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Sample records for valence change oxide

  1. Effect of Oxidation Degree on Valence Change and Distribution of Octahedral Fe Element in Biotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ziqian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the valence change and distribution of iron elements in octahedral vacancies of biotite were studied in the oxidation process. The biotite and saturated barium nitrate solution were mixed in dilute hydrochloric acid under hydrothermal reaction conditions, the solid after reaction was used as the test sample. Firstly, the remainder potassium and iron content were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS. Secondly, the state of iron along with oxidation degree increased was analyzed, in addition, the phase composition and the change of layer spacing in samples was detected by X-ray diffraction(XRD. Thirdly, The variation mode of Si-O bond were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR.This research was adopted hydrogen ions in diluted hydrochloric acid and nitrate ions in barium nitrate to provide oxidation environment for reaction, and the oxidation degree was controlled by adjusted the amount of hydrogen ion introduced. We found out that the amount of hydrogen ion is positively correlated with oxidation degree in biotite, and the deeper oxidation degree in biotite, the lower electronegativity of singer layer. Potassium and iron element would be release out of micaceous structure during the biotite oxidation. The higher the oxidation degree is, the greater the releasing happen. The charge density combining Fe oxidation and releasing firstly increased then decreased with the oxidation degree turned greater. During the oxidation, the Si-O vibrated would change from parallel layer vibration model to vertical vibration model.

  2. Valence change detection in memristive oxide based heterostructure cells by hard X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindsmüller, A.; Schmitz, C.; Wiemann, C.; Skaja, K.; Wouters, D. J.; Waser, R.; Schneider, C. M.; Dittmann, R.

    2018-04-01

    The switching mechanism of valence change resistive memory devices is widely accepted to be an ionic movement of oxygen vacancies resulting in a valence change of the metal cations. However, direct experimental proofs of valence changes in memristive devices are scarce. In this work, we have employed hard X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) to probe local valence changes in Pt/ZrOx/Ta memristive devices. The use of hard X-ray radiation increases the information depth, thus providing chemical information from buried layers. By extracting X-ray photoelectron spectra from different locations in the PEEM images, we show that zirconia in the active device area is reduced compared to a neighbouring region, confirming the valence change in the ZrOx film during electroforming. Furthermore, we succeeded in measuring the Ta 4f spectrum for two different resistance states on the same device. In both states, as well as outside the device region, the Ta electrode is composed of different suboxides without any metallic contribution, hinting to the formation of TaOx during the deposition of the Ta thin film. We observed a reduction of the Ta oxidation state in the low resistance state with respect to the high resistive state. This observation is contradictory to the established model, as the internal redistribution of oxygen between ZrOx and the Ta electrode during switching would lead to an oxidation of the Ta layer in the low resistance state. Instead, we have to conclude that the Ta electrode takes an active part in the switching process in our devices and that oxygen is released and reincorporated in the ZrOx/TaOx bilayer during switching. This is confirmed by the degradation of the high resistance state during endurance measurements under vacuum.

  3. Direct Probing of the Dielectric Scavenging-Layer Interface in Oxide Filamentary-Based Valence Change Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Umberto; Op de Beeck, Jonathan; Clima, Sergiu; Luebben, Michael; Koenraad, Paul M; Goux, Ludovic; Valov, Ilia; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2017-03-29

    A great improvement in valence change memory performance has been recently achieved by adding another metallic layer to the simple metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure. This metal layer is often referred to as oxygen exchange layer (OEL) and is introduced between one of the electrodes and the oxide. The OEL is believed to induce a distributed reservoir of defects at the metal-insulator interface thus providing an unlimited availability of building blocks for the conductive filament (CF). However, its role remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties to probe the interface between the OEL and the CF. Here, using Scalpel SPM we probe multiple functions of the OEL which have not yet been directly measured, for two popular VCMs material systems: Hf/HfO 2 and Ta/Ta 2 O 5 . We locate and characterize in three-dimensions the volume containing the oxygen exchange layer and the CF with nanometer lateral resolution. We demonstrate that the OEL induces a thermodynamic barrier for the CF and estimate the minimum thickness of the OEL/oxide interface to guarantee the proper switching operations is ca. 3 nm. Our experimental observations are combined to first-principles thermodynamics and defect kinetics to elucidate the role of the OEL for device optimization.

  4. Conduction Mechanism of Valence Change Resistive Switching Memory: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Wah Lim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistive switching effect in transition metal oxide (TMO based material is often associated with the valence change mechanism (VCM. Typical modeling of valence change resistive switching memory consists of three closely related phenomena, i.e., conductive filament (CF geometry evolution, conduction mechanism and temperature dynamic evolution. It is widely agreed that the electrochemical reduction-oxidation (redox process and oxygen vacancies migration plays an essential role in the CF forming and rupture process. However, the conduction mechanism of resistive switching memory varies considerably depending on the material used in the dielectric layer and selection of electrodes. Among the popular observations are the Poole-Frenkel emission, Schottky emission, space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC, trap-assisted tunneling (TAT and hopping conduction. In this article, we will conduct a survey on several published valence change resistive switching memories with a particular interest in the I-V characteristic and the corresponding conduction mechanism.

  5. Semiempirical search for oxide superconductors based on bond valence sums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, S.; Fukushima, N.; Niu, H.; Ando, K.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between crystal structures and electronic states of layered transition-metal oxides are analyzed in the light of bond valence sums. Correlations between the superconducting transition temperature T c and the bond-valence-sum parameters are investigated for the high-T c cuprate compounds. Possibility of making nonsuperconducting oxides superconducting is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Optoelectronic properties of valence-state-controlled amorphous niobium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Takaki; Katase, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Katayama, Shota; Matsushima, Koichi; Itagaki, Naho; Yoshida, Hisao; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the optoelectronic properties of amorphous niobium oxide (a-NbO x ), we have investigated the valence states, local structures, electrical resistivity, and optical absorption of a-NbO x thin films with various oxygen contents. It was found that the valence states of Nb ion in a-NbO x films can be controlled from 5+  to 4+  by reducing oxygen pressure during film deposition at room temperature, together with changing the oxide-ion arrangement around Nb ion from Nb2O5-like to NbO2-like local structure. As a result, a four orders of magnitude reduction in the electrical resistivity of a-NbO x films was observed with decreasing oxygen content, due to the carrier generation caused by the appearance and increase of an oxygen-vacancy-related subgap state working as an electron donor. The tunable optoelectronic properties of a-NbO x films by valence-state-control with oxygen-vacancy formation will be useful for potential flexible optoelectronic device applications.

  7. The controlled-potential coulometric determination of plutonium based upon cerium oxidation and the Pu022+/Pu4+ valency change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.; Crossley, D.; Venkataramana, P.

    1977-09-01

    Conditions have been established enabling plutonium to be oxidised quantitatively to the hexavalent state in the working compartment of a controlled-potential coulometric cell using electrogenerated ceric ion or excess ceric nitrate. The excess ceric ion is reduced in situ electrochemically without reduction of the hexavalent plutonium. The plutonium is then determined controlled-potential coulometrically by reduction to Pu 3+ followed by oxidation to Pu 4+ . The first oxidation step is conducted in molar nitric acid solution containing sulphamic acid but the coulometric determination step is conducted in molar sulphuric acid solution. The results obtained in the coulometric determination step were less satisfactory following oxidation with electrogenerated ceric ion rather than with chemically added ceric nitrate. Using the recommended conditions, 6 mg quantities of plutonium can be determined with an accuracy of 100.06% and a precision of 0.12% (coefficient of variation). The behaviour of chromium, manganese and vanadium impurity is reported. (author)

  8. Evaluative conditioning induces changes in sound valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Bolders

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative Conditioning (EC has hardly been tested in the auditory domain, but it is a potentially valuable research tool. In Experiment 1 we investigated whether the affective evaluation of short environmental sounds can be changed using affective words as unconditioned stimuli (US. Congruence effects on an affective priming task (APT for conditioned sounds demonstrated successful EC. Subjective ratings for sounds paired with negative words changed accordingly. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether the acquired valence remains stable after repeated presentation of the conditioned sound without the US or whether extinction occurs. The acquired affective value remained present, albeit weaker, even after 40 extinction trials. These results warrant the use of EC to study processing of short environmental sounds with acquired valence, even if this requires repeated stimulus presentations. This paves the way for studying processing of affective environmental sounds while effectively controlling low level-stimulus properties.

  9. Valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shijing; Zhang Boping; Zhao Cuihua; Li Songjie; Zhang Meixia; Yan Liping

    2011-01-01

    The cobalt oxide (CoO and Co 3 O 4 ) thin films were successfully prepared using a spin-coating technique by a chemical solution method with CH 3 OCH 2 CH 2 OH and Co(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O as starting materials. The grayish cobalt oxide films had uniform crystalline grains with less than 50 nm in diameter. The phase structure is able to tailor by controlling the annealing atmosphere and temperature, in which Co 3 O 4 thin film was obtained by annealing in air at 300-600, and N 2 at 300, and transferred to CoO thin film by raising annealing temperature in N 2 . The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Co2p electrons are distinguishable from different valence states of cobalt oxide especially for their satellite structure. The valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere contributes to the tailored optical absorption property.

  10. Valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shijing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Boping, E-mail: bpzhang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao Cuihua; Li Songjie; Zhang Meixia; Yan Liping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The cobalt oxide (CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were successfully prepared using a spin-coating technique by a chemical solution method with CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH and Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O as starting materials. The grayish cobalt oxide films had uniform crystalline grains with less than 50 nm in diameter. The phase structure is able to tailor by controlling the annealing atmosphere and temperature, in which Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin film was obtained by annealing in air at 300-600, and N{sub 2} at 300, and transferred to CoO thin film by raising annealing temperature in N{sub 2}. The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Co2p electrons are distinguishable from different valence states of cobalt oxide especially for their satellite structure. The valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere contributes to the tailored optical absorption property.

  11. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...... valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involved in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations...... and more subtle features at the highest energies reflect changes in the frontier orbital populations....

  12. Valence force fields and the lattice dynamics of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, R.; Mani, K.K.; Singh, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    The lattice dynamics of beryllium oxide have been studied using a rigid-ion model, with short-range forces represented by a valence force field. Various existing calculations on group-IV elements using such a field have been examined as a prelude to transference of force constants from diamond to beryllium oxide. The effects of ionicity on the force constants have been included in the form of scale factors. It is shown that no satisfactory fit to the long-wavelength data on BeO can be found with transferred force constants. However, adequate least-squares fits can be found both with four- and six-parameter valence force fields, the discrepancy with experiment being large only for one optical mode at the Brillouin-zone center. Dispersion curves along Δ and Σ are presented and are in fair agreement with experiment, deviations arising essentially from the quality of the fit to the long-wavelength data. The bond-bending interactions are found to play a significant role and arguments have been presented to show that the inclusion of further angle-angle interactions would yield a very satisfactory picture of the dynamics

  13. Nanostructured high valence silver oxide produced by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D.; Facibeni, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Russo, V.; Conti, C.; Ducati, C.; Casari, C.S.; Li Bassi, A.; Bottani, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Among silver oxides, Ag 4 O 4 , i.e. high valence Ag(I)Ag(III) oxide, is interesting for applications in high energy batteries and for the development of antimicrobial coatings. We here show that ns UV pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen containing atmosphere allows the synthesis of pure Ag 4 O 4 nanocrystalline thin films, permitting at the same time to control the morphology of the material at the sub-micrometer scale. Ag 4 O 4 films with a crystalline domain size of the order of tens of nm can be deposited provided the deposition pressure is above a threshold (roughly 4 Pa pure O 2 or 20 Pa synthetic air). The formation of this particular high valence silver oxide is explained in terms of the reactions occurring during the expansion of the ablated species in the reactive atmosphere. In particular, expansion of the PLD plasma plume is accompanied by formation of low stability Ag-O dimers and atomic oxygen, providing reactive species at the substrate where the film grows. Evidence of reactive collisions in the expanding ablation plume is obtained by analysis of the plume visible shape in inert and reactive atmospheres. In addition, we show how the dimensionless deposition parameter L, relating the target-to-substrate distance to the ablation plume maximum expansion length, can be used to classify different growth regimes. It is thus possible to vary the stoichiometry and the morphology of the films, from compact and columnar to foam-like, by controlling both the gas pressure and the target-to-substrate distance

  14. A numerical simulation model of valence-change-based resistive switching

    OpenAIRE

    Marchewka, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Due to their superior scalability and performance, nanoscale resistive switches based on the valence-change mechanism are considered promising candidates for future nonvolatile memory and logic applications. These devices are metal-oxide-metal structures that can be reversibly switched between different resistance states by electrical signals. Typically, they contain one Schottky-like and one ohmic-like metal-oxide contact and exhibit bipolar switching. The switching mechanism and the initial...

  15. Crossover and valence band Kβ X-rays of chromium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazinic, Stjepko; Mandic, Luka; Kavcic, Matjaz; Bozicevic, Iva

    2011-01-01

    Kβ X-ray spectra of chromium metal and selected chromium oxides were measured twice using medium resolution flat crystal spectrometer and high resolution spectrometer employing Johansson geometry after excitation with 2 MeV proton beams. The positions and intensities of crossover (Kβ'') and valence (Kβ 2,5 ) band X-rays relative to the primary Kβ X-ray components were extracted in a consistent way. The results were compared with the existing data obtained by proton and photon induced ionization mechanisms and theoretical predictions. The obtained results in peak relative positions and intensities were analyzed in order to study dependence on the chromium oxidation states and chromium-oxygen bond lengths in selected chromium oxides. Our results obtained by both spectrometers confirm that the linear trend observed for the valence peak relative energy shift as a function of chromium oxidation number does not depend on the experimental resolution. Experimental results for normalized intensities (i.e. relative intensities divided with the number of chromium-oxygen pairs) of crossover and valence band X-rays obtained by both spectrometers are in very good agreement, and follow exponential relationship with the average Cr-O bond lengths in corresponding chromium oxides. The observed trends in crossover and valence X-rays normalized intensities could be used to measure the average chromium-oxygen bond length in various chromium oxides, with the sum of both crossover and valence X-ray normalized intensities being the most sensitive measure.

  16. Titanium oxide modification with oxides of mixed cobalt valence for photo catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanis O, R.; Jimenez B, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, heterogenous photo catalysis, a technique often used for organic compound degradation toxic in water, was used. The photo catalyst most often used in this technique is TiO 2 , which due to its physical and chemical properties, can degrade a great number of organic compounds. In addition, in recent years it has been verified that the doping of semiconductors with metals or metallic oxides increases the photo catalytic activity of these semiconductors, which is why it was proposed for doping by the impregnating method using commercial TiO 2 synthesized by the Degussa company (TiO 2 Degussa P25) with and oxide of mixed cobalt valence (Co 3 O 4 ) synthesized using the sol-gel method. The synthesized photo catalyst TiO 2 /Co 3 O 4 was characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and finally, photo catalytic tests by means of the degradation of methylene blue. (Author)

  17. Titanium oxide modification with oxides of mixed cobalt valence for photo catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanis O, R.; Jimenez B, J., E-mail: jaime.jimenez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the present work, heterogenous photo catalysis, a technique often used for organic compound degradation toxic in water, was used. The photo catalyst most often used in this technique is TiO{sub 2}, which due to its physical and chemical properties, can degrade a great number of organic compounds. In addition, in recent years it has been verified that the doping of semiconductors with metals or metallic oxides increases the photo catalytic activity of these semiconductors, which is why it was proposed for doping by the impregnating method using commercial TiO{sub 2} synthesized by the Degussa company (TiO{sub 2} Degussa P25) with and oxide of mixed cobalt valence (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) synthesized using the sol-gel method. The synthesized photo catalyst TiO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and finally, photo catalytic tests by means of the degradation of methylene blue. (Author)

  18. Valency state changes in lanthanide-contained systems under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, A

    1980-08-01

    Changes in valency state induced by pressure in samarium sulphide SmS remind one of alchemy, as the mat black initial substance shines golden after the electron transition. The alchemist's dream is of course not realized, however the compound does exhibit an unusually interesting behaviour in the new state. The valency state of samarium as newly appeared fluctuated very rapidly between two electron configurations. Manipulation of the valency state by pressure or chemical substitution can basically change the physical properties of systems containing lanthanides. The phenomena are described and discussed in the following survey.

  19. Pressure-induced valence change and moderate heavy fermion state in Eu-compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Fuminori; Okauchi, Keigo; Sato, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Ai; Akamine, Hiromu; Ashitomi, Yosuke; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Valenta, Jaroslav; Prchal, Jiri; Sechovský, Vladimir; Aoki, Dai; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2018-05-01

    A pressure-induced valence transition has attracted much attention in Eu-compounds. Among them, EuRh2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2 reveal the valence transition around 1, 2, and 3 GPa, respectively. We have succeeded in growing single crystals of EuT2X2 (T: transition metal, X: Si, Ge) and studied electronic properties under pressure. EuRh2Si2 indicates a first-order valence transition between 1 and 2 GPa, with a large and prominent hysteresis in the electrical resistivity. At higher pressures, the first-order valence transition changes to a cross-over regime with an intermediate valence state. Tuning of the valence state with pressure is reflected in a drastic change of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in EuRh2Si2 single crystals. Effect of pressure on the valence states on EuRh2Si2, EuIr2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2, as well as an isostructural related compound EuGa4, are reviewed.

  20. Size-dependent valence change in small Pr, Nd, and Sm clusters isolated in solid Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebcke, M.; Sonntag, B.; Niemann, W.; Rabe, P.

    1986-01-01

    The L/sub III/ absorption thresholds of Pr, Nd, and Sm clusters isolated in solid Ar are marked by prominent white lines. The lines ascribed to divalent and trivalent rare-earth metals are well separated in energy. From the relative intensities of these lines an average valence of the rare-earth atoms in the cluster has been determined. For dimers and trimers the average valence is close to 2, the value for free atoms. For clusters consisting of more than 20 atoms the average valence approaches 3, the value for bulk metals. In between the valence changes abruptly, indicating the existence of a critical cluster size of approximately 5 atoms for Pr and Nd and of 13 atoms for Sm

  1. Lithium Storage in Microstructures of Amorphous Mixed-Valence Vanadium Oxide as Anode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Zheng, Lirong; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xia; Cao, Minhua

    2015-07-08

    Constructing three-dimensional (3 D) nanostructures with excellent structural stability is an important approach for realizing high-rate capability and a high capacity of the electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Herein, we report the synthesis of hydrangea-like amorphous mixed-valence VOx microspheres (a-VOx MSs) through a facile solvothermal method followed by controlled calcination. The resultant hydrangea-like a-VOx MSs are composed of intercrossed nanosheets and, thus, construct a 3 D network structure. Upon evaluation as an anode material for LIBs, the a-VOx MSs show excellent lithium-storage performance in terms of high capacity, good rate capability, and long-term stability upon extended cycling. Specifically, they exhibit very stable cycling behavior with a highly reversible capacity of 1050 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 0.1 A g(-1) after 140 cycles. They also show excellent rate capability, with a capacity of 390 mA h g(-1) at a rate as high as 10 A g(-1) . Detailed investigations on the morphological and structural changes of the a-VOx MSs upon cycling demonstrated that the a-VOx MSs went through modification of the local VO coordinations accompanied with the formation of a higher oxidation state of V, but still with an amorphous state throughout the whole discharge/charge process. Moreover, the a-VOx MSs can buffer huge volumetric changes during the insertion/extraction process, and at the same time they remain intact even after 200 cycles of the charge/discharge process. Thus, these microspheres may be a promising anode material for LIBs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Variable valence of praseodymium in rare-earth oxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchinskaya, M.V.; Merezhinskii, K.Y.; Tikhonov, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Solid solutions of elevated praseodymium oxide content have interesting electrical properties, making them the basis for the manufacture of high-temperature electrically conducting materials. Establishment of the composition-structure-valence state relationships enables control of the material properties. The authors performed investigations using a thermogravimetric apparatus with an electronic microbalance of type EM-5-3M, and using x-ray phase analysis of powders (DRON-1 diffractometer, CuK /SUB alpha/ -radiation). The authors also studied the kinetics of praseodymium oxidation with a thermogravimetric apparatus under isothermal conditions. Evaluation of the results with the equation of Kolmogorov, Erofeev, and Avraam indicates that the process is limited by the chemical oxidation of praseodymium and not by diffusion

  3. Cerium valence change in the solid solutions Ce(Rh1-xRux)Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, Oliver; Riecken, Jan F.; Winter, Florian; Poettgen, Rainer; Muenster Univ.; Abdala, Paula M.; Chevalier, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The solid solutions Ce(Rh 1-x Ru x )Sn were investigated by means of susceptibility measurements, specific heat, electrical resistivity, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and 119 Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements as well as XAS data show a cerium valence change in dependence on the ruthenium content. Higher ruthenium content causes an increase from 3.22 to 3.45 at 300 K. Furthermore χ and χ -1 data indicate valence fluctuation for cerium as a function of temperature. For example, Ce(Rh 0.8 Ru 0.2 )Sn exhibits valence fluctuations between 3.42 and 3.32 in the temperature range of 10 to 300 K. This could be proven by using the interconfiguration fluctuation (ICF) model introduced by Sales and Wohlleben. Cerium valence change does not influence the tin atoms as proven by 119 Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy, but it influences the electrical properties. Ce(Rh 0.9 Ru 0.1 )Sn behaves like a typical valence fluctuating compound, and higher ruthenium content causes an increase of the metallic behavior. (orig.)

  4. Inducing changes in arousal and valence: comparison of two mood induction procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallais, Christophe; Gilet, Anne-Laure

    2010-02-01

    This research examined the relative effectiveness of two mood induction procedures (MIPs) for inducing four specific moods varying along the dimensions of both valence and arousal. Participants were randomly assigned either to an autobiographical recall or to a music and guided imagery MIP and underwent a happiness, serenity, anger, or sadness mood induction. The findings confirmed the effectiveness of the two MIPs in producing changes on both the valence and arousal dimensions of mood. The results also revealed an unexpected greater efficiency of the autobiographical recall than of the combined procedure.

  5. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Valence change in rare earth semiconductors in many-impurity Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocharyan, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Green functions averaged over point impurity localization are found out in the simplest many-impurity model of rare earth semiconductor taking into account local Coulomb repulsion and hybridization of s- and f-electrons. Analytical expressions for s- and f-electron states density are obtained in the appoximation linear in can centration. Behaviour of a state density nearly the continuous spectrum edge and in the vicinity of the f-level is studied as a function of electron parameters. A comparison with the Anderson one-impurity model is performed. It is shown that essential energy spectrum conversion occurs in the case of a great number of impurities close to the continuous spectrum. Continuous spectrum boundaries are found out, and conditions are defined, at which the forbidden energy gap occurs in the continuous spectrum nearly a f-level. Effect of the coherent conversion of spectrum on behaviour of valence in changing f-level position is analyzed. It is shown that in the lack of electron-lattice interaction the phase transition with valence change occurs in a smooth manner as in the model with strictly periodic Andersen lattice

  7. Influence of changes in the valence electronic configuration on the structure of L-X-ray spectra of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polasik, M; Koziol, K; Slabkowska, K; Czarnota, M; Pajek, M

    2009-01-01

    Extensive multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations with the inclusion of the transverse (Breit) interaction and QED corrections have been carried out on molybdenum to explain the dependence of the structure of Lα 1,2 and Lβ 1 lines on the changes in configurations of the valence electrons belonging to two different configuration types: three open-shell 4d 6-r 5s r (r = 2,1,0) configurations and one closed-shell 4d 4 3/2 5s 2 configuration. It has been found that the MCDF predictions for open-shell valence configurations (4d 4 5s 2 , 4d 5 5s 1 , 4d 6 5s 0 ) much better reproduce observed structure of Lα 1,2 lines in X-ray spectra of molybdenum than closed-shell 4d 4 3/2 5s 2 valence configuration. The influence of changes in the valence electronic configuration on the structure of L-X-ray spectra of molybdenum is noticeable. Moreover, the observation of the shapes of L-X-ray spectra seems to be very good method to investigate the changes of the valence electronic configuration caused by the chemical environment.

  8. NiMn layered double hydroxide nanosheets/NiCo2O4 nanowires with surface rich high valence state metal oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liting; Chen, Lin; Yang, Dawen; Yu, Xu; Xue, Huaiguo; Feng, Ligang

    2018-07-01

    High valence transition metal oxide is significant for anode catalyst of proton membrane water electrolysis technique. Herein, we demonstrate NiMn layered double hydroxide nanosheets/NiCo2O4 nanowires hierarchical nanocomposite catalyst with surface rich high valence metal oxide as an efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction. A low overpotential of 310 mV is needed to drive a 10 mA cm-2 with a Tafel slope of 99 mV dec-1, and a remarkable stability during 8 h is demonstrated in a chronoamperometry test. Theoretical calculation displays the change in the rate-determining step on the nanocomposite electrode in comparison to NiCo2O4 nanowires alone. It is found high valence Ni and Mn oxide in the catalyst system can efficiently facilitate the charge transport across the electrode/electrolyte interface. The enhanced electrical conductivity, more accessible active sites and synergistic effects between NiMn layered double hydroxide nanosheets and NiCo2O4 nanowires can account for the excellent oxygen evolution reaction. The catalytic performance is comparable to most of the best non-noble catalysts and IrO2 noble catalyst, indicating the promising applications in water-splitting technology. It is an important step in the development of hierarchical nanocomposites by surface valence state tuning as an alternative to noble metals for oxygen evolution reaction.

  9. Changing the conversation: the influence of emotions on conversational valence and alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hanneke; van den Putte, Bas; de Bruijn, Gert-Jan

    2014-10-01

    Health campaign effects may be improved by taking interpersonal communication processes into account. The current study, which employed an experimental, pretest-posttest, randomized exposure design (N = 208), investigated whether the emotions induced by anti-alcohol messages influence conversational valence about alcohol and subsequent persuasion outcomes. The study produced three main findings. First, an increase in the emotion fear induced a negative conversational valence about alcohol. Second, fear was most strongly induced by a disgusting message, whereas a humorous appeal induced the least fear. Third, a negative conversational valence elicited healthier binge drinking attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, intentions, and behaviors. Thus, health campaign planners and health researchers should pay special attention to the emotional characteristics of health messages and should focus on inducing a healthy conversational valence.

  10. Action and valence modulate choice and choice-induced preference change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Koster

    Full Text Available Choices are not only communicated via explicit actions but also passively through inaction. In this study we investigated how active or passive choice impacts upon the choice process itself as well as a preference change induced by choice. Subjects were tasked to select a preference for unfamiliar photographs by action or inaction, before and after they gave valuation ratings for all photographs. We replicate a finding that valuation increases for chosen items and decreases for unchosen items compared to a control condition in which the choice was made post re-evaluation. Whether choice was expressed actively or passively affected the dynamics of revaluation differently for positive and negatively valenced items. Additionally, the choice itself was biased towards action such that subjects tended to choose a photograph obtained by action more often than a photographed obtained through inaction. These results highlight intrinsic biases consistent with a tight coupling of action and reward and add to an emerging understanding of how the mode of action itself, and not just an associated outcome, modulates the decision making process.

  11. Role of valence changes and nanoscale atomic displacements in BiS2-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Zhai, Huifei; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wei; Liu, Shengli; Cao, Guanghan

    2016-11-22

    Superconductivity within layered crystal structures has attracted sustained interest among condensed matter community, primarily due to their exotic superconducting properties. EuBiS 2 F is a newly discovered member in the BiS 2 -based superconducting family, which shows superconductivity at 0.3 K without extrinsic doping. With 50 at.% Ce substitution for Eu, superconductivity is enhanced with Tc increased up to 2.2 K. However, the mechanisms for the T c enhancement have not yet been elucidated. In this study, the Ce-doping effect on the self-electron-doped superconductor EuBiS 2 F was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We have established a relationship between Ce-doping and the T c enhancement in terms of Eu valence changes and nanoscale atomic displacements. The new finding sheds light on the interplay among superconductivity, charge and local structure in BiS 2 -based superconductors.

  12. Behind the stage of deliberate self-persuasion: When changes in valence of associations to an attitude object predict attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tong; Lord, Charles G; Yoke, Kristin

    2015-12-01

    Modern theory and research on evaluative processes, combined with a comprehensive review of deliberate self-persuasion (Maio & Thomas, 2007, Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull., 11, 46), suggest two types of strategies people can use to construct new, more desired attitudes. Epistemic strategies change the perceived valence of associations activated by the attitude object. Teleologic strategies, in contrast, keep undesired associations from being activated in the first place, thus obviating the need to change their perceived valence. Change in perceived valence of associations therefore might predict attitude change better when people pursue epistemic than teleologic strategies for deliberate self-persuasion. This hypothesis gained convergent support from three studies in which use of epistemic versus teleologic strategies was measured as an individual difference (Study 1) and manipulated (studies 2 and 3). The results of these studies supported the theoretical distinction between the two strategies and suggested further research directions. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Life changes and depressive symptoms: the effects of valence and amount of change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennik, Elise C.; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Only few studies have focused on the effects of positive life changes on depression, and the ones that did demonstrated inconsistent findings. The aim of the present study was to obtain a better understanding of the influence of positive life changes on depressive symptoms by decomposing

  14. Pressure-induced valence and structure change in some anti-Th3P4 structure rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, A.; Hochheimer, H.D.; Jayaraman, A.; Bucher, E.

    1981-01-01

    The anti-Th 3 P 4 structure compounds Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 have been investigated to 350 kbar by high pressure X-ray diffraction, using the diamond anvil cell. From the P-V data it is found that Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 are much more compressible, compared to Sm 4 Bi 3 before the valence transition. This suggests that a continuous change in the valence state of Yb takes place with pressure in the two compounds and that they may be in the mixed valent state already at ambient pressure. The ''collapsed'' anti-Th 3 P 4 structure becomes unstable in Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 and new lines appear at high pressure, that fit the NaCl structure. The latter structure change seems to occur also in the electronically collapsed Sm 4 Bi 3 . The results are presented and discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Features of carrier tunneling between the silicon valence band and metal in devices based on the Al/high-K oxide/SiO_2/Si structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vexler, M. I.; Grekhov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The features of electron tunneling from or into the silicon valence band in a metal–insulator–semiconductor system with the HfO_2(ZrO_2)/SiO_2 double-layer insulator are theoretically analyzed for different modes. It is demonstrated that the valence-band current plays a less important role in structures with HfO_2(ZrO_2)/SiO_2 than in structures containing only silicon dioxide. In the case of a very wide-gap high-K oxide ZrO_2, nonmonotonic behavior related to tunneling through the upper barrier is predicted for the valence-band–metal current component. The use of an insulator stack can offer certain advantages for some devices, including diodes, bipolar tunnel-emitter transistors, and resonant-tunneling diodes, along with the traditional use of high-K insulators in a field-effect transistor.

  16. Mixed valence transition metal 2D-oxides: Comparison between delafossite and crednerite compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christine; Poienar, Maria

    2017-08-01

    Transition metal oxides offer large opportunities to study relationships between structures and properties. Indeed these compounds crystallize in numerous frameworks corresponding to different dimensionalities and, accordingly, show a huge variety of properties (as high Tc superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistivity, multiferroicity..). The control of the oxidation state of the transition metal, via the monitoring of the oxygen content, is of prime importance to understand and optimize the properties, due to the strong coupling that exists between the lattice and the charges and spins of the transition metals. In this large playground for chemists, we reinvestigated several 2D-compounds derived from delafossite structure. Considering this paper as a very short review, we report here the results obtained on CuMO2 compounds (with M = Cr, Mn or Mn+Cu) by using a combination of techniques, as X-ray, neutrons and/or electrons diffraction on poly-crystals for structural characterisations that are correlated with electrical and/or magnetic properties. The complementarity of studies is also addressed by the synthesis and characterization of single crystals in addition to poly-crystals. Moreover the comparison of the structures of similar Cr and Mn based oxides highlights the crucial role of the Jahn-Teller effect of trivalent manganese to lift the degeneracy, which is responsible of the magnetic frustration in CuCrO2.

  17. Plutonium valence state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    A calculational method for ascertaining equilibrium valence state distributions of plutonium in acid solutions as a function of the plutonium oxidation number and the solution acidity is illustrated with an example. The method may be more practical for manual use than methods based upon polynomial equations. (T.G.)

  18. High Valence, Normal Valence and Unknown Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul

    the serendipitous synthesis of the nitrido-bridged [Rh(en)3]2- [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]. The complex anion have previously been studied in the form of the mixed Rb4Na2-salt. In this earlier study, the nitrido-bridge was found to be asymmetrical with the axial ligands in an eclipsed formation. The complex was described...... the [Rh(en)3]2-salt is best described as Mn3.5/Mn3.5. This means that the [(CN)5MnNMn(CN)5]6􀀀 ion displays crystal packing induced oxidation state isomerism, a rare phenomenon. Chapter 4 details the synthesis and characterisation of group 9 dithiolene complexes with focus on the hitherto unknown...... homoleptic iridium dithiolene complexes. When the complexes [M(mnt)3]3􀀀, M = Rh and Co are chemically oxidized, they decompose to yield dinuclear complexes with the metal still in oxidation state III. This is not the case for the corresponding Ir complex which can be oxidized and the oxidation...

  19. Mn valence state and electrode performance of perovskite-type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    increase in the oxidation state of Mn ions was due to the formation of Mn4+ ions and oxygen vacancies. The addition of Cu ions to LSM systems could lead to enhanced electrode performance for oxygen reduction reactions originating from the change in valence of Mn ions. Keywords. Cu-doped LSM; electrical conductivity; ...

  20. B-site cation order/disorder and their valence states in Ba3MnNb2O9 perovskite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yan; Huang, Qing; Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Zhou, Haidong

    2018-06-01

    Polycrystalline samples Ba3MnNb2O9 synthesized by solid state reaction and single crystal samples grown by optical floating zone have been characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Three types of B-site Mn and Nb ordering phase are observed: fully ordered 1Mn:2Nb; fully disordered; nano-sized 1Mn:1Nb ordered. No electronic structure change for crystals with different ordering/disordering. The Mn valence is determined to be 2+, and Nb valence is 5+. Oxygen 2p orbitals hybridize with Mn 3d and Nb 4d orbitals. Factors that affect the electron energy loss near edge structures of transition metal white-lines in electron energy loss spectroscopy are explicitly illustrated and discussed.

  1. Improvement of transistor characteristics and stability for solution-processed ultra-thin high-valence niobium doped zinc-tin oxide thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeng, Jiann-Shing, E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw

    2016-08-15

    Nb-doped Zinc tin oxide (NZTO) channel materials have been prepared by solution process in combination with the spin-coating method. All NZTO thin film transistors (TFTs) are n-type enhancement-mode devices, either without or with Nb additives. High-valence niobium ion (ionic charge = +5) has a larger ionic potential and similar ionic radius to Zn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+} ions. As compared with the pure ZTO device, introducing Nb{sup 5+} ions into the ZTO channel layers can improve the electrical properties and bias stability of TFTs because of the reduction of the oxygen vacancies. This study discusses the connection among the material properties of the NZTO films and the electrical performance and bias stability of NZTO TFTs and how they are influenced by the Nb/(Nb + Sn) molar ratios of NZTO films. - Highlights: • Ultra-thin high-valence niobium doped zinc-tin oxide (NZTO) thin films are prepared using a solution process. • Nb dopants in ZTO films reduce the oxygen vacancy and subgap adsorption of the ZTO films. • The Nb-doping concentration of the NZTO channel layer has a strong influence on the TFT performance.

  2. Nanoscale Chemical and Valence Evolution at the Metal/Oxide Interface: A Case Study of Ti/SrTiO 3

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2016-06-27

    Metal/oxide interfaces are ubiquitous in a wide range of applications such as electronics, photovoltaics, memories, catalysis, and sensors. However, there have been few investigations dedicated to the nanoscale structural and chemical characteristics of these buried interfaces. In this work, the metal/oxide interface between Ti and SrTiO3 (STO) is examined as a prototypical system using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. An atomic-thin Ti2O3-like layer at the Ti/STO interface prepared at room temperature is discovered, and first-principles calculations predict a metallic band structure of this 2D electron system. As a universal feature of such interfaces prepared at different temperatures, near the interface nanoscale oxygen-deficient domains and continuous modulation of Ti oxidation states are found. Overall, these results directly reveal complex chemical and valence evolutions at the metal/oxide interfaces, providing microscopic insights on such heterostructures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  3. Visible light photoreactivity from hybridization states between carbon nitride bandgap states and valence states in Nb and Ti oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hosik, E-mail: hosiklee@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Unist-gil 100 Eonyang-eup, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ohno, Takahisa, E-mail: OHNO.Takahisa@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Material Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan); Computational Materials Science Unit (CMSU), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Origin of bandgap reduction for visible photoreactivity is suggested. ► Carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space can induce the bandgap reduction. ► The electronic structures are studied by density functional theory calculations. - Abstract: For better efficiency as photocatalysts, N-doping for visible light reactivity has been intensively studied in Lamellar niobic and titanic solid acids (HNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}, H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}), and its microscopic structures have been debated in this decade. We calculate the layered solid acids’ structures and bandgaps. Bandgap reduction by carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space is observed computationally. It originates from localized nitrogen states which form delocalized top-valence states by hybridizing with the host oxygen states and can contribute to photo-current.

  4. The observation of valence band change on resistive switching of epitaxial Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} film using removable liquid electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Ku, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-07

    The resistive switching (RS) phenomenon in transition metal oxides (TMOs) has received a great deal of attention for non-volatile memory applications. Various RS mechanisms have been suggested as to explain the observed RS characteristics. Many reports suggest that changes of interface and the role of oxygen vacancies originate in RS phenomena; therefore, in this study, we use a liquid drop of mercury as the top electrode (TE), epitaxial Pr{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (PCMO) (110) film of the perovskite manganite family for RS material, and an Nb-doped (0.7 at. %) SrTiO{sub 3} (100) single crystal as the substrate to observe changes in the interface between the TE and TMOs. The use of removable liquid electrode Hg drop as TE not only enables observation of the RS characteristic as a bipolar RS curve (counterclockwise) but also facilitates analysis of the valence band of the PCMO surface after resistive switching via photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed I-V behaviors of the low and high resistance states (HRS) are explained with an electrochemical migration model in PCMO film where accumulated oxygen vacancies at the interface between the Hg TE and PCMO (110) surface induce the HRS. The interpreted RS mechanism is directly confirmed via valence band spectrum analysis.

  5. Levels of valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eShuman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the positive and the negative is fundamental in our emotional life. In appraisal theories, in particular in the component process model of emotion (Scherer, 1984, 2010, qualitatively different types of valence are proposed based on appraisals of (unpleasantness, goal obstructiveness/conduciveness, low or high power, self- (incongruence, and moral badness/goodness. This multifaceted conceptualization of valence is highly compatible with the frequent observation of mixed feelings in real life. However, it seems to contradict the one-dimensional conceptualization of valence often encountered in psychological theories, and the notion of valence as a common currency used to explain choice behavior. Here, we propose a framework to integrate the seemingly disparate conceptualizations of multifaceted valence and one-dimensional valence by suggesting that valence should be conceived at different levels, micro and macro. Micro-valences correspond to qualitatively different types of evaluations, potentially resulting in mixed feelings, whereas one-dimensional macro-valence corresponds to an integrative common currency to compare alternatives for choices. We propose that conceptualizing levels of valence may focus research attention on the mechanisms that relate valence at one level (micro to valence at another level (macro, leading to new hypotheses and addressing various concerns that have been raised about the valence concept, such as the valence-emotion relation.

  6. Levels of Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Vera; Sander, David; Scherer, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between the positive and the negative is fundamental in our emotional life. In appraisal theories, in particular in the component process model of emotion (Scherer, 1984, 2010), qualitatively different types of valence are proposed based on appraisals of (un)pleasantness, goal obstructiveness/conduciveness, low or high power, self-(in)congruence, and moral badness/goodness. This multifaceted conceptualization of valence is highly compatible with the frequent observation of mixed feelings in real life. However, it seems to contradict the one-dimensional conceptualization of valence often encountered in psychological theories, and the notion of valence as a common currency used to explain choice behavior. Here, we propose a framework to integrate the seemingly disparate conceptualizations of multifaceted valence and one-dimensional valence by suggesting that valence should be conceived at different levels, micro and macro. Micro-valences correspond to qualitatively different types of evaluations, potentially resulting in mixed feelings, whereas one-dimensional macro-valence corresponds to an integrative “common currency” to compare alternatives for choices. We propose that conceptualizing levels of valence may focus research attention on the mechanisms that relate valence at one level (micro) to valence at another level (macro), leading to new hypotheses, and addressing various concerns that have been raised about the valence concept, such as the valence-emotion relation. PMID:23717292

  7. Theory-driven design of high-valence metal sites for water oxidation confirmed using in situ soft X-ray absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueli; Zhang, Bo; de Luna, Phil; Liang, Yufeng; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Han, Lili; García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Liu, Min; Dinh, Cao Thang; Regier, Tom; Dynes, James J.; He, Sisi; Xin, Huolin L.; Peng, Huisheng; Prendergast, David; Du, Xiwen; Sargent, Edward H.

    2018-02-01

    The efficiency with which renewable fuels and feedstocks are synthesized from electrical sources is limited at present by the sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in pH-neutral media. We took the view that generating transition-metal sites with high valence at low applied bias should improve the activity of neutral OER catalysts. Here, using density functional theory, we find that the formation energy of desired Ni4+ sites is systematically modulated by incorporating judicious combinations of Co, Fe and non-metal P. We therefore synthesized NiCoFeP oxyhydroxides and probed their oxidation kinetics with in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS). In situ sXAS studies of neutral-pH OER catalysts indicate ready promotion of Ni4+ under low overpotential conditions. The NiCoFeP catalyst outperforms IrO2 and retains its performance following 100 h of operation. We showcase NiCoFeP in a membrane-free CO2 electroreduction system that achieves a 1.99 V cell voltage at 10 mA cm-2, reducing CO2 into CO and oxidizing H2O to O2 with a 64% electricity-to-chemical-fuel efficiency.

  8. Theory-driven design of high-valence metal sites for water oxidation confirmed using in situ soft X-ray absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueli; Zhang, Bo; De Luna, Phil; Liang, Yufeng; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Han, Lili; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Liu, Min; Dinh, Cao Thang; Regier, Tom; Dynes, James J; He, Sisi; Xin, Huolin L; Peng, Huisheng; Prendergast, David; Du, Xiwen; Sargent, Edward H

    2018-02-01

    The efficiency with which renewable fuels and feedstocks are synthesized from electrical sources is limited at present by the sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in pH-neutral media. We took the view that generating transition-metal sites with high valence at low applied bias should improve the activity of neutral OER catalysts. Here, using density functional theory, we find that the formation energy of desired Ni 4+ sites is systematically modulated by incorporating judicious combinations of Co, Fe and non-metal P. We therefore synthesized NiCoFeP oxyhydroxides and probed their oxidation kinetics with in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS). In situ sXAS studies of neutral-pH OER catalysts indicate ready promotion of Ni 4+ under low overpotential conditions. The NiCoFeP catalyst outperforms IrO 2 and retains its performance following 100 h of operation. We showcase NiCoFeP in a membrane-free CO 2 electroreduction system that achieves a 1.99 V cell voltage at 10 mA cm -2 , reducing CO 2 into CO and oxidizing H 2 O to O 2 with a 64% electricity-to-chemical-fuel efficiency.

  9. Valencies of the lanthanides

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, David A.; Nelson, Peter G.

    2018-01-01

    The valencies of the lanthanides vary more than was once thought. In addition to valencies associated with a half-full shell, there are valencies associated with a quarter- and three-quarter-full shell. This can be explained on the basis of Slater’s theory of many-electron atoms. The same theory explains the variation in complexing constants in the trivalent state (the “tetrad effect”). Valency in metallic and organometallic compounds is also discussed.

  10. Double photoionization of propylene oxide: A coincidence study of the ejection of a pair of valence-shell electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Vecchiocattivi, Franco; Alagia, Michele; Schio, Luca; Richter, Robert; Stranges, Stefano; Catone, Daniele; Arruda, Manuela S.; Mendes, Luiz A. V.; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Pirani, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    Propylene oxide, a favorite target of experimental and theoretical studies of circular dichroism, was recently discovered in interstellar space, further amplifying the attention to its role in the current debate on protobiological homochirality. In the present work, a photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, using an ion-imaging detector and tunable synchrotron radiation in the 18.0-37.0 eV energy range, permits us (i) to observe six double ionization fragmentation channels, their relative yields being accounted for about two-thirds by the couple (C2H4+, CH2O+) and one-fifth by (C2H3+, CH3O+); (ii) to measure thresholds for their openings as a function of photon energy; and (iii) to unravel a pronounced bimodality for a kinetic-energy-released distribution, fingerprint of competitive non-adiabatic mechanisms.

  11. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of valence change processes in resistive switching SrTiO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehl, Annemarie

    2014-01-01

    Due to physical limitations of the currently used flash memory in terms of writing speed and scalability, new concepts for data storage attract great interest. A possible alternative with promising characteristics are so-called ''Resistive Random Access Memories'' (ReRAM). These memory devices are based on the resistive switching effect where the electrical resistance of a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure can be switched reversibly by a current or voltage pulse. Although this effect attracted wide scientific as well as commercial interest, up to now the it is not fully understood on a microscopic scale. Consequently, in this work the chemical and physical modifications caused by the resistive switching process are studied by spectroscopic techniques. As most switching models predict a strongly localized rather than a homogeneous effect, advanced micro-spectroscopy techniques are employed where additionally the lateral structure of the sample is imaged. In this work Fe-doped SrTiO 3 films are used as model material due to the thorough understanding of their defect chemistry. The epitaxial thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition. In a first approach, transmission X-ray microscopy is employed to study the bulk properties of ReRAM devices. At first, a new procedure for sample preparation based on a selective etching process is developed in order to realize photon-transparent samples. Investigations of switched devices reveal a significant contribution of Ti 3+ states within growth defects. In contrast to the indirect evidence in previous studies, this observation directly confirms that the resistance change is based on a local redox-process. The localization of the switching process within the growth defects is explained by a self-accelerating process due to Joule heating within the pre-reduced defects. In a second approach, after removal of the top electrode the chemical and electronic structure of the former interface between the

  12. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of valence change processes in resistive switching SrTiO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, Annemarie

    2014-05-15

    Due to physical limitations of the currently used flash memory in terms of writing speed and scalability, new concepts for data storage attract great interest. A possible alternative with promising characteristics are so-called ''Resistive Random Access Memories'' (ReRAM). These memory devices are based on the resistive switching effect where the electrical resistance of a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure can be switched reversibly by a current or voltage pulse. Although this effect attracted wide scientific as well as commercial interest, up to now the it is not fully understood on a microscopic scale. Consequently, in this work the chemical and physical modifications caused by the resistive switching process are studied by spectroscopic techniques. As most switching models predict a strongly localized rather than a homogeneous effect, advanced micro-spectroscopy techniques are employed where additionally the lateral structure of the sample is imaged. In this work Fe-doped SrTiO{sub 3} films are used as model material due to the thorough understanding of their defect chemistry. The epitaxial thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition. In a first approach, transmission X-ray microscopy is employed to study the bulk properties of ReRAM devices. At first, a new procedure for sample preparation based on a selective etching process is developed in order to realize photon-transparent samples. Investigations of switched devices reveal a significant contribution of Ti{sup 3+} states within growth defects. In contrast to the indirect evidence in previous studies, this observation directly confirms that the resistance change is based on a local redox-process. The localization of the switching process within the growth defects is explained by a self-accelerating process due to Joule heating within the pre-reduced defects. In a second approach, after removal of the top electrode the chemical and electronic structure of the former interface

  13. Valence effects of sorption: laboratory control of valence state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.I.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rates of migration of nuclides from nuclear waste repositories required knowledge of the interaction of these nuclides with the components of the geological formations in the path of the migration. These interactions will be dependent upon the valence state and speciation of the nuclide. If the valence state is not known, then there can be little confidence in use of the data for safety analysis. An electrochemical method of valence state control was developed which makes use of a porous electrode in a flow system containing a column of the adsorbent. By use of this method and solvent extraction analyses of the valence states, a number of reactions of interest to HLW repositories were investigated. These include the reduction of Np(V) and Tc(VII) by crushed basalt and other minerals. For the reduction of Np(V) by basalt, the experiments indicate that sorption on basalt increases with pH and that most of the Np is reduced to Np(IV). The adsorbed Np(IV) is very difficult to remove from the basalt. For the experiments with Tc(VII), the results are considerably more complicated. The results of these experiments are used to assess some of the techniques and methods currently used in safety analyses of proposed HLW repositories. Perhaps the most important consideration is that predictive modeling of valence change reactions, such as the reduction of Np(V) and Tc(VII), must be used with considerable caution, and the occurrence of such reactions should be verified as best as possible with experiments using valence state control and analyses. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  14. Photo-induced valence change of the sulfur atom in an L-cysteine thin film grown on a silver metal substrate in a saliva-emulated aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujibayashi, Toru [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-27

    A thin film of L-cysteine (HSCH{sub 2}CH(NH{sub 2})COOH) is grown on a silver substrate in saliva-emulated aqueous solution. X-ray photoemission spectroscopic measurements have revealed that the sulfur atom shows valence change under IR laser irradiation at 825 nm. The valence change maintains for about a minute at room temperature and more than an hour between 110 and 250 K after stopping the laser irradiation. It is not observed at all at temperatures lower than 110 K. This temperature-dependent behavior indicates that the photo-excited electronic change should be accompanied by a conformational change in the L-cysteine molecule. It is strongly suggested that the reversible valence change of the sulfur atom is applicable to a memory used around room temperature.

  15. Simultaneous conditioning of valence and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, Bertram; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-01-01

    Evaluative conditioning (EC) refers to the change in the valence of a conditioned stimulus (CS) due to its pairing with a positive or negative unconditioned stimulus (US). To the extent that core affect can be characterised by the two dimensions of valence and arousal, EC has important implications for the origin of affective responses. However, the distinction between valence and arousal is rarely considered in research on EC or conditioned responses more generally. Measuring the subjective feelings elicited by a CS, the results from two experiments showed that (1) repeated pairings of a CS with a positive or negative US of either high or low arousal led to corresponding changes in both CS valence and CS arousal, (2) changes in CS arousal, but not changes in CS valence, were significantly related to recollective memory for CS-US pairings, (3) subsequent presentations of the CS without the US reduced the conditioned valence of the CS, with conditioned arousal being less susceptible to extinction and (4) EC effects were stronger for high arousal than low arousal USs. The results indicate that the conditioning of affective responses can occur simultaneously along two independent dimensions, supporting evidence in related areas that calls for a consideration of both valence and arousal. Implications for research on EC and the acquisition of emotional dispositions are discussed.

  16. Structural changes during oxidation of Au(110)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, P.; Thurgate, S.; Wilkie, P.; Parker, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have constructed an Ultra High vacuum (UHV) system interfaced to an electro-chemical cell. The UHV system is equipped with Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). We have used these techniques to examine the oxidation of the Au(110) surface. The gold (110) single crystal exhibits a (2x1) surface structure when clean, but when immersed in 0.01 M HCIO 4 under potential control, the structure has been found to change. Throughout the double layer region the structure remains as (2x1) but when the potential is increased above 0.9-1.0V vs Ag/AgCI, (the pre-oxidation region) the surface structure changes to a centred rectangular structure found to represent a c(2x2) over-layer. This structure is fairly stable and reproducible. After the initial oxidation the structure prevails until 1.2-1.3V whereupon oxidation occurs on a larger scale and the surface structure becomes (1x1). These structures return to (2x1) after the reduction of the oxide, proving that the structural changes are reversible. XPS of these regions has shown a difference in the chemical state of the oxygen. Adsorbed perchlorate ion is initially the only oxygen component but as the potential increases the peak shifts into the hydroxide region and finally it splits into a hydroxide peak and a metal oxide peak. This study indicates a new way of looking at the structure and composition of the gold surface and provides insight into the nature of the interaction between the surface and the solution

  17. Theory for the mixed-valence state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A theory is presented which explains why mixed-valence compounds behave as two component Fermi liquids, and why TmSe orders magnetically while the other known mixed-valence compounds do not. The variation of Tsub(N) and the field Hsub(T) to obtain ferromagnetic alignment with changing Tm 2+ /Tm 3+ ratio is quantitatively explained. For Tm 2+ concentration > = 0.3, TmSe is predicted to order ferromagnetically

  18. Thickness-dependent change in the valence band offset of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface studied using synchrotron-radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, S., E-mail: toyoda.satoshi.4w@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Oshima, M. [Department of Applied Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    We have studied the thickness-dependent change in the valence band offset (VBO) of the SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) interface using synchrotron-radiation photoemission spectroscopy with soft and hard X-rays. The SiO{sub 2}-film thickness (T{sub ox}) and X-ray irradiation time (t{sub irrad}) were systematically parameterized to distinguish between the “intrinsic” T{sub ox} effects in the VBOs and the “extrinsic” differential charging phenomena in SiO{sub 2} films on Si substrates. The results revealed that at a spontaneous time (t{sub irrad} ≈ 5 s) that suppresses the differential charging phenomena as much as possible, the experimental VBO abruptly increases as a function of T{sub ox} and gradually saturates to the traditional VBO value range determined by the internal photoemission and photoconduction measurements. This effect is not attributed to the differential charging phenomena, but rather it is attributed to the “intrinsic” T{sub ox}-dependent change in the VBO. The two possible physical behaviors include electronic polarization and image charge. We have derived the electronic polarization contribution from experimental data by carefully describing the effects of the long-range image charges based on the classical dielectric-screening model.

  19. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  20. Changes in symptom intensity and emotion valence during the process of assimilation of a problematic experience: A quantitative study of a good outcome case of cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Isabel; Pinheiro, Patrícia; Stiles, William B; Rijo, Daniel; Salgado, João

    2017-07-01

    The assimilation model describes the change process in psychotherapy. In this study we analyzed the relation of assimilation with changes in symptom intensity, measured session by session, and changes in emotional valence, measured for each emotional episode, in the case of a 33-year-old woman treated for depression with cognitive-behavioral therapy. Results showed the theoretically expected negative relation between assimilation of the client's main concerns and symptom intensity, and the relation between assimilation levels and emotional valence corresponded closely to the assimilation model's theoretical feelings curve. The results show how emotions work as markers of the client's current assimilation level, which could help the therapist adjust the intervention, moment by moment, to the client's needs.

  1. Valence skipping driven superconductivity and charge Kondo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. •Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. •The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. •We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. •There is a high temperature region near the boundary. -- Abstract: Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. The superconducting state is changed into a metallic state with a local singlet as the attractive interaction |U| increases. There is a high temperature region near the boundary

  2. Micro-Valences: Affective valence in neutral everyday objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eLebrecht

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Affective valence influences both our cognition and our perception of the world. Indeed, the speed and quality with which we recognize objects in a visual scene can vary dramatically depending on its affective content. However, affective processing of visual objects has been typically studied using only stimuli with strong affective valences (e.g., guns or roses. Here we explore whether affective valence must be strong or obvious to exert an effect on our perception. We conclude that the majority of objects carry some affective valence (micro-valences and, thus, nominally neutral objects are not really neutral. Functionally, the perception of valence in everyday objects facilitates perceptually-driven choice behavior, decision-making, and affective responses.

  3. Micro-Valences: Affective valence in neutral everyday objects

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie eLebrecht; Moshe eBar; Lisa F Barrett; Michael J Tarr

    2012-01-01

    Affective valence influences both our cognition and our perception of the world. Indeed, the speed and quality with which we recognize objects in a visual scene can vary dramatically depending on its affective content. However, affective processing of visual objects has been typically studied using only stimuli with strong affective valences (e.g., guns or roses). Here we explore whether affective valence must be strong or obvious to exert an effect on our perception. We conclude that the maj...

