federal Government must begin using metric units in grants, procurements, and other business transactions. Second, on 25 Jul. 1991, President George Bush signed Executive Order 12770 which urged Federal agencies to expedite conversion to metric units. Third, the contract between the University of California and the Department of Energy calls for the Laboratory to convert to the metric system. Thus, conversion to the metric system is a legal requirement and a contractual mandate with the University of California. Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770 are discussed in more detail later in this section, but first they examine the reasons behind the nation's conversion to the metric system. The second part of this report is on applying the metric system.

  16. Metric-adjusted skew information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Cai; Hansen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    on a bipartite system and proved superadditivity of the Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew informations for such states. We extend this result to the general metric-adjusted skew information. We finally show that a recently introduced extension to parameter values 1 ...We give a truly elementary proof of the convexity of metric-adjusted skew information following an idea of Effros. We extend earlier results of weak forms of superadditivity to general metric-adjusted skew information. Recently, Luo and Zhang introduced the notion of semi-quantum states...... of (unbounded) metric-adjusted skew information....

  17. Two classes of metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Garrido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The class of metric spaces (X,d known as small-determined spaces, introduced by Garrido and Jaramillo, are properly defined by means of some type of real-valued Lipschitz functions on X. On the other hand, B-simple metric spaces introduced by Hejcman are defined in terms of some kind of bornologies of bounded subsets of X. In this note we present a common framework where both classes of metric spaces can be studied which allows us to see not only the relationships between them but also to obtain new internal characterizations of these metric properties.

  18. Reproducibility of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelaar, J. P.; Goossen, T. E.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Transrectal three-dimensional (3-D) contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (US) is a novel technique for studying possible prostate malignancy. Before studies can be performed to investigate the clinical validity of the technique, reproducibility of the contrast US studies must be proven.

  19. Exploring the Coming Repositories of Reproducible Experiments: Challenges and Opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freire, Juliana; Bonnet, Philippe; Shasha, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Computational reproducibility efforts in many communities will soon give rise to validated software and data repositories of high quality. A scientist in a field may want to query the components of such repositories to build new software workflows, perhaps after adding the scientist’s own algorithms...

  20. Software metrics: Software quality metrics for distributed systems. [reliability engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    Software quality metrics was extended to cover distributed computer systems. Emphasis is placed on studying embedded computer systems and on viewing them within a system life cycle. The hierarchy of quality factors, criteria, and metrics was maintained. New software quality factors were added, including survivability, expandability, and evolvability.

  1. Multimetric indices: How many metrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multimetric indices (MMI’s) often include 5 to 15 metrics, each representing a different attribute of assemblage condition, such as species diversity, tolerant taxa, and nonnative taxa. Is there an optimal number of metrics for MMIs? To explore this question, I created 1000 9-met...

  2. Metrical Phonology: German Sound System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Bradley S.

    Metrical phonology, a linguistic process of phonological stress assessment and diagrammatic simplification of sentence and word stress, is discussed as it is found in the English and German languages. The objective is to promote use of metrical phonology as a tool for enhancing instruction in stress patterns in words and sentences, particularly in…

  3. Extending cosmology: the metric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza, S.

    2012-01-01

    Comment: 2012, Extending Cosmology: The Metric Approach, Open Questions in Cosmology; Review article for an Intech "Open questions in cosmology" book chapter (19 pages, 3 figures). Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/open-questions-in-cosmology/extending-cosmology-the-metric-approach

  4. Numerical Calabi-Yau metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, Michael R.; Karp, Robert L.; Lukic, Sergio; Reinbacher, Rene

    2008-01-01

    We develop numerical methods for approximating Ricci flat metrics on Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in projective spaces. Our approach is based on finding balanced metrics and builds on recent theoretical work by Donaldson. We illustrate our methods in detail for a one parameter family of quintics. We also suggest several ways to extend our results

  5. High resolution metric imaging payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delclaud, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Alcatel Space Industries has become Europe's leader in the field of high and very high resolution optical payloads, in the frame work of earth observation system able to provide military government with metric images from space. This leadership allowed ALCATEL to propose for the export market, within a French collaboration frame, a complete space based system for metric observation.

  6. Weyl metrics and wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, Gary W. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA U.K. (United Kingdom); Volkov, Mikhail S., E-mail: gwg1@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: volkov@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, LMPT CNRS—UMR 7350, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, Tours, 37200 France (France)

    2017-05-01

    We study solutions obtained via applying dualities and complexifications to the vacuum Weyl metrics generated by massive rods and by point masses. Rescaling them and extending to complex parameter values yields axially symmetric vacuum solutions containing singularities along circles that can be viewed as singular matter sources. These solutions have wormhole topology with several asymptotic regions interconnected by throats and their sources can be viewed as thin rings of negative tension encircling the throats. For a particular value of the ring tension the geometry becomes exactly flat although the topology remains non-trivial, so that the rings literally produce holes in flat space. To create a single ring wormhole of one metre radius one needs a negative energy equivalent to the mass of Jupiter. Further duality transformations dress the rings with the scalar field, either conventional or phantom. This gives rise to large classes of static, axially symmetric solutions, presumably including all previously known solutions for a gravity-coupled massless scalar field, as for example the spherically symmetric Bronnikov-Ellis wormholes with phantom scalar. The multi-wormholes contain infinite struts everywhere at the symmetry axes, apart from solutions with locally flat geometry.

  7. Metrics for image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gareth; Greenway, Phil; Morray, Denise

    1998-07-01

    An important challenge in mapping image-processing techniques onto applications is the lack of quantitative performance measures. From a systems engineering perspective these are essential if system level requirements are to be decomposed into sub-system requirements which can be understood in terms of algorithm selection and performance optimization. Nowhere in computer vision is this more evident than in the area of image segmentation. This is a vigorous and innovative research activity, but even after nearly two decades of progress, it remains almost impossible to answer the question 'what would the performance of this segmentation algorithm be under these new conditions?' To begin to address this shortcoming, we have devised a well-principled metric for assessing the relative performance of two segmentation algorithms. This allows meaningful objective comparisons to be made between their outputs. It also estimates the absolute performance of an algorithm given ground truth. Our approach is an information theoretic one. In this paper, we describe the theory and motivation of our method, and present practical results obtained from a range of state of the art segmentation methods. We demonstrate that it is possible to measure the objective performance of these algorithms, and to use the information so gained to provide clues about how their performance might be improved.

  8. Metric regularity and subdifferential calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, A D

    2000-01-01

    The theory of metric regularity is an extension of two classical results: the Lyusternik tangent space theorem and the Graves surjection theorem. Developments in non-smooth analysis in the 1980s and 1990s paved the way for a number of far-reaching extensions of these results. It was also well understood that the phenomena behind the results are of metric origin, not connected with any linear structure. At the same time it became clear that some basic hypotheses of the subdifferential calculus are closely connected with the metric regularity of certain set-valued maps. The survey is devoted to the metric theory of metric regularity and its connection with subdifferential calculus in Banach spaces

  9. Systematic heterogenization for better reproducibility in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S Helene

    2017-08-31

    The scientific literature is full of articles discussing poor reproducibility of findings from animal experiments as well as failures to translate results from preclinical animal studies to clinical trials in humans. Critics even go so far as to talk about a "reproducibility crisis" in the life sciences, a novel headword that increasingly finds its way into numerous high-impact journals. Viewed from a cynical perspective, Fett's law of the lab "Never replicate a successful experiment" has thus taken on a completely new meaning. So far, poor reproducibility and translational failures in animal experimentation have mostly been attributed to biased animal data, methodological pitfalls, current publication ethics and animal welfare constraints. More recently, the concept of standardization has also been identified as a potential source of these problems. By reducing within-experiment variation, rigorous standardization regimes limit the inference to the specific experimental conditions. In this way, however, individual phenotypic plasticity is largely neglected, resulting in statistically significant but possibly irrelevant findings that are not reproducible under slightly different conditions. By contrast, systematic heterogenization has been proposed as a concept to improve representativeness of study populations, contributing to improved external validity and hence improved reproducibility. While some first heterogenization studies are indeed very promising, it is still not clear how this approach can be transferred into practice in a logistically feasible and effective way. Thus, further research is needed to explore different heterogenization strategies as well as alternative routes toward better reproducibility in animal experimentation.

  10. METRICS DEVELOPMENT FOR PATENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-01-01

    To develop a proposal for metrics for patents to be applied in assessing the postgraduate programs of Medicine III - Capes. From the reading and analysis of the 2013 area documents of all the 48 areas of Capes, a proposal for metrics for patents was developed to be applied in Medicine III programs. Except for the areas Biotechnology, Food Science, Biological Sciences III, Physical Education, Engineering I, III and IV and Interdisciplinary, most areas do not adopt a scoring system for patents. The proposal developed was based on the criteria of Biotechnology, with adaptations. In general, it will be valued, in ascending order, the deposit, the granting and licensing/production. It will also be assigned higher scores to patents registered abroad and whenever there is a participation of students. This proposal can be applied to the item Intellectual Production of the evaluation form, in subsection Technical Production/Patents. The percentage of 10% for academic programs and 40% for Masters Professionals should be maintained. The program will be scored as Very Good when it reaches 400 points or over; Good, between 200 and 399 points; Regular, between 71 and 199 points; Weak up to 70 points; Insufficient, no punctuation. Desenvolver uma proposta de métricas para patentes a serem aplicadas na avaliação dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da Área Medicina III - Capes. A partir da leitura e análise dos documentos de área de 2013 de todas as 48 Áreas da Capes, desenvolveu-se uma proposta de métricas para patentes, a ser aplicada na avaliação dos programas da área. Constatou-se que, com exceção das áreas Biotecnologia, Ciência de Alimentos, Ciências Biológicas III, Educação Física, Engenharias I, III e IV e Interdisciplinar, a maioria não adota sistema de pontuação para patentes. A proposta desenvolvida baseou-se nos critérios da Biotecnologia, com adaptações. De uma forma geral, foi valorizado, em ordem crescente, o depósito, a concessão e o

  11. Model assessment using a multi-metric ranking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, P. J.; Lau, Y.; Alaka, G.; Marks, F.

    2017-12-01

    Validation comparisons of multiple models presents challenges when skill levels are similar, especially in regimes dominated by the climatological mean. Assessing skill separation will require advanced validation metrics and identifying adeptness in extreme events, but maintain simplicity for management decisions. Flexibility for operations is also an asset. This work postulates a weighted tally and consolidation technique which ranks results by multiple types of metrics. Variables include absolute error, bias, acceptable absolute error percentages, outlier metrics, model efficiency, Pearson correlation, Kendall's Tau, reliability Index, multiplicative gross error, and root mean squared differences. Other metrics, such as root mean square difference and rank correlation were also explored, but removed when the information was discovered to be generally duplicative to other metrics. While equal weights are applied, weights could be altered depending for preferred metrics. Two examples are shown comparing ocean models' currents and tropical cyclone products, including experimental products. The importance of using magnitude and direction for tropical cyclone track forecasts instead of distance, along-track, and cross-track are discussed. Tropical cyclone intensity and structure prediction are also assessed. Vector correlations are not included in the ranking process, but found useful in an independent context, and will be briefly reported.

  12. A Metric for Heterotic Moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelas, Philip; de la Ossa, Xenia; McOrist, Jock

    2017-12-01

    Heterotic vacua of string theory are realised, at large radius, by a compact threefold with vanishing first Chern class together with a choice of stable holomorphic vector bundle. These form a wide class of potentially realistic four-dimensional vacua of string theory. Despite all their phenomenological promise, there is little understanding of the metric on the moduli space of these. What is sought is the analogue of special geometry for these vacua. The metric on the moduli space is important in phenomenology as it normalises D-terms and Yukawa couplings. It is also of interest in mathematics, since it generalises the metric, first found by Kobayashi, on the space of gauge field connections, to a more general context. Here we construct this metric, correct to first order in {α^{\\backprime}}, in two ways: first by postulating a metric that is invariant under background gauge transformations of the gauge field, and also by dimensionally reducing heterotic supergravity. These methods agree and the resulting metric is Kähler, as is required by supersymmetry. Checking the metric is Kähler is intricate and the anomaly cancellation equation for the H field plays an essential role. The Kähler potential nevertheless takes a remarkably simple form: it is the Kähler potential of special geometry with the Kähler form replaced by the {α^{\\backprime}}-corrected hermitian form.

  13. Implications of Metric Choice for Common Applications of Readmission Metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Sheryl; Saynina, Olga; Schultz, Ellen; McDonald, Kathryn M; Baker, Laurence C

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the differential impact on hospital performance of three readmission metrics: all-cause readmission (ACR), 3M Potential Preventable Readmission (PPR), and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid 30-day readmission (CMS).

  14. Reproducible research: a minority opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Reproducible research, a growing movement within many scientific fields, including machine learning, would require the code, used to generate the experimental results, be published along with any paper. Probably the most compelling argument for this is that it is simply following good scientific practice, established over the years by the greats of science. The implication is that failure to follow such a practice is unscientific, not a label any machine learning researchers would like to carry. It is further claimed that misconduct is causing a growing crisis of confidence in science. That, without this practice being enforced, science would inevitably fall into disrepute. This viewpoint is becoming ubiquitous but here I offer a differing opinion. I argue that far from being central to science, what is being promulgated is a narrow interpretation of how science works. I contend that the consequences are somewhat overstated. I would also contend that the effort necessary to meet the movement's aims, and the general attitude it engenders would not serve well any of the research disciplines, including our own.

  15. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  16. Background metric in supergravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneya, T.

    1978-01-01

    In supergravity theories, we investigate the conformal anomaly of the path-integral determinant and the problem of fermion zero modes in the presence of a nontrivial background metric. Except in SO(3) -invariant supergravity, there are nonvanishing conformal anomalies. As a consequence, amplitudes around the nontrivial background metric contain unpredictable arbitrariness. The fermion zero modes which are explicitly constructed for the Euclidean Schwarzschild metric are interpreted as an indication of the supersymmetric multiplet structure of a black hole. The degree of degeneracy of a black hole is 2/sup 4n/ in SO(n) supergravity

  17. Generalized Painleve-Gullstrand metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Chunyu [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: l2891112@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Soo Chopin [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cpsoo@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2009-02-02

    An obstruction to the implementation of spatially flat Painleve-Gullstrand (PG) slicings is demonstrated, and explicitly discussed for Reissner-Nordstroem and Schwarzschild-anti-deSitter spacetimes. Generalizations of PG slicings which are not spatially flat but which remain regular at the horizons are introduced. These metrics can be obtained from standard spherically symmetric metrics by physical Lorentz boosts. With these generalized PG metrics, problematic contributions to the imaginary part of the action in the Parikh-Wilczek derivation of Hawking radiation due to the obstruction can be avoided.

  18. Daylight metrics and energy savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardaljevic, John; Heschong, Lisa; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-12-31

    The drive towards sustainable, low-energy buildings has increased the need for simple, yet accurate methods to evaluate whether a daylit building meets minimum standards for energy and human comfort performance. Current metrics do not account for the temporal and spatial aspects of daylight, nor of occupants comfort or interventions. This paper reviews the historical basis of current compliance methods for achieving daylit buildings, proposes a technical basis for development of better metrics, and provides two case study examples to stimulate dialogue on how metrics can be applied in a practical, real-world context.

  19. Next-Generation Metrics: Responsible Metrics & Evaluation for Open Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilsdon, J.; Bar-Ilan, J.; Peters, I.; Wouters, P.

    2016-07-01

    Metrics evoke a mixed reaction from the research community. A commitment to using data to inform decisions makes some enthusiastic about the prospect of granular, real-time analysis o of research and its wider impacts. Yet we only have to look at the blunt use of metrics such as journal impact factors, h-indices and grant income targets, to be reminded of the pitfalls. Some of the most precious qualities of academic culture resist simple quantification, and individual indicators often struggle to do justice to the richness and plurality of research. Too often, poorly designed evaluation criteria are “dominating minds, distorting behaviour and determining careers (Lawrence, 2007).” Metrics hold real power: they are constitutive of values, identities and livelihoods. How to exercise that power to more positive ends has been the focus of several recent and complementary initiatives, including the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA1), the Leiden Manifesto2 and The Metric Tide3 (a UK government review of the role of metrics in research management and assessment). Building on these initiatives, the European Commission, under its new Open Science Policy Platform4, is now looking to develop a framework for responsible metrics for research management and evaluation, which can be incorporated into the successor framework to Horizon 2020. (Author)

  20. Energy-Based Metrics for Arthroscopic Skills Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursartip, Behnaz; LeBel, Marie-Eve; McCracken, Laura C; Escoto, Abelardo; Patel, Rajni V; Naish, Michael D; Trejos, Ana Luisa

    2017-08-05

    Minimally invasive skills assessment methods are essential in developing efficient surgical simulators and implementing consistent skills evaluation. Although numerous methods have been investigated in the literature, there is still a need to further improve the accuracy of surgical skills assessment. Energy expenditure can be an indication of motor skills proficiency. The goals of this study are to develop objective metrics based on energy expenditure, normalize these metrics, and investigate classifying trainees using these metrics. To this end, different forms of energy consisting of mechanical energy and work were considered and their values were divided by the related value of an ideal performance to develop normalized metrics. These metrics were used as inputs for various machine learning algorithms including support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NNs) for classification. The accuracy of the combination of the normalized energy-based metrics with these classifiers was evaluated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The proposed method was validated using 26 subjects at two experience levels (novices and experts) in three arthroscopic tasks. The results showed that there are statistically significant differences between novices and experts for almost all of the normalized energy-based metrics. The accuracy of classification using SVM and NN methods was between 70% and 95% for the various tasks. The results show that the normalized energy-based metrics and their combination with SVM and NN classifiers are capable of providing accurate classification of trainees. The assessment method proposed in this study can enhance surgical training by providing appropriate feedback to trainees about their level of expertise and can be used in the evaluation of proficiency.

  1. Instrument Motion Metrics for Laparoscopic Skills Assessment in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Boel A; Chen, Chi-Ya; Noyes, Julie A; Ragle, Claude A

    2016-11-01

    To determine the construct and concurrent validity of instrument motion metrics for laparoscopic skills assessment in virtual reality and augmented reality simulators. Evaluation study. Veterinarian students (novice, n = 14) and veterinarians (experienced, n = 11) with no or variable laparoscopic experience. Participants' minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience was determined by hospital records of MIS procedures performed in the Teaching Hospital. Basic laparoscopic skills were assessed by 5 tasks using a physical box trainer. Each participant completed 2 tasks for assessments in each type of simulator (virtual reality: bowel handling and cutting; augmented reality: object positioning and a pericardial window model). Motion metrics such as instrument path length, angle or drift, and economy of motion of each simulator were recorded. None of the motion metrics in a virtual reality simulator showed correlation with experience, or to the basic laparoscopic skills score. All metrics in augmented reality were significantly correlated with experience (time, instrument path, and economy of movement), except for the hand dominance metric. The basic laparoscopic skills score was correlated to all performance metrics in augmented reality. The augmented reality motion metrics differed between American College of Veterinary Surgeons diplomates and residents, whereas basic laparoscopic skills score and virtual reality metrics did not. Our results provide construct validity and concurrent validity for motion analysis metrics for an augmented reality system, whereas a virtual reality system was validated only for the time score. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  3. Coverage Metrics for Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, John; Visser, Willem; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When using model checking to verify programs in practice, it is not usually possible to achieve complete coverage of the system. In this position paper we describe ongoing research within the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames on the use of test coverage metrics to measure partial coverage and provide heuristic guidance for program model checking. We are specifically interested in applying and developing coverage metrics for concurrent programs that might be used to support certification of next generation avionics software.

  4. Phantom metrics with Killing spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Sabra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study metric solutions of Einstein–anti-Maxwell theory admitting Killing spinors. The analogue of the IWP metric which admits a space-like Killing vector is found and is expressed in terms of a complex function satisfying the wave equation in flat (2+1-dimensional space–time. As examples, electric and magnetic Kasner spaces are constructed by allowing the solution to depend only on the time coordinate. Euclidean solutions are also presented.

  5. Validation of neural spike sorting algorithms without ground-truth information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alex H; Magland, Jeremy F; Greengard, Leslie F

    2016-05-01

    The throughput of electrophysiological recording is growing rapidly, allowing thousands of simultaneous channels, and there is a growing variety of spike sorting algorithms designed to extract neural firing events from such data. This creates an urgent need for standardized, automatic evaluation of the quality of neural units output by such algorithms. We introduce a suite of validation metrics that assess the credibility of a given automatic spike sorting algorithm applied to a given dataset. By rerunning the spike sorter two or more times, the metrics measure stability under various perturbations consistent with variations in the data itself, making no assumptions about the internal workings of the algorithm, and minimal assumptions about the noise. We illustrate the new metrics on standard sorting algorithms applied to both in vivo and ex vivo recordings, including a time series with overlapping spikes. We compare the metrics to existing quality measures, and to ground-truth accuracy in simulated time series. We provide a software implementation. Metrics have until now relied on ground-truth, simulated data, internal algorithm variables (e.g. cluster separation), or refractory violations. By contrast, by standardizing the interface, our metrics assess the reliability of any automatic algorithm without reference to internal variables (e.g. feature space) or physiological criteria. Stability is a prerequisite for reproducibility of results. Such metrics could reduce the significant human labor currently spent on validation, and should form an essential part of large-scale automated spike sorting and systematic benchmarking of algorithms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Scalar-metric and scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldersley, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The techniques of dimensional analysis and of the theory of tensorial concomitants are employed to study field equations in gravitational theories which incorporate scalar fields of the Brans-Dicke type. Within the context of scalar-metric gravitational theories, a uniqueness theorem for the geometric (or gravitational) part of the field equations is proven and a Lagrangian is determined which is uniquely specified by dimensional analysis. Within the context of scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories a uniqueness theorem for field Lagrangians is presented and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are given. Finally, an example of a scalar-metric-torsion theory is presented which is similar in many respects to the Brans-Dicke theory and the Einstein-Cartan theory

  7. Theory of reproducing kernels and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Saburou

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a large extension of the general theory of reproducing kernels published by N. Aronszajn in 1950, with many concrete applications. In Chapter 1, many concrete reproducing kernels are first introduced with detailed information. Chapter 2 presents a general and global theory of reproducing kernels with basic applications in a self-contained way. Many fundamental operations among reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces are dealt with. Chapter 2 is the heart of this book. Chapter 3 is devoted to the Tikhonov regularization using the theory of reproducing kernels with applications to numerical and practical solutions of bounded linear operator equations. In Chapter 4, the numerical real inversion formulas of the Laplace transform are presented by applying the Tikhonov regularization, where the reproducing kernels play a key role in the results. Chapter 5 deals with ordinary differential equations; Chapter 6 includes many concrete results for various fundamental partial differential equations. In Chapt...