  4. 2:1 Charge disproportionation in perovskite-structure oxide La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} with unusually-high-valence Fe{sup 3.67+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Haichuan; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Seki, Hayato; Saito, Takashi; Ichikawa, Noriya [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi, E-mail: shimak@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Integrated Research Consortium on Chemical Sciences, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} with unusually-high-valence Fe{sup 3.67+} was synthesized at a high pressure and high temperature. The compound crystallizes in a √2a×2a×√2a perovskite cell in which the La and Ca ions at the A site are disordered. At 217 K the Fe{sup 3.67+} shows charge disproportionation to Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} in a ratio of 2:1, and this disproportionation is accompanied by transitions in magnetic and transport properties. The charge-disproportionated Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} are arranged along the <111> direction of the cubic perovskite cell. The local electronic and magnetic environments of Fe in La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} are quite similar to those of Fe in La{sub 1/3}Sr{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3}, and the 2:1 charge disproportionation pattern of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} in La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} is also the same as that in La{sub 1/3}Sr{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: The perovskite-structure oxide La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} with unusually-high-valence Fe{sup 3.67+} shows charge disproportionation to Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} in a ratio of 2:1, and the charge-disproportionated Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} are arranged along the <111> direction of the cubic perovskite cell. - Highlights: • La{sub 1/3}Ca{sub 2/3}FeO{sub 3} with unusually-high-valence Fe{sup 3.67+} was synthesized at a high pressure and high temperature. • At 217 K the Fe{sup 3.67+} shows charge disproportionation (CD) to Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} in a ratio of 2:1. • The charge-disproportionated Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 5+} are arranged along the <111> direction of the cubic perovskite cell. • The disproportionation is accompanied by transitions in magnetic and transport properties.

  5. Oxidative stress and histopathological changes induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: ... Oxidative stress has been proposed as a pos- sible mechanism involved .... to the Natural Health Institute of Health Guidelines for. Animal Care and ..... Journal of American College of.

  6. Electrochemical determination of the oxidation potentials and the thermodynamic stability of the valence states of the transuranium elements in aqueous alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation potentials of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in the valance states from (III) to (VII) have been determined experimentally in 0.1-15 M NaOH. Heptavalent plutonium and americium are thermodynamically able to oxidize water with the evolution of oxygen in 0.1-15 M NaOH, neptunium(VII) in 0.1-7 M NaOH. All valance states of plutonium resist disproportionation in alkaline solutions; in the case of neptunium and americium only one disproportionation reaction is possible; of the hexavalent state in to penta- and heptavalent states. The degree of completion of the reaction can be calculated accurately from the oxidation potentials determined

  7. Intermediate valence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schoenhammer, K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of intermediate valence compounds are studied using the Anderson model. Due to the large orbital and spin degeneracy N/sub f/ of the 4f-level, 1/N/sub f/ can be treated as a small parameter. This approach provides exact T = 0 results for the Anderson impurity model in the limit N/sub f/ → ∞, and by adding 1/N/sub f/ corrections some properties can be calculated accurately even for N/sub f/ = 1 or 2. In particular valence photoemission and resonance photoemission spectroscopies are studied. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra provides an estimate of the parameters in the model. Core level photoemission spectra provide estimates of the coupling between the f-level and the conduction states and of the f-level occupancy. With these parameters the model gives a fair description of other electron spectroscopies. For typical parameters the model predicts two structures in the f-spectrum, namely one structure at the f-level and one at the Fermi energy. The resonance photoemission calculation gives a photon energy dependence for these two peaks in fair agreement with experiment. The peak at the Fermi energy is partly due to a narrow Kondo resonance, resulting from many-body effects and the presence of a continuous, partly filled conduction band. This resonance is related to a large density of low-lying excitations, which explains the large susceptibility and specific heat observed for these systems at low temperatures. 38 references, 11 figures, 2 tables

  8. Oxidative stress and histopathological changes induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methyl-thiophanate (MT), a fungicide largely used in agriculture throughout the world including Tunisia, protects many vegetables, fruits and field crops against a wide spectrum of fungal diseases. Oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism involved in MT toxicity on non-target organism.

  9. Persistence of Mixed and Non-intermediate Valence in the High-Pressure Structure of Silver(I,III) Oxide, AgO: A Combined Raman, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Adam; Gawraczyński, Jakub; Jaroń, Tomasz; Somayazulu, Maddury; Derzsi, Mariana; Struzhkin, Viktor; Grochala, Wojciech

    2017-05-15

    The X-ray diffraction data collected up to ca. 56 GPa and the Raman spectra measured up to 74.8 GPa for AgO, or Ag I Ag III O 2 , which is a prototypical mixed valence (disproportionated) oxide, indicate that two consecutive phase transitions occur: the first-order phase transition occurs between 16.1 GPa and 19.7 GPa, and a second-order phase transition occurs at ca. 40 GPa. All polymorphic forms host the square planar [Ag III O 4 ] units typical of low-spin Ag III . The disproportionated Imma form persists at least up to 74.8 GPa, as indicated by Raman spectra. Theoretical hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the first-order transition is phonon-driven. AgO stubbornly remains disproportionated up to at least 100 GPa-in striking contrast to its copper analogue-and the fundamental band gap of AgO is ∼0.3 eV at this pressure and is weakly pressure-dependent. Metallization of AgO is yet to be achieved.

  10. Valence instabilities in cerium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the magnetic behaviour of cerium in intermetallic compounds, that show an IV behaviour, e.g. CeSn 3 . In the progress of the investigations, it became of interest to study the effect of changes in the lattice of the IV compound by substituting La or Y for Ce, thus constituting the Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)Sn 3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)Sn 3 quasibinary systems. A second purpose was to examine the possibility of introducing instabilities in the valency of a trivalent intermetallic cerium compound: CeIn 3 , also by La and Y-substitutions in the lattice. Measurements on the resulting Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)In 3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)In 3 quasibinaries are described. A third purpose was to study the (gradual) transition from a trivalent cerium compound into an IV cerium compound. This was done by examining the magnetic properties of the CeInsub(x)Snsub(3-x) and CePbsub(x)Snsub(3-x) systems. Finally a new possibility was investigated: that of the occurrence of IV behaviour in CeSi 2 , CeSi, and in CeGa 2 . (Auth.)

  11. Strong impacts on aerosol indirect effects from historical oxidant changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsahl Karset, Inger Helene; Koren Berntsen, Terje; Storelvmo, Trude; Alterskjær, Kari; Grini, Alf; Olivié, Dirk; Kirkevåg, Alf; Seland, Øyvind; Iversen, Trond; Schulz, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Uncertainties in effective radiative forcings through aerosol-cloud interactions (ERFaci, also called aerosol indirect effects) contribute strongly to the uncertainty in the total preindustrial-to-present-day anthropogenic forcing. Some forcing estimates of the total aerosol indirect effect are so negative that they even offset the greenhouse gas forcing. This study highlights the role of oxidants in modeling of preindustrial-to-present-day aerosol indirect effects. We argue that the aerosol precursor gases should be exposed to oxidants of its era to get a more correct representation of secondary aerosol formation. Our model simulations show that the total aerosol indirect effect changes from -1.32 to -1.07 W m-2 when the precursor gases in the preindustrial simulation are exposed to preindustrial instead of present-day oxidants. This happens because of a brightening of the clouds in the preindustrial simulation, mainly due to large changes in the nitrate radical (NO3). The weaker oxidative power of the preindustrial atmosphere extends the lifetime of the precursor gases, enabling them to be transported higher up in the atmosphere and towards more remote areas where the susceptibility of the cloud albedo to aerosol changes is high. The oxidation changes also shift the importance of different chemical reactions and produce more condensate, thus increasing the size of the aerosols and making it easier for them to activate as cloud condensation nuclei.

  12. Strong impacts on aerosol indirect effects from historical oxidant changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. H. H. Karset

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in effective radiative forcings through aerosol–cloud interactions (ERFaci, also called aerosol indirect effects contribute strongly to the uncertainty in the total preindustrial-to-present-day anthropogenic forcing. Some forcing estimates of the total aerosol indirect effect are so negative that they even offset the greenhouse gas forcing. This study highlights the role of oxidants in modeling of preindustrial-to-present-day aerosol indirect effects. We argue that the aerosol precursor gases should be exposed to oxidants of its era to get a more correct representation of secondary aerosol formation. Our model simulations show that the total aerosol indirect effect changes from −1.32 to −1.07 W m−2 when the precursor gases in the preindustrial simulation are exposed to preindustrial instead of present-day oxidants. This happens because of a brightening of the clouds in the preindustrial simulation, mainly due to large changes in the nitrate radical (NO3. The weaker oxidative power of the preindustrial atmosphere extends the lifetime of the precursor gases, enabling them to be transported higher up in the atmosphere and towards more remote areas where the susceptibility of the cloud albedo to aerosol changes is high. The oxidation changes also shift the importance of different chemical reactions and produce more condensate, thus increasing the size of the aerosols and making it easier for them to activate as cloud condensation nuclei.

  13. Valence states and occupation sites in (Fe,Mn){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel oxides investigated by soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H J; Kim, G; Kim, D H; Kang, J-S [Department of Physics, Catholic University of Korea (CUK), Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, C L; Cheong, S-W [Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Shim, J H; Lee, Soonchil [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hangil; Kim, J-Y [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, B H; Min, B I [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kangjs@catholic.ac.kr

    2008-07-23

    The electronic structures of (Fe,Mn){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel oxides have been investigated by employing soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). We have determined the valence states as well as the occupation sites of Mn and Fe ions in Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 2.1}O{sub 4} and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 2.1}O{sub 4} is found to be close to the inverse spinel (the inversion parameter y{approx}0.85), while MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is close to the normal spinel (y{approx}0.2). In Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 2.1}O{sub 4}, Fe ions are mainly trivalent and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupy the octahedral B sites, while Mn ions are mixed-valent with approximately 45% Mn{sub A}{sup 2+} at the tetrahedral A sites and 55% Mn{sub B}{sup 3+} ions at the octahedral B sites. In MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Mn ions are mainly divalent and the majority of Mn{sup 2+} ions occupy the tetrahedral A sites, while Fe ions are mainly trivalent and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupy the octahedral B sites.

  14. Localized description of valence fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alascio, B.; Allub, R.; Aligia, A.

    1979-07-01

    The authors set up a model for intermediate valence equivalent to the ''atomic'' limit of the Anderson Hamiltonian. Detailed analysis of this model shows that most of the essential characteristics of valence fluctuators are already present in this crudely simplified Hamiltonian. The spin-spin and the 4f charge-charge correlation functions are studied and it is shown that it is possible to define a spin fluctuation frequency ωsub(s.f.) and a charge fluctuation frequency ωsub(ch.f.).ωsub(s.f.) and ωsub(ch.f.) can differ considerably for some values of the parameters of the model. The magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are calculated as functions of temperature and it is shown how the results simulate the behaviour found in valence fluctuators. (author)

  15. Emotional valence and the free-energy principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffily, Mateus; Coricelli, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The free-energy principle has recently been proposed as a unified Bayesian account of perception, learning and action. Despite the inextricable link between emotion and cognition, emotion has not yet been formulated under this framework. A core concept that permeates many perspectives on emotion is valence, which broadly refers to the positive and negative character of emotion or some of its aspects. In the present paper, we propose a definition of emotional valence in terms of the negative rate of change of free-energy over time. If the second time-derivative of free-energy is taken into account, the dynamics of basic forms of emotion such as happiness, unhappiness, hope, fear, disappointment and relief can be explained. In this formulation, an important function of emotional valence turns out to regulate the learning rate of the causes of sensory inputs. When sensations increasingly violate the agent's expectations, valence is negative and increases the learning rate. Conversely, when sensations increasingly fulfil the agent's expectations, valence is positive and decreases the learning rate. This dynamic interaction between emotional valence and learning rate highlights the crucial role played by emotions in biological agents' adaptation to unexpected changes in their world.

  16. Emotional valence and the free-energy principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Joffily

    Full Text Available The free-energy principle has recently been proposed as a unified Bayesian account of perception, learning and action. Despite the inextricable link between emotion and cognition, emotion has not yet been formulated under this framework. A core concept that permeates many perspectives on emotion is valence, which broadly refers to the positive and negative character of emotion or some of its aspects. In the present paper, we propose a definition of emotional valence in terms of the negative rate of change of free-energy over time. If the second time-derivative of free-energy is taken into account, the dynamics of basic forms of emotion such as happiness, unhappiness, hope, fear, disappointment and relief can be explained. In this formulation, an important function of emotional valence turns out to regulate the learning rate of the causes of sensory inputs. When sensations increasingly violate the agent's expectations, valence is negative and increases the learning rate. Conversely, when sensations increasingly fulfil the agent's expectations, valence is positive and decreases the learning rate. This dynamic interaction between emotional valence and learning rate highlights the crucial role played by emotions in biological agents' adaptation to unexpected changes in their world.

  17. Valence effects on adsorption: a preliminary assessment of the effects on valence state control on sorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.; Shiao, S.Y.; Palmer, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical arguments are advanced to illustrate that what is usually measured in practice is a mixed potential determined by the kinetics of the electrode processes occurring at the indicator electrode. Valence states can be altered electrochemically or by use of added chemical reagents, including redox couples which can hold the potential to relatively specific potentials. The disadvantage of added chemical reagents is that they may alter the characteristics of the sorption reactions by interaction with the sorbent. Electrochemical methods are versatile and do not add reagents, but in some caes the nuclide can adsorb on the electrode itself. A description is given of the application of the electrochemical method of valence control to determination of sorption of Np(V) on alumina. Valence state control and analysis can be used to study possible redox reactions on materials which might be used as backfill materials. A description is given of survey experiments with a number of sulfides and iron-containing materials. Valence state analysis is used on the initial solutions and leachate from acid leaches of the sorbent after the sorption experiment to help determine whether valence state change is occurring. The preliminary results indicate that on the sulfides tested, sorption occurs both with and without valence state change

  18. Change in the conversion rate for the E3-isomer sup(235m)U (76,8 eV; 1/2+ → 7/2-) at variation of configurations of the valence band of the atomic shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechukhin, D.P.; Soldatov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In the framework of the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater method, a change of the conversion rate lambda for the E3 isomer (at the transition energy of h/2πω=77 eV) with respect to the rate lambda for the normal configuration of uranium atom, (7ssup(1/2)sup(2)(6dsup(3/2))sup(1)(5fsup(5/2))sup(3), is calcUlated for 14 configurations of the valence band of the atomic shell, including considerable variations of the occupation numbers in 6d, 7s, and 5f orbits. A very strong change Δlambda/lambda 1 is found to be due to variation of the occupation number for the 5f orbit (ΔN(5f) not equal to 0); the change amounts to about 8% per ΔN(5f)=+-1, that is an order of magnitude higher than Δlambda/lambda 1 due to variations of the occupation numbers for other orbits in the cases where N(5f)=const. Though the direct contribution from the 5f electrons to the conversion is very small ( 1 for ΔN(5f) not equal to 0. A rigid correlation between the partial conversion rate and the r. m. s. radius of the orbit is obtained for 6p orbits

  19. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundim, K.C.; Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author) [pt

  20. THE VALENCE OF CORPUSCULAR PROTEINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, M H; Mover, L S

    1942-07-20

    BY THE USE OF TWO EXTREME MODELS: a hydrated sphere and an unhydrated rod the valence (net charge) of corpuscular proteins can be successfully calculated from electric mobility data by the Debye-Hückel theory (modified to include the effect of the ions in the ion atmosphere) in conjunction with the electrophoretic theory of Henry. As pointed out by Abramson, this permits a comparison with values for the valence from titration data. Electrometric titration measurements of serum albumin B (Kekwick) have been determined at several ionic strengths. These results, together with the available data in the literature for serum albumin B, egg albumin, and beta-lactoglobulin have been used to compare values for the valence calculated from measurements of titration, electrophoresis, and membrane potentials. The results indicate that the usual interpretation of titration curves is open to serious question. By extrapolation of the titration data to zero ionic strength and protein concentration, there results an "intrinsic" net charge curve describing the binding of H(+) (OH(-)) ion alone. This curve agrees closely, in each case, with values of the valence calculated from mobility data (which in turn are in close accord with those estimated from membrane potential measurements). The experimental titration curves in the presence of appreciable quantities of ions and protein deviate widely from the ideal curve. It is suggested that, under these conditions, binding of undissociated acid (base) leads to erroneous values for the net charge. This binding would not affect the electrophoretic mobility. Values of the net charge obtained by the two extreme models from electrophoretic data are in agreement within 15 to 20 per cent. The agreement between the cylindrical model and the titration data is somewhat better in each case than with the sphere; i.e., this comparison enables a choice to be made between asymmetry and hydration in the interpretation of results from sedimentation and

  1. Valency stabilization of Polyvalent Iron Ions in Solution By some Organic additives during Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.F.; Abdel Hamid, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Valency stabilization of polyvalent ions in gamma irradiated aqueous solutions is sometimes necessary for the success of some chemical operations. In some previous publications valency stabilization of some polyvalent ions in solution upon gamma irradiation was achieved by using additives capable of interacting with the oxidizing or reducing species formed by water radiolysis in the medium. The results showed that the duration of valency stabilization depends on the concentration of the additives used.In the present work, a series of some organic additives has been used to investigate their capability in inducing valency stabilization of polyvalent iron ions when subjected to extended gamma irradiation periods. The results showed that the efficiency of valency stabilization depends on the amount and chemical structure of the organic additive used

  2. Oxidative Stress to the Cornea, Changes in Corneal Optical Properties, and Advances in Treatment of Corneal Oxidative Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cestmir Cejka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

  3. Measurement of valence band structure in arbitrary dielectric films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun H.

    2012-01-01

    A new way of measuring the band structure of various dielectric materials using the secondary electron emission from Auger neutralization of ions is introduced. The first example of this measurement scheme is the magnesium oxide (MgO) films with respect to the application of the films in the display industries. The density of state in the valence bands of MgO film and MgO film with a functional layer (FL) deposited over a dielectric surface reveals that the density peak of film with a FL is considerably less than that of film, thereby indicating a better performance of MgO film with functional layer in display devices. The second example of the measurement is the boron-zinc oxide (BZO) films with respect to the application of the films to the development of solar cells. The measurement of density of state in BZO film suggests that a high concentration of boron impurity in BZO films may enhance the transition of electrons and holes through the band gap from the valence to the conduction band in zinc oxide crystals; thereby improving the conductivity of the film. Secondary electron emission by the Auger neutralization of ions is highly instrumental for the determination of the density of states in the valence band of dielectric materials.

  4. Switching behavior of resistive change memory using oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Takashige; Sugawa, Kosuke; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso; Takase, Kouichi

    2018-06-01

    Resistive change random access memory (ReRAM), which is expected to be the next-generation nonvolatile memory, often has wide switching voltage distributions due to many kinds of conductive filaments. In this study, we have tried to suppress the distribution through the structural restriction of the filament-forming area using NiO nanowires. The capacitor with Ni metal nanowires whose surface is oxidized showed good switching behaviors with narrow distributions. The knowledge gained from our study will be very helpful in producing practical ReRAM devices.

  5. Contribution to the study of higher valency states of americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlet, Jean.

    1976-01-01

    Study of the chemistry of the higher valencies of americium in aqueous solutions and especially the autoreduction phenomenon. First a purification method of americium solutions is studied by precipitation, solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Studies of higher valency states chemical properties are disturbed by the autoreduction phenomenon changing Am VI and Am V in Am III more stable. Stabilization of higher valency states, characterized by a steady concentration of Am VI in solution, can be done by complexation of Am VI and Am V ions or by a protecting effect of foreign ions. The original medium used has a complexing effect by SO 4 2- ions and a protecting effect by the system S 2 O 8 2- -Ag + consuming H 2 O 2 main reducing agent produced by water radiolysis. These effects are shown by the study of Am VI in acid and basic solutions. A mechanism of the stabilization effect is given [fr

  6. Valence configurations in 214Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Bark, R.A.; Poletti, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Excited states of 214 Rn, up to spins of ≅ 24 ℎ have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the 208 Pb( 9 Be,3n) 214 Rn reaction. The level scheme (which differs substantially from earlier work) is compared with the results of a semi-empirical shell model calculation. The availability of high-spin orbitals for the four valence protons and two valence neutrons, and the effect of the attractive proton-neutron interaction, leads to the prediction of high-spin states at an unusually low excitation energy. Experimentally, the high level density leads to difficulties in the level scheme assignments at high spin. Nevertheless, configuration assignments, supported by transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes (in the nanosecond region) are suggested for the main yrast states. The decay properties also suggest that configuration mixing is important. The possibility of a gradual transition to octupole deformation, implied by the decay properties of the 11 - and 10 + yrast states is also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Influence of variable tungsten valency on optical transmittance and radiation hardness of lead tungstate (PWO) scintillation crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Burachas, S; Makov, I; Saveliev, Yu; Ippolitov, M S; Man'ko, V; Nikulin, S P; Nyanin, A; Vasilev, A; Apanasenko, A; Tamulaitis, G

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to interpret the radiation hardness of PbWO//4 (PWO) scintillators is developed by revealing importance of the inclusions of tungsten oxides WO//3//-//x with variable valency. It is demonstrated that the influence of the ionizing radiation on PWO is, in many aspects, similar to the effect of the high-temperature annealing in oxygenless ambient. In both cases, a valency change of the tungsten oxides is initiated and results in induced absorption and, consequently, in crystal coloration. In the PWO crystals doped with L//2O//3 (L = Y, La, Gd), the radiation hardness and the optical properties are mainly affected by inclusions of W//1//-//yL//yO//3//- //x (0 less than x less than 0.3) instead of inclusions of WO//3//- //x prevailing in the undoped samples. It is demonstrated that the radiation-induced bleaching and the photochromic effect of PWO are caused by phase transitions in the inclusions of tungsten oxide. Thermodynamic conditions for the phase transitions are discussed and the optimal oxid...

  8. Spin and spinless conductivity in polypyrrole. Evidence for mixed-valence conduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotti, G.; Schiavon, G. (Ist. di Polarografia ed Elettrochimica Preparativa, Padova (Italy))

    In situ conductivity of polypyrrole (as tosylate) as a function of oxidative doping level attains a maximum at three-quarters the total oxidation charge and the relevant in situ ESR signal corresponds to an equal concentration of spin-carrying (polaron) and spinless (bipolaron) species. Results are explained on the basis of mixed-valence conduction. Bipolaron conduction, taking the place of polaron-bipolaron conductivity at higher oxidation levels, accounts for persisting conductivity in the high-oxidation state.

  9. Valence instabilities as a source of actinide system inconsistencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Light actinide elements alone, and in some of their alloys, may exist as a static or dynamic mixture of two configurations. Such a state can explain both a resistivity maximum and lack of magnetic order observed in so many actinide materials, and still be compatible with the existence of f-electrons in narrow bands. Impurity elements may stabilize slightly different intermediate valence states in U, Np, and Pu, thus contributing to inconsistencies in published results. The physical property behavior of mixed-valence, rare-earth compounds is very much like that observed in development of antiphase (martensitic) structures. Martensitic transformations in U, Np, and Pu, from high-temperature b. c. c. to alpha phase, may be a way of ordering an alloy-like metal of mixed or intermediate valence. The relative stability of each phase structure may depend upon its electron-valence ratio. A Hubbard model for electron correlations in a narrow energy band has been invoked in most recent theories for explaining light actinide behavior. Such a model may also be applicable to crystal symmetry changes in martensitic transformations in actinides

  10. Valence, magnetism and conduction in the intermediate valence compounds: the case SmB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derr, J.

    2006-09-01

    In some rare earth based compounds, the 4f level is situated so close to the Fermi level that the valence of the compound can become intermediate between two integer values. The so called 'intermediate valence' compound of Samarium hexaboride (SmB 6 ) is one typical example of the exciting physics which can result from this quantum equilibrium between two valence configurations. The first configuration (Sm 2+ ) corresponds to an insulating and non magnetic state whereas the second one (Sm 3+ ) would theoretically give a magnetic and metallic ground state. This dissertation deals with the influence of pressure on this equilibrium. Specific heat measurements under pressure evidenced a new long range magnetic ordering for pressures higher than p c ∼ 10 GPa. On another hand, transport measurements measured for the first time in good conditions of hydrostatics found a reliable and reproducible critical pressure for the insulator to metal transition equal to p c . The phase diagram of SmB 6 is now well known and the observation for the first time of a magnetic anomaly in the high pressure resistivity curves certifies that the onset of the magnetic phase really coincide with the closure of the gap. This change at the critical pressure p c is discussed in a general frame taking into account the Kondo lattice temperature as a key parameter for the renormalization of the wavefunction from one integer configuration to the other whereas the valence itself is still intermediate. This general idea seems to be valid also for other systems studied in this dissertation like SmS or TmSe and could even be valid for more general cases (Ytterbium, Cerium). In the same time, resistivity measurements under uniaxial stress were undertaken. The result is a strong anisotropy effect observed on the pressure dependence of the residual resistivity in the compound SmB 6 . The comparison with the transport under hydrostatic conditions enables us to consider a new idea for the nature of the gap

  11. Chromium valences in ureilite olivine and implications for ureilite petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Wirick, S.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ureilites are a group of ultramafic achondrites commonly thought to be residues of partial melting on a carbon-rich asteroid. They show a large variation in FeO content (olivine Fo values ranging from ∼74 to 95) that cannot be due to igneous fractionation and suggests instead variation in oxidation state. The presence of chromite in only a few of the most ferroan (Fo 75-76) samples appears to support such a model. MicroXANES analyses were used in this study to determine the valence states of Cr (previously unknown) in olivine cores of 11 main group ureilites. The goal of this work was to use a method that is independent of Fo to determine the oxidation conditions under which ureilites formed, in order to evaluate whether the ureilite FeO-variation is correlated with oxidation state, and whether it is nebular or planetary in origin. Two of the analyzed samples, LEW 88774 (Fo 74.2) and NWA 766 (Fo 76.7) contain primary chromite; two others, LAP 03587 (Fo 74.4) and CMS 04048 (Fo 76.2) contain sub-micrometer-sized exsolutions of chromite + Ca-rich pyroxene in olivine; and one, EET 96328 (Fo 85.2) contains an unusual chromite grain of uncertain origin. No chromite has been observed in the remaining six samples (Fo 77.4-92.3). Chromium in olivine in all eleven samples was found to be dominated by the divalent species, with valences ranging from 2.10 ± 0.02 (1σ) to 2.46 ± 0.04. The non-chromite-bearing ureilites have the most reduced Cr, with a weighted mean valence of 2.12 ± 0.01, i.e., Cr2+/Cr3+ = 7.33. All low-Fo chromite-bearing ureilites have more oxidized Cr, with valences ranging from 2.22 ± 0.03 to 2.46 ± 0.04. EET 96328, whose chromite grain we interpret as a late-crystallizing phase, yielded a reduced Cr valence of 2.15 ± 0.07, similar to the non-chromite-bearing samples. Based on the measured Cr valences, magmatic (1200-1300 °C) oxygen fugacities (fO2) of the non-chromite-bearing samples were estimated to be in the range IW-1.9 to IW-2.8 (assuming

  12. Valence evaluation with approaching or withdrawing cues: directly testing valence-arousal conflict theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Mei; Li, Ting; Li, Lin

    2017-07-19

    The valence-arousal conflict theory assumes that both valence and arousal will trigger approaching or withdrawing tendencies. It also predicts that the speed of processing emotional stimuli will depend on whether valence and arousal trigger conflicting or congruent motivational tendencies. However, most previous studies have provided evidence of the interaction between valence and arousal only, and have not provided direct proof of the interactive links between valence, arousal and motivational tendencies. The present study provides direct evidence for the relationship between approach-withdrawal tendencies and the valence-arousal conflict. In an empirical test, participants were instructed to judge the valence of emotional words after visual-spatial cues that appeared to be either approaching or withdrawing from participants. A three-way interaction (valence, arousal, and approach-withdrawal tendency) was observed such that the response time was shorter if participants responded to a negative high-arousal stimulus after a withdrawing cue, or to a positive low-arousal stimulus after an approaching cue. These findings suggest that the approach-withdrawal tendency indeed plays a crucial role in valence-arousal conflict, and that the effect depends on the congruency of valence, arousal and tendency at an early stage of processing.

  13. Ab initio valence calculations in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, D B

    1974-01-01

    Ab Initio Valence Calculations in Chemistry describes the theory and practice of ab initio valence calculations in chemistry and applies the ideas to a specific example, linear BeH2. Topics covered include the Schrödinger equation and the orbital approximation to atomic orbitals; molecular orbital and valence bond methods; practical molecular wave functions; and molecular integrals. Open shell systems, molecular symmetry, and localized descriptions of electronic structure are also discussed. This book is comprised of 13 chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the use of the Schrödinge

  14. On triangle meshes with valence dominant vertices

    KAUST Repository

    Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    We study triangulations $\\cal T$ defined on a closed disc $X$ satisfying the following condition: In the interior of $X$, the valence of all vertices of $\\cal T$ except one of them (the irregular vertex) is $6$. By using a flat singular Riemannian metric adapted to $\\cal T$, we prove a uniqueness theorem when the valence of the irregular vertex is not a multiple of $6$. Moreover, for a given integer $k >1$, we exhibit non isomorphic triangulations on $X$ with the same boundary, and with a unique irregular vertex whose valence is $6k$.

  15. On triangle meshes with valence dominant vertices

    KAUST Repository

    Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2018-02-16

    We study triangulations $\\\\cal T$ defined on a closed disc $X$ satisfying the following condition: In the interior of $X$, the valence of all vertices of $\\\\cal T$ except one of them (the irregular vertex) is $6$. By using a flat singular Riemannian metric adapted to $\\\\cal T$, we prove a uniqueness theorem when the valence of the irregular vertex is not a multiple of $6$. Moreover, for a given integer $k >1$, we exhibit non isomorphic triangulations on $X$ with the same boundary, and with a unique irregular vertex whose valence is $6k$.

  16. Changes in physical properties of graphene oxide with thermal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Bhishma; Jo, Chang Hee; Joo, Kwan Seon; Cho, Jaehee

    2017-08-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted significant attention as an easily fabricable twodimensional material. Depending on the oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) in an rGO specimen, the optical and electrical properties can vary significantly, directly affecting the performance of devices in which rGO is implemented. Here, we investigated the optical and electrical properties of GO treated with various annealing (reduction) temperatures from 350 to 950 °C in H2 ambient. Using diverse characteristic tools, we found that the transmittance, nanoscale domain size, OFGs in GO and rGO, and Schottky barrier height (SBH) measured on n-type GaN are significantly influenced by the annealing temperature. The relative intensity of the defect-induced band in Raman spectroscopy showed a minimum at the annealing temperature of approximately 350 °C, before the OFGs in rGO showed vigorous changes in relative content. When the domain size of rGO reached a minimum at the annealing temperature of 650 °C, the SBH of rGO/GaN showed the maximum value of 1.07 eV.

  17. Changes in Physical Properties of Graphene Oxide with Thermal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Bhishma; Jo, Chang Hee; Joo, Kwan Seon; Cho, Jaehee [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted significant attention as an easily fabricable two dimensional material. Depending on the oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) in an rGO specimen, the optical and electrical properties can vary significantly, directly affecting the performance of devices in which rGO is implemented. Here, we investigated the optical and electrical properties of GO treated with various annealing (reduction) temperatures from 350 to 950 ℃ in H2 ambient. Using diverse characteristic tools, we found that the transmittance, nanoscale domain size, OFGs in GO and rGO, and Schottky barrier height (SBH) measured on n-type GaN are significantly influenced by the annealing temperature. The relative intensity of the defect-induced band in Raman spectroscopy showed a minimum at the annealing temperature of approximately 350 ℃, before the OFGs in rGO showed vigorous changes in relative content. When the domain size of rGO reached a minimum at the annealing temperature of 650 ℃, the SBH of rGO/GaN showed the maximum value of 1.07 eV.

  18. Valence nucleons in self-consistent fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Toro, M.; Lomnitz-Adler, J.

    1978-01-01

    An iterative approach to determine directly the best Hartree-Fock one-body density rho is extended by expressing rho in terms of a core and a valence part and allowing for general crossings of occupied and unoccupied levels in the valence part. Results are shown for 152 Sm and a microscopic analysis of the core structure of deformed light nuclei is carried out. (author)

  19. Intestinal nitric oxide synthase activity changes during experimental colon obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palásthy, Zsolt; Kaszaki, József; Lázár, György; Nagy, Sándor; Boros, Mihály

    2006-08-01

    The experiments in this study were designed to follow the time course of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the large bowel during acute mechanical ileus. Occlusion of the mid-transverse colon was maintained for 420 min in anesthetized dogs. Strain-gauge transducers were used to analyze motility changes on the hepatic and lienal flexures, respectively. Constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) activities were determined in tissue biopsies, and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) level was measured in the portal blood. Following completion of the baseline studies, the animals were treated with either 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, selective neuronal NOS inhibitor), or N-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, non-selective NOS inhibitor). In the sham-operated group the cNOS activities differed significantly in the oral and aboral tissue samples (oral: 102.9; versus aboral: 62.1 fmol/mg protein/min). The obstruction elicited a significant increase in portal NOx and elevated tissue inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity. NNA treatment decreased the motility index in both intestinal segments for 60 min, but 120 min later the motility index was significantly elevated (2.5-fold increase in the oral part, and 1.8-fold enhancement in the aboral segment, respectively). Treatment with 7-NI decreased the cNOS activity in the oral and aboral parts by approximately 40% and 70%, respectively, and suppressed the motility increase in the aboral colon segment. The motility of the colon was either significantly increased or decreased, depending on the type and selectivity of the NOS inhibitor compounds applied. NO of neuronal origin is a transmitter that stimulates peristaltic activity; but an increased iNOS/nNOS ratio significantly moderates the obstruction-induced motility increase.

  20. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-20

    Jan 20, 2013 ... activated sludge in batch reactors under different initial phenol concentrations. ... wet air oxidation, ozonation, non-catalytic, catalytic and ... design of aeration devices. ... using an open (flowing gas/static liquid) respirometer.

  1. Theory of Valence Transitions in Ytterbium and Europium Intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatic, V.; Freericks, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    The exact solution of the multi-component Falicov-Kimball model in infinite-dimensions is presented and used to discuss a new fixed point of valence fluctuating intermetallics with Yb and Eu ions. In these compounds, temperature, external magnetic field, pressure, or chemical pressure induce a transition between a metallic state with the f-ions in a mixed-valent (non-magnetic) configuration and a semi-metallic state with the f-ions in an integral-valence (paramagnetic) configuration. The zero-field transition occurs at the temperature T V , while the zero-temperature transition sets in at the critical field H c . We present the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the model for an arbitrary concentration of d- and f -electrons. For large U, we find a MI transition, triggered by the temperature or field- induced change in the f-occupancy. (author)

  2. Change in the work function of zirconium by oxidation at high temperatures and low oxygen pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Naito, Shizuo; Mabuchi, Mahito; Hashino, Tomoyasu

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the work function of zirconium on oxidation are measured at oxygen pressures of 3.0 x 10 -6 - 3.0 x 10 -4 Pa and at temperatures in the range 426-775 K. The work function first decreases then increases until a final saturation stage is reached. Use of secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) shows that the changes correspond to oxygen adsorption, oxide nucleation and oxide growth, respectively. The initial decrease in work function is interpreted by the incorporation of oxygen adatoms into the subsurface. The oxygen adsorption potential of zirconium is evaluated by an effective medium theory, and the physical origin of the incorporation of oxygen adatoms is discussed. The positive change in the work function caused by oxide formation and the temperature and pressure dependences of the change in the work function by oxidation are explained qualitatively. (author)

  3. Valence holes observed in nanodiamonds dispersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Pflüger, Mika; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Xiao, Jie; Aziz, Emad F.

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed.Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, details on XAS/XES normalization and background correction procedures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06639a

  4. Core and Valence Structures in K beta X-ray Emission Spectra of Chromium Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Deluigi, Maria; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Lopez-Diaz, Gaston; Tirao, German; Stutz, Guillermo; Riveros de la Vega, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the core and valence transitions in chromium in a series of materials with a number of different ligands and including the oxidation states: Cr-II, Cr-III, Cr-IV, and Cr-VI. To study the core-to-core transitions we employ the CTM4XAS program and investigate the shapes, widths,

  5. [Emotional valence of words in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalenques, I; Enjolras, J; Izaute, M

    2013-06-01

    Emotion recognition is a domain in which deficits have been reported in schizophrenia. A number of emotion classification studies have indicated that emotion processing deficits in schizophrenia are more pronounced for negative affects. Given the difficulty of developing material suitable for the study of these emotional deficits, it would be interesting to examine whether patients suffering from schizophrenia are responsive to positively and negatively charged emotion-related words that could be used within the context of remediation strategies. The emotional perception of words was examined in a clinical experiment involving schizophrenia patients. This emotional perception was expressed by the patients in terms of the valence associated with the words. In the present study, we investigated whether schizophrenia patients would assign the same negative and positive valences to words as healthy individuals. Twenty volunteer, clinically stable, outpatients from the Psychiatric Service of the University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand were recruited. Diagnoses were based on DSM-IV criteria. Global psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). The patients had to evaluate the emotional valence of a set of 300 words on a 5-point scale ranging from "very unpleasant" to "very pleasant". . The collected results were compared with those obtained by Bonin et al. (2003) [13] from 97 University students. Correlational analyses of the two studies revealed that the emotional valences were highly correlated, i.e. the schizophrenia patients estimated very similar emotional valences. More precisely, it was possible to examine three separate sets of 100 words each (positive words, neutral words and negative words). The positive words that were evaluated were the more positive words from the norms collected by Bonin et al. (2003) [13], and the negative words were the more negative examples taken from these norms. The neutral words

  6. Oxidative stress participates in age-related changes in rat lumbar intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gang; Lu, Huading; Chen, Mingjuan; Yao, Hui; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a major factor associated with lumber intervertebral disc degeneration, and oxidative stress is known to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress in intervertebral discs of Wistar rats in three different age groups: youth, adult, and geriatric. Age-related intervertebral disc changes were examined by histological analysis. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated by assessing nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs). Intervertebral disc, but not serum, NO concentrations significantly differed between the three groups. Serum and intervertebral disc SOD activity gradually decreased with age. Furthermore, both serum and intervertebral disc MDA and AOPP levels gradually increased with age. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress is associated with age-related intervertebral disc changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Change of properties after oxidation of IG-11 graphite by air and CO2 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun-Soo; Chi, Se-Hwan; Cho, Kwang-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Artificial graphite is typically manufactured by carbonization of a shaped body of a kneaded mixture using granular cokes as a filler and pitch as a binder. It undergoes a pitch impregnation process if necessary and finally applying graphitization heat treatment. The effect of thermal oxidation in air or a CO 2 atmosphere on IG-11 graphite samples is investigated in this study. The results show a localized oxidation process that progressively reveals the large coke particles with increasing level of overall weight loss in air. The surface of the graphite was peeled off and no change was found in the specific gravity after air oxidation. However, the specific gravity of graphite was continuously decreased by CO 2 oxidation. The decrease in the specific gravity by CO 2 oxidation was due to CO 2 gas that progressed from the surface to the interior. The pore shape after CO 2 oxidation differed from that under air oxidation

  8. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the aerobic degradation of phenol by acclimated activated sludge was studied. Results demonstrate that while the phenol removal rate by acclimated activated sludge follows the Monod model, the oxygen uptake rate obeys a Haldane-type equation. The phenol oxidation coefficient obtained at different intial ...

  9. Phase change induced by polypyrrole in iron-oxide polypyrrole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    polymer. Polypyrrole, one of the conducting polymers, has received lot of attention in the preparation of nanocomposites due to its high stability in conducting oxidized form (Partch et al 1991; Huang and Matijevic. 1995; Maeda and Armes 1995). Nanocomposite materials based on nanosized magnetic materials have been ...

  10. Nitrous oxide flux under changing temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are investigating nitrous oxide flux seasonal trends and response to temperature and CO2 increases in a boreal peatland. Peatlands located in boreal regions make up a third of global wetland area and are expected to have the highest temperature increases in response to climat...

  11. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds.

  12. Decoding emotional valence from electroencephalographic rhythmic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkanat, Hande; Moriya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Hyvarinen, Aapo

    2017-07-01

    We attempt to decode emotional valence from electroencephalographic rhythmic activity in a naturalistic setting. We employ a data-driven method developed in a previous study, Spectral Linear Discriminant Analysis, to discover the relationships between the classification task and independent neuronal sources, optimally utilizing multiple frequency bands. A detailed investigation of the classifier provides insight into the neuronal sources related with emotional valence, and the individual differences of the subjects in processing emotions. Our findings show: (1) sources whose locations are similar across subjects are consistently involved in emotional responses, with the involvement of parietal sources being especially significant, and (2) even though the locations of the involved neuronal sources are consistent, subjects can display highly varying degrees of valence-related EEG activity in the sources.

  13. Obesity and Age-Related Changes in Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Across Four Generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Picavet, H. Susan J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gansevoort, Ron T; Dollé, Martijn E T; Smit, Henriette A; Monique Verschuren, W M

    OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of obesity increases with age and is higher in each younger generation (unfavorable generation shift). This may influence patterns of oxidative stress and inflammation. Age-related changes and generation shifts in markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were

  14. Obesity and Age-Related Changes in Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Across Four Generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Susan, H; Picavet, J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gansevoort, Ron T; Dollé, Martijn E T; Smit, Henriette A; Monique Verschuren, W M

    ObjectiveThe prevalence of obesity increases with age and is higher in each younger generation (unfavorable generation shift). This may influence patterns of oxidative stress and inflammation. Age-related changes and generation shifts in markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were

  15. Emotions and false memories: valence or arousal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Yves; Verrier, Nadège

    2007-03-01

    The effects of mood on false memories have not been studied systematically until recently. Some results seem to indicate that negative mood may reduce false recall and thus suggest an influence of emotional valence on false memory. The present research tested the effects of both valence and arousal on recall and recognition and indicates that the effect is actually due to arousal. In fact, whether participants' mood is positive, negative, or neutral, false memories are significantly more frequent under conditions of high arousal than under conditions of low arousal.

  16. Valence electronic properties of porphyrin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenuit, G; Castellarin-Cudia, C; Plekan, O; Feyer, V; Prince, K C; Goldoni, A; Umari, P

    2010-09-28

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the valence electronic structure of porphyrin-derived molecules. The valence photoemission spectra of the free-base tetraphenylporphyrin and of the octaethylporphyrin molecule were measured using synchrotron radiation and compared with theoretical spectra calculated using the GW method and the density-functional method within the generalized gradient approximation. Only the GW results could reproduce the experimental data. We found that the contribution to the orbital energies due to electronic correlations has the same linear behavior in both molecules, with larger deviations in the vicinity of the HOMO level. This shows the importance of adequate treatment of electronic correlations in these organic systems.

  17. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid in Osteoarthritis Patients ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and moderate phase patients after intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate, while the effect ...

  18. Oxidation flux change on spermatozoa membrane in important pathologic conditions leading to male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2008-06-01

    Free radicals or reactive oxygen species mediate their action through proinflammatory cytokines and this mechanism has been proposed as a common underlying factor for male infertility. There is extensive literature on oxidative stress and its role in male infertility and sperm DNA damage and its effects on assisted reproductive techniques. However, there has never been a report on the oxidation flux change in spermatozoa. Here, the author determined the oxidation flux change in such hypoxic cases, using the simulation test based on nanomedicine technique is used. Of interest, change of flux can be detected. The main pathogenesis should be the direct injury of membrane structure of spermatozoa by free radicals which can lead to sperm defect. Therefore, this work can support the finding that the oxidation flux change corresponding to oxygen pressure change in spermatozoa does not exist. However, the flux change can be seen if the membrane thickness of spermatozoa is varied. Thin membrane spermatozoa are more prone to oxidative stress than thick membrane ones. The defect in the enzymatic system within the spermatozoa should be a better explanation for vulnerability of spermatozoa to oxidative stress. The use of enzymatic modification technique by antioxidants can be useful alternative in management of male infertility.

  19. Double-valence-fluctuating molecules and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Scalapino, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of ''double-valence-fluctuating'' molecules, having two ground-state configurations differing by two electrons. We propose a possible realization of such a molecule, and experimental ways to look for it. We argue that a weakly coupled array of such molecules should give rise to a strong-coupling Shafroth-Blatt-Butler superconductor, with a high transition temperature

  20. NEVER forget: negative emotional valence enhances recapitulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Holly J; Kark, Sarah M; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2017-07-10

    A hallmark feature of episodic memory is that of "mental time travel," whereby an individual feels they have returned to a prior moment in time. Cognitive and behavioral neuroscience methods have revealed a neurobiological counterpart: Successful retrieval often is associated with reactivation of a prior brain state. We review the emerging literature on memory reactivation and recapitulation, and we describe evidence for the effects of emotion on these processes. Based on this review, we propose a new model: Negative Emotional Valence Enhances Recapitulation (NEVER). This model diverges from existing models of emotional memory in three key ways. First, it underscores the effects of emotion during retrieval. Second, it stresses the importance of sensory processing to emotional memory. Third, it emphasizes how emotional valence - whether an event is negative or positive - affects the way that information is remembered. The model specifically proposes that, as compared to positive events, negative events both trigger increased encoding of sensory detail and elicit a closer resemblance between the sensory encoding signature and the sensory retrieval signature. The model also proposes that negative valence enhances the reactivation and storage of sensory details over offline periods, leading to a greater divergence between the sensory recapitulation of negative and positive memories over time. Importantly, the model proposes that these valence-based differences occur even when events are equated for arousal, thus rendering an exclusively arousal-based theory of emotional memory insufficient. We conclude by discussing implications of the model and suggesting directions for future research to test the tenets of the model.

  1. Anomalous structural changes and elastic properties of bismuth oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.S.; Xiang, J.; Chang, F.G.; Zhang, J.C.; He, A.S.; Wang, H.; Gu, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic measurement revealed that there are anomalous structural changes near 200 K in single 2212 or 2223 phase samples of Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O. Detailed study showed such anomalous changes are isothermal-like processes and have a characteristics of second order phase transition, accompanying with increases in lattice constants. The elastic properties of these ceramics and related systems are discussed

  2. Valence band variation in Si (110) nanowire induced by a covered insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Hua, Xu; Xiao-Yan, Liu; Yu-Hui, He; Gang, Du; Ru-Qi, Han; Jin-Feng, Kang; Chun, Fan; Ai-Dong, Sun

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate strain effects induced by the deposition of gate dielectrics on the valence band structures in Si (110) nanowire via the simulation of strain distribution and the calculation of a generalized 6×6k·p strained valence band. The nanowire is surrounded by the gate dielectric. Our simulation indicates that the strain of the amorphous SiO 2 insulator is negligible without considering temperature factors. On the other hand, the thermal residual strain in a nanowire with amorphous SiO 2 insulator which has negligible lattice misfit strain pushes the valence subbands upwards by chemical vapour deposition and downwards by thermal oxidation treatment. In contrast with the strain of the amorphous SiO 2 insulator, the strain of the HfO 2 gate insulator in Si (110) nanowire pushes the valence subbands upwards remarkably. The thermal residual strain by HfO 2 insulator contributes to the up-shifting tendency. Our simulation results for valence band shifting and warping in Si nanowires can provide useful guidance for further nanowire device design. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  3. Oxygen Evolution at Manganite Perovskite Ruddlesden-Popper Type Particles: Trends of Activity on Structure, Valence and Covalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ebrahimizadeh Abrishami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An improved understanding of the correlation between the electronic properties of Mn-O bonds, activity and stability of electro-catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER is of great importance for an improved catalyst design. Here, an in-depth study of the relation between lattice structure, electronic properties and catalyst performance of the perovskite Ca1−xPrxMnO3 and the first-order RP-system Ca2−xPrxMnO4 at doping levels of x = 0, 0.25 and 0.5 is presented. Lattice structure is determined by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Mn-L and O-K edges gives access to Mn valence and covalency of the Mn-O bond. Oxygen evolution activity and stability is measured by rotating ring disc electrode studies. We demonstrate that the highest activity and stability coincidences for systems with a Mn-valence state of +3.7, though also requiring that the covalency of the Mn-O bond has a relative minimum. This observation points to an oxygen evolution mechanism with high redox activity of Mn. Covalency should be large enough for facile electron transfer from adsorbed oxygen species to the MnO6 network; however, it should not be hampered by oxidation of the lattice oxygen, which might cause a crossover to material degradation. Since valence and covalency changes are not entirely independent, the introduction of the energy position of the eg↑ pre-edge peak in the O-K spectra as a new descriptor for oxygen evolution is suggested, leading to a volcano-like representation of the OER activity.

  4. Valence and Magnetic Transitions in YbMn2Ge2-Applied Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Link, P.; Campbell, S.J.; Goncharenko, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Rare-earth intermetallic compounds containing ytterbium exhibit a wide range of interesting and unusual physical and magnetic properties. This occurs mainly as a result of their mixed valence states (II/III) or changes from one valence state to the other. We have recently determined the magnetic structures of tetragonal YbMn 2 Ge 2 (I4/mmm) by powder neutron diffraction experiments and demonstrated that YbMn 2 Ge 2 has a planar antiferromagnetic structure below T N1 ∼ 510 K with a canted antiferromagnetic structure below T N2 ∼ 185 K. As applied pressure favours changes in the valence character of intermediate valence systems and correspondingly influences the magnetic behaviour, we have investigated the effects of applied pressure on YbMn 2 Ge 2 . Analyses of our in situ neutron diffraction experiments (T=1.5-300 K; p=0-2.7 GPa), reveal a distinct change in magnetic structure and a sharp drop in the a-lattice parameter above ∼ 1.4 GPa with the changes associated with a valence transition. A full account of these effects will be discussed in relation to our current photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of YbMn 2 Ge 2 . (authors)

  5. Reducing the negative valence of stressful memories through emotionally valenced, modality-specific tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadmor, Avia; McNally, Richard J; Engelhard, Iris M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: People who perform a cognitively demanding secondary task while recalling a distressing memory often experience the memory as less emotional, vivid, or accurate during subsequent recollections. In this experiment, we tested whether the emotional valence (positive versus

  6. Valence-Dependent Belief Updating: Computational Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Kuzmanovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available People tend to update beliefs about their future outcomes in a valence-dependent way: they are likely to incorporate good news and to neglect bad news. However, belief formation is a complex process which depends not only on motivational factors such as the desire for favorable conclusions, but also on multiple cognitive variables such as prior beliefs, knowledge about personal vulnerabilities and resources, and the size of the probabilities and estimation errors. Thus, we applied computational modeling in order to test for valence-induced biases in updating while formally controlling for relevant cognitive factors. We compared biased and unbiased Bayesian models of belief updating, and specified alternative models based on reinforcement learning. The experiment consisted of 80 trials with 80 different adverse future life events. In each trial, participants estimated the base rate of one of these events and estimated their own risk of experiencing the event before and after being confronted with the actual base rate. Belief updates corresponded to the difference between the two self-risk estimates. Valence-dependent updating was assessed by comparing trials with good news (better-than-expected base rates with trials with bad news (worse-than-expected base rates. After receiving bad relative to good news, participants' updates were smaller and deviated more strongly from rational Bayesian predictions, indicating a valence-induced bias. Model comparison revealed that the biased (i.e., optimistic Bayesian model of belief updating better accounted for data than the unbiased (i.e., rational Bayesian model, confirming that the valence of the new information influenced the amount of updating. Moreover, alternative computational modeling based on reinforcement learning demonstrated higher learning rates for good than for bad news, as well as a moderating role of personal knowledge. Finally, in this specific experimental context, the approach based on

  7. Comparison of descriptive sensory analysis and chemical analysis for oxidative changes in milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, R V; Kristensen, D; Nielsen, Jacob Holm

    2006-01-01

    and lipolytic changes occurring in the milk during chill storage for 4 d. Sensory analysis and chemical analysis showed high correlation between the typical descriptors for oxidation such as cardboard, metallic taste, and boiled milk and specific chemical markers for oxidation such as hexanal. Notably, primary......Oxidation in 3 types of bovine milk with different fatty acid profiles obtained through manipulation of feed was evaluated by analytical methods quantifying the content of potential antioxidants, the tendency of formation of free radicals, and the accumulation of primary and secondary oxidation...... products. The milk samples were evaluated in parallel by descriptive sensory analysis by a trained panel, and the correlation between the chemical analysis and the descriptive sensory analysis was evaluated. The fatty acid composition of the 3 types of milk was found to influence the oxidative...

  8. Comparison of descriptive sensory analysis and chemical analysis for oxidative changes in milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Kristensen, D.; Nielsen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    products. The milk samples were evaluated in parallel by descriptive sensory analysis by a trained panel, and the correlation between the chemical analysis and the descriptive sensory analysis was evaluated. The fatty acid composition of the 3 types of milk was found to influence the oxidative...... and lipolytic changes occurring in the milk during chill storage for 4 d. Sensory analysis and chemical analysis showed high correlation between the typical descriptors for oxidation such as cardboard, metallic taste, and boiled milk and specific chemical markers for oxidation such as hexanal. Notably, primary...... oxidation products (i.e., lipid hydroperoxides) and even the tendency of formation of radicals as measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy were also highly correlated to the sensory descriptors for oxidation. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy should accordingly be further explored as a routine...

  9. WIPP Magnesium Oxide (MgO) - Planned Change Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    On April 10, 2006, the DOE submitted a planned change request pertaining to the amount of MgO emplaced in the WIPP repository. MgO is an engineered barrier that DOE included as part of the original WIPP Certification Decision.

  10. Oxidative stress biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium (Cd)-induced stress in hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus) was investigated by growing seedlings in a nutrient solution containing increasing cadmium concentrations (0 to 50 μM), under strictly controlled growth conditions. Changes consequent to Cd uptake in growth parameters, enzyme activities and other stress ...

  11. Bombardment-induced compositional change with alloys, oxides, and oxysalts. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of the role of surface binding energies in bombardment-induced compositional change with alloys, oxides and oxysalts is presented. The concepts of preferential sputtering and compositional change may or may not coincide; their differences are clarified. 77 refs.; 12 figs.; 4 tabs

  12. Enthalpy changes when passing from simple to complex perovskite-like oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznitskij, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Formation enthalpies of complex perovskite-like oxides and their hexagonal analogs of the composition: Ba 2 ReFeO 6 , Sr 2 ReFeO 6 , Sr 2 ReMnO 6 , Ca 2 ReMnO 6 , Sr 2 WCrO 6 , Sr 2 MoCrO 6 , Ca 2 MoCrO 6 , Ca 2 WCrO 6 , Ba 3 Fe 2 ReO 9 , Ba 3 Cr 2 ReO 9 , Ba 2 RhTaO 6 and B 2 ScIrO 6 from simple oxides were calculated by approximate method using enthalpies of the cations coordination change in oxygen medium. The conclusion was made that enthalpy stabilization of the oxide with regard to simple oxides is mainly determined by the change in enthalpies of alkaline earth metal cations [ru

  13. Oxidation kinetic changes of UO2 by additive addition and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil-Sung; Kim, Keon-Sik; Min, Duck-Kee; Ro, Seung-Gy

    2000-01-01

    The kinetic changes of air-oxidation of UO 2 by additive addition and irradiation were investigated. Several kinds of specimens, such as unirradiated-UO 2 , simulated-UO 2 for spent PWR fuel (SIMFUEL), unirradiated-Gd-doped UO 2 , irradiated-UO 2 and -Gd-doped UO 2 , were used for these experiments. The oxidation results represented that the kinetic patterns among those samples are remarkably different. It was also revealed that the oxidation kinetics of irradiated-UO 2 seems to be more similar to that of unirradiated-Gd-doped UO 2 than that of SIMFUEL

  14. Oxidative Stress and Pulmonary Changes in Experimental Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Salatti Ferrari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 in rats is an experimental model of hepatic tissue damage; which leads to fibrosis, and at the long term, cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is the consequence of progressive continued liver damage, it may be reversible when the damaging noxae have been withdrawn. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes caused by cirrhosis in lung and liver, through the experimental model of intraperitoneal CCI4 administration. We used 18 male Wistar rats divided into three groups: control (CO and two groups divided by the time of cirrhosis induction by CCI4: G1 (11 weeks, G2 (16 weeks. We found significant increase of transaminase levels and lipid peroxidation (TBARS in liver and lung tissue and also increased antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT, as well as the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung of cirrhotic animals. We observed changes in gas exchange in both cirrhotic groups. We can conclude that our model reproduces a model of liver cirrhosis, which causes alterations in the pulmonary system that leads to changes in gas exchange and size of pulmonary vessels.

  15. Human Amygdala Represents the Complete Spectrum of Subjective Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingwen; Zelano, Christina; Gottfried, Jay A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is a major locus for hedonic processing, how it encodes valence information is poorly understood. Given the hedonic potency of odor stimuli and the amygdala's anatomical proximity to the peripheral olfactory system, we combined high-resolution fMRI with pattern-based multivariate techniques to examine how valence information is encoded in the amygdala. Ten human subjects underwent fMRI scanning while smelling 9 odorants that systematically varied in perceived valence. Representational similarity analyses showed that amygdala codes the entire dimension of valence, ranging from pleasantness to unpleasantness. This unidimensional representation significantly correlated with self-reported valence ratings but not with intensity ratings. Furthermore, within-trial valence representations evolved over time, prioritizing earlier differentiation of unpleasant stimuli. Together, these findings underscore the idea that both spatial and temporal features uniquely encode pleasant and unpleasant odor valence in the amygdala. The availability of a unidimensional valence code in the amygdala, distributed in both space and time, would create greater flexibility in determining the pleasantness or unpleasantness of stimuli, providing a mechanism by which expectation, context, attention, and learning could influence affective boundaries for guiding behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our findings elucidate the mechanisms of affective processing in the amygdala by demonstrating that this brain region represents the entire valence dimension from pleasant to unpleasant. An important implication of this unidimensional valence code is that pleasant and unpleasant valence cannot coexist in the amygdale because overlap of fMRI ensemble patterns for these two valence extremes obscures their unique content. This functional architecture, whereby subjective valence maps onto a pattern continuum between pleasant and unpleasant poles, offers a robust mechanism by which context

  16. 5th International Conference on Valence Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, S

    1987-01-01

    During the Koln meeting (August 28-31, 1984), Irdia was chosen as the venue for the next International Conference on Valence Fluctuations. lhis was in recognition ard appreciation of the work done, both experimental ard theoretical, by the Irdian scientists in this area during the last decade. We decided to hold this Conference in the month of January, 1987 at Bangalore. lhe subject of Valence Fluctuations has kept itself alive ard active as it has provided many shocks ard suprises particularly among the Ce- ard U-based intermetallies. lhe richness of many interesting physical phenomena occurring in mixed valent materials, the flexibility of modifying their physical properties (by alloying, for example) ard the possibility of synthesizing a wide variety of new such materials seem to be the key factors in this regard. Barely six months before this Conference, an International Conference on Anomalous Rare Earths and Actinides (ICAREA) had been held at Grenoble (July, 1986) which also focussed on mixed valence a...

  17. Valence fluctuations between two magnetic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzaferro, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of this work is the study of a microscopic model which describes TmSe through its most important feature, i.e.: the valence fluctuations between two magnetic configurations. Chapter I is a general review of the most important physical properties of rare-earth systems with intermediate valence (I.V.) and a general description of experimental results and theoretical models on Tm compounds. In Chapter II the Hamiltonian model is discussed and the loss of rotational invariance is also analyzed. Chapter III is devoted to the study of non-stoichiometric Tsub(x)Se compounds. It is shown that these compounds can be considered as a mixture of TmSe (I.V. system) and Tm 3+ 0.87Se. Chapter IV is devoted to the calculation of spin-and charge susceptibilities. The results obtained permit to explain the essential features of the neutron scattering spectrum in TmSe. In Chapter V, an exactly solvable periodic Hamiltonian is presented. From the experimental results, some fundamental features are deduced to describe TmSe as an intermediate valence system whose two accessible ionic configurations are magnetic (degenerated fundamental state). (M.E.L) [es

  18. Music, emotion, and time perception: the influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Ramos, Danilo; Bueno, José L. O.; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (2 s) stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow) (Experiment 1) or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces). The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant) vs. atonal (unpleasant) versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music. PMID:23882233

  19. Music, Emotion and Time Perception: The influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYLVIE eDROIT-VOLET

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (< 2 s and long (> 2 s stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow (Experiment 1 or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces. The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant versus atonal (unpleasant versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

  20. Music, emotion, and time perception: the influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Ramos, Danilo; Bueno, José L O; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (2 s) stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow) (Experiment 1) or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces). The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant) vs. atonal (unpleasant) versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music.

  1. Quantum conductance of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Zhe; Nelson, Christopher; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2014-01-01

    The electronic properties of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons (ZGOR) are presented. The results show interesting behaviors which are considerably different from the properties of the perfect graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). The theoretical methods include a Huckel-tight binding approach, a Green's function methodology, and the Landauer formalism. The presence of oxygen on the edge results in band bending, a noticeable change in density of states and thus the conductance. Consequently, the occupation in the valence bands increase for the next neighboring carbon atom in the unit cell. Conductance drops in both the conduction and valence band regions are due to the reduction of allowed k modes resulting from band bending. The asymmetry of the energy band structure of the ZGOR is due to the energy differences of the atoms. The inclusion of a foreign atom's orbital energies changes the dispersion relation of the eigenvalues in energy space. These novel characteristics are important and valuable in the study of quantum transport of GNRs

  2. Radiation-induced oxidative chemical changes in dehydrated egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Rasem, B.; Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced buildup of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and destruction of carotenoids were followed in whole egg powder and egg yolk powder as functions of dose, dose rate, and the presence of oxygen. In the absence of air the formation of LOOH was limited by the available oxygen, while destruction of carotenoids progressed linearly with dose; neither process depended on the dose rate. In the presence of air, the accumulation of LOOH and the destruction of carotenoids were strongly coupled and inversely proportional to the dose rate. The induction dose of 2.5 kGy was observed in air in both whole egg powder and egg yolk powder, independent of the dose rate. The practical consequence is that radiation decontamination can be carried out in the presence of air at the highest available dose rate by a dose not exceeding 2.5 kGy to avoid extensive degradation. This dose is adequate for a 10(3) reduction factor of Salmonella and well within the threshold dose of 3 kGy for organoleptic changes

  3. Structural and surface changes of cobalt modified manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Wojciech; Greluk, Magdalena; Słowik, Grzegorz; Turczyniak-Surdacka, Sylwia

    2018-05-01

    Surface and structural changes of unmodified manganese and cobalt-manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction conditions (ESR) were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation (TPR/TPO) and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that synthesis of cobalt manganese oxide by the redox precipitation method led to the formation of strongly dispersed cobalt ionic species within cryptomelane-based manganese oxide structure. Development of large cube-like MnO nanoparticles with spherical cobalt metallic crystallites decorated by manganese oxide on the high oxidation state and potassium species was observed during reduction. Cobalt manganese catalyst showed high initial activity and selectivity to H2 and CO2 in ethanol stem reforming reaction in the range of 390-480 °C. The drop of ethanol conversion and changes of selectivity with the time-on-stream were observed. An increase of reaction temperature led to intensification of deactivation phenomena. TEM studies evidenced coexistence of Co and CoOx nanoparticles formed under ethanol steam reforming conditions, partially covered by filamentous and encapsulating carbonaceous deposits.

  4. Study of transition metal oxides by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, C.N.R.; Sarma, D.D.; Vasudevan, S.; Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    Systematics in the X-ray photoelectron spectra (X.p.e.s.) of Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Nb oxides with the metal ion in different oxidation states as well as of related series of mono-, sesqui- and di-oxides of the first row of transition metals have been investigated in detail. Core level binding energies, spin-orbit splittings and exchange splittings are found to exhibit interesting variations with the oxidation state of the metal or the nuclear charge. The 3d binding energies of the monoxides show a proportionality to Goodenough's (R - RC). Other aspects of interest in the study are the satellite structure and final state effects in the X.p.e.s. of the oxides, and identification of different valence states in oxides of the general formulae Mn02n-1 and M304. The nature of changes in the 3d bands of oxides undergoing metal-insulator transitions is also indicated. (author)

  5. Local valence balance in the structure of a high-temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalbandyan, V.B.

    1990-01-01

    Hitherto superconductivity of complex oxides has been observed only if the metal is present in a mixed (nonintegral) degree of oxidation. It is of interest to verify the statement that in YBa 2 Cu 3 O x there is no copper in a degree of oxidation above 2+; instead of this, part of the oxygen is in the degree of oxidation 1-. Thus, the calculations of the valence forces tell against the presence of copper in a mixed degree of oxidation between 2+ and 3+ in high-temperature superconductors of the stoichiometric composition RBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . In two-dimensional layers, copper is in the degree of oxidation 2+ (or even lower), while the electron holes are concentrated in one-dimensional chains - either in the form Cu(3+) or in the form O(1-)

  6. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-04-29

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings.

  7. Segregation of information about emotional arousal and valence in horse whinnies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefer, Elodie F; Maigrot, Anne-Laure; Mandel, Roi; Freymond, Sabrina Briefer; Bachmann, Iris; Hillmann, Edna

    2015-04-21

    Studying vocal correlates of emotions is important to provide a better understanding of the evolution of emotion expression through cross-species comparisons. Emotions are composed of two main dimensions: emotional arousal (calm versus excited) and valence (negative versus positive). These two dimensions could be encoded in different vocal parameters (segregation of information) or in the same parameters, inducing a trade-off between cues indicating emotional arousal and valence. We investigated these two hypotheses in horses. We placed horses in five situations eliciting several arousal levels and positive as well as negative valence. Physiological and behavioral measures collected during the tests suggested the presence of different underlying emotions. First, using detailed vocal analyses, we discovered that all whinnies contained two fundamental frequencies ("F0" and "G0"), which were not harmonically related, suggesting biphonation. Second, we found that F0 and the energy spectrum encoded arousal, while G0 and whinny duration encoded valence. Our results show that cues to emotional arousal and valence are segregated in different, relatively independent parameters of horse whinnies. Most of the emotion-related changes to vocalizations that we observed are similar to those observed in humans and other species, suggesting that vocal expression of emotions has been conserved throughout evolution.

  8. Titanium, vanadium and chromium valences in silicates of ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538 record highly-reduced origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Goodrich, C. A.; Wirick, S.

    2017-05-01

    Titanium, Cr, and V valences were determined by applying micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy methods to individual grains of olivine and pyroxene in the ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538, as well as to plagioclase in NWA 7325. The advantages of applying multiple, multivalent-element-based oxybarometers to individual grains are (1) the ability to cover the entire oxygen fugacity (fO2) range encountered in nature, and (2) the increased reliability from consistent results for semi-independent fO2 proxies. fO2 values were inferred from each mineral valence determination after correcting with available laboratory-experiment-derived, valence-specific partition coefficients to obtain melt valences and then calibrating with the fO2 values of the relevant equal species proportions points suggested for igneous (primarily basaltic) systems. The resulting olivine and pyroxene valences are highly reduced and similar in the two meteorites with substantial fractions of Cr2+, Ti3+ and V2+. The exception is Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene which is much more oxidized than the Cr in its olivine. Chromium and Ti in plagioclase in NWA 7325 is relatively oxidized (V valence not determined). The anomalously oxidized Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene may be due to a secondary reheating event that oxidized Cr in the pyroxene without similarly oxidizing Ti and V. Such a separation of the redox couples may be an effect of re-equilibration kinetics, where the valence of Cr would be more rapidly modified. These valences yielded similar mean fO2s for the two meteorites; IW-3.1 ± 0.2 for NWA 7325 and IW-2.8 ± 0.2 for Y-791538, consistent with an origin of NWA 7325 in either Mercury or an asteroid that experienced redox conditions similar to those on the ureilite parent body.

  9. Valence framing of political preferences and resistance to persuasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žeželj Iris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the "valence framing effect": an assumption that negatively conceptualized attitudes (as opposing the non-preferred alternative are more resistant to later persuasion attempts. In the experiment we created choice between two political candidates and experimental subjects were led to conceptualize their political preferences in one of two possible ways: either as supporting the preferred candidate or as opposing the non-preferred candidate. The data indicate that negative preferences show less overall change when exposed to counterarguments. This finding can be incorporated in two theoretical frameworks: dual process theories of attitude change (Elaboration likelihood model and descriptive decision making theories (Prospect theory. Results are discussed for their implications for the efficacy of political communication. .

  10. Coincidence Doppler broadening study on hydrocarbons with pi and sigma valence electrons: positronium correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Yu, R.S.; Ito, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) technique was applied to study the electron momentum distribution in anthracene, diphenyl, naphthalene, and polystyrene. A method for separation of the positron and positronium (Ps) components from the Doppler-broadened annihilation line (DBAL) was developed further to be applicable to hydrocarbons with different π and σ valence electron distributions. This method allows extraction of the electron momentum distribution (EMD) from DBAL for samples when Ps formation occurs. The annihilation on π valence electrons was detected as broadening of the EMD compared to that obtained for a polymer sample only with σ valence electrons. The broadening appeared as a significant change in the shape of the CDB ratio of the corresponding positronium-corrected curves: a slight enhancement above the unity line in the low-momentum region and a drop in the momentum region, 10-20x10 -3 m o c

  11. Studies on the valence electronic structure of Fe and Ni in FexNi1−x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure of Fe and Ni in various Fex Ni1−x alloys. Since Kβ-to-Kα X-ray intensity ratio has been reported [2–7] to be a sensitive physical parameter to investigate the changes in the valence electronic structure of 3d-transition metals [2], we have undertaken the study of the valence electronic structure of Fe and Ni in the Fex ...

  12. Topological Qubits from Valence Bond Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Affleck, Ian; Raussendorf, Robert

    2018-05-01

    Topological qubits based on S U (N )-symmetric valence-bond solid models are constructed. A logical topological qubit is the ground subspace with twofold degeneracy, which is due to the spontaneous breaking of a global parity symmetry. A logical Z rotation by an angle 2 π /N , for any integer N >2 , is provided by a global twist operation, which is of a topological nature and protected by the energy gap. A general concatenation scheme with standard quantum error-correction codes is also proposed, which can lead to better codes. Generic error-correction properties of symmetry-protected topological order are also demonstrated.

  13. Thermal recombination: Beyond the valence quark approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Fries, R.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: fries@physics.umn.edu; Bass, S.A. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2005-07-07

    Quark counting rules derived from recombination models agree well with data on hadron production at intermediate transverse momenta in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. They convey a simple picture of hadrons consisting only of valence quarks. We discuss the inclusion of higher Fock states that add sea quarks and gluons to the hadron structure. We show that, when recombination occurs from a thermal medium, hadron spectra remain unaffected by the inclusion of higher Fock states. However, the quark number scaling for elliptic flow is somewhat affected. We discuss the implications for our understanding of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  14. Valence electron momentum distributions in cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.; Weigold, E.; Mitroy, J.

    1982-08-01

    The valence 5s and 4d electron momentum distributions in cadmium have been measured using noncoplanar symmetric (e, 2e) electron coincidence spectroscopy at a total energy of 1200eV. They are in close agreement with Hartree-Fock momentum distributions both in shape and relative magnitudes. Some satellite lines of very low intensity have been detected. A CI calculation of the Cd ground state and several Cd + ion states has been carried out to predict cross reactions for the ground state and various satellite transitions. The predictions are in agreement with the data

  15. Reply to Isgur's comments on valence QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the complexity of QCD and the role of symmetry in dynamics, the authors studied a field theory called Valence QCD (VQCD) in which the Z graphs are forbidden so that the Fock space is limited to the valence quarks. The authors calculated nucleon form factors, matrix elements, and hadron masses both with this theory and with quenched QCD on a set of lattices with the same gauge background. Comparing the results of the lattice calculations in these two theories, the authors drew conclusions regarding the SU(6) valence quark model and chiral symmetry. While recognizing the goal of VQCD, Nathan Isgur disagrees on some of the conclusions the authors have drawn. The foremost objection raised in section 2 is to their suggestion that the major part of the hyperfine splittings in baryons is due to Goldstone boson exchange and not one-gluon-exchange (OGE) interactions. The logic of Isgur's objection is that VQCD yields a spectroscopy vastly different from quenched QCD and therefore the structure of the hadrons (to which hyperfine splittings in a quark model are intimately tied) is also suspect so no definite conclusions are possible. To put this into perspective it should be emphasized at the outset that spectroscopy is only one aspect of hadron physics examined in section 1. The authors have studied the axial and scalar couplings of nucleon in terms of F A /D A and F S /D S , the neutron to proton magnetic moment ratio μn/μp, and various form factors. None of these results reveal any pathologies of hadron structure and turn out to be close to the SU(6) relations, as expected. In fact this is what motivated the study of valence degrees of freedom via VQCD. In section 2 the authors address specific issues related to spectroscopy in VQCD. Isgur also presented more general arguments against the idea of boson exchange as a contributor to hyperfine effects. A cornerstone of his discussion is the unifying aspect of OGE in a quark model picture. The

  16. Vanadium K XANES of synthetic olivine: Valence determinations and crystal orientation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium can exist in a large number of valence states in nature (2+?, 3+, 4+ and 5+) and determinations of V valence is therefore valuable in defining the oxidation states of earth and planetary materials over a large redox range. Synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is well-suited for measurements of V valence with ∼micrometer spatial resolution and ∼ppm elemental sensitivity. Applications of microXANES have been demonstrated for basaltic glasses. Applications to minerals are feasible but complicated by orientation effects (e.g. due to polarization of the synchrotron x-ray beam) and some results for spinel have been reported. Here we report initial results for olivine from laboratory crystallization ex-periments. The goal is to define the valence partition-ing between olivine and melt and quantify the magnitude of orientation effects, the latter tested by measuring grains at a variety of orientations in the same charge.

  17. The Synthesis of NiO/TiO2 Heterostructures and Their Valence Band Offset Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Ibupoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a heterojunction based on p-type NiO/n-type TiO2 nanostructures has been prepared on the fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO glass substrate by hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-Ray diffraction techniques were used for the morphological and crystalline arrays characterization. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the valence-band offset (VBO of the NiO/TiO2 heterojunction prepared on FTO glass substrate. The core levels of Ni 2p and Ti 2p were utilized to align the valence-band offset of p-type NiO/n-type TiO2 heterojunction. The valence band offset was found to be ∼0.41 eV and the conduction band was calculated about ∼0.91 eV. The ratio of conduction band offset and the valence-band offset was found to be 2.21.

  18. The effect of body weight changes and endurance training on 24h substrate oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.; Saris, W.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of body weight changes and endurance training on 24h substrate oxidation. Pasman WJ, Westerterp MS, Saris WH. Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, The Netherlands. Pasman@voeding.tno.nl OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of exercise training and dietary macronutrient

  19. Liver changes under the influence of chronic experimental intoxication with nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmider, S; Misiewicz, A

    1973-01-01

    Male guinea pigs were divided into three groups: a control group; a group of animals breathing air containing 1 ppM nitrogen oxides during 6 months, 8 hr/day; and third group exposed to products of reactions between nitrogen oxide and gaseous ammonia. The animals lived through the 6 mo with no increase in mortality. The body weight of the animals exposed to nitrogen oxides increased during the 6 mo by 62 g on the average, while in the control group the body weight increased by 395 g on the average. In homogenates of the livers of the animals exposed to nitrogen oxides, the activities of aldolase, lactic dehydrogenase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase increased, and the activities of cholinesterase, ceruloplasmin, and aminotransferases (aspartic and alanine) decreased. Neutralization of NO/sub x/ by gaseous ammonia restored the disorders in enzyme activities in the liver of the animals exposed to nitrogen oxides to their normal values. The study was statistically analyzed. The livers of the animals exposed to nitrogen oxides contained small foci of necrosis, and hemorrhages could be observed. In some animals, fatty degeneration of the liver could be observed. The changes in the liver can also be associated with inhibited protein synthesis, enhanced catabolic processes, and hypovitaminosis.

  20. Valence-delocalization of the mixed-valence oxo-centered trinuclear iron propionates [FeIII2FeIIO(C2H5CO2)6(py)3[npy; n = 0, 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, Tadahiro; Katada, Motomi; Kawata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Sano, Hirotoshi; Konno, Michiko

    1994-01-01

    Mixed-valence trinuclear iron propionates [Fe III 2 Fe II O(C 2 H 5 CO 2 ) 6 (py) 3 [npy, where n = 0, 1.5, were synthesized and the structure of the pyridine-solvated complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Moessbauer spectra of the solvated propionate complex showed a temperature-dependent mixed-valence state related to phase transitions, reaching an almost delocalized valence state at room temperature. On the other hand, the non-solvated propionate showed a remarkable change of the spectral shape related to a phase transition, remaining in a localized valence state at higher temperatures up to room temperature. (orig.)

  1. Structure changes in the sol-gel systems of hydrated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Y.A.; Karakchiev, L.G.; Lyakhov, N.Z.; Tolochko, B.P.; Ito, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Sols of hydrated aluminium oxide, hydrated zirconium oxide and their mixtures were investigated during the xerogel-amorphous-product-crystalline-product transition by SAXS using synchrotron radiation. In the different temperature regions certain changes in structure and morphology were observed. Some correlation between the characteristics of the initial sols and their mixtures (the size and shape of the pores) was observed. In the temperature region 298-1173 K the characteristics of the mixed sol are defined by the characteristics of the initial sols

  2. Impact of scorpion stings on electrocardiographic changes and relationship with body oxidant and antioxidant status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behcet, A.; Zengin, S.; Yildirim, C.; Ercan, S.; Davutoglu, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate electrocardiogram changes due to scorpion stings and association between oxidative stress index, body oxidant/antioxidant system and the electrocardiogram changes. Methods: The study was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Turkey, between May 2009 and October 2010. It comprised 44 patients admitted to the emergency department for scorpion sting, and a control group of matched age and gender of 20 persons. Electrocardiograms were taken promptly in the most painful phases of the patients. Cardiac parameters were measured. Erythrocyte packages were prepared to detect toxin/antioxidant levels. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 44 patients, 22 (50%) were male. Overall average age of the patients was 45.22+-17.99 years. None of the patients required intensive care and none of them had limb losses. Cardiac parameters of the patients in electrocardiogram were higher (p 0.05). Conclusion: Scorpion stings associated with electrocardiogram changes. The mechanism of this relationship is not related with the status of body oxidative stress index and body oxidant and antioxidant capacity. Some parameters warrant further study in terms of potential serious arrhythmias in scorpionism. (author)

  3. Changes in inflammation, oxidative stress and adipokines following bariatric surgery among adolescents with severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A S; Ryder, J R; Marlatt, K L; Rudser, K D; Jenkins, T; Inge, T H

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation, oxidative stress and dysregulation of adipokines are thought to be pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. In adults, bariatric surgery reduces inflammation and oxidative stress, and beneficially changes the levels of several adipokines, but little is known about the postsurgical changes among adolescents. In two separate longitudinal cohorts we evaluated change from baseline of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1), oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (oxLDL), adiponectin, leptin and resistin up to 12 months following elective laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) surgery in adolescents with severe obesity. In cohort 1, which consisted of 39 adolescents (mean age 16.5±1.6 years; 29 females) undergoing either RYGB or VSG, IL-6 (baseline: 2.3±3.4 pg ml(-1) vs 12 months: 0.8±0.6 pg ml(-1), Padolescents (mean age 16.5±1.6 years; 10 females) undergoing RYGB, results were similar: IL-6 (baseline: 1.7±0.9 pg ml(-1) vs 12 months: 0.4±0.9 pg ml(-1), PBariatric surgery produced robust improvements in markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and several adipokines among adolescents with severe obesity, suggesting potential reductions in risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  4. Valence photoelectron spectrum of KBr: Effects of electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calo, A.; Huttula, M.; Patanen, M.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-01-01

    The valence photoelectron spectrum has been measured for molecular KBr. Experimental energies of the main and satellite structures have been compared with the results of ab initio calculations based on molecular orbital theory including configuration and multiconfiguration interaction approaches. Comparison between the experimental KBr spectrum and previously reported Kr valence photoelectron spectrum has also been performed in order to find out if electron correlation is of the same importance in the valence ionized state of KBr as in the corresponding state of Kr

  5. Temperature effects in the valence fluctuation of europium intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, O.L.T. de; Troper, A.; Gomes, A.A.

    1978-03-01

    A previously reported model for valence fluctuations in europium compound in order to account for thermal occupation effect. Experimental results are critically discussed and new experiments are suggested

  6. Positive valence music restores executive control over sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carryl L; Lewis, Bridget A

    2017-01-01

    Music sometimes improves performance in sustained attention tasks. But the type of music employed in previous investigations has varied considerably, which can account for equivocal results. Progress has been hampered by lack of a systematic database of music varying in key characteristics like tempo and valence. The aims of this study were to establish a database of popular music varying along the dimensions of tempo and valence and to examine the impact of music varying along these dimensions on restoring attentional resources following performance of a sustained attention to response task (SART) vigil. Sixty-nine participants rated popular musical selections that varied in valence and tempo to establish a database of four musical types: fast tempo positive valence, fast tempo negative valence, slow tempo positive valence, and slow tempo negative valence. A second group of 89 participants performed two blocks of the SART task interspersed with either no break or a rest break consisting of 1 of the 4 types of music or silence. Presenting positive valence music (particularly of slow tempo) during an intermission between two successive blocks of the SART significantly decreased miss rates relative to negative valence music or silence. Results support an attentional restoration theory of the impact of music on sustained attention, rather than arousal theory and demonstrate a means of restoring sustained attention. Further, the results establish the validity of a music database that will facilitate further investigations of the impact of music on performance.

  7. Nanoscopic morphological changes in yeast cell surfaces caused by oxidative stress: an atomic force microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-06-01

    Nanoscopic changes in the cell surface morphology of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), due to their exposure to varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxidative stress), were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration led to a decrease in cell viabilities and mean cell volumes, and an increase in the surface roughness of the yeasts. In addition, AFM studies revealed that oxidative stress caused cell compression in both S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe cells and an increase in the number of aged yeasts. These results confirmed the importance and usefulness of AFM in investigating the morphology of stressed microbial cells at the nanoscale. The results also provided novel information on the relative oxidative stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe.

  8. Valence band offset of wurtzite InN/SrTiO3 heterojunction measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The valence band offset (VBO of wurtzite indium nitride/strontium titanate (InN/SrTiO3 heterojunction has been directly measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The VBO is determined to be 1.26 ± 0.23 eV and the conduction band offset is deduced to be 1.30 ± 0.23 eV, indicating the heterojunction has a type-I band alignment. The accurate determination of the valence and conduction band offsets paves a way to the applications of integrating InN with the functional oxide SrTiO3.

  9. Dynamically tracking anxious individuals' affective response to valenced information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fua, Karl C; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-09-01

    Past research has shown that an individual's feelings at any given moment reflect currently experienced stimuli as well as internal representations of similar past experiences. However, anxious individuals' affective reactions to streams of interrelated valenced information (vs. reactions to static stimuli that are arguably less ecologically valid) are rarely tracked. The present study provided a first examination of the newly developed Tracking Affect Ratings Over Time (TAROT) task to continuously assess anxious individuals' affective reactions to streams of information that systematically change valence. Undergraduate participants (N = 141) completed the TAROT task in which they listened to narratives containing positive, negative, and neutral physically- or socially-relevant events, and indicated how positive or negative they felt about the information they heard as each narrative unfolded. The present study provided preliminary evidence for the validity and reliability of the task. Within scenarios, participants higher (vs. lower) in anxiety showed many expected negative biases, reporting more negative mean ratings and overall summary ratings, changing their pattern of responding more quickly to negative events, and responding more negatively to neutral events. Furthermore, individuals higher (vs. lower) in anxiety tended to report more negative minimums during and after positive events, and less positive maximums after negative events. Together, findings indicate that positive events were less impactful for anxious individuals, whereas negative experiences had a particularly lasting impact on future affective responses. The TAROT task is able to efficiently capture a number of different cognitive biases, and may help clarify the mechanisms that underlie anxious individuals' biased negative processing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Methane oxidation in a landfill cover soil reactor: Changing of kinetic parameters and microorganism community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi L; Zhao, Tian T; Gao, Yan H; Yang, Xu; Liu, Shuai; Peng, Xu Y

    2017-02-23

    Changing of CH 4 oxidation potential and biological characteristics with CH 4 concentration was studied in a landfill cover soil reactor (LCSR). The maximum rate of CH 4 oxidation reached 32.40 mol d -1 m -2 by providing sufficient O 2 in the LCSR. The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil were obtained by fitting substrate diffusion and consumption model based on the concentration profile of CH 4 and O 2 . The values of [Formula: see text] (0.93-2.29%) and [Formula: see text] (140-524 nmol kg soil-DW -1 ·s -1 ) increased with CH 4 concentration (9.25-20.30%), while the values of [Formula: see text] (312.9-2.6%) and [Formula: see text] (1.3 × 10 -5 to 9.0 × 10 -3 nmol mL -1 h -1 ) were just the opposite. MiSeq pyrosequencing data revealed that Methylobacter (the relative abundance was decreased with height of LCSR) and Methylococcales_unclassified (the relative abundance was increased expect in H 80) became the key players after incubation with increasing CH 4 concentration. These findings provide information for assessing CH 4 oxidation potential and changing of biological characteristics in landfill cover soil.

  11. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jesse H; Lim, Christopher Y; Kessler, Sean H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-11-05

    Atmospheric oxidation reactions are known to affect the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) particles over timescales of several days, but the details of such oxidative aging reactions are poorly understood. In this study we examine the rates and products of a key class of aging reaction, the heterogeneous oxidation of particle-phase organic species by the gas-phase hydroxyl radical (OH). We compile and reanalyze a number of previous studies from our laboratories involving the oxidation of single-component organic particles. All kinetic and product data are described on a common basis, enabling a straightforward comparison among different chemical systems and experimental conditions. Oxidation chemistry is described in terms of changes to key ensemble properties of the OA, rather than to its detailed molecular composition, focusing on two quantities in particular, the amount and the oxidation state of the particle-phase carbon. Heterogeneous oxidation increases the oxidation state of particulate carbon, with the rate of increase determined by the detailed chemical mechanism. At the same time, the amount of particle-phase carbon decreases with oxidation, due to fragmentation (C-C scission) reactions that form small, volatile products that escape to the gas phase. In contrast to the oxidation state increase, the rate of carbon loss is nearly uniform among most systems studied. Extrapolation of these results to atmospheric conditions indicates that heterogeneous oxidation can have a substantial effect on the amount and composition of atmospheric OA over timescales of several days, a prediction that is broadly in line with available measurements of OA evolution over such long timescales. In particular, 3-13% of particle-phase carbon is lost to the gas phase after one week of heterogeneous oxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative aging represents an important sink for particulate organic carbon, and more generally that fragmentation reactions play a major

  13. Seniority Number in Valence Bond Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Wei

    2015-09-08

    In this work, a hierarchy of valence bond (VB) methods based on the concept of seniority number, defined as the number of singly occupied orbitals in a determinant or an orbital configuration, is proposed and applied to the studies of the potential energy curves (PECs) of H8, N2, and C2 molecules. It is found that the seniority-based VB expansion converges more rapidly toward the full configuration interaction (FCI) or complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) limit and produces more accurate PECs with smaller nonparallelity errors than its molecular orbital (MO) theory-based analogue. Test results reveal that the nonorthogonal orbital-based VB theory provides a reverse but more efficient way to truncate the complete active Hilbert space by seniority numbers.

  14. Modeling the solar cycle change in nitric oxide in the thermosphere and upper mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite have shown that low-latitude nitric oxide densities at 110 km decrease by about a factor of 8 from January 1982 to April 1985. This time period corresponds to the descending phase of the last solar cycle where the monthly smoothed sunspot number decreased from more than 150 to less than 25. In addition, nitric oxide was observed to vary by a factor of 2 over a solar rotation, during high solar activity. A one-dimensional, globally averaged model of the thermosphere and upper mesosphere has been used to study the height distribution of nitric oxide (NO) and its response to changes in the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV) through the solar cycle and over a solar rotation. The primary source of nitric oxide is the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen, N( 2 D), with molecular oxygen. The atomic nitrogen is created by a number of ion-neutral reactions and by direct dissociation of molecular nitrogen by photons and photoelectrons. The occurrence of the peak nitric oxide density at or below 115 km is a direct consequence of ionization and dissociation of molecular nitrogen by photoelectrons, which are produced by the solar flux below 30.0 nm (XUV). Nitric oxide is shown to vary over the solar cycle by a factor of 7 at low latitudes in the lower thermosphere E region, due to the estimated change in the solar EUV flux, in good agreement with the SME satellite observations. The NO density is shown to be strongly dependent on the temperature profile in the lower thermosphere and accounts for the difference between the current model and previous work. Wavelengths less than 1.8 nm have little impact on the NO profile. A factor of 3 change in solar flux below 5.0 nm at high solar activity produced a factor of 2 change in the peak NO density, consistent with SME observations over a solar rotation; this change also lowered the peak to 100 km, consistent with rocket data. 52 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Prediction of valence and arousal from music features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Brinker, A.C.; Van Dinther, C.H.B.A.; Skowronek, J.

    2011-01-01

    Mood is an important attribute of music and knowledge on mood can beused as a basic ingredient in music recommender and retrieval systems. Moods are assumed to be dominantly determined by two dimensions:valence and arousal. An experiment was conducted to attain data forsong-based ratings of valence

  16. Investigating Valence and Autonomy in Children's Relationships with Imaginary Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Melissa A.; Pierucci, Jillian M.; Gilpin, Ansley Tullos

    2013-01-01

    Little research has explored valence and autonomy in children's imaginary relationships. In the present study, a new interview (modeled after an existing measure for real relationships) was designed to elicit descriptions of both positive and negative interactions with imaginary companions and to provide a measure of relationship valence and…

  17. Novel Functional Changes during Podocyte Differentiation: Increase of Oxidative Resistance and H-Ferritin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emese Bányai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Podocytes are highly specialized, arborized epithelial cells covering the outer surface of the glomerular tuft in the kidney. Terminally differentiated podocytes are unable to go through cell division and hereby they are lacking a key property for regeneration after a toxic injury. Podocytes are long-lived cells but, to date, little is known about the mechanisms that support their stress resistance. Our aim was to investigate whether the well-known morphological changes during podocyte differentiation are accompanied by changes in oxidative resistance in a manner that could support their long-term survival. We used a conditionally immortalized human podocyte cell line to study the morphological and functional changes during differentiation. We followed the differentiation process for 14 days by time-lapse microscopy. During this period nondifferentiated podocytes gradually transformed into large, nonproliferating, frequently multinucleated cells, with enlarged nuclei and opened chromatin structure. We observed that differentiated podocytes were highly resistant to oxidants such as H2O2 and heme when applied separately or in combination, whereas undifferentiated cells were prone to such challenges. Elevated oxidative resistance of differentiated podocytes was associated with increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and H-ferritin expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal human kidney specimens revealed that podocytes highly express H-ferritin in vivo as well.

  18. Impact of green tea extract addition on oxidative changes in the lipid fraction of pastry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żbikowska, Anna; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Rutkowska, Jarosława; Kozłowska, Mariola; Onacik-Gür, Sylwia

    2017-01-01

    Alongside flour, fat is the key ingredient of sponge cakes, including those with long shelf lives. It is an unstable food component, whose quality and nutritional safety depend on the composition and pres- ence of oxidation products. Consumption of fat oxidation products adversely affects the human body and contributes to the incidence of a number of medical conditions. Qualitative changes in fats extracted from thermostat sponge cakes with and without antioxidant additions were determined in this study. In the study, two types of antioxidant were used: natural - green tea extract in three doses (0.02%; 0.2% and 1.0%) and synthetic BHA (0.02%) and 100%, solid bakery shortening. Sponge-cakes were thermostatted at temperatures 63°C after twenty-eight days. In this study, the quality of the lipid fraction was analyzed. The amount of primary (PV) and secondary (AnV) oxidation products was determined, and   a Rancimat test was performed. Adding antioxidants to fats varied in the degree to which oxidation processes of lipids fractions were inhibited. The peroxide value after twenty-eight days of thermostatting ranged from 3.57 meq O/kg (BHA) and 11.14 O meq/kg (extract content - 1%) to 62.85 meq O/kg (control sample). In turn, the value of AnV after the storage period ranged from 4.84 (BHA) and 6.71 (extract content - 1%) to 16.83 (control sample). The best protective effects in the process of oxidation was achieved by BHA. The longest in- duction time and the lowest peroxide value and anisidine value were obtained for this antioxidant. It was achieved after twenty-eight days of fat thermostatting. Nonetheless, the results demonstrated it is possible to use the commercially available green tea extract to slow the adverse process of fat oxidation in sponge cake products.

  19. Architectural Representation of Valence in the Limbic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namburi, Praneeth; Al-Hasani, Ream; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G; Bruchas, Michael R; Tye, Kay M

    2016-01-01

    In order to thrive, animals must be able to recognize aversive and appetitive stimuli within the environment and subsequently initiate appropriate behavioral responses. This assignment of positive or negative valence to a stimulus is a key feature of emotional processing, the neural substrates of which have been a topic of study for several decades. Until recently, the result of this work has been the identification of specific brain regions, such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), as important to valence encoding. The advent of modern tools in neuroscience has allowed further dissection of these regions to identify specific populations of neurons signaling the valence of environmental stimuli. In this review, we focus upon recent work examining the mechanisms of valence encoding, and provide a model for the systematic investigation of valence within anatomically-, genetically-, and functionally defined populations of neurons. PMID:26647973

  20. Increased FasL expression correlates with apoptotic changes in granulocytes cultured with oxidized clozapine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Delgado, Julio C.; Clavijo, Olga P.; Castro, Januario E.; Belalcazar, Viviana; Pinto, Clara; Zuniga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2006-01-01

    Clozapine has been associated with a 1% incidence of agranulocytosis. The formation of an oxidized intermediate clozapine metabolite has been implicated in direct polymorphonuclear (PMN) toxicity. We utilized two separate systems to analyze the role of oxidized clozapine in inducing apoptosis in treated cells. Human PMN cells incubated with clozapine (0-10 μM) in the presence of 0.1 mM H 2 O 2 demonstrated a progressive decrease of surface CD16 expression along with increased apoptosis. RT-PCR analysis showed decreased CD16 but increased FasL gene expression in clozapine-treated PMN cells. No change in constitutive Fas expression was observed in treated cells. In HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with retinoic acid (RA), a similar increase in FasL expression, but no associated changes in CD16 gene expression, was observed following clozapine treatments. Our results demonstrate increased FasL gene expression in oxidized clozapine-induced apoptotic neutrophils suggesting that apoptosis in granulocytes treated with clozapine involves Fas/FasL interaction that initiates a cascade of events leading to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

  1. PHASE CHANGES ON 4H AND 6H SIC AT HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Setiawan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT PHASE CHANGES ON 4H AND 6H SIC AT HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION. The oxidation on two silicon carbide contain 6H phase and contains 6H and 4H phases has been done.  Silicon carbide is ceramic non-oxide with excellent properties that potentially used in industry.  Silicon carbide is used in nuclear industry as structure material that developed as light water reactor (LWR fuel cladding and as a coating layer in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR fuel.  In this study silicon carbide oxidation simulation take place in case the accident in primary cooling pipe is ruptured.  Sample silicon carbide made of powder that pressed into pellet with diameter 12.7 mm and thickness 1.0 mm, then oxidized at temperature 1000 oC, 1200 oC dan 1400 oC for 1 hour.  The samples were weighted before and after oxidized.  X-ray diffraction con-ducted to the samples using Panalytical Empyrean diffractometer with Cu as X-ray source.  Diffraction pattern analysis has been done using General Structure Analysis System (GSAS software. This software was resulting the lattice parameter changes and content of SiC phases.  The result showed all of the oxidation samples undergoes weight gain.  The 6S samples showed the highest weight change at oxidation temperature 1200 oC, for the 46S samples showed increasing tendency with the oxidation temperature.  X-ray diffraction pattern analysis showed the 6S samples contain dominan phase 6H-SiC that matched to ICSD 98-001-5325 card.  Diffraction pattern on 6S showed lattice parameter, composition and crystallite size changes.  Lattice parameters changes had smaller tendency from the model and before oxidation.  However, the lowest silicon carbide composition or the highest converted into other phases up to 66.85 %, occurred at oxidation temperature 1200 oC.  The 46S samples contains two polytypes silicon car-bide.  The 6H-SiC phases matched by ICSD 98-016-4972 card and 4H-SiC phase matched by ICSD 98

  2. Valency and type conversion in CuInSe2 with H2 plasma exposure: A photoemission investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Frigo, S.P.; Rosenberg, R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of H 2 plasma exposure on CuInSe 2 was studied by synchrotron radiation soft-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The low-power H 2 plasma was generated with a commercial electron cyclotron resonance plasma source using pure H 2 with the plasma exposure being performed at 200 degree C. In situ photoemission measurements were acquired after each plasma exposure in order to observe changes in the valence-band electronic structure as well as changes in the In 4d and Se 3d core lines. The results were correlated in order to relate changes in surface chemistry to the electronic structure. These measurements indicate that the H 2 plasma exposure type converts the CuInSe 2 surface to an n-type surface as well as converting the In +3 valency state to an In +1 valency state

  3. Oligostilbenoids from Vatica pauciflora and the Oxidative Effect on Chang Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihah Kamarozaman, Aisyah; Latip, Jalifah; Syah, Yana M.; Rajab, Norfadilah; Jaloh, Anuar

    2013-04-01

    Phytochemical studies on the woods and twigs of Vatica pauciflora (Dipterocarpaceae) have been conducted. The woods and twigs of V. pauciflora were extracted in methanol and ethanol respectively with Soxhlet apparatus. The crude methanol extracts from the woods were semi-purified by vacuum liquid chromatography to give 14 fractions (VMB01-VMB14). The VMB10 was further purified by radial chromatography to give pure dimmer stilbenoid. The same technique has been employed on the crude ethanol extracts from the twigs in which one pure fraction, VER612 was obtained. Based on the UV, IR, NMR and mass spectral data, the pure compounds were characterized as epsilon-viniferin and vaticanol G respectively. An oxidative damage test which was done on Chang liver cells has shown that epsilon-viniferin has a potential to be a chemopreventive agent to protect liver cells from oxidative damage.

  4. Roasting pumpkin seeds and changes in the composition and oxidative stability of cold-pressed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyk, Marianna; Siger, Aleksander; Radziejewska-Kubzdela, Elżbieta; Ratusz, Katarzyna; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Pumpkin seed oil is valuable oil for its distinctive taste and aroma, as well as supposed health- promoting properties. The aim of this study was to investigate how roasting pumpkin seeds influences the physicochemical properties of cold-pressed oils. The fatty acid composition, content of phytosterols, carotenoids and tocopherols, oxidative stability and colour were determined in oils after cold pressing and storage for 3 months using GC-FID, GCxGC-ToFMS, HPLC, Rancimat and spectrophotometric methods. The results of this study indicate that the seed-roasting and storage process have no effect on the fatty acid composition of pumpkin seed oils, but does affect phytosterols and tocopherols. The carotenoid content decreased after storage. The colour of the roasted oil was darker and changed significantly during storage. Pumpkin oil obtained from roasted seeds shows better physicochemical properties and oxidative stability than oil from unroasted seeds.

  5. Emotion and language: Valence and arousal affect word recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysbaert, Marc; Warriner, Amy Beth

    2014-01-01

    Emotion influences most aspects of cognition and behavior, but emotional factors are conspicuously absent from current models of word recognition. The influence of emotion on word recognition has mostly been reported in prior studies on the automatic vigilance for negative stimuli, but the precise nature of this relationship is unclear. Various models of automatic vigilance have claimed that the effect of valence on response times is categorical, an inverted-U, or interactive with arousal. The present study used a sample of 12,658 words, and included many lexical and semantic control factors, to determine the precise nature of the effects of arousal and valence on word recognition. Converging empirical patterns observed in word-level and trial-level data from lexical decision and naming indicate that valence and arousal exert independent monotonic effects: Negative words are recognized more slowly than positive words, and arousing words are recognized more slowly than calming words. Valence explained about 2% of the variance in word recognition latencies, whereas the effect of arousal was smaller. Valence and arousal do not interact, but both interact with word frequency, such that valence and arousal exert larger effects among low-frequency words than among high-frequency words. These results necessitate a new model of affective word processing whereby the degree of negativity monotonically and independently predicts the speed of responding. This research also demonstrates that incorporating emotional factors, especially valence, improves the performance of models of word recognition. PMID:24490848

  6. Electroencephalography Based Analysis of Working Memory Load and Affective Valence in an N-back Task with Emotional Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissmann, Sebastian; Faller, Josef; Scharinger, Christian; Spüler, Martin; Gerjets, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Most brain-based measures of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are used in highly controlled lab environments and only focus on narrow mental states (e.g., working memory load). However, we assume that outside the lab complex multidimensional mental states are evoked. This could potentially create interference between EEG signatures used for identification of specific mental states. In this study, we aimed to investigate more realistic conditions and therefore induced a combination of working memory load and affective valence to reveal potential interferences in EEG measures. To induce changes in working memory load and affective valence, we used a paradigm which combines an N-back task (for working memory load manipulation) with a standard method to induce affect (affective pictures taken from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) database). Subjective ratings showed that the experimental task was successful in inducing working memory load as well as affective valence. Additionally, performance measures were analyzed and it was found that behavioral performance decreased with increasing workload as well as negative valence, showing that affective valence can have an effect on cognitive processing. These findings are supported by changes in frontal theta and parietal alpha power, parameters used for measuring of working memory load in the EEG. However, these EEG measures are influenced by the negative valence condition as well and thereby show that detection of working memory load is sensitive to affective contexts. Unexpectedly, we did not find any effects for EEG measures typically used for affective valence detection (Frontal Alpha Asymmetry (FAA)). Therefore we assume that the FAA measure might not be usable if cognitive workload is induced simultaneously. We conclude that future studies should account for potential context-specifity of EEG measures.

  7. Behavioural and physiological measures indicate subtle variations in the emotional valence of young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliveld, Lisette M C; Düpjan, Sandra; Tuchscherer, Armin; Puppe, Birger

    2016-04-01

    In the study of animal emotions, emotional valence has been found to be difficult to measure. Many studies of farm animals' emotions have therefore focussed on the identification of indicators of strong, mainly negative, emotions. However, subtle variations in emotional valence, such as those caused by rather moderate differences in husbandry conditions, may also affect animals' mood and welfare when such variations occur consistently. In this study, we investigated whether repeated moderate aversive or rewarding events could lead to measurable differences in emotional valence in young, weaned pigs. We conditioned 105 female pigs in a test arena to either a repeated startling procedure (sudden noises or appearances of objects) or a repeated rewarding procedure (applesauce, toy and straw) over 11 sessions. Control pigs were also regularly exposed to the same test arena but without conditioning. Before and after conditioning, we measured heart rate and its variability as well as the behavioural reactions of the subjects in the test arena, with a special focus on detailed acoustic analyses of their vocalisations. The behavioural and heart rate measures were analysed as changes compared to the baseline values before conditioning. A limited number of the putative indicators of emotional valence were affected by the conditioning. We found that the negatively conditioned pigs showed changes that were significantly different from those in control pigs, namely a decrease in locomotion and an increase in standing. The positively conditioned pigs, however, showed a stronger increase in heart rate and a smaller decrease in SDNN (a heart rate variability parameter indicating changes in autonomic regulation) compared to the controls. Compared to the negatively conditioned pigs, the positively conditioned pigs produced fewer vocalisations overall as well as fewer low-frequency grunts but more high-frequency grunts. The low-frequency grunts of the negatively conditioned pigs also

  8. Intersite interactions and susceptibility in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaoqian Wang; Gao Lin; Bingjian Ni; Fusui Liu.

    1985-10-01

    This paper considers the effect of intersite processes on the susceptibility in mixed valence system. The method of thermodynamical perturbation used in this paper can also be generalized to study other properties of mixed valence system. The general formula of partition function of two-site interactions for the mixed valence system is given. The numerical calculations show that the intersite interaction is large enough to explain the minimum of susceptibility discovered in experiments. The different types of our theoretical curves predict that the susceptibility should exhibit a rich variety of behaviour at low temperature for various materials. (author)

  9. Valence bond model potential energy surface for H4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, D.M.; Brown, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    Potential energy surfaces for the H 4 system are derived using the valence bond procedure. An ab initio evaluation of the valence bond energy expression is described and some of its numerical properties are given. Next, four semiempirical evaluations of the valence bond energy are defined and parametrized to yield reasonable agreement with various ab initio calculations of H 4 energies. Characteristics of these four H 4 surfaces are described by means of tabulated energy minima and equipotential contour maps for selected geometrical arrangements of the four nuclei

  10. Prediction of crack density and electrical resistance changes in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel; Khan, Kamran; El Sayed, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    We present unified predictions for the crack onset strain, evolution of crack density, and changes in electrical resistance in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading. We propose a damage mechanics model to quantify and predict

  11. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuexian

    1990-08-01

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f 7n -orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  12. Color change mechanism of niobium oxide thin film with incidental light angle and applied voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Isao [Course of Information Science and Technology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokai University (Japan); Aoki, Hayata [Course of Electro Photo Optics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan); Ebisawa, Mizue [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute (Japan); Kuroda, Akihiro [Department of Optical and Imaging Science & Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan); Kuroda Consulting Incorporated (Japan); Kuroda, Koichi [Kuroda Consulting Incorporated (Japan); Maeda, Shuichi [Course of Information Science and Technology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokai University (Japan); Course of Electro Photo Optics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan); Department of Optical and Imaging Science & Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

    2016-03-31

    Niobium oxide thin layers made by the anodization process showed coloration owing to thin film interference. The reflection spectra depended on both the applied voltage and incident light angle. Large color differences were observed at incident light angles between 5° and 70°, when the applied voltage was over 60 V. In this study, we explored the cause of these results using ellipsometry and goniophotometry to understand the transition of optical constants and the reflection spectra with applied voltage. Finally, we concluded that the coloration of the reflection spectra, which included only a first-order interference peak, exhibits a smaller change because the first order interference peak has a wider half value width than higher order interference peaks. - Highlights: • We investigated color change of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} oxide thin layers with incidental light angle. • The reflection spectra shift to lower wavelength region with increasing incident light angle. • The reflection spectra shift to higher wavelength region with increasing applied voltage. • First-order interference has wider half value width, and exhibits small color change.

  13. Lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color changes, and volatile compounds production in irradiated raw pork batters with different fat content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Cheo Run; Byun, Myung Woo

    2000-01-01

    An emulsion-type product was prepared to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color change, and volatile production in raw pork with different fat content. Lipid oxidation increased with an increase in fat content or irradiation dose. Irradiated batters had higher cholesterol oxides than did non-irradiated batters, and the major cholesterol oxides formed in irradiated pork batters were 7α- and 7β- hydroxycholesterol. Hunter color a- and b-values of raw pork batters were decreased by irradiation regardless of fat content. Irradiation significantly increased the amount of volatile compounds. Although lipid oxidation of high fat products (10 and 15% fat) was higher than that of low fat products (4%), high fat products did not always produce greater amount of volatile compounds in raw pork batters. In summary, irradiation increased lipid and cholesterol oxidation, and volatile compounds production, and had detrimental effects on the color of raw pork batter under aerobic conditions

  14. Method of encapsulating a phase change material with a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Manoj Kumar; Jotshi, Chand K.; Stefanakos, Elias K.; Goswami, Dharendra Yogi

    2016-11-15

    Storage systems based on latent heat storage have high-energy storage density, which reduces the footprint of the system and the cost. However, phase change materials (PCMs), such as NaNO.sub.3, NaCl, KNO.sub.3, have very low thermal conductivities. To enhave the storage of PCMs, macroencapsulation of PCMs was performed using a metal oxide, such as SiO.sub.2 or a graphene-SiO.sub.2, over polyimide-coated or nickel-embedded, polyimide-coated pellets The macro encapsulation provides a self-supporting structure, enhances the heat transfer rate, and provides a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage for use in solar thermal power plants. NaNO.sub.3 was selected for thermal storage in a temperature range of 300.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. The PCM was encapsulated in a metal oxide cell using self-assembly reactions, hydrolysis, and simultaneous chemical oxidation at various temperatures.

  15. Edaravone leads to proteome changes indicative of neuronal cell protection in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Ahmadinejad, Fereshteh; Hoedt, Esthelle; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh; Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Neubert, Thomas A; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2015-11-01

    Neuronal cell death, in neurodegenerative disorders, is mediated through a spectrum of biological processes. Excessive amounts of free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), has detrimental effects on neurons leading to cell damage via peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) has been used for neurological recovery in several countries, including Japan and China, and it has been suggested that Edaravone may have cytoprotective effects in neurodegeneration. Edaravone protects nerve cells in the brain by reducing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. To gain further insight into the cytoprotective effects of Edaravone against oxidative stress condition we have performed comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE)-based proteomic analyses on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to oxidative stress and in combination with Edaravone. We showed that Edaravone can reverse the cytotoxic effects of H2O2 through its specific mechanism. We observed that oxidative stress changes metabolic pathways and cytoskeletal integrity. Edaravone seems to reverse the H2O2-mediated effects at both the cellular and protein level via induction of Peroxiredoxin-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural and morphological changes in pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide caused by irradiation with high-energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernykh, M.A.; Belov, V.T.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the structural and morphological changes, occurring under the electron beam in pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide, prepared in seven different solutions and irradiated beforehand by protons of x-rays, with the aim of elucidating the structure of anodic aluminum oxides. An increased stability of the pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide has been observed towards the action of the electron beam of an UEMV-100K microscope at standard working regimes (75 keV) as a result of irradiation with protons or x-rays. A difference has been found to exist between structural and morphological changes of anodic aluminum oxide films, prepared in different solutions, when irradiated with high-energy particles. A structural and phase inhomogeneity of amorphous pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide has been detected and its influence on the character of solid-phase transformations under the maximum-intensity electron beam

  17. Systemic inflammatory changes and increased oxidative stress in rural Indian women cooking with biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Anindita; Ray, Manas Ranjan; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    investigated. ► Serum markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress were studied. ► Biomass using women had increased systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. ► Indoor air pollution and observed changes were positively associated.

  18. Systemic inflammatory changes and increased oxidative stress in rural Indian women cooking with biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Anindita, E-mail: anidu14@gmail.com [College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 (India); Ray, Manas Ranjan; Banerjee, Anirban [Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 (India)

    2012-06-15

    cardiovascular health was investigated. ► Serum markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress were studied. ► Biomass using women had increased systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. ► Indoor air pollution and observed changes were positively associated.

  19. Physiological plasticity of the thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii in response to a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, T.; Johnson, A.; Gelsinger, D.; de la Torre, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Our understanding of nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in high temperature environments underwent a dramatic revision with the discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA). The importance of AOA to the global nitrogen cycle came to light when recent studies of marine AOA demonstrated the dominance of these organisms in the ocean microbiome and their role as producers of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Understanding how AOA respond to fluctuating environments is crucial to fully comprehending their contribution to global biogeochemical cycling and climate change. In this study we use the thermophilic AOA Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii strain HL72 to explore the physiological plasticity of energy metabolism in these organisms. Previous studies have shown that HL72 grows autotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-). Unlike studies of marine AOA, we find that HL72 can grow over a wide ammonia concentration range (0.25 - 10 mM NH4Cl) with comparable generation times when in the presence of 0.25 to 4 mM NH4Cl. However, preliminary data indicate that amoA, the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO), is upregulated at low ammonia concentrations (<50 μM) compared to growth at 1 mM. Although the ammonia oxidation pathway has not been fully elucidated, we have shown that nitric oxide (NO) appears to be a key intermediate: exponentially growing HL72 produces significant NO and the removal of NO using a scavenger reversibly inhibits growth. In addition to AMO, the HL72 genome also contains sequences for a urease encoded by subunits ureABC and an active urea transporter. Urea ((NH2)2CO) is an organic compound ubiquitous to aquatic and soil habitats that, when hydrolyzed, forms NH3 and CO2. We examined urea as an alternate source of ammonia for the ammonia oxidation pathway. HL72 grows over a wide range of urea concentrations (0.25 - 10 mM) at rates comparable to growth on ammonia. In a substrate competition experiment HL72 preferentially

  20. A new oxidation flow reactor for measuring secondary aerosol formation of rapidly changing emission sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonen, Pauli; Saukko, Erkka; Karjalainen, Panu; Timonen, Hilkka; Bloss, Matthew; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) or environmental chambers can be used to estimate secondary aerosol formation potential of different emission sources. Emissions from anthropogenic sources, such as vehicles, often vary on short timescales. For example, to identify the vehicle driving conditions that lead to high potential secondary aerosol emissions, rapid oxidation of exhaust is needed. However, the residence times in environmental chambers and in most oxidation flow reactors are too long to study these transient effects ( ˜ 100 s in flow reactors and several hours in environmental chambers). Here, we present a new oxidation flow reactor, TSAR (TUT Secondary Aerosol Reactor), which has a short residence time ( ˜ 40 s) and near-laminar flow conditions. These improvements are achieved by reducing the reactor radius and volume. This allows studying, for example, the effect of vehicle driving conditions on the secondary aerosol formation potential of the exhaust. We show that the flow pattern in TSAR is nearly laminar and particle losses are negligible. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in TSAR has a similar mass spectrum to the SOA produced in the state-of-the-art reactor, PAM (potential aerosol mass). Both reactors produce the same amount of mass, but TSAR has a higher time resolution. We also show that TSAR is capable of measuring the secondary aerosol formation potential of a vehicle during a transient driving cycle and that the fast response of TSAR reveals how different driving conditions affect the amount of formed secondary aerosol. Thus, TSAR can be used to study rapidly changing emission sources, especially the vehicular emissions during transient driving.