  8. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved

  9. Regge calculus from discontinuous metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsymovsky, V.M.

    2003-01-01

    Regge calculus is considered as a particular case of the more general system where the linklengths of any two neighbouring 4-tetrahedra do not necessarily coincide on their common face. This system is treated as that one described by metric discontinuous on the faces. In the superspace of all discontinuous metrics the Regge calculus metrics form some hypersurface defined by continuity conditions. Quantum theory of the discontinuous metric system is assumed to be fixed somehow in the form of quantum measure on (the space of functionals on) the superspace. The problem of reducing this measure to the Regge hypersurface is addressed. The quantum Regge calculus measure is defined from a discontinuous metric measure by inserting the δ-function-like phase factor. The requirement that continuity conditions be imposed in a 'face-independent' way fixes this factor uniquely. The term 'face-independent' means that this factor depends only on the (hyper)plane spanned by the face, not on it's form and size. This requirement seems to be natural from the viewpoint of existence of the well-defined continuum limit maximally free of lattice artefacts

  10. Symmetries of Taub-NUT dual metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, D.; Codoban, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recently geometric duality was analyzed for a metric which admits Killing tensors. An interesting example arises when the manifold has Killing-Yano tensors. The symmetries of the dual metrics in the case of Taub-NUT metric are investigated. Generic and non-generic symmetries of dual Taub-NUT metric are analyzed

  11. A Kerr-NUT metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, P.C.; Patel, L.K.; Bhatt, P.V.

    1976-01-01

    Using Galilean time and retarded distance as coordinates the usual Kerr metric is expressed in form similar to the Newman-Unti-Tamburino (NUT) metric. The combined Kerr-NUT metric is then investigated. In addition to the Kerr and NUT solutions of Einstein's equations, three other types of solutions are derived. These are (i) the radiating Kerr solution, (ii) the radiating NUT solution satisfying Rsub(ik) = sigmaxisub(i)xisub(k), xisub(i)xisup(i) = 0, and (iii) the associated Kerr solution satisfying Rsub(ik) = 0. Solution (i) is distinct from and simpler than the one reported earlier by Vaidya and Patel (Phys. Rev.; D7:3590 (1973)). Solutions (ii) and (iii) gave line elements which have the axis of symmetry as a singular line. (author)

  12. The uniqueness of the Fisher metric as information metric

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2017), s. 879-896 ISSN 0020-3157 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Chentsov’s theorem * mixed topology * monotonicity of the Fisher metric Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.049, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10463-016-0562-0

  13. Reprodutibilidade e validade relativa do Questionário de Frequência Alimentar do ELSA-Brasil Reproducibilidad y validez relativa del Cuestionario de Frecuencia Alimentaria del ELSA-Brasil Reproducibility and relative validity of the Food Frequency Questionnaire used in the ELSA-Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Manato

    2013-02-01

    , respectivamente. Concordancias exactas y adyacentes entre métodos variaron de un 82,9% en el caso de la vitamina E a un 89% en el lípido y calcio (media = 86%. Se encontró una discordancia media de un 13,6%. Se concluye que el QFA ELSA-Brasil presenta una confiabilidad satisfactoria para todos los nutrientes y validez relativa razonable en los casos la energía, macronutrientes, calcio, potasio y vitaminas E y C.This study evaluated the reproducibility and relative validity of the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ used in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil. Participants (n = 281 completed the FFQ and three food records on two occasions during a 12-month period. Energy and nutrient values from food records were disattenuated and log-transformed. Reproducibility and validity were assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. Agreement between the two methods was evaluated by classification in tertiles. In the evaluation of reproducibility, ICC estimated ranged from 0.55 to 0.83 for protein and vitamin E, respectively. On relative validity, ICC ranged from 0.20 to 0.72 for selenium and calcium, respectively. Exact and adjacent agreement between methods varied from 82.9% for vitamin E to 89% for lipids and calcium (mean 86%. Average disagreement was 13.6%. In conclusion, this FFQ showed satisfactory reliability for all nutrients and reasonable validity, especially for energy, macronutrients, calcium, potassium, and vitamins E and C.

  14. Thermodynamic metrics and optimal paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E

    2012-05-11

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  15. Invariant metrics for Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, G.; Dragt, A.J.; Neri, F.

    1991-05-01

    In this paper, invariant metrics are constructed for Hamiltonian systems. These metrics give rise to norms on the space of homeogeneous polynomials of phase-space variables. For an accelerator lattice described by a Hamiltonian, these norms characterize the nonlinear content of the lattice. Therefore, the performance of the lattice can be improved by minimizing the norm as a function of parameters describing the beam-line elements in the lattice. A four-fold increase in the dynamic aperture of a model FODO cell is obtained using this procedure. 7 refs

  16. Generalization of Vaidya's radiation metric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleiser, R J; Kozameh, C N [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Instituto de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica

    1981-11-01

    In this paper it is shown that if Vaidya's radiation metric is considered from the point of view of kinetic theory in general relativity, the corresponding phase space distribution function can be generalized in a particular way. The new family of spherically symmetric radiation metrics obtained contains Vaidya's as a limiting situation. The Einstein field equations are solved in a ''comoving'' coordinate system. Two arbitrary functions of a single variable are introduced in the process of solving these equations. Particular examples considered are a stationary solution, a nonvacuum solution depending on a single parameter, and several limiting situations.

  17. Method Points: towards a metric for method complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham McLeod

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available A metric for method complexity is proposed as an aid to choosing between competing methods, as well as in validating the effects of method integration or the products of method engineering work. It is based upon a generic method representation model previously developed by the author and adaptation of concepts used in the popular Function Point metric for system size. The proposed technique is illustrated by comparing two popular I.E. deliverables with counterparts in the object oriented Unified Modeling Language (UML. The paper recommends ways to improve the practical adoption of new methods.

  18. MESUR: USAGE-BASED METRICS OF SCHOLARLY IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The evaluation of scholarly communication items is now largely a matter of expert opinion or metrics derived from citation data. Both approaches can fail to take into account the myriad of factors that shape scholarly impact. Usage data has emerged as a promising complement to existing methods o fassessment but the formal groundwork to reliably and validly apply usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact is lacking. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded MESUR project constitutes a systematic effort to define, validate and cross-validate a range of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact by creating a semantic model of the scholarly communication process. The constructed model will serve as the basis of a creating a large-scale semantic network that seamlessly relates citation, bibliographic and usage data from a variety of sources. A subsequent program that uses the established semantic network as a reference data set will determine the characteristics and semantics of a variety of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact. This paper outlines the architecture and methodology adopted by the MESUR project and its future direction.

  19. Technical Privacy Metrics: a Systematic Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Isabel; Eckhoff, David

    2018-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version The goal of privacy metrics is to measure the degree of privacy enjoyed by users in a system and the amount of protection offered by privacy-enhancing technologies. In this way, privacy metrics contribute to improving user privacy in the digital world. The diversity and complexity of privacy metrics in the literature makes an informed choice of metrics challenging. As a result, instead of using existing metrics, n...

  20. Remarks on G-Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessem Samet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, Mustafa and Sims (2006 introduced and studied a new class of generalized metric spaces, which are called G-metric spaces, as a generalization of metric spaces. We establish some useful propositions to show that many fixed point theorems on (nonsymmetric G-metric spaces given recently by many authors follow directly from well-known theorems on metric spaces. Our technique can be easily extended to other results as shown in application.

  1. DLA Energy Biofuel Feedstock Metrics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    moderately/highly in- vasive  Metric 2: Genetically modified organism ( GMO ) hazard, Yes/No and Hazard Category  Metric 3: Species hybridization...4– biofuel distribution Stage # 5– biofuel use Metric 1: State inva- siveness ranking Yes Minimal Minimal No No Metric 2: GMO hazard Yes...may utilize GMO microbial or microalgae species across the applicable biofuel life cycles (stages 1–3). The following consequence Metrics 4–6 then

  2. Reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An investigation on the reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming was performed to document the applicability of this approach for testing cutting fluids. Austenitic stainless steel was used as a workpiece material and HSS reamers as cutting tools. Reproducibility of the results was evaluat...

  3. Applicability of Existing Objective Metrics of Perceptual Quality for Adaptive Video Streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jacob; Krasula, Lukás; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective video quality metrics are designed to estimate the quality of experience of the end user. However, these objective metrics are usually validated with video streams degraded under common distortion types. In the presented work, we analyze the performance of published and known full......-reference and noreference quality metrics in estimating the perceived quality of adaptive bit-rate video streams knowingly out of scope. Experimental results indicate not surprisingly that state of the art objective quality metrics overlook the perceived degradations in the adaptive video streams and perform poorly...

  4. Reprodutibilidade e validade do Questionário Internacional de Atividade Física (IPAQ em homens idosos Reproducibilidad y validez del Cuestionario Internacional de Actividad Física (IPAQ en hombres ancianos Reproducibility and validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ in elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia R. Bertoldo Benedetti

    2007-02-01

    ómetro y c Diario de Actividad Física de Bouchard (DAF. Para la reproducibilidad fueron realizadas dos aplicaciones de IPAQ, con intervalo de 21 días (r s = 0,95. El análisis estadístico adoptada fue el de correlación de Spearman (r s, el porcentaje de concordancia (%C, el índice kappa (k y el "plotaje" de Bland y Altman. La muestra fue dividida, utilizando como criterio la mediana. La reproducibilidad presentó una correlación de r s = 0,95. La asociación entre el IPAQ y el DAF fue de: r s = 0,38; %C = 69 y k = 0,04 y la asociación entre el IPAQ y el pedómetro de: r s = 0,24; %C = 62 y k = 0,19. Se concluye que la validez varió de moderado a bajo, mientras que la reproducibilidad fue adecuada.It is necessary to efficiently and economically find means to quantify the level of physical activity of the population. Questionnaires are viable and economical; however, their trustworthiness is questionable. This study aimed to determine the reproducibility and validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ in elderly men. The sampling was composed of 29 elderly men over the age of 60, average age of 66.6 years (SD = 4.3, who were members of the extension program at the Federal University of Santa Catarina. The instruments used were: a IPAQ extended version; b pedometer and c Bouchard's Physical Activity Diary (PAD. For reproducibility, the IPAQ was applied twice with a 21 day interval (r s = 0.95. The statistical analysis used was Spearman Correlation (r s; Concordance Percentile (%C; Kappa Index (k; and Bland and Altman plot. The sample was divided using the median as criterion. The reproducibility showed a correlation of r s 0.95. The combination between IPAQ and PAD was: r s = 0.38; %C = 69 and k = 0.04. The combination between IPAQ and the Pedometer was: r s = 0.24; %C = 62 and k = 0.19. It was concluded that the validity varied from moderate to low while the reproducibility was adequate.

  5. Reproducibility principles, problems, practices, and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Maasen, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Featuring peer-reviewed contributions from noted experts in their fields of research, Reproducibility: Principles, Problems, Practices, and Prospects presents state-of-the-art approaches to reproducibility, the gold standard sound science, from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. Including comprehensive coverage for implementing and reflecting the norm of reproducibility in various pertinent fields of research, the book focuses on how the reproducibility of results is applied, how it may be limited, and how such limitations can be understood or even controlled in the natural sciences, computational sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and studies of science and technology. The book presents many chapters devoted to a variety of methods and techniques, as well as their epistemic and ontological underpinnings, which have been developed to safeguard reproducible research and curtail deficits and failures. The book also investigates the political, historical, and social practices that underlie repro...

  6. Is my network module preserved and reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Langfelder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many applications, one is interested in determining which of the properties of a network module change across conditions. For example, to validate the existence of a module, it is desirable to show that it is reproducible (or preserved in an independent test network. Here we study several types of network preservation statistics that do not require a module assignment in the test network. We distinguish network preservation statistics by the type of the underlying network. Some preservation statistics are defined for a general network (defined by an adjacency matrix while others are only defined for a correlation network (constructed on the basis of pairwise correlations between numeric variables. Our applications show that the correlation structure facilitates the definition of particularly powerful module preservation statistics. We illustrate that evaluating module preservation is in general different from evaluating cluster preservation. We find that it is advantageous to aggregate multiple preservation statistics into summary preservation statistics. We illustrate the use of these methods in six gene co-expression network applications including 1 preservation of cholesterol biosynthesis pathway in mouse tissues, 2 comparison of human and chimpanzee brain networks, 3 preservation of selected KEGG pathways between human and chimpanzee brain networks, 4 sex differences in human cortical networks, 5 sex differences in mouse liver networks. While we find no evidence for sex specific modules in human cortical networks, we find that several human cortical modules are less preserved in chimpanzees. In particular, apoptosis genes are differentially co-expressed between humans and chimpanzees. Our simulation studies and applications show that module preservation statistics are useful for studying differences between the modular structure of networks. Data, R software and accompanying tutorials can be downloaded from the following webpage: http

  7. Separable metrics and radiating stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the junction condition relating the pressure to heat flux at the boundary of an accelerating and expanding spherically symmetric radiating star. We transform the junction condition to an ordinary differential equation by making a separability assumption on the metric functions in the space–time variables.

  8. Socio-technical security metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gollmann, D.; Herley, C.; Koenig, V.; Pieters, W.; Sasse, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Report from Dagstuhl seminar 14491. This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14491 “Socio-Technical Security Metrics”. In the domain of safety, metrics inform many decisions, from the height of new dikes to the design of nuclear plants. We can state, for example, that

  9. Leading Gainful Employment Metric Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kristina; MacPherson, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will address the importance of intercampus involvement in reporting of gainful employment student-level data that will be used in the calculation of gainful employment metrics by the U.S. Department of Education. The authors will discuss why building relationships within the institution is critical for effective gainful employment…

  10. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Value of Metrics for Science Data Center Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J.; Behnke, J.; Watts, T. H.; Lu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been collecting and analyzing records of science data archive, processing and product distribution for more than 10 years. The types of information collected and the analysis performed has matured and progressed to become an integral and necessary part of the system management and planning functions. Science data center managers are realizing the importance that metrics can play in influencing and validating their business model. New efforts focus on better understanding of users and their methods. Examples include tracking user web site interactions and conducting user surveys such as the government authorized American Customer Satisfaction Index survey. This paper discusses the metrics methodology, processes and applications that are growing in EOSDIS, the driving requirements and compelling events, and the future envisioned for metrics as an integral part of earth science data systems.

  12. Value-based metrics and Internet-based enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishan M.

    2001-10-01

    Within the last few years, a host of value-based metrics like EVA, MVA, TBR, CFORI, and TSR have evolved. This paper attempts to analyze the validity and applicability of EVA and Balanced Scorecard for Internet based organizations. Despite the collapse of the dot-com model, the firms engaged in e- commerce continue to struggle to find new ways to account for customer-base, technology, employees, knowledge, etc, as part of the value of the firm. While some metrics, like the Balance Scorecard are geared towards internal use, others like EVA are for external use. Value-based metrics are used for performing internal audits as well as comparing firms against one another; and can also be effectively utilized by individuals outside the firm looking to determine if the firm is creating value for its stakeholders.

  13. Nonlinear Semi-Supervised Metric Learning Via Multiple Kernels and Local Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Bai, Yanqin; Peng, Yaxin; Du, Shaoyi; Ying, Shihui

    2018-03-01

    Changing the metric on the data may change the data distribution, hence a good distance metric can promote the performance of learning algorithm. In this paper, we address the semi-supervised distance metric learning (ML) problem to obtain the best nonlinear metric for the data. First, we describe the nonlinear metric by the multiple kernel representation. By this approach, we project the data into a high dimensional space, where the data can be well represented by linear ML. Then, we reformulate the linear ML by a minimization problem on the positive definite matrix group. Finally, we develop a two-step algorithm for solving this model and design an intrinsic steepest descent algorithm to learn the positive definite metric matrix. Experimental results validate that our proposed method is effective and outperforms several state-of-the-art ML methods.

  14. MESUR metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Sompel, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Usage data is increasingly regarded as a valuable resource in the assessment of scholarly communication items. However, the development of quantitative, usage-based indicators of scholarly impact is still in its infancy. The Digital Library Research & Prototyping Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Research library has therefore started a program to expand the set of usage-based tools for the assessment of scholarly communication items. The two-year MESUR project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to define and validate a range of usage-based impact metrics, and issue guidelines with regards to their characteristics and proper application. The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting c...

  15. Learning Reproducibility with a Yearly Networking Contest

    KAUST Repository

    Canini, Marco

    2017-08-10

    Better reproducibility of networking research results is currently a major goal that the academic community is striving towards. This position paper makes the case that improving the extent and pervasiveness of reproducible research can be greatly fostered by organizing a yearly international contest. We argue that holding a contest undertaken by a plurality of students will have benefits that are two-fold. First, it will promote hands-on learning of skills that are helpful in producing artifacts at the replicable-research level. Second, it will advance the best practices regarding environments, testbeds, and tools that will aid the tasks of reproducibility evaluation committees by and large.

  16. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard P Freedman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible-in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures.

  17. Thou Shalt Be Reproducible! A Technology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on reproducibility in psychology from a technological viewpoint. Modernopen source computational environments are shown and explained that foster reproducibilitythroughout the whole research life cycle, and to which emerging psychology researchers shouldbe sensitized, are shown and explained. First, data archiving platforms that make datasets publiclyavailable are presented. Second, R is advocated as the data-analytic lingua franca in psychologyfor achieving reproducible statistical analysis. Third, dynamic report generation environments forwriting reproducible manuscripts that integrate text, data analysis, and statistical outputs such asfigures and tables in a single document are described. Supplementary materials are provided inorder to get the reader started with these technologies.

  18. METRIC EVALUATION PIPELINE FOR 3D MODELING OF URBAN SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bosch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  19. Metric Evaluation Pipeline for 3d Modeling of Urban Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, M.; Leichtman, A.; Chilcott, D.; Goldberg, H.; Brown, M.

    2017-05-01

    Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  20. The Growing Need for Validated Biomarkers and Endpoints for Dry Eye Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Neeta S; Wei, Yi; Kuklinski, Eric; Asbell, Penny A

    2017-05-01

    Biomarkers with minimally invasive and reproducible objective metrics provide the key to future paradigm shifts in understanding of the underlying causes of dry eye disease (DED) and approaches to treatment of DED. We review biomarkers and their validity in providing objective metrics for DED clinical research and patient care. The English-language literature in PubMed primarily over the last decade was surveyed for studies related to identification of biomarkers of DED: (1) inflammation, (2) point-of-care, (3) ocular imaging, and (4) genetics. Relevant studies in each group were individually evaluated for (1) methodological and analytical details, (2) data and concordance with other similar studies, and (3) potential to serve as validated biomarkers with objective metrics. Significant work has been done to identify biomarkers for DED clinical trials and for patient care. Interstudy variation among studies dealing with the same biomarker type was high. This could be attributed to biologic variations and/or differences in processing, and data analysis. Correlation with other signs and symptoms of DED was not always clear or present. Many of the biomarkers reviewed show the potential to serve as validated and objective metrics for clinical research and patient care in DED. Interstudy variation for a given biomarker emphasizes the need for detailed reporting of study methodology, including information on subject characteristics, quality control, processing, and analysis methods to optimize development of nonsubjective metrics. Biomarker development offers a rich opportunity to significantly move forward clinical research and patient care in DED. DED is an unmet medical need - a chronic pain syndrome associated with variable vision that affects quality of life, is common with advancing age, interferes with the comfortable use of contact lenses, and can diminish results of eye surgeries, such as cataract extraction, LASIK, and glaucoma procedures. It is a worldwide

  1. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy...... source. Toluene was degraded under aerobic conditions at a constant temperature of 28 degreesC. The experiments were modelled by a Monod model - extended to meet the air/liquid system, and the parameter values were estimated using a statistical nonlinear estimation procedure. Model reduction analysis...... resulted in a simpler model without the biomass decay term. In order to test for model reduction and reproducibility of parameter estimates, a likelihood ratio test was employed. The limited reproducibility for these experiments implied that all 9 batch experiments could not be described by the same set...

  2. Archiving Reproducible Research with R and Dataverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reproducible research and data archiving are increasingly important issues in research involving statistical analyses of quantitative data. This article introduces the dvn package, which allows R users to publicly archive datasets, analysis files, codebooks, and associated metadata in Dataverse...

  3. Group covariance and metrical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, L.

    1983-01-01

    The a priori introduction of a Lie group of transformations into a physical theory has often proved to be useful; it usually serves to describe special simplified conditions before a general theory can be worked out. Newton's assumptions of absolute space and time are examples where the Euclidian group and translation group have been introduced. These groups were extended to the Galilei group and modified in the special theory of relativity to the Poincare group to describe physics under the given conditions covariantly in the simplest way. The criticism of the a priori character leads to the formulation of the general theory of relativity. The general metric theory does not really give preference to a particular invariance group - even the principle of equivalence can be adapted to a whole family of groups. The physical laws covariantly inserted into the metric space are however adapted to the Poincare group. 8 references

  4. General relativity: An erfc metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Réjean

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes an erfc potential to incorporate in a symmetric metric. One key feature of this model is that it relies on the existence of an intrinsic physical constant σ, a star-specific proper length that scales all its surroundings. Based thereon, the new metric is used to study the space-time geometry of a static symmetric massive object, as seen from its interior. The analytical solutions to the Einstein equation are presented, highlighting the absence of singularities and discontinuities in such a model. The geodesics are derived in their second- and first-order differential formats. Recalling the slight impact of the new model on the classical general relativity tests in the solar system, a number of facts and open problems are briefly revisited on the basis of a heuristic definition of σ. A special attention is given to gravitational collapses and non-singular black holes.

  5. Reproducing Epidemiologic Research and Ensuring Transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S

    2017-08-15

    Measures for ensuring that epidemiologic studies are reproducible include making data sets and software available to other researchers so they can verify published findings, conduct alternative analyses of the data, and check for statistical errors or programming errors. Recent developments related to the reproducibility and transparency of epidemiologic studies include the creation of a global platform for sharing data from clinical trials and the anticipated future extension of the global platform to non-clinical trial data. Government agencies and departments such as the US Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program have also enhanced their data repositories and data sharing resources. The Institute of Medicine and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors released guidance on sharing clinical trial data. The US National Institutes of Health has updated their data-sharing policies. In this issue of the Journal, Shepherd et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2017;186:387-392) outline a pragmatic approach for reproducible research with sensitive data for studies for which data cannot be shared because of legal or ethical restrictions. Their proposed quasi-reproducible approach facilitates the dissemination of statistical methods and codes to independent researchers. Both reproducibility and quasi-reproducibility can increase transparency for critical evaluation, further dissemination of study methods, and expedite the exchange of ideas among researchers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Multi-Metric Sustainability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowlin, Shannon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, Donna [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mann, Margaret [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Jacquelyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Munoz, David [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-01

    A readily accessible framework that allows for evaluating impacts and comparing tradeoffs among factors in energy policy, expansion planning, and investment decision making is lacking. Recognizing this, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) funded an exploration of multi-metric sustainability analysis (MMSA) to provide energy decision makers with a means to make more comprehensive comparisons of energy technologies. The resulting MMSA tool lets decision makers simultaneously compare technologies and potential deployment locations.