  1. Changes in methane oxidation activity and methanotrophic community composition in saline alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J

    2014-05-01

    The soil of the former Lake Texcoco is a saline alkaline environment where anthropogenic drainage in some areas has reduced salt content and pH. Potential methane (CH4) consumption rates were measured in three soils of the former Lake Texcoco with different electrolytic conductivity (EC) and pH, i.e. Tex-S1 a >18 years drained soil (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 8.5), Tex-S2 drained for ~10 years (EC 9.0 dS m(-1), pH 10.3) and the undrained Tex-S3 (EC 84.8 dS m(-1), pH 10.3). An arable soil from Alcholoya (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 6.7), located nearby Lake Texcoco was used as control. Methane oxidation in the soil Tex-S1 (lowest EC and pH) was similar to that in the arable soil from Alcholoya (32.5 and 34.7 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively). Meanwhile, in soils Tex-S2 and Tex-S3, the potential CH4 oxidation rates were only 15.0 and 12.8 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively. Differences in CH4 oxidation were also related to changes in the methane-oxidizing communities in these soils. Sequence analysis of pmoA gene showed that soils differed in the identity and number of methanotrophic phylotypes. The Alcholoya soil and Tex-S1 contained phylotypes grouped within the upland soil cluster gamma and the Jasper Ridge, California JR-2 clade. In soil Tex-S3, a phylotype related to Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum was detected.

  2. Effect of valence on the electromigration in silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Doan

    1970-01-01

    It is shown that the apparent effective valence Z B ** of a solute deduced from experiments differs from the true effective valence Z B * defined in the atomic models by a corrective term due to the 'vacancy flow effect'. The experimental results suggest that this corrective term is very important and that it is negative for transition elements; this hypothesis is confirmed for the case of iron in a copper matrix. For the elements to the right of silver in the periodic table, where the correction can be neglected, the effective valence of the solute varies linearly with z (z + 1), z being the difference between the valency of the solute and the solvent; in contrast, the further the solute is from the solvent in the periodic table the more nearly the electronic structure of the ion at the saddle point resembles that of the ion at the equilibrium position. (author) [fr

  3. Hole energy and momentum distributions in valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, G. van der.

    1982-01-01

    In order to understand the electrical and magnetic properties of solids, the knowledge of the density of states and the dispersion relation of the valence bands is indispensable. This thesis offers some alternative methods to obtain information about the nature of the valence band. Part A deals with the energy distribution of the photoelectrons. A simple model, which explains the core hole satellite structure in compounds with large correlation effects between the valence band holes and the created photo-hole, is outlined. CuCl, CuX 2 (X = F Cl and Br) are studied, by photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopies in determining the valence band properties. Part B deals with the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the wave vector of the emitted electrons. A practical example is given for the determination of the dispersion relation in copper. The measurements of a surface resonance band and the distribution of the secondary electrons are also reported. (Auth.)

  4. Modulation of motor-meaning congruity effects for valenced words

    OpenAIRE

    Brookshire, Geoffrey; Ivry, Richard; Casasanto, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which emotionally valenced words automatically cue spatio-motor representations. Participants made speeded button presses, moving their hand upward or downward while viewing words with positive or negative valence. Only the color of the words was relevant to the response; on target trials, there was no requirement to read the words or process their meaning. In Experiment 1, upward responses were faster for positive words, and downward for negative words. This eff...

  5. Freeze-drying-induced changes in the properties of graphene oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Heon; Van Khai, Tran; Gil Na, Han; Jung Kwon, Yong; Yeon Cho, Hong; Woo Kim, Hyoun; Park, No-Hyung; So, Dae Sup; Lee, Joon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We have characterized and evaluated changes in graphene oxide (GO) induced by means of freeze-drying. In order to evaluate these changes, we investigated the effects of freeze-drying and chemical reduction processes on the structure, morphology, chemical composition, and Raman properties of GO and reduced GO. The freeze-dried GO had a pore structure, maintaining a pored morphology even after thermal annealing. The freeze-dried samples were composed of a single folded nanosheet or a few nanosheets stacked and folded. The oxygen-containing functional groups were removed not only during the freeze-drying but also during the reduction processes, with an accompanying decrease in the average size of the sp 2 carbon domain (i.e. an increase in the I D /I G value). (papers)

  6. Implication of volume changes in uranium oxides: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J.A.; Milman, V.; Goldberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    In severe nuclear accident scenarios (in air environments and high temperatures) UO 2 fuel pellets oxidise to produce uranium oxides with higher oxygen content, e.g., U 4 O 9 or U 3 O 8 . As a first step in investigating the microstructural changes following UO 2 oxidation to hexagonal high temperature phase of U 3 O 8 , density functional quantum mechanical calculations of the structure, elastic properties and electronic structure of U 3 O 8 have been performed. The calculated properties of hexagonal phase of U 3 O 8 are compared to those of the orthorhombic pseudo-hexagonal phase which is stable at room temperature. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used to investigate changes in the lattice constants. The first-principles calculations predict a 35-42% increase in volume per uranium atom as a result of the transformation from UO 2 to U 3 O 8 , in agreement with experimental data. The implications of this prediction on the linear expansion and fragmentation of fuel are discussed. (authors)

  7. Explaining the effect of event valence on unrealistic optimism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ron S; Brown, Mark G

    2009-05-01

    People typically exhibit 'unrealistic optimism' (UO): they believe they have a lower chance of experiencing negative events and a higher chance of experiencing positive events than does the average person. UO has been found to be greater for negative than positive events. This 'valence effect' has been explained in terms of motivational processes. An alternative explanation is provided by the 'numerosity model', which views the valence effect simply as a by-product of a tendency for likelihood estimates pertaining to the average member of a group to increase with the size of the group. Predictions made by the numerosity model were tested in two studies. In each, UO for a single event was assessed. In Study 1 (n = 115 students), valence was manipulated by framing the event either negatively or positively, and participants estimated their own likelihood and that of the average student at their university. In Study 2 (n = 139 students), valence was again manipulated and participants again estimated their own likelihood; additionally, group size was manipulated by having participants estimate the likelihood of the average student in a small, medium-sized, or large group. In each study, the valence effect was found, but was due to an effect on estimates of own likelihood, not the average person's likelihood. In Study 2, valence did not interact with group size. The findings contradict the numerosity model, but are in accord with the motivational explanation. Implications for health education are discussed.

  8. Valence, arousal and cognitive control: A voluntary task switching study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle eDemanet

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the interplay between arousal, valence and cognitive control. To this end, we investigated how arousal and valence associated with affective stimuli influenced cognitive flexibility when switching between tasks voluntarily. Three hypotheses were tested. First, a valence hypothesis that states that the positive valence of affective stimuli will facilitate both global and task-switching performance because of increased cognitive flexibility. Second, an arousal hypothesis that states that arousal, and not valence, will specifically impair task-switching performance by strengthening the previously executed task-set. Third, an attention hypothesis that states that both cognitive and emotional control ask for limited attentional resources, and predicts that arousal will impair both global and task-switching performance. The results showed that arousal affected task-switching but not global performance, possibly by phasic modulations of the noradrenergic system that reinforces the previously executed task. In addition, positive valence only affected global performance but not task-switching performance, possibly by phasic modulations of dopamine that stimulates the general ability to perform in a multitasking environment.

  9. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: Oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Baron, Caroline; Bruni Let, Mette

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed...

  10. Changes in Acylglycerols composition, quality characteristics and in vivo effects of dietary pumpkin seed oil upon thermal oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Alam; Ahmad, Sultan

    2017-07-01

    This study was aimed to determine the acylglycerols composition, quality characteristics and protective role of dietary pumpkin seed oil in rabbits. Pumpkin seed oil was thermally oxidized and analyzed for quality characteristics and acylglycerols composition using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Oxidized and un-oxidized oil samples were fed to the rabbits in different doses for two weeks. The changes in the serum biochemistry, hematology, and liver histology were studied. The levels of quality parameters such peroxide value (PV), anisidine value (AV), total phenolic contents (TPC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), conjugated dienes (CD) and conjugated trienes (CT) significantly increased with thermal treatment. HPLC analyses revealed ten individual triacylglycerols (TAGs), total di-acylglycerols (DAGs), mono-acylglycerols (MAGs), and total oxidized TAGs. Trilinolein (LLL), 1-oleoyl-2,3-dilinolinoyl glycerol (OLL), triolein (OOO) and 1,2-distearoyl-3-palmitoyl glycerol (SSP) were present in higher amounts and decreased with thermal treatment. Animal's studies showed that oxidized oils decreased the whole body weight, which was ameliorated by the co-administration of un-oxidized oils. The levels of serum biochemical parameters were improved by co-administration of pumpkin seed oils. There were no significant effects of both oxidized and un-oxidized pumpkin seed oil on the hematological and histological parameters of rabbits. In conclusion, nutritionally important triacylglycerols were present in pumpkin seed oil with protective role against the toxicity of its corresponding oxidized oils.

  11. Changes in Acylglycerols Composition, Quality Characteristics and In vivo Effects of Dietary Pumpkin Seed Oil upon Thermal Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Zeb

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the acylglycerols composition, quality characteristics, and protective role of dietary pumpkin seed oil (PSO in rabbits. PSO was thermally oxidized and analyzed for quality characteristics and acylglycerols composition using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD. Oxidized and un-oxidized oil samples were fed to the rabbits in different doses for 2 weeks. The changes in the serum biochemistry, hematology, and liver histology were studied. The levels of quality parameters such peroxide value (PV, anisidine value (AV, total phenolic contents (TPC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, conjugated dienes (CD and conjugated trienes (CT significantly increased with thermal treatment. HPLC analyses revealed 10 individual triacylglycerols (TAGs, total di-acylglycerols (DAGs, mono-acylglycerols (MAGs, and total oxidized TAGs. Trilinolein (LLL, 1-oleoyl-2,3-dilinolinoyl glycerol (OLL, triolein (OOO and 1,2-distearoyl-3-palmitoyl glycerol (SSP were present in higher amounts and decreased with thermal treatment. Animal's studies showed that oxidized oils decreased the whole body weight, which was ameliorated by the co-administration of un-oxidized oils. The levels of serum biochemical parameters were improved by co-administration of pumpkin seed oils. There were no significant effects of both oxidized and un-oxidized PSO on the hematological and histological parameters of rabbits. In conclusion, nutritionally important triacylglycerols were present in PSO with protective role against the toxicity of its corresponding oxidized oils.

  12. Effects of emotional valence and three-dimensionality of visual stimuli on brain activation: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, A R; Almeida, I; Barbosa, F; Castelo-Branco, M; Monteiro, L; Reis, M; de Sousa, L; Caldas, A Castro

    2013-01-01

    Examining changes in brain activation linked with emotion-inducing stimuli is essential to the study of emotions. Due to the ecological potential of techniques such as virtual reality (VR), inspection of whether brain activation in response to emotional stimuli can be modulated by the three-dimensional (3D) properties of the images is important. The current study sought to test whether the activation of brain areas involved in the emotional processing of scenarios of different valences can be modulated by 3D. Therefore, the focus was made on the interaction effect between emotion-inducing stimuli of different emotional valences (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral valences) and visualization types (2D, 3D). However, main effects were also analyzed. The effect of emotional valence and visualization types and their interaction were analyzed through a 3 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA. Post-hoc t-tests were performed under a ROI-analysis approach. The results show increased brain activation for the 3D affective-inducing stimuli in comparison with the same stimuli in 2D scenarios, mostly in cortical and subcortical regions that are related to emotional processing, in addition to visual processing regions. This study has the potential of clarify brain mechanisms involved in the processing of emotional stimuli (scenarios' valence) and their interaction with three-dimensionality.

  13. Temperature-induced valence transition in EuNi2(Si0.20Ge0.80)2 studied by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kamakura, Nozomu; Taguchi, Munetaka; Chainani, Ashish; Takata, Yasutaka; Horiba, Koji; Shin, Shik; Ikenaga, Eiji; Mimura, Kojiro; Shiga, Masayuki; Wada, Hirofumi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Awaji, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Nishino, Yoshinori; Miwa, Daigo; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    The temperature-induced mixed valence transition in EuNi 2 (Si 0.20 Ge 0.80 ) 2 has been investigated by hard X-ray (5940 eV) photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) for fractured surfaces, with a probing depth larger than 5 nm. The Eu 3d core-level states are studied below and above the critical valence transition temperature, T v = 80 K. The HX-PES spectra at 40 and 120 K show the mixed valence transition, with clear changes in the divalent and trivalent Eu 3d chemically shifted features. The Eu 3d HX-PES spectra indicate a mean valence of 2.70 ± 0.03 at 40 K which changes to 2.40 ± 0.03 at 120 K, in good accordance with the results of bulk Eu III -edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

  14. Macaque cardiac physiology is sensitive to the valence of passively viewed sensory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Bliss-Moreau

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system activity is an important component of affective experience. We demonstrate in the rhesus monkey that both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system respond differentially to the affective valence of passively viewed video stimuli. We recorded cardiac impedance and an electrocardiogram while adult macaques watched a series of 300 30-second videos that varied in their affective content. We found that sympathetic activity (as measured by cardiac pre-ejection period increased and parasympathetic activity (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia decreased as video content changes from positive to negative. These findings parallel the relationship between autonomic nervous system responsivity and valence of stimuli in humans. Given the relationship between human cardiac physiology and affective processing, these findings suggest that macaque cardiac physiology may be an index of affect in nonverbal animals.

  15. Effects of Electric Field on the Valence-Bond Property of an Electron in a Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of the quantum-dot molecules in an electric field is investigated by the finite element method with the effective mass approximation. The numerical calculation results show that the valence bond of the quantum-dot molecule alternates between covalent bonds and ionic bonds as the electric field increases. The valence-bond property can be reflected by the oscillator strength of the intraband transition. The bound state with the highest energy level in the quantum-dot molecule gradually changes into a quasibound state when the electric field increases.

  16. Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature Oxidation of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2011-01-01

    Raman microprobe spectroscopy was applied in studies of high-temperature air oxidation of a ferritic alloy (HT-9) in the absence and presence of zirconia coatings with the objective of evaluating the technique as a way to quickly screen candidate cladding materials and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures for advanced nuclear reactors. When oxidation was relatively uniform, Raman spectra collected using microscope optics with low spatial resolution were found to be similar to those collected with conventional Raman spectroscopy. These spectra could be used to identify major oxide corrosion products and follow changes in the composition of the oxides due to heating. However, when the oxidation films were comprised of multiple layers of varying composition, or with layers containing metallic phases, techniques with higher depth resolution and sensitivity to zero-valence metals were necessary. The requirements were met by combining Raman microprobe using different optical configurations and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Determination of a natural valence-band offset - The case of HgTe and CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. K.; Spicer, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    A method to determine a natural valence-band offset (NVBO), i.e., the change in the valence-band maximum energy which is intrinsic to the bulk band structures of semiconductors is proposed. The HgTe-CdTe system is used as an example in which it is found that the valence-band maximum of HgTe lies 0.35 + or - 0.06 eV above that of CdTe. The NVBO of 0.35 eV is in good agreement with the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement of the heterojunction offset. The procedure to determine the NVBO between semiconductors, and its implication on the heterojunction band lineup and the electronic structures of semiconductor alloys, are discussed.

  18. Raman spectroscopic study of acute oxidative stress induced changes in mice skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alimova, Alexandra; Chakraverty, Rahul; Katz, A.; Gayen, S. K.; Larsson, L.; Savage, H. E.; Alfano, R. R.

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative stress due to free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer dementia, diabetes mellitus, and mitochrondrial myopathies. In this study, the acute oxidative stress induced changes in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in mouse skeletal muscles are studied in vitro using Raman spectroscopy. Mammalian skeletal muscles are rich in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in both reduced (NADH) and oxidized (NAD) states, as they are sites of aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The relative levels of NAD and NADH are altered in certain physiological and pathological conditions of skeletal muscles. In this study, near infrared Raman spectroscopy is used to identify the molecular fingerprints of NAD and NADH in five-week-old mice biceps femoris muscles. A Raman vibrational mode of NADH is identified in fresh skeletal muscle samples suspended in buffered normal saline. In the same samples, when treated with 1% H IIO II for 5 minutes and 15 minutes, the Raman spectrum shows molecular fingerprints specific to NAD and the disappearance of NADH vibrational bands. The NAD bands after 15 minutes were more intense than after 5 minutes. Since NADH fluoresces and NAD does not, fluorescence spectroscopy is used to confirm the results of the Raman measurements. Fluorescence spectra exhibit an emission peak at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH emission wavelength in fresh muscle samples; while the H IIO II treated muscle samples do not exhibit NADH fluorescence. Raman spectroscopy may be used to develop a minimally invasive, in vivo optical biopsy method to measure the relative NAD and NADH levels in muscle tissues. This may help to detect diseases of muscle, including mitochondrial myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

  19. Theory, simulation and experimental results of the acoustic detection of magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgert Jörn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic Particle Imaging is a novel method for medical imaging. It can be used to measure the local concentration of a tracer material based on iron oxide nanoparticles. While the resulting images show the distribution of the tracer material in phantoms or anatomic structures of subjects under examination, no information about the tissue is being acquired. To expand Magnetic Particle Imaging into the detection of soft tissue properties, a new method is proposed, which detects acoustic emissions caused by magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide. Methods Starting from an introduction to the theory of acoustically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging, a comparison to magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging is presented. Furthermore, an experimental setup for the detection of acoustic emissions is described, which consists of the necessary field generating components, i.e. coils and permanent magnets, as well as a calibrated microphone to perform the detection. Results The estimated detection limit of acoustic Magnetic Particle Imaging is comparable to the detection limit of magnetic resonance imaging for iron oxide nanoparticles, whereas both are inferior to the theoretical detection limit for magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging. Sufficient data was acquired to perform a comparison to the simulated data. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. The remaining differences can be well explained. Conclusions It was possible to demonstrate the detection of acoustic emissions of magnetic tracer materials in Magnetic Particle Imaging. The processing of acoustic emission in addition to the tracer distribution acquired by magnetic detection might allow for the extraction of mechanical tissue parameters. Such parameters, like for example the velocity of sound and the attenuation caused by the tissue, might also be used to support and improve ultrasound imaging. However, the method

  20. Changes in oxidative stress in transgenic RNAi ACO1 tomato fruit during ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglous, Najat Mohamed; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Hassan, Maizom; Zainal, Zamri

    2013-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) is the second most cultivated vegetable in the world and widely used as a system for studying the role of ethylene during fruit ripening. Our objective was to study the oxidative stress and antioxidative metabolism during ripening of non transgenic tomato and transgenic line-21 tomato which reduced ethylene. The line-21 of transgenic tomato plants (RNAi ACO1) had lower ethylene production and longer shelf-life more than 32 days as compared to the wild-type fruits which have very short shelf-life. In this study, tomato fruit were divided into five different stages (MG: mature green 5%, B: breaker 25%, T: turning 50%, O: orange75%, RR: red ripe100%). The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were measured to assess changes in oxidative stress. The LOX activity and MDA content decreased significantly obtaining 2.6-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild type fruit. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were increased to 1.9 and 1.2 folds from the mature green to the fully ripe stage in transgenic tomatoes. Furthermore, the wild type tomato increases 1.3 in SOD and 1.6 in CAT activities. The overall results indicate that the wild type tomato fruit showed a faster rate of ripening, parallel to decline in the rate of enzymatic antioxidative systems as compared to the transgenic line-21 tomato fruit. In addition, the results show that the antioxidant capacity is improved during the ripening process and is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress.

  1. The effects of climate changes on soil methane oxidation in a dry Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imperio, Ludovica

    2014-05-01

    The effects of climate changes on soil methane oxidation in a dry Arctic tundra. Ludovica D'Imperio1, Anders Michelsen1, Christian J. Jørgensen1, Bo Elberling1 1Center for Permafrost (CENPERM), Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Denmark At Northern latitudes climatic changes are predicted to be most pronounced resulting in increasing active layer depth and changes in growing season length, vegetation cover and nutrient cycling. As a consequence of increased temperature, large stocks of carbon stored in the permafrost-affected soils could become available for microbial transformations and under anoxic conditions result in increasing methane production affecting net methane (CH4) budget. Arctic tundra soils also serves as an important sink of atmospheric CH4 by microbial oxidation under aerobic conditions. While several process studies have documented the mechanisms behind both production and emissions of CH4 in arctic ecosystems, an important knowledge gap exists with respect to the in situ dynamics of microbial-driven uptake of CH4 in arctic dry lands which may be enhanced as a consequence of global warming and thereby counterbalancing CH4 emissions from Arctic wetlands. In-situ methane measurements were made in a dry Arctic tundra in Disko Island, Western Greenland, during the summer 2013 to assess the role of seasonal and inter-annual variations in temperatures and snow cover. The experimental set-up included snow fences installed in 2012, allowed investigations of the emissions of GHGs from soil under increased winter snow deposition and ambient field conditions. The soil fluxes of CH4 and CO2 were measured using closed chambers in manipulated plots with increased summer temperatures and shrub removal with or without increased winter precipitation. At the control plots, the averaged seasonal CH4 oxidation rates ranged between -0.05 mg CH4 m-2 hr-1 (end of August) and -0.32 mg CH4 m-2 hr-1 (end of June). In the

  2. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Shirzad, Hedayatolah

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients.

  3. Thermal oxidation of cesium loaded Prussian blue as a precaution for exothermic phase change in extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, Durga; Tanaka, Hisashi; Takahashi, Akira; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Cesium adsorbed Prussian blue is studied for the thermal oxidation. The TG-DTA shows exothermic phase change of micro aggregates of nano-PB at above 270°C. For this reason, Cs loaded PB was heated between 180 to 260°C. Heating at 180 removed only the water. Neither the oxidation of Iron nor the removal of cyanide is observed at this temperature. Oxidation of cyanide is observed upon heating above 200°C while loaded Cs is released after heating at >250°C followed by washing with water. Thermal oxidation between 200 to 220°C for more than 2 h showed control on exothermic phase change and loaded Cs is also not solubilized. (author)

  4. Nitridation of one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanostructures: Changes in structure and photoactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Tamás

    2017-10-12

    In the search for stable, visible light active photoelectrodes, hydrothermally synthesized tungsten oxide nanowires were modified via nitrogen incorporation into their structure. To this end, nanowires were heat-treated in ammonia/nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures. This procedure caused transitions in their structure that were investigated along with the photoelectrochemical properties of the samples. Results were subsequently compared to the reference samples treated in inert nitrogen atmosphere. Morphological changes and structural transitions were followed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Bandgap energies were determined from the UV–vis spectra of the materials, while photoelectrochemical properties were tested by linear sweep photovoltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Pristine tungsten oxide nanowires were first transformed into tungsten oxynitride and then tungsten nitride during high-temperature calcination in ammonia atmosphere. Electron microscopic investigation revealed that, along with phase transition, the initial fibrous morphology gradually converted into nanosheets. Simultaneously, bandgap energies significantly decreased in the calcination process, too. Photoelectrochemical measurements demonstrated that photoactivity in the treated samples was not improved by the decrease of the bandgap. This behavior might be explained with the deterioration of charge carrier transport properties of the materials due to the increased number of structural defects (acting as trap states), and current ongoing work aims to verify this notion.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum avoids change in erythrocytic surface expression of phagocytosis markers during inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Kohnke, Hannes; Maretty, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. It may be produced by a parasite NO synthase (NOS) or by nitrate reduction. The parasite's benefit of NO accumulation is not understood. We investigated if inhibiting the P. falciparum NOS with specific and unspecific NOS...... increased the fraction of phosphatidyl serine exposing cells significantly. The infection did not change the level of expression of neither total CD47 nor its oxidized form. Unrelated to NOS inhibition, incubation with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide lead to a decrease in oxidized CD47. In conclusion...

  6. The indirect global warming potential and global temperature change potential due to methane oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Olivier; Collins, Bill; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Shine, Keith P

    2009-01-01

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere next to carbon dioxide. Its global warming potential (GWP) for a time horizon of 100 years is 25, which makes it an attractive target for climate mitigation policies. Although the methane GWP traditionally includes the methane indirect effects on the concentrations of ozone and stratospheric water vapour, it does not take into account the production of carbon dioxide from methane oxidation. We argue here that this CO 2 -induced effect should be included for fossil sources of methane, which results in slightly larger GWP values for all time horizons. If the global temperature change potential is used as an alternative climate metric, then the impact of the CO 2 -induced effect is proportionally much larger. We also discuss what the correction term should be for methane from anthropogenic biogenic sources.

  7. Effect of land use change on methane oxidation in temperate forest and grassland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D.S.; Valentine, D.W.; Mosier, A.R.; Parton, W.J.; Schimel, D.S. (Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (USA). Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    Evidence is accumulating that land use changes and other human activity during the past 100 to 200 years have contributed to decreased CH[sub 4] oxidation in the soil. Increased N additions to temperate forest soils in the northeastern United States decreased CH[sub 4] uptake by 30 to 60%, and increased N fertilization and conversion to cropland in temperate grasslands decreased CH[sub 4] uptake by 30 to 75%. Using these data, a series of calculations were made to estimate the impact of land use and management changes which have altered soil, the CH[sub 4] sink in temperate forest and grassland ecosystems. As the atmospheric mixing ratio of CH[sub 4] has increased during the past 150 y, the temperate CH[sub 4] sink has risen from approximately 8 Tg y[sup -1] to 27 Tg y[sup -1], assuming no loss of land cover to cropland conversion. The net effect of intensive land cover changes and extensive chronic disturbance (i.e., increased atmospheric N deposition) to these ecosystems have resulted in about 30% reduction in the CH[sub 4] budget even more as atmospheric CH[sub 4] concentrations increase and as a result of further disturbance to other biomes. Without accounting for this approximately 20 Tg y[sup -1] temperate soil sink, the atmospheric CH[sub 4] concentration would be increasing about 1.5 times the current rate. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Characteristics of phase-change materials containing oxide nano-additives for thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Yu, Chao-Chieh

    2012-11-06

    In this study, the authors report the production of nanocomposite-enhanced phase-change materials (NEPCMs) using the direct-synthesis method by mixing paraffin with alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the experimental samples. Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO were dispersed into three concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 wt.%. Through heat conduction and differential scanning calorimeter experiments to evaluate the effects of varying concentrations of the nano-additives on the heat conduction performance and thermal storage characteristics of NEPCMs, their feasibility for use in thermal storage was determined. The experimental results demonstrate that TiO2 is more effective than the other additives in enhancing both the heat conduction and thermal storage performance of paraffin for most of the experimental parameters. Furthermore, TiO2 reduces the melting onset temperature and increases the solidification onset temperature of paraffin. This allows the phase-change heat to be applicable to a wider temperature range, and the highest decreased ratio of phase-change heat is only 0.46%, compared to that of paraffin. Therefore, this study demonstrates that TiO2, added to paraffin to form NEPCMs, has significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of paraffin.

  9. Changes in fat oxidation in response to various regimes of high intensity interval training (HIIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd Anthony; Schubert, Matthew M

    2018-01-01

    Increased whole-body fat oxidation (FOx) has been consistently demonstrated in response to moderate intensity continuous exercise training. Completion of high intensity interval training (HIIT) and its more intense form, sprint interval training (SIT), has also been reported to increase FOx in different populations. An explanation for this increase in FOx is primarily peripheral adaptations via improvements in mitochondrial content and function. However, studies examining changes in FOx are less common in response to HIIT or SIT than those determining increases in maximal oxygen uptake which is concerning, considering that FOx has been identified as a predictor of weight gain and glycemic control. In this review, we explored physiological and methodological issues underpinning existing literature concerning changes in FOx in response to HIIT and SIT. Our results show that completion of interval training increases FOx in approximately 50% of studies, with the frequency of increased FOx higher in response to studies using HIIT compared to SIT. Significant increases in β-HAD, citrate synthase, fatty acid binding protein, or FAT/CD36 are likely responsible for the greater FOx seen in these studies. We encourage scientists to adopt strict methodological procedures to attenuate day-to-day variability in FOx, which is dramatic, and develop standardized procedures for assessing FOx, which may improve detection of changes in FOx in response to HIIT.

  10. Decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen and surface ozone over the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Mao, Jingqiu; Fiore, Arlene M.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Lee, Ben H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Thornton, Joel A.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana B.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Nowak, John B.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Fried, Alan; Singh, Hanwant B.; Dibb, Jack; Paulot, Fabien; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2018-02-01

    Widespread efforts to abate ozone (O3) smog have significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) over the past 2 decades in the Southeast US, a place heavily influenced by both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. How reactive nitrogen speciation responds to the reduction in NOx emissions in this region remains to be elucidated. Here we exploit aircraft measurements from ICARTT (July-August 2004), SENEX (June-July 2013), and SEAC4RS (August-September 2013) and long-term ground measurement networks alongside a global chemistry-climate model to examine decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen (RON) and ozone over the Southeast US. We show that our model can reproduce the mean vertical profiles of major RON species and the total (NOy) in both 2004 and 2013. Among the major RON species, nitric acid (HNO3) is dominant (˜ 42-45 %), followed by NOx (31 %), total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs; 14 %), and total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs; 9-12 %) on a regional scale. We find that most RON species, including NOx, ΣPNs, and HNO3, decline proportionally with decreasing NOx emissions in this region, leading to a similar decline in NOy. This linear response might be in part due to the nearly constant summertime supply of biogenic VOC emissions in this region. Our model captures the observed relative change in RON and surface ozone from 2004 to 2013. Model sensitivity tests indicate that further reductions of NOx emissions will lead to a continued decline in surface ozone and less frequent high-ozone events.

  11. Neuronal changes and oxidative stress in adolescent rats after repeated exposure to mephedrone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Arnau, Raúl; Martínez-Clemente, José; Rodrigo, Teresa; Pubill, David; Camarasa, Jorge; Escubedo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Mephedrone is a new designer drug of abuse. We have investigated the neurochemical/enzymatic changes after mephedrone administration to adolescent rats (3 × 25 mg/kg, s.c. in a day, with a 2 h interval between doses, for two days) at high ambient temperature (26 ± 2 °C), a schedule that intends to model human recreational abuse. In addition, we have studied the effect of mephedrone in spatial learning and memory. The drug caused a transient decrease in weight gain. After the first dose, animals showed hypothermia but, after the subsequent doses, temperature raised over the values of saline-treated group. We observed the development of tolerance to these thermoregulatory effects of mephedrone. Mephedrone induced a reduction of the densities of dopamine (30% in the frontal cortex) and serotonin (40% in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus and 48% in the striatum) transporters without microgliosis. These deficits were also accompanied by a parallel decrease in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2. These changes matched with a down-regulation of D 2 dopamine receptors in the striatum. Mephedrone also induced an oxidative stress evidenced by an increase of lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex, and accompanied by a rise in glutathione peroxidase levels in all studied brain areas. Drug-treated animals displayed an impairment of the reference memory in the Morris water maze one week beyond the cessation of drug exposure, while the spatial learning process seems to be preserved. These findings raise concerns about the neuronal long-term effects of mephedrone. - Highlights: • We studied the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity of mephedrone in rats. • Mephedrone induced a transient hypothermia following sustained hyperthermia. • In a weekend consumption pattern, mephedrone induced selective neurotoxicity. • Mephedrone generated oxidative stress. • Mephedrone induced an impairment in memory function

  12. Decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen and surface ozone over the Southeast United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Widespread efforts to abate ozone (O3 smog have significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx over the past 2 decades in the Southeast US, a place heavily influenced by both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. How reactive nitrogen speciation responds to the reduction in NOx emissions in this region remains to be elucidated. Here we exploit aircraft measurements from ICARTT (July–August 2004, SENEX (June–July 2013, and SEAC4RS (August–September 2013 and long-term ground measurement networks alongside a global chemistry–climate model to examine decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen (RON and ozone over the Southeast US. We show that our model can reproduce the mean vertical profiles of major RON species and the total (NOy in both 2004 and 2013. Among the major RON species, nitric acid (HNO3 is dominant (∼ 42–45 %, followed by NOx (31 %, total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs; 14 %, and total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs; 9–12 % on a regional scale. We find that most RON species, including NOx, ΣPNs, and HNO3, decline proportionally with decreasing NOx emissions in this region, leading to a similar decline in NOy. This linear response might be in part due to the nearly constant summertime supply of biogenic VOC emissions in this region. Our model captures the observed relative change in RON and surface ozone from 2004 to 2013. Model sensitivity tests indicate that further reductions of NOx emissions will lead to a continued decline in surface ozone and less frequent high-ozone events.

  13. Neuronal changes and oxidative stress in adolescent rats after repeated exposure to mephedrone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Arnau, Raúl; Martínez-Clemente, José [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Rodrigo, Teresa [Animal Experimentation Unit of Psychology and Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Pubill, David [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Camarasa, Jorge, E-mail: jcamarasa@ub.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Escubedo, Elena [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Mephedrone is a new designer drug of abuse. We have investigated the neurochemical/enzymatic changes after mephedrone administration to adolescent rats (3 × 25 mg/kg, s.c. in a day, with a 2 h interval between doses, for two days) at high ambient temperature (26 ± 2 °C), a schedule that intends to model human recreational abuse. In addition, we have studied the effect of mephedrone in spatial learning and memory. The drug caused a transient decrease in weight gain. After the first dose, animals showed hypothermia but, after the subsequent doses, temperature raised over the values of saline-treated group. We observed the development of tolerance to these thermoregulatory effects of mephedrone. Mephedrone induced a reduction of the densities of dopamine (30% in the frontal cortex) and serotonin (40% in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus and 48% in the striatum) transporters without microgliosis. These deficits were also accompanied by a parallel decrease in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2. These changes matched with a down-regulation of D{sub 2} dopamine receptors in the striatum. Mephedrone also induced an oxidative stress evidenced by an increase of lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex, and accompanied by a rise in glutathione peroxidase levels in all studied brain areas. Drug-treated animals displayed an impairment of the reference memory in the Morris water maze one week beyond the cessation of drug exposure, while the spatial learning process seems to be preserved. These findings raise concerns about the neuronal long-term effects of mephedrone. - Highlights: • We studied the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity of mephedrone in rats. • Mephedrone induced a transient hypothermia following sustained hyperthermia. • In a weekend consumption pattern, mephedrone induced selective neurotoxicity. • Mephedrone generated oxidative stress. • Mephedrone induced an impairment in memory function.

  14. Effects of valence and divided attention on cognitive reappraisal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John A; Leclerc, Christina M; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the neural substrates supporting cognitive reappraisal, identifying the importance of cognitive control processes implemented by prefrontal cortex (PFC). This study examined how valence and attention affect the processes used for cognitive reappraisal by asking participants to passively view or to cognitively reappraise positive and negative images with full or divided attention. When participants simply viewed these images, results revealed few effects of valence or attention. However, when participants engaged in reappraisal, there was a robust effect of valence, with the reappraisal of negative relative to positive images associated with more widespread activation, including within regions of medial and lateral PFC. There also was an effect of attention, with more lateral PFC recruitment when regulating with full attention and more medial PFC recruitment when regulating with divided attention. Within two regions of medial PFC and one region of ventrolateral PFC, there was an interaction between valence and attention: in these regions, divided attention reduced activity during reappraisal of positive but not negative images. Critically, participants continued to report reappraisal success even during the Divided Attention condition. These results suggest multiple routes to successful cognitive reappraisal, depending upon image valence and the availability of attentional resources. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The acoustic correlates of valence depend on emotion family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The voice expresses a wide range of emotions through modulations of acoustic parameters such as frequency and amplitude. Although the acoustics of individual emotions are well understood, attempts to describe the acoustic correlates of broad emotional categories such as valence have yielded mixed results. In the present study, we analyzed the acoustics of emotional valence for different families of emotion. We divided emotional vocalizations into "motivational," "moral," and "aesthetic" families as defined by the OCC (Ortony, Clore, and Collins) model of emotion. Subjects viewed emotional scenarios and were cued to vocalize congruent exclamations in response to them, for example, "Yay!" and "Damn!". Positive valence was weakly associated with high-pitched and loud vocalizations. However, valence interacted with emotion family for both pitch and amplitude. A general acoustic code for valence does not hold across families of emotion, whereas family-specific codes provide a more accurate description of vocal emotions. These findings are consolidated into a set of "rules of expression" relating vocal dimensions to emotion dimensions. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Space-Valence Priming with Subliminal and Supraliminal Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich eAnsorge

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To date it is unclear whether (1 awareness-independent non-evaluative semantic processes influence affective semantics and whether (2 awareness-independent affective semantics influence non-evaluative semantic processing. In the current study, we investigated these questions with the help of subliminal (masked primes and visible targets in a space-valence across-category congruence effect. In line with (1, we found that subliminal space prime words influenced valence classification of supraliminal target words (Experiment 1: Classifications were faster with a congruent prime (e.g., the prime ‘up’ before the target ‘happy’ than with an incongruent prime (e.g., the prime ‘up’ before the target ‘sad’. In contrast to (2, no influence of subliminal valence primes on the classification of supraliminal space targets into up- and down-words was found (Experiment 2. Control conditions showed that standard masked response-priming effects were found with both subliminal prime types, and that an across-category congruence effect was also found with supraliminal valence primes and spatial target words. The final Experiment 3 confirmed that the across-category congruence effect indeed reflected priming of target categorization of a relevant meaning category. Together, the data jointly confirmed prediction (1 that awareness-independent non-evaluative semantic priming influences valence judgments.

  17. Effects of valence and divided attention on cognitive reappraisal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Christina M.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the neural substrates supporting cognitive reappraisal, identifying the importance of cognitive control processes implemented by prefrontal cortex (PFC). This study examined how valence and attention affect the processes used for cognitive reappraisal by asking participants to passively view or to cognitively reappraise positive and negative images with full or divided attention. When participants simply viewed these images, results revealed few effects of valence or attention. However, when participants engaged in reappraisal, there was a robust effect of valence, with the reappraisal of negative relative to positive images associated with more widespread activation, including within regions of medial and lateral PFC. There also was an effect of attention, with more lateral PFC recruitment when regulating with full attention and more medial PFC recruitment when regulating with divided attention. Within two regions of medial PFC and one region of ventrolateral PFC, there was an interaction between valence and attention: in these regions, divided attention reduced activity during reappraisal of positive but not negative images. Critically, participants continued to report reappraisal success even during the Divided Attention condition. These results suggest multiple routes to successful cognitive reappraisal, depending upon image valence and the availability of attentional resources. PMID:24493837

  18. Social learning modulates the lateralization of emotional valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Lavidor, Michal; Aharon-Peretz, Judith

    2008-08-01

    Although neuropsychological studies of lateralization of emotion have emphasized valence (positive vs. negative) or type (basic vs. complex) dimensions, the interaction between the two dimensions has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that recognition of basic emotions is processed preferentially by the right prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas recognition of complex social emotions is processed preferentially by the left PFC. Experiment 1 assessed the ability of healthy controls and patients with right and left PFC lesions to recognize basic and complex emotions. Experiment 2 modeled the patient's data of Experiment 1 on healthy participants under lateralized displays of the emotional stimuli. Both experiments support the Type as well as the Valence Hypotheses. However, our findings indicate that the Valence Hypothesis holds for basic but less so for complex emotions. It is suggested that, since social learning overrules the basic preference of valence in the hemispheres, the processing of complex emotions in the hemispheres is less affected by valence.

  19. Electron Band Alignment at Interfaces of Semiconductors with Insulating Oxides: An Internal Photoemission Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Afanas'ev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the electron energy band alignment at interfaces between different semiconductors and wide-gap oxide insulators is examined using the internal photoemission spectroscopy, which is based on observations of optically-induced electron (or hole transitions across the semiconductor/insulator barrier. Interfaces of various semiconductors ranging from the conventional silicon to the high-mobility Ge-based (Ge, Si1-xGex, Ge1-xSnx and AIIIBV group (GaAs, InxGa1-xAs, InAs, GaP, InP, GaSb, InSb materials were studied revealing several general trends in the evolution of band offsets. It is found that in the oxides of metals with cation radii larger than ≈0.7 Å, the oxide valence band top remains nearly at the same energy (±0.2 eV irrespective of the cation sort. Using this result, it becomes possible to predict the interface band alignment between oxides and semiconductors as well as between dissimilar insulating oxides on the basis of the oxide bandgap width which are also affected by crystallization. By contrast, oxides of light elements, for example, Be, Mg, Al, Si, and Sc exhibit significant shifts of the valence band top. General trends in band lineup variations caused by a change in the composition of semiconductor photoemission material are also revealed.

  20. Fluorescence properties of valence-controlled Eu2+ and Mn2+ ions in aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyen, Ho; Nonaka, Takamasa; Yamanaka, Ken-ichi; Chau, Pham Minh; Quy Hai, Nguyen Thi; Quang, Vu Xuan; Nogami, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Controlling of valence states of metal ions doped in glasses has attracted considerable interest due to the possibility of looking toward optical applications. In this study, new Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glasses were developed to dope Eu 2+ and Mn 2+ with well controlled valence states by heating in H 2 gas atmosphere, and the changes in the valence state of doped-ions and their fluorescence properties were investigated using visible and infrared optical absorption spectroscopies, X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Among Eu 3+ , Mn 3+ and Mn 2+ ions incorporated in the as-prepared glasses, the Eu 3+ and Mn 3+ ions were reduced to Eu 2+ and Mn 2+ ions, respectively, by heating in H 2 gas and OH bonds were concurrently formed. The fluorescence spectra of glasses heated in H 2 exhibited broad emission bands at 450 and 630 nm wavelength, assigned to the Eu 2+ and Mn 2+ , respectively, ions, in which the fluorescence intensity at 450 nm was observed to decrease with increasing Mn 2+ ion content. The increased fluorescence intensities were analyzed as the energy transfer from Eu 2+ to Mn 2+ ions and the energy transfer efficiency was estimated with a concentration of Eu 2+ and Mn 2+ ions.

  1. Effects of emotional valence and arousal on the voice perception network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Sonja A.; Belin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several theories conceptualise emotions along two main dimensions: valence (a continuum from negative to positive) and arousal (a continuum that varies from low to high). These dimensions are typically treated as independent in many neuroimaging experiments, yet recent behavioural findings suggest that they are actually interdependent. This result has impact on neuroimaging design, analysis and theoretical development. We were interested in determining the extent of this interdependence both behaviourally and neuroanatomically, as well as teasing apart any activation that is specific to each dimension. While we found extensive overlap in activation for each dimension in traditional emotion areas (bilateral insulae, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdalae), we also found activation specific to each dimension with characteristic relationships between modulations of these dimensions and BOLD signal change. Increases in arousal ratings were related to increased activations predominantly in voice-sensitive cortices after variance explained by valence had been removed. In contrast, emotions of extreme valence were related to increased activations in bilateral voice-sensitive cortices, hippocampi, anterior and midcingulum and medial orbito- and superior frontal regions after variance explained by arousal had been accounted for. Our results therefore do not support a complete segregation of brain structures underpinning the processing of affective dimensions. PMID:28449127

  2. Differences in neural activity when processing emotional arousal and valence in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Angela; Wang, Zhishun; Huo, Yuankai; Goh, Suzanne; Russell, James A; Peterson, Bradley S

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often have difficulty recognizing and interpreting facial expressions of emotion, which may impair their ability to navigate and communicate successfully in their social, interpersonal environments. Characterizing specific differences between individuals with ASD and their typically developing (TD) counterparts in the neural activity subserving their experience of emotional faces may provide distinct targets for ASD interventions. Thus we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a parametric experimental design to identify brain regions in which neural activity correlated with ratings of arousal and valence for a broad range of emotional faces. Participants (51 ASD, 84 TD) were group-matched by age, sex, IQ, race, and socioeconomic status. Using task-related change in blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal as a measure, and covarying for age, sex, FSIQ, and ADOS scores, we detected significant differences across diagnostic groups in the neural activity subserving the dimension of arousal but not valence. BOLD-signal in TD participants correlated inversely with ratings of arousal in regions associated primarily with attentional functions, whereas BOLD-signal in ASD participants correlated positively with arousal ratings in regions commonly associated with impulse control and default-mode activity. Only minor differences were detected between groups in the BOLD signal correlates of valence ratings. Our findings provide unique insight into the emotional experiences of individuals with ASD. Although behavioral responses to face-stimuli were comparable across diagnostic groups, the corresponding neural activity for our ASD and TD groups differed dramatically. The near absence of group differences for valence correlates and the presence of strong group differences for arousal correlates suggest that individuals with ASD are not atypical in all aspects of emotion-processing. Studying these similarities

  3. Valence-to-core-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Eleanor R.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can provide detailed insight into the electronic and geometric structures of transition-metal active sites in metalloproteins and chemical catalysts. However, standard XAS spectra inherently represent an average contribution from the entire coordination...... environment with limited ligand selectivity. To address this limitation, we have investigated the enhancement of XAS features using valence-to-core (VtC)-detected XAS, whereby XAS spectra are measured by monitoring fluorescence from valence-to-core X-ray emission (VtC XES) events. VtC emission corresponds...... to transitions from filled ligand orbitals to the metal 1s core hole, with distinct energetic shifts for ligands of differing ionization potentials. VtC-detected XAS data were obtained from multiple valence emission features for a series of well-characterized Mn model compounds; taken together, these data...

  4. RKKY interaction in mixed valence system and heavy fermion superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusui Liu; Gao Lin; Lin Zonghan

    1985-11-01

    The 1-D RKKY interaction of mixed valence system is given by using the thermodynamic perturbation theory. The numerical comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RKKY interaction between systems with localized magnetic moments of mixed valence and non-mixed valence show that the former is much stronger than the latter. From some analyses we propose that the heavy Fermion superconductivity comes from the RKKY interaction between two local f electrons which hop off the impurity site to become two continuum electrons. The source of the two impurity electrons hopping is the Coulomb interaction. It is also emphasized that the RKKY interaction does not disappear for the Kondo lattice, when the temperature is less than the Kondo temperature. (author)

  5. Direct double photoionization of the valence shell of Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrini, F.; Malegat, L.; Selles, P.; Kazansky, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The hyperspherical R-matrix method with semiclassical outgoing waves is used to study the direct double photoionization (DPI) of the valence shell of the lightest alkaline earth-metal Be. The absolute fully integrated, singly, doubly, and triply differential cross sections obtained are compared with the single set of measurements available and with recent calculations based on the convergent close coupling and time-dependent close coupling methods. The level of agreement between all these data is very encouraging. A comparison is also made between the DPI of He and the direct DPI of the valence shell of Be. It confirms that the electron-electron correlations are stronger in the valence 2s shell of Be than in the 1s shell of He, thus contributing to a desirable clarification

  6. Field-induced valence transition in rare-earth system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhaya, A.; Ghatak, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic field-induced valence transition in rare-earth compound has been examined based on a pseudospin S=1 Ising model proposed earlier for valence transition. The model includes finite mixing between two pertinent ionic configurations (magnetic and non-magnetic) separated by an energy gap and with intersite interaction between rare-earth ions. Using the mean field approximation the magnetic behaviour and the critical field (H c ) for transition are obtained as a function of energy gap and temperature. The phase boundary defined in terms of reduced field H c /H co and reduced temperature T/T v (T v being valence transition temperature in absence of field) is nearly independent of energy gap. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observation in Yb- and Eu-compounds

  7. A facilitative effect of negative affective valence on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Fumiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Olofsson, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that negatively valenced information impaired working memory performance due to an attention-capturing effect. The present study examined whether negative valence could also facilitate working memory. Affective words (negative, neutral, positive) were used as retro-cues in a working memory task that required participants to remember colors at different spatial locations on a computer screen. Following the cue, a target detection task was used to either shift attention to a different location or keep attention at the same location as the retro-cue. Finally, participants were required to discriminate the cued color from a set of distractors. It was found that negative cues yielded shorter response times (RTs) in the attention-shift condition and longer RTs in the attention-stay condition, compared with neutral and positive cues. The results suggest that negative affective valence may enhance working memory performance (RTs), provided that attention can be disengaged.

  8. Fatty acid oxidation changes and the correlation with oxidative stress in different preeclampsia-like mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD expression is decreased in placenta of some cases of preeclampsia (PE which may result in free fatty acid (FFA increased. High FFA level will induce oxidative stress, so abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway. METHODS: PE-like groups were ApoC3 transgenic mice with abnormal fatty acid metabolism, classical PE-like models with injection of Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NA or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS mouse model with β2GPI injection (ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA, L-NA, LPS and β2GPI groups. The control group was wild-type mice with normal saline injection. Except for β2GPI mice, the other mice were subdivided into pre-implantation (Pre and mid-pregnancy (Mid subgroups by injection time. RESULTS: All PE-like groups showed hypertension and proteinuria except ApoC3+NS mice only showed hypertension. Serum FFA levels increased significantly except in LPS group compared to controls (P<0.05. LCHAD mRNA and protein expression in the liver and placenta was significantly higher for ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA and β2GPI mice and lower for L-NA mice than controls (P<0.05 but did not differ between LPS mice and controls. P47phox mRNA and protein expression in the liver significantly increased in all PE-like groups except LPS group, while P47phox expression in the placenta only significantly increased in L-NA and β2GPI groups. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may play a different role in different PE-like models and in some cases participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway.

  9. An iridium oxide microelectrode for monitoring acute local pH changes of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shu Rui; O'Hare, Danny

    2015-06-21

    pH sensors were fabricated by anodically electrodepositing iridium oxide films (AEIROFs) onto microelectrodes on chips and coated with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) for mechanical stability. These demonstrate super-Nernstian response to pH from pH 4.0 to 7.7 in chloride-free phosphate buffer. The surface of the chip was coated with fibronectin for the attachment of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs). The working capability of the pH sensor for monitoring acute local pH changes was investigated by stimulating the PAECs with thrombin. Our results show that thrombin induced acute extracellular acidification of PAECs and dissolution of fibronectin, causing the local pH to decrease. The use of PD98059, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, reduced extracellular acidification and an increase in local pH was observed. This study shows that our pH sensors can facilitate the investigation of acute cellular responses to stimulation by monitoring the real-time, local pH changes of cells attached to the sensors.

  10. Morphological changes of the red blood cells treated with metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozelskaya, A I; Panin, A V; Khlusov, I A; Mokrushnikov, P V; Zaitsev, B N; Kuzmenko, D I; Vasyukov, G Yu

    2016-12-01

    The toxic effect of Al 2 O 3 , SiО 2 and ZrО 2 nanoparticles on red blood cells of Wistar rats was studied in vitro using the atomic force microscopy and the fluorescence analysis. Transformation of discocytes into echinocytes and spherocytes caused by the metal oxide nanoparticles was revealed. It was shown that only extremely high concentration of the nanoparticles (2mg/ml) allows correct estimating of their effect on the cell morphology. Besides, it was found out that the microviscosity changes of red blood cell membranes treated with nanoparticles began long before morphological modifications of the cells. On the contrary, the negatively charged ZrO 2 and SiO 2 nanoparticles did not affect ghost microviscosity up to concentrations of 1μg/ml and 0.1mg/ml, correspondingly. In its turn, the positively charged Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles induced structural changes in the lipid bilayer of the red blood cells already at a concentration of 0.05μg/ml. A decrease in microviscosity of the erythrocyte ghosts treated with Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 nanoparticles was shown. It was detected that the interaction of ZrO 2 nanoparticles with the cells led to an increase in the membrane microviscosity and cracking of swollen erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Valence band offset of β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Qin, Zhixin; Fan, Shunfei; Li, Zhiwei; Shi, Kai; Zhu, Qinsheng; Zhang, Guoyi

    2012-10-10

    A sample of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure has been grown by dry thermal oxidation of GaN on a sapphire substrate. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the β-Ga2O3 layer was formed epitaxially on GaN. The valence band offset of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure is measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the valence band of the β-Ga2O3/GaN structure is 1.40 ± 0.08 eV.

  12. Valence QCD: Connecting QCD to the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.; Dong, S.J.; Draper, T.; Sloan, J.; Leinweber, D.; Woloshyn, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    A valence QCD theory is developed to study the valence quark properties of hadrons. To keep only the valence degrees of freedom, the pair creation through the Z graphs is deleted in the connected insertions, whereas the sea quarks are eliminated in the disconnected insertions. This is achieved with a new 'valence QCD' Lagrangian where the action in the time direction is modified so that the particle and antiparticle decouple. It is shown in this valence version of QCD that the ratios of isovector to isoscalar matrix elements (e.g., F A /D A and F S /D S ratios) in the nucleon reproduce the SU(6) quark model predictions in a lattice QCD calculation. We also consider how the hadron masses are affected on the lattice and discover new insights into the origin of dynamical mass generation. It is found that, within statistical errors, the nucleon and the Δ become degenerate for the quark masses we have studied (ranging from 1 to 4 times the strange mass). The π and ρ become nearly degenerate in this range. It is shown that valence QCD has the C, P, T symmetries. The lattice version is reflection positive. It also has the vector and axial symmetries. The latter leads to a modified partially conserved axial Ward identity. As a result, the theory has a U(2N F ) symmetry in the particle-antiparticle space. Through lattice simulation, it appears that this is dynamically broken down to U q (N F )xU bar q (N F ). Furthermore, the lattice simulation reveals spin degeneracy in the hadron masses and various matrix elements. This leads to an approximate U q (2N F )xU bar q (2N F ) symmetry which is the basis for the valence quark model. In addition, we find that the masses of N, Δ,ρ,π,a 1 , and a 0 all drop precipitously compared to their counterparts in the quenched QCD calculation. This is interpreted as due to the disappearance of the 'constituent' quark mass which is dynamically generated through tadpole diagrams. The origin of the hyperfine splitting in the baryon is

  13. Spin Dynamics and Magnetic Ordering in Mixed Valence Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, S. M.; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Axe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    . 0 meV at the transition to the alpha phase. The temperature independence of the susceptibility within the gamma phase cannot be simply reconciled with the temperature dependence of the valence within the gamma phase. TmSe is shown to order in a type I antiferromagnetic structure below T//N similar 3....... 2 K. The magnetic phase diagram is understood as a successive domain reorientation and a metamagnetic phase transition for T less than 3 K with increasing field. The mixed valence nature manifests itself in a reduced moment and a markedly altered crystal field. Another sample of TmSe with a lattice...

  14. Modulating central gain in tinnitus: changes in nitric oxide synthase in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber, Ben; Kowalkowski, Victoria L; Berger, Joel I; Palmer, Alan Richard; Wallace, Mark Nelson

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in tinnitus research lies in explaining how acoustic insult leads to tinnitus in some individuals, but not others. One possibility is genetic variability in the expression and function of neuromodulators - components of neural signaling that alter the balance of excitation and inhibition in neural circuits. An example is nitric oxide (NO) - a free radical and potent neuromodulator in the mammalian brain - that regulates plasticity via both pre-synaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. Changes in NO have previously been implicated in tinnitus generation, specifically in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). Here, we examined nitric oxide synthase (NOS) - the enzyme responsible for NO production - in the guinea pig VCN following acoustic trauma. NOS was present in most cell types - including spherical and globular bushy cells, small, medium, and large multipolar cells, and octopus cells - spanning the entire extent of the VCN. The staining pattern was symmetrical in control animals. Unilateral acoustic over-exposure (AOE) resulted in marked asymmetries between ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the VCN in terms of the distribution of NOS across the cochlear nuclei in animals with behavioral evidence of tinnitus: fewer NOS-positive cells and a reduced level of NOS staining was present across the whole extent of the contralateral VCN, relative to the ipsilateral VCN. The asymmetric pattern of NOS-containing cells was observed as early as 1 day after AOE and was also present in some animals at 3, 7, and 21 days after AOE. However, it was not until 8 weeks after AOE, when tinnitus had developed, that asymmetries were significant overall, compared with control animals. Asymmetrical NOS expression was not correlated with shifts in the threshold hearing levels. Variability in NOS expression between animals may represent one underlying difference that can be linked to whether or not tinnitus develops after noise exposure.

  15. Modulating central gain in tinnitus: Changes in nitric oxide synthase in the ventral cochlear nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant challenge in tinnitus research lies in explaining how acoustic insult leads to tinnitus in some individuals, but not others. One possibility is genetic variability in the expression and function of neuromodulators – components of neural signalling that alter the balance of excitation and inhibition in neural circuits. An example is nitric oxide (NO – a free radical and potent neuromodulator in the mammalian brain – that regulates plasticity via both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. Changes in NO have previously been implicated in tinnitus generation, specifically in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN. Here, we examined nitric oxide synthase (NOS – the enzyme responsible for NO production – in the guinea pig VCN following acoustic trauma. NOS was present in most cell types – including spherical and globular bushy cells, small, medium and large multipolar cells, and octopus cells – spanning the entire extent of the VCN. The staining pattern was symmetrical in control animals. Unilateral acoustic over-exposure (AOE resulted in marked asymmetries between ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the VCN in terms of the distribution of NOS across the cochlear nuclei in animals with behavioural evidence of tinnitus: fewer NOS-positive cells and a reduced level of NOS staining was present across the whole extent of the contralateral VCN, relative to the ipsilateral VCN. The asymmetric pattern of NOS-containing cells was observed as early as one day after AOE and was also present in some animals at 3, 7 and 21 days after AOE. However it was not until eight weeks after AOE, when tinnitus had developed, that asymmetries were significant overall, compared with control animals. Asymmetrical NOS expression was not correlated with shifts in the threshold hearing levels. Variability in NOS expression between animals may represent one underlying difference that can be linked to whether or not tinnitus develops after noise

  16. High altitude induced anorexia: effect of changes in leptin and oxidative stress levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Praveen; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Singh, Som Nath; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2007-01-01

    High altitude (HA) exposure usually leads to a significant weight loss in non-acclimatized humans. Anorexia is believed to be the main cause of this body weight loss. Appetite regulatory peptides, i.e. leptin and neuropeptide Y play a key role in food intake and energy homeostasis. Recent studies suggests increased oxidative stress during HA exposure. In present study effect of HA exposure on levels of leptin and NPY was evaluated along with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and vitamin E supplementation in relation to food intake and body weight changes. The study was conducted on 30 healthy male volunteers (age 19-29 years). Subjects were divided randomly into three groups of 10 each. Group 1 (placebo) supplemented with 400 mg of calcium gluconate, group 2 and 3 were supplemented with 400 mg of NAC and 400 mg vitamin E, respectively per day. The study was conducted at low altitude (320 m, Phase I), at HA 3600 m (Phase II) and at an altitude of 4580 m (Phase III). On HA exposure significant reduction in plasma leptin levels was observed in all the groups on day 2 (Phase II) along with decrease in food intake and reduction in body weight. Statistically significant increase in blood malondialdehyde (MDA) levels was seen in all the groups on HA exposure (Phase II, Day 2), but the maximum increase was in case of placebo group (65.1%) on day 2 (Phase II) in comparison to low altitude values. The decrease in energy intake was almost same in all the groups indicating that antioxidant supplementation did not provide any protection against HA anorexia. From the study, it may be concluded that leptin and oxidative stress possibly are not the key players for HA anorexia.

  17. Oxidation-induced embrittlement and structural changes of Zircaloy-4 tubing in steam at 700-1000 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A E; Huessein, A G; El-Sayed, A A; El Banna, O A [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); El Raghy, S M [Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01

    The oxidation-induced embrittlement and structural changes of Zircaloy-4 (KWU-Type) tubing was investigated under light water reactors (LWR) Loss-of-Coolant. Accident conditions (LOCA) in temperature range 700-1000 deg. C. The effect of hydrogen addition to steam was also investigated in the temperature range 800-1000 deg. C. The oxidation-induced embrittlement was found to be a function of both temperature and time. Fractography investigation of oxidized tubing showed a typical brittle fracture in the stabilized-alpha zone. The microhardness measurements revealed that the alpha-Zr is harder than that near the mid-wall position. The oxidation-induced embrittlement at 900 deg. C was found to be higher than at 1000 deg. C. The results also indicated that the addition of 5% by volume hydrogen to steam resulted in an increase in the degree of embrittlement. (author). 22 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  18. Probing Structural Changes in Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) During Electrochemical Oxidation with In Situ X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Jacob L.; Patel, Shrayesh N.; Javier, Anna E.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2014-03-01

    Mixtures of poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P3HT-b-PEO) block copolymer and lithium bis(trifluromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) salt can microphase separate into electron (P3HT) and ion (PEO/LiTFSI) conducting domains. P3HT is a semicrystalline polymer with intrinsically semiconducting electronic properties. Electrochemical oxidation (doping) of the P3HT block provides the P3HT-b-PEO/LiTFSI mixtures with electronic conductivity suitable for lithium battery operation. Due to the presence of the solid-state electrolyte (PEO/LiTFSI) in intimate contact with the microphase separated P3HT domains, electrochemical oxidation of P3HT can be performed entirely in the solid state; therefore, P3HT-b-PEO/LiTFSI provides a unique opportunity to study the structural changes in P3HT induced by oxidation. We use in situ x-ray scattering techniques to probe structural changes in P3HT during electrochemical oxidation and correlate these changes with previously observed enhancements in electron mobility. Supported by the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR).

  19. The response of methane and nitrous oxide fluxes to forest change in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gundersen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Forests in Europe are changing due to interactions between climate change, nitrogen (N deposition and new forest management practices. The concurrent impact on the forest greenhouse gas (GHG balance is at present difficult to predict due to a lack of knowledge on controlling factors of GHG fluxes and response to changes in these factors. To improve the mechanistic understanding of the ongoing changes, we studied the response of soil–atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O and methane (CH4 at twelve experimental or natural gradient forest sites, representing anticipated future forest change. The experimental manipulations, one or more per site, included N addition (4 sites, changes of climate (temperature, 1 site; precipitation, 2 sites, soil hydrology (3 sites, harvest intensity (1 site, wood ash fertilisation (1 site, pH gradient in organic soil (1 site and afforestation of cropland (1 site.

    On average, N2O emissions increased by 0.06 ± 0.03 (range 0–0.3 g N2O-N m−2 yr−1 across all treatments on mineral soils, but the increase was up to 10 times higher in an acidic organic soil. Soil moisture together with mineral soil C / N ratio and pH were found to significantly influence N2O emissions across all treatments. Emissions were increased by elevated N deposition, especially in interaction with increased soil moisture. High pH reduced the formation of N2O, even under otherwise favourable soil conditions.

    Oxidation (uptake of CH4 was on average reduced from 0.16 ± 0.02 to 0.04 ± 0.05 g CH4-C m−2 yr−1 by the investigated treatments. The CH4 exchange was significantly influenced by soil moisture and soil C / N ratio across all treatments, and CH4 emissions occurred only in wet or water-saturated conditions.

    For most of the investigated forest manipulations

  20. Negative pressure driven valence instability of Eu in cubic Eu0.4La0.6Pd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Abhishek; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the change in the valency of Eu-ions in the binary intermetallic cubic compound EuPd 3 induced by La doping at rare-earth sites. Doping of La generates negative chemical pressure in the lattice, resulting in a significant increase of the lattice parameter without altering the simple-cubic structure of the compound. Results of dc-magnetic measurements suggest that this increase in the lattice parameter is associated with the valence transition of Eu-ions from Eu 3+ to a mixed-valent state. As Eu 2+ -ions possess a large magnetic moment, this valence transition significantly modifies the magnetic behavior of the compound. In contrast to introducing boron at the vacant body center site of the unit cell to change the valency of Eu-ions, as in the case of EuPd 3 B, our results suggest it can also be altered by doping a rare-earth ion of larger size at the lattice site of Eu in EuPd 3 .

  1. Lipid oxidative changes in traditional dry fermented sausage Petrovská klobása during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Šojić, Branislav V.; Petrović, Ljiljana S.; Mandić, Anamarija I.; Sedej, Ivana J.; Džinić, Natalija R.; Tomović, Vladimir M.; Jokanović, Marija R.; Tasić, Tatjana A.; Škaljac, Snežana B.; Ikonić, Predrag M.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of drying and ripeninig conditions (traditional and industrial) in the production of dry fermented sausage Petrovská klobása, on fatty-acid composition and oxidative changes in lipids, during 7 months of storage, was investigated. During the storage period, the sum of unsaturated fatty acids and the content of free fatty acids were significantly higher (p

  2. Chronological change of electrical resistance in GeCu2Te3 amorphous film induced by surface oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yuta; Shindo, Satoshi; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Unusual chronological electrical resistance change behavior was investigated for amorphous GeCu 2 Te 3 phase change material. More than a 1 order decrease of electrical resistance was observed in the air even at room temperature. The resistance of the amorphous film gradually increased with increasing temperature and then showed a drop upon crystallization. Such unusual behavior was attributed to the oxidation of the amorphous GeCu 2 Te 3 film. From the compositional depth profile measurement, the GeCu 2 Te 3 film without any capping layer was oxidized in air at room temperature and the formed oxide was mainly composed of germanium oxide. Consequently, a highly-conductive Cu-rich layer was formed in the vicinity of the surface of the film, which reduced the total resistance of the film. The present results could provide insight into the chronological change of electrical resistance in amorphous chalcogenide materials, indicating that not only relaxation of the amorphous, but also a large atomic diffusion contributes to the chronological resistance change. (paper)

  3. Emotional Valence and Arousal Effects on Memory and Hemispheric Asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mneimne, Malek; Powers, Alice S.; Walton, Kate E.; Kosson, David S.; Fonda, Samantha; Simonetti, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This study examined predictions based upon the right hemisphere (RH) model, the valence-arousal model, and a recently proposed integrated model (Killgore & Yurgelun-Todd, 2007) of emotion processing by testing immediate recall and recognition memory for positive, negative, and neutral verbal stimuli among 35 right-handed women. Building upon…

  4. Nuclear masses and the number of valence nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Temis, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J.G.; Lopez Vieyra, J.C.; Morales, I.; Barea, J.; Van Isacker, P.; Velazquez, V.

    2008-01-01

    An improved version of the liquid drop model is presented. The addition of two terms, linear and quadratic in the total number of valence nucleons (particles or holes), improves the description of atomic masses, which can be fitted with an r.m.s. error of 1.2 MeV. Predictions are analysed an compared with those of established models

  5. Optical verification of the valence band structure of cadmium arsenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelten, M.J.; Es, van C.M.; Blom, F.A.P.; Jongeneelen, J.W.F.

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption measurements were performed on thin single crystalline samples of Cd3As2 at temperatures of 300 K and 10 K. At low temperature the interband absorption coefficient shows clearly two steps due to direct transitions from the heavy hole and light hole valence bands to the conduction

  6. Vection Modulates Emotional Valence of Autobiographical Episodic Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Takeharu; Kawabe, Takahiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Sunaga, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether illusory self-motion perception ("vection") induced by viewing upward and downward grating motion stimuli can alter the emotional valence of recollected autobiographical episodic memories. We found that participants recollected positive episodes more often while perceiving upward vection. However, when we tested a small moving…

  7. Valence mixing in YbCuAl: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattens, W.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the valence state of Yb in the intermetallic compound YbCuAl. Both macroscopic physical properties (magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, thermal expansion, electric resistivity) and microscopic physical properties (neutron inelastic scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance) are determined. The results are compared with a local Fermi liquid theory. (G.T.H.)

  8. Effective valence as the control parameter of the superconducting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One approach to investigating the superconductivity in the ironbased materials is understanding the chemical and structural parameters that can be used to tune their remarkably high Tc. In this paper, we have demonstrated that the effective valence of iron can be used as the control parameter to tune the Tc of this family of ...

  9. Voice and Valency in San Luis Potosi Huasteco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Ledo Yanez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of the system of transitivity, voice and valency alternations in Huasteco of San Luis Potosi (Mayan) within a functional-typological framework. The study is based on spoken discourse and elicited data collected in the municipalities of Aquismon and Tancanhuitz de Santos in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The…

  10. verbal extensions: valency decreasing extensions in the basà ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finance

    London: Hodder. Education. Imoh, P.M., 2013. Verbal extensions: Valency increasing operations in Basà verbal system. Paper presented at the West African Languages Congress (WALC) and 26th Annual. Conference of the Linguistic Association of Nigeria (26th CLAN), 29th July to 2nd August. 2013, University of Ibadan, ...

  11. Changing of the electron structure of dispersed iron oxide during interaction with amines and borofluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobert, H.; Arnold, D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of chemisorption on the surface of iron oxide was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy performed on samples of iron oxide finely dispersed in SiO 2 . It was found from Moessbauer spectra that the interaction of the oxide with amines resulted in a reversible electron transition from the amine to the adsorbent. The interaction with BF 3 brought about an irreversible electron transition from iron to boron. (A.K.)

  12. Histopathological changes associated with oxidative stress induced by electromagnetic waves in rats' ovarian and uterine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S.H. Alchalabi

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Results executed that the potential alteration of antioxidant capacity may contribute to endometrial oxidative damage that could be related to pathogenesis and progression of endometritis.

  13. Stromatolitic iron oxides: Evidence that sea-level changes can cause sedimentary iridium anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Malcolm W.; Keays, Reid R.; Gostin, Victor A.

    1991-06-01

    In an attempt to understand the origin of an Ir-rich unit near the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) boundary in the Canning basin of Western Australia, we have examined two lithologically similar Early Cambrian and late Oligocene age horizons from southeastern Australia. Both consist of stromatolitic iron oxide and carbonate petrographically similar to the Ir-rich Frutexites microstromatolites near the F/F boundary. Significant siderophile and chalcophile element anomalies (Ir, Pt, and Ru up to 1.1, 14, and 1.2 ppb, respectively) at both horizons have a geochemistry similar to that of the F/F Frutexites anomaly. As with the F/F bed, the Cambrian and Oligocene stromatolitic beds are closely associated with synsedimentary hardgrounds that contain evidence of subaerial exposure. We suggest that all of these Ir-rich stromatolitic beds developed in response to relative sea-level change and represent periods of condensed marine sedimentation. It is probable that condensation was produced by rapid drowning following subaerial exposure.

  14. Modification of mechanical properties of single crystal aluminum oxide by ion beam induced structural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, W.; Nowak, R.; Horino, Y.; Baba, K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of ceramics is essentially determined by their surface qualities. As a surface modification technique, ion implantation provides the possibility to modify the mechanical properties of ceramics. Highly energetic ions are implanted into the near-surface region of a material and modify its composition and structure. Ions of aluminum, oxygen, nickel and tantalum were implanted into single-crystal α-aluminum oxide. Three-point bending tests showed that an increase in flexural strength of up to 30% could be obtained after implantation of aluminum and oxygen. Nickel and tantalum ion implantation increased the fracture toughness. Indentation tests with Knoop and Vickers diamonds and comparison of the lengths of the developed radial cracks showed that ion implantation leads to a reaction in cracking. The observed effects are assigned to radiation induced structural changes of the ceramic. Ion bombardment leads to radiation damage and formation of compressive stress. In case of tantalum implantation, the implanted near-surface zone becomes amorphous. These effects make the ceramic more resistant to fracture. (orig.)

  15. Changes in color and odorant compounds during oxidative aging of Pedro Ximenez sweet wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Margarita; Zea, Luis; Moyano, Lourdes; Medina, Manuel

    2007-05-02

    Pedro Ximenez sweet wines obtained following the typical criaderas and solera method for sherry wines and subjected to oxidative aging for 0, 1.3, 4.2, 7.0, or 11.5 years were studied in terms of color and aroma fraction by using the CIELab method and gas chromatography, respectively. The parameters defining the CIELab color space (a*, b*, and L*) were subjected to a multiple-range test (p 1 that enriched the wines with fruity, fatty, floral, and balsamic notes during the aging process. The changes in color parameters and active odorants were not linearly related to aging time, being especially marked during the first 1.3 years and then less substantial up to the 7 years, the oldest wines exhibiting sensorial properties markedly departing from all others. For the wines aged over 1.3 years (minimum aging), 2,3-butanedione, linalool, and decanal can be used as reliable fingerprints of the older wines' quality.

  16. The changes of nitric oxide production during the growth of Microcystis aerugrinosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Xiang; Chen Juan; Wang Wenhua; Liu Tingwu; Zhang Jun; Gao Yahui [Key Laboratory for Subtropical Wetland Ecosystem Research of Ministry of Education of China, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Pei Zhenming [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Zheng Hailei, E-mail: zhenghl@xmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Subtropical Wetland Ecosystem Research of Ministry of Education of China, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-12-15

    This study characterized the changes of nitric oxide (NO) production during the growth of Microcystis aerugrinosa, a cyanobacterium which usually cause cyanobacterial blooms. Results showed a drastic NO release accompanying with cell density and Chl-a content sharp rises when M. aerugrinosa grew from fifth day to sixth day. Moreover, high N:P ratio accelerated the cyanobacterial growth and NO burst. Sodium nitroprusside, an exogenous NO donor, promoted M. aerugrinosa growth with the optimal concentration of 0.1 mg/L. Experiments by supplementing with sodium nitrite and L-arginine demonstrated NO production in M. aerugrinosa cells was mainly through nitrate reductase (NR) pathway while minorly through NO synthase pathway. All these data suggested M. aerugrinosa produced increasing NO during its growth mainly by NR pathway, during which NO positively regulated the growth of M. aerugrinosa. - Highlights: > We study NO release during M. aerugrinosa growth. > A drastic NO release from M. aerugrinosa accompanies with cell density and Chl-a sharp rise. > High N:P ratio accelerates the sharp increase of cell density, Chl-a content and NO burst. > NO donor promotes M. aerugrinosa growth with the optimal concentration of 0.1 mg/L. > NO production in M. aerugrinosa cells is mainly through nitrate reductase pathway. - NO produced by M. aerugrinosa has an promoting effect on cyanobacterial growth.

  17. Chemical and Sensory Characterization of Oxidative Changes in Roasted Almonds Undergoing Accelerated Shelf Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Lillian M; Chapman, Dawn M; King, Ellena S; Mau, Mallory; Huang, Guangwei; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2017-03-29

    In almonds, there is no standard method for detecting oxidative changes and little data correlating consumer perception with chemical markers of rancidity. To address this, we measured peroxide values (PV), free fatty acid values (FFAs), conjugated dienes, tocopherols, headspace volatiles, and consumer hedonic response in light roasted (LR) and dark roasted (DR) almonds stored under conditions that promote rancidity development over 12 months. Results demonstrate that, although rancidity develops at different rates in LR and DR almonds, consumer liking was not significantly different between LR and DR almonds. Average hedonic ratings of almonds were found to fall below a designated acceptable score of 5 ("neither like nor dislike") by 6 months of storage. This did not correspond with recommended industry rejection standard of PV almonds stored in low humidity environments. Regression of consumer liking to concentration of rancidity indicators revealed that selected headspace volatiles, including heptanal, octanal, nonanal, 2-octenal, 2-heptanone, 2-pentylfuran, hexanal, and pentanal, had a better correlation with liking than did nonvolatile indicators.

  18. Time-dependent postirradiation oxidative chemical changes in dehydrated egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Razem, B.; Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxidative chemical changes in whole egg and egg yolk powder were followed in time after irradiation as a function of dose, dose rate, and storage atmosphere. In evacuated samples of whole egg powder the decay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) was pseudo-first order (kappa = 0.088 day-1), while carotenoids did not decay at all. In the presence of air both lipid hydroperoxides and carotenoids decayed during postirradiation storage. The decay of LOOH could be treated by dispersive kinetics with the measure of dispersion, alpha = 0.51 +/- 0.05, independent of dose, and the effective lifetime tau inversely related to dose. The decay of carotenoids could also be treated by dispersive kinetics, with the values of alpha decreasing with increasing dose. The effective lifetimes of carotenoids did not depend on dose in samples irradiated in vacuum. In samples irradiated and stored in air the effective lifetimes decreased with dose, faster in egg yolk than in whole egg powder. The complex nature of postirradiation kinetics in solid food systems is discussed

  19. Lipid oxidation and color changes of goose meat stored under vacuum and modified atmosphere conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkusz, A; Haraf, G; Okruszek, A; Werenska-Sudnik, M

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the work was to investigate the color and lipid oxidation changes of goose breast meat packaged in vacuum and modified atmosphere (MA) conditions consisting of 80% O2, 20% CO2, and stored in refrigerated conditions at 4°C. Color stability was monitored by determining total heme pigments concentration; relative concentration of myoglobin, oxymyoglobin, and metmyoglobin; parameters of color L*, a*, b*, and sensory evaluation of the surface color. Lipid stability was measured by determining thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The samples were examined in 24 h after slaughter (unpacked muscles) and on d 4, 7, 9, 11 of storage (muscles packed in vacuum and in MA). Through the time of storage, samples packed in MA had higher TBARS values in comparison to the meat packed in vacuum. For samples packed in two types of atmospheres, the total pigments concentration decreased gradually within 11 d of storage. It was observed that relative metmyoglobin concentration increased whereas relative oxymyoglobin concentration decreased in total heme pigments in the MA stored muscle. The relative concentration of all three myoglobin forms sample packed in vacuum remained unchanged. The color parameters (L*, a*, b*) did not change for 11 d of storage for the vacuum packed meat. The value of the color parameter a* decreased and the value of the color parameters L* and b* increased in the samples packaged in MA. The data prove that if you store goose meat in MA (consisting of 80% O2, 20% CO2) or vacuum, the unchanged surface color is preserved for 9 and 11 day, respectively.Vacuum appears to be a better method as regards the maintaining of lipid stability in goose meat. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  20. Changes of fluorescent spectral features after successive rare earth doping of gadolinium oxide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznik, W. [Chemical Department, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia); Brik, M.G. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia); Cieslik, I.; Majchrowski, A.; Jaroszewicz, L. [Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); AlZayed, N.S. [Physics and Astronomy Dept., College of Science, P.O. Box 2455, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); El-Naggar, A.M. [Physics and Astronomy Dept., College of Science, P.O. Box 2455, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Permanent address: Physics department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abassia, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Sildos, I.; Lange, S.; Kiisk, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia); Kityk, I.V., E-mail: ikityk@el.pcz.czest.pl [Electrical Engineering Department, Czestochowa University of Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, Czestochowa (Poland); Physics and Astronomy Dept., College of Science, P.O. Box 2455, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Principally new phosphors based on rare earth moped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} are obtained. > The time-resolved fluorescent spectra show drastic changes with the doping. > Temperature measurements were done. - Abstract: We present a complex fluorescence study of a series of gadolinium oxide polycrystalline powders singly, doubly and triply doped with trivalent rare earth ions (Er{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}), to explore a possibility of their use as materials for white light emitting diodes. The excitation and luminescence spectra along with the decay kinetics were measured in the temperature range from 6 to 300 K. The luminescence efficiency was studied within the visible spectral range, i.e. -400 nm to 750 nm under excitation by 355 nm third harmonic Nd:YAG laser pulses. Singly doped Er{sup 3+} sample gave stronger luminescence signals, but others showed significantly larger decay lifetimes. The successive rare earths doping leads to substantial changes of the spectral positions due to the up-conversion processes. In the singly (Er{sup 3+}) doped sample, following the time resolved spectrum and decay curves, there are two different types of emissions: at 660 nm and at shorter wavelengths (below 640 nm) the red emission's lifetime is ten times longer than at shorter wavelengths. The singly doped sample shows unclear temperature-dependence of luminescence with lifetime at 550 nm (the longest at 100 K, similarly at 6 K and 300 K) and achieved luminous efficacy 73.5 lm/W.

  1. The changing face of lower tropospheric sulfur oxides in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Hidy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sulfur oxides, sulfur dioxide and airborne sulfate, SOx, are short-lived species in the troposphere whose concentrations in air and precipitation have changed dramatically in association with fossil fuel combustion. The historic rise in concentration is coincident with the era of the so-called “Anthropocene.” Unlike concentrations of long-lived species such as carbon dioxide, atmospheric SOx in the United States (US peaked between 1970 and 2005 then declined. The rise and fall of SOx is traced by comparing national data on emission changes, ambient concentrations, and precipitation sulfate from prior to World War II to the present. Surface SOx concentrations and precipitation sulfate have decreased with emissions in most parts of the US after the late 1970s. Continued reduction toward a natural “background” condition has depended on aggressive management of anthropogenic emission sources. Annual average ambient concentrations of SO2 and SO4 have become more uniform across the US at levels of 1–3 ppbv and 0.3–3 µg/m3, respectively. Precipitation SO4 has a nominal concentration generally less than 0.5 mg/L. The effective lifetime of SOx in the troposphere is a few days. This duration limits the spatial extent of emission source influence of SOx to regional scales, wherein spatial gradients in species concentrations lead to variations in human exposure and impacts on vulnerable terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The effects of domestic emission reductions on SOx levels are moderated by intra- and intercontinental transport of SOx from Canada, Mexico, Asia and elsewhere. The trends in tropospheric SOx concentrations illustrate the results of more than a century of rising public awareness and action to progressively reduce a US environmental risk, accomplished with advances in energy production technology that have maintained economic well-being.

  2. Oxidative inorganic sulphur metabolism in obligately and facultatively chemolithotrophic thiobacilli. Part of a coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.P.

    1978-10-01

    This review explores a field of microbiology of ecological biochemical and economic interest. It deals with that category of this subject which is concerned with biochemical transformations of metals which can involve solubilization or precipitation, valency changes through oxidative or reductive processes and the interconversion of inorganic and organic metal compounds. The review in particular considers processes involved in the extraction of metals from insoluble minerals and secondly recovery of metals from solution

  3. Universality class of non-Fermi liquid behaviour in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Su Zhaobin; Lu Yu

    1995-11-01

    A generalized Anderson single-impurity model with off-site Coulomb interactions is derived from the extended three-band Hubbard model, originally proposed to describe the physics of the copper-oxides. Using the abelian bosonization technique and canonical transformations, an effective Hamiltonian is derived in the strong coupling limit, which is essentially analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem. In this limit, the effective Hamiltonian can be exactly solved, with a mixed valence quantum critical point separating two different Fermi liquid phases, i.e. the Kondo phase and the empty orbital phase. In the mixed valence quantum critical regime, the local moment is only partially quenched and X-ray edge singularities are generated. Around the quantum critical point, a new type of non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted with an extra specific heat C imp ∼ T 1/4 and a singular spin-susceptibility χ imp ∼ T -3/4 . At the same time, the effective Hamiltonian under single occupancy is transformed into a resonant-level model, from which the correct Kondo physical properties (specific heat, spin susceptibility, and an enhanced Wilson ratio) are easily rederived. Finally, a brief discussion is given to relate these theoretical results to observations in U Pd x Cu 5-x (x=1, 1.5) alloys, which show single-impurity critical behaviour consistent with our predictions. (author). 30 refs

  4. Universality class of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in mixed-valence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Zhao-Bin; Yu, Lu

    1996-01-01

    A generalized Anderson single-impurity model with off-site Coulomb interactions is derived from the extended three-band Hubbard model, originally proposed to describe the physics of the copper oxides. Using the Abelian bosonization technique and canonical transformations, an effective Hamiltonian is derived in the strong-coupling limit, which is essentially analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem. In this limit, the effective Hamiltonian can be exactly solved, with a mixed-valence quantum critical point separating two different Fermi-liquid phases, i.e., the Kondo phase and the empty orbital phase. In the mixed-valence quantum critical regime, the local moment is only partially quenched and x-ray edge singularities are generated. Around the quantum critical point, a type of non-Fermi-liquid behavior is predicted with an extra specific heat Cimp~T1/4 and a singular spin susceptibility χimp~T-3/4. At the same time, the effective Hamiltonian under single occupancy is transformed into a resonant-level model, from which the correct Kondo physical properties (specific heat, spin susceptibility, and an enhanced Wilson ratio) are easily rederived. Finally, a brief discussion is given to relate these theoretical results to observations in UPdxCu5-x (x=1,1.5) alloys, which show single-impurity critical behavior consistent with our predictions.

  5. Bond-Valence Constraints on Liquid Water Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Brown, I. David; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2009-01-01

    The recent controversy about the structure of liquid water pits a new model involving water molecules in relatively stable rings-and-chains structures against the standard model that posits water molecules in distorted tetrahedral coordination. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations 'both classical and ab initio' almost uniformly support the standard model, but since none of them can yet reproduce all the anomalous properties of water, they leave room for doubt. We argue that it is possible to evaluate these simulations by testing them against their adherence to the bond-valence model, a well known, and quantitatively accurate, empirical summary of the behavior of atoms in the bonded networks of inorganic solids. Here we use the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ice, water, and several solvated aqueous species to show that the valence sum rule (the first axiom of the bond-valence model,) is followed in both solid and liquid bond networks. We then test MD simulations of water, employing several popular potential models, against this criterion and the experimental O-O radial distribution function. It appears that most of those tested cannot satisfy both criteria well, except TIP4P and TIP5P. If the valence sum rule really can be applied to simulated liquid structures, then it follows that the bonding behaviors of atoms in liquids are in some ways identical to those in solids. We support this interpretation by showing that the simulations produce O-H-O geometries completely consistent with the range of geometries available in solids, and the distributions of instantaneous valence sums reaching the atoms in both the ice and liquid water simulations are essentially identical. Taken together, this is powerful evidence in favor of the standard distorted tetrahedral model of liquid water structure

  6. Change in postprandial substrate oxidation after a high fructose meal is related to Body Mass Index (BMI) in Healthy Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglio, Anne C.; Kennedy, Emily K.; Horgan, Angela; Purnell, Jonathan Q.; Gillingham, Melanie B.

    2013-01-01

    Oral fructose decreases fat oxidation and increases carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation in obese subjects, but the metabolic response to fructose in lean individuals is less well understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a single fructose-rich mixed meal on substrate oxidation in young healthy non-obese males. We hypothesized that a decrease in fat oxidation and an increase in carbohydrate oxidation would be observed following a fructose-rich mixed meal compared to a glucose-rich mixed meal. Twelve healthy males, normal to overweight and age 23–31 years old, participated in a double-blind, cross-over study. Each participant completed two study visits, eating a mixed meal containing 30% of the calories from either fructose or glucose. Blood samples for glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and leptin as well as gas exchange by indirect calorimetry were measured intermittently for 7 hours. Serum insulin was higher after a fructose mixed meal but plasma glucose, plasma leptin and serum triglycerides were not different. Mean postprandial respiratory quotient and estimated fat oxidation did not differ between the fructose and glucose meals. The change in fat oxidation between the fructose and glucose rich meals negatively correlated with BMI (r=−0.59, P=0.04 and r=−0.59, P=0.04 at the 4 and 7 hour time points, respectively). In healthy non-obese males, BMI correlates with altered postprandial fat oxidation after a high-fructose mixed meal. The metabolic response to a high fructose meal may be modulated by BMI. PMID:23746558

  7. Structure and Magnetic Properties of a Mixed-Valence Heptanuclear Manganese Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbati, Gian Luca; Cornia, Andrea; Fabretti, Antonio C.; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante

    1998-07-27

    Two novel polynuclear manganese(II,III) complexes have been synthesized by exploiting controlled methanolysis. A one-pot reaction of MnCl(2), NaOMe, dibenzoylmethane (Hdbm), and O(2) in anhydrous methanol, followed by recrystallization from MeOH/CHCl(3) mixtures, afforded the alkoxomanganese complexes [Mn(7)(OMe)(12)(dbm)(6)].CHCl(3).14MeOH (2) and [Mn(2)(OMe)(2)(dbm)(4)] (3). Complex 2 crystallizes in trigonal space group R&thremacr; with a = 14.439(2) Å, alpha = 86.34(1) degrees, and Z = 1. Complex 3 crystallizes in triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 9.612(1) Å, b = 10.740(1) Å, c = 13.168(1) Å, alpha = 80.39(1) degrees, beta = 87.66(1) degrees, gamma = 83.57(1) degrees, and Z = 1. The solid-state structure of 2 comprises a [Mn(6)(OMe)(12)(dbm)(6)] "crown" with crystallographically imposed 6-fold symmetry plus a central manganese ion. The layered Mn/O core mimics a fragment of the manganese oxide mineral lithiophorite. Conductivity measurements confirmed the nonionic character of 2 and suggested a mixed-valence Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(4) formulation. The metrical parameters of the core were analyzed with the aid of bond-valence sum calculations. The central ion is essentially a valence-trapped Mn(II) ion, whereas the average Mn-O distances for the manganese ions of the "crown" are consistent with the presence of two Mn(II) and four Mn(III) ions. However, (1)H NMR spectra in solution strongly support valence localization and suggest that the observed solid-state structure may be a result of static disorder effects. Magnetic susceptibility vs T and magnetization vs field data at low temperature are consistent with an S = (17)/(2) ground state. Complex 3 is a symmetric alkoxo-bridged dimer. The two high-spin Mn(III) ions are antiferromagnetically coupled with J = 0.28(4) cm(-)(1), g = 1.983(2), and D = -2.5(4) cm(-)(1).

  8. Does the MRI or MRI contrast medium gadopentetate dimeglumine change the oxidant and antioxidant status in humans?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmaz, Refik; Oguz, Ebru Gok; Kiykim, Ahmet; Turgutalp, Kenan [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Nephrology, School of Medicine, Mersin Univ., Mersin (Turkey)], e-mail: k.turgutalp@hotmail.com; Horoz, M. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Nephrology, School of Medicine, Harran Univ., Sanliurfa (Turkey); Ozhan, Onur [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Endocrinology and Metabolism, School of Medicine, Mersin Univ., Mersin (Turkey); Muslu, Necati [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Mersin Univ., Mersin (Turkey); Sungur, Mehmet [Dept. of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Mersin Univ., Mersin (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Background: It has become evident that gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) may have nephrotoxic potential. Oxidative stress is one of the most important pathways in the pathogenesis of iodinated contrast-induced nephropathy. Purpose: To investigate the effects of static magnetic fields and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist) on oxidant/antioxidant status via measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), and serum malondialdehide (MDA). Material and Methods: Two age- and sex-matched groups of patients not under oxidative stress conditions that underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were recruited to this study. While contrast-enhanced (Magnevist, 0.2 mmol/kg) MRI was performed in group 1, MRI without GBCA was performed in group 2. Fasting blood glucose, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, liver enzymes, uric acid, and lipid parameters were examined in all patients. Peripheral venous blood samples in order to determine TAC, TOS, and MDA were collected before and 6, 24, and 72 h after the MRI procedures. The TOS:TAC ratio was used as the oxidative stress index (OSI). Patients were followed up to 72 h. Results: There were no significant changes in serum TAC, TOS, and MDA levels ({Delta}{sub s}erum{sub T}AC, {Delta}{sub s}erum{sub T}OS, and {Delta}{sub M}DA) in either group 6, 24, or 72 h after the procedures (P > 0.05). Furthermore, OSI did not change after the procedures in either group (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Magnetic field and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist) do not change the oxidant or antioxidant status at a dose of 0.2 mmol/kg.

  9. Does the MRI or MRI contrast medium gadopentetate dimeglumine change the oxidant and antioxidant status in humans?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmaz, Refik; Oguz, Ebru Gok; Kiykim, Ahmet; Turgutalp, Kenan; Horoz, M.; Ozhan, Onur; Muslu, Necati; Sungur, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has become evident that gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) may have nephrotoxic potential. Oxidative stress is one of the most important pathways in the pathogenesis of iodinated contrast-induced nephropathy. Purpose: To investigate the effects of static magnetic fields and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist) on oxidant/antioxidant status via measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), and serum malondialdehide (MDA). Material and Methods: Two age- and sex-matched groups of patients not under oxidative stress conditions that underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were recruited to this study. While contrast-enhanced (Magnevist, 0.2 mmol/kg) MRI was performed in group 1, MRI without GBCA was performed in group 2. Fasting blood glucose, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, liver enzymes, uric acid, and lipid parameters were examined in all patients. Peripheral venous blood samples in order to determine TAC, TOS, and MDA were collected before and 6, 24, and 72 h after the MRI procedures. The TOS:TAC ratio was used as the oxidative stress index (OSI). Patients were followed up to 72 h. Results: There were no significant changes in serum TAC, TOS, and MDA levels (Δ s erum T AC, Δ s erum T OS, and Δ M DA) in either group 6, 24, or 72 h after the procedures (P > 0.05). Furthermore, OSI did not change after the procedures in either group (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Magnetic field and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist) do not change the oxidant or antioxidant status at a dose of 0.2 mmol/kg

  10. Future Research Directions in the Positive Valence Systems: Measurement, Development, and Implications for Youth Unipolar Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olino, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The Positive Valence Systems (PVS) have been introduced by the National Institute of Mental Health as a domain to help organize multiple constructs focusing on reward-seeking behaviors. However, the initial working model for this domain is strongly influenced by adult constructs and measures. Thus, the present review focuses on extending the PVS into a developmental context. Specifically, the review provides some hypotheses about the structure of the PVS, how PVS components may change throughout development, how family history of depression may influence PVS development, and potential means of intervening on PVS function to reduce onsets of depression. Future research needs in each of these areas are highlighted.

  11. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua G Choudhury

    Full Text Available The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (a bacterial endotoxin, and (b to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted

  12. Winter-swimming as a building-up body resistance factor inducing adaptive changes in the oxidant/antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Anna; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Szyguła, Zbigniew; Bryczkowska, Iwona; Stańczyk-Dunaj, Małgorzata; Sałata, Daria; Budkowska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our research was to examine whether winter-swimming for five consecutive months results in adaptational changes improving tolerance to stress induced by exposure to cryogenic temperatures during whole-body cryostimulation (WBC). The research involved 15 healthy men, with normal bodyweight, who had never been subjected to either WBC or cold water immersion. During the experiment, the participants were twice subjected to WBC (3 min/- 130°C), namely before the winter-swimming season and after the season. Blood was taken seven times: In the morning before each cryostimulation, 30 min after each cryostimulation and the next morning. Additionally, control blood was collected in the middle of the winter season, in February. Our analysis concerned changes in hematological parameters as well as in reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione, total oxidant status, total antioxidant status and in components of the antioxidant system: Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and 8-Isoprostanes as a sensitive indicator of oxidative stress. We found significant changes in hemoglobin concentration, the number of red blood cells, the hematocrit index and mean corpuscular volume of red blood cell and the percentage of monocytes and granulocytes after the winter swimming season. The response to cryogenic temperatures was milder after five months of winter-swimming. The obtained results may indicate positive adaptive changes in the antioxidant system of healthy winter-swimmers. These changes seem to increase the readiness of the human body to stress factors.

  13. Determination of the impact of Bi content on the valence band energy of GaAsBi using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Collar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the change of the valence band energy of GaAs1-xBix (0change in the valence band energy per addition of 1 % Bi is determined for strained and unstrained thin films using a linear approximation applicable to the dilute regime. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE was used as a complementary technique to determine the change in GaAsBi bandgap resulting from Bi addition. Analysis of SE and XPS data together supports the conclusion that ∼75% of the reduction in the bandgap is in the valence band for a compressively strained, dilute GaAsBi thin film at room temperature.

  14. Approach and withdrawal tendencies during written word processing: effects of task, emotional valence and emotional arousal

    OpenAIRE

    Citron, Francesca Maria Marina; Abugaber, David; Herbert, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    The affective dimensions of emotional valence and emotional arousal affect processing of verbal and pictorial stimuli. Traditional emotional theories assume a linear relationship between these dimensions, with valence determining the direction of a behaviour (approach vs. withdrawal) and arousal its intensity or strength. In contrast, according to the valence-arousal conflict theory, both dimensions are interactively related: positive valence and low arousal (PL) are associated with an implic...

  15. Changes in oxidative properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana leaf mitochondria during development of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustin, P; Queiroz-Claret, C

    1985-06-01

    Kalanchoe blossfeldiana plants grown under long days (16 h light) exhibit a C3-type photosynthetic metabolism. Switching to short days (9 h light) leads to a gradual development of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Under the latter conditions, dark CO2 fixation produces large amounts of malate. During the first hours of the day, malate is rapidly decarboxylated into pyruvate through the action of a cytosolic NADP(+)-or a mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme. Mitochondria were isolated from leaves of plants grown under long days or after treatment by an increasing number of short days. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as exogenous NADH and NADPH were readily oxidized by mitochondria isolated from the two types of plants. Glycine, known to be oxidized by C3-plant mitochondria, was still oxidized after CAM establishment. The experiments showed a marked parallelism in the increase of CAM level and the increase in substrate-oxidation capacity of the isolated mitochondria, particularly the capacity to oxidize malate in the presence of cyanide. These simultaneous variations in CAM level and in mitochondrial properties indicate that the mitochondrial NAD(+)-malic enzyme could account at least for a part of the oxidation of malate. The studies of whole-leaf respiration establish that mitochondria are implicated in malate degradation in vivo. Moreover, an increase in cyanide resistance of the leaf respiration has been observed during the first daylight hours, when malate was oxidized to pyruvate by cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes.

  16. Hard x-ray photoemission study of the temperature-induced valence transition system EuNi2(Si1-xGex) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiki, Katsuya; Mimura, Kojiro; Anzai, Hiroaki; Uozumi, Takayuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Yuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Mitsuda, Akihiro; Wada, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Yukihiro; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the bulk-derived electronic structure of the temperature-induced valence transition system EuNi2(Si1 -xGex )2 (x =0.70 , 0.79, and 0.82) by means of hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES). The HAXPES spectra clearly show distinct temperature dependencies in the spectral intensities of the Eu2 + and Eu3 +3 d components. For x =0.70 , the changes in the Eu2 + and Eu3 +3 d spectral components with temperature reflect a continuous valence transition, whereas the sudden changes for x =0.79 and 0.82 reflect first-order valence transitions. The Eu 3 d spectral shapes for all x and particularly the drastic changes in the Eu3 +3 d feature with temperature are validated by a theoretical calculation based on the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). SIAM analysis reveals that the valence transition for each x is controlled by the c -f hybridization strength and the charge-transfer energy. Furthermore, the c -f hybridization strength governs the valence transition of this system, which is either first order or continuous, consistent with Kondo volume collapse.

  17. Broader color gamut of color-modulating optical coating display based on indium tin oxide and phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhigang; Mou, Shenghong; Zhou, Tong; Cheng, Zhiyuan

    2018-05-01

    A color-modulating optical coating display based on phase change materials (PCM) and indium tin oxide (ITO) is fabricated and analyzed. We demonstrate that altering the thickness of top-ITO in this PCM-based display device can effectively change color. The significant role of the top-ITO layer in the thin-film interference in this multilayer system is confirmed by experiment as well as simulation. The ternary-color modulation of devices with only 5 nano thin layer of phase change material is achieved. Furthermore, simulation work demonstrates that a stirringly broader color gamut can be obtained by introducing the control of the top-ITO thickness.

  18. Changes of turbidity during the phenol oxidation by photo-Fenton treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Camarero, Luis M; Lomas, Jose M; Perez, Jonatan

    2014-11-01

    Turbidity presented by phenol solutions oxidized with Fenton reagent shows the tendency of a first order intermediate kinetics. Thus, turbidity can be considered a representative parameter of the presence of intermediate oxidation species, which are generated along the decomposition of toxic and reluctant contaminants, such as phenol. Moreover, that parameter presents a linear dependence with the catalyst dosage, but is also determined by the initial contaminant load. When analyzing the oxidation mechanism of phenol, it is found that the maximum turbidity occurs when the treatment is carried out at oxidant to phenol molar ratios R = 4.0. These oxidation conditions correspond to the presence of a reaction mixture mainly composed of dihydroxylated rings, precursors of the muconic acid formation. The oxidation via "para" comprises the formation reactions of charge transfer complexes (quinhydrone), between the para-dihydroxylated intermediates (hydroquinone) and the para-substituted quinones (p-benzoquinone), which are quite unstable and reactive species, quickly decomposed into hydroxyhydroquinones. Working with oxidant ratios up to R = 6.0, the maximum observed value of turbidity in the oxidized solutions is kept almost constant. It is found that, in these conditions, the pyrogallol formation is maximal, what is generated through the degradation of ortho-species (catechol and ortho-benzoquinone) and meta-substituted (resorcinol). Operating with ratios over R = 6.0, these intermediates are decomposed into biodegradable acids, generating lower turbidity in the solution. Then, the residual turbidity is a function of the molar ratio of the ferrous ions vs. moles of oxidant utilized in the essays, that lets to estimate the stoichiometric dosage of catalyst as 20 mg/L at pH = 3.0, whereas operating in stoichiometric conditions, R = 14.0, the residual turbidity of water results almost null.

  19. Inhibition of Direct Electrolytic Ammonia Oxidation Due to a Change in Local pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical ammonia oxidation has gained a lot of attention recently as an efficient method for ammonia removal from wastewater, for the use in ammonia-based fuel cells and the production of high purity hydrogen. Thermally decomposed iridium oxide films (TDIROF) have been shown to be catalytically active for direct ammonia oxidation in aqueous solutions if NH 3 is present. However, the process was reported to be rapidly inhibited on TDIROF. Herein, we show that this fast inhibition of direct ammonia oxidation does not result from surface poisoning by adsorbed elemental nitrogen (N ads ). Instead, we propose that direct ammonia oxidation and oxygen evolution can lead to a drop of the local pH at the electrode resulting in a low availability of the actual reactant, NH 3 . The hypothesis was tested with cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments on stagnant and rotating disk electrodes (RDE). The CV experiments on the stagnant electrode revealed that the decrease of the ammonia oxidation peaks was considerably reduced by introducing an idle phase at open circuit potential between subsequent scans. Furthermore, the polarization of the TDIROF electrode into the hydrogen evolution region (HER) resulted in increased ammonia oxidation peaks in the following anodic scans which can be explained with an increased local pH after the consumption of protons in the HER. On the RDE, the ammonia oxidation peaks did not decrease in immediately consecutive scans. These findings would not be expected if surface poisoning was responsible for the fast inhibition but they are in good agreement with the proposed mechanism of pH induced limitation by the reactant, NH 3 . The plausibility of the mechanism was also supported by our numerical simulations of the processes in the Nernstian diffusion layer. The knowledge about this inhibition mechanism of direct ammonia oxidation is especially important for the design of electrochemical cells for wastewater treatment. The mechanism is not only

  20. Renal aging in WKY rats: changes in Na+,K+ -ATPase function and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E; Pinto, V; Simão, S; Serrão, M P; Afonso, J; Amaral, J; Pinho, M J; Gomes, P; Soares-da-Silva, P

    2010-12-01

    It has been suggested that alterations in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase mediate the development of several aging-related pathologies, such as hypertension and diabetes. Thus, we evaluated Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function and H(2)O(2) production in the renal cortex and medulla of Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats at 13, 52 and 91 weeks of age. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urinary excretion of Na(+) and K(+) and fractional excretion of Na(+) were also determined. The results show that at 91 weeks old WKY rats had increased creatinine clearance and did not have proteinuria. Despite aging having had no effect on urinary Na(+) excretion, urinary K(+) excretion was increased and fractional Na(+) excretion was decreased with age. In renal proximal tubules and isolated renal cortical cells, 91 week old rats had decreased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity when compared to 13 and 52 week old rats. In renal medulla, 91 week old rats had increased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, paralleled by an increase in protein expression of α(1)-subunit of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. In addition, renal H(2)O(2) production increased with age and at 91 weeks of age renal medulla H(2)O(2) production was significantly higher than renal cortex production. The present work demonstrates that although at 91 weeks of age WKY rats were able to maintain Na(+) homeostasis, aging was accompanied by alterations in renal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function. The observed increase in oxidative stress may account, in part, for the observed changes. Possibly, altered Na(+),K(+)-ATPase renal function may precede the development of age-related pathologies and loss of renal function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Siyu [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Kai [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: pzhang@nmemc.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (t{sub d,E}) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (t{sub ·OH,E}) in sunlit surface waters. The t{sub d,E} values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas t{sub ·OH,E} ranges from 3.24 h to 33.6 h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. - Highlights: • It is first reported on hydroxyl-radical oxidation of 6 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. • Methods were developed to assess photolysis and oxidation fate in surface waters. • The neutral form reacted faster with hydroxyl radical than protonated forms. • The main oxidation intermediates and transformation pathways were clarified. • The antibacterial activity changes depend on dominant photolysis pathways.

  2. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (t d,E ) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (t ·OH,E ) in sunlit surface waters. The t d,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas t ·OH,E ranges from 3.24 h to 33.6 h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. - Highlights: • It is first reported on hydroxyl-radical oxidation of 6 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. • Methods were developed to assess photolysis and oxidation fate in surface waters. • The neutral form reacted faster with hydroxyl radical than protonated forms. • The main oxidation intermediates and transformation pathways were clarified. • The antibacterial activity changes depend on dominant photolysis pathways

  3. Analysis of sources of bulk conductivity change in saturated silica sand after unbuffered TCE oxidation by permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hort, Ryan D; Revil, André; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Time lapse resistivity surveys could potentially improve monitoring of permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants such as trichloroethene (TCE) by tracking changes in subsurface conductivity that result from injection of permanganate and oxidation of the contaminant. Bulk conductivity and pore fluid conductivity changes during unbuffered TCE oxidation using permanganate are examined through laboratory measurements and conductivity modeling using PHREEQC in fluid samples and porous media samples containing silica sand. In fluid samples, oxidation of one TCE molecule produces three chloride ions and one proton, resulting in an increase in fluid electrical conductivity despite the loss of two permanganate ions in the reaction. However, in saturated sand samples in which up to 8mM TCE was oxidized, at least 94% of the fluid conductivity associated with the presence of protons was removed within 3h of sand contact, most likely through protonation of silanol groups found on the surface of the sand grains. Minor conductivity effects most likely associated with pH-dependent reductive dissolution of manganese dioxide were also observed but not accounted for in pore-fluid conductivity modeling. Unaccounted conductivity effects resulted in an under-calculation of post-reaction pore fluid conductivity of 2.1% to 5.5%. Although small increases in the porous media formation factor resulting from precipitation of manganese dioxide were detected (about 3%), these increases could not be confirmed to be statistically significant. Both injection of permanganate and oxidation of TCE cause increases in bulk conductivity that would be detectable through time-lapse resistivity surveys in field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Developmental Reversals in False Memory: Effects of Emotional Valence and Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, C. J.; Holliday, R. E.; Reyna, V. F.; Yang, Y.; Toglia, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Do the emotional valence and arousal of events distort children's memories? Do valence and arousal modulate counterintuitive age increases in false memory? We investigated those questions in children, adolescents, and adults using the Cornell/Cortland Emotion Lists, a word list pool that induces false memories and in which valence and arousal can…

  5. Valence-Specific Laterality Effects in Vocal Emotion: Interactions with Stimulus Type, Blocking and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepman, Astrid; Rodway, Paul; Geddes, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Valence-specific laterality effects have been frequently obtained in facial emotion perception but not in vocal emotion perception. We report a dichotic listening study further examining whether valence-specific laterality effects generalise to vocal emotions. Based on previous literature, we tested whether valence-specific laterality effects were…

  6. Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents mediate the…

  7. Oxidative Stress State Is Associated with Left Ventricular Mechanics Changes, Measured by Speckle Tracking in Essential Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antonio Moreno-Ruíz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress state is characterized by an increase in oxygen reactive species that overwhelms the antioxidant defense; we do not know if these pathological changes are correlated with alterations in left ventricular mechanics. The aim was correlating the oxidative stress state with the left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS and the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP. Twenty-five patients with essential hypertension and 25 controls paired by age and gender were studied. All of the participants were subjected to echocardiography and biochemical determination of oxidative stress markers. The hypertensive patients, compared with control subjects, had significantly (p<0.05 higher levels of oxidized proteins (5.03±1.05 versus 4.06±0.63 nmol/mg, lower levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD activity (0.045±0.02 versus 0.082±0.02 U/mg, higher LVEDP (16.2±4.5 versus 11.3±1.6 mm Hg, and lower GLS (−12% versus −16%. Both groups had preserved ejection fraction and the results showed a positive correlation of oxidized proteins with GLS (r=0.386, p=0.006 and LVEDP (r=0.389, p=0.005; we also found a negative correlation of EC-SOD activity with GLS (r=-0.404, p=0.004 and LVEDP (r=-0.347, p=0.014.

  8. The influence of ion implantation on the oxidation of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, P.D.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of ion implantation on the oxidation of polycrystalline nickel have been studied for a range of implanted species: viz. He, Li, Ne, Ca, Ti, Ni, Co, Xe, Ce and Bi. The oxides were grown in dry oxygen at 630 0 C and the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction technique used to determine the amount of oxygen taken up. The influence of atomic and ionic size, valency and electronegativity of the implanted impurities was studied as also were the effects of ion bombardment damage and the influence of sputtering during implantation. Atomic size and the annealing of disorder were found to have a marked influence on oxide growth rate. The dependence of oxidation on annealing was further studied by implanting polycrystalline specimens with self ions and observing the oxide growth rate as a function of annealing temperature. A peak in the curve was found at 400 0 C and a similar peak observed at a somewhat higher temperature for oxidised single crystals. It is concluded that the oxidation rate will be influenced by those factors which alter the epitaxial relationship between metal and growing oxide. Such factors include atomic size of the implanted species, surface strain induced by implantation and changes in surface topography as a result of sputtering. In addition a model based on vacancy assisted cation migration is proposed to explain enhanced oxidation observed over a limited temperature range. (author)

  9. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients after intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate, while the effect is insignificant in severe patients. Thus, sodium hyaluronate can effectively improve nitric oxide levels in synovial fluid, reduce ..... Modern Med Health, 2014; 1:.

  10. Morphological Changes of Yeast Cells due to Oxidative Stress by Mercury and Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Hyoun; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most important microorganisms employed in industry. Growth rate, mutation, and environmental conditions affect yeast size and shape distributions but, in general, the influence of spatial variations in large-scale bioreactors is not considered. Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks in the nucleus, In addition, it causes lipid peroxidation, ceramide generation, and protein oxidation in the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Metal ions are essential to life. However, some metals such as mercury are harmful, even when present at trace amounts. Toxicity of mercury arises mainly from its oxidizing properties. As a metal ion, it induces an oxidative stress or predisposes cells to an oxidative stress, with considerable damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. In this work, we investigated to effect of ionizing radiation (IR) and mercury chloride (II) on cell morphology.

  11. System Re-set: High LET Radiation or Transient Musculoskeletal Disuse Cause Lasting Changes in Oxidative Defense Pathways Within Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, A.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Six months post-IR, there were no notable changes in skeletal expression of 84 principal genes in the p53 signaling pathway due to low dose IR (0.5Gy), HU, or both. In contrast, numerous genes relevant to oxidative stress were regulated by the treatments, typically in a direction indicative of increased oxidative stress and impaired defense. IR and HU independently reduced (between 0.46 to 0.88 fold) expression levels of Noxa1, Gpx3, Prdx2, Prdx3, and Zmynd17. Surprisingly, transient HU alone (sham-irradiated) decreased expression of several redox-related genes (Gpx1,Gstk1, Prdx1, Txnrd2), which were not affected significantly by IR alone. Irradiation increased (1.13 fold) expression of a gene responsible for production of superoxides by neutrophils (NCF2). Of interest, only combined treatment with HU and IR led to increased expression levels of Ercc2, (1.19 fold), a DNA excision repair enzyme. Differences in gene expression levels may reflect a change in gene expression on a per cell basis, a shift in the repertoire of specific cell types within the tissue, or both. Serum nitrite/nitrate levels were elevated to comparable levels (1.6-fold) due to IR, HU or both, indicative of elevated systemic nitrosyl stress. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of changes in skeletal expression of oxidative stress-related genes six months after irradiation and/or transient unloading tended to be relatively modest (0.46-1.15 fold), whereas the p53 pathway was not affected. The finding that many different oxidative stress-related genes differed from controls at this late time point implicates a generalized impairment of oxidative defense within skeletal tissue, which coincides with both profound radiation damage to osteoprogenitors/stem cells in bone marrow and impaired remodeling of mineralized tissue.

  12. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K.; Alm, J.; Silvola, J.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH 4 ). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH 4 release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr -1 of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr -1 ) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N 2 O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH 4 and N 2 O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH 4 , N 2 O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH 4 , N 2 O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N 2 O, NO and CH 4 , and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  13. Extreme nitrogen deposition can change methane oxidation rate in moist acidic tundra soil in Arctic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Kang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, extreme nitrogen(N) deposition events are observed in Arctic regions where over 90% of the annual N deposition occurred in just a few days. Since Arctic ecosystems are typically N-limited, input of extremely high amount of N could substantially affect ecosystem processes. CH4 is a potent greenhouse gas that has 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 over a 100-year time frame. Ammonium is known as an inhibitor of methane oxidation and nitrate also shows inhibitory effect on it in temperate ecosystems. However, effects of N addition on Arctic ecosystems are still elusive. We conducted a lab-scale incubation experiment with moist acidic tundra (MAT) soil from Council, Alaska to investigate the effect of extreme N deposition events on methane oxidation. Zero point five % methane was added to the head space to determine the potential methane oxidation rate of MAT soil. Three treatments (NH4NO3-AN, (NH4)2SO4-AS, KNO3-PN) were used to compare effects of ammonium, nitrate and salts. All treatments were added in 3 levels: 10μg N gd.w-1(10), 50μg N gd.w-1(50) and 100μg N gd.w-1(100). AN10 and AN50 increased methane oxidation rate 1.7, 6% respectively. However, AN100 shows -8.5% of inhibitory effect. In AS added samples, all 3 concentrations (AN10, AN50, AN100) stimulated methane oxidation rate with 4.7, 8.9, 4%, respectively. On the contrary, PN50 (-9%) and PN100 (-59.5%) exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. We also analyzed the microbial gene abundance and community structures of methane oxidizing bacteria using a DNA-based fingerprinting method (T-RFLP) Our study results suggest that NH4+ can stimulate methane oxidation in Arctic MAT soil, while NO3- can inhibit methane oxidation significantly.