  7. Sensory Metrics of Neuromechanical Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Softky, William; Benford, Criscillia

    2017-09-01

    Today digital sources supply a historically unprecedented component of human sensorimotor data, the consumption of which is correlated with poorly understood maladies such as Internet addiction disorder and Internet gaming disorder. Because both natural and digital sensorimotor data share common mathematical descriptions, one can quantify our informational sensorimotor needs using the signal processing metrics of entropy, noise, dimensionality, continuity, latency, and bandwidth. Such metrics describe in neutral terms the informational diet human brains require to self-calibrate, allowing individuals to maintain trusting relationships. With these metrics, we define the trust humans experience using the mathematical language of computational models, that is, as a primitive statistical algorithm processing finely grained sensorimotor data from neuromechanical interaction. This definition of neuromechanical trust implies that artificial sensorimotor inputs and interactions that attract low-level attention through frequent discontinuities and enhanced coherence will decalibrate a brain's representation of its world over the long term by violating the implicit statistical contract for which self-calibration evolved. Our hypersimplified mathematical understanding of human sensorimotor processing as multiscale, continuous-time vibratory interaction allows equally broad-brush descriptions of failure modes and solutions. For example, we model addiction in general as the result of homeostatic regulation gone awry in novel environments (sign reversal) and digital dependency as a sub-case in which the decalibration caused by digital sensorimotor data spurs yet more consumption of them. We predict that institutions can use these sensorimotor metrics to quantify media richness to improve employee well-being; that dyads and family-size groups will bond and heal best through low-latency, high-resolution multisensory interaction such as shared meals and reciprocated touch; and

  8. Metric reconstruction from Weyl scalars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Bernard F; Price, Larry R [Department of Physics, PO Box 118440, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2005-08-07

    The Kerr geometry has remained an elusive world in which to explore physics and delve into the more esoteric implications of general relativity. Following the discovery, by Kerr in 1963, of the metric for a rotating black hole, the most major advance has been an understanding of its Weyl curvature perturbations based on Teukolsky's discovery of separable wave equations some ten years later. In the current research climate, where experiments across the globe are preparing for the first detection of gravitational waves, a more complete understanding than concerns just the Weyl curvature is now called for. To understand precisely how comparatively small masses move in response to the gravitational waves they emit, a formalism has been developed based on a description of the whole spacetime metric perturbation in the neighbourhood of the emission region. Presently, such a description is not available for the Kerr geometry. While there does exist a prescription for obtaining metric perturbations once curvature perturbations are known, it has become apparent that there are gaps in that formalism which are still waiting to be filled. The most serious gaps include gauge inflexibility, the inability to include sources-which are essential when the emitting masses are considered-and the failure to describe the l = 0 and 1 perturbation properties. Among these latter properties of the perturbed spacetime, arising from a point mass in orbit, are the perturbed mass and axial component of angular momentum, as well as the very elusive Carter constant for non-axial angular momentum. A status report is given on recent work which begins to repair these deficiencies in our current incomplete description of Kerr metric perturbations.

  9. Metric reconstruction from Weyl scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiting, Bernard F; Price, Larry R

    2005-01-01

    The Kerr geometry has remained an elusive world in which to explore physics and delve into the more esoteric implications of general relativity. Following the discovery, by Kerr in 1963, of the metric for a rotating black hole, the most major advance has been an understanding of its Weyl curvature perturbations based on Teukolsky's discovery of separable wave equations some ten years later. In the current research climate, where experiments across the globe are preparing for the first detection of gravitational waves, a more complete understanding than concerns just the Weyl curvature is now called for. To understand precisely how comparatively small masses move in response to the gravitational waves they emit, a formalism has been developed based on a description of the whole spacetime metric perturbation in the neighbourhood of the emission region. Presently, such a description is not available for the Kerr geometry. While there does exist a prescription for obtaining metric perturbations once curvature perturbations are known, it has become apparent that there are gaps in that formalism which are still waiting to be filled. The most serious gaps include gauge inflexibility, the inability to include sources-which are essential when the emitting masses are considered-and the failure to describe the l = 0 and 1 perturbation properties. Among these latter properties of the perturbed spacetime, arising from a point mass in orbit, are the perturbed mass and axial component of angular momentum, as well as the very elusive Carter constant for non-axial angular momentum. A status report is given on recent work which begins to repair these deficiencies in our current incomplete description of Kerr metric perturbations

  10. Validação e reprodutibilidade da Escala de Evaluación de Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes Validación y reproducibilidad de la Escala de Evaluación de la Insatisfacción Corporal para Adolescentes Validity and reproducibility of Escala de Evaluación da Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Conti

    2009-06-01

    rotation, discriminant validity by comparing score means according to nutritional status (low weight, normal weight, and at risk of overweight and obesity using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Concurrent validity was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between scores and body mass index, waist-hip ratio and waist circumference. Reproducibility was evaluated using Wilcoxon test, and intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS: The translated and back-translated scale showed good agreement with the original one. The translated scale had good internal consistency in all subgroups studied (males and females in early and intermediate adolescence and was able to discriminate adolescents according to their nutritional status. In the concurrent analysis, all three measures were correlated, except for males in early adolescence. Its reproducibility was ascertained. CONCLUSIONS: The "Escala de Evaluación da Insatisfación Corporal para Adolescentes" was successfully translated into Portuguese and adapted to the Brazilian background and showed good results. It is recommended for the evaluation of the attitudinal component of body image in adolescents.

  11. Sustainability Metrics: The San Luis Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability is about promoting humanly desirable dynamic regimes of the environment. Metrics: ecological footprint, net regional product, exergy, emergy, and Fisher Information. Adaptive management: (1) metrics assess problem, (2) specific problem identified, and (3) managemen...

  12. Reproducibility of studies on text mining for citation screening in systematic reviews: Evaluation and checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorisade, Babatunde Kazeem; Brereton, Pearl; Andras, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Independent validation of published scientific results through study replication is a pre-condition for accepting the validity of such results. In computation research, full replication is often unrealistic for independent results validation, therefore, study reproduction has been justified as the minimum acceptable standard to evaluate the validity of scientific claims. The application of text mining techniques to citation screening in the context of systematic literature reviews is a relatively young and growing computational field with high relevance for software engineering, medical research and other fields. However, there is little work so far on reproduction studies in the field. In this paper, we investigate the reproducibility of studies in this area based on information contained in published articles and we propose reporting guidelines that could improve reproducibility. The study was approached in two ways. Initially we attempted to reproduce results from six studies, which were based on the same raw dataset. Then, based on this experience, we identified steps considered essential to successful reproduction of text mining experiments and characterized them to measure how reproducible is a study given the information provided on these steps. 33 articles were systematically assessed for reproducibility using this approach. Our work revealed that it is currently difficult if not impossible to independently reproduce the results published in any of the studies investigated. The lack of information about the datasets used limits reproducibility of about 80% of the studies assessed. Also, information about the machine learning algorithms is inadequate in about 27% of the papers. On the plus side, the third party software tools used are mostly free and available. The reproducibility potential of most of the studies can be significantly improved if more attention is paid to information provided on the datasets used, how they were partitioned and utilized, and

  13. Improving transparency and reproducibility through registration: The status of intervention trials published in clinical psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Lukasz; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Prospective registration increases the validity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In the United States, registration is a legal requirement for drugs and devices regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and many biomedical journals refuse to publish trials that are not registered. Trials in clinical psychology have not been subject to these requirements; it is unknown to what extent they are registered. We searched the 25 highest-impact clinical psychology journals that published at least 1 RCT of a health-related psychological intervention in 2013. For included trials, we evaluated their registration status (prospective, retrospective, not registered) and the completeness of their outcome definitions. We identified 163 articles that reported 165 RCTs; 73 (44%) RCTs were registered, of which only 25 (15%) were registered prospectively. Of registered RCTs, only 42 (58%) indicated their registration status in the publication. Only 2 (1% of all trials) were registered prospectively and defined their primary outcomes completely. For the primary outcome(s), 72 (99%) of all registrations defined the domain, 67 (92%) the time frame, and 48 (66%) the specific measurements. Only 19 (26%) and 5 (7%) defined the specific metric and method of aggregation, respectively, for all primary outcomes. Very few reports of RCTs published in clinical psychology journals were registered prospectively and completely. Clinical psychology journals could improve transparency and reproducibility, as well as reduce bias, by requiring complete prospective trial registration for publication and by including trial registration numbers in all reports of RCTs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A family of metric gravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Robert

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to take a completely fresh approach to metric gravity, in which the metric principle is strictly adhered to but its properties in local space-time are derived from conservation principles, not inferred from a global field equation. The global field strength variation then gains some flexibility, but only in the regime of very strong fields (2nd-order terms) whose measurement is now being contemplated. So doing provides a family of similar gravities, differing only in strong fields, which could be developed into meaningful verification targets for strong fields after the manner in which far-field variations were used in the 20th century. General Relativity (GR) is shown to be a member of the family and this is demonstrated by deriving the Schwarzschild metric exactly from a suitable field strength assumption. The method of doing so is interesting in itself because it involves only one differential equation rather than the usual four. Exact static symmetric field solutions are also given for one pedagogical alternative based on potential, and one theoretical alternative based on inertia, and the prospects of experimentally differentiating these are analyzed. Whether the method overturns the conventional wisdom that GR is the only metric theory of gravity and that alternatives must introduce additional interactions and fields is somewhat semantical, depending on whether one views the field strength assumption as a field and whether the assumption that produces GR is considered unique in some way. It is of course possible to have other fields, and the local space-time principle can be applied to field gravities which usually are weak-field approximations having only time dilation, giving them the spatial factor and promoting them to full metric theories. Though usually pedagogical, some of them are interesting from a quantum gravity perspective. Cases are noted where mass measurement errors, or distributions of dark matter, can cause one

  15. Hybrid metric-Palatini stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilǎ, Bogdan; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mak, M. K.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the internal structure and the physical properties of specific classes of neutron, quark and Bose-Einstein condensate stars in the recently proposed hybrid metric-Palatini gravity theory, which is a combination of the metric and Palatini f (R ) formalisms. It turns out that the theory is very successful in accounting for the observed phenomenology, since it unifies local constraints at the Solar System level and the late-time cosmic acceleration, even if the scalar field is very light. In this paper, we derive the equilibrium equations for a spherically symmetric configuration (mass continuity and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff) in the framework of the scalar-tensor representation of the hybrid metric-Palatini theory, and we investigate their solutions numerically for different equations of state of neutron and quark matter, by adopting for the scalar field potential a Higgs-type form. It turns out that the scalar-tensor definition of the potential can be represented as an Clairaut differential equation, and provides an explicit form for f (R ) given by f (R )˜R +Λeff, where Λeff is an effective cosmological constant. Furthermore, stellar models, described by the stiff fluid, radiation-like, bag model and the Bose-Einstein condensate equations of state are explicitly constructed in both general relativity and hybrid metric-Palatini gravity, thus allowing an in-depth comparison between the predictions of these two gravitational theories. As a general result it turns out that for all the considered equations of state, hybrid gravity stars are more massive than their general relativistic counterparts. Furthermore, two classes of stellar models corresponding to two particular choices of the functional form of the scalar field (constant value, and logarithmic form, respectively) are also investigated. Interestingly enough, in the case of a constant scalar field the equation of state of the matter takes the form of the bag model equation of state describing

  16. Metrics for Evaluation of Student Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelanek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Researchers use many different metrics for evaluation of performance of student models. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of commonly used metrics, to discuss properties, advantages, and disadvantages of different metrics, to summarize current practice in educational data mining, and to provide guidance for evaluation of student…

  17. Context-dependent ATC complexity metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercado Velasco, G.A.; Borst, C.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have investigated Air Traffic Control (ATC) complexity metrics in a search for a metric that could best capture workload. These studies have shown how daunting the search for a universal workload metric (one that could be applied in different contexts: sectors, traffic patterns,

  18. Properties of C-metric spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Anca; Apreutesei, Gabriela; Mastorakis, Nikos E.

    2017-09-01

    The subject of this paper belongs to the theory of approximate metrics [23]. An approximate metric on X is a real application defined on X × X that satisfies only a part of the metric axioms. In a recent paper [23], we introduced a new type of approximate metric, named C-metric, that is an application which satisfies only two metric axioms: symmetry and triangular inequality. The remarkable fact in a C-metric space is that a topological structure induced by the C-metric can be defined. The innovative idea of this paper is that we obtain some convergence properties of a C-metric space in the absence of a metric. In this paper we investigate C-metric spaces. The paper is divided into four sections. Section 1 is for Introduction. In Section 2 we recall some concepts and preliminary results. In Section 3 we present some properties of C-metric spaces, such as convergence properties, a canonical decomposition and a C-fixed point theorem. Finally, in Section 4 some conclusions are highlighted.

  19. Reproducibility of central lumbar vertebral BMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, F.; Pocock, N.; Griffiths, M.; Majerovic, Y.; Freund, J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Lumbar vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has generally been calculated from a region of interest which includes the entire vertebral body. Although this region excludes part of the transverse processes, it does include the outer cortical shell of the vertebra. Recent software has been devised to calculate BMD in a central vertebral region of interest which excludes the outer cortical envelope. Theoretically this area may be more sensitive to detecting osteoporosis which affects trabecular bone to a greater extent than cortical bone. Apart from the sensitivity of BMD estimation, the reproducibility of any measurement is important owing to the slow rate of change of bone mass. We have evaluated the reproducibility of this new vertebral region of interest in 23 women who had duplicate lumbar spine DXA scans performed on the same day. The patients were repositioned between each measurement. Central vertebral analysis was performed for L2-L4 and the reproducibility of area, bone mineral content (BMC) and BMD calculated as the coefficient of variation; these values were compared with those from conventional analysis. Thus we have shown that the reproducibility of the central BMD is comparable to the conventional analysis which is essential if this technique is to provide any additional clinical data. The reasons for the decrease in reproducibility of the area and hence BMC requires further investigation

  20. On characterizations of quasi-metric completeness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dag, H.; Romaguera, S.; Tirado, P.

    2017-07-01

    Hu proved in [4] that a metric space (X, d) is complete if and only if for any closed subspace C of (X, d), every Banach contraction on C has fixed point. Since then several authors have investigated the problem of characterizing the metric completeness by means of fixed point theorems. Recently this problem has been studied in the more general context of quasi-metric spaces for different notions of completeness. Here we present a characterization of a kind of completeness for quasi-metric spaces by means of a quasi-metric versions of Hu’s theorem. (Author)

  1. Can cancer researchers accurately judge whether preclinical reports will reproduce?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is vigorous debate about the reproducibility of research findings in cancer biology. Whether scientists can accurately assess which experiments will reproduce original findings is important to determining the pace at which science self-corrects. We collected forecasts from basic and preclinical cancer researchers on the first 6 replication studies conducted by the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (RP:CB to assess the accuracy of expert judgments on specific replication outcomes. On average, researchers forecasted a 75% probability of replicating the statistical significance and a 50% probability of replicating the effect size, yet none of these studies successfully replicated on either criterion (for the 5 studies with results reported. Accuracy was related to expertise: experts with higher h-indices were more accurate, whereas experts with more topic-specific expertise were less accurate. Our findings suggest that experts, especially those with specialized knowledge, were overconfident about the RP:CB replicating individual experiments within published reports; researcher optimism likely reflects a combination of overestimating the validity of original studies and underestimating the difficulties of repeating their methodologies.

  2. An Innovative Metric to Evaluate Satellite Precipitation's Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Chu, W.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2011-12-01

    Thanks to its capability to cover the mountains, where ground measurement instruments cannot reach, satellites provide a good means of estimating precipitation over mountainous regions. In regions with complex terrains, accurate information on high-resolution spatial distribution of precipitation is critical for many important issues, such as flood/landslide warning, reservoir operation, water system planning, etc. Therefore, in order to be useful in many practical applications, satellite precipitation products should possess high quality in characterizing spatial distribution. However, most existing validation metrics, which are based on point/grid comparison using simple statistics, cannot effectively measure satellite's skill of capturing the spatial patterns of precipitation fields. This deficiency results from the fact that point/grid-wised comparison does not take into account of the spatial coherence of precipitation fields. Furth more, another weakness of many metrics is that they can barely provide information on why satellite products perform well or poor. Motivated by our recent findings of the consistent spatial patterns of the precipitation field over the western U.S., we developed a new metric utilizing EOF analysis and Shannon entropy. The metric can be derived through two steps: 1) capture the dominant spatial patterns of precipitation fields from both satellite products and reference data through EOF analysis, and 2) compute the similarities between the corresponding dominant patterns using mutual information measurement defined with Shannon entropy. Instead of individual point/grid, the new metric treat the entire precipitation field simultaneously, naturally taking advantage of spatial dependence. Since the dominant spatial patterns are shaped by physical processes, the new metric can shed light on why satellite product can or cannot capture the spatial patterns. For demonstration, a experiment was carried out to evaluate a satellite

  3. A Practitioners’ Perspective on Developmental Models, Metrics and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Stewart

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article builds on a paper by Stein and Heikkinen (2009, and suggestsways to expand and improve our measurement of the quality of the developmentalmodels, metrics and instruments and the results we get in collaborating with clients. Wesuggest that this dialogue needs to be about more than stage development measured by(even calibrated stage development-focused, linguistic-based, developmental psychologymetrics that produce lead indicators and are shown to be reliable and valid bypsychometric qualities alone. The article first provides a brief overview of ourbackground and biases, and an applied version of Ken Wilber’s Integral OperatingSystem that has provided increased development, client satisfaction, and contribution toour communities measured by verifiable, tangible results (as well as intangible resultssuch as increased ability to cope with complex surroundings, reduced stress and growthin developmental stages to better fit to the environment in which our clients wereengaged at that time. It then addresses four key points raised by Stein and Heikkinen(need for quality control, defining and deciding on appropriate metrics, building a systemto evaluate models and metrics, and clarifying and increasing the reliability and validityof the models and metrics we use by providing initial concrete steps to:• Adopt a systemic value-chain approach• Measure results in addition to language• Build on the evaluation system for instruments, models and metrics suggested byStein & Heikkinen• Clarify and improve the reliability and validity of the instruments, models andmetrics we useWe complete the article with an echoing call for the community of AppliedDevelopmental Theory suggested by Ross (2008 and Stein and Heikkinen, a briefdescription of that community (from our perspective, and a table that builds on Table 2proposed by Stein and Heikkinen.

  4. Enacting the International/Reproducing Eurocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Gülşah Çapan

    Full Text Available Abstract This article focuses on the way in which Eurocentric conceptualisations of the ‘international’ are reproduced in different geopolitical contexts. Even though the Eurocentrism of International Relations has received growing attention, it has predominantly been concerned with unearthing the Eurocentrism of the ‘centre’, overlooking its varied manifestations in other geopolitical contexts. The article seeks to contribute to discussions about Eurocentrism by examining how different conceptualisations of the international are at work at a particular moment, and how these conceptualisations continue to reproduce Eurocentrism. It will focus on the way in which Eurocentric designations of spatial and temporal hierarchies were reproduced in the context of Turkey through a reading of how the ‘Gezi Park protests’ of 2013 and ‘Turkey’ itself were written into the story of the international.

  5. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  6. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR

  7. Undefined cellulase formulations hinder scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Michael E; Abbas, Charles A; Baker, John O; Bayer, Edward A; Bomble, Yannick J; Brunecky, Roman; Chen, Xiaowen; Felby, Claus; Jeoh, Tina; Kumar, Rajeev; McCleary, Barry V; Pletschke, Brett I; Tucker, Melvin P; Wyman, Charles E; Decker, Stephen R

    2017-01-01

    In the shadow of a burgeoning biomass-to-fuels industry, biological conversion of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars in a cost-effective manner is key to the success of second-generation and advanced biofuel production. For the effective comparison of one cellulase preparation to another, cellulase assays are typically carried out with one or more engineered cellulase formulations or natural exoproteomes of known performance serving as positive controls. When these formulations have unknown composition, as is the case with several widely used commercial products, it becomes impossible to compare or reproduce work done today to work done in the future, where, for example, such preparations may not be available. Therefore, being a critical tenet of science publishing, experimental reproducibility is endangered by the continued use of these undisclosed products. We propose the introduction of standard procedures and materials to produce specific and reproducible cellulase formulations. These formulations are to serve as yardsticks to measure improvements and performance of new cellulase formulations.

  8. Utility Validation of a New Fingerprint Quality Metric

    OpenAIRE

    Yao , Zhigang; Charrier , Christophe; Rosenberger , Christophe

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Fingerprint somehow can be regarded as a relatively fullfledged application in biometrics. The use of this biometric modality is not limited to traditional public security area, but spread into the daily life, smart phone authentication control and e-payment, for instance. However, quality control of biometric sample is still a necessary task due in order to optimize the operational performance. Research works had shown that biometric systems performance could be great...

  9. Reproducibility of somatosensory spatial perceptual maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbergen, Peter; Buitenweg, Jan R; Trojan, Jörg; Veltink, Peter H

    2013-02-01

    Various studies have shown subjects to mislocalize cutaneous stimuli in an idiosyncratic manner. Spatial properties of individual localization behavior can be represented in the form of perceptual maps. Individual differences in these maps may reflect properties of internal body representations, and perceptual maps may therefore be a useful method for studying these representations. For this to be the case, individual perceptual maps need to be reproducible, which has not yet been demonstrated. We assessed the reproducibility of localizations measured twice on subsequent days. Ten subjects participated in the experiments. Non-painful electrocutaneous stimuli were applied at seven sites on the lower arm. Subjects localized the stimuli on a photograph of their own arm, which was presented on a tablet screen overlaying the real arm. Reproducibility was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the mean localizations of each electrode site and the slope and offset of regression models of the localizations, which represent scaling and displacement of perceptual maps relative to the stimulated sites. The ICCs of the mean localizations ranged from 0.68 to 0.93; the ICCs of the regression parameters were 0.88 for the intercept and 0.92 for the slope. These results indicate a high degree of reproducibility. We conclude that localization patterns of non-painful electrocutaneous stimuli on the arm are reproducible on subsequent days. Reproducibility is a necessary property of perceptual maps for these to reflect properties of a subject's internal body representations. Perceptual maps are therefore a promising method for studying body representations.

  10. The Metric of Colour Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    and found the MacAdam ellipses which are often interpreted as defining the metric tensor at their centres. An important question is whether it is possible to define colour coordinates such that the Euclidean distance in these coordinates correspond to human perception. Using cubic splines to represent......The space of colours is a fascinating space. It is a real vector space, but no matter what inner product you put on the space the resulting Euclidean distance does not correspond to human perception of difference between colours. In 1942 MacAdam performed the first experiments on colour matching...