  14. Theoretical calculations of valence states in Fe-Mo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, F; Navarro, O; Noverola, H; Suárez, J R; Avignon, M

    2014-01-01

    The half-metallic ferromagnetic double perovskite compound Sr 2 FeMoO 6 is considered as an important material for spintronic applications. It appears to be fundamental to understand the role of electronic parameters controlling the half-metallic ground state. Fe-Mo double perovskites usually present some degree of Fe/Mo disorder which generally increases with doping. In this work, we study the valence states of Fe-Mo cations in the off-stoichiometric system Sr 2 Fe 1+x Mo 1−x O 6 (−1 ≤ x ≤ 1/3) with disorder. Our results for Fe and Mo valence states are obtained using the Green functions and the renormalization perturbation expansion method. The model is based on a correlated electron picture with localized Fe-spins and conduction Mo-electrons interacting with the local spins via a double-exchange-type mechanism

  15. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  16. Bond charge approximation for valence electron density in elemental semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashenov, V.K.; Gorbachov, V.E.; Marvakov, D.I.

    1985-07-01

    The spatial valence electron distribution in silicon and diamond is calculated in adiabatic bond charge approximation at zero temperature when bond charges have the Gaussian shape and their tensor character is taken into account. An agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved. For this purpose Xia's ionic pseudopotentials and Schulze-Unger's dielectric function are used. By two additional parameters Asub(B) and Zsub(B)sup(') we describe the spatial extent of the bond charge and local-field corrections, respectively. The parameter Zsub(B)sup(') accounts for the ratio between the Coulomb and exchange correlation interactions of the valence electrons and its silicon and diamond values have different signs. (author)

  17. Spin dynamics and magnetic ordering in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.; Moller, H.B.; Axe, J.D.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Bucher, E.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron scattering measurements are reported on the mixed valence compounds Ce/sub 1-x/Th/sub x/ and TmSe. The Chi''(Q,ω) as derived from the inelastic spectra of Ce 0 . 74 Th 0 . 26 shows a peak in the γ phase near 20.0 meV and shifts abruptly to greater than 70.0 meV at the transition to the α phase. The temperature independence of the susceptibility within the γ phase cannot be simply reconciled with the temperature dependence of the valence within the γ phase. TmSe is shown to order in a type I antiferromagnetic structure below T/sub N/ approx. 3.2 K. The magnetic phase diagram is understood as a successive domain reorientation and a metamagnetic phase transition for T 3+ orders in a type II structure but never achieves long range order

  18. The olfactory tubercle encodes odor valence in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadziola, Marie A; Tylicki, Kate A; Christian, Diana L; Wesson, Daniel W

    2015-03-18

    Sensory information acquires meaning to adaptively guide behaviors. Despite odors mediating a number of vital behaviors, the components of the olfactory system responsible for assigning meaning to odors remain unclear. The olfactory tubercle (OT), a ventral striatum structure that receives monosynaptic input from the olfactory bulb, is uniquely positioned to transform odor information into behaviorally relevant neural codes. No information is available, however, on the coding of odors among OT neurons in behaving animals. In recordings from mice engaged in an odor discrimination task, we report that the firing rate of OT neurons robustly and flexibly encodes the valence of conditioned odors over identity, with rewarded odors evoking greater firing rates. This coding of rewarded odors occurs before behavioral decisions and represents subsequent behavioral responses. We predict that the OT is an essential region whereby odor valence is encoded in the mammalian brain to guide goal-directed behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354515-13$15.00/0.

  19. Clustering of low-valence particles: structure and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Olga; Alberts, Jonathan; Munro, Edwin; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2014-08-01

    We compute the structure and kinetics of two systems of low-valence particles with three or six freely oriented bonds in two dimensions. The structure of clusters formed by trivalent particles is complex with loops and holes, while hexavalent particles self-organize into regular and compact structures. We identify the elementary structures which compose the clusters of trivalent particles. At initial stages of clustering, the clusters of trivalent particles grow with a power-law time dependence. Yet at longer times fusion and fission of clusters equilibrates and clusters form a heterogeneous phase with polydispersed sizes. These results emphasize the role of valence in the kinetics and stability of finite-size clusters.

  20. Effects of valence and divided attention on cognitive reappraisal processes

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, John A.; Leclerc, Christina M.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the neural substrates supporting cognitive reappraisal, identifying the importance of cognitive control processes implemented by prefrontal cortex (PFC). This study examined how valence and attention affect the processes used for cognitive reappraisal by asking participants to passively view or to cognitively reappraise positive and negative images with full or divided attention. When participants simply viewed these images, results revealed few effects of v...

  1. Magnetic excitations in intermediate valence semiconductors with singlet ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikoin, K.A.; Mishchenko, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    The explanation of the origin inelastic peaks in magnetic neutron scattering spectra of the mixed-valent semiconductor SmB 6 is proposed. It is shown that the excitonic theory of intermediate valence state not only gives the value of the peak frequency but also explains the unusual angular dependence of intensity of inelastic magnetic scattering and describes the dispersion of magnetic excitations in good agreement with experiment

  2. Continuum-limit scaling of overlap fermions as valence quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Herdoiza, Gregorio; Jansen, Karl

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of a mixed action approach, employing dynamical twisted mass fermions in the sea sector and overlap valence fermions, with the aim of testing the continuum limit scaling behaviour of physical quantities, taking the pion decay constant as an example. To render the computations practical, we impose for this purpose a fixed finite volume with lattice size L∼1.3 fm. We also briefly review the techniques we have used to deal with overlap fermions. (orig.)

  3. Few-valence-particle excitations around doubly magic 132Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, P.J.; Zhang, C.T.; Bhattacharyya, P.

    1996-01-01

    Prompt γ-ray cascades in neutron-rich nuclei around doubly-magic 132 Sn have been studied using a 248 Cm fission source. Yrast states located in the N = 82 isotones 134 Te and 135 I are interpreted as valence proton and neutron particle-hole core excitations with the help of shell model calculations employing empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions from both 132 Sn and 208 Pb regions

  4. Magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allub, R.; Machiavelli, O.; Balseiro, C.; Alascio, B.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility is explored of magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds. Using a simplified Anderson-Lattice model the pressure-temperature magnetic phase diagram is obtained. This diagram shows that for some value of the microscopic parameters the temperature induced two transitions (non-magnetic to magnetically ordered to paramagnetic). The magnetization and the average occupation number of the localized state are calculated. Estimations of the observability of the effect in systems like CeAl 2 are made. (author)

  5. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  6. Human Amygdala Tracks a Feature-Based Valence Signal Embedded within the Facial Expression of Surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M Justin; Mattek, Alison M; Bennett, Randi H; Solomon, Kimberly M; Shin, Jin; Whalen, Paul J

    2017-09-27

    Human amygdala function has been traditionally associated with processing the affective valence (negative vs positive) of an emotionally charged event, especially those that signal fear or threat. However, this account of human amygdala function can be explained by alternative views, which posit that the amygdala might be tuned to either (1) general emotional arousal (activation vs deactivation) or (2) specific emotion categories (fear vs happy). Delineating the pure effects of valence independent of arousal or emotion category is a challenging task, given that these variables naturally covary under many circumstances. To circumvent this issue and test the sensitivity of the human amygdala to valence values specifically, we measured the dimension of valence within the single facial expression category of surprise. Given the inherent valence ambiguity of this category, we show that surprised expression exemplars are attributed valence and arousal values that are uniquely and naturally uncorrelated. We then present fMRI data from both sexes, showing that the amygdala tracks these consensus valence values. Finally, we provide evidence that these valence values are linked to specific visual features of the mouth region, isolating the signal by which the amygdala detects this valence information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There is an open question as to whether human amygdala function tracks the valence value of cues in the environment, as opposed to either a more general emotional arousal value or a more specific emotion category distinction. Here, we demonstrate the utility of surprised facial expressions because exemplars within this emotion category take on valence values spanning the dimension of bipolar valence (positive to negative) at a consistent level of emotional arousal. Functional neuroimaging data showed that amygdala responses tracked the valence of surprised facial expressions, unconfounded by arousal. Furthermore, a machine learning classifier identified

  7. Changes of serum inflammatory factors, adipokines and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurong Guri Maimaiti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the changes of serum inflammatory factors, adipokines and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods: A total of 130 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted in our hospital from January 2015 to June 2016 were selected and divided into 41 cases with diabetic retinopathy (NDR, 44 cases with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR and 45 cases with proliferative retinopathy group (PDR, another 40 healthy volunteers in our hospital were selected as control group (NC, and the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, hs-CRP, leptin, adiponectin, MDA and SOD were detected. Results: There were significant differences in the levels of IL-6, TNF-α and hs-CRP in groups, PDR group was the highest, which were respectively (18.19 ± 3.84 pg/mL, (197.48 ± 13.78 ng/L and (8.13 ± 0.74 mg/L, significantly higher than that of NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, NPDR group followed, respectively (14.07 ± 3.62 pg/mL, (115.29 ± 20.08 ng/L and (5.62 ± 0.83 mg/L, which were significantly higher than that of NC and NDR groups. NDR group were (12.67 ± 3.93 pg/mL, (89.49 ± 10.49 ng/L and (3.91 ± 0.49 mg/L respectively, significantly higher than the NC group, the difference was statistically significant. There were significant differences among groups of leptin and adiponectin, the leptin level in PDR group was the highest, (23.19 ± 6.48 μg/mL, which was significantly higher than NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, adiponectin was the lowest (3.70 ± 1.02 g/mL, lower than that in NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, the levels of leptin in NPDR group were higher than NC group and NDR group while adiponectin were lower than the two groups. Leptin levels in NDR group were significantly higher than those in NC group while adiponectin were lower than those in NC group, the differences were statistically significant. The levels of MDA and SOD in each group were significantly different. MDA in PDR group was the highest, (17.77

  8. Changes of serum inflammatory factors, adipokines and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurong Guri Maimaiti; Akomatine Tuhuti

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum inflammatory factors, adipokines and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods: A total of 130 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted in our hospital from January 2015 to June 2016 were selected and divided into 41 cases with diabetic retinopathy (NDR), 44 cases with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR) and 45 cases with proliferative retinopathy group (PDR), another 40 healthy volunteers in our hospital were selected as control group (NC), and the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, hs-CRP, leptin, adiponectin, MDA and SOD were detected. Results: There were significant differences in the levels of IL-6, TNF-α and hs-CRP in groups, PDR group was the highest, which were respectively (18.19 ± 3.84) pg/mL, (197.48 ± 13.78) ng/L and (8.13 ± 0.74) mg/L, significantly higher than that of NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, NPDR group followed, respectively (14.07 ± 3.62) pg/mL, (115.29 ± 20.08) ng/L and (5.62 ± 0.83) mg/L, which were significantly higher than that of NC and NDR groups. NDR group were (12.67 ± 3.93) pg/mL, (89.49 ± 10.49) ng/L and (3.91 ± 0.49) mg/L respectively, significantly higher than the NC group, the difference was statistically significant. There were significant differences among groups of leptin and adiponectin, the leptin level in PDR group was the highest, (23.19 ± 6.48) μg/mL, which was significantly higher than NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, adiponectin was the lowest (3.70 ± 1.02) g/mL, lower than that in NC group, NDR group and NPDR group, the levels of leptin in NPDR group were higher than NC group and NDR group while adiponectin were lower than the two groups. Leptin levels in NDR group were significantly higher than those in NC group while adiponectin were lower than those in NC group, the differences were statistically significant. The levels of MDA and SOD in each group were significantly different. MDA in PDR group was the highest, (17.77 ± 4

  9. [Age-related changes in biogenic amine content and oxidative stress profile in the rat hypothalamus in hyperhomocysteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Yu P; Pustygina, A V; Zaloznyaya, I V; Arutjunyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a detailed analysis of correlations between the content of a variety of biogenic amines in the hypothalamic structures responsible for the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone synthesis and secretion (the medial preoptic area and median eminence) and such independent factors as total L-homocysteine plasma level elevation induced by L-methionine loading and aging. Both a nature and a pattern of changes in oxidative stress profile were evaluated. It was shown that ageing, when compared to hyperhomocysteinemia, is a determining factor influencing biogenic amine content in the studied hypothalamic structures. Unlike antioxidant defense system profile, considerable changes in macromolecule oxidative modification were not found, which evidences a balanced activity of pro- and antioxidant systems in the hypothalamus.

  10. Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Lei [CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Mezrag, Cédric; Moutarde, Hervé [Centre de Saclay, IRFU/Service de Physique Nucléaire, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roberts, Craig D. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rodríguez-Quintero, Jose [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva E-21071 (Spain); Tandy, Peter C. [Center for Nuclear Research, Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbow–ladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, q{sup π}(x); namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, q{sup π}(x)∼(1−x){sup 2} for x≳0.85; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.

  11. Automated Construction of Molecular Active Spaces from Atomic Valence Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R; Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Knizia, Gerald

    2017-09-12

    We introduce the atomic valence active space (AVAS), a simple and well-defined automated technique for constructing active orbital spaces for use in multiconfiguration and multireference (MR) electronic structure calculations. Concretely, the technique constructs active molecular orbitals capable of describing all relevant electronic configurations emerging from a targeted set of atomic valence orbitals (e.g., the metal d orbitals in a coordination complex). This is achieved via a linear transformation of the occupied and unoccupied orbital spaces from an easily obtainable single-reference wave function (such as from a Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham calculations) based on projectors to targeted atomic valence orbitals. We discuss the premises, theory, and implementation of the idea, and several of its variations are tested. To investigate the performance and accuracy, we calculate the excitation energies for various transition-metal complexes in typical application scenarios. Additionally, we follow the homolytic bond breaking process of a Fenton reaction along its reaction coordinate. While the described AVAS technique is not a universal solution to the active space problem, its premises are fulfilled in many application scenarios of transition-metal chemistry and bond dissociation processes. In these cases the technique makes MR calculations easier to execute, easier to reproduce by any user, and simplifies the determination of the appropriate size of the active space required for accurate results.

  12. Spectroscopic determination of valence band parameters in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.A.; Lough, B.C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The general form of the Hamiltonian for an electron or hole in a semiconductor has been given by Luttinger. The valence band is characterised by three parameters - γ 1 , γ 2 , γ 3 -now commonly known as the Luttinger parameters. Despite many investigations there is still considerable uncertainty regarding the Luttinger parameters of InP. The situation has been reviewed by Hackenberg et al. These authors themselves sought to determine the Luttinger parameters by hot-electron luminescence and discovered that many Luttinger parameter triplets were consistent with their data. We employ a spectroscopic approach to estimating valence-band parameters in InP. Calculations have been made for both the unperturbed energy levels and the energy levels in a magnetic field of acceptor impurities in semiconductors characterised by different Luttinger parameters. We compare our recent experimental data for the transitions associated with the Zn acceptor impurity in InP in magnetic fields up to 30 T to determine the most appropriate set of valence-band parameters for InP

  13. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borries, A K L; Verkes, R J; Bulten, B H; Cools, R; de Bruijn, E R A

    2013-12-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures--that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model predicts an FRN on negative prediction errors, as well as implying a role for the FRN in learning and the adaptation of behavior. However, these predictions have recently been challenged. Notably, studies so far have used tasks in which the outcomes have been contingent on the response. In these paradigms, the need to adapt behavioral responses is present only for negative, not for positive feedback. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of positive as well as negative violations of expectancy on FRN amplitudes, without the usual confound of behavioral adjustments. A reversal-learning task was employed in which outcome value and outcome expectancy were orthogonalized; that is, both positive and negative outcomes were equally unexpected. The results revealed a double dissociation, with effects of valence but not expectancy on the FRN and, conversely, effects of expectancy but not valence on the P300. While FRN amplitudes were largest for negative-outcome trials, irrespective of outcome expectancy, P300 amplitudes were largest for unexpected-outcome trials, irrespective of outcome valence. These FRN effects were interpreted to reflect an evaluation along a good-bad dimension, rather than reflecting a negative prediction error or a role in behavioral adaptation. By contrast, the P300 reflects the updating of information relevant for behavior in a changing context.

  14. Study of possible changes brought about by plutonium oxide in the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar macrophages of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvroy, Huguette

    1970-06-01

    This report describes the various techniques used for determining the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar rabbit macrophages after inhalation of radioactive plutonium oxide particles, exposure of the animals, removal and sampling of the alveolar cells, and technical dosage. The results obtained are presented; they do not make it possible, in this particular case, to affirm that an important change in the enzymatic activity studied occurs. (author) [fr

  15. Highly Reversible Electrochemical Insertion of Lithium, Accompanied With a Marked Color Change, Occuring in Microcrystalline Lithium Nickel Oxide Films

    OpenAIRE

    Campet, G.; Portier, J.; Morel, B.; Ferry, D.; Chabagno, J. M.; Benotmane, L.; Bourrel, M.

    1992-01-01

    Thin films of lithium-nickel oxide, whose texture consists of microcrystallites with an average grain size of 50 Å, permit highly reversible electrochemical insertion of lithium ions in Li+ conducting electrolytes. Therefore, the corresponding materials would be of great interest for energy storage applications. In addition, the lithium insertion/extraction reactions in the nickel-based layers are accompanied with a marked color change, making these films of interest for the devel...

  16. Energy shift and conduction-to-valence band transition mediated by a time-dependent potential barrier in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Andrey; da Costa, D. R.; de Sousa, G. O.; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the scattering of a wave packet describing low-energy electrons in graphene by a time-dependent finite-step potential barrier. Our results demonstrate that, after Klein tunneling through the barrier, the electron acquires an extra energy which depends on the rate of change of the barrier height with time. If this rate is negative, the electron loses energy and ends up as a valence band state after leaving the barrier, which effectively behaves as a positively charged quasiparticle.

  17. Autonomic Effects of Music in Health and Crohn's Disease: The Impact of Isochronicity, Emotional Valence, and Tempo

    OpenAIRE

    Krabs, Roland Uwe; Enk, Ronny; Teich, Niels; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Music can evoke strong emotions and thus elicit significant autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses. However, previous studies investigating music-evoked ANS effects produced inconsistent results. In particular, it is not clear (a) whether simply a musical tactus (without common emotional components of music) is sufficient to elicit ANS effects; (b) whether changes in the tempo of a musical piece contribute to the ANS effects; (c) whether emotional valence of music influences ANS...

  18. Study of valence of cerium and praseodymium ions in Pr1-xCexO2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartsman, K.G.; Kartenko, N.F.; Melekh, B.T.

    1990-01-01

    Effect of preparation conditions of Pr 1-x Ce x O 2 solid solutions on Ce and Pr ion valence within Pr 1-x Ce x O 2 system is studied. The data obtained enable to conclude that praseodymium may depending on annealing conditions change its state from Pr 3+ to Pr 4+ , while Ce 4+ is stable in Pr 1-x Ce x O 2 solid solutions

  19. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  20. Two-electron electrochemical oxidation of quercetin and kaempferol changes only the flavonoid C-ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars; Cornett, Claus; Justesen, Ulla

    1998-01-01

    Bulk electrolysis of the antioxidant flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol in acetonitrile both yield a single oxidation product in two-electron processes. The oxidation products are more polar than their parent compounds, with an increased molecular weight of 16g/mol, and were identified as 2......-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxy-3 (2H)-benzofuranone and 2-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxy-3(2H)-benzofuranone for quercetin and kaempferol, respectively. Two-electron oxidation of the parent flavonoid is suggested to yield a 3,4-flavandione with unchanged substitution pattern in the A- and B-ring, which...... may rearrange to form the substituted 3(2H)-benzofuranone through the chalcan-trione ring-chain tautomer. The acidity of the 3-OH group is suggested to determine the fate of the flavonoid phenoxyl radical originally formed by one-electron oxidation, as no well-defined oxidation product of luteolin...

  1. Structural changes in graphene oxide thin film by electron-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Chetna, E-mail: tchetna91@gmail.com [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 67 (India); Lakshmi, G.B.V.S.; Kumar, Sunil; Tripathi, Ambuj [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 67 (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Amity University, Noida 201313, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2016-07-15

    Although we have a whole class of 2D materials, graphene has drawn much attention for its excellent electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties. Recent researches have shown its large scale production by the reduction of graphene oxide either thermally, chemically or electrochemically. Although the structure of graphene oxide is inhomogeneous and hence complicated due to the presence of organic moieties e.g. epoxy, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl groups etc., its properties can be tuned by reduction according to desired application. The aim of this work is to synthesize continuous thin film of graphene oxide using commercially available graphene oxide solution and to study its reduction by 25 keV electron beam irradiation at fluences varying from 2 × 10{sup 11} to 2 × 10{sup 13} e{sup −}/cm{sup 2}. Our studies using X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy and UV–Vis spectroscopy showed that electron-beam irradiation is an effective tool for reduction of graphene oxide and for tuning its band gap.

  2. Excitations of one-valence-proton, one-valence-neutron nucleus {sup 210}Bi from cold-neutron capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N. [INFN sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Kraków (Poland); Fornal, B.; Szpak, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Kraków (Poland); Leoni, S.; Bottoni, S. [INFN sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bazzacco, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell’Università, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T. [Institute Laue-Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bocchi, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, Bd. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); Simpson, G. [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Ur, C. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Urban, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoża 69, 02-681, Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    The low-spin structure of one-proton, one-neutron {sup 210}Bi nucleus was investigated in cold-neutron capture reaction on {sup 209}Bi. The γ-coincidence measurements were performed with use of EXILL array consisted of 16 HPGe detectors. The experimental results were compared to shell-model calculations involving valence particles excitations. The {sup 210}Bi nucleus offers the potential to test the effective proton-neutron interactions because most of the states should arise from the proton-neutron excitations. Additionally, it was discovered that a few states should come from the couplings of valence particles to the 3{sup −} octupole vibration in {sup 208}Pb which provides also the possibility of testing the calculations involving the core excitations.

  3. Temporal changes in cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and remodeling induced by exercise in hypertension: Role for local angiotensin II reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião D Silva

    Full Text Available Exercise training reduces renin-angiotensin system (RAS activation, decreases plasma and tissue oxidative stress and inflammation in hypertension. However, the temporal nature of these phenomena in response to exercise is unknown. We sought to determine in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and age-matched WKY controls the weekly effects of training on blood pressure (BP, plasma and left ventricle (LV Ang II and Ang-(1-7 content (HPLC, LV oxidative stress (DHE staining, gene and protein expression (qPCR and WB of pro-inflammatory cytokines, antioxidant enzymes and their consequence on hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. SHR and WKY were submitted to aerobic training (T or maintained sedentary (S for 8 weeks; measurements were made at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy was accompanied by acute plasma Ang II increase with amplified responses during the late phase of LV hypertrophy. Similar pattern was observed for oxidative stress markers, TNF alpha and interleukin-1β, associated with cardiomyocytes' diameter enlargement and collagen deposition. SHR-T exhibited prompt and marked decrease in LV Ang II content (T1 vs T4 in WKY-T, normalized oxidative stress (T2, augmented antioxidant defense (T4 and reduced both collagen deposition and inflammatory profile (T8, without changing cardiomyocytes' diameter and LV hypertrophy. These changes were accompanied by decreased plasma Ang II content (T2-T4 and reduced BP (T8. SHR-T and WKY-T showed parallel increases in LV and plasma Ang-(1-7 content. Our data indicate that early training-induced downregulation of LV ACE-AngII-AT1 receptor axis is a crucial mechanism to reduce oxidative/pro-inflammatory profile and improve antioxidant defense in SHR-T, showing in addition this effect precedes plasma RAS deactivation.

  4. Valenced cues and contexts have different effects on event-based prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Peter; Yu, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the separate influence and joint influences on event-based prospective memory task performance due to the valence of cues and the valence of contexts. We manipulated the valence of cues and contexts with pictures from the International Affective Picture System. The participants, undergraduate students, showed higher performance when neutral compared to valenced pictures were used for cueing prospective memory. In addition, neutral pictures were more effective as cues when they occurred in a valenced context than in the context of neutral pictures, but the effectiveness of valenced cues did not vary across contexts that differed in valence. The finding of an interaction between cue and context valence indicates that their respective influence on event-based prospective memory task performance cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Our findings are not consistent with by the prevailing view which holds that the scope of attention is broadened and narrowed, respectively, by positively and negatively valenced stimuli. Instead, our findings are more supportive of the recent proposal that the scope of attention is determined by the motivational intensity associated with valenced stimuli. Consistent with this proposal, we speculate that the motivational intensity associated with different retrieval cues determines the scope of attention, that contexts with different valence values determine participants' task engagement, and that prospective memory task performance is determined jointly by attention scope and task engagement.

  5. Valenced cues and contexts have different effects on event-based prospective memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Graf

    Full Text Available This study examined the separate influence and joint influences on event-based prospective memory task performance due to the valence of cues and the valence of contexts. We manipulated the valence of cues and contexts with pictures from the International Affective Picture System. The participants, undergraduate students, showed higher performance when neutral compared to valenced pictures were used for cueing prospective memory. In addition, neutral pictures were more effective as cues when they occurred in a valenced context than in the context of neutral pictures, but the effectiveness of valenced cues did not vary across contexts that differed in valence. The finding of an interaction between cue and context valence indicates that their respective influence on event-based prospective memory task performance cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Our findings are not consistent with by the prevailing view which holds that the scope of attention is broadened and narrowed, respectively, by positively and negatively valenced stimuli. Instead, our findings are more supportive of the recent proposal that the scope of attention is determined by the motivational intensity associated with valenced stimuli. Consistent with this proposal, we speculate that the motivational intensity associated with different retrieval cues determines the scope of attention, that contexts with different valence values determine participants' task engagement, and that prospective memory task performance is determined jointly by attention scope and task engagement.

  6. Oxidized trilinoleate and tridocosahexaenoate induce pica behavior and change locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Fuki; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Umeno, Aya; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Kurata, Kenji; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Pica behavior, a behavior that is characterized by eating a nonfood material such as kaolin and relates to the degree of discomfort in animals, and the variations of locomotor activity of rats after eating deteriorated fat and oil extracted from instant noodles were examined in our previous study. The result shows that oxidized fat and oil with at least 100 meq/kg in peroxide value (PV) increase pica behavior and decrease locomotor activity. In the present study, the same two behaviors were measured using autoxidized trilinoleate (tri-LA) and tridocosahexaenoate (tri-DHA) as a model of vegetable and fish oil, respectively, to compare fatty acid differences against the induction of two behaviors. The oxidized levels of tri-LA and tri-DHA were analyzed with PV and p-anisidine value (AnV), the method to analyze secondary oxidized products. The oxidation levels of respective triacylglycerol (TAG) samples were carefully adjusted to make them having almost the same PV and AnV. As the results, 600 or more meq/kg in PV of both TAGs significantly increased the consumption of kaolin pellets compared to the control group. Furthermore, 300 or more meq/kg in PV of tri-LA and 200 or more meq/kg in PV of tri-DHA demonstrated significant decrease in locomotor activity compared to control group. These results would indicate that the oxidized TAG having the same PV and/or AnV would induce the same type of pica behavior and locomotor activity. Furthermore, that the structure of oxidized products might not be important and the amount of hydroperoxide group and/or aldehyde group in deteriorated fats and oils might affect the pica behavior and locomotor activity were thought.

  7. The resistance changes of carbon and metal oxide film resistors by irradiation of 60Co γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Shinichi; Fujino, Takahiro; Furuta, Junichiro; Yoshida, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    The resistance changes of glass-sealed deposited-carbon-film and carbon-coated-film resitors and metal oxide glazed resistors made in USA were studied by gamma-ray irradiation. (1) The resistances of deposited-carbon-film resistors of 50, 100 and 200 megohm did not change by irradiation of gamma rays up to 1.9 x 10 9 R. (2) The carbon-coated-film resistors of 100, 1000, 10000 and 100000 megohm had negative resistance changes by irradiation of gamma rays up to 9.9 x 10 8 R. (3) The resistances of metal oxide glazed resistors of 100, 1000 and 10000 megohm did not change by irradiation of gamma rays up to 8.8 x 10 8 R. When radiation monitoring instruments with hi-meg resistors are used in a gamma field with high intensity, the resistors must not be exposed to gamma rays with high doses, or the resistors which do not change by gamma-ray irradiation must be selected. (author)

  8. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G 0 , is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices

  9. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G0, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  10. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiO{sub x} resistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehonic, Adnan, E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J., E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-28

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  11. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    their help in producing this special section. We hope that it conveys some of the excitement and significance of the field. Semiconducting oxides contents Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO2 (M = In, Ga, Sc) K G Godinho, B J Morgan, J P Allen, D O Scanlon and G W Watson Electrical properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 thin films with Pt and ITO electrodes: dielectric and rectifying behaviourShunyi Li, Cosmina Ghinea, Thorsten J M Bayer, Markus Motzko, Robert Schafranek and Andreas Klein Orientation dependent ionization potential of In2O3: a natural source for inhomogeneous barrier formation at electrode interfaces in organic electronicsMareike V Hohmann, Péter Ágoston, André Wachau, Thorsten J M Bayer, Joachim Brötz, Karsten Albe and Andreas Klein Cathodoluminescence studies of electron irradiation effects in n-type ZnOCasey Schwarz, Yuqing Lin, Max Shathkin, Elena Flitsiyan and Leonid Chernyak Resonant Raman scattering in ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Mn:Al thin films grown by RF sputteringM F Cerqueira, M I Vasilevskiy, F Oliveira, A G Rolo, T Viseu, J Ayres de Campos, E Alves and R Correia Structure and electrical properties of nanoparticulate tungsten oxide prepared by microwave plasma synthesisM Sagmeister, M Postl, U Brossmann, E J W List, A Klug, I Letofsky-Papst, D V Szabó and R Würschum Charge compensation in trivalent cation doped bulk rutile TiO2Anna Iwaszuk and Michael Nolan Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniquesL Scheffler, Vl Kolkovsky, E V Lavrov and J Weber Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour depositionC David, T Girardeau, F Paumier, D Eyidi, B Lacroix, N Papathanasiou, B P Tinkham, P Guérin and M Marteau Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modellingAron Walsh, Juarez L F Da Silva and Su-Huai Wei Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of

  12. Specific oxidative stress parameters differently correlate with nailfold capillaroscopy changes and organ involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Fuksa, Leos; Firuzi, Omidreza; Saso, Luciano; Valesini, Guido

    2008-02-01

    Oxidative stress is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study was to clarify such a hypothesis by determination of four different plasmatic parameters of oxidative stress, and to define its role in the microvascular damage, assessed by nailfold capillaroscopy (NC). Plasma samples of 18 patients with SSc were analyzed. The biomarkers measured were: total antioxidant capacity, hydroperoxides (ROOHs), and sulfhydryl (SH) and carbonyl (CO) groups. Each patient had a detailed clinical assessment and underwent an NC. The results showed significantly increased ROOHs in SSc patients compared to control group (5.02 +/- 0.24 vs 3.28 +/- 0.19 micromol/l; p capillaroscopy semiquantitative rating scale score (p < 0.05) and with the rating system for avascular areas (p < 0.03). The levels of CO groups inversely correlated with modified Rodnan's skin score (p < 0.039) and were lower in patients with pulmonary fibrosis (p < 0.045), while the levels of SH groups were lower in those presenting gastrointestinal involvement (p < 0.029). The obtained data indicate augmented free radical-mediated injury in SSc and also show correlations among oxidative abnormalities, some clinical findings, and signs of a more severe microvascular involvement. These results give more evidence to the connection between oxidative impairment and SSc.

  13. The effect of body weight changes and endurance training on 24 h substrate oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Muls, G.; Vansant, G.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.; Saris, W.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of exercise training and dietary macronutrient composition on 24 h substrate oxidation in male, obese subjects. DESIGN: A 16 month exercise intervention study was executed, including a weight loss period with a very low energy diet (VLED) for 2 months at the

  14. DNA sequence changes induced by two nitric oxide donor drugs in the supF assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routledge, M.N.; Dipple, A. [ABL-Basic Research Program, Frederick, MD (United States); Wink, D.A.; Keefer, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    To refine our understanding of the mutational spectra one might expect on exposure of human cells to nitric oxide (NO), we have treated the plasmid pSP189 at pH 7.4 with two compounds that generate NO spontaneously in solution, and then sequenced the mutations found when the treated plasmid was transfected into human Ad293 cells and allowed to replicate. G{center_dot}C {yields} A{center_dot}T transitions were the most abundant mutation observed with these NO donor drugs, whereas in previous work, A{center_dot}T {yields} G{center_dot}C transitions predominated when nitric oxide gas was bubbled through the plasmid solution under otherwise identical conditions. A difference in reactive intermediates formed in solution- versus gas-phase NO exposure was demonstrated by treating buffered 2,2{prime}-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) or ferrocyanide, in the presence or absence of azide, aerobically with preformed solutions of NO, with solutions of the two NO-releasing compounds, or with gaseous mixtures of equimolar NO/O{sub 2} in air; oxidation of these substrates was extensive with the gas-phase NO source whether azide was present or not, while azide almost completely quenched the oxidation pathway in the solution-phase reactions.

  15. Oxidative stress and repetitive element methylation changes in artisanal gold miners occupationally exposed to mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Narváez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg exposure is a public health concern due to its persistence in the environment and its high toxicity. Such toxicity has been associated with the generation of oxidative stress in occupationally exposed subjects, such as artisanal gold miners. In this study, we characterize occupational exposure to Hg by measuring blood, urine and hair levels, and investigate oxidative stress and DNA methylation associated with gold mining. To do this, samples from 53 miners and 36 controls were assessed. We show higher levels of oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG in the miners. Differences in LINE1 and Alu(Yb8 DNA methylation between gold miners and control group are present in peripheral blood leukocytes. LINE1 methylation is positively correlated with 8-OHdG levels, while XRCC1 and LINE1 methylation are positively correlated with Hg levels. These results suggest an effect of Hg on oxidative stress and DNA methylation in gold miners that may have an impact on miners’ health.

  16. Oxidative changes in lipids, proteins, and antioxidants in yogurt during the shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citta, Anna; Folda, Alessandra; Scalcon, Valeria; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Bellamio, Marco; Feller, Emiliano; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Oxidation processes in milk and yogurt during the shelf life can result in an alteration of protein and lipid constituents. Therefore, the antioxidant properties of yogurt in standard conditions of preservation were evaluated. Total phenols, free radical scavenger activity, degree of lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation were determined in plain and skim yogurts with or without fruit puree. After production, plain, skim, plain berries, and skim berries yogurts were compared during the shelf life up to 9 weeks. All types of yogurts revealed a basal antioxidant activity that was higher when a fruit puree was present but gradually decreased during the shelf life. However, after 5-8 weeks, antioxidant activity increased again. Both in plain and berries yogurts lipid peroxidation increased until the seventh week of shelf life and after decreased, whereas protein oxidation of all yogurts was similar either in the absence or presence of berries and increased during shelf life. During the shelf life, a different behavior between lipid and protein oxidation takes place and the presence of berries determines a protection only against lipid peroxidation.

  17. Changing oxidation in whey fat concentrate upon addition of green tea extract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Marianne; Nielsen, J; Sørensen, J

    2011-01-01

    was measured using a number of different antioxidants: Trolox (TRX), propyl gallate (PG), Grindox 1021 (GRX), green tea extract (GTE) and rosemary extract (RE). The development of the secondary lipid oxidation product hexanal was inhibited by all the tested antioxidants, and GTE was found to be the most...

  18. Molecular mechanism of catalase activity change under sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced oxidative stress in the mouse primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Chi; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-04-15

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via changing the activity of antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT). But the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. This study characterized the harmful effects of SDS-induced oxidative stress on the mouse primary hepatocytes as well as the structure and function of CAT molecule and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism. After 12h SDS (0.1μM to 0.2mM) exposure, no significant change was observed in CAT activity of the hepatocytes. After 0.5 and 0.8mM SDS exposure, the state of oxidative stress stimulated CAT production in the hepatocytes. The inhibition of CAT activity induced by directly interacting with SDS was unable to catch the synthesis of CAT and therefore resulted in the increased activity and elevated ROS level. Further molecular experiments showed that SDS prefers to bind to the interface with no direct effect on the active site and the structure of heme groups of CAT molecule. When the sites in the interface is saturated, SDS interacts with VAL 73, HIS 74, ASN 147 and PHE 152, the key residues of the enzyme activity, and leads to the decrease of CAT activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of high-magnetic-field XMCD spectra at the L2,3 absorption edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Akio; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Nojiri, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism(XMCD) spectra at the L 2,3 edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds in high magnetic fields are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical study is based on a new framework proposed recently by Kotani. The Zeeman splitting of 4f states, the mixed-valence character of 4f states, and the 4f-5d exchange interaction are incorporated into a single impurity Anderson model. New XMCD experiments in high magnetic fields up to 40 T are carried out for the mixed-valence compounds EuNi 2 (Si 0.18 Ge 0.82 ) 2 and YbInCu 4 by using a miniature pulsed magnet, which was developed recently by Matsuda et al. The XMCD data are taken at 5 K by transmission measurements for incident X-rays with ± helicities at BL39XU in SPring-8. After giving a survey on recent developments in the theory of XMCD spectra for mixed-valence Ce and Yb compounds, we calculate the XMCD spectra of YbInCu 4 at the field-induced valence transition around 32 T by applying the recent theoretical framework and by newly introducing at 32 T a discontinuous change in the Yb 4f level and that in the hybridization strength between the Yb 4f and conduction electrons. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones.

  20. Do Valenced Odors and Trait Body Odor Disgust Affect Evaluation of Emotion in Dynamic Faces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, Elmeri; Liuzza, Marco Tullio; Fischer, Håkan; Olofsson, Jonas K

    2017-12-01

    Disgust is a core emotion evolved to detect and avoid the ingestion of poisonous food as well as the contact with pathogens and other harmful agents. Previous research has shown that multisensory presentation of olfactory and visual information may strengthen the processing of disgust-relevant information. However, it is not known whether these findings extend to dynamic facial stimuli that changes from neutral to emotionally expressive, or if individual differences in trait body odor disgust may influence the processing of disgust-related information. In this preregistered study, we tested whether a classification of dynamic facial expressions as happy or disgusted, and an emotional evaluation of these facial expressions, would be affected by individual differences in body odor disgust sensitivity, and by exposure to a sweat-like, negatively valenced odor (valeric acid), as compared with a soap-like, positively valenced odor (lilac essence) or a no-odor control. Using Bayesian hypothesis testing, we found evidence that odors do not affect recognition of emotion in dynamic faces even when body odor disgust sensitivity was used as moderator. However, an exploratory analysis suggested that an unpleasant odor context may cause faster RTs for faces, independent of their emotional expression. Our results further our understanding of the scope and limits of odor effects on facial perception affect and suggest further studies should focus on reproducibility, specifying experimental circumstances where odor effects on facial expressions may be present versus absent.

  1. Change in maximal fat oxidation in response to different regimes of periodized high-intensity interval training (HIIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Edmunds, Ross M; Clark, Amy; Gallant, Rachael; King, Leesa; Ordille, Gina M; Heath, Brendyn; Montell, Matthew; Bandong, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Increased capacity for fat oxidation (FatOx) is demonstrated in response to chronic endurance training as well as high-intensity interval training (HIIT). This study examined changes in maximal fat oxidation (MFO) in response to 20 sessions of periodized HIIT in an attempt to identify if various regimes of HIIT similarly augment capacity for FatOx. Thirty-nine habitually active men and women (mean age and VO 2 max = 22.5 ± 4.4 year and 40.0 ± 5.6 mL/kg/min) completed training and 32 men and women with similar physical activity and fitness level served as non-exercising controls (CON). Training consisted of ten sessions of progressive low-volume HIIT on the cycle ergometer after which participants completed an additional ten sessions of sprint interval training (SIT), high-volume HIIT, or periodized HIIT, whose assignment was randomized. Before and throughout training, MFO, FatOx, and carbohydrate oxidation (CHOOx) were assessed during progressive cycling to exhaustion. Compared to CON, there was no effect of HIIT on MFO (p = 0.11). Small increases (p = 0.03) in FatOx were evident in response to HIIT leading to an additional 4.3 g of fat oxidized, although this value may not be clinically meaningful. Our results refute the widely reported increases in capacity for FatOx demonstrated with HIIT, which is likely due to marked day-to-day variability in determinations of MFO and exercise fat oxidation as well as the heterogeneity of our sample.

  2. Strategies to curb structural changes of lithium/transition metal oxide cathode materials & the changes’ effects on thermal & cycling stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiqian, Yu; Enyuan, Hu; Seongmin, Bak; Yong-Ning, Zhou; Xiao-Qing, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Structural transformation behaviors of several typical oxide cathode materials during a heating process are reviewed in detail to provide in-depth understanding of the key factors governing the thermal stability of these materials. We also discuss applying the information about heat induced structural evolution in the study of electrochemically induced structural changes. All these discussions are expected to provide valuable insights for designing oxide cathode materials with significantly improved structural stability for safe, long-life lithium ion batteries, as the safety of lithium-ion batteries is a critical issue; it is widely accepted that the thermal instability of the cathodes is one of the most critical factors in thermal runaway and related safety problems. Project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies (Grant No. DE-SC0012704).

  3. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Valence Bond Property of the Double-Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field on the valence bond property of the double-quantum-dot molecule are numerically studied by the finite element method and perturbation approach because of the absence of cylindrical symmetry in the horizontally coupled dots. The calculation results show that the energy value of the ground state changes differently from that of the first excited state with increasing magnetic field strength, and they cross under a certain magnetic field. The increasing magnetic field makes the covalent bond state change into an ionic bond state, which agrees qualitatively with experimental results and makes ionic bond states remain. The oscillator strength of transition between covalent bond states decreases distinctly with the increasing magnetic field strength, when the molecule is irradiated by polarized light. Such a phenomenon is possibly useful for actual applications.

  4. "Transformation Tuesday": Temporal context and post valence influence the provision of social support on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Erin A; Rose, Jason P; Crane, Chantal

    2018-01-01

    Social network sites (SNSs) such as Facebook have become integral in the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. Users of SNSs seek social support and validation, often using posts that illustrate how they have changed over time. The purpose of the present research is to examine how the valence and temporal context of an SNS post affect the likelihood of other users providing social support. Participants viewed hypothetical SNS posts and reported their intentions to provide social support to the users. Results revealed that participants were more likely to provide social support for posts that were positive and included temporal context (i.e., depicted improvement over time; Study 1). Furthermore, this research suggests that visual representations of change over time are needed to elicit social support (Study 2). Results are discussed in terms of their practical implications for SNS users and theoretical implications for the literature on social support and social media.

  5. Impact of oxidative stress defense on bacterial survival and morphological change in Campylobacter jejuni under aerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euna eOh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a microaerophilic foodborne pathogen, inescapably faces high oxygen tension during its transmission to humans. Thus, the ability of C. jejuni to survive under oxygen-rich conditions may significantly impact C. jejuni viability in food and food safety as well. In this study, we investigated the impact of oxidative stress resistance on the survival of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions by examining three mutants defective in key antioxidant genes, including ahpC, katA, and sodB. All the three mutants exhibited growth reduction under aerobic conditions compared to the wild type (WT, and the ahpC mutant showed the most significant growth defect. The CFU reduction in the mutants was recovered to the WT level by complementation. Higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS were accumulated in C. jejuni under aerobic conditions than microaerobic conditions, and supplementation of culture media with an antioxidant recovered the growth of C. jejuni. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were significantly increased in the mutants compared to WT. Additionally, the mutants exhibited different morphological changes under aerobic conditions. The ahpC and katA mutants developed coccoid morphology by aeration, whereas the sodB mutant established elongated cellular morphology. Compared to microaerobic conditions, interestingly, aerobic culture conditions substantially induced the formation of coccoidal cells, and antioxidant treatment reduced the emergence of coccoid forms under aerobic conditions. The ATP concentrations and PMA-qPCR analysis supported that oxidative stress is a factor that induces the development of a viable-but-non-culturable (VBNC state in C. jejuni. The findings in this study clearly demonstrated that oxidative stress resistance plays an important role in the survival and morphological changes of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions.

  6. New conception in the theory of chemical bonding; the role of core and valence atomic orbitals in formation of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikova, G.P.; Kostikov, Yu.P.; Korol'kov, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectra leads to a simple and consistent conception in the theory of chemical bonding, which satisfies (unlike the simple MO-LCAO theory) the virial theorem and defines the roles of the core and valence atomic orbitals in the formation of chemical bonds. Its essence is clear from the foregoing: the exothermic effects of the formation of complexes are caused by the lowering of the energies of the core levels of the central atoms with simultaneous small changes in the energies of the core levels of the ligands despite the significant destabilization of the delocalized valence MO's in comparison to the orbital energies of the corresponding free atoms. In order to confirm these ideas, they recorded the x-ray photoelectron spectra of the valence region and the inner levels of single-crystal silicon carbide, silicon, and graphite

  7. Determination of valence band parameters in ZnTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, D.; Noethe, A.; Reimann, K. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst. - Lehrstuhl 2)

    1984-10-01

    The fine structure of the 2P exciton in ZnTe is studied by two-photon-absorption. The energy splitting into four states, caused by the envelope-hole coupling, allows the determination of the Luttinger parameters ..gamma../sub 2/ and ..gamma../sub 3/, which describe the complex valence band. ..gamma../sub 2/ = 0.8 and ..gamma../sub 3/ = 1.7 are obtained. These values are compared to results of other experiments mainly on 1S excitons.

  8. Kondo and mixed-valence regimes in multilevel quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.; Ulloa, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the ground state of a multilevel quantum dot on the coupling to an external fermionic system and on the interactions in the dot. As the coupling to the external system increases, the rearrangement of the effective energy levels in the dot signals the transition from the Kondo regime to a mixed-valence (MV) regime. The MV regime in a two-level dot is characterized by an intrinsic mixing of the levels in the dot, resulting in nonperturbative subtunneling and supertunneling phenomena that strongly influence the Kondo effect

  9. Changes in oxidative potential of soil and fly ash after reaction with gaseous nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Shafer, Martin M.; Rudich, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Katra, Itzhak; Katoshevski, David; Schauer, James J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of simulated atmospheric aging on the oxidative potential of inorganic aerosols comprised primarily of crustal materials. Four soil samples and one coal fly ash sample were artificially aged in the laboratory through exposure to the vapor from 15.8 M nitric acid solution for 24 h at room temperature. Native and acid-aged samples were analyzed with a cellular macrophage and acellular dithionthreitol assays to determine oxidative potential. Additionally, the samples were analyzed to determine the concentration of 50 elements, both total and the water-soluble fraction of these elements by Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICMS) and crystalline mineral composition using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results show that reactions with gaseous nitric acid increase the water-soluble fraction of many elements, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and lead. The mineral composition analysis documented that calcium-rich minerals present in the soils (e.g., calcite) are converted into different chemical forms, such as calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). The nitric acid aging process, which can occur in the atmosphere, leads to a 200-600% increase in oxidative potential, as measured by cellular and acellular assays. This laboratory study demonstrates that the toxic effects of aged versus freshly emitted atmospheric dust may be quite different. In addition, the results suggest that mineralogical analysis of atmospheric dust may be useful in understanding its degree of aging.

  10. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J.; Silvola, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  11. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P J; Nykaenen, H; Regina, K [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J; Silvola, J [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  12. Prediction of crack density and electrical resistance changes in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel

    2014-06-11

    We present unified predictions for the crack onset strain, evolution of crack density, and changes in electrical resistance in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading. We propose a damage mechanics model to quantify and predict such changes as an alternative to fracture mechanics formulations. Our predictions are obtained by assuming that there are no flaws at the onset of loading as opposed to the assumptions of fracture mechanics approaches. We calibrate the crack onset strain and the damage model based on experimental data reported in the literature. We predict crack density and changes in electrical resistance as a function of the damage induced in the films. We implement our model in the commercial finite element software ABAQUS using a user subroutine UMAT. We obtain fair to good agreement with experiments. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. The color changes and tensile properties of oxidized Ti–6A1–2Mo–1.5Cr–2Zr–2Sn–2Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhiqiang, E-mail: jzq19841102@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zeng, Weidong, E-mail: zengwd@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zhang, Yaowu [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Shi, Chunling [Xi’an Aircraft Industry Company LTD, 710089 (China); Quan, Biao; Wu, Jianding [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The oxidized alloy exhibited notable color changes. • The color was mainly attributed to the mixing of titanium oxides. • A corresponding relation between the color and tensile properties was established. • A predicted model was proposed to characterize the diffusion of oxygen. - Abstract: The oxidation of titanium alloy at elevated temperature severely limits its property and service life. It is a common and urgent issue to assess the mechanical property of oxidized titanium component without destroying its structural integrity. In this work, the color changes and tensile properties of oxidized Ti–6A1–2Mo–1.5Cr–2Zr–2Sn–2Nb alloy with initial basket-weave microstructure were investigated in the temperature range of 100–1000 °C. It was found that the oxidized specimens exhibited brilliant and regular color changes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the color changes were mainly attributed to the mixing of colored titanium oxides in the oxidation layer (such as yellow TiO, white TiO{sub 2} and blue Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). It was also found that mechanical properties were significant influenced by the oxidation treatment. The specimens oxidized below 600 °C exhibited excellent strength and plasticity due to its fine basket-weave microstructure and dense oxidation layer. In the temperature range from 600 to 800 °C, the strength slightly decreased while the plasticity rose a little. The change of mechanical properties during the temperature range was mainly determined by the microstructure change. Eventually, both strength and plasticity decreased sharply when the temperature was over 800 °C, which was mainly caused by the thick oxidation layer with porous and loose microstructure. The fracture mode of tensile specimens also changed from ductile fracture (below 800 °C) to transgranular cleavage fracture (over 800 °C). On the basis of experiments, a corresponding relation between the color changes and tensile properties

  14. The color changes and tensile properties of oxidized Ti–6A1–2Mo–1.5Cr–2Zr–2Sn–2Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Weidong; Zhang, Yaowu; Shi, Chunling; Quan, Biao; Wu, Jianding

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The oxidized alloy exhibited notable color changes. • The color was mainly attributed to the mixing of titanium oxides. • A corresponding relation between the color and tensile properties was established. • A predicted model was proposed to characterize the diffusion of oxygen. - Abstract: The oxidation of titanium alloy at elevated temperature severely limits its property and service life. It is a common and urgent issue to assess the mechanical property of oxidized titanium component without destroying its structural integrity. In this work, the color changes and tensile properties of oxidized Ti–6A1–2Mo–1.5Cr–2Zr–2Sn–2Nb alloy with initial basket-weave microstructure were investigated in the temperature range of 100–1000 °C. It was found that the oxidized specimens exhibited brilliant and regular color changes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the color changes were mainly attributed to the mixing of colored titanium oxides in the oxidation layer (such as yellow TiO, white TiO 2 and blue Ti 2 O 3 ). It was also found that mechanical properties were significant influenced by the oxidation treatment. The specimens oxidized below 600 °C exhibited excellent strength and plasticity due to its fine basket-weave microstructure and dense oxidation layer. In the temperature range from 600 to 800 °C, the strength slightly decreased while the plasticity rose a little. The change of mechanical properties during the temperature range was mainly determined by the microstructure change. Eventually, both strength and plasticity decreased sharply when the temperature was over 800 °C, which was mainly caused by the thick oxidation layer with porous and loose microstructure. The fracture mode of tensile specimens also changed from ductile fracture (below 800 °C) to transgranular cleavage fracture (over 800 °C). On the basis of experiments, a corresponding relation between the color changes and tensile properties was

  15. Changes in activation energy and kinetics of heat-activated persulfate oxidation of phenol in response to changes in pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Li, Haiyan; Chi, Liping; Chen, Hongkun; Chen, Changzhao

    2017-12-01

    Persulfate (peroxydisulfate, S 2 O 8 2- ) is the newest oxidant used for the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) remediation of soil and groundwater. The present study investigated impacts of solution pH, temperature, and persulfate concentration on the reaction rate constant (k 1 ), activation energy (E a ), and reaction order of the heat-activated persulfate process. Phenol was chosen as the model organic contaminant. As temperature increased from 30 °C to 70 °C, k 1 exhibited a significant increase from 0.003 h -1 ∼0.962 h -1 (pH 1.3-13.9) to 1.184 h -1 ∼9.91 h -1 (pH 1.3-13.9), which corroborated with the activation of persulfate using heat. As pH increased from 1.3 to 13.9, k 1 exhibited a 4.3-fold increase at 70 °C and a 320-fold increase at 30 °C, thereby suggesting that: 1) the phenol oxidation rate increased under alkaline conditions, and 2) the enhancement of reaction rate due to alkaline activation was more pronounced at a lower temperature. Increasing pH significantly reduced E a from 139.7 ± 1.3 kJ/mol at pH 1.3 to 52.0 ± 3.3 kJ/mol at pH 13.9. In contrast to changing pH, increasing persulfate concentration from 20 to 320 mM significantly increased k 1 but did not affect E a . Changes in E a suggest that persulfate oxidation of phenol experienced different reaction pathways or elementary reaction sequences as the pH changed from 1.3 to 13.9. In addition, the k 1 and E a data also suggest that a minimal pH threshold of ∼11 was required for the effective alkaline activation of persulfate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thorium valency in molten alkali halides in equilibrium with metallic thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic thorium is shown to corrode in molten alkali halides even in the absence of external oxidizing agents, alkali cations acting as oxidizing agents. Its corrosion rate grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl at constant temperature. Substituting halide anions for one another exerts a smaller influence, the rate rising slightly in going from chlorides to bromides and iodides, having the same alkali cations. Thorium valency is determined coulometrically, the metal being dissolved anodically in molten alkali halides and their mixtures. In fluoride melts it is equal to 4 but in chloride, bromide and iodide ones, as a rule, it has non-integral values between 4 and 2 which diminish as the temperature is raised, as the thorium concentration is lowered, as the radii of alkali cations decrease and those of halide anions increase. The emf of cells Th/N ThHlsub(n) + (1-N) MHl/MHl/C, Hlsub(2(g)) where Hl is Cl, Br or I, M is Li, Na, K, Cs or Na + K, and N < 0.05, is measured as a function of concentration at several temperatures. Expressions are obtained for its concentration dependence. The emf grows in the series of alkali chlorides from LiCl to CsCl, other conditions being equal. (author)

  17. Influence of rapid changes in cytosolic pH on oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle: theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2002-07-01

    Cytosolic pH in skeletal muscle may vary significantly because of proton production/consumption by creatine kinase and/or proton production by anaerobic glycolysis. A computer model of oxidative phosphorylation in intact skeletal muscle developed previously was used to study the kinetic effect of these variations on the oxidative phosphorylation system. Two kinds of influence were analysed: (i) via the change in pH across the inner mitochondrial membrane and (ii) via the shift in the equilibrium of the creatine kinase-catalysed reaction. Our simulations suggest that cytosolic pH has essentially no impact on the steady-state fluxes and most metabolite concentrations. On the other hand, rapid acidification/alkalization of cytosol causes a transient decrease/increase in the respiration rate. Furthermore, changes in pH seem to affect significantly the kinetic properties of transition between resting state and active state. An increase in pH brought about by proton consumption by creatine kinase at the onset of exercise lengthens the transition time. At intensive exercise levels this pH increase could lead to loss of the stability of the system, if not compensated by glycolytic H+ production. Thus our theoretical results stress the importance of processes/mechanisms that buffer/compensate for changes in cytosolic proton concentration. In particular, we suggest that the second main role of anaerobic glycolysis, apart from additional ATP supply, may be maintaining the stability of the system at intensive exercise.

  18. Change of the work function and potential barrier transparency of W(100) and GaAs(110) single crystals during removing the inherent surface oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asalkhanov, Yu.I.; Saneev, Eh.L.

    2002-01-01

    Changes of current voltage characteristics of slow monoenergetic electron beam through the surfaces of W(100) and GaAs(100) single crystals have been measured in the process of surface oxide layers elimination. It is shown that work function is decreased and transparency coefficient of surface potential barrier is increased under increasing the temperature of vacuum annealing. Peculiarities of surface potential change under oxide layer elimination in metals and semiconductors are discussed [ru

  19. Lipid Oxidation, Color Changes, and Microbiological Quality of Frozen Beef Burgers Incorporated with Shirazi Thyme, Cinnamon, and Rosemary Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hashemi Gahruie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the oxidative stability of beef burgers incorporated with Shirazi thyme, cinnamon, and rosemary extracts was compared with that of BHT-incorporated and antioxidant-free samples. The chemical composition, TBARS, metmyoglobin, pH, color, and microbial and sensory characteristics were evaluated during storage at −18°C for 2 months. The results indicated that Shirazi thyme and cinnamon extracts did not change the colorimetric properties significantly (P BHT > Shirazi thyme > rosemary > control. Finally, the results showed that these plant extracts can be utilized as an alternative to synthetic antioxidants in formulation of burgers.

  20. Processing negative valence of word pairs that include a positive word.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkes, Oksana; Mashal, Nira

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has suggested that cognitive performance is interrupted by negative relative to neutral or positive stimuli. We examined whether negative valence affects performance at the word or phrase level. Participants performed a semantic decision task on word pairs that included either a negative or a positive target word. In Experiment 1, the valence of the target word was congruent with the overall valence conveyed by the word pair (e.g., fat kid). As expected, response times were slower in the negative condition relative to the positive condition. Experiment 2 included target words that were incongruent with the overall valence of the word pair (e.g., fat salary). Response times were longer for word pairs whose overall valence was negative relative to positive, even though these word pairs included a positive word. Our findings support the Cognitive Primacy Hypothesis, according to which emotional valence is extracted after conceptual processing is complete.

  1. Virtual Distance and Soundstage, and their Impacts on Experienced Emotional Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Justin

    2015-01-01

    stimuli should cause stronger valenced responses in the nearfield than at a distance. Thus, music experienced as being negatively valenced at a distance should be more negatively valenced in nearfield, and music that is experienced as having a positive valence at a distance should be more positively......Research from animal ethology and affective neuroscience suggest that a listener’s perceived distance from a signal source can alter their experienced emotional valence of the music. Furthermore, appraisal theories of emotion suggest that emotionally valenced responses will diverge according...... to the type of emotion presented. For these exploratory investigations, subjects listen to selected musical excerpts on speakers in combination with a tactile transducer attached to their chair. The listening sessions are recorded on EEG supported by subject feedback responses. My hypothesis is that musical...

  2. Decarburization and hardness changes of Fe-C-Cr-Mn-Si steels caused by high temperature oxidation in ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, J; Broz, P [Academy of Sciences, Brno (Czech Republic); Hajduga, M; Glowacki, J [Tech. Univ., Lodz (Poland). Dept. of Mater. Sci.

    1999-07-01

    In the present paper the investigation of carbon diffusion and hardness changes in Fe-C-Cr-Mn-Si steels initiated by surface oxidation are reported. The oxidation anneals were carried out in ambient air. The measurements of carbon concentration and the metallographic investigation have shown that the steels decarburize expressively in the course of the oxidation process. The evaluation of the carbon concentration curves N{sub C}(x, t) yielded diffusion coefficients D{sub C} of carbon in the given steels. The dependence of D{sub C} on the concentration N{sub i} of alloying elements i is expressed by the use of diffusion interaction coefficients {beta}{sub C}{sup i}. The decrease of carbon concentration caused the increase of grain size in subsurface layers and the decrease of hardness HV. The dependence of HV(x, t) on N{sub C}(x, t) is expressed by the general parabolic relationship y(t) = k t{sup m}. (orig.) 24 refs.

  3. Dynamic changes of carbon isotope apparent fractionation factor to describe transition to syntrophic acetate oxidation during cellulose and acetate methanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V

    2017-05-01

    To identify predominant metabolic pathway for cellulose methanization new equations that take into account dynamics of 13C are added to the basic model of cellulose methanization. The correct stoichiometry of hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis steps including biomass is considered. Using experimental data by Laukenmann et al. [Identification of methanogenic pathway in anaerobic digesters using stable carbon isotopes. Eng. Life Sci. 2010;10:1-6], who reported about the importance of ace`tate oxidation during mesophilic cellulose methanization, the model confirmed that, at high biomass concentration of acetate oxidizers, the carbon isotope fractionation factor amounts to about 1.085. The same model, suggested firstly for cellulose degradation, was used to describe, secondly, changes in, and in methane and carbon dioxide during mesophylic acetate methanization measured by Grossin-Debattista [Fractionnements isotopiques (13C/12C) engendres par la methanogenese: apports pour la comprehension des processus de biodegradation lors de la digestion anaerobie [doctoral thesis]. 2011. Bordeaux: Universite Bordeaux-1;2011. Available from: http://ori-oai.u-bordeaux1.fr/pdf/2011/GROSSIN-DEBATTISTA_JULIEN_2011.pdf . French].The model showed that under various ammonium concentrations, at dominating acetoclastic methanogenesis, the value decreases over time to a low level (1.016), while at dominating syntrophic acetate oxidation, coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, slightly increases, reaching 1.060 at the end of incubation.

  4. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (td,E) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (tOH,E) in sunlit surface waters. The td,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas tOH,E ranges from 3.24h to 33.6h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Systematic thermodynamic properties of actinide metal-oxygen systems at high temperatures: Emphasis on lower valence states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, R.J.; Chandrasekharaiah, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The thermodynamic data for the actinide metals and oxides (thorium to curium ) have been assessed, examined for consistency, and compared with the lanthanides. Correlations relating the enthalpies of formation of the solid oxides with the corresponding aquo ions make possible the estimation of the thermodynamic properties of AmO 2 (s) and Am 2 O 3 (s) which are in accordance with vaporization data. The known thermodynamic properties of the substoichiometric dioxides MOsub(2-x)(s) at high temperatures demonstrate the relative stabilities of valence states less than 4+ and lead to the examination of stability requirements for the sesquioxides M 2 O 3 (s) and the monoxides MO(s). Sequential trends in the gaseous metals, monoxides and dioxides are examined, compared, and contrasted with the lanthanides. (author)

  6. Visuospatial asymmetries and emotional valence influence mental time travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole A; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2018-06-01

    Spatial information is tightly intertwined with temporal and valence-based information. Namely, "past" is represented on the left, and "future" on the right, along a horizontal mental timeline. Similarly, right is associated with positive, whereas left is negative. We developed a novel task to examine the effects of emotional valence and temporal distance on mental representations of time. We compared positivity biases, where positive events are positioned closer to now, and right hemisphere emotion biases, where negative events are positioned to the left. When the entire life span was used, a positivity bias emerged; positive events were closer to now. When timeline length was reduced, positivity and right hemisphere emotion biases were consistent for past events. In contrast, positive and negative events were equidistant from now in the future condition, suggesting positivity and right hemisphere emotion biases opposed one another, leading events to be positioned at a similar distance. We then reversed the timeline by moving past to the right and future to the left. Positivity biases in the past condition were eliminated, and negative events were placed slightly closer to now in the future condition. We conclude that an underlying left-to-right mental representation of time is necessary for positivity biases to emerge for past events; however, our mental representations of future events are inconsistent with positivity biases. These findings point to an important difference in the way in which we represent the past and the future on our mental timeline. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. The effects of colour and valence on news evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Grümmer, Melanie; Kießler, Antje; Neuß, Celina; Schröter, Franziska

    2017-12-01

    Research across different fields of psychology has reported effects of colour cues on a variety of cognitive processes. Especially, the colour red has been shown to have striking influences. In the context of media reception, however, colour effects have been widely neglected so far. This study made a first step in this direction by investigating the effects of the colour red (compared with blue and grey) on the way news articles are evaluated. Two types of news were framed by a coloured border while the valence of the news content additionally varied. Based on 369 participants who read and evaluated the news articles online, we observed effects for colour cues and news valence in the absence of an interaction effect, indicating that the colour red induced approach motivation. However, only the contrast between red and grey reached statistical significance, indicating that chromatic and achromatic colours may differ in their perceived visual saliency. Overall, these results provide an important complement to previous studies and have practical implications for media researchers and producers. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  8. Neutron scattering studies of mixed-valence semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, J M [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) - Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alekseev, P A [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments on the mixed-valence (MV) compounds SmB{sub 6} are reported. The inelastic magnetic response of SmB{sub 6} at T = 2 K, measured on a double-isotope single crystal,displays a strongly damped peak at 35 meV corresponding to the inter multiplet transition of Sm{sup 2+}. At lower energies ( h.{omega} {approx_equal} 14 meV), a narrow magnetic excitation is observed, with remarkable scattering-vector and temperature dependences of its intensity. This novel feature is discussed in terms of recent theoretical works describing the formation of an anisotropic local bound state in semiconducting MV materials. If the average samarium valence is decreased by substituting La for Sm, a peak is found to appear at high energies. The elastic magnetic form factor of SmB{sub 6} was determined using polarised neutrons and no significant difference is observed in its Q-dependence with respect to that of pure divalent samarium. This surprising behaviour is constant with previous measurements on the gold (high-pressure) phase of SmS. The above results are compared to those already reported for other MV materials. In particular existing information for TmSe is supplemented by recent inelastic scattering measurements carried out on a large stoichiometric single crystal. (author). 44 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Relative Contribution of Odour Intensity and Valence to Moral Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetto, Cinzia; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida; Parma, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analytic evidence showed that the chemical senses affect moral decisions. However, how odours impact on morality is currently unclear. Through a set of three studies, we assess whether and how odour intensity biases moral choices (Study 1a), its psychophysiological responses (Study 1b), as well as the behavioural and psychophysiological effects of odour valence on moral choices (Study 2). Study 1a suggests that the presence of an odour plays a role in shaping moral choice. Study 1b reveals that of two iso-pleasant versions of the same neutral odour, only the one presented sub-threshold (vs. supra-threshold) favours deontological moral choices, those based on the principle of not harming others even when such harm provides benefits. As expected, this odour intensity effect is tracked by skin conductance responses, whereas no difference in cardiac activity - proxy for the valence dimension - is revealed. Study 2 suggests that the same neutral odour presented sub-threshold increases deontological choices even when compared to iso-intense ambiguous odour, perceived as pleasant or unpleasant by half of the participants, respectively. Skin conductance responses, as expected, track odour pleasantness, but cardiac activity fails to do so. Results are discussed in the context of mechanisms alternative to disgust induction underlying moral choices.

  10. Affective picture modulation: valence, arousal, attention allocation and motivational significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Sandra; Galdo-Alvarez, Santiago; Alves, Jorge; Sampaio, Adriana; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2012-03-01

    The present study analyses the modulatory effects of affective pictures in the early posterior negativity (EPN), the late positive potential (LPP) and the human startle response on both the peripheral (eye blink EMG) and central neurophysiological levels (Probe P3), during passive affective pictures viewing. The affective pictures categories were balanced in terms of valence (pleasant; unpleasant) and arousal (high; low). The data shows that EPN may be sensitive to specific stimulus characteristics (affective relevant pictures versus neutral pictures) associated with early stages of attentional processing. In later stages, the heightened attentional resource allocation as well as the motivated significance of the affective stimuli was found to elicit enhanced amplitudes of slow wave processes thought to be related to enhanced encoding, namely LPP,. Although pleasant low arousing pictures were effective in engaging the resources involved in the slow wave processes, the highly arousing affective stimuli (pleasant and unpleasant) were found to produce the largest enhancement of the LPP, suggesting that high arousing stimuli may are associated with increased motivational significance. Additionally the response to high arousing stimuli may be suggestive of increased motivational attention, given the heightened attentional allocation, as expressed in the P3 probe, especially for the pleasant pictures. The hedonic valence may then serve as a mediator of the attentional inhibition to the affective priming, potentiating or inhibiting a shift towards defensive activation, as measured by the startle reflex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Relaxation and cross section effects in valence band photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFeely, F.R.

    1976-09-01

    Various problems relating to the interpretation of valence band x-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra of solids are discussed. The experiments and calculations reported herein deal with the following questions: (1) To what extent do many-body effects manifest themselves in an XPS valence band spectrum, and thus invalidate a direct comparison between the photoemission energy distribution, I(E), and the density of states, N(E), calculated on the basis of ground-state one-electron theory. (2) The effect of the binding-energy-dependent photoemission cross section on I(E) at XPS energies. (3) In favorable cases indicated by (1) and (2) we examine the effect of the interaction of the crystal field with the apparent spin-orbit splittings of core levels observed in XPS spectra. (4) The use of tight binding band structure calculations to parameterize the electronic band structure from XPS and other data is described. (5) The use of high energy angle-resolved photoemission on oriented single crystals to gain orbital symmetry information is discussed. (6) The evolution of the shape of the photoemission energy distribution (of polycrystalline Cu) as a function of photon energy from 50 less than or equal h ω less than or equal 175 is discussed

  12. Solvent extraction of irradiated neptunium targets. I. Valence stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.; Thompson, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    Solvent extraction of 237 Np and 238 Pu from irradiated neptunium is being investigated as a possible replacement for the currently used anion exchange process at the Savannah River Plant. Solvent extraction would reduce separations costs and waste volume and increase the production rate. The major difficulty in solvent extraction processing is maintaining neptunium and plutonium in the extractable IV or VI valence states during initial extraction. This study investigated the stability of these states. Results show that: The extractable M(IV) valence states of neptunium and plutonium are mutually unstable in plant dissolver solution (2 g/l 237 Np, 0.4 g/l 238 Pu, 1.2M Al 3+ , 4.6M NO 3 - , and 1M H + ). The reaction rates producing inextractable species from extractable M(IV) or M(VI) are fast enough that greater than or equal to 99.9 percent extractable species in 237 Np-- 238 Pu mixtures cannot be maintained for a practicable processing period

  13. Valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohani, H. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Goyal, R.; Awana, V.P.S. [National Physical Laboratory(CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sekhar, B.R., E-mail: sekhar@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • VB Photoemission study and DFT calculations on Pd based ternary superconductors are presented. • Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} shows a temperature dependent pseudogap. • VB spectral features of ternary superconductors are correlated to their structural geometry. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5}, Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}Te{sub 6} using experimental photoemission spectroscopy and density functional based theoretical calculations. We observe a qualitatively similarity between valence band (VB) spectra of Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6}. Further, we find a pseudogap feature in Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} at low temperature, unlike other two compounds. We have correlated the structural geometry with the differences in VB spectra of these compounds. The different atomic packing in these compounds could vary the strength of inter-orbital hybridization among various atoms which leads to difference in their electronic structure as clearly observed in our DOS calculations.

  14. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton quasidistributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-Sheng; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2018-05-01

    Algebraic Ansätze for the Poincaré-covariant Bethe-Salpeter wave functions of the pion and kaon are used to calculate their light-front wave functions, parton distribution amplitudes, parton quasidistribution amplitudes, valence parton distribution functions, and parton quasidistribution functions (PqDFs). The light-front wave functions are broad, concave functions, and the scale of flavor-symmetry violation in the kaon is roughly 15%, being set by the ratio of emergent masses in the s - and u -quark sectors. Parton quasidistribution amplitudes computed with longitudinal momentum Pz=1.75 GeV provide a semiquantitatively accurate representation of the objective parton distribution amplitude, but even with Pz=3 GeV , they cannot provide information about this amplitude's end point behavior. On the valence-quark domain, similar outcomes characterize PqDFs. In this connection, however, the ratio of kaon-to-pion u -quark PqDFs is found to provide a good approximation to the true parton distribution function ratio on 0.4 ≲x ≲0.8 , suggesting that with existing resources computations of ratios of parton quasidistributions can yield results that support empirical comparison.

  15. Gold-supported two-dimensional cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) and multilayer cobalt oxide islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fester, Jakob; Walton, Alexander; Li, Zheshen

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the facile conversion of Co-O bilayer islands on a Au(111) surface into preferentially O-Co-O trilayers in an oxygen atmosphere and O-Co-O-Co-O multilayers at elevated temperature. We characterize and compare the island morphologies with scanning tunneling...... microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and valence band spectroscopy, and show that the cobalt oxidation state changes from Co2+ in bilayers to purely Co3+ in trilayers and a mixture of Co2+ and Co3+ in the multilayer morphology. In contrast to bilayers and multilayers, the trilayer structure...

  16. Change in activity of catalysts for the oxidation of tritium during a fire event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Sato, Katsumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We experimentally demonstrated the influence of produced gases from burned low-halogen cable on the activity of catalysts for tritium oxidation. ► At 423 K, no considerable decrease in catalytic activity was observed. ► At 293 K, considerable increase in catalytic activity was initially observed due to the effect of produced hydrogen. Then the temporary decrease was observed due mainly to the effect of produced moisture, however the activity was gradually recovered. - Abstract: The catalytic performance should be maintained in any off normal events. Fire accident is the typical off normal event. In the fusion plant, typical combustibles are evaluated to be polymeric low-halogen cables. Produced gases from burned low-halogen cable may affect the activity of catalysts for the oxidation of tritium. We experimentally demonstrated the influence of produced gases from burned low-halogen cable on the activity of catalyst using tritium gas. Our evaluation showed that ethylene, methane and benzene were major produced gases. The activity of catalysts for the oxidation of tritium during a fire event was evaluated using a commercial hydrophilic Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalyst and a commercial hydrophobic Pt-catalyst. The temperature of catalytic reactor was selected to be 423 and 293 K. At 423 K, no considerable decrease in catalytic activity was observed for both catalysts even in the presence of produced gases from burned low-halogen cable. At 293 K, considerable increase in catalytic activity was initially observed for both catalysts due to the effect of produced hydrogen. Then the temporary decrease was observed, however the catalytic activity was gradually recovered to be the original activity. Consequently, the irreversible decrease in activity of the catalysts during a fire event was not observed.

  17. Propolis Supplementation and the Changes in the Oxidative Metabolism of Blood Platelets Exposed to Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrykowska Gabriela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Electromagnetic radiation (EMR that has an effect on living organisms may be a source of oxidative stress. A lack of proper compensation by antioxidant defences on the part of proteins leading to an uncontrolled growth of reactive forms of oxygen, which may give rise to numerous health conditions. Various scientific studies have indicated that propolis has multiple valuable medicinal properties: antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, protective - in relation to liver parenchyma, as well as anti-cancer. Nonetheless, the results of studies concerned with its antioxidant capabilities are not explicit and require further tests and analyses.

  18. Developmental Reversals in False Memory: Effects of Emotional Valence and Arousal

    OpenAIRE

    Brainerd, C. J.; Holliday, R. E.; Reyna, V. F.; Yang, Y.; Toglia, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Do the emotional valence and arousal of events distort children’s memories? Do valence and arousal modulate counterintuitive age increases in false memory? We investigated those questions in children, adolescents, and adults using the Cornell/Cortland Emotion Lists, a word list pool that induces false memories and in which valence and arousal can be manipulated factorially. False memories increased with age for unpresented semantic associates of word lists, and net accuracy (the ratio of true...

  19. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de, E-mail: joao.mello@cruzeirodosul.edu.br [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Tsushima, K. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ahmed, I. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); National Center for Physics, Quaidi-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2017-03-10

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  20. Analysis of the valence electronic structures and calculation of the physical properties of Fe,Co,and Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of Fe, Co and Ni have been investigated with Empirical Electron Theory of Solids and Molecules. The magnetic moments, Curie temperature, cohesive energy and melting point have been calculated according to the valence electronic structure. These calculations fit the experimental data very well. Based on the calculations, the magnetic moments are proportional to the number of 3d magnetic electrons. Curie temperatures are related to the magnetic electrons and the bond lengths between magnetic atoms. Cohesive energies increase with the increase of the number of covalent electrons, and the decrease of the number of magnetic and dumb pair electrons. The melting point is mainly related to the number of covalent electron pairs distributed in the strongest bond. The contribution from the lattice electrons is very small, the dumb pair electrons weaken the melting point; however, the contribution to melting point of the magnetic electrons can be neglected. It reveals that the magnetic and thermal properties are closely related to the valence electronic structures, and the changes or transitions between the electrons obviously affect the physical properties.

  1. Characteristics of the behavior of rare-earth oxides and composites on their base by charged particles and neutrons irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuseev, T.; Aksenova, T.I.; Berdauletov, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    In this work the results of comparative investigation of adsorption curves versus REM order number (La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Gd) and dose neutron irradiation are presented. It is discovered that the original REM oxides have high adsorption capacity both for donor gases and for acceptor ones. The adsorption capacity for oxygen and hydrogen becomes lower when the REM order number is higher, but it is contrary for water molecules. The obtained results showed that adsorption properties of REM oxides were changing on identical laws. But oxides of metals, having anomalous properties (variable valency, high cross-section capture) revealed especial adsorption properties under irradiation. In the time of consideration of possible mechanism of radiation - stimulated gas adsorption on oxide surface it is necessary to take in attention both the formation of radiation defects in crystal lattice and the characteristics of electron structure and presence of 4 f - cover in rare-earth metals

  2. Photo-induced changes in nano-copper oxide for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, A. A.; Rashad, M.

    2018-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared using microwave irradiation. A mother material was copper nitrate in distilled water. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for characterizing the NPs powders. Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) were measured for as-prepared CuO NPs. The obtained oxides NPs were confirmed produced during chemical precipitation by these characterizions. These NPs were dropped on top of glass substrate for measuring the optical characterizions. Both linear and nonlinear optical properties of the as-prepared CuO NP films were studied. The optical energy gap of the as-prepared CuO NP films is equal to 3.98 eV, which is higher than that of the bulk material. The effect of ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation on the CuO NP films was investigated at 2 and 5 h for study the photo-induced effect. The optical properties of CuO NP films were measured as a function of these UV irradiation time. The optical constants for as-prepared and irradiated CuO NP films were calculated which reflect the affect of UV irradiation time. As observed from these optical results, a highly forced for optoelectronic applications.

  3. Oxidative effects, nutrients and metabolic changes in aquatic macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii, following exposure to lanthanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Tingting; Lu, Qianqian; Cai, Sanjuan; Chu, Weiyue; Qiu, Han; Xu, Ting; Li, Feifei; Xu, Qinsong

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the phytoremediation potential of Elodea nuttallii to remove rare earth metals from contaminated water. The laboratory experiments were designed to assess the responses induced by lanthanum (5-20mgL(-1)) in E. nuttallii over a period of 7 days. The results showed that most La (approximately 85%) was associated with the cell wall. The addition of La to the culture medium reduced the concentration of K, Ca, Cu, Mg, and Mn. However, O2(·-) levels increased with a concomitant increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration as the La concentration increased, which indicated that the cells were under oxidative stress. Significant reductions in the levels of chlorophyll (Chl) a, b, and carotenoids (Car) were observed in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), total non-protein thiols (TNP-SH) and phytochelatins (PCs) increased for all La concentrations. The results suggested that La was toxic to E. nuttallii because it induced oxidative stress and disturbed mineral uptake. However, E. nuttallii was able to combat La induced damage via an immobilization mechanism, which involved the cell wall and the activation of non-enzymatic antioxidant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Climate Change and the Impact of Greenhouse Gasses: CO2 and NO, Friends and Foes of Plant Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassia, Raúl; Nocioni, Macarena; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Here, we review information on how plants face redox imbalance caused by climate change, and focus on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in this response. Life on Earth is possible thanks to greenhouse effect. Without it, temperature on Earth’s surface would be around -19°C, instead of the current average of 14°C. Greenhouse effect is produced by greenhouse gasses (GHG) like water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxides (NxO) and ozone (O3). GHG have natural and anthropogenic origin. However, increasing GHG provokes extreme climate changes such as floods, droughts and heat, which induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in plants. The main sources of ROS in stress conditions are: augmented photorespiration, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, β-oxidation of fatty acids and disorders in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts. Plants have developed an antioxidant machinery that includes the activity of ROS detoxifying enzymes [e.g., superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and peroxiredoxin (PRX)], as well as antioxidant molecules such as ascorbic acid (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) that are present in almost all subcellular compartments. CO2 and NO help to maintain the redox equilibrium. Higher CO2 concentrations increase the photosynthesis through the CO2-unsaturated Rubisco activity. But Rubisco photorespiration and NOX activities could also augment ROS production. NO regulate the ROS concentration preserving balance among ROS, GSH, GSNO, and ASC. When ROS are in huge concentration, NO induces transcription and activity of SOD, APX, and CAT. However, when ROS are necessary (e.g., for pathogen resistance), NO may inhibit APX, CAT, and NOX activity by the S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, favoring cell death. NO also regulates GSH concentration in several ways. NO may react with GSH to form GSNO, the NO cell reservoir and main source of S

  5. Climate Change and the Impact of Greenhouse Gasses: CO2 and NO, Friends and Foes of Plant Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassia, Raúl; Nocioni, Macarena; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Here, we review information on how plants face redox imbalance caused by climate change, and focus on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in this response. Life on Earth is possible thanks to greenhouse effect. Without it, temperature on Earth's surface would be around -19°C, instead of the current average of 14°C. Greenhouse effect is produced by greenhouse gasses (GHG) like water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxides (N x O) and ozone (O 3 ). GHG have natural and anthropogenic origin. However, increasing GHG provokes extreme climate changes such as floods, droughts and heat, which induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in plants. The main sources of ROS in stress conditions are: augmented photorespiration, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, β-oxidation of fatty acids and disorders in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts. Plants have developed an antioxidant machinery that includes the activity of ROS detoxifying enzymes [e.g., superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and peroxiredoxin (PRX)], as well as antioxidant molecules such as ascorbic acid (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) that are present in almost all subcellular compartments. CO 2 and NO help to maintain the redox equilibrium. Higher CO 2 concentrations increase the photosynthesis through the CO 2 -unsaturated Rubisco activity. But Rubisco photorespiration and NOX activities could also augment ROS production. NO regulate the ROS concentration preserving balance among ROS, GSH, GSNO, and ASC. When ROS are in huge concentration, NO induces transcription and activity of SOD, APX, and CAT. However, when ROS are necessary (e.g., for pathogen resistance), NO may inhibit APX, CAT, and NOX activity by the S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, favoring cell death. NO also regulates GSH concentration in several ways. NO may react with GSH to form GSNO, the NO cell reservoir and main source of S

  6. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate promotes oxidative stress prior to myelin structural changes and increases myelin copper content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viquez, Olga M.; Lai, Barry; Ahn, Jae Hee; Does, Mark D.; Valentine, Holly L.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates are a commercially important class of compounds that can produce peripheral neuropathy in humans and experimental animals. Previous studies have supported a requirement for copper accumulation and enhanced lipid peroxidation in dithiocarbamate-mediated myelinopathy. The study presented here extends previous investigations in two areas. Firstly, although total copper levels have been shown to increase within the nerve it has not been determined whether copper is increased within the myelin compartment, the primary site of lesion development. Therefore, the distribution of copper in sciatic nerve was characterized using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy to determine whether the neurotoxic dithiocarbamate, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, increases copper levels in myelin. Secondly, because lipid peroxidation is an ongoing process in normal nerve and the levels of lipid peroxidation products produced by dithiocarbamate exposure demonstrated an unusual cumulative dose response in previous studies the biological impact of dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation was evaluated. Experiments were performed to determine whether dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation products elicit an antioxidant response through measuring the protein expression levels of three enzymes, superoxide dismutase 1, heme oxygenase 1, and glutathione transferase α, that are linked to the antioxidant response element promoter. To establish the potential of oxidative injury to contribute to myelin injury the temporal relationship of the antioxidant response to myelin injury was determined. Myelin structure in peripheral nerve was assessed using multi-exponential transverse relaxation measurements (MET 2 ) as a function of exposure duration, and the temporal relationship of protein expression changes relative to the onset of changes in myelin integrity were determined. Initial assessments were also performed to explore the potential contribution of dithiocarbamate

  7. Valence band structures of InAs/GaAs quantum rings using the Fourier transform method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Boyong; Yu Zhongyuan; Liu Yumin

    2009-01-01

    The valence band structures of strained InAs/GaAs quantum rings are calculated, with the four-band k · p model, in the framework of effective-mass envelope function theory. When determining the Hamiltonian matrix elements, we develop the Fourier transform method instead of the widely used analytical integral method. Using Fourier transform, we have investigated the energy levels as functions of the geometrical parameters of the rings and compared our results with those obtained by the analytical integral method. The results show that the energy levels in the quantum rings change dramatically with the inner radius, outer radius, average radius, width, height of the ring and the distance between two adjacent rings. Our method can be adopted in low-dimensional structures with arbitrary shape. Our results are consistent with those in the literature and should be helpful for studying and fabricating optoelectronic devices

  8. Lipid oxidative changes in traditional dry fermented sausage Petrovská klobása during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šojić Branislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of drying and ripeninig conditions (traditional and industrial in the production of dry fermented sausage Petrovská klobása, on fatty-acid composition and oxidative changes in lipids, during 7 months of storage, was investigated. During the storage period, the sum of unsaturated fatty acids and the content of free fatty acids were significantly higher (p<0.05, while the content of malondialdehyde was significantly lower in the sausage subjected to traditional conditions of drying and ripening. At the end of the storage period, contents of pentanal and hexanal in the sausage subjected to traditional conditions of drying and ripening (4.03 μg/g and 1.67 μg/g, respectively were significantly lower (p<0.05 in comparison with these contents in the sausage subjected to industrial conditions of drying and ripening. Traditional conditions of drying and ripening at lower temperatures have led to lower oxidative changes in lipids in traditional dry fermented sausage Petrovská klobása during storage period. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31032

  9. Lanthanum rather than cadmium induces oxidative stress and metabolite changes in Hypericum perforatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babula, Petr [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Klejdus, Bořivoj [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC–Central European Institute of Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kovacik, Jozef, E-mail: jozkovacik@yahoo.com [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC–Central European Institute of Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Hedbavny, Josef; Hlavna, Marián [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Impact of La, Cd and Cd + La on the metabolism of Hypericum perforatum was compared. • La stimulated ROS and suppressed growth and basic antioxidants more than Cd. • Impact of Cd + La was not synergistic including the sod gene expression. • La depleted hypericin and hyp-1 gene expression but amount of hyperforin increased. • La reduced flavonols and procyanidins mainly in the roots and affected anatomy - Abstract: Physiology, oxidative stress and production of metabolites in Hypericum perforatum exposed to moderate Cd and/or La concentration (10 μM) were studied. La evoked increase in reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and proline but suppressed growth, tissue water content, glutathione, ascorbic acid and affected mineral nutrient contents more than Cd while the impact of Cd + La was not synergistic. Similar trend was observed at the level of superoxide dismutase gene expression. Shoot Cd amount increased in Cd + La while only root La increased in the same treatment. Extensive quantification of secondary metabolites revealed that La affected phenolic acids more pronouncedly than Cd in shoots and roots. Flavonols were suppressed by La that could contribute to the appearance of oxidative damage. Procyanidins increased in response to La in the shoots but decreased in the roots. Metabolic responses in Cd + La treatment resembled those of La treatment (almost identically in the roots). Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was mainly suppressed by La. The presence of La also depleted amount of hypericin and expression of its putative gene (hyp-1) showed similar trend but accumulation of hyperforin increased under Cd or La excess. Clear differences in the stem and root anatomy in response to Cd or La were also found. Overall, H. perforatum is La-sensitive species and rather Cd ameliorated negative impact of La.

  10. [Change of blood antioxidant capacity of experimental animals during nutritional correction under oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, A A; Bykov, I M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional correction (a diet high in foods with antioxidant content) on blood parameters in laboratory animals with metabolic disorders associated with oxidative stress has been studied. In experimental models of laboratory animals (male rabbits weighing 3.5-4.0 kg, n = 40) with purulent septic diseases it has been demonstrated that the use of nutritive correction (replacement of 100 g of the cereal mixture through day on a mixture of cabbage 50 g, carrots 50 g, beet 25 g, apple 25 g, kiwi 10 g and garnet 10 g per 1 rabbit) is not inferior to its efficiency of glutathione use (2 g per day). The use of these antioxidants in laboratory animals significantly reduced the phenomenon of oxidative stress on the 5th day: blood antioxidant capacity significantly increased by 14.9 and 26.6%, and the area of the flash of luminol-dependent H2O2-induced chemiluminescence of blood plasma reduced by 44.2 and 48.6% in the experimental groups receiving respectively nutritive correction and glutathione. The low-molecula level of blood antioxidant capacity was restored and the balance of the activity of superoxide dismutase (decrease) and catalase (increase) was achieved on the 10th day of the experiment. These figures significantly (p < 0.05) differed from than in the group of animals receiving no antioxidant correction. The latter studied parameters of prooxidant-antioxidant system reached values comparable with those in intact animals (n = 10) only on the 30th day, confirming the advisability of appointing a complex antioxidant therapy.

  11. Nitridation of one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanostructures: Changes in structure and photoactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Tamá s; Haspel, Henrik; Kormá nyos, Attila; Janá ky, Csaba; Kukovecz, Á kos; Kó nya, Zoltá n

    2017-01-01

    nitrogen atmosphere. Morphological changes and structural transitions were followed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Bandgap energies were determined from the UV–vis spectra of the materials, while photoelectrochemical

  12. Negative pressure driven valence instability of Eu in cubic Eu{sub 0.4}La{sub 0.6}Pd{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Abhishek [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata-700098 (India); Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R [Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)], E-mail: abhishek.phy@gmail.com, E-mail: chandan.mazumar@saha.ac.in

    2009-05-27

    We report the change in the valency of Eu-ions in the binary intermetallic cubic compound EuPd{sub 3} induced by La doping at rare-earth sites. Doping of La generates negative chemical pressure in the lattice, resulting in a significant increase of the lattice parameter without altering the simple-cubic structure of the compound. Results of dc-magnetic measurements suggest that this increase in the lattice parameter is associated with the valence transition of Eu-ions from Eu{sup 3+} to a mixed-valent state. As Eu{sup 2+}-ions possess a large magnetic moment, this valence transition significantly modifies the magnetic behavior of the compound. In contrast to introducing boron at the vacant body center site of the unit cell to change the valency of Eu-ions, as in the case of EuPd{sub 3}B, our results suggest it can also be altered by doping a rare-earth ion of larger size at the lattice site of Eu in EuPd{sub 3}.

  13. Development of hard X-ray photoelectron SPLEED-based spectrometer applicable for probing of buried magnetic layer valence states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, Xeniya, E-mail: kozina@uni-mainz.de [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Viol Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Ouardi, Siham; Karel, Julie [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Yamamoto, Masafumi [Division of Electronics for Informatics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Kobayashi, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Elmers, Hans Joachim; Schönhense, Gerd [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg – Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Felser, Claudia [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A high-voltage compatible spin-HAXPES detector based on SPLEED from W(001) has been developed. • Magnetic properties of a TMR device were studied by core-level photoemission on the Fe 2p{sub 3/2} states. • The developed instrument enabled probing of buried layers in the region of the valence states. - Abstract: A novel design of high-voltage compatible polarimeter for spin-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Spin-HAXPES) went into operation at beamline BL09XU of SPring-8 in Hyogo, Japan. The detector is based on the well-established principle of electron diffraction from a W(001) single-crystal at a scattering energy of 103.5 eV. It's special feature is that it can be operated at a high negative bias potential up to 10 kV, necessary to access the HAXPES range. The polarimeter is operated behind a large hemispherical analyzer (Scienta R-4000). It was optimized for high transmission of the transfer optics. A delay-line detector (20 mm dia.) is positioned at the exit plane of the analyzer enabling conventional multichannel intensity spectroscopy simultaneously with single-channel spin analysis. The performance of the combined setup is demonstrated by the spin-resolved data for the valence-region of a FeCo functional layer of a tunneling device, buried beneath 3 nm of oxidic material. The well-structured spin polarization spectrum validates Spin-HAXPES in the valence energy range as powerful method for bulk electronic structure analysis. The spin polarization spectrum exhibits a rich structure, originating from clearly discernible transitions in the majority and minority partial spin spectra.

  14. Aging and long-term memory for emotionally valenced events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Carolyn W; Safer, Martin A

    2013-06-01

    In 2008, 1103 ardent Boston Red Sox fans answered questions about their team's 2003 loss and 2004 win in baseball championship games with archrival New York Yankees. Contrary to predictions based on socioemotional selectivity theory, there were no significant interactions of age and event valence for accuracy in remembering event details, or for self-reported subjective vividness and rehearsal of the memories. Fans 65 years and older tended to remember feeling only sad about the 2003 loss, whereas fans 25 years and under tended to remember feeling both sad and angry. Individuals may remember emotional feelings based on remembered goals about an event. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Isotopic exchange in mixed valence compounds in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Valverde, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work aims at the determination of isotopic exchange kinetics and mechanism in two mixed valence compounds: Cs 10 (Sbsup(V)Cl 6 ) (Sbsup(III)Cl 6 ) 3 and Tl 3 sup(I)(Tlsup(III)Cl 6 ). The synthesis of the first compound is very difficult because in most of the cases mixtures of chloroantimoniates are obtained. Exchange in Tl 4 Cl 6 labelled on Tlsup(III) is studied in detail by radiochemical analysis and physical techniques: ionic conductivity and positon annihilation. Cation vacancies are easily created in the lattice with formation enthalpy of 0.35 eV and migration enthalpy of 0.52 eV. Isochronic and isothermal exchange curves are described by a kinetic based on species diffusion. Models are given. Exchange is increased by grinding probably because extrinseque defects are introduced [fr

  16. Overlap valence quarks on an twisted mass sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, K. [Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Drach, V.; Garcia-Ramos, E.; Herdoiza, G.; Jansen, K. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC

    2010-12-15

    We present the results of an investigation of a mixed action approach of overlap valence and maximally twisted mass sea quarks. Employing a particular matching condition on the pion mass, we analyze the continuum limit scaling of the pion decay constant and the role of chiral zero modes of the overlap operator in this process. We employ gauge field configurations generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with linear lattice size L ranging from 1.3 to 1.9 fm. The continuum limit is taken at a fixed value of L=1.3 fm, employing three values of the lattice spacing and two values of the pion mass constructed from sea quarks only. (orig.)

  17. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricius, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-02-01

    High spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O,5n) at 96 MeV. The decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the Multi-Particle Octupole Coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes is 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  18. A role of valence particles number equal to 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Kumar, S.; Hasan, Z.; Kumar, D.; Pradeep; Koranga, B.S.; Kumar, S.; Negi, D.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the N p N n parametrization was first demonstrated by Casten in connection with the role of the proton-neutron interaction in the growth of deformation away from shell closures, and there have subsequently been many developments in this theme. The symbols N p and N n are number of valence particles/holes of protons and neutrons, respectively (where nucleons are counted as holes beyond the middle of a major shell). The observables which reflect collective structure in the deformed mass region for even-even nuclei such as E(2 + ), R 4/2 ≡ E(4 + )/E(2 + ) and B(E2) have behaved smoothly with N p N n

  19. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  20. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  1. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricus, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    High-spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O, 5n) at 96 MeV. Their decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell-model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high-spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the multi-particle octupole-coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes in 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. (orig.)

  2. Pressure induced valence transitions in the Anderson lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, B.H.; Coqblin, B.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the equation of motion method to the Anderson lattice model, which describes the physical properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, we focus here on the variation of the number of f electrons with pressure, associated to the crossover from the Kondo regime to the intermediate valence regime. We treat here the non-magnetic case and introduce an improved approximation, which consists of an alloy analogy based decoupling for the Anderson lattice model. It is implemented by partial incorporation of the spatial correlations contained in higher-order Green's functions involved in the problem that have been formerly neglected. As it has been verified in the framework of the Hubbard model, the alloy analogy avoids the breakdown of sum rules and is more appropriate to explore the asymmetric case of the periodic Anderson Hamiltonian. The densities of states for a simple cubic lattice are calculated for various values of the model parameters V, t, E f , and U.

  3. Processing Metaphors in the Elderly: Does Valence Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartczak Marlena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Much evidence from theory and research points towards difficulties in processing metaphors by elderly people. These difficulties are usually associated with working memory and inhibitory control deficits observed in this age group, as these very functions play a crucial part in efficient metaphor processing. However, results of research on understanding metaphorical content by elderly people are inconclusive. The following article reviews studies showing that metaphor processing relies on a set of complex variables, which might explain the inconclusiveness of previous results. Though we acknowledge the role of interindividual factors (differences in cognitive functioning among the elderly, we focus on the properties of the metaphor stimuli themselves, especially those of conventionalization and valence, as they might influence the processing of verbal metaphors by people in older age groups.

  4. Time flies with music whatever its emotional valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Bigand, Emmanuel; Ramos, Danilo; Bueno, José Lino Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    The present study used a temporal bisection task to investigate whether music affects time estimation differently from a matched auditory neutral stimulus, and whether the emotional valence of the musical stimuli (i.e., sad vs. happy music) modulates this effect. The results showed that, compared to sine wave control music, music presented in a major (happy) or a minor (sad) key shifted the bisection function toward the right, thus increasing the bisection point value (point of subjective equality). This indicates that the duration of a melody is judged shorter than that of a non-melodic control stimulus, thus confirming that "time flies" when we listen to music. Nevertheless, sensitivity to time was similar for all the auditory stimuli. Furthermore, the temporal bisection functions did not differ as a function of musical mode. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural and microstructural changes in the zirconium-indium mixed oxide system during the thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefanić, G.; Štefanić, I. I.; Musić, S.; Ivanda, M.

    2011-05-01

    The zirconium-indium mixed oxide systems on both the zirconium- and the indium-rich side of the concentration range were prepared by co-precipitation from aqueous solutions of the corresponding salts, followed by washing and heat-treatment. The thermal behavior (up to 1000 °C) of the dried samples was examined by X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric measurements. The obtained results show that the increase in the amount of the second phase causes an increase of both the crystallization temperature of the amorphous precursors of ZrO 2, from 435 °C (0 mol.% of InO 1.5) to 476 °C (˜62 mol.% of InO 1.5), and of the topotactic transition temperature of cubic In(OH) 3 to cubic In 2O 3, from 259 °C (0 mol.% of ZrO 2) to 290 °C (˜25 mol.% of ZrO 2). The amorphous precursors of ZrO 2 phase exhibit an extended capability to incorporate In 3+ ions (more than 60 mol.%). With a rise in temperature the maximum solubility of In 3+ ions in the ZrO 2 lattice decreases from ˜55 mol.% in the crystallization products obtained after calcination at 400 °C to ˜10 mol.% after calcination at 1000 °C. The results of phase analysis indicate that the incorporation of In 3+ ions partially stabilized both the tetragonal and cubic ZrO 2 polymorphs. The maximum solubility of Zr 4+ ions in the starting In(OH) 3 lattice was estimated at ˜10 mol.%. Thermal treatment causes a small increase of Zr 4+ ion solubility limits, estimated at ˜15 mol.% in the cubic In 2O 3 lattice after calcination at 1000 °C. Precise lattice parameter measurements, by using Le Bail refinements of the powder diffraction patterns with added silicon as an internal standard, show that the incorporation of In 3+ ions caused a very small decrease of the cubic ZrO 2 lattice, while the incorporation of Zr 4+ ions had a negligible

  6. Oxidative stress and damage to erythrocytes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--changes in ATPase and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Bożena; Sicińska, Paulina; Pająk, Aneta; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta; Pietras, Tadeusz; Pszczółkowska, Anna; Górski, Paweł; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The study indicates, for the first time, the changes in both ATPase and AChE activities in the membrane of red blood cells of patients diagnosed with COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common and severe lung disorders. We examined the impact of COPD on redox balance and properties of the membrane of red blood cells. The study involved 30 patients with COPD and 18 healthy subjects. An increase in lipid peroxidation products and a decrease in the content of -SH groups in the membrane of red blood cells in patients with COPD were observed. Moreover, an increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase and a decrease in superoxide dismutase, but not in catalase activity, were found as well. Significant changes in activities of erythrocyte membrane enzymes in COPD patients were also evident demonstrated by a considerably lowered ATPase activity and elevated AChE activity. Changes in the structure and function of red blood cells observed in COPD patients, together with changes in the activity of the key membrane enzymes (ATPases and AChE), can result from the imbalance of redox status of these cells due to extensive oxidative stress induced by COPD disease.

  7. Transformers: the changing phases of low-dimensional vanadium oxide bronzes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Peter M; Horrocks, Gregory A; Pelcher, Kate E; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-28

    In this feature article, we explore the electronic and structural phase transformations of ternary vanadium oxides with the composition MxV2O5 where M is an intercalated cation. The periodic arrays of intercalated cations ordered along quasi-1D tunnels or layered between 2D sheets of the V2O5 framework induce partial reduction of the framework vanadium atoms giving rise to charge ordering patterns that are specific to the metal M and stoichiometry x. This periodic charge ordering makes these materials remarkably versatile platforms for studying electron correlation and underpins the manifestation of phenomena such as colossal metal-insulator transitions, quantized charge corrals, and superconductivity. We describe current mechanistic understanding of these emergent phenomena with a particular emphasis on the benefits derived from scaling these materials to nanostructured dimensions wherein precise ordering of cations can be obtained and phase relationships can be derived that are entirely inaccessible in the bulk. In particular, structural transformations induced by intercalation are dramatically accelerated due to the shorter diffusion path lengths at nanometer-sized dimensions, which cause a dramatic reduction of kinetic barriers to phase transformations and facilitate interconversion between the different frameworks. We conclude by summarizing numerous technological applications that have become feasible due to recent advances in controlling the structural chemistry and both electronic and structural phase transitions in these versatile frameworks.

  8. Exercise, oxidants, and antioxidants change the shape of the bell-shaped hormesis curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Radak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It is debated whether exercise-induced ROS production is obligatory to cause adaptive response. It is also claimed that antioxidant treatment could eliminate the adaptive response, which appears to be systemic and reportedly reduces the incidence of a wide range of diseases. Here we suggest that if the antioxidant treatment occurs before the physiological function-ROS dose-response curve reaches peak level, the antioxidants can attenuate function. On the other hand, if the antioxidant treatment takes place after the summit of the bell-shaped dose response curve, antioxidant treatment would have beneficial effects on function. We suggest that the effects of antioxidant treatment are dependent on the intensity of exercise, since the adaptive response, which is multi pathway dependent, is strongly influenced by exercise intensity. It is further suggested that levels of ROS concentration are associated with peak physiological function and can be extended by physical fitness level and this could be the basis for exercise pre-conditioning. Physical inactivity, aging or pathological disorders increase the sensitivity to oxidative stress by altering the bell-shaped dose response curve.

  9. Oxidized-LDL induce morphological changes and increase stiffness of endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouinard, Julie A.; Grenier, Guillaume; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Vermette, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury contributing to the age-related physio-pathological process of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effects of native LDL and ox-LDL on the mechanical properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. The contribution of filamentous actin (F-actin) and vimentin on cytoskeletal network organization were also examined by fluorescence microscopy. Our results revealed that ox-LDL had an impact on the HUVEC shape by interfering with F-actin and vimentin while native LDL showed no effect. AFM colloidal force measurements on living individual HUVEC were successfully used to measure stiffness of cells exposed to native and ox-LDL. AFM results demonstrated that the cell body became significantly stiffer when cells were exposed for 24 h to ox-LDL while cells exposed for 24 h to native LDL displayed similar rigidity to that of the control cells. Young's moduli of LDL-exposed HUVEC were calculated using two models. This study thus provides quantitative evidence on biomechanical mechanisms related to endothelial cell dysfunction and may give new insight on strategies aiming to protect endothelial function in atherosclerosis

  10. Ultrastructural and some functional changes in tumor cells treated with stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, O V; Todor, I N; Khayetsky, I K; Tregubova, N A; Lukianova, N Yu; Chekhun, V F

    2010-12-01

    To study the ultrastructure and some functional indexes of tumor cells treated with stabilized iron nanoparticles in vitro. 3-[4,5dimethylthiazol-2-1]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-test, electron microscopy, polarography with applying of closed Clark's electrode. It was shown that cultivation of cells with stabilized Fe(3)O(4) leads to intracellular accumulation of ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The most active ferromagnetic uptake by cells has been observed after 24 and 48 h of incubation. The presence of ferromagnetic in cells led to altered mitochondrial structure that caused the decrease of oxygen uptake rate in the cells of all studied lines. Ferromagnetic released from the majority of cells via exocytosis or clasmacytosis after a certain period of time. The number of dead cells or cells with severe damage was moderate, so cytotoxic action of stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles was minimal toward the studied cell lines. the presence of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in culture medium led to alterations in mitochondria ultrastructural organization and decrease of oxygen uptake by mitochondria in sensitive and anticancer-drugs resistant cells.

  11. Oxidative Stress during Ovarian Torsion in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients: Changing The Perspective of The Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Simone Laganà

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the different causes of gynecological acute pelvic pain, ovarian torsion represents a surgical emergency. It is a rare case in the pediatric/adolescent aged group that must be included in the differential diagnosis of any girl with abdominal pain or pelvic/abdominal mass. Current recommendations suggest that laparoscopic detorsion should be performed in order to preserve the integrity of the ovaries and fertility, although oophoropexy may be considered in case of severe necrosis. Nevertheless, maintaining the circulation of the ovary after detorsion deteriorates the tissue injury and leads to a pathologic process called ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, which is characterized by oxidative stress. During the detorsion process, an excess amount of molecular oxygen is supplied to the tissues, and reactive species of oxygen (ROS such as superoxide radical (O2 -, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, hydroxyl radical (OH•, as well as reactive nitrogen species (RNS are produced in excess. ROS, RNS and their toxic products cause DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in the cellular and mitochondrial membranes, leading to cell death. In spite of attention on this topic, currently there is no shared and clear evidence about the use of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents to prevent I/R damage after laparoscopic ovarian detorsion. Considering this element, future research should aim to develop shared protocols for the clinical use (route of application, dosage and time of application of antioxidants after laparoscopic management of this condition.

  12. Changes of medullary hemopoiesis produced by chronic exposure to tritium oxide and external γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzina, L.D.; Muksinova, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of a chronic effect of tritium oxide ( 3 HOH) and external γ-radiation by 137 Cs on medullary hemopoiesis was conducted in experiments on Wistar rats. 3 HOH was administered for 3mos., 37x10 4 Bk per lg per of body mass daily (the absorbed dose 10.8 Gy), external irradiation was given in correlated values of dose rates and integral doses. Bone marrow depopulation was 1.9 times as deeper in rats exposed to 3 HOH as compared to that in irradiated rats. This difference is caused by early and stable inhibition of erythropoiesis with the administration of the radionuclide. The integral index showing the injuring effect of tritium on erythropoiesis was 4 times as high as compared to that of external γ-irradiation by 137 Cs. The time course of value of the proliferative pool of bone marrow granulocytes with the exposure to 2 types of radiation was monotypic. Differences in maturing and functioning granulocytic pools were marked in early time of the experiment

  13. In vitro assessment of physiological changes of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) upon iron oxide nanoparticles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunqiang; Hu, Jing; Dai, Zhaoyi; Li, Junli; Huang, Jin

    2016-11-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, developing nano iron fertilizer is an important strategy to alleviate Fe deficiency and elevate Fe fertilization effect in agricultural applications. In this study, watermelon seedlings were grown in soil amended with iron oxide nanoparticles (γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs) at different concentrations (0, 20, 50, 100 mg/L). The content of soluble sugar and protein, content of chlorophyll and malondialdehyde (MDA), and activity of antioxidant enzymes of watermelon leaves were determined in five successive weeks to evaluate the physiological changes of watermelon plants after γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs exposure. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations indicated that γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs could enter root cell of watermelon. Results showed that 20 mg/L γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs didn't cause any oxidative stress on watermelon and 50 mg/L γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs could increase soluble sugar, soluble protein and chlorophyll content in the growth of plants. In addition, 50 and 100 mg/L γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs caused oxidative stress on watermelon leaves, but this NP-induced stress was removed with the growth of watermelon. It is noteworthy that we found γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs might possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The variation trend of physiological parameters was correlated with the nutritional requirements of plants. It can be concluded that γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs at proper concentrations have the ability to improve iron deficiency chlorosis and promote the growth of watermelon plants. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first holistic study focusing on the impact of γ-Fe 2 O 3 NPs in long-term experiment of watermelon plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Research Update: Retardation and acceleration of phase separation evaluated from observation of imbalance between structure and valence in LiFePO4/FePO4 electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Tokuda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LiFePO4 is a potential positive electrode material for lithium ion batteries. We have experimentally observed an imbalance between the valence change of Fe ions and the structure change from the LiFePO4 phase to the FePO4 phase during delithiation by simultaneous in situ XRD and XANES measurements in an LiFePO4/FePO4 electrode. The ratio of structure change to valence change clearly indicates that the phase separation from LiFePO4 to FePO4 is suppressed at the beginning of delithiation, while it is accelerated at the latter stage, which is due to the coherent strain caused by the lattice misfit between the two phases.

  15. Chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and demineralization by acid treatment as revealed by high resolution solid state 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekely, P.; Nicole, D.; Delpuech, J.-J.; Totino, E.; Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    13 C CP/MAS NMR has been used for characterization of chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and prolonged demineralization by acid treatment. In both cases the changes take place mainly in the aliphatic part of coal molecules. 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Global change impact on oxidative potential and toxicity of atmospheric particles from the East Mediterranean basin: the ARCHIMEDES initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Laurent; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Garçon, Guillaume; Lo Guidice, Jean-Marc; Hamonou, Eric; Öztürk, Fatma; Perdrix, Esperanza; Rudich, Yinon; Sciare, Jean; Sauvage, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Climate change (CC) has important social, economical and health implications, notably in accordance with variation in air pollution or microbiome modification and its related toxicity mechanisms. CC will have a strong influence on meteorology, inducing dryer and warmer conditions in some regions. The Mediterranean basin is foreseen as a hotspot for regional climate warming, favoring larger dust episodes, wild fire events, vegetation emissions and changes in air pollution physic-chemical characteristics due to enhanced photochemical reactivity. Increasing concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone, and radicals will be associated with rising concentrations of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and other oxidized aerosols. These expected changes in aerosol composition are currently studied within the international ChArMEx (Chemistry-aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) program, part of the interdisciplinary MISTRALS metaprogramme (Mediterranean Integrated STudies at Regional And Local Scales). According to the LIFE/MED-PARTICLES (LIFE) project, this might result in more adverse effects on health. However, toxicologists are far from having a detailed mechanistic knowledge of the quantitative causal relations between particles (PM) and health effects suggested by epidemiological evidences. Detailed toxicological studies looking at contrasted PM origins and chemical compositions are highly needed, particularly on strongly aged SOA suspected to increase the oxidative potential (OP) and to enhance the toxicity of airborne particles. Intensive researches onto the underlying mechanisms of inflammation started to describe the outlines of the intricate relationship between oxidative stress and inflammation. It is therefore, of great importance to better determine the OP of PM from contrasted surroundings, its relationship with CC through PM's physical, chemical and microbial characteristics, and its toxicological consequences within the lungs. Recently

  17. Interpersonal Valence Dimensions as Discriminators of Communication Contexts: An Empirical Assessment of Dyadic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, John P.; And Others

    The capability of 14 interpersonal dimensions to predict dyadic communication contexts was investigated in this study. Friend, acquaintance, co-worker, and family contexts were examined. The interpersonal valence construct, based on a coactive or mutual-causal paradigm, encompasses traditional source-valence components (credibility, power,…

  18. Dissociable modulation of overt visual attention in valence and arousal revealed by topology of scan path.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguang Ni

    Full Text Available Emotional stimuli have evolutionary significance for the survival of organisms; therefore, they are attention-grabbing and are processed preferentially. The neural underpinnings of two principle emotional dimensions in affective space, valence (degree of pleasantness and arousal (intensity of evoked emotion, have been shown to be dissociable in the olfactory, gustatory and memory systems. However, the separable roles of valence and arousal in scene perception are poorly understood. In this study, we asked how these two emotional dimensions modulate overt visual attention. Twenty-two healthy volunteers freely viewed images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS that were graded for affective levels of valence and arousal (high, medium, and low. Subjects' heads were immobilized and eye movements were recorded by camera to track overt shifts of visual attention. Algebraic graph-based approaches were introduced to model scan paths as weighted undirected path graphs, generating global topology metrics that characterize the algebraic connectivity of scan paths. Our data suggest that human subjects show different scanning patterns to stimuli with different affective ratings. Valence salient stimuli (with neutral arousal elicited faster and larger shifts of attention, while arousal salient stimuli (with neutral valence elicited local scanning, dense attention allocation and deep processing. Furthermore, our model revealed that the modulatory effect of valence was linearly related to the valence level, whereas the relation between the modulatory effect and the level of arousal was nonlinear. Hence, visual attention seems to be modulated by mechanisms that are separate for valence and arousal.

  19. Pressure and irradiation effects on transport properties of samarium compounds with instable valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillo, J.