  11. Product Operations Status Summary Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Atsuya; Toole, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The Product Operations Status Summary Metrics (POSSUM) computer program provides a readable view into the state of the Phoenix Operations Product Generation Subsystem (OPGS) data pipeline. POSSUM provides a user interface that can search the data store, collect product metadata, and display the results in an easily-readable layout. It was designed with flexibility in mind for support in future missions. Flexibility over various data store hierarchies is provided through the disk-searching facilities of Marsviewer. This is a proven program that has been in operational use since the first day of the Phoenix mission.

  12. Web metrics for library and information professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Stuart, David

    2014-01-01

    This is a practical guide to using web metrics to measure impact and demonstrate value. The web provides an opportunity to collect a host of different metrics, from those associated with social media accounts and websites to more traditional research outputs. This book is a clear guide for library and information professionals as to what web metrics are available and how to assess and use them to make informed decisions and demonstrate value. As individuals and organizations increasingly use the web in addition to traditional publishing avenues and formats, this book provides the tools to unlock web metrics and evaluate the impact of this content. The key topics covered include: bibliometrics, webometrics and web metrics; data collection tools; evaluating impact on the web; evaluating social media impact; investigating relationships between actors; exploring traditional publications in a new environment; web metrics and the web of data; the future of web metrics and the library and information professional.Th...

  13. [Natural head position's reproducibility on photographs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddo, Marie-Line; El Hayeck, Émilie; Hoyeck, Maha; Khoury, Élie; Ghoubril, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of natural head position with time on profile photographs. Our sample is composed of 96 students (20-30 years old) at the department of dentistry of Saint Joseph University in Beirut. Two profile photographs were taken in natural head position about a week apart. No significant differences were found between T0 and T1 (E = 1.065°). Many studies confirmed this reproducibility with time. Natural head position can be adopted as an orientation for profile photographs in orthodontics. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  14. Highly reproducible polyol synthesis for silver nanocubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hye Ji; Yu, Taekyung; Kim, Woo-Sik; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2017-07-01

    We could synthesize the Ag nanocubes highly reproducibly by conducting the polyol synthesis using HCl etchant in dark condition because the photodecomposition/photoreduction of AgCl nanoparticles formed at initial reaction stage were greatly depressed and consequently the selective self-nucleation of Ag single crystals and their selective growth reaction could be promoted. Whereas the reproducibility of the formation of Ag nanocubes were very poor when we synthesize the Ag nanocubes in light condition due to the photoreduction of AgCl to Ag.

  15. Reproducible statistical analysis with multiple languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenth, Russell; Højsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the system for making reproducible statistical analyses. differs from other systems for reproducible analysis in several ways. The two main differences are: (1) Several statistics programs can be in used in the same document. (2) Documents can be prepared using OpenOffice or ......Office or \\LaTeX. The main part of this paper is an example showing how to use and together in an OpenOffice text document. The paper also contains some practical considerations on the use of literate programming in statistics....

  16. Towards interoperable and reproducible QSAR analyses: Exchange of datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjuth, Ola; Willighagen, Egon L; Guha, Rajarshi; Eklund, Martin; Wikberg, Jarl Es

    2010-06-30

    QSAR is a widely used method to relate chemical structures to responses or properties based on experimental observations. Much effort has been made to evaluate and validate the statistical modeling in QSAR, but these analyses treat the dataset as fixed. An overlooked but highly important issue is the validation of the setup of the dataset, which comprises addition of chemical structures as well as selection of descriptors and software implementations prior to calculations. This process is hampered by the lack of standards and exchange formats in the field, making it virtually impossible to reproduce and validate analyses and drastically constrain collaborations and re-use of data. We present a step towards standardizing QSAR analyses by defining interoperable and reproducible QSAR datasets, consisting of an open XML format (QSAR-ML) which builds on an open and extensible descriptor ontology. The ontology provides an extensible way of uniquely defining descriptors for use in QSAR experiments, and the exchange format supports multiple versioned implementations of these descriptors. Hence, a dataset described by QSAR-ML makes its setup completely reproducible. We also provide a reference implementation as a set of plugins for Bioclipse which simplifies setup of QSAR datasets, and allows for exporting in QSAR-ML as well as old-fashioned CSV formats. The implementation facilitates addition of new descriptor implementations from locally installed software and remote Web services; the latter is demonstrated with REST and XMPP Web services. Standardized QSAR datasets open up new ways to store, query, and exchange data for subsequent analyses. QSAR-ML supports completely reproducible creation of datasets, solving the problems of defining which software components were used and their versions, and the descriptor ontology eliminates confusions regarding descriptors by defining them crisply. This makes is easy to join, extend, combine datasets and hence work collectively, but

  17. Towards interoperable and reproducible QSAR analyses: Exchange of datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spjuth Ola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background QSAR is a widely used method to relate chemical structures to responses or properties based on experimental observations. Much effort has been made to evaluate and validate the statistical modeling in QSAR, but these analyses treat the dataset as fixed. An overlooked but highly important issue is the validation of the setup of the dataset, which comprises addition of chemical structures as well as selection of descriptors and software implementations prior to calculations. This process is hampered by the lack of standards and exchange formats in the field, making it virtually impossible to reproduce and validate analyses and drastically constrain collaborations and re-use of data. Results We present a step towards standardizing QSAR analyses by defining interoperable and reproducible QSAR datasets, consisting of an open XML format (QSAR-ML which builds on an open and extensible descriptor ontology. The ontology provides an extensible way of uniquely defining descriptors for use in QSAR experiments, and the exchange format supports multiple versioned implementations of these descriptors. Hence, a dataset described by QSAR-ML makes its setup completely reproducible. We also provide a reference implementation as a set of plugins for Bioclipse which simplifies setup of QSAR datasets, and allows for exporting in QSAR-ML as well as old-fashioned CSV formats. The implementation facilitates addition of new descriptor implementations from locally installed software and remote Web services; the latter is demonstrated with REST and XMPP Web services. Conclusions Standardized QSAR datasets open up new ways to store, query, and exchange data for subsequent analyses. QSAR-ML supports completely reproducible creation of datasets, solving the problems of defining which software components were used and their versions, and the descriptor ontology eliminates confusions regarding descriptors by defining them crisply. This makes is easy to join

  18. Metrics for building performance assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koles, G.; Hitchcock, R.; Sherman, M.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents part of the work performed in phase I of a Laboratory Directors Research and Development (LDRD) funded project entitled Building Performance Assurances (BPA). The focus of the BPA effort is to transform the way buildings are built and operated in order to improve building performance by facilitating or providing tools, infrastructure, and information. The efforts described herein focus on the development of metrics with which to evaluate building performance and for which information and optimization tools need to be developed. The classes of building performance metrics reviewed are (1) Building Services (2) First Costs, (3) Operating Costs, (4) Maintenance Costs, and (5) Energy and Environmental Factors. The first category defines the direct benefits associated with buildings; the next three are different kinds of costs associated with providing those benefits; the last category includes concerns that are broader than direct costs and benefits to the building owner and building occupants. The level of detail of the various issues reflect the current state of knowledge in those scientific areas and the ability of the to determine that state of knowledge, rather than directly reflecting the importance of these issues; it intentionally does not specifically focus on energy issues. The report describes work in progress and is intended as a resource and can be used to indicate the areas needing more investigation. Other reports on BPA activities are also available.

  19. Assessment of precision and reproducibility of a new myograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepenbrock Siegfried

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological characteristics of muscle activity and the assessment of muscle strength represent important diagnostic information. There are many devices that measure muscle force in humans, but some require voluntary contractions, which are difficult to assess in weak or unconscious patients who are unable to complete a full range of voluntary force assessment tasks. Other devices, which obtain standard muscle contractions by electric stimulations, do not have the technology required to induce and measure reproducible valid contractions at the optimum muscle length. Methods In our study we used a newly developed diagnostic device which measures accurately the reproducibility and time-changed-variability of the muscle force in an individual muscle. A total of 500 in-vivo measurements of supra-maximal isometric single twitch contractions were carried out on the musculus adductor pollicis of 5 test subjects over 10 sessions, with ten repetitions per session. The same protocol was performed on 405 test subjects with two repetitions each to determine a reference-interval on healthy subjects. Results Using our test setting, we found a high reproducibility of the muscle contractions of each test subject. The precision of the measurements performed with our device was 98.74%. Only two consecutive measurements are needed in order to assess a real, representative individual value of muscle force. The mean value of the force of contraction was 9.51 N and the 95% reference interval was 4.77–14.25 N. Conclusion The new myograph is a highly reliable measuring device with which the adductor pollicis can be investigated at the optimum length. It has the potential to become a reliable and valid tool for diagnostic in the clinical setting and for monitoring neuromuscular diseases.

  20. Metrics Feedback Cycle: measuring and improving user engagement in gamified eLearning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Atkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the identification, design and implementation of a set of metrics of user engagement in a gamified eLearning application. The 'Metrics Feedback Cycle' (MFC is introduced as a formal process prescribing the iterative evaluation and improvement of application-wide engagement, using data collected from metrics as input to improve related engagement features. This framework was showcased using a gamified eLearning application as a case study. In this paper, we designed a prototype and tested it with thirty-six (N=36 students to validate the effectiveness of the MFC. The analysis and interpretation of metrics data shows that the gamification features had a positive effect on user engagement, and helped identify areas in which this could be improved. We conclude that the MFC has applications in gamified systems that seek to maximise engagement by iteratively evaluating implemented features against a set of evolving metrics.

  1. Reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of Gaussian priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaart, van der A.W.; Zanten, van J.H.; Clarke, B.; Ghosal, S.

    2008-01-01

    We review definitions and properties of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces attached to Gaussian variables and processes, with a view to applications in nonparametric Bayesian statistics using Gaussian priors. The rate of contraction of posterior distributions based on Gaussian priors can be described

  2. Reproducibility of the results in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaye, M.; Launay, J.P.; Thomas, A.

    1980-12-01

    This memorandum reports on the conclusions of the tests carried out in order to evaluate the reproducibility of ultrasonic tests made on welded joints. FRAMATOME have started a study to assess the dispersion of results afforded by the test line and to characterize its behaviour. The tests covered sensors and ultrasonic generators said to be identical to each other (same commercial batch) [fr

  3. Reproducibility in Computational Neuroscience Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Robert A.; Bulanova, Anna S.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Like all scientific research, computational neuroscience research must be reproducible. Big data science, including simulation research, cannot depend exclusively on journal articles as the method to provide the sharing and transparency required for reproducibility. Methods Ensuring model reproducibility requires the use of multiple standard software practices and tools, including version control, strong commenting and documentation, and code modularity. Results Building on these standard practices, model sharing sites and tools have been developed that fit into several categories: 1. standardized neural simulators, 2. shared computational resources, 3. declarative model descriptors, ontologies and standardized annotations; 4. model sharing repositories and sharing standards. Conclusion A number of complementary innovations have been proposed to enhance sharing, transparency and reproducibility. The individual user can be encouraged to make use of version control, commenting, documentation and modularity in development of models. The community can help by requiring model sharing as a condition of publication and funding. Significance Model management will become increasingly important as multiscale models become larger, more detailed and correspondingly more difficult to manage by any single investigator or single laboratory. Additional big data management complexity will come as the models become more useful in interpreting experiments, thus increasing the need to ensure clear alignment between modeling data, both parameters and results, and experiment. PMID:27046845

  4. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Hartgerink, Chris; Krijnen, Job; Nuijten, Michele B.; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; Wissink, Joeri; Zeelenberg, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  5. Reproducibility, Controllability, and Optimization of Lenr Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments.

  6. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

  7. Operator-based metric for nuclear operations automation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharias, G.L.; Miao, A.X.; Kalkan, A. [Charles River Analytics Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Continuing advances in real-time computational capabilities will support enhanced levels of smart automation and AI-based decision-aiding systems in the nuclear power plant (NPP) control room of the future. To support development of these aids, we describe in this paper a research tool, and more specifically, a quantitative metric, to assess the impact of proposed automation/aiding concepts in a manner that can account for a number of interlinked factors in the control room environment. In particular, we describe a cognitive operator/plant model that serves as a framework for integrating the operator`s information-processing capabilities with his procedural knowledge, to provide insight as to how situations are assessed by the operator, decisions made, procedures executed, and communications conducted. Our focus is on the situation assessment (SA) behavior of the operator, the development of a quantitative metric reflecting overall operator awareness, and the use of this metric in evaluating automation/aiding options. We describe the results of a model-based simulation of a selected emergency scenario, and metric-based evaluation of a range of contemplated NPP control room automation/aiding options. The results demonstrate the feasibility of model-based analysis of contemplated control room enhancements, and highlight the need for empirical validation.

  8. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  9. Validation, repeatability and reproducibility of a noninvasive instrument for measuring thoracic and lumbar curvature of the spine in the sagittal plane Validade, repetibilidade e reprodutibilidade de um instrumento não-invasivo para medição das curvaturas torácica e lombar da coluna vertebral no plano sagital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana O. Chaise

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The need for early identification of postural abnormalities without exposing patients to constant radiation has stimulated the development of instruments aiming to measure the spinal curvatures. OBJECTIVE: To verify the validity, repeatability and reproducibility of angular measures of sagittal curvatures of the spine obtained using an adapted arcometer, by comparing them with Cobb angles of the respective curvatures obtained by using X-rays. METHODS: 52 participants were submitted to two procedures designed to evaluate the thoracic and lumbar curvatures: (1 X-ray examination from which the Cobb angles (CA of both curvatures were obtained, and (2 measuring the angles with the arcometer (AA. Two evaluators collected the data using the arcometer, with the rods placed at T1, T12, L1 and L5 spinous processes levels in a way as to permit linear measurements which, with aid of trigonometry, supplied the AA. RESULTS: There was a very strong and significant correlation between AA and CA (r=0.94; pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A necessidade de identificação precoce de alterações posturais, sem expor as pessoas à radiação constante, tem estimulado a construção de instrumentos para medir as curvaturas da coluna vertebral. OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade, repetibilidade e reprodutibilidade dos ângulos das curvaturas sagitais da coluna vertebral, obtidos por meio de um arcômetro adaptado, comparando-os com os ângulos de Cobb (AC das respectivas curvaturas, obtidos por meio de exames radiográficos. MÉTODOS: Cinquenta e dois indivíduos foram submetidos a dois procedimentos destinados a avaliar as curvaturas torácica e lombar: (1 exame de raios-X, a partir do qual os AC de ambas as curvaturas foram obtidos e (2 medição dos ângulos das curvaturas com o arcômetro (AA. Dois avaliadores coletaram os dados usando o arcômetro com as hastes sobre os processos espinhosos T1, T12, L1 e L5, de modo a permitir medidas que, com auxílio de

  10. ITK: Enabling Reproducible Research and Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Michael McCormick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility verification is essential to the practice of the scientific method. Researchers report their findings, which are strengthened as other independent groups in the scientific community share similar outcomes. In the many scientific fields where software has become a fundamental tool for capturing and analyzing data, this requirement of reproducibility implies that reliable and comprehensive software platforms and tools should be made available to the scientific community. The tools will empower them and the public to verify, through practice, the reproducibility of observations that are reported in the scientific literature.Medical image analysis is one of the fields in which the use of computational resources, both software and hardware, are an essential platform for performing experimental work. In this arena, the introduction of the Insight Toolkit (ITK in 1999 has transformed the field and facilitates its progress by accelerating the rate at which algorithmic implementations are developed, tested, disseminated and improved. By building on the efficiency and quality of open source methodologies, ITK has provided the medical image community with an effective platform on which to build a daily workflow that incorporates the true scientific practices of reproducibility verification.This article describes the multiple tools, methodologies, and practices that the ITK community has adopted, refined, and followed during the past decade, in order to become one of the research communities with the most modern reproducibility verification infrastructure. For example, 207 contributors have created over 2400 unit tests that provide over 84% code line test coverage. The Insight Journal, an open publication journal associated with the toolkit, has seen over 360,000 publication downloads. The median normalized closeness centrality, a measure of knowledge flow, resulting from the distributed peer code review system was high, 0.46.

  11. In utero diffusion tensor imaging of the fetal brain: A reproducibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, András; Tuura, Ruth; Kellenberger, Christian; Scheer, Ianina

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the within-subject reproducibility of in utero diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics and the visibility of major white matter structures. Images for 30 fetuses (20-33. postmenstrual weeks, normal neurodevelopment: 6 cases, cerebral pathology: 24 cases) were acquired on 1.5 T or 3.0 T MRI. DTI with 15 diffusion-weighting directions was repeated three times for each case, TR/TE: 2200/63 ms, voxel size: 1 ∗ 1 mm, slice thickness: 3-5 mm, b-factor: 700 s/mm 2 . Reproducibility was evaluated from structure detectability, variability of DTI measures using the coefficient of variation (CV), image correlation and structural similarity across repeated scans for six selected structures. The effect of age, scanner type, presence of pathology was determined using Wilcoxon rank sum test. White matter structures were detectable in the following percentage of fetuses in at least two of the three repeated scans: corpus callosum genu 76%, splenium 64%, internal capsule, posterior limb 60%, brainstem fibers 40% and temporooccipital association pathways 60%. The mean CV of DTI metrics ranged between 3% and 14.6% and we measured higher reproducibility in fetuses with normal brain development. Head motion was negatively correlated with reproducibility, this effect was partially ameliorated by motion-correction algorithm using image registration. Structures on 3.0 T had higher variability both with- and without motion correction. Fetal DTI is reproducible for projection and commissural bundles during mid-gestation, however, in 16-30% of the cases, data were corrupted by artifacts, resulting in impaired detection of white matter structures. To achieve robust results for the quantitative analysis of diffusivity and anisotropy values, fetal-specific image processing is recommended and repeated DTI is needed to ensure the detectability of fiber pathways.

  12. Does systematic variation improve the reproducibility of animal experiments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, R.M.; Guenther, A.; Engqvist, L.; Schmoll, T.

    2013-01-01

    Reproducibility of results is a fundamental tenet of science. In this journal, Richter et al.1 tested whether systematic variation in experimental conditions (heterogenization) affects the reproducibility of results. Comparing this approach with the current standard of ensuring reproducibility

  13. Is There a Need for New Marketing Communications Performance Metrics for Social Media?

    OpenAIRE

    Töllinen, Aarne; Karjaluoto, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing communications. With recent advances in information and communications technology, especially in social collaboration technologies, both academics and practitioners rethink whether the existing marketing communications performance metrics are still valid in the changing communications landscape, or is it time to devise entirely new metrics for measuring mar...

  14. Comment on 'New ansatz for metric operator calculation in pseudo-Hermitian field theory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Benincasa, Gregorio; Jones, H. F.

    2009-01-01

    In a recent Brief Report by Shalaby, a new first-order perturbative calculation of the metric operator for an iφ 3 scalar field theory is given. It is claimed that the incorporation of derivative terms in the ansatz for the metric operator results in a local solution, in contrast to the nonlocal solution previously obtained by Bender, Brody, and Jones. Unfortunately, Shalaby's calculation is not valid because of sign errors.

  15. Common fixed point theorems for weakly compatible mappings in fuzzy metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Chauhan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to prove a common fixed point theorem for a pair of weakly compatible mappings in fuzzy metric space by using the (CLRg property. An example is also furnished which demonstrates the validity of our main result. As an application to our main result, we present a fixed point theorem for two finite families of self mappings in fuzzy metric space by using the notion of pairwise commuting. Our results improve the results of Sedghi, Shobe and Aliouche [A common fixed point theorem for weakly compatible mappings in fuzzy metric spaces, Gen. Math. 18(3 (2010, 3-12 MR2735558].

  16. Metric approach to quantum constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Hughston, Lane P; Gustavsson, Anna C T

    2009-01-01

    A framework for deriving equations of motion for constrained quantum systems is introduced and a procedure for its implementation is outlined. In special cases, the proposed new method, which takes advantage of the fact that the space of pure states in quantum mechanics has both a symplectic structure and a metric structure, reduces to a quantum analogue of the Dirac theory of constraints in classical mechanics. Explicit examples involving spin-1/2 particles are worked out in detail: in the first example, our approach coincides with a quantum version of the Dirac formalism, while the second example illustrates how a situation that cannot be treated by Dirac's approach can nevertheless be dealt with in the present scheme.

  17. Metrics for Business Process Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendling, Jan

    Up until now, there has been little research on why people introduce errors in real-world business process models. In a more general context, Simon [404] points to the limitations of cognitive capabilities and concludes that humans act rationally only to a certain extent. Concerning modeling errors, this argument would imply that human modelers lose track of the interrelations of large and complex models due to their limited cognitive capabilities and introduce errors that they would not insert in a small model. A recent study by Mendling et al. [275] explores in how far certain complexity metrics of business process models have the potential to serve as error determinants. The authors conclude that complexity indeed appears to have an impact on error probability. Before we can test such a hypothesis in a more general setting, we have to establish an understanding of how we can define determinants that drive error probability and how we can measure them.

  18. Neutron Damage Metrics and the Quantification of the Associated Uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The motivation for this work is the determination of a methodology for deriving and validating a reference metric that can be used to correlate radiation damage from neutrons of various energies and from charged particles with observed damage modes. Exposure functions for some damage modes are being used by the radiation effects community, e.g. 1-MeV-Equivalent damage in Si and in GaAs semiconductors as well as displacements per atom (dpa) and subsequent material embrittlement in iron. The limitations with the current treatment of these energy-dependent metrics include a lack of an associated covariance matrix and incomplete validation. In addition, the analytical approaches used to derive the current metrics fail to properly treat damage in compound/poly-atomic materials, the evolution and recombination of defects as a function of time since exposure, as well as the influence of dopant materials and impurities in the material of interest. The current metrics only provide a crude correlation with the damage modes of interest. They do not, typically, even distinguish between the damage effectiveness of different types of neutron-induced lattice defects, e.g. they fail to distinguish between a vacancy-oxygen defect and a divacancy with respect to the minority carrier lifetime and the decrease in gain in a Si bipolar transistor. The goal of this work is to facilitate the generation of more advanced radiation metrics that will provide an easier intercomparison of radiation damage as delivered from various types of test facilities and with various real-world nuclear applications. One first needs to properly define the scope of the radiation damage application that is a concern before an appropriate damage metric is selected. The fidelity of the metric selected and the range of environmental parameters under which the metric can be correlated with the damage should match the intended application. It should address the scope of real-world conditions where the metric will

  19. Active Metric Learning for Supervised Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaran, Krishnan; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Chang, Yutong; Li, Minhan; Takáč, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Clustering and classification critically rely on distance metrics that provide meaningful comparisons between data points. We present mixed-integer optimization approaches to find optimal distance metrics that generalize the Mahalanobis metric extensively studied in the literature. Additionally, we generalize and improve upon leading methods by removing reliance on pre-designated "target neighbors," "triplets," and "similarity pairs." Another salient feature of our method is its ability to en...

  20. On Nakhleh's metric for reduced phylogenetic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona, Gabriel; Llabrés, Mercè; Rosselló, Francesc; Valiente Feruglio, Gabriel Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    We prove that Nakhleh’s metric for reduced phylogenetic networks is also a metric on the classes of tree-child phylogenetic networks, semibinary tree-sibling time consistent phylogenetic networks, and multilabeled phylogenetic trees. We also prove that it separates distinguishable phylogenetic networks. In this way, it becomes the strongest dissimilarity measure for phylogenetic networks available so far. Furthermore, we propose a generalization of that metric that separates arbitrary phyl...

  1. Generalized tolerance sensitivity and DEA metric sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Neralić, Luka; E. Wendell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between Tolerance sensitivity analysis in optimization and metric sensitivity analysis in Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Herein, we extend the results on the generalized Tolerance framework proposed by Wendell and Chen and show how this framework includes DEA metric sensitivity as a special case. Further, we note how recent results in Tolerance sensitivity suggest some possible extensions of the results in DEA metric sensitivity.

  2. The definitive guide to IT service metrics

    CERN Document Server

    McWhirter, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Used just as they are, the metrics in this book will bring many benefits to both the IT department and the business as a whole. Details of the attributes of each metric are given, enabling you to make the right choices for your business. You may prefer and are encouraged to design and create your own metrics to bring even more value to your business - this book will show you how to do this, too.

  3. Generalized tolerance sensitivity and DEA metric sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Neralić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the relationship between Tolerance sensitivity analysis in optimization and metric sensitivity analysis in Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. Herein, we extend the results on the generalized Tolerance framework proposed by Wendell and Chen and show how this framework includes DEA metric sensitivity as a special case. Further, we note how recent results in Tolerance sensitivity suggest some possible extensions of the results in DEA metric sensitivity.

  4. Common Metrics for Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Aaron; Lewis, Michael; Fong, Terrence; Scholtz, Jean; Schultz, Alan; Kaber, David; Goodrich, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to identify common metrics for task-oriented human-robot interaction (HRI). We begin by discussing the need for a toolkit of HRI metrics. We then describe the framework of our work and identify important biasing factors that must be taken into consideration. Finally, we present suggested common metrics for standardization and a case study. Preparation of a larger, more detailed toolkit is in progress.

  5. Chaotic inflation with metric and matter perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, H.A.; Brandenberger, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    A perturbative scheme to analyze the evolution of both metric and scalar field perturbations in an expanding universe is developed. The scheme is applied to study chaotic inflation with initial metric and scalar field perturbations present. It is shown that initial gravitational perturbations with wavelength smaller than the Hubble radius rapidly decay. The metric simultaneously picks up small perturbations determined by the matter inhomogeneities. Both are frozen in once the wavelength exceeds the Hubble radius. (orig.)

  6. Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, Mauro

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity is discussed. I introduce a generalized approximate metric element, inclusive of both post-post-Newtonian contributions and a gravitomagnetic field. Following Fermat's principle and standard hypotheses, I derive the time delay function and deflection angle caused by an isolated mass distribution. Several astrophysical systems are considered. In most of the cases, the gravitomagnetic correction offers the best perspectives for an observational detection. Actual measurements distinguish only marginally different metric theories from each other

  7. Evaluation of mobile phone camera benchmarking using objective camera speed and image quality metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2014-11-01

    When a mobile phone camera is tested and benchmarked, the significance of image quality metrics is widely acknowledged. There are also existing methods to evaluate the camera speed. However, the speed or rapidity metrics of the mobile phone's camera system has not been used with the quality metrics even if the camera speed has become a more and more important camera performance feature. There are several tasks in this work. First, the most important image quality and speed-related metrics of a mobile phone's camera system are collected from the standards and papers and, also, novel speed metrics are identified. Second, combinations of the quality and speed metrics are validated using mobile phones on the market. The measurements are done toward application programming interface of different operating systems. Finally, the results are evaluated and conclusions are made. The paper defines a solution to combine different image quality and speed metrics to a single benchmarking score. A proposal of the combined benchmarking metric is evaluated using measurements of 25 mobile phone cameras on the market. The paper is a continuation of a previous benchmarking work expanded with visual noise measurement and updates of the latest mobile phone versions.

  8. Inter-examiner reproducibility of tests for lumbar motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkjaer Arne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies show a relation between reduced lumbar motor control (LMC and low back pain (LBP. However, test circumstances vary and during test performance, subjects may change position. In other words, the reliability - i.e. reproducibility and validity - of tests for LMC should be based on quantitative data. This has not been considered before. The aim was to analyse the reproducibility of five different quantitative tests for LMC commonly used in daily clinical practice. Methods The five tests for LMC were: repositioning (RPS, sitting forward lean (SFL, sitting knee extension (SKE, and bent knee fall out (BKFO, all measured in cm, and leg lowering (LL, measured in mm Hg. A total of 40 subjects (14 males, 26 females 25 with and 15 without LBP, with a mean age of 46.5 years (SD 14.8, were examined independently and in random order by two examiners on the same day. LBP subjects were recruited from three physiotherapy clinics with a connection to the clinic's gym or back-school. Non-LBP subjects were recruited from the clinic's staff acquaintances, and from patients without LBP. Results The means and standard deviations for each of the tests were 0.36 (0.27 cm for RPS, 1.01 (0.62 cm for SFL, 0.40 (0.29 cm for SKE, 1.07 (0.52 cm for BKFO, and 32.9 (7.1 mm Hg for LL. All five tests for LMC had reproducibility with the following ICCs: 0.90 for RPS, 0.96 for SFL, 0.96 for SKE, 0.94 for BKFO, and 0.98 for LL. Bland and Altman plots showed that most of the differences between examiners A and B were less than 0.20 cm. Conclusion These five tests for LMC displayed excellent reproducibility. However, the diagnostic accuracy of these tests needs to be addressed in larger cohorts of subjects, establishing values for the normal population. Also cut-points between subjects with and without LBP must be determined, taking into account age, level of activity, degree of impairment and participation in sports. Whether reproducibility of these

  9. About the possibility of a generalized metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Ladik, J.

    1991-10-01

    The metric (the structure of the space-time) may be dependent on the properties of the object measuring it. The case of size dependence of the metric was examined. For this dependence the simplest possible form of the metric tensor has been constructed which fulfils the following requirements: there be two extremal characteristic scales; the metric be unique and the usual between them; the change be sudden in the neighbourhood of these scales; the size of the human body appear as a parameter (postulated on the basis of some philosophical arguments). Estimates have been made for the two extremal length scales according to existing observations. (author) 19 refs

  10. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R.; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests

  11. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests.

  12. Reproducibility of the chamber scarification test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The chamber scarification test is a predictive human skin irritation test developed to rank the irritation potential of products and ingredients meant for repeated use on normal and diseased skin. 12 products or ingredients can be tested simultaneously on the forearm skin of each volunteer....... The test combines with the procedure scratching of the skin at each test site and subsequent closed patch tests with the products, repeated daily for 3 days. The test is performed on groups of human volunteers: a skin irritant substance or products is included in each test as a positive control...... high reproducibility of the test. Further, intra-individual variation in skin reaction to the 2 control products in 26 volunteers, who participated 2x, is shown, which supports the conclusion that the chamber scarification test is a useful short-term human skin irritation test with high reproducibility....

  13. Additive Manufacturing: Reproducibility of Metallic Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the properties of five different metals/alloys (Al-12Si, Cu-10Sn and 316L—face centered cubic structure, CoCrMo and commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti—hexagonal closed packed structure fabricated by selective laser melting. The room temperature tensile properties of Al-12Si samples show good consistency in results within the experimental errors. Similar reproducible results were observed for sliding wear and corrosion experiments. The other metal/alloy systems also show repeatable tensile properties, with the tensile curves overlapping until the yield point. The curves may then follow the same path or show a marginal deviation (~10 MPa until they reach the ultimate tensile strength and a negligible difference in ductility levels (of ~0.3% is observed between the samples. The results show that selective laser melting is a reliable fabrication method to produce metallic materials with consistent and reproducible properties.

  14. Evaluation of CMIP5 Ability to Reproduce 20th Century Regional Trends in Surface Air Temperature and Precipitation over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Waliser, D. E.; Lee, H.; Loikith, P. C.; Kunkel, K.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring temporal changes in key climate variables, such as surface air temperature and precipitation, is an integral part of the ongoing efforts of the United States National Climate Assessment (NCA). Climate models participating in CMIP5 provide future trends for four different emissions scenarios. In order to have confidence in the future projections of surface air temperature and precipitation, it is crucial to evaluate the ability of CMIP5 models to reproduce observed trends for three different time periods (1895-1939, 1940-1979, and 1980-2005). Towards this goal, trends in surface air temperature and precipitation obtained from the NOAA nClimGrid 5 km gridded station observation-based product are compared during all three time periods to the 206 CMIP5 historical simulations from 48 unique GCMs and their multi-model ensemble (MME) for NCA-defined climate regions during summer (JJA) and winter (DJF). This evaluation quantitatively examines the biases of simulated trends of the spatially averaged temperature and precipitation in the NCA climate regions. The CMIP5 MME reproduces historical surface air temperature trends for JJA for all time period and all regions, except the Northern Great Plains from 1895-1939 and Southeast during 1980-2005. Likewise, for DJF, the MME reproduces historical surface air temperature trends across all time periods over all regions except the Southeast from 1895-1939 and the Midwest during 1940-1979. The Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES), an analysis tool which supports the NCA by providing access to data and tools for regional climate model validation, facilitates the comparisons between the models and observation. The RCMES Toolkit is designed to assist in the analysis of climate variables and the procedure of the evaluation of climate projection models to support the decision-making processes. This tool is used in conjunction with the above analysis and results will be presented to demonstrate its capability to

  15. Reproducibility in cyclostratigraphy: initiating an intercomparison project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnesael, Matthias; De Vleeschouwer, David; Zeeden, Christian; Claeys, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The study of astronomical climate forcing and the application of cyclostratigraphy have experienced a spectacular growth over the last decades. In the field of cyclostratigraphy a broad range in methodological approaches exist. However, comparative study between the different approaches is lacking. Different cases demand different approaches, but with the growing importance of the field, questions arise about reproducibility, uncertainties and standardization of results. The radioisotopic dating community, in particular, has done far-reaching efforts to improve reproducibility and intercomparison of radioisotopic dates and their errors. To satisfy this need in cyclostratigraphy, we initiate a comparable framework for the community. The aims are to investigate and quantify reproducibility of, and uncertainties related to cyclostratigraphic studies and to provide a platform to discuss the merits and pitfalls of different methodologies, and their applicabilities. With this poster, we ask the feedback from the community on how to design this comparative framework in a useful, meaningful and productive manner. In parallel, we would like to discuss how reproducibility should be tested and what uncertainties should stand for in cyclostratigraphy. On the other hand, we intend to trigger interest for a cyclostratigraphic intercomparison project. This intercomparison project would imply the analysis of artificial and genuine geological records by individual researchers. All participants would be free to determine their method of choice. However, a handful of criterions will be required for an outcome to be comparable. The different results would be compared (e.g. during a workshop or a special session), and the lessons learned from the comparison could potentially be reported in a review paper. The aim of an intercomparison project is not to rank the different methods according to their merits, but to get insight into which specific methods are most suitable for which

  16. A how to guide to reproducible research

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Kirstie

    2018-01-01

    This talk will discuss the perceived and actual barriers experienced by researchers attempting to do reproducible research, and give practical guidance on how they can be overcome. It will include suggestions on how to make your code and data available and usable for others (including a strong suggestion to document both clearly so you don't have to reply to lots of email questions from future users). Specifically it will include a brief guide to version control, collaboration and disseminati...

  17. Systems Engineering Metrics: Organizational Complexity and Product Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mog, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    Innovative organizational complexity and product quality models applicable to performance metrics for NASA-MSFC's Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory (SAIL) missions and objectives are presented. An intensive research effort focuses on the synergistic combination of stochastic process modeling, nodal and spatial decomposition techniques, organizational and computational complexity, systems science and metrics, chaos, and proprietary statistical tools for accelerated risk assessment. This is followed by the development of a preliminary model, which is uniquely applicable and robust for quantitative purposes. Exercise of the preliminary model using a generic system hierarchy and the AXAF-I architectural hierarchy is provided. The Kendall test for positive dependence provides an initial verification and validation of the model. Finally, the research and development of the innovation is revisited, prior to peer review. This research and development effort results in near-term, measurable SAIL organizational and product quality methodologies, enhanced organizational risk assessment and evolutionary modeling results, and 91 improved statistical quantification of SAIL productivity interests.

  18. Growth Modeling of Human Mandibles using Non-Euclidean Metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Larsen, Rasmus; Wrobel, Mark

    2003-01-01

    From a set of 31 three-dimensional CT scans we model the temporal shape and size of the human mandible. Each anatomical structure is represented using 14851 semi-landmarks, and mapped into Procrustes tangent space. Exploratory subspace analyses are performed leading to linear models of mandible...... shape evolution in Procrustes space. The traditional variance analysis results in a one-dimensional growth model. However, working in a non-Euclidean metric results in a multimodal model with uncorrelated modes of biological variation. The applied non-Euclidean metric is governed by the correlation...... structure of the estimated noise in the data. The generative models are compared, and evaluated on the basis of a cross validation study. The new non-Euclidean analysis is completely data driven. It not only gives comparable results w.r.t. to previous studies of the mean modelling error, but in addition...

  19. Standing Together for Reproducibility in Large-Scale Computing: Report on reproducibility@XSEDE

    OpenAIRE

    James, Doug; Wilkins-Diehr, Nancy; Stodden, Victoria; Colbry, Dirk; Rosales, Carlos; Fahey, Mark; Shi, Justin; Silva, Rafael F.; Lee, Kyo; Roskies, Ralph; Loewe, Laurence; Lindsey, Susan; Kooper, Rob; Barba, Lorena; Bailey, David

    2014-01-01

    This is the final report on reproducibility@xsede, a one-day workshop held in conjunction with XSEDE14, the annual conference of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE). The workshop's discussion-oriented agenda focused on reproducibility in large-scale computational research. Two important themes capture the spirit of the workshop submissions and discussions: (1) organizational stakeholders, especially supercomputer centers, are in a unique position to promote, enab...

  20. METRIC TESTS CHARACTERISTIC FOR ESTIMATING JUMPING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toplica Stojanović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available With goal to establish metric tests characteristics for estimating jumping for volleyball players, it was organized a pilot research on pattern of 23 volleyball players from cadet team and 23 students from high-school. For needs of this research four tests are valid for estimation, jump in block with left and right leg and jump in spike with left and right leg. Each test has been taken three times, so that we could with test-re test method determine their reliability, and with factor analysis their validity. Data were processed by multivariate analysis (item analysis, factor analysis from statistical package „Statistica 6.0 for windows“. On the results of research and discussion we can say that the tests had high coefficient of reliability, as well as factor validity, and these tests can be used to estimate jumping for volleyball players.

  1. Enhancing Authentication Models Characteristic Metrics via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, we derive the universal characteristic metrics set for authentication models based on security, usability and design issues. We then compute the probability of the occurrence of each characteristic metrics in some single factor and multifactor authentication models in order to determine the effectiveness of these ...

  2. Gravitational Metric Tensor Exterior to Rotating Homogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The covariant and contravariant metric tensors exterior to a homogeneous spherical body rotating uniformly about a common φ axis with constant angular velocity ω is constructed. The constructed metric tensors in this gravitational field have seven non-zero distinct components.The Lagrangian for this gravitational field is ...

  3. Invariant metric for nonlinear symplectic maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we construct an invariant metric in the space of homogeneous polynomials of a given degree (≥ 3). The homogeneous polynomials specify a nonlinear symplectic map which in turn represents a Hamiltonian system. By minimizing the norm constructed out of this metric as a function of system parameters, we ...

  4. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...

  5. Fixed point theory in metric type spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi P; O’Regan, Donal; Roldán-López-de-Hierro, Antonio Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Written by a team of leading experts in the field, this volume presents a self-contained account of the theory, techniques and results in metric type spaces (in particular in G-metric spaces); that is, the text approaches this important area of fixed point analysis beginning from the basic ideas of metric space topology. The text is structured so that it leads the reader from preliminaries and historical notes on metric spaces (in particular G-metric spaces) and on mappings, to Banach type contraction theorems in metric type spaces, fixed point theory in partially ordered G-metric spaces, fixed point theory for expansive mappings in metric type spaces, generalizations, present results and techniques in a very general abstract setting and framework. Fixed point theory is one of the major research areas in nonlinear analysis. This is partly due to the fact that in many real world problems fixed point theory is the basic mathematical tool used to establish the existence of solutions to problems which arise natur...

  6. Metric solution of a spinning mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on a particular class of asymptotically flat and stationary metric solutions called the Kerr-Tomimatsu-Sato class are reviewed about its derivation and properties. For a further study, an almost complete list of the papers worked on the Tomimatsu-Sato metrics is given. (Auth.)

  7. On Information Metrics for Spatial Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bryan C; Pavão, Rodrigo; Belchior, Hindiael; Tort, Adriano B L

    2018-04-01

    The hippocampal formation is involved in navigation, and its neuronal activity exhibits a variety of spatial correlates (e.g., place cells, grid cells). The quantification of the information encoded by spikes has been standard procedure to identify which cells have spatial correlates. For place cells, most of the established metrics derive from Shannon's mutual information (Shannon, 1948), and convey information rate in bits/s or bits/spike (Skaggs et al., 1993, 1996). Despite their widespread use, the performance of these metrics in relation to the original mutual information metric has never been investigated. In this work, using simulated and real data, we find that the current information metrics correlate less with the accuracy of spatial decoding than the original mutual information metric. We also find that the top informative cells may differ among metrics, and show a surrogate-based normalization that yields comparable spatial information estimates. Since different information metrics may identify different neuronal populations, we discuss current and alternative definitions of spatially informative cells, which affect the metric choice. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Software Power Metric Model: An Implementation | Akwukwuma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and the execution time (TIME) in each case was recorded. We then obtain the application functions point count. Our result shows that the proposed metric is computable, consistent in its use of unit, and is programming language independent. Keywords: Software attributes, Software power, measurement, Software metric, ...

  9. Metrics for border management systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2009-07-01

    There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

  10. The metrics of science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Eliezer

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Geisler's far-reaching, unique book provides an encyclopedic compilation of the key metrics to measure and evaluate the impact of science and technology on academia, industry, and government. Focusing on such items as economic measures, patents, peer review, and other criteria, and supported by an extensive review of the literature, Dr. Geisler gives a thorough analysis of the strengths and weaknesses inherent in metric design, and in the use of the specific metrics he cites. His book has already received prepublication attention, and will prove especially valuable for academics in technology management, engineering, and science policy; industrial R&D executives and policymakers; government science and technology policymakers; and scientists and managers in government research and technology institutions. Geisler maintains that the application of metrics to evaluate science and technology at all levels illustrates the variety of tools we currently possess. Each metric has its own unique strengths and...

  11. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, Patrick J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonopoulos, Chrissi A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clements, Samuel L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gorrissen, Willy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kirkham, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ruiz, Kathleen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, Chris [APQC, Houston, TX (United States); Varney, Jeff [APQC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  12. Metrics for Polyphonic Sound Event Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Mesaros

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses various metrics proposed for evaluation of polyphonic sound event detection systems used in realistic situations where there are typically multiple sound sources active simultaneously. The system output in this case contains overlapping events, marked as multiple sounds detected as being active at the same time. The polyphonic system output requires a suitable procedure for evaluation against a reference. Metrics from neighboring fields such as speech recognition and speaker diarization can be used, but they need to be partially redefined to deal with the overlapping events. We present a review of the most common metrics in the field and the way they are adapted and interpreted in the polyphonic case. We discuss segment-based and event-based definitions of each metric and explain the consequences of instance-based and class-based averaging using a case study. In parallel, we provide a toolbox containing implementations of presented metrics.

  13. The Web system of visualization and analysis equipped with reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Saito, Kanji; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Youichi; Hayashi, Sachiko

    2005-01-01

    In the advanced photon experimental research, real-time visualization and steering system is thought as desirable method of data analysis. This approach is valid only in the fixed analysis at one time or in the easily reproducible experiment. But, in the research for an unknown problem like the advanced photon experimental research, it is necessary that the observation data can be analyzed many times because profitable analysis is difficult at the first time. Consequently, output data should be filed to refer and analyze at any time. To support the research, we need the followed automatic functions, transporting data files from data generator to data storage, analyzing data, tracking history of data handling, and so on. The supporting system will be integrated database system with several functional servers distributed on the network. (author)

  14. Quark/gluon jet discrimination: a reproducible analysis using R

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The power to discriminate between light-quark jets and gluon jets would have a huge impact on many searches for new physics at CERN and beyond. This talk will present a walk-through of the development of a prototype machine learning classifier for differentiating between quark and gluon jets at experiments like those at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A new fast feature selection method that combines information theory and graph analytics will be outlined. This method has found new variables that promise significant improvements in discrimination power. The prototype jet tagger is simple, interpretable, parsimonious, and computationally extremely cheap, and therefore might be suitable for use in trigger systems for real-time data processing. Nested stratified k-fold cross validation was used to generate robust estimates of model performance. The data analysis was performed entirely in the R statistical programming language, and is fully reproducible. The entire analysis workflow is data-driven, automated a...

  15. Towards Reproducible Research Data Analyses in LHC Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Simko, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    The reproducibility of the research data analysis requires having access not only to the original datasets, but also to the computing environment, the analysis software and the workflow used to produce the original results. We present the nascent CERN Analysis Preservation platform with a set of tools developed to support particle physics researchers in preserving the knowledge around analyses so that capturing, sharing, reusing and reinterpreting data becomes easier. The presentation will focus on three pillars: (i) capturing structured knowledge information about data analysis processes; (ii) capturing the computing environment, the software code, the datasets, the configuration and other information assets used in data analyses; (iii) re-instantiating of preserved analyses on a containerised computing cloud for the purposes of re-validation and re-interpretation.

  16. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease...... of application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...... clinicopathologic variables and immunohistochemical MMR protein expression. RESULTS: Female sex, age ≥60 years, proximal tumor location, expanding growth pattern, lack of dirty necrosis, mucinous differentiation and presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes significantly correlated with MMR deficiency. Presence...