    1981-01-01

    Electron transport properties in samarium compounds with instable valence are studied in this thesis: from SmS in its integer valence phases at common pressure to SmB 6 compound IV at common pressure through SmSsub(1-x)Psub(x) (x 6 is presented [fr

  20. Identifying Facial Emotions: Valence Specific Effects and an Exploration of the Effects of Viewer Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansari, Ashok; Rodway, Paul; Goncalves, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The valence hypothesis suggests that the right hemisphere is specialised for negative emotions and the left hemisphere is specialised for positive emotions (Silberman & Weingartner, 1986). It is unclear to what extent valence-specific effects in facial emotion perception depend upon the gender of the perceiver. To explore this question 46…

  1. Carcass characteristics, physicochemical changes and oxidative stress indicators of meat from sheep fed diets with coffee pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Salinas-Rios

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine how feeding sheep coffee pulp affects carcass characteristics and what changes occur in physicochemical, antioxidant capacity and oxidation of the meat during refrigerated storage. The experiment was carried out in 15 Blackbelly lambs weighing an average 22.86±0.76kg. The animals were assigned to three treatments: T0=control diet, T1=diet with 8% coffee pulp, and T2=diet with 16% coffee pulp. After fattening for 56 days, the sheep were slaughtered and the carcasses assessed. The inclusion of 16% coffee pulp in the diet increased carcass dressing from 48.19 to 50.83% and decreased the amount of fat in rumen and intestines from 3.43 to 2.53% (P<0.05. The inclusion of coffee pulp in the diet did not alter the amount of crude protein or fat in meat or its oxidation and antioxidant capacity during refrigerated storage. However, the inclusion of coffee pulp in the diet decreased fat in the rumen and intestines, and thus increased the amount of usable meat.

  2. [Determination of the daily changes curve of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere by digital imaging colorimetry method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan-Xiao; Sun, Xiang-Ying; Liu, Bin

    2009-06-01

    From the digital images of the red complex which resulted in the interaction of nitrite with N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride and P-Aminobenzene sulfonic acid, it could be seen that the solution colors obviously increased with increasing the concentration of nitrite ion. The JPEG format of the digital images was transformed into gray-scale format by origin 7.0 software, and the gray values were measured with scion image software. It could be seen that the gray values of the digital image obviously increased with increasing the concentration of nitrite ion, too. Thus a novel digital imaging colorimetric (DIC) method to determine nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) contents in air was developed. Based on the red, green and blue (RGB) tricolor theory, the principle of the digital imaging colorimetric method and the influential factors on digital imaging were discussed. The present method was successfully applied to the determination of the daily changes curve of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere and NO2- in synthetic samples with the recovery of 97.3%-104.0%, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5.0%. The results of the determination were consistent with those obtained by spectrophotometric method.

  3. Motivational valence alters memory formation without altering exploration of a real-life spatial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Kimberly S; Hashemi, Jordan; Gans, Lee K; Lerebours, Laura; Clement, Nathaniel J; Vu, Mai-Anh T; Sapiro, Guillermo; Heller, Nicole E; Adcock, R Alison

    2018-01-01

    Volitional exploration and learning are key to adaptive behavior, yet their characterization remains a complex problem for cognitive science. Exploration has been posited as a mechanism by which motivation promotes memory, but this relationship is not well-understood, in part because novel stimuli that motivate exploration also reliably elicit changes in neuromodulatory brain systems that directly alter memory formation, via effects on neural plasticity. To deconfound interrelationships between motivation, exploration, and memory formation we manipulated motivational state prior to entering a spatial context, measured exploratory responses to the context and novel stimuli within it, and then examined motivation and exploration as predictors of memory outcomes. To elicit spontaneous exploration, we used the physical space of an art exhibit with affectively rich content; we expected motivated exploration and memory to reflect multiple factors, including not only motivational valence, but also individual differences. Motivation was manipulated via an introductory statement framing exhibit themes in terms of Promotion- or Prevention-oriented goals. Participants explored the exhibit while being tracked by video. They returned 24 hours later for recall and spatial memory tests, followed by measures of motivation, personality, and relevant attitude variables. Promotion and Prevention condition participants did not differ in terms of group-level exploration time or memory metrics, suggesting similar motivation to explore under both framing contexts. However, exploratory behavior and memory outcomes were significantly more closely related under Promotion than Prevention, indicating that Prevention framing disrupted expected depth-of-encoding effects. Additionally, while trait measures predicted exploration similarly across framing conditions, traits interacted with motivational framing context and facial affect to predict memory outcomes. This novel characterization of

  4. Motivational valence alters memory formation without altering exploration of a real-life spatial environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly S Chiew

    Full Text Available Volitional exploration and learning are key to adaptive behavior, yet their characterization remains a complex problem for cognitive science. Exploration has been posited as a mechanism by which motivation promotes memory, but this relationship is not well-understood, in part because novel stimuli that motivate exploration also reliably elicit changes in neuromodulatory brain systems that directly alter memory formation, via effects on neural plasticity. To deconfound interrelationships between motivation, exploration, and memory formation we manipulated motivational state prior to entering a spatial context, measured exploratory responses to the context and novel stimuli within it, and then examined motivation and exploration as predictors of memory outcomes. To elicit spontaneous exploration, we used the physical space of an art exhibit with affectively rich content; we expected motivated exploration and memory to reflect multiple factors, including not only motivational valence, but also individual differences. Motivation was manipulated via an introductory statement framing exhibit themes in terms of Promotion- or Prevention-oriented goals. Participants explored the exhibit while being tracked by video. They returned 24 hours later for recall and spatial memory tests, followed by measures of motivation, personality, and relevant attitude variables. Promotion and Prevention condition participants did not differ in terms of group-level exploration time or memory metrics, suggesting similar motivation to explore under both framing contexts. However, exploratory behavior and memory outcomes were significantly more closely related under Promotion than Prevention, indicating that Prevention framing disrupted expected depth-of-encoding effects. Additionally, while trait measures predicted exploration similarly across framing conditions, traits interacted with motivational framing context and facial affect to predict memory outcomes. This novel

  5. Motivational valence alters memory formation without altering exploration of a real-life spatial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Jordan; Gans, Lee K.; Lerebours, Laura; Clement, Nathaniel J.; Vu, Mai-Anh T.; Sapiro, Guillermo; Heller, Nicole E.; Adcock, R. Alison

    2018-01-01

    Volitional exploration and learning are key to adaptive behavior, yet their characterization remains a complex problem for cognitive science. Exploration has been posited as a mechanism by which motivation promotes memory, but this relationship is not well-understood, in part because novel stimuli that motivate exploration also reliably elicit changes in neuromodulatory brain systems that directly alter memory formation, via effects on neural plasticity. To deconfound interrelationships between motivation, exploration, and memory formation we manipulated motivational state prior to entering a spatial context, measured exploratory responses to the context and novel stimuli within it, and then examined motivation and exploration as predictors of memory outcomes. To elicit spontaneous exploration, we used the physical space of an art exhibit with affectively rich content; we expected motivated exploration and memory to reflect multiple factors, including not only motivational valence, but also individual differences. Motivation was manipulated via an introductory statement framing exhibit themes in terms of Promotion- or Prevention-oriented goals. Participants explored the exhibit while being tracked by video. They returned 24 hours later for recall and spatial memory tests, followed by measures of motivation, personality, and relevant attitude variables. Promotion and Prevention condition participants did not differ in terms of group-level exploration time or memory metrics, suggesting similar motivation to explore under both framing contexts. However, exploratory behavior and memory outcomes were significantly more closely related under Promotion than Prevention, indicating that Prevention framing disrupted expected depth-of-encoding effects. Additionally, while trait measures predicted exploration similarly across framing conditions, traits interacted with motivational framing context and facial affect to predict memory outcomes. This novel characterization of

  6. Valence of physical stimuli, not housing conditions, affects behaviour and frontal cortical brain activity in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Sabine; Lutz, Janika; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2014-07-01

    Modulation of short-term emotions by long-term mood is little understood but relevant to understand the affective system and of importance in respect to animal welfare: a negative mood might taint experiences, whilst a positive mood might alleviate single negative events. To induce different mood states in sheep housing conditions were varied. Fourteen ewes were group-housed in an unpredictable, stimulus-poor and 15 ewes in a predictable, stimulus-rich environment. Sheep were tested individually for mood in a behavioural cognitive bias paradigm. Also, their reactions to three physical stimuli thought to differ in their perceived valence were observed (negative: pricking, intermediate: slight pressure, positive: kneading). General behaviour, activity, ear movements and positions, and haemodynamic changes in the cortical brain were recorded during stimulations. Generalised mixed-effects models and model probabilities based on the BIC (Bayesian information criterion) were used. Only weak evidence for mood difference was found. Sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing condition had a somewhat more negative cognitive bias, showed slightly more aversive behaviour, were slightly more active and moved their ears somewhat more. Sheep most clearly differentiated the negative from the intermediate and positive stimulus in that they exhibited more aversive behaviour, less nibbling, were more active, showed more ear movements, more forward ear postures, fewer backward ear postures, and a stronger decrease in deoxyhaemoglobin when subjected to the negative stimulus. In conclusion, sheep reacted towards stimuli according to their presumed valence but their mood was not strongly influenced by housing conditions. Therefore, behavioural reactions and cortical brain activity towards the stimuli were hardly modulated by housing conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Postoperative changes in serum cytokines profile and nitric oxide levels in patients with cystic echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik M.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine serum cytokines and nitric oxide (NO levels in patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE. 28 patients with CE were studied and all underwent surgery. Serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin IL- 1β, receptor of soluble IL-2R (sIL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, nitrate/nitrite, and C-reactive protein (CRP were determined before and after induction of treatment. Data were compared with those obtained from 28 healthy volunteers. IL-6 was elevated in all CE patients (100%. IL-8 was increased in 11/28 (39.3%. Increased levels of IL-2R and TNF-α were found in a limited number of them particularly those showing cysts in the central area of the liver (5/28, 6/28. IL-1β level was not elevated in any patient except in secondary severe CE. CRP and nitrate/nitrite levels were also increased. A positive correlation between CRP and IL-6 (r = 0.74; p < 0.001 was found confirming the link between inflammation due to CE and activation of monocytes. All patients completely recovered and the levels of the studied parameters reverted to normal levels except one patient in whom severe recurrent disease occurred two years after the first operation. These results suggest that there are different immunoregulatory events and cytokines response during CE and may be in part related to slight monocytosis and in part to Th2 activation. IL-6, NO and CRP were unambiguously involved in the host parasite interaction and therefore may be useful markers in monitoring CE management and evaluating surgical stress.

  8. Postnatal changes in the nitric oxide system of the rat cerebral cortex after hypoxia during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ana Patricia; Alonso, David; Lisazoaín, Ignacio; Serrano, Julia; Leza, Juan Carlos; Bentura, María Luisa; López, Juan Carlos; Manuel Encinas, Juan; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Castro-Blanco, Susana; Martínez, Alfredo; Martinez-Murillo, Ricardo; Lorenzo, Pedro; Pedrosa, Juan Angel; Peinado, María Angeles; Rodrigo, José

    2003-05-14

    The impact of hypoxia in utero during delivery was correlated with the immunocytochemistry, expression and activity of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) isoforms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme as well as with the reactivity and expression of nitrotyrosine as a marker of protein nitration during early postnatal development of the cortex. The expression of nNOS in both normal and hypoxic animals increased during the first few postnatal days, reaching a peak at day P5, but a higher expression was consistently found in hypoxic brain. This expression decreased progressively from P7 to P20, but was more prominent in the hypoxic group. Immunoreactivity for iNOS was also higher in the cortex of the hypoxic rats and was more evident between days P0 and P5, decreasing dramatically between P10 and P20 in both groups of rats. Two nitrated proteins of 52 and 38 kDa, were also identified. Nitration of the 52-kDa protein was more intense in the hypoxic animals than in the controls, increasing from P0 to P7 and then decreasing progressively to P20. The 38-kDa nitrated protein was seen only from P10 to P20, and its expression was more intense in control than in the hypoxic group. These results suggest that the NO system may be involved in neuronal maturation and cortical plasticity over postnatal development. Overproduction of NO in the brain of hypoxic animals may constitute an effort to re-establish normal blood flow and may also trigger a cascade of free-radical reactions, leading to modifications in the cortical plasticity.

  9. Topologically distinct classes of valence-bond solid states with their parent Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Honghao; Zhang Guangming; Xiang Tao; Liu Zhengxin; Ng Taikai

    2009-01-01

    We present a general method to construct one-dimensional translationally invariant valence-bond solid states with a built-in Lie group G and derive their matrix product representations. The general strategies to find their parent Hamiltonians are provided so that the valence-bond solid states are their unique ground states. For quantum integer-spin-S chains, we discuss two topologically distinct classes of valence-bond solid states: one consists of two virtual SU(2) spin-J variables in each site and another is formed by using two SO(2S+1) spinors. Among them, a spin-1 fermionic valence-bond solid state, its parent Hamiltonian, and its properties are discussed in detail. Moreover, two types of valence-bond solid states with SO(5) symmetries are further generalized and their respective properties are analyzed as well.

  10. Influence of emotional valence and arousal on the spread of activation in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhean-Larose, Sandra; Leveau, Nicolas; Denhière, Guy

    2014-11-01

    Controversy still persists on whether emotional valence and arousal influence cognitive activities. Our study sought to compare how these two factors foster the spread of activation within the semantic network. In a lexical decision task, prime words were varied depending on the valence (pleasant or unpleasant) or on the level of emotional arousal (high or low). Target words were carefully selected to avoid semantic priming effects, as well as to avoid arousing specific emotions (neutral). Three SOA durations (220, 420 and 720 ms) were applied across three independent groups. Results indicate that at 220 ms, the effect of arousal is significantly higher than the effect of valence in facilitating spreading activation while at 420 ms, the effect of valence is significantly higher than the effect of arousal in facilitating spreading activation. These findings suggest that affect is a sequential process involving the successive intervention of arousal and valence.

  11. Morphological changes during oxidation of a single char particle. Quarterly progress report, April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Amore, M. [Salerno Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemical and Food Engineering; Tognotti, L. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sarofim, A.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1992-12-31

    In this study, the changes with conversion in morphology of a carbon char in the temperature range 500--1200 K are followed by using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) (Spjut et al., 1985; Dudek, 1988; Bar-ziv et al., 1989). This device allows one to measure in situ, over temperature range wider than in other apparatuses, mass, diameter, density, surface area, rate of reaction and temperature for a single, suspended submillimeter particle. By following with the EDB the changes in the char as it reacts, it is possible to study the influence of the porous texture on the reaction behavior and shed some light on the contribution by micropores to the reaction in the chemical kinetic controlled regime.

  12. Changes in peak fat oxidation in response to different doses of endurance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mads Rosenkilde; Reichkendler, M H; Auerbach, P

    2015-01-01

    enzymes determined by Western blotting. PFO increased in both MOD [1.2 mg/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/min, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.08:2.3, P = 0.03] and HIGH (1.8 mg/kg FFM/min, CI: 0.6:2.9, P ..., and mitochondrial oxphos complexes II-V increased similarly in MOD and HIGH. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with backward elimination of individual variables correlated with changes in PFO revealed increases in cycling efficiency, FFM, and VO2 peak as the remaining associated variables. In conclusion......, PFO during exercise increased with both moderate- and high-dose endurance training. Increases in PFO were mainly predicted by changes in VO2 peak, FFM, and cycling efficiency, and less with skeletal muscle mitochondrial enzymes....

  13. Monoamine oxidase enzymes and oxidative stress in the rat optic nerve: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Marcella; Pascarella, Antonia; Cavallotti, Carlo; Pescosolido, Nicola

    2012-12-01

    In this study, age-related changes in the monoamine oxidases (MAO) were studied in the optic nerve (ON) of both young and aged male rats. The aim of the study was to assess the role of MAO in age-related changes in the rat ON and explain the mechanisms of neuroprotection mediated by MAO-B-specific inhibitors. Fifteen three month old and fifteen 26 month old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The animals were killed by terminal anaesthesia. Staining of MAO, quantitative analysis of images, biochemical assays and statistical analysis of data were carried out. Samples of the ON were washed in water, fixed in Bowen fluid, dehydrated and embedded in Entellan. Histological sections were stained for MAO-enzymatic activities. The specificity of the reaction was evaluated by incubating control sections in a medium either without substrate or without dye. The quantitative analysis of images was carried out at the same magnification and the same lighting using a Zeiss photomicroscope. The histochemical findings were compared with the biochemical results. After enzymatic staining, MAO could be demonstrated in the ON fibres of both young and aged animals; however, MAO were increased in the nerve fibres of the elderly rats. These morphological findings were confirmed biochemically. The possibility that age-related changes in MAO levels may be attributed to impaired energy production mechanisms and/or represent the consequence of reduced energy needs is discussed. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2012 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  14. Hydrothermally-induced changes in mineralogy and magnetic properties of oxidized A-type granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, Anne; Trindade, Ricardo; Peschler, Anne; Archanjo, Carlos; Macouin, Mélina; Poitrasson, Franck; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The changes in magnetic mineralogy due to the hydrothermal alteration of A-type granitic rocks have been thoroughly investigated in samples from the granite of Tana (Corsica, France), and compared with other A-type granites: Meruoca (NE Brazil), Bushveld (South Africa), Mount Scott (Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, USA) and the stratoid hypersolvus granites of Madagascar. The altered red-colored samples and their non-altered equivalents were magnetically characterized by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, hysteresis loops, remanent coercivity spectra, and Lowrie test. It is shown that hydrothermalization in magnetite-bearing granites is related to the formation of fine-grained magnetite and hematite, and to coeval depletion in the content of primary low-coercive coarse-grained magnetite. These mineralogical changes give typical rock magnetic signatures, namely lower susceptibility magnitudes and anisotropy degrees, prolate AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) fabrics and increased coercivities. Optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electronic microscopy) images suggest that the orientation of the secondary magnetic minerals is related to fluid-pathways and micro-fractures formed during the hydrothermal event and therefore may be unrelated to magma emplacement and crystallization fabrics. Changes in magnetic mineralogy and grain-size distribution have also to be considered for any paleomagnetic and iron isotope studies in granites.

  15. Experimental determination of conduction and valence bands of semiconductor nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen; Chen Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The ability to determine a semiconductor’s band edge positions is important for the design of new photocatalyst materials. In this paper, we introduced an experimental method based on Kelvin probe force microscopy to determine the conduction and valence band edge energies of semiconductor nanomaterials, which has rarely been demonstrated. We tested the method on six semiconductor nanoparticles (α-Fe 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CuO, TiO 2 , and ZnO) with known electronic structures. The experimentally determined band edge positions for α-Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , and CuO well matched the literature values with no statistical difference. Except CeO 2 , all other metal oxides had a consistent upward bias in the experimental measurements of band edge positions because of the shielding effect of the adsorbed surface water layer. This experimental approach may outstand as a unique alternative way of probing the band edge energy positions of semiconductor materials to complement the current computational methods, which often find limitations in new synthetic or complex materials. Ultimately, this work provides scientific foundation for developing experimental tools to probe nanoscale electronic properties of photocatalytic materials, which will drive breakthroughs in the design of novel photocatalytic systems and advance the fundamental understanding of material properties.

  16. Influence of humic substances and wood decay products on the valency state of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of dissolved natural substances on the oxidation state of iron and uranium. The ongoing remediation of uranium mining areas in Saxony and Thuringia involves flooding of extended pits, submerging and subjecting to microbial decay considerable amounts of pit timber in the process. This gives rise to the problem whether the reductive environment which develops as a result of wood decay in the pit water is capable of reducing the uranium (VI) and iron (III) contained in the flood water. Measurements of the valency state of uranium and iron following their interaction with natural decay products were performed by means of electrochemical, photometric and laser spectroscopic methods. This was followed by sorption experiments with a view to collecting phenomenological data on the binding behaviour of uranium species with respect to the rock bed of the Western Erz Hills and the sediments of the Elbe valley under different redox potential conditions. The study was concluded with redox potential calculations aimed at describing the state of pit waters as well as characterising analogous natural waters. The study was performed using humic acids for alkaline brown coal extract, high moor humic substances originating from natural microbial wood decay for wood decay products, and products from hydrothermal wood decomposition as well as lignin for a methanolic wood extract [de

  17. Innocuous oil as an additive for reductive reactions involving zero valence iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.W.; Cantrell, K.J.

    1994-11-01

    Reductive reactions involving zero valence iron appear to hold promise for in situ remediation of sites containing chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents and certain reducible metals and radionuclides. Treatment involves the injection of metallic iron and the creation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in the aqueous phase through oxidation of the metallic iron. The use of a biodegradable immiscible and innocuous organic liquid such as vegetable oil as an additive offers several intriguing possibilities. The oil phase creates a large oil-water interface that is immobile with respect to flow in the aqueous phase. This phase will act as a trap for chlorinated hydrocarbons and could potentially increase the reaction efficiency of reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by the metallic iron. When iron particles are suspended in the oil before injection they are preferentially held in the oil phase and tend to accumulate at the oil-water interface. Thus oil injection can serve as a mechanism for creating a stable porous curtain of metallic iron in the vadose to maintain a low oxygen environment which will minimize the consumption of the iron by molecular oxygen

  18. Hyperthyroidism stimulates mitochondrial proton leak and ATP turnover in rat hepatocytes but does not change the overall kinetics of substrate oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, M E; Brand, M D

    1994-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have well-known effects on oxidative phosphorylation, but there is little quantitative information on their important sites of action. We have used top-down elasticity analysis, an extension of metabolic control analysis, to identify the sites of action of thyroid hormones on oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes. We divided the oxidative phosphorylation system into three blocks of reactions: the substrate oxidation subsystem, the phosphorylating subsystem, and the mitochondrial proton leak subsystem and have identified those blocks of reactions whose kinetics are significantly changed by hyperthyroidism. Our results show significant effects on the kinetics of the proton leak and the phosphorylating subsystems. Quantitative analyses revealed that 43% of the increase in resting respiration rate in hyperthyroid hepatocytes compared with euthyroid hepatocytes was due to differences in the proton leak and 59% was due to differences in the activity of the phosphorylating subsystem. There were no significant effects on the substrate oxidation subsystem. Changes in nonmitochondrial oxygen consumption accounted for -2% of the change in respiration rate. Top-down control analysis revealed that the distribution of control over the rates of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis and consumption, and proton leak and over mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) was similar in hepatocytes from hyperthyroid and littermate-paired euthyroid controls. The results of this study include the first complete top-down elasticity and control analyses of oxidative phosphorylation in hepatocytes from hyperthyroid rats.

  19. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Paital, Biswaranjan; Dandapat, Jagneswar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  20. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Bihari Nityananda Chainy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  1. Wastewater treatment plant effluents change abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in mediterranean urban stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merbt, Stephanie N; Auguet, Jean-Christophe; Blesa, Alba; Martí, Eugènia; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2015-01-01

    Streams affected by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are hotspots of nitrification. We analyzed the influence of WWTP inputs on the abundance, distribution, and composition of epilithic ammonia-oxidizing (AO) assemblages in five Mediterranean urban streams by qPCR and amoA gene cloning and sequencing of both archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). The effluents significantly modified stream chemical parameters, and changes in longitudinal profiles of both NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) indicated stimulated nitrification activity. WWTP effluents were an allocthonous source of both AOA, essentially from the Nitrosotalea cluster, and mostly of AOB, mainly Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosomonas communis, and Nitrosospira spp. changing the relative abundance and the natural composition of AO assemblages. Under natural conditions, Nitrososphaera and Nitrosopumilus AOA dominated AO assemblages, and AOB were barely detected. After the WWTP perturbation, epilithic AOB increased by orders of magnitude whereas AOA did not show quantitative changes but a shift in population composition to dominance of Nitrosotalea spp. The foraneous AOB successfully settled in downstream biofilms and probably carried out most of the nitrification activity. Nitrosotalea were only observed downstream and only in biofilms exposed to either darkness or low irradiance. In addition to other potential environmental limitations for AOA distribution, this result suggests in situ photosensitivity as previously reported for Nitrosotalea under laboratory conditions.

  2. Valence determination as a function of doping in $PrBa_{2} Cu_{3} O_{7}$

    CERN Document Server

    Staub, U; Wasserman, S R; Conner, A G O; Kramer, M J; Patterson, B D; Shi, M; Knapp, M P

    2000-01-01

    We present results of X-ray absorption near edge spectra (XANES), neutron powder diffraction, and resonant X-ray diffraction on samples of PrBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7- delta / and Pr/sub 1-x/Ca/sub x/Ba /sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/. The data are obtained as a function of the doping levels of oxygen and Ca. There are significant changes in the Pr L/sub 3/ XANES spectra with changes in oxygen or Ca concentrations, indicating that the Pr electronic properties are affected by doping. The resonant X-ray scattering experiments show that the changes observed occur on Pr ions incorporated in the PrBa /sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7- delta / structure, and are not the result of changes to a Pr-containing impurity phase. A quantitative model, based on literature precedent, is used to extract Pr valences from the data, although the XANES cannot distinguish between models involving charge transfer and those involving hybridization. The results are compared with data obtained from Pb/sub 2/Sr/sub 2/Pr/sub 1-x/Ca/sub x/Cu/sub 3/O/sub ...

  3. Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Are More Resistant Than Denitrifiers to Seasonal Precipitation Changes in an Acidic Subtropical Forest Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal precipitation changes are increasingly severe in subtropical areas. However, the responses of soil nitrogen (N cycle and its associated functional microorganisms to such precipitation changes remain unclear. In this study, two projected precipitation patterns were manipulated: intensifying the dry-season drought (DD and extending the dry-season duration (ED but increasing the wet-season storms following the DD and ED treatment period. The effects of these two contrasting precipitation patterns on soil net N transformation rates and functional gene abundances were quantitatively assessed through a resistance index. Results showed that the resistance index of functional microbial abundance (-0.03 ± 0.08 was much lower than that of the net N transformation rate (0.55 ± 0.02 throughout the experiment, indicating that microbial abundance was more responsive to precipitation changes compared with the N transformation rate. Spring drought under the ED treatment significantly increased the abundances of both nitrifying (amoA and denitrifying genes (nirK, nirS, and nosZ, while changes in these gene abundances overlapped largely with control treatment during droughts in the dry season. Interestingly, the resistance index of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA amoA abundance was significantly higher than that of the denitrifying gene abundances, suggesting that AOA were more resistant to the precipitation changes. This was attributed to the stronger environmental adaptability and higher resource utilization efficiency of the AOA community, as indicated by the lack of correlations between AOA gene abundance and environmental factors [i.e., soil water content, ammonium (NH4+ and dissolved organic carbon concentrations] during the experiment.

  4. Impact of plastic mulching on nitrous oxide emissions in China's arid agricultural region under climate change conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongxiang; Tao, Hui; Jia, Hongtao; Zhao, Chengyi

    2017-06-01

    The denitrification-decomposition (DNDC) model is a useful tool for integrating the effects of agricultural practices and climate change on soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural ecosystems. In this study, the DNDC model was evaluated against observations and used to simulate the effect of plastic mulching on soil N2O emissions and crop growth. The DNDC model performed well in simulating temporal variations in N2O emissions and plant growth during the observation period, although it slightly underestimated the cumulative N2O emissions, and was able to simulate the effects of plastic mulching on N2O emissions and crop yield. Both the observations and simulations demonstrated that the application of plastic film increased cumulative N2O emissions and cotton lint yield compared with the non-mulched treatment. The sensitivity test showed that the N2O emissions and lint yield were sensitive to changes in climate and management practices, and the application of plastic film made the N2O emissions and lint yield less sensitive to changes in temperature and irrigation. Although the simulations showed that the beneficial impacts of plastic mulching on N2O emissions were not gained under high fertilizer and irrigation scenarios, our simulations suggest that the application of plastic film effectively reduced soil N2O emissions while promoting yields under suitable fertilizer rates and irrigation. Compared with the baseline scenario, future climate change significantly increased N2O emissions by 15-17% without significantly influencing the lint yields in the non-mulched treatment; in the mulched treatment, climate change significantly promoted the lint yield by 5-6% and significantly reduced N2O emissions by 14% in the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. Overall, our results demonstrate that the application of plastic film is an efficient way to address increased N2O emissions and simultaneously enhance crop yield in the future.

  5. Continuously Monocropped Jerusalem Artichoke Changed Soil Bacterial Community Composition and Ammonia-Oxidizing and Denitrifying Bacteria Abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingang; Wang, Zhilin; Jia, Huiting; Li, Li; Wu, Fengzhi

    2018-01-01

    Soil microbial communities have profound effects on the growth, nutrition and health of plants in agroecosystems. Understanding soil microbial dynamics in cropping systems can assist in determining how agricultural practices influence soil processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study, soil bacterial communities were monitored in a continuously monocropped Jerusalem artichoke (JA) system, in which JA was successively monocropped for 3 years in a wheat field. Soil bacterial community compositions were estimated by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria were estimated by quantitative PCR analysis of the amoA , nirS , and nirK genes. Results showed that 1-2 years of monocropping of JA did not significantly impact the microbial alpha diversity, and the third cropping of JA decreased the microbial alpha diversity ( P < 0.05). Principal coordinates analysis and permutational multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that continuous monocropping of JA changed soil bacterial community structure and function profile ( P < 0.001). At the phylum level, the wheat field was characterized with higher relative abundances of Latescibacteria , Planctomycetes , and Cyanobacteria , the first cropping of JA with Actinobacteria , the second cropping of JA with Acidobacteria , Armatimonadetes , Gemmatimonadetes , and Proteobacteria . At the genus level, the first cropping of JA was enriched with bacterial species with pathogen-antagonistic and/or plant growth promoting potentials, while members of genera that included potential denitrifiers increased in the second and third cropping of JA. The first cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms related to lignocellulose degradation and phosphorus cycling, the second cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms nitrous-oxide reductase and nitric-oxide reductase, and the third cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms

  6. Continuously Monocropped Jerusalem Artichoke Changed Soil Bacterial Community Composition and Ammonia-Oxidizing and Denitrifying Bacteria Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities have profound effects on the growth, nutrition and health of plants in agroecosystems. Understanding soil microbial dynamics in cropping systems can assist in determining how agricultural practices influence soil processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study, soil bacterial communities were monitored in a continuously monocropped Jerusalem artichoke (JA system, in which JA was successively monocropped for 3 years in a wheat field. Soil bacterial community compositions were estimated by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria were estimated by quantitative PCR analysis of the amoA, nirS, and nirK genes. Results showed that 1–2 years of monocropping of JA did not significantly impact the microbial alpha diversity, and the third cropping of JA decreased the microbial alpha diversity (P < 0.05. Principal coordinates analysis and permutational multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that continuous monocropping of JA changed soil bacterial community structure and function profile (P < 0.001. At the phylum level, the wheat field was characterized with higher relative abundances of Latescibacteria, Planctomycetes, and Cyanobacteria, the first cropping of JA with Actinobacteria, the second cropping of JA with Acidobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Proteobacteria. At the genus level, the first cropping of JA was enriched with bacterial species with pathogen-antagonistic and/or plant growth promoting potentials, while members of genera that included potential denitrifiers increased in the second and third cropping of JA. The first cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms related to lignocellulose degradation and phosphorus cycling, the second cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms nitrous-oxide reductase and nitric-oxide reductase, and the third cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO

  7. Separation of different valency states of neptunium from processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana, R.; EL-Naggar, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The three main oxidation states of neptunium (Np(IV),Np(V) and Np(V I)) have been separated from each other by solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic techniques. The separation procedure is based on a systematic study of the extraction behaviour of each oxidation state using TBP as an extractant. The purity of separated species is identified using spectrophotometry

  8. Valence and Arousal Value of Visual Stimuli and Their Role in the Mitigation of Chronic Pain: What Is the Power of Pictures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygan, Maryam; Böger, Andreas; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pain-reducing effects of various pictures in a sample of 88 patients receiving inpatient treatment for chronic pain. We investigated whether the pain-attenuating effects of the pictures were mediated by picture valence, arousal, or change in subjective social support. The study was carried out over 4 consecutive days. Patients were presented with photographs of loved ones, strangers, landscapes, or optical illusions via digital albums and were asked to rate their pain intensity and their sensory and affective experience of pain immediately before and after viewing the pictures. They also evaluated the valence of the pictures and the extent to which they were arousing. Before and after participation in the study, patients provided information on their subjective social support. The valence attributed to the pictures varied; photographs of loved ones elicited the greatest pleasure. Pictures of varying emotional content and arousal value all reduced affective and sensory perceptions of pain. Viewing photographs of loved ones reduced pain intensity more than viewing other picture types. The association between picture type and decrease in pain intensity was mediated by picture valence. These findings suggest an easy to implement supplementary intervention that could be used in multidisciplinary pain treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that pictures mitigate pain in chronic pain patients receiving treatment in a multidisciplinary pain center. The procedure could be used routinely to treat pain, particularly severe pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of donor doping and acceptor doping on rutile TiO2 particles for photocatalytic O2 evolution by water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Fumiaki; Tosaki, Ryosuke; Sato, Kyosuke; Higuchi, Yamato

    2018-02-01

    Crystalline defects of photocatalyst particles may be considered to be the recombination center of photoexcited electrons and holes. In this study, we investigated the photocatalytic activity of cation-doped rutile TiO2 photocatalysts for O2 evolution from an aqueous silver nitrate solution under ultraviolet light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity of rutile TiO2 was enhanced by donor doping of Ta5+ and Nb5+ with a valence higher than that of Ti4+, regardless of increased density of electrons and Ti3+ species (an electron trapped in Ti4+ sites). Conversely, acceptor doping of lower valence cations such as In3+ and Ga3+ decreased photocatalytic activity for O2 evolution by water oxidation. The doping of equal valence cations such as Sn4+ and Ge4+ hardly changed the activity of non-doped TiO2. This study demonstrates that Ti3+ species, which is a crystalline defect, enhanced the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor oxides, for example rutile TiO2 with large crystalline size.

  10. Ga-doped indium oxide nanowire phase change random access memory cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Bo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun; Latypov, Marat I; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Meyyappan, M

    2014-01-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) devices are usually constructed using tellurium based compounds, but efforts to seek other materials providing desirable memory characteristics have continued. We have fabricated PCRAM devices using Ga-doped In 2 O 3 nanowires with three different Ga compositions (Ga/(In+Ga) atomic ratio: 2.1%, 11.5% and 13.0%), and investigated their phase switching properties. The nanowires (∼40 nm in diameter) can be repeatedly switched between crystalline and amorphous phases, and Ga concentration-dependent memory switching behavior in the nanowires was observed with ultra-fast set/reset rates of 80 ns/20 ns, which are faster than for other competitive phase change materials. The observations of fast set/reset rates and two distinct states with a difference in resistance of two to three orders of magnitude appear promising for nonvolatile information storage. Moreover, we found that increasing the Ga concentration can reduce the power consumption and resistance drift; however, too high a level of Ga doping may cause difficulty in achieving the phase transition. (paper)

  11. High potential oxidation-reduction titration of absorbance changes induced by pulsed laser and continuous light in chromatophores of photosynthesizing bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum and Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remennikov, S.M.; Chamorovsky, S.K.; Kononenko, A.A.; Venediktov, P.S.; Rubin, A.B.

    1975-01-01

    The photoreactions, activated both by pulsed laser and continuous light were studied in the membranes of isolated bacterial chromatophores poised at different oxidation-reduction potentials over a range of +200 mV to +500 mV. In Rhodospirillum rubrum a midpoint potential of oxidation-reduction curves for the laser-induced positive absorbance changes centred around 430 nm and carotenoid red shifts coincides with that for continuous light-induced absorbance changes, bleaching at 865 nm and blue shift at 800 nm, of the photosynthetic reaction centre bacteriochlorophyll. In Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii the photosynthetic reaction centre bacteriochlorophyll, its photooxidation can be seen as light-induced absorbance changes, bleaching at 890 nm, blue shift at 800 nm and broad band appearance near 440 nm, has a midpoint oxidation-reduction potential of +390 mV at pH 7.4. The analysis of the oxidation-reduction titration curves for the high-potential c-type cytochrome absorbance changes induced both by pulsed laser and continuous light allowed to show that at least two haems of this cytochrome with a midpoint potential of +290 mV (pH 7.4), associated with each reaction centre bacteriochlorophyll, can donate electrons to the oxidized pigment directly

  12. Cerebral Metabolic Changes Related to Oxidative Metabolism in a Model of Bacterial Meningitis Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Michael; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction is prominent in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we hypothesize that the metabolic changes seen after intracisternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in a piglet model of meningitis is compatible...... with mitochondrial dysfunction and resembles the metabolic patterns seen in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Eight pigs received LPS injection in cisterna magna, and four pigs received NaCl in cisterna magna as a control. Biochemical variables related to energy metabolism were monitored by intracerebral...... dysfunction with increasing cerebral LPR due to increased lactate and normal pyruvate, PbtO2, and ICP. The metabolic pattern resembles the one observed in patients with bacterial meningitis. Metabolic monitoring in these patients is feasible to monitor for cerebral metabolic derangements otherwise missed...

  13. Quantum confinement-induced tunable exciton states in graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Lee, Jiyoul; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Cole, Jacqueline M; Shin, Taeho; Lee, Jaichan; Lee, Hangil; Su, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide has recently been considered to be a potential replacement for cadmium-based quantum dots due to its expected high fluorescence. Although previously reported, the origin of the luminescence in graphene oxide is still controversial. Here, we report the presence of core/valence excitons in graphene-based materials, a basic ingredient for optical devices, induced by quantum confinement. Electron confinement in the unreacted graphitic regions of graphene oxide was probed by high resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Using experiments and simulations, we were able to tune the core/valence exciton energy by manipulating the size of graphitic regions through the degree of oxidation. The binding energy of an exciton in highly oxidized graphene oxide is similar to that in organic electroluminescent materials. These results open the possibility of graphene oxide-based optoelectronic device technology.

  14. Raman and XPS characterization of vanadium oxide thin films with temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ureña-Begara, Ferran, E-mail: ferran.urena@uclouvain.be [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Crunteanu, Aurelian [XLIM Research Institute, UMR 7252, CNRS/Université de Limoges, Limoges (France); Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Comprehensive study of the oxidation of VO{sub 2} thin films from R.T. up to 550 °C. • Phase changes and mixed-valence vanadium oxides formed during the oxidation process. • Reported Raman and XPS signatures for each vanadium oxide. • Monitoring of the current and resistance evolution at the surface of the films. • Oxidation model describing the evolution of the vanadium oxides and phase changes. - Abstract: The oxidation mechanisms and the numerous phase transitions undergone by VO{sub 2} thin films deposited on SiO{sub 2}/Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates when heated from room temperature (R.T.) up to 550 °C in air are investigated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that the films undergo several intermediate phase transitions between the initial VO{sub 2} monoclinic phase at R.T. and the final V{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase at 550 °C. The information about these intermediate phase transitions is scarce and their identification is important since they are often found during the synthesis of vanadium dioxide films. Significant changes in the film conductivity have also been observed to occur associated to the phase transitions. In this work, current and resistance measurements performed on the surface of the films are implemented in parallel with the Raman measurements to correlate the different phases with the conductivity of the films. A model to explain the oxidation mechanisms and phenomena occurring during the oxidation of the films is proposed. Peak frequencies, full-width half-maxima, binding energies and oxidation states from the Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are reported and analyzed for all the phases encountered in VO{sub 2} films prepared on SiO{sub 2}/Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates.

  15. Changes in LDL fatty acid composition as a response to olive oil treatment are inversely related to lipid oxidative damage: The EUROLIVE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Nascetti, Simona; López-Sabater, Maria C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the changes in the fatty acid composition of low density lipoproteins (LDL) after sustained consumption of olive oil at real-life doses (25 mL/day) and their relationship with lipid oxidative damage.......The aim of our study was to assess the changes in the fatty acid composition of low density lipoproteins (LDL) after sustained consumption of olive oil at real-life doses (25 mL/day) and their relationship with lipid oxidative damage....

  16. Changing of Bacteria Catalase Activity Under the Influence of Electro-Magnetic Radiation on a Frequency of Nitric Oxide Absorption and Radiation Molecular Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Shub

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of catalase activity degree changing in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is described under the influence of electro-magnetic radiation on a frequency of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Central Scientific Research Institute of measuring equipment Public corporation, Saratov, was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the structure of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The growth of activity of the mentioned enzyme of the strains under research was detected. The most significant changes were observed under 60-minutes exposure.

  17. Oxidative stress-induced metabolic changes in mouse C2C12 myotubes studied with high-resolution 13C, 1H, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    In this study, stress in relation to slaughter was investigated in a model system by the use of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for elucidating changes in the metabolites in C2C12 myotubes exposed to H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Oxidative stress resulted in lower...... to lower levels of the unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were identified in the (1)H spectra after stress exposure. These data indicate an increase in de novo synthesis of alanine, concomitant with a release of lactate from the myotubes to the medium at oxidative stress conditions. The changes in the metabolite...

  18. Small structural changes on a hydroquinone scaffold determine the complex I inhibition or uncoupling of tumoral oxidative phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urra, Félix A., E-mail: felix.urra@qf.uchile.cl [Programa de Farmacología Molecular y Clínica, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas (ICBM), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Independencia 1027, Casilla 7, Santiago (Chile); Córdova-Delgado, Miguel [Departamento de Química Orgánica y Físico-Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 233, Santiago 1 (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Orellana-Manzano, Andrea [Programa de Farmacología Molecular y Clínica, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas (ICBM), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Independencia 1027, Casilla 7, Santiago (Chile); Acevedo-Arévalo, Luis; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernán; González-Vivanco, Jaime M. [Departamento de Química Orgánica y Físico-Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 233, Santiago 1 (Chile); Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano [Instituto de Química de Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca (Chile); and others

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria participate in several distinctiveness of cancer cell, being a promising target for the design of anti-cancer compounds. Previously, we described that ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold 14 inhibits the complex I-dependent respiration with selective anti-proliferative effect on mouse mammary adenocarcinoma TA3/Ha cancer cells; however, the structural requirements of this hydroquinone scaffold to affect the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) of cancer cells have not been studied in detail. Here, we characterize the mitochondrial metabolism of TA3/Ha cancer cells, which exhibit a high oxidative metabolism, and evaluate the effect of small structural changes of the hydroquinone scaffold 14 on the respiration of this cell line. Our results indicate that these structural changes modify the effect on OXPHOS, obtaining compounds with three alternative actions: inhibitors of complex I-dependent respiration, uncoupler of OXPHOS and compounds with both actions. To confirm this, the effect of a bicyclic hydroquinone (9) was evaluated in isolated mitochondria. Hydroquinone 9 increased mitochondrial respiration in state 4o without effects on the ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3{sub ADP}), decreasing the complexes I and II-dependent respiratory control ratio. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was reversed by 6-ketocholestanol addition, indicating that this hydroquinone is a protonophoric uncoupling agent. In intact TA3/Ha cells, hydroquinone 9 caused mitochondrial depolarization, decreasing intracellular ATP and NAD(P)H levels and GSH/GSSG ratio, and slightly increasing the ROS levels. Moreover, it exhibited selective NAD(P)H availability-dependent anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold offers the possibility to design compounds with specific actions on OXPHOS of cancer cells. - Highlights: • Small changes on a hydroquinone scaffold modify the action on OXPHOS of cancer

  19. Lying about the valence of affective pictures: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatia M C Lee

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of lying about affective information were studied using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI methodology. Specifically, 13 healthy right-handed Chinese men were instructed to lie about the valence, positive or negative, of pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS while their brain activity was scanned by a 3T Philip Achieva scanner. The key finding is that the neural activity associated with deception is valence-related. Comparing to telling the truth, deception about the valence of the affectively positive pictures was associated with activity in the inferior frontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, precuneus, and middle temporal regions. Lying about the valence of the affectively negative pictures, on the other hand, was associated with activity in the orbital and medial frontal regions. While a clear valence-related effect on deception was observed, common neural regions were also recruited for the process of deception about the valence of the affective pictures. These regions included the lateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions. Activity in these regions has been widely reported in fMRI studies on deception using affectively-neutral stimuli. The findings of this study reveal the effect of valence on the neural activity associated with deception. Furthermore, the data also help to illustrate the complexity of the neural mechanisms underlying deception.

  20. Effect of Regular Exercise on the Histochemical Changes of d-Galactose-Induced Oxidative Renal Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sok; Kim, Chan-Sik; Lee, Jin; Suk Kim, Jung; Kim, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Renal lipid accumulation exhibits slowly developing chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased oxidative stress. The impact of exercise on the obese- and oxidative stress-related renal disease is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a high-fat diet (HFD) would accelerate d-galactose-induced aging process in rat kidney and to examine the preventive effect of regular exercise on the obese- and oxidative stress-related renal disease. Oxidative stress was induced by an administration of d-galactose (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally injected) for 9 weeks, and d-galactose-treated rats were also fed with a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) for 9 weeks to induce obesity. We investigated the efficacy of regular exercise in reducing renal injury by analyzing Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML), 8-hydroxygluanine (8-OHdG) and apoptosis. When rats were fed with a HFD for 9 weeks in d-galactose-treated rats, an increased CML accumulation, oxidative DNA damage and renal podocyte loss were observed in renal glomerular cells and tubular epithelial cells. However, the regular exercise restored all these renal changes in HFD plus d-galactose-treated rats. Our data suggested that long-term HFD may accelerate the deposition of lipoxidation adducts and oxidative renal injury in d-galactose-treated rats. The regular exercise protects against obese- and oxidative stress-related renal injury by inhibiting this lipoxidation burden

  1. Valence Scaling of Dynamic Facial Expressions Is Altered in High-Functioning Subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An FMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahko, Jukka S.; Paakki, Jyri-Johan; Starck, Tuomo H.; Nikkinen, Juha; Pauls, David L.; Katsyri, Jari V.; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira M.; Carter, Alice S.; Hurtig, Tuula M.; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Jussila, Katja K.; Remes, Jukka J.; Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna A.; Sams, Mikko E.; Bolte, Sven; Ebeling, Hanna E.; Moilanen, Irma K.; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2012-01-01

    FMRI was performed with the dynamic facial expressions fear and happiness. This was done to detect differences in valence processing between 25 subjects with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and 27 typically developing controls. Valence scaling was abnormal in ASDs. Positive valence induces lower deactivation and abnormally strong activity in ASD…

  2. The Polarised Valence Quark Distribution from semi-inclusive DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Arbuzov, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, A.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Reggiani, D.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The semi-inclusive difference asymmetry A^{h+ - h-} for hadrons of opposite charge has been measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The data were collected in the years 2002-2004 using a 160 GeV polarised muon beam scattered off a large polarised 6-LiD target and cover the range 0.006 < x < 0.7 and 1 < Q^2 < 100 (GeV/c)^2. In leading order QCD (LO) the asymmetry A_d^{h+ - h-} measures the valence quark polarisation and provides an evaluation of the first moment of Delta u_v + Delta d_v which is found to be equal to 0.40 +- 0.07 (stat.) +- 0.05 (syst.) over the measured range of x at Q^2 = 10 (GeV/c)^2. When combined with the first moment of g_1^d previously measured on the same data, this result favours a non-symmetric polarisation of light quarks Delta u-bar = -Delta d-bar at a confidence level of two standard deviations, in contrast to the often assumed symmetric scenario Delta u-bar = Delta d-bar = Delta s-bar = Delta s.

  3. Moessbauer spectroscopic study on valence-detrapping and trapping of mixed-valence trinuclear iron (III, III, II) fluorine-substitute benzoate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Y.; Onaka, S.; Ogiso, R.; Takayama, T.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamoto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Four mixed-valence trinuclear iron(III, III, II) fluorine-substituted benzoate complexes were synthesized; Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 ·CH 2 Cl 2 (1), Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (2), Fe 3 O(2H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (3), and Fe 3 O(4H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (4). By means of 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, valence-detrapping and trapping phenomena have been investigated for the four mixed-valence complexes. The valence state of three iron ions is trapped at lower temperatures while it is fully detrapped at higher temperatures for 1. Valence detrapping is not observed for 2, 3, and 4 even at room temperature, although Moessbauer spectra for 3 and 4 show a complicated temperature dependence. (author)

  4. Changes in LDL Oxidative Status and Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression after Red Wine Intake in Healthy People: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Gualtieri, Paola; Gratteri, Santo; Tomasi, Diego; Gaiotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. Micronutrients modulate immune system and exert a protective action by reducing low density lipoproteins (LDL) oxidation via induction of antioxidant enzymes. We evaluated the gene expression of oxidative stress (HOSp), inflammasome (HIp), and human drug metabolism pathways (HDM) and ox-LDL level at baseline and after the intake of red wine naturally enriched with resveratrol (NPVRW), in association with or without a McDonald's meal (McDM). The ox-LDL levels significantly increase comparing baseline (B) versus McDM and decreased comparing McDM versus McDM + NPVRW (P ≤ 0.05). Percentages of significant genes expressed after each nutritional intervention were the following: (1) B versus McDM, 2.88% HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 3.37% of HDMp; (2) B versus McDM + NPVRW, 1.44% of HOSp, 4.81% of HIp, and 0.96% of HDMp; (3) McDM versus McDM + NPVRW, 2.40% of HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 5.77% of HDMp; (4) B versus NPVRW, 4.80% HOSp, 3.85% HIp, and 3.85% HDMp. NPVRW intake reduced postprandial ox-LDL and the expression of inflammation and oxidative stress related genes. Chronic studies on larger population are necessary before definitive conclusions. PMID:26101461

  5. Changes in LDL Oxidative Status and Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression after Red Wine Intake in Healthy People: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Di Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. Micronutrients modulate immune system and exert a protective action by reducing low density lipoproteins (LDL oxidation via induction of antioxidant enzymes. We evaluated the gene expression of oxidative stress (HOSp, inflammasome (HIp, and human drug metabolism pathways (HDM and ox-LDL level at baseline and after the intake of red wine naturally enriched with resveratrol (NPVRW, in association with or without a McDonald’s meal (McDM. The ox-LDL levels significantly increase comparing baseline (B versus McDM and decreased comparing McDM versus McDM + NPVRW (P≤0.05. Percentages of significant genes expressed after each nutritional intervention were the following: (1 B versus McDM, 2.88% HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 3.37% of HDMp; (2 B versus McDM + NPVRW, 1.44% of HOSp, 4.81% of HIp, and 0.96% of HDMp; (3 McDM versus McDM + NPVRW, 2.40% of HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 5.77% of HDMp; (4 B versus NPVRW, 4.80% HOSp, 3.85% HIp, and 3.85% HDMp. NPVRW intake reduced postprandial ox-LDL and the expression of inflammation and oxidative stress related genes. Chronic studies on larger population are necessary before definitive conclusions.

  6. Slow-Absorbing Modified Starch before and during Prolonged Cycling Increases Fat Oxidation and Gastrointestinal Distress without Changing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Daniel A; Vargas, Fernanda de C S; Bach, Christopher W; Garvey, Jordan A; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2016-06-25

    While prior research reported altered fuel utilization stemming from pre-exercise modified starch ingestion, the practical value of this starch for endurance athletes who consume carbohydrates both before and during exercise is yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ingesting a hydrothermally-modified starch supplement (HMS) before and during cycling on performance, metabolism, and gastrointestinal comfort. In a crossover design, 10 male cyclists underwent three nutritional interventions: (1) a commercially available sucrose/glucose supplement (G) 30 min before (60 g carbohydrate) and every 15 min during exercise (60 g∙h(-1)); (2) HMS consumed at the same time points before and during exercise in isocaloric amounts to G (Iso HMS); and (3) HMS 30 min before (60 g carbohydrate) and every 60 min during exercise (30 g·h(-1); Low HMS). The exercise protocol (~3 h) consisted of 1 h at 50% Wmax, 8 × 2-min intervals at 80% Wmax, and 10 maximal sprints. There were no differences in sprint performance with Iso HMS vs. G, while both G and Iso HMS likely resulted in small performance enhancements (5.0%; 90% confidence interval = ±5.3% and 4.4%; ±3.2%, respectively) relative to Low HMS. Iso HMS and Low HMS enhanced fat oxidation (31.6%; ±20.1%; very likely (Iso); 20.9%; ±16.1%; likely (Low), and reduced carbohydrate oxidation (-19.2%; ±7.6%; most likely; -22.1%; ±12.9%; very likely) during exercise relative to G. However, nausea was increased during repeated sprints with ingestion of Iso HMS (17 scale units; ±18; likely) and Low HMS (18; ±14; likely) vs. G. Covariate analysis revealed that gastrointestinal distress was associated with reductions in performance with Low HMS vs. G (likely), but this relationship was unclear with Iso HMS vs. G. In conclusion, pre- and during-exercise ingestion of HMS increases fat oxidation relative to G. However, changes do not translate to performance improvements, possibly owing to HMS

  7. Slow-Absorbing Modified Starch before and during Prolonged Cycling Increases Fat Oxidation and Gastrointestinal Distress without Changing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Baur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available While prior research reported altered fuel utilization stemming from pre-exercise modified starch ingestion, the practical value of this starch for endurance athletes who consume carbohydrates both before and during exercise is yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ingesting a hydrothermally-modified starch supplement (HMS before and during cycling on performance, metabolism, and gastrointestinal comfort. In a crossover design, 10 male cyclists underwent three nutritional interventions: (1 a commercially available sucrose/glucose supplement (G 30 min before (60 g carbohydrate and every 15 min during exercise (60 g∙h−1; (2 HMS consumed at the same time points before and during exercise in isocaloric amounts to G (Iso HMS; and (3 HMS 30 min before (60 g carbohydrate and every 60 min during exercise (30 g·h−1; Low HMS. The exercise protocol (~3 h consisted of 1 h at 50% Wmax, 8 × 2-min intervals at 80% Wmax, and 10 maximal sprints. There were no differences in sprint performance with Iso HMS vs. G, while both G and Iso HMS likely resulted in small performance enhancements (5.0%; 90% confidence interval = ±5.3% and 4.4%; ±3.2%, respectively relative to Low HMS. Iso HMS and Low HMS enhanced fat oxidation (31.6%; ±20.1%; very likely (Iso; 20.9%; ±16.1%; likely (Low, and reduced carbohydrate oxidation (−19.2%; ±7.6%; most likely; −22.1%; ±12.9%; very likely during exercise relative to G. However, nausea was increased during repeated sprints with ingestion of Iso HMS (17 scale units; ±18; likely and Low HMS (18; ±14; likely vs. G. Covariate analysis revealed that gastrointestinal distress was associated with reductions in performance with Low HMS vs. G (likely, but this relationship was unclear with Iso HMS vs. G. In conclusion, pre- and during-exercise ingestion of HMS increases fat oxidation relative to G. However, changes do not translate to performance improvements, possibly owing to HMS

  8. [Intraoperative pain stimuli change somatosensory evoked potentials, but not auditory evoked potentials during isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundshagen, I; Kochs, E; Bischoff, P; Schulte am Esch, J

    1997-10-01

    Evoked potentials are used for intraoperative monitoring to assess changes of cerebral function. This prospective randomised study assesses the influence of surgical stimulation on midlatency components of somatosensory (SEPs) and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in anaesthetised patients. After approval of the Ethics Committee and written informed consent 36 orthopaedic patients (34 +/- 15 y, 73 +/- 14 kg. 1.71 +/- 0.07 m, ASA I-II) were randomly included in the study. Anaesthesia was induced with 1.5 micrograms/kg fentanyl, 0.3 mg/kg etomidate and 0.1 mg/kg vecuronium. The lungs were intubated and patients normoventilated in steady state anaesthesia with isoflurane (end-tidal 0.6%) and 66% nitrous oxide. 18 patients (group 1) were assigned to the SEP group: median nerve stimulation, recording at Erb, C 6 and the contralateral somatosensory cortex (N20, P25, N35) vs Fz. AEPs were recorded in group 2 (n = 18): binaural stimulation, recording at Cz versus linked mastoid (V, Na, Pa, Nb). Recordings were performed during 30 min before the start of surgery (baseline: BL), at skin incision (SURG1) and at the preparation of the periost (SURG2). Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation, endtidal pCO2 and isoflurane (PetISO) concentrations were registered simultaneously. Data were analysed by one-way analysis of variance. Post hoc comparison were made by Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test with p beats/min) to SURG2 (76 +/- 12 beats/min). Increases of amplitudes of midlatency SEP amplitudes indicate increased nociceptive signal transmission which is not blunted by isoflurane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia. In contrast, unchanged AEPs indicate adequate levels of the hypnotic components of anaesthesia.

  9. Age related changes in NAD+ metabolism oxidative stress and Sirt1 activity in wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nady Braidy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ has emerged as a key regulator of metabolism, stress resistance and longevity. Apart from its role as an important redox carrier, NAD+ also serves as the sole substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes, including poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, an important DNA nick sensor, and NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirtuins which play an important role in a wide variety of processes, including