  17. App Usage Factor: A Simple Metric to Compare the Population Impact of Mobile Medical Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Thomas Lorchan; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2015-08-19

    One factor when assessing the quality of mobile apps is quantifying the impact of a given app on a population. There is currently no metric which can be used to compare the population impact of a mobile app across different health care disciplines. The objective of this study is to create a novel metric to characterize the impact of a mobile app on a population. We developed the simple novel metric, app usage factor (AUF), defined as the logarithm of the product of the number of active users of a mobile app with the median number of daily uses of the app. The behavior of this metric was modeled using simulated modeling in Python, a general-purpose programming language. Three simulations were conducted to explore the temporal and numerical stability of our metric and a simulated app ecosystem model using a simulated dataset of 20,000 apps. Simulations confirmed the metric was stable between predicted usage limits and remained stable at extremes of these limits. Analysis of a simulated dataset of 20,000 apps calculated an average value for the app usage factor of 4.90 (SD 0.78). A temporal simulation showed that the metric remained stable over time and suitable limits for its use were identified. A key component when assessing app risk and potential harm is understanding the potential population impact of each mobile app. Our metric has many potential uses for a wide range of stakeholders in the app ecosystem, including users, regulators, developers, and health care professionals. Furthermore, this metric forms part of the overall estimate of risk and potential for harm or benefit posed by a mobile medical app. We identify the merits and limitations of this metric, as well as potential avenues for future validation and research.

  18. Convergence of macrostates under reproducible processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    I show that whenever a system undergoes a reproducible macroscopic process the mutual distinguishability of macrostates, as measured by their relative entropy, diminishes. This extends the second law which regards only ordinary entropies, and hence only the distinguishability between macrostates and one specific reference state (equidistribution). The new result holds regardless of whether the process is linear or nonlinear. Its proof hinges on the monotonicity of quantum relative entropy under arbitrary coarse grainings, even those that cannot be represented by trace-preserving completely positive maps.

  19. Open and reproducible global land use classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüst, Daniel; Václavík, Tomáš; Pross, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Researchers led by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental research (UFZ) developed a new world map of land use systems based on over 30 diverse indicators (http://geoportal.glues.geo.tu-dresden.de/stories/landsystemarchetypes.html) of land use intensity, climate and environmental and socioeconomic factors. They identified twelve land system archetypes (LSA) using a data-driven classification algorithm (self-organizing maps) to assess global impacts of land use on the environment, and found unexpected similarities across global regions. We present how the algorithm behind this analysis can be published as an executable web process using 52°North WPS4R (https://wiki.52north.org/bin/view/Geostatistics/WPS4R) within the GLUES project (http://modul-a.nachhaltiges-landmanagement.de/en/scientific-coordination-glues/). WPS4R is an open source collaboration platform for researchers, analysts and software developers to publish R scripts (http://www.r-project.org/) as a geo-enabled OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) process. The interoperable interface to call the geoprocess allows both reproducibility of the analysis and integration of user data without knowledge about web services or classification algorithms. The open platform allows everybody to replicate the analysis in their own environments. The LSA WPS process has several input parameters, which can be changed via a simple web interface. The input parameters are used to configure both the WPS environment and the LSA algorithm itself. The encapsulation as a web process allows integration of non-public datasets, while at the same time the publication requires a well-defined documentation of the analysis. We demonstrate this platform specifically to domain scientists and show how reproducibility and open source publication of analyses can be enhanced. We also discuss future extensions of the reproducible land use classification, such as the possibility for users to enter their own areas of interest to the system and

  20. Assessment of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: better reproducibility with polynomial analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, A. F.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Cleophas, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) data using values of arbitrarily separated day- and nighttime hours are poorly reproducible, undermining the validity of this diagnostic tool. Previous studies from our group have demonstrated that polynomial curves can be produced of ABPM data

  1. Accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID SLS-2 scanner in three-dimensional facial imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jesper Jared; Darvann, Tron Andre; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A prospective study was performed to test the accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID-SLS-2 scanner (SLS-2) [DAVID Vision Systems GmbH], compared to the validated 3dMDtrio scanner (3dMD) [3dMD, LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA]. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The accuracy of the SLS-2 was determined thro...

  2. Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project: Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Jeff; Policelli, Fritz; Fletcher, Rosea; Holecamp, Kara; Owen, Carolyn; Nicholson, Lamar; Dartez, Deanna

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project's verification,and validation process. The topics include: 1) What is Verification and Validation? 2) Why Verification and Validation? 3) Background; 4) ESE Data Purchas Validation Process; 5) Data Validation System and Ingest Queue; 6) Shipment Verification; 7) Tracking and Metrics; 8) Validation of Contract Specifications; 9) Earth Watch Data Validation; 10) Validation of Vertical Accuracy; and 11) Results of Vertical Accuracy Assessment.

  3. On the axisymmetric Lewis metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariel, J.; Marcilhacy, G.

    2001-03-01

    We obtain the general solution of the axisymmetric stationary vacuum spacetime of Lewis. After precising the fundamental hypothesis of Lewis, we demonstrate that the solution is related to an arbitrary harmonic function. Formally, these solutions are the same as for the corresponding cylindrically symmetric case, and can be classified in a similar way. Furthermore, the interpretation, in the cylindrically symmetric system, of the field equations as decribing the motion of a classical particle in a central force field is still valid. (author)

  4. Robustness Metrics: Consolidating the multiple approaches to quantify Robustness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göhler, Simon Moritz; Eifler, Tobias; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    robustness metrics; 3) Functional expectancy and dispersion robustness metrics; and 4) Probability of conformance robustness metrics. The goal was to give a comprehensive overview of robustness metrics and guidance to scholars and practitioners to understand the different types of robustness metrics...

  5. Partial rectangular metric spaces and fixed point theorems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Satish

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of partial rectangular metric spaces as a generalization of rectangular metric and partial metric spaces. Some properties of partial rectangular metric spaces and some fixed point results for quasitype contraction in partial rectangular metric spaces are proved. Some examples are given to illustrate the observed results.

  6. Towards Video Quality Metrics Based on Colour Fractal Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Noël

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vision is a complex process that integrates multiple aspects of an image: spatial frequencies, topology and colour. Unfortunately, so far, all these elements were independently took into consideration for the development of image and video quality metrics, therefore we propose an approach that blends together all of them. Our approach allows for the analysis of the complexity of colour images in the RGB colour space, based on the probabilistic algorithm for calculating the fractal dimension and lacunarity. Given that all the existing fractal approaches are defined only for gray-scale images, we extend them to the colour domain. We show how these two colour fractal features capture the multiple aspects that characterize the degradation of the video signal, based on the hypothesis that the quality degradation perceived by the user is directly proportional to the modification of the fractal complexity. We claim that the two colour fractal measures can objectively assess the quality of the video signal and they can be used as metrics for the user-perceived video quality degradation and we validated them through experimental results obtained for an MPEG-4 video streaming application; finally, the results are compared against the ones given by unanimously-accepted metrics and subjective tests.

  7. Measuring Information Security: Guidelines to Build Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Faber, Eberhard

    Measuring information security is a genuine interest of security managers. With metrics they can develop their security organization's visibility and standing within the enterprise or public authority as a whole. Organizations using information technology need to use security metrics. Despite the clear demands and advantages, security metrics are often poorly developed or ineffective parameters are collected and analysed. This paper describes best practices for the development of security metrics. First attention is drawn to motivation showing both requirements and benefits. The main body of this paper lists things which need to be observed (characteristic of metrics), things which can be measured (how measurements can be conducted) and steps for the development and implementation of metrics (procedures and planning). Analysis and communication is also key when using security metrics. Examples are also given in order to develop a better understanding. The author wants to resume, continue and develop the discussion about a topic which is or increasingly will be a critical factor of success for any security managers in larger organizations.

  8. Characterising risk - aggregated metrics: radiation and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, W.

    1998-01-01

    The characterisation of risk is an important phase in the risk assessment - risk management process. From the multitude of risk attributes a few have to be selected to obtain a risk characteristic or profile that is useful for risk management decisions and implementation of protective measures. One way to reduce the number of attributes is aggregation. In the field of radiation protection such an aggregated metric is firmly established: effective dose. For protection against environmental noise the Health Council of the Netherlands recently proposed a set of aggregated metrics for noise annoyance and sleep disturbance. The presentation will discuss similarities and differences between these two metrics and practical limitations. The effective dose has proven its usefulness in designing radiation protection measures, which are related to the level of risk associated with the radiation practice in question, given that implicit judgements on radiation induced health effects are accepted. However, as the metric does not take into account the nature of radiation practice, it is less useful in policy discussions on the benefits and harm of radiation practices. With respect to the noise exposure metric, only one effect is targeted (annoyance), and the differences between sources are explicitly taken into account. This should make the metric useful in policy discussions with respect to physical planning and siting problems. The metric proposed has only significance on a population level, and can not be used as a predictor for individual risk. (author)

  9. Energy functionals for Calabi-Yau metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headrick, M; Nassar, A

    2013-01-01

    We identify a set of ''energy'' functionals on the space of metrics in a given Kähler class on a Calabi-Yau manifold, which are bounded below and minimized uniquely on the Ricci-flat metric in that class. Using these functionals, we recast the problem of numerically solving the Einstein equation as an optimization problem. We apply this strategy, using the ''algebraic'' metrics (metrics for which the Kähler potential is given in terms of a polynomial in the projective coordinates), to the Fermat quartic and to a one-parameter family of quintics that includes the Fermat and conifold quintics. We show that this method yields approximations to the Ricci-flat metric that are exponentially accurate in the degree of the polynomial (except at the conifold point, where the convergence is polynomial), and therefore orders of magnitude more accurate than the balanced metrics, previously studied as approximations to the Ricci-flat metric. The method is relatively fast and easy to implement. On the theoretical side, we also show that the functionals can be used to give a heuristic proof of Yau's theorem

  10. Comparison of Employer Productivity Metrics to Lost Productivity Estimated by Commonly Used Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Bethany T; Dale, Ann Marie; Buckner-Petty, Skye; Van Dillen, Linda; Amick, Benjamin C; Evanoff, Bradley

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess construct and discriminant validity of four health-related work productivity loss questionnaires in relation to employer productivity metrics, and to describe variation in economic estimates of productivity loss provided by the questionnaires in healthy workers. Fifty-eight billing office workers completed surveys including health information and four productivity loss questionnaires. Employer productivity metrics and work hours were also obtained. Productivity loss questionnaires were weakly to moderately correlated with employer productivity metrics. Workers with more health complaints reported greater health-related productivity loss than healthier workers, but showed no loss on employer productivity metrics. Economic estimates of productivity loss showed wide variation among questionnaires, yet no loss of actual productivity. Additional studies are needed comparing questionnaires with objective measures in larger samples and other industries, to improve measurement methods for health-related productivity loss.

  11. Comparison of employer productivity metrics to lost productivity estimated by commonly used questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Bethany T.; Dale, Ann Marie; Buckner-Petty, Skye; Van Dillen, Linda; Amick, Benjamin C.; Evanoff, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess construct and discriminant validity of four health-related work productivity loss questionnaires in relation to employer productivity metrics, and to describe variation in economic estimates of productivity loss provided by the questionnaires in healthy workers. Methods 58 billing office workers completed surveys including health information and four productivity loss questionnaires. Employer productivity metrics and work hours were also obtained. Results Productivity loss questionnaires were weakly to moderately correlated with employer productivity metrics. Workers with more health complaints reported greater health-related productivity loss than healthier workers, but showed no loss on employer productivity metrics. Economic estimates of productivity loss showed wide variation among questionnaires, yet no loss of actual productivity. Conclusions Additional studies are needed comparing questionnaires with objective measures in larger samples and other industries, to improve measurement methods for health-related productivity loss. PMID:26849261

  12. A new metric method-improved structural holes researches on software networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Hai; Cai, Wei; Li, Dazhou; Li, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The scale software systems quickly increase with the rapid development of software technologies. Hence, how to understand, measure, manage and control software structure is a great challenge for software engineering. there are also many researches on software networks metrics: C&K, MOOD, McCabe and etc, the aim of this paper is to propose a new and better method to metric software networks. The metric method structural holes are firstly introduced to in this paper, which can not directly be applied as a result of modular characteristics on software network. Hence, structural holes is redefined in this paper and improved, calculation process and results are described in detail. The results shows that the new method can better reflect bridge role of vertexes on software network and there is a significant correlation between degree and improved structural holes. At last, a hydropower simulation system is taken as an example to show validity of the new metric method.

  13. Metrics Are Needed for Collaborative Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mohtashami

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for metrics for inter-organizational collaborative software development projects, encompassing management and technical concerns. In particular, metrics are needed that are aimed at the collaborative aspect itself, such as readiness for collaboration, the quality and/or the costs and benefits of collaboration in a specific ongoing project. We suggest questions and directions for such metrics, spanning the full lifespan of a collaborative project, from considering the suitability of collaboration through evaluating ongoing projects to final evaluation of the collaboration.

  14. Indefinite metric fields and the renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherry, T.N.

    1976-11-01

    The renormalization group equations are derived for the Green functions of an indefinite metric field theory. In these equations one retains the mass dependence of the coefficient functions, since in the indefinite metric theories the masses cannot be neglected. The behavior of the effective coupling constant in the asymptotic and infrared limits is analyzed. The analysis is illustrated by means of a simple model incorporating indefinite metric fields. The model scales at first order, and at this order also the effective coupling constant has both ultra-violet and infra-red fixed points, the former being the bare coupling constant

  15. Metric learning for DNA microarray data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Masao; Seto, Masao

    2009-01-01

    In many microarray studies, gene set selection is an important preliminary step for subsequent main task such as tumor classification, cancer subtype identification, etc. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using metric learning as an alternative to gene set selection. We develop a simple metric learning algorithm aiming to use it for microarray data analysis. Exploiting a property of the algorithm, we introduce a novel approach for extending the metric learning to be adaptive. We apply the algorithm to previously studied microarray data on malignant lymphoma subtype identification.

  16. Software metrics a rigorous and practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Fenton, Norman

    2014-01-01

    A Framework for Managing, Measuring, and Predicting Attributes of Software Development Products and ProcessesReflecting the immense progress in the development and use of software metrics in the past decades, Software Metrics: A Rigorous and Practical Approach, Third Edition provides an up-to-date, accessible, and comprehensive introduction to software metrics. Like its popular predecessors, this third edition discusses important issues, explains essential concepts, and offers new approaches for tackling long-standing problems.New to the Third EditionThis edition contains new material relevant

  17. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Influence of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction algorithms for measurement accuracy and reproducibility of pulmonary nodule volumetry: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Chang Min; Song, Yong Sub; Lee, Sang Min; Goo, Jin Mo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of radiation dose settings and reconstruction algorithms on the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of semi-automated pulmonary nodule volumetry. Materials and methods: CT scans were performed on a chest phantom containing various nodules (10 and 12 mm; +100, −630 and −800 HU) at 120 kVp with tube current–time settings of 10, 20, 50, and 100 mAs. Each CT was reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), iDose 4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Semi-automated volumetry was performed by two radiologists using commercial volumetry software for nodules at each CT dataset. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio of CT images were also obtained. The absolute percentage measurement errors and differences were then calculated for volume and mass. The influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on measurement accuracy, reproducibility and objective image quality metrics was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Measurement accuracy and reproducibility of nodule volume and mass were not significantly associated with CT radiation dose settings or reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.05). Objective image quality metrics of CT images were superior in IMR than in FBP or iDose 4 at all radiation dose settings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Semi-automated nodule volumetry can be applied to low- or ultralow-dose chest CT with usage of a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm without losing measurement accuracy and reproducibility

  19. Influence of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction algorithms for measurement accuracy and reproducibility of pulmonary nodule volumetry: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungjin, E-mail: khj.snuh@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min, E-mail: cmpark@radiol.snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yong Sub, E-mail: terasong@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min, E-mail: sangmin.lee.md@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo, E-mail: jmgoo@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of radiation dose settings and reconstruction algorithms on the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of semi-automated pulmonary nodule volumetry. Materials and methods: CT scans were performed on a chest phantom containing various nodules (10 and 12 mm; +100, −630 and −800 HU) at 120 kVp with tube current–time settings of 10, 20, 50, and 100 mAs. Each CT was reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), iDose{sup 4} and iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Semi-automated volumetry was performed by two radiologists using commercial volumetry software for nodules at each CT dataset. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio of CT images were also obtained. The absolute percentage measurement errors and differences were then calculated for volume and mass. The influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on measurement accuracy, reproducibility and objective image quality metrics was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Measurement accuracy and reproducibility of nodule volume and mass were not significantly associated with CT radiation dose settings or reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.05). Objective image quality metrics of CT images were superior in IMR than in FBP or iDose{sup 4} at all radiation dose settings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Semi-automated nodule volumetry can be applied to low- or ultralow-dose chest CT with usage of a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm without losing measurement accuracy and reproducibility.

  20. Influence of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction algorithms for measurement accuracy and reproducibility of pulmonary nodule volumetry: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Chang Min; Song, Yong Sub; Lee, Sang Min; Goo, Jin Mo

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of radiation dose settings and reconstruction algorithms on the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of semi-automated pulmonary nodule volumetry. CT scans were performed on a chest phantom containing various nodules (10 and 12mm; +100, -630 and -800HU) at 120kVp with tube current-time settings of 10, 20, 50, and 100mAs. Each CT was reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), iDose(4) and iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Semi-automated volumetry was performed by two radiologists using commercial volumetry software for nodules at each CT dataset. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio of CT images were also obtained. The absolute percentage measurement errors and differences were then calculated for volume and mass. The influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on measurement accuracy, reproducibility and objective image quality metrics was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Measurement accuracy and reproducibility of nodule volume and mass were not significantly associated with CT radiation dose settings or reconstruction algorithms (p>0.05). Objective image quality metrics of CT images were superior in IMR than in FBP or iDose(4) at all radiation dose settings (pvolumetry can be applied to low- or ultralow-dose chest CT with usage of a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm without losing measurement accuracy and reproducibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metrics, Media and Advertisers: Discussing Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio de Souza Rodrigues

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how Brazilian advertisers are adapting to new media and its attention metrics. In-depth interviews were conducted with advertisers in 2009 and 2011. In 2009, new media and its metrics were celebrated as innovations that would increase advertising campaigns overall efficiency. In 2011, this perception has changed: New media’s profusion of metrics, once seen as an advantage, started to compromise its ease of use and adoption. Among its findings, this study argues that there is an opportunity for media groups willing to shift from a product-focused strategy towards a customer-centric one, through the creation of new, simple and integrative metrics

  2. Networks and centroid metrics for understanding football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gonçalo Dias

    games. However, it seems that the centroid metric, supported only by the position of players in the field ...... the strategy adopted by the coach (Gama et al., 2014). ... centroid distance as measures of team's tactical performance in youth football.

  3. Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.

    2011-08-01

    Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

  4. Metric Guidelines Inservice and/or Preservice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Dolores

    1978-01-01

    Guidelines are given for designing teacher training for going metric. The guidelines were developed from existing guidelines, journal articles, a survey of colleges, and the detailed reactions of a panel. (MN)

  5. Science and Technology Metrics and Other Thoughts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harman, Wayne; Staton, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This report explores the subject of science and technology metrics and other topics to begin to provide Navy managers, as well as scientists and engineers, additional tools and concepts with which to...

  6. Using Activity Metrics for DEVS Simulation Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzy A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity metrics can be used to profile DEVS models before and during the simulation. It is critical to get good activity metrics of models before and during their simulation. Having a means to compute a-priori activity of components (analytic activity may be worth when simulating a model (or parts of it for the first time. After, during the simulation, analytic activity can be corrected using dynamic one. In this paper, we introduce McCabe cyclomatic complexity metric (MCA to compute analytic activity. Both static and simulation activity metrics have been implemented through a plug-in of the DEVSimPy (DEVS Simulator in Python language environment and applied to DEVS models.

  7. Evaluating and Estimating the WCET Criticality Metric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    a programmer (or compiler) from targeting optimizations the right way. A possible resort is to use a metric that targets WCET and which can be efficiently computed for all code parts of a program. Similar to dynamic profiling techniques, which execute code with input that is typically expected...... for the application, based on WCET analysis we can indicate how critical a code fragment is, in relation to the worst-case bound. Computing such a metric on top of static analysis, incurs a certain overhead though, which increases with the complexity of the underlying WCET analysis. We present our approach...... to estimate the Criticality metric, by relaxing the precision of WCET analysis. Through this, we can reduce analysis time by orders of magnitude, while only introducing minor error. To evaluate our estimation approach and share our garnered experience using the metric, we evaluate real-time programs, which...

  8. 16 CFR 1511.8 - Metric references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric references. 1511.8 Section 1511.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... parentheses for convenience and information only. ...

  9. Flight Crew State Monitoring Metrics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — eSky will develop specific crew state metrics based on the timeliness, tempo and accuracy of pilot inputs required by the H-mode Flight Control System (HFCS)....

  10. Supplier selection using different metric functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omosigho S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supplier selection is an important component of supply chain management in today’s global competitive environment. Hence, the evaluation and selection of suppliers have received considerable attention in the literature. Many attributes of suppliers, other than cost, are considered in the evaluation and selection process. Therefore, the process of evaluation and selection of suppliers is a multi-criteria decision making process. The methodology adopted to solve the supplier selection problem is intuitionistic fuzzy TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to the Ideal Solution. Generally, TOPSIS is based on the concept of minimum distance from the positive ideal solution and maximum distance from the negative ideal solution. We examine the deficiencies of using only one metric function in TOPSIS and propose the use of spherical metric function in addition to the commonly used metric functions. For empirical supplier selection problems, more than one metric function should be used.

  11. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickenig Georg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wrist blood pressure (BP devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP measurement methods: 1 office BP, 2 home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor, 3 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hunconventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have to be used cautious and with defined limitations, the use of validated devices with position sensor according to recently recommended measurement schedules might have the potential to be used for therapy monitoring.

  12. Classroom reconstruction of the Schwarzschild metric

    OpenAIRE

    Kassner, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    A promising way to introduce general relativity in the classroom is to study the physical implications of certain given metrics, such as the Schwarzschild one. This involves lower mathematical expenditure than an approach focusing on differential geometry in its full glory and permits to emphasize physical aspects before attacking the field equations. Even so, in terms of motivation, lacking justification of the metric employed may pose an obstacle. The paper discusses how to establish the we...

  13. Some observations on a fuzzy metric space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, V.

    2017-07-01

    Let $(X,d)$ be a metric space. In this paper we provide some observations about the fuzzy metric space in the sense of Kramosil and Michalek $(Y,N,/wedge)$, where $Y$ is the set of non-negative real numbers $[0,/infty[$ and $N(x,y,t)=1$ if $d(x,y)/leq t$ and $N(x,y,t)=0$ if $d(x,y)/geq t$. (Author)

  14. Area Regge calculus and discontinuous metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, Chris; Williams, Ruth M

    2004-01-01

    Taking the triangle areas as independent variables in the theory of Regge calculus can lead to ambiguities in the edge lengths, which can be interpreted as discontinuities in the metric. We construct solutions to area Regge calculus using a triangulated lattice and find that on a spacelike or timelike hypersurface no such discontinuity can arise. On a null hypersurface however, we can have such a situation and the resulting metric can be interpreted as a so-called refractive wave

  15. Localized Multi-Model Extremes Metrics for the Fourth National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T. R.; Kunkel, K.; Stevens, L. E.; Easterling, D. R.; Biard, J.; Sun, L.

    2017-12-01

    We have performed localized analysis of scenario-based datasets for the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4). These datasets include CMIP5-based Localized Constructed Analogs (LOCA) downscaled simulations at daily temporal resolution and 1/16th-degree spatial resolution. Over 45 temperature and precipitation extremes metrics have been processed using LOCA data, including threshold, percentile, and degree-days calculations. The localized analysis calculates trends in the temperature and precipitation extremes metrics for relatively small regions such as counties, metropolitan areas, climate zones, administrative areas, or economic zones. For NCA4, we are currently addressing metropolitan areas as defined by U.S. Census Bureau Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Such localized analysis provides essential information for adaptation planning at scales relevant to local planning agencies and businesses. Nearly 30 such regions have been analyzed to date. Each locale is defined by a closed polygon that is used to extract LOCA-based extremes metrics specific to the area. For each metric, single-model data at each LOCA grid location are first averaged over several 30-year historical and future periods. Then, for each metric, the spatial average across the region is calculated using model weights based on both model independence and reproducibility of current climate conditions. The range of single-model results is also captured on the same localized basis, and then combined with the weighted ensemble average for each region and each metric. For example, Boston-area cooling degree days and maximum daily temperature is shown below for RCP8.5 (red) and RCP4.5 (blue) scenarios. We also discuss inter-regional comparison of these metrics, as well as their relevance to risk analysis for adaptation planning.

  16. Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Citations in peer-reviewed articles and the impact factor are generally accepted measures of scientific impact. Web 2.0 tools such as Twitter, blogs or social bookmarking tools provide the possibility to construct innovative article-level or journal-level metrics to gauge impact and influence. However, the relationship of the these new metrics to traditional metrics such as citations is not known. Objective (1) To explore the feasibility of measuring social impact of and public attention to scholarly articles by analyzing buzz in social media, (2) to explore the dynamics, content, and timing of tweets relative to the publication of a scholarly article, and (3) to explore whether these metrics are sensitive and specific enough to predict highly cited articles. Methods Between July 2008 and November 2011, all tweets containing links to articles in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) were mined. For a subset of 1573 tweets about 55 articles published between issues 3/2009 and 2/2010, different metrics of social media impact were calculated and compared against subsequent citation data from Scopus and Google Scholar 17 to 29 months later. A heuristic to predict the top-cited articles in each issue through tweet metrics was validated. Results A total of 4208 tweets cited 286 distinct JMIR articles. The distribution of tweets over the first 30 days after article publication followed a power law (Zipf, Bradford, or Pareto distribution), with most tweets sent on the day when an article was published (1458/3318, 43.94% of all tweets in a 60-day period) or on the following day (528/3318, 15.9%), followed by a rapid decay. The Pearson correlations between tweetations and citations were moderate and statistically significant, with correlation coefficients ranging from .42 to .72 for the log-transformed Google Scholar citations, but were less clear for Scopus citations and rank correlations. A linear multivariate model with time and tweets as significant

  17. Relaxed metrics and indistinguishability operators: the relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.

    2017-07-01

    In 1982, the notion of indistinguishability operator was introduced by E. Trillas in order to fuzzify the crisp notion of equivalence relation (/cite{Trillas}). In the study of such a class of operators, an outstanding property must be pointed out. Concretely, there exists a duality relationship between indistinguishability operators and metrics. The aforesaid relationship was deeply studied by several authors that introduced a few techniques to generate metrics from indistinguishability operators and vice-versa (see, for instance, /cite{BaetsMesiar,BaetsMesiar2}). In the last years a new generalization of the metric notion has been introduced in the literature with the purpose of developing mathematical tools for quantitative models in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence (/cite{BKMatthews,Ma}). The aforementioned generalized metrics are known as relaxed metrics. The main target of this talk is to present a study of the duality relationship between indistinguishability operators and relaxed metrics in such a way that the aforementioned classical techniques to generate both concepts, one from the other, can be extended to the new framework. (Author)

  18. Validation Process Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, John E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); English, Christine M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gesick, Joshua C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mukkamala, Saikrishna [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-04

    This report documents the validation process as applied to projects awarded through Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) within the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (DOE-BETO). It describes the procedures used to protect and verify project data, as well as the systematic framework used to evaluate and track performance metrics throughout the life of the project. This report also describes the procedures used to validate the proposed process design, cost data, analysis methodologies, and supporting documentation provided by the recipients.

  19. Baby universe metric equivalent to an interior black-hole metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the maximally extended metric corresponding to a large wormhole is the unique possible wormhole metric whose baby universe sector is conformally equivalent ot the maximal inextendible Kruskal metric corresponding to the interior region of a Schwarzschild black hole whose gravitational radius is half the wormhole neck radius. The physical implications of this result in the black hole evaporation process are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Numerical optimization of alignment reproducibility for customizable surgical guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Thomas; Valstar, Edward; Eisemann, Elmar

    2015-10-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery aims at minimizing invasiveness, postoperative pain, and morbidity with computer-assisted preoperative planning and intra-operative guidance techniques, of which camera-based navigation and patient-specific templates (PST) are the most common. PSTs are one-time templates that guide the surgeon initially in cutting slits or drilling holes. This method can be extended to reusable and customizable surgical guides (CSG), which can be adapted to the patients' bone. Determining the right set of CSG input parameters by hand is a challenging task, given the vast amount of input parameter combinations and the complex physical interaction between the PST/CSG and the bone. This paper introduces a novel algorithm to solve the problem of choosing the right set of input parameters. Our approach predicts how well a CSG instance is able to reproduce the planned alignment based on a physical simulation and uses a genetic optimization algorithm to determine optimal configurations. We validate our technique with a prototype of a pin-based CSG and nine rapid prototyped distal femora. The proposed optimization technique has been compared to manual optimization by experts, as well as participants with domain experience. Using the optimization technique, the alignment errors remained within practical boundaries of 1.2 mm translation and [Formula: see text] rotation error. In all cases, the proposed method outperformed manual optimization. Manually optimizing CSG parameters turns out to be a counterintuitive task. Even after training, subjects with and without anatomical background fail in choosing appropriate CSG configurations. Our optimization algorithm ensures that the CSG is configured correctly, and we could demonstrate that the intended alignment of the CSG is accurately reproduced on all tested bone geometries.

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Bridget; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT), a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). Prospective repeated-measure design. Outpatient clinics. Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI (N=43; age range, 19-82y). People with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability, including systematic differences using paired t tests, test retest using intraclass correlation coefficient model 1,1 (ICC 1,1 ), and internal consistency using Cronbach α. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement. BrAT. Test-retest reliability was excellent (ICC 1,1 =.90-.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach α=.90-.98). Measurement error was relatively low (standard error of measurement range, 3.1-8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3, and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ±4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reproducibility of morphometric X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culton, N.; Pocock, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Morphometric X-ray absorptiometry (MXA) using DXA is potentially a useful clinical tool which may provide additional vertebral fracture information with low radiation exposure. While morphometric analysis is semi-automated, operator intervention is crucial for the accurate positioning of the six data points quantifying the vertebral heights at the anterior, middle and posterior positions. Our study evaluated intra-operator reproducibility of MXA in an elderly patient population and assessed the effect of training and experience on vertebral height precision. Ten patients, with a mean lumbar T score of - 2.07, were studied. Images were processed by a trained operator who had initially only limited morphometric experience. The analysis of the data files were repeated at 2 and 6 weeks, during which time the operator had obtained further experience and training. The intra-operator precision of vertebral height measurements was calculated using the three separate combinations of paired analyses, and expressed as the coefficient of variation. This study confirms the importance of adequate training and attention to detail in MXA analysis. The data indicate that the precision of MXA is adequate for its use in the diagnosis of vertebral fractures, based on a 20% deformity criteria. Use of MXA for monitoring would require approximately an 8% change in vertebral heights to achieve statistical significance

  3. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  4. Modeling reproducibility of porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Bao, J.; Oostrom, M.; Battiato, I.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-phase flow in porous media is widely encountered in geological systems. Understanding immiscible fluid displacement is crucial for processes including, but not limited to, CO2 sequestration, non-aqueous phase liquid contamination and oil recovery. Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  5. Environment and industrial economy: Challenge of reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rullani, E.

    1992-01-01

    Historically and methodologically counterposed until now, the environmentalist and the economic approach to environmental problems need to be integrated in a new approach that considers, from one side, the relevance of the ecological equilibria for the economic systems and, from the other side, the economic dimension (in terms of investments and transformations in the production system) of any attempt to achieve a better environment. In order to achieve this integration, both approaches are compelled to give up some cultural habits that have characterized them, and have contributed to over-emphasize the opposition between them. The article shows that both approaches can converge into a new one, in which environment is no longer only an holistic, not bargainable, natural external limit to human activity (as in the environmentalist approach), nor simply a scarce and exhaustible resource (as economics tends to consider it); environment should instead become part of the reproducibility sphere, or, in other words, it must be regarded as part of the output that the economic system provides. This new approach, due to scientific and technological advances, is made possible for an increasing class of environmental problems. In order to do this, an evolution is required, that could be able to convert environmental goals into investment and technological innovation goals, and communicate to the firms the value society assigns to environmental resources. This value, the author suggests, should correspond to the reproduction cost. Various examples of this new approach are analyzed and discussed

  6. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. → The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. → Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. → f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy

  7. Automated ensemble assembly and validation of microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The continued democratization of DNA sequencing has sparked a new wave of development of genome assembly and assembly validation methods. As individual research labs, rather than centralized centers, begin to sequence the majority of new genomes, it is important to establish best practices for genome assembly. However, recent evaluations such as GAGE and the Assemblathon have concluded that there is no single best approach to genome assembly. Instead, it is preferable to generate multiple assemblies and validate them to determine which is most useful for the desired analysis; this is a labor-intensive process that is often impossible or unfeasible. Results To encourage best practices supported by the community, we present iMetAMOS, an automated ensemble assembly pipeline; iMetAMOS encapsulates the process of running, validating, and selecting a single assembly from multiple assemblies. iMetAMOS packages several leading open-source tools into a single binary that automates parameter selection and execution of multiple assemblers, scores the resulting assemblies based on multiple validation metrics, and annotates the assemblies for genes and contaminants. We demonstrate the utility of the ensemble process on 225 previously unassembled Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes as well as a Rhodobacter sphaeroides benchmark dataset. On these real data, iMetAMOS reliably produces validated assemblies and identifies potential contamination without user intervention. In addition, intelligent parameter selection produces assemblies of R. sphaeroides comparable to or exceeding the quality of those from the GAGE-B evaluation, affecting the relative ranking of some assemblers. Conclusions Ensemble assembly with iMetAMOS provides users with multiple, validated assemblies for each genome. Although computationally limited to small or mid-sized genomes, this approach is the most effective and reproducible means for generating high-quality assemblies and enables users to

  8. Liquid scintigraphic gastric emptying - is it reproducible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.G.; Shuter, B.; Leach, M.; Roach, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Radioisotope gastric emptying (GE) studies have been used as a non-invasive technique for motility assessment for many years. In a recent study investigating the correlation of mesenteric vascular changes with GE, six subjects had a repeat study 2-4 months later. Repeat studies were required due to minor technical problems (5 subjects) and a very slow GE (I subject) on the original study. Subjects drank 275 ml of 'Ensure Plus' mixed with 8 MBq 67 Ga-DTPA and were imaged for 2 h while lying supine. GE time-activity curves for each subject were generated and time to half emptying (T l/2 ) calculated. Five of the six subjects had more rapid GE on the second study. Three of the subjects had T l/2 values on their second study which were within ± 15 min of their original T l/2 . The other three subjects had T l/2 values on their second study which were 36 min, 55 min and 280 min (subject K.H.) less than their original T l/2 . Statistical analysis (t-test) was performed on paired T l/2 values. The average T l/2 value was greater in the first study than in the second (149 ± 121 and 86 ± 18 min respectively), although the difference was not statistically significant (P ∼ 0.1). Subjects' anxiety levels were not quantitated during the GE study; however, several major equipment faults occurred during the original study of subject K.H., who became visibly stressed. These results suggest that the reproducibility of GE studies may be influenced by psychological factors

  9. Enhanced Data Representation by Kernel Metric Learning for Dementia Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cárdenas-Peña

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the kind of dementia that affects the most people around the world. Therefore, an early identification supporting effective treatments is required to increase the life quality of a wide number of patients. Recently, computer-aided diagnosis tools for dementia using Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans have been successfully proposed to discriminate between patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment, and healthy controls. Most of the attention has been given to the clinical data, provided by initiatives as the ADNI, supporting reliable researches on intervention, prevention, and treatments of AD. Therefore, there is a need for improving the performance of classification machines. In this paper, we propose a kernel framework for learning metrics that enhances conventional machines and supports the diagnosis of dementia. Our framework aims at building discriminative spaces through the maximization of center kernel alignment function, aiming at improving the discrimination of the three considered neurological classes. The proposed metric learning performance is evaluated on the widely-known ADNI database using three supervised classification machines (k-nn, SVM and NNs for multi-class and bi-class scenarios from structural MRIs. Specifically, from ADNI collection 286 AD patients, 379 MCI patients and 231 healthy controls are used for development and validation of our proposed metric learning framework. For the experimental validation, we split the data into two subsets: 30% of subjects used like a blindfolded assessment and 70% employed for parameter tuning. Then, in the preprocessing stage, each structural MRI scan a total of 310 morphological measurements are automatically extracted from by FreeSurfer software package and concatenated to build an input feature matrix. Obtained test performance results, show that including a supervised metric learning improves the compared baseline classifiers in both scenarios. In the multi

  10. Evaluation metrics for biostatistical and epidemiological collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Doris McGartland; Del Junco, Deborah J; Bhore, Rafia; Lindsell, Christopher J; Oster, Robert A; Wittkowski, Knut M; Welty, Leah J; Li, Yi-Ju; Demets, Dave

    2011-10-15

    Increasing demands for evidence-based medicine and for the translation of biomedical research into individual and public health benefit have been accompanied by the proliferation of special units that offer expertise in biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design (BERD) within academic health centers. Objective metrics that can be used to evaluate, track, and improve the performance of these BERD units are critical to their successful establishment and sustainable future. To develop a set of reliable but versatile metrics that can be adapted easily to different environments and evolving needs, we consulted with members of BERD units from the consortium of academic health centers funded by the Clinical and Translational Science Award Program of the National Institutes of Health. Through a systematic process of consensus building and document drafting, we formulated metrics that covered the three identified domains of BERD practices: the development and maintenance of collaborations with clinical and translational science investigators, the application of BERD-related methods to clinical and translational research, and the discovery of novel BERD-related methodologies. In this article, we describe the set of metrics and advocate their use for evaluating BERD practices. The routine application, comparison of findings across diverse BERD units, and ongoing refinement of the metrics will identify trends, facilitate meaningful changes, and ultimately enhance the contribution of BERD activities to biomedical research. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Metric on Phylogenetic Tree Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colijn, C; Plazzotta, G

    2018-01-01

    The shapes of evolutionary trees are influenced by the nature of the evolutionary process but comparisons of trees from different processes are hindered by the challenge of completely describing tree shape. We present a full characterization of the shapes of rooted branching trees in a form that lends itself to natural tree comparisons. We use this characterization to define a metric, in the sense of a true distance function, on tree shapes. The metric distinguishes trees from random models known to produce different tree shapes. It separates trees derived from tropical versus USA influenza A sequences, which reflect the differing epidemiology of tropical and seasonal flu. We describe several metrics based on the same core characterization, and illustrate how to extend the metric to incorporate trees' branch lengths or other features such as overall imbalance. Our approach allows us to construct addition and multiplication on trees, and to create a convex metric on tree shapes which formally allows computation of average tree shapes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  12. Future of the PCI Readmission Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Jason H; Yeh, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    Between 2013 and 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the National Cardiovascular Data Registry publically reported risk-adjusted 30-day readmission rates after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a pilot project. A key strength of this public reporting effort included risk adjustment with clinical rather than administrative data. Furthermore, because readmission after PCI is common, expensive, and preventable, this metric has substantial potential to improve quality and value in American cardiology care. Despite this, concerns about the metric exist. For example, few PCI readmissions are caused by procedural complications, limiting the extent to which improved procedural technique can reduce readmissions. Also, similar to other readmission measures, PCI readmission is associated with socioeconomic status and race. Accordingly, the metric may unfairly penalize hospitals that care for underserved patients. Perhaps in the context of these limitations, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has not yet included PCI readmission among metrics that determine Medicare financial penalties. Nevertheless, provider organizations may still wish to focus on this metric to improve value for cardiology patients. PCI readmission is associated with low-risk chest discomfort and patient anxiety. Therefore, patient education, improved triage mechanisms, and improved care coordination offer opportunities to minimize PCI readmissions. Because PCI readmission is common and costly, reducing PCI readmission offers provider organizations a compelling target to improve the quality of care, and also performance in contracts involve shared financial risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. g-Weak Contraction in Ordered Cone Rectangular Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove some common fixed-point theorems for the ordered g-weak contractions in cone rectangular metric spaces without assuming the normality of cone. Our results generalize some recent results from cone metric and cone rectangular metric spaces into ordered cone rectangular metric spaces. Examples are provided which illustrate the results.

  14. Defining a Progress Metric for CERT RMM Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    REV-03.18.2016.0 Defining a Progress Metric for CERT-RMM Improvement Gregory Crabb Nader Mehravari David Tobar September 2017 TECHNICAL ...fendable resource allocation decisions. Technical metrics measure aspects of controls implemented through technology (systems, soft- ware, hardware...implementation metric would be the percentage of users who have received anti-phishing training . • Effectiveness/efficiency metrics measure whether

  15. NASA education briefs for the classroom. Metrics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of metric measurement in space is summarized for classroom use. Advantages of the metric system over the English measurement system are described. Some common metric units are defined, as are special units for astronomical study. International system unit prefixes and a conversion table of metric/English units are presented. Questions and activities for the classroom are recommended.

  16. SOCIAL METRICS APPLIED TO SMART TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cervantes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a strategy to make productive use of semantically-related social data, from a user-centered semantic network, in order to help users (tourists and citizens in general to discover cultural heritage, points of interest and available services in a smart city. This data can be used to personalize recommendations in a smart tourism application. Our approach is based on flow centrality metrics typically used in social network analysis: flow betweenness, flow closeness and eccentricity. These metrics are useful to discover relevant nodes within the network yielding nodes that can be interpreted as suggestions (venues or services to users. We describe the semantic network built on graph model, as well as social metrics algorithms used to produce recommendations. We also present challenges and results from a prototypical implementation applied to the case study of the City of Puebla, Mexico.

  17. Landscape pattern metrics and regional assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, R. V.; Riitters, K.H.; Wickham, J.D.; Jones, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    The combination of remote imagery data, geographic information systems software, and landscape ecology theory provides a unique basis for monitoring and assessing large-scale ecological systems. The unique feature of the work has been the need to develop and interpret quantitative measures of spatial pattern-the landscape indices. This article reviews what is known about the statistical properties of these pattern metrics and suggests some additional metrics based on island biogeography, percolation theory, hierarchy theory, and economic geography. Assessment applications of this approach have required interpreting the pattern metrics in terms of specific environmental endpoints, such as wildlife and water quality, and research into how to represent synergystic effects of many overlapping sources of stress.

  18. A bi-metric theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1975-01-01

    The bi-metric theory of gravitation proposed previously is simplified in that the auxiliary conditions are discarded, the two metric tensors being tied together only by means of the boundary conditions. Some of the properties of the field of a particle are investigated; there is no black hole, and it appears that no gravitational collapse can take place. Although the proposed theory and general relativity are at present observationally indistinguishable, some differences are pointed out which may some day be susceptible of observation. An alternative bi-metric theory is considered which gives for the precession of the perihelion 5/6 of the value given by general relativity; it seems less satisfactory than the present theory from the aesthetic point of view. (author)

  19. Steiner trees for fixed orientation metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazil, Marcus; Zachariasen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing Steiner minimum trees for a metric defined by a polygonal unit circle (corresponding to s = 2 weighted legal orientations in the plane). A linear-time algorithm to enumerate all angle configurations for degree three Steiner points is given. We provide...... a simple proof that the angle configuration for a Steiner point extends to all Steiner points in a full Steiner minimum tree, such that at most six orientations suffice for edges in a full Steiner minimum tree. We show that the concept of canonical forms originally introduced for the uniform orientation...... metric generalises to the fixed orientation metric. Finally, we give an O(s n) time algorithm to compute a Steiner minimum tree for a given full Steiner topology with n terminal leaves....

  20. Metrical and dynamical aspects in complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The central theme of this reference book is the metric geometry of complex analysis in several variables. Bridging a gap in the current literature, the text focuses on the fine behavior of the Kobayashi metric of complex manifolds and its relationships to dynamical systems, hyperbolicity in the sense of Gromov and operator theory, all very active areas of research. The modern points of view expressed in these notes, collected here for the first time, will be of interest to academics working in the fields of several complex variables and metric geometry. The different topics are treated coherently and include expository presentations of the relevant tools, techniques and objects, which will be particularly useful for graduate and PhD students specializing in the area.

  1. Social Metrics Applied to Smart Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, O.; Gutiérrez, E.; Gutiérrez, F.; Sánchez, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a strategy to make productive use of semantically-related social data, from a user-centered semantic network, in order to help users (tourists and citizens in general) to discover cultural heritage, points of interest and available services in a smart city. This data can be used to personalize recommendations in a smart tourism application. Our approach is based on flow centrality metrics typically used in social network analysis: flow betweenness, flow closeness and eccentricity. These metrics are useful to discover relevant nodes within the network yielding nodes that can be interpreted as suggestions (venues or services) to users. We describe the semantic network built on graph model, as well as social metrics algorithms used to produce recommendations. We also present challenges and results from a prototypical implementation applied to the case study of the City of Puebla, Mexico.

  2. Metric Learning for Hyperspectral Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Brian D.; Thompson, David R.; Gilmore, Martha S.; Castano, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    We present a metric learning approach to improve the performance of unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation. Unsupervised spatial segmentation can assist both user visualization and automatic recognition of surface features. Analysts can use spatially-continuous segments to decrease noise levels and/or localize feature boundaries. However, existing segmentation methods use tasks-agnostic measures of similarity. Here we learn task-specific similarity measures from training data, improving segment fidelity to classes of interest. Multiclass Linear Discriminate Analysis produces a linear transform that optimally separates a labeled set of training classes. The defines a distance metric that generalized to a new scenes, enabling graph-based segmentation that emphasizes key spectral features. We describe tests based on data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) in which learned metrics improve segment homogeneity with respect to mineralogical classes.

  3. Kerr metric in the deSitter background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to the Kerr metric with cosmological constant Λ several other metrics are presented giving a Kerr-like solution of Einstein's equations in the background of deSitter universe. A new metric of what may be termed as rotating deSitter space-time devoid of matter but containing null fluid with twisting null rays, has been presented. This metric reduces to the standard deSitter metric when the twist in the rays vanishes. Kerr metric in this background is the immediate generalization of Schwarzschild's exterior metric with cosmological constant. (author)

  4. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M A; Fink, D; Hua, Q; Jacobsen, G E; Lawson, E M; Smith, A M; Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  5. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Lawson, E. M.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  6. A neural coding scheme reproducing foraging trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Esther D.; Cabrera, Juan Luis

    2015-12-01

    The movement of many animals may follow Lévy patterns. The underlying generating neuronal dynamics of such a behavior is unknown. In this paper we show that a novel discovery of multifractality in winnerless competition (WLC) systems reveals a potential encoding mechanism that is translatable into two dimensional superdiffusive Lévy movements. The validity of our approach is tested on a conductance based neuronal model showing WLC and through the extraction of Lévy flights inducing fractals from recordings of rat hippocampus during open field foraging. Further insights are gained analyzing mice motor cortex neurons and non motor cell signals. The proposed mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the neuro-dynamical fundamentals of spatial searching patterns observed in animals (including humans) and illustrates an until now unknown way to encode information in neuronal temporal series.

  7. Concordance-based Kendall's Correlation for Computationally-Light vs. Computationally-Heavy Centrality Metrics: Lower Bound for Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We identify three different levels of correlation (pair-wise relative ordering, network-wide ranking and linear regression that could be assessed between a computationally-light centrality metric and a computationally-heavy centrality metric for real-world networks. The Kendall's concordance-based correlation measure could be used to quantitatively assess how well we could consider the relative ordering of two vertices vi and vj with respect to a computationally-light centrality metric as the relative ordering of the same two vertices with respect to a computationally-heavy centrality metric. We hypothesize that the pair-wise relative ordering (concordance-based assessment of the correlation between centrality metrics is the most strictest of all the three levels of correlation and claim that the Kendall's concordance-based correlation coefficient will be lower than the correlation coefficient observed with the more relaxed levels of correlation measures (linear regression-based Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient and the network wide ranking-based Spearman's correlation coefficient. We validate our hypothesis by evaluating the three correlation coefficients between two sets of centrality metrics: the computationally-light degree and local clustering coefficient complement-based degree centrality metrics and the computationally-heavy eigenvector centrality, betweenness centrality and closeness centrality metrics for a diverse collection of 50 real-world networks.

  8. A Kepler Workflow Tool for Reproducible AMBER GPU Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purawat, Shweta; Ieong, Pek U; Malmstrom, Robert D; Chan, Garrett J; Yeung, Alan K; Walker, Ross C; Altintas, Ilkay; Amaro, Rommie E

    2017-06-20

    With the drive toward high throughput molecular dynamics (MD) simulations involving ever-greater numbers of simulation replicates run for longer, biologically relevant timescales (microseconds), the need for improved computational methods that facilitate fully automated MD workflows gains more importance. Here we report the development of an automated workflow tool to perform AMBER GPU MD simulations. Our workflow tool capitalizes on the capabilities of the Kepler platform to deliver a flexible, intuitive, and user-friendly environment and the AMBER GPU code for a robust and high-performance simulation engine. Additionally, the workflow tool reduces user input time by automating repetitive processes and facilitates access to GPU clusters, whose high-performance processing power makes simulations of large numerical scale possible. The presented workflow tool facilitates the management and deployment of large sets of MD simulations on heterogeneous computing resources. The workflow tool also performs systematic analysis on the simulation outputs and enhances simulation reproducibility, execution scalability, and MD method development including benchmarking and validation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Active Metric Learning from Relative Comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Sicheng; Rosales, Rómer; Pei, Yuanli; Fern, Xiaoli Z.

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on active learning of distance metrics from relative comparison information. A relative comparison specifies, for a data point triplet $(x_i,x_j,x_k)$, that instance $x_i$ is more similar to $x_j$ than to $x_k$. Such constraints, when available, have been shown to be useful toward defining appropriate distance metrics. In real-world applications, acquiring constraints often require considerable human effort. This motivates us to study how to select and query the most useful ...

  10. Heuristic extension of the Schwarzschild metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Schwarzschild solution of Einstein's equations of gravitation has several singularities. It is known that the singularity at r = 2Gm/c 2 is only apparent, a result of the coordinates in which the solution was found. Paradoxical results occuring near the singularity show the system of coordinates is incomplete. We introduce a simple, two-dimensional metric with an apparent singularity that makes it incomplete. By a straightforward, heuristic procedure we extend and complete this simple metric. We then use the same procedure to give a heuristic derivation of the Kruskal system of coordinates, which is known to extend the Schwarzschild manifold past its apparent singularity and produce a complete manifold

  11. Jacobi-Maupertuis metric and Kepler equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sumanto; Gibbons, Gary William; Guha, Partha

    This paper studies the application of the Jacobi-Eisenhart lift, Jacobi metric and Maupertuis transformation to the Kepler system. We start by reviewing fundamentals and the Jacobi metric. Then we study various ways to apply the lift to Kepler-related systems: first as conformal description and Bohlin transformation of Hooke’s oscillator, second in contact geometry and third in Houri’s transformation [T. Houri, Liouville integrability of Hamiltonian systems and spacetime symmetry (2016), www.geocities.jp/football_physician/publication.html], coupled with Milnor’s construction [J. Milnor, On the geometry of the Kepler problem, Am. Math. Mon. 90 (1983) 353-365] with eccentric anomaly.

  12. In vivo evaluation of inter-operator reproducibility of digital dental and conventional impression techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Kamimura

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inter-operator reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D images of teeth captured by a digital impression technique to a conventional impression technique in vivo.Twelve participants with complete natural dentition were included in this study. A digital impression of the mandibular molars of these participants was made by two operators with different levels of clinical experience, 3 or 16 years, using an intra-oral scanner (Lava COS, 3M ESPE. A silicone impression also was made by the same operators using the double mix impression technique (Imprint3, 3M ESPE. Stereolithography (STL data were directly exported from the Lava COS system, while STL data of a plaster model made from silicone impression were captured by a three-dimensional (3D laboratory scanner (D810, 3shape. The STL datasets recorded by two different operators were compared using 3D evaluation software and superimposed using the best-fit-algorithm method (least-squares method, PolyWorks, InnovMetric Software for each impression technique. Inter-operator reproducibility as evaluated by average discrepancies of corresponding 3D data was compared between the two techniques (Wilcoxon signed-rank test.The visual inspection of superimposed datasets revealed that discrepancies between repeated digital impression were smaller than observed with silicone impression. Confirmation was forthcoming from statistical analysis revealing significantly smaller average inter-operator reproducibility using a digital impression technique (0.014± 0.02 mm than when using a conventional impression technique (0.023 ± 0.01 mm.The results of this in vivo study suggest that inter-operator reproducibility with a digital impression technique may be better than that of a conventional impression technique and is independent of the clinical experience of the operator.

  13. In vivo evaluation of inter-operator reproducibility of digital dental and conventional impression techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Emi; Tanaka, Shinpei; Takaba, Masayuki; Tachi, Keita; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inter-operator reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D) images of teeth captured by a digital impression technique to a conventional impression technique in vivo. Materials and methods Twelve participants with complete natural dentition were included in this study. A digital impression of the mandibular molars of these participants was made by two operators with different levels of clinical experience, 3 or 16 years, using an intra-oral scanner (Lava COS, 3M ESPE). A silicone impression also was made by the same operators using the double mix impression technique (Imprint3, 3M ESPE). Stereolithography (STL) data were directly exported from the Lava COS system, while STL data of a plaster model made from silicone impression were captured by a three-dimensional (3D) laboratory scanner (D810, 3shape). The STL datasets recorded by two different operators were compared using 3D evaluation software and superimposed using the best-fit-algorithm method (least-squares method, PolyWorks, InnovMetric Software) for each impression technique. Inter-operator reproducibility as evaluated by average discrepancies of corresponding 3D data was compared between the two techniques (Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Results The visual inspection of superimposed datasets revealed that discrepancies between repeated digital impression were smaller than observed with silicone impression. Confirmation was forthcoming from statistical analysis revealing significantly smaller average inter-operator reproducibility using a digital impression technique (0.014± 0.02 mm) than when using a conventional impression technique (0.023 ± 0.01 mm). Conclusion The results of this in vivo study suggest that inter-operator reproducibility with a digital impression technique may be better than that of a conventional impression technique and is independent of the clinical experience of the operator. PMID:28636642

  14. Guidelines for Reproducibly Building and Simulating Systems Biology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, J Kyle; Goldberg, Arthur P; Karr, Jonathan R

    2016-10-01

    Reproducibility is the cornerstone of the scientific method. However, currently, many systems biology models cannot easily be reproduced. This paper presents methods that address this problem. We analyzed the recent Mycoplasma genitalium whole-cell (WC) model to determine the requirements for reproducible modeling. We determined that reproducible modeling requires both repeatable model building and repeatable simulation. New standards and simulation software tools are needed to enhance and verify the reproducibility of modeling. New standards are needed to explicitly document every data source and assumption, and new deterministic parallel simulation tools are needed to quickly simulate large, complex models. We anticipate that these new standards and software will enable researchers to reproducibly build and simulate more complex models, including WC models.

  15. A lighting metric for quantitative evaluation of accent lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acholo, Cyril O.; Connor, Kenneth A.; Radke, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    Accent lighting is critical for artwork and sculpture lighting in museums, and subject lighting for stage, Film and television. The research problem of designing effective lighting in such settings has been revived recently with the rise of light-emitting-diode-based solid state lighting. In this work, we propose an easy-to-apply quantitative measure of the scene's visual quality as perceived by human viewers. We consider a well-accent-lit scene as one which maximizes the information about the scene (in an information-theoretic sense) available to the user. We propose a metric based on the entropy of the distribution of colors, which are extracted from an image of the scene from the viewer's perspective. We demonstrate that optimizing the metric as a function of illumination configuration (i.e., position, orientation, and spectral composition) results in natural, pleasing accent lighting. We use a photorealistic simulation tool to validate the functionality of our proposed approach, showing its successful application to two- and three-dimensional scenes.

  16. Optical nano artifact metrics using silicon random nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Nishio, Shumpei; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Tate, Naoya; Naruse, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Nano-artifact metrics exploit unique physical attributes of nanostructured matter for authentication and clone resistance, which is vitally important in the age of Internet-of-Things where securing identities is critical. However, expensive and huge experimental apparatuses, such as scanning electron microscopy, have been required in the former studies. Herein, we demonstrate an optical approach to characterise the nanoscale-precision signatures of silicon random structures towards realising low-cost and high-value information security technology. Unique and versatile silicon nanostructures are generated via resist collapse phenomena, which contains dimensions that are well below the diffraction limit of light. We exploit the nanoscale precision ability of confocal laser microscopy in the height dimension; our experimental results demonstrate that the vertical precision of measurement is essential in satisfying the performances required for artifact metrics. Furthermore, by using state-of-the-art nanostructuring technology, we experimentally fabricate clones from the genuine devices. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the genuine and clone devices are successfully exploited, showing that the liveness-detection-type approach, which is widely deployed in biometrics, is valid in artificially-constructed solid-state nanostructures. These findings pave the way for reasonable and yet sufficiently secure novel principles for information security based on silicon random nanostructures and optical technologies.

  17. Quantitative properties of the Schwarzschild metric

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 2018, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-10 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : exterior and interior Schwarzschild metric * proper radius * coordinate radius Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics http://astro.shu-bg.net/pasb/index_files/Papers/2018/SCHWARZ8.pdf

  18. Strong Ideal Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  19. lakemorpho: Calculating lake morphometry metrics in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Jeffrey; Stachelek, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Metrics describing the shape and size of lakes, known as lake morphometry metrics, are important for any limnological study. In cases where a lake has long been the subject of study these data are often already collected and are openly available. Many other lakes have these data collected, but access is challenging as it is often stored on individual computers (or worse, in filing cabinets) and is available only to the primary investigators. The vast majority of lakes fall into a third category in which the data are not available. This makes broad scale modelling of lake ecology a challenge as some of the key information about in-lake processes are unavailable. While this valuable in situ information may be difficult to obtain, several national datasets exist that may be used to model and estimate lake morphometry. In particular, digital elevation models and hydrography have been shown to be predictive of several lake morphometry metrics. The R package lakemorpho has been developed to utilize these data and estimate the following morphometry metrics: surface area, shoreline length, major axis length, minor axis length, major and minor axis length ratio, shoreline development, maximum depth, mean depth, volume, maximum lake length, mean lake width, maximum lake width, and fetch. In this software tool article we describe the motivation behind developing lakemorpho , discuss the implementation in R, and describe the use of lakemorpho with an example of a typical use case.

  20. Contraction theorems in fuzzy metric space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnoosh, R.; Aghajani, A.; Azhdari, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the results on fuzzy contractive mapping proposed by Dorel Mihet will be proved for B-contraction and C-contraction in the case of George and Veeramani fuzzy metric space. The existence of fixed point with weaker conditions will be proved; that is, instead of the convergence of subsequence, p-convergence of subsequence is used.

  1. Inferring feature relevances from metric learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander; Mokbel, Bassam; Biehl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Powerful metric learning algorithms have been proposed in the last years which do not only greatly enhance the accuracy of distance-based classifiers and nearest neighbor database retrieval, but which also enable the interpretability of these operations by assigning explicit relevance weights...

  2. DIGITAL MARKETING: SUCCESS METRICS, FUTURE TRENDS

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    Abstract – Business Marketing is one of the prospective which has been tremendously affected by digital world in last few years. Digital marketing refers to doing advertising through digital channels. This paper provides detailed study of metrics to measure success of digital marketing platform and glimpse of future of technologies by 2020.

  3. Assessing Software Quality Through Visualised Cohesion Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Shih

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Cohesion is one of the most important factors for software quality as well as maintainability, reliability and reusability. Module cohesion is defined as a quality attribute that seeks for measuring the singleness of the purpose of a module. The module of poor quality can be a serious obstacle to the system quality. In order to design a good software quality, software managers and engineers need to introduce cohesion metrics to measure and produce desirable software. A highly cohesion software is thought to be a desirable constructing. In this paper, we propose a function-oriented cohesion metrics based on the analysis of live variables, live span and the visualization of processing element dependency graph. We give six typical cohesion examples to be measured as our experiments and justification. Therefore, a well-defined, well-normalized, well-visualized and well-experimented cohesion metrics is proposed to indicate and thus enhance software cohesion strength. Furthermore, this cohesion metrics can be easily incorporated with software CASE tool to help software engineers to improve software quality.

  4. Metric propositional neighborhood logics on natural numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Della Monica, Dario; Goranko, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Metric Propositional Neighborhood Logic (MPNL) over natural numbers. MPNL features two modalities referring, respectively, to an interval that is “met by” the current one and to an interval that “meets” the current one, plus an infinite set of length constraints, regarded as atomic propositions...

  5. Calabi–Yau metrics and string compactification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yau proved an existence theorem for Ricci-flat Kähler metrics in the 1970s, but we still have no closed form expressions for them. Nevertheless there are several ways to get approximate expressions, both numerical and analytical. We survey some of this work and explain how it can be used to obtain physical predictions from superstring theory.

  6. Goedel-type metrics in various dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerses, Metin; Karasu, Atalay; Sarioglu, Oezguer

    2005-01-01

    Goedel-type metrics are introduced and used in producing charged dust solutions in various dimensions. The key ingredient is a (D - 1)-dimensional Riemannian geometry which is then employed in constructing solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations with a dust distribution in D dimensions. The only essential field equation in the procedure turns out to be the source-free Maxwell's equation in the relevant background. Similarly the geodesics of this type of metric are described by the Lorentz force equation for a charged particle in the lower dimensional geometry. It is explicitly shown with several examples that Goedel-type metrics can be used in obtaining exact solutions to various supergravity theories and in constructing spacetimes that contain both closed timelike and closed null curves and that contain neither of these. Among the solutions that can be established using non-flat backgrounds, such as the Tangherlini metrics in (D - 1)-dimensions, there exists a class which can be interpreted as describing black-hole-type objects in a Goedel-like universe

  7. Strong Statistical Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Şençimen, Celaleddin; Pehlivan, Serpil

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the concepts of strongly statistically convergent sequence and strong statistically Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong statistical limit points and the strong statistical cluster points of a sequence in this space and investigate the relations between these concepts.

  8. Language Games: University Responses to Ranking Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Troy A.; Heffernan, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    League tables of universities that measure performance in various ways are now commonplace, with numerous bodies providing their own rankings of how institutions throughout the world are seen to be performing on a range of metrics. This paper uses Lyotard's notion of language games to theorise that universities are regaining some power over being…

  9. A new universal colour image fidelity metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Lucassen, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    We extend a recently introduced universal grayscale image quality index to a newly developed perceptually decorrelated colour space. The resulting colour image fidelity metric quantifies the distortion of a processed colour image relative to its original version. We evaluated the new colour image

  10. Standardised metrics for global surgical surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Thomas G; Makary, Martin A; Haynes, Alex B; Dziekan, Gerald; Berry, William R; Gawande, Atul A

    2009-09-26

    Public health surveillance relies on standardised metrics to evaluate disease burden and health system performance. Such metrics have not been developed for surgical services despite increasing volume, substantial cost, and high rates of death and disability associated with surgery. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives initiative of WHO's Patient Safety Programme has developed standardised public health metrics for surgical care that are applicable worldwide. We assembled an international panel of experts to develop and define metrics for measuring the magnitude and effect of surgical care in a population, while taking into account economic feasibility and practicability. This panel recommended six measures for assessing surgical services at a national level: number of operating rooms, number of operations, number of accredited surgeons, number of accredited anaesthesia professionals, day-of-surgery death ratio, and postoperative in-hospital death ratio. We assessed the feasibility of gathering such statistics at eight diverse hospitals in eight countries and incorporated them into the WHO Guidelines for Safe Surgery, in which methods for data collection, analysis, and reporting are outlined.

  11. A Lagrangian-dependent metric space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Tahir, A.

    1989-08-01

    A generalized Lagrangian-dependent metric of the static isotropic spacetime is derived. Its behaviour should be governed by imposing physical constraints allowing to avert the pathological features of gravity at the strong field domain. This would restrict the choice of the Lagrangian form. (author). 10 refs

  12. Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  13. Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-10-01

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  14. Genetic basis of a cognitive complexity metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansell, Narelle K; Halford, Graeme S; Andrews, Glenda; Shum, David H K; Harris, Sarah E; Davies, Gail; Franic, Sanja; Christoforou, Andrea; Zietsch, Brendan; Painter, Jodie; Medland, Sarah E; Ehli, Erik A; Davies, Gareth E; Steen, Vidar M; Lundervold, Astri J; Reinvang, Ivar; Montgomery, Grant W; Espeseth, Thomas; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Starr, John M; Martin, Nicholas G; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Boomsma, Dorret I; Deary, Ian J; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Relational complexity (RC) is a metric reflecting capacity limitation in relational processing. It plays a crucial role in higher cognitive processes and is an endophenotype for several disorders. However, the genetic underpinnings of complex relational processing have not been investigated. Using

  15. Genetic Basis of a Cognitive Complexity Metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansell, N.K.; Halford, G.S.; Andrews, G.; Shum, D.H.K.; Harris, S.E.; Davies, G.; Franic, S.; Christoforou, A.; Zietsch, B.; Painter, J.; Medland, S.E.; Ehli, E.A.; Davies, G.E.; Steen, V.M.; Lundervold, A.J.; Reinvang, I.; Montgomery, G.W.; Espeseth, T.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Starr, J.M.; Martin, N.G.; Le Hellard, S.; Boomsma, D.I.; Deary, I.J.; Wright, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Relational complexity (RC) is a metric reflecting capacity limitation in relational processing. It plays a crucial role in higher cognitive processes and is an endophenotype for several disorders. However, the genetic underpinnings of complex relational processing have not been investigated. Using

  16. Business model metrics : An open repository

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkila, M.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.; Heikkila, J.; Solaimani, S.; Janssen, W.

    2015-01-01

    Development of successful business models has become a necessity in turbulent business environments, but compared to research on business modeling tools, attention to the role of metrics in designing business models in literature is limited. Building on existing approaches to business models and

  17. Software quality metrics aggregation in industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mordal, K.; Anquetil, N.; Laval, J.; Serebrenik, A.; Vasilescu, B.N.; Ducasse, S.

    2013-01-01

    With the growing need for quality assessment of entire software systems in the industry, new issues are emerging. First, because most software quality metrics are defined at the level of individual software components, there is a need for aggregation methods to summarize the results at the system

  18. Invariance group of the Finster metric function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asanov, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    An invariance group of the Finsler metric function is introduced and studied that directly generalized the respective concept (a group of Euclidean rolations) of the Rieman geometry. A sequential description of the isotopic invariance of physical fields on the base of the Finsler geometry is possible in terms of this group

  19. Sigma Routing Metric for RPL Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sanmartin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the adaptation of a specific metric for the RPL protocol in the objective function MRHOF. Among the functions standardized by IETF, we find OF0, which is based on the minimum hop count, as well as MRHOF, which is based on the Expected Transmission Count (ETX. However, when the network becomes denser or the number of nodes increases, both OF0 and MRHOF introduce long hops, which can generate a bottleneck that restricts the network. The adaptation is proposed to optimize both OFs through a new routing metric. To solve the above problem, the metrics of the minimum number of hops and the ETX are combined by designing a new routing metric called SIGMA-ETX, in which the best route is calculated using the standard deviation of ETX values between each node, as opposed to working with the ETX average along the route. This method ensures a better routing performance in dense sensor networks. The simulations are done through the Cooja simulator, based on the Contiki operating system. The simulations showed that the proposed optimization outperforms at a high margin in both OF0 and MRHOF, in terms of network latency, packet delivery ratio, lifetime, and power consumption.

  20. Participant Nonnaiveté and the reproducibility of cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, Rolf A; Pecher, Diane; Paolacci, Gabriele; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Verkoeijen, Peter; Dijkstra, Katinka; Zeelenberg, René

    2017-07-25

    Many argue that there is a reproducibility crisis in psychology. We investigated nine well-known effects from the cognitive psychology literature-three each from the domains of perception/action, memory, and language, respectively-and found that they are highly reproducible. Not only can they be reproduced in online environments, but they also can be reproduced with nonnaïve participants with no reduction of effect size. Apparently, some cognitive tasks are so constraining that they encapsulate behavior from external influences, such as testing situation and prior recent experience with the experiment to yield highly robust effects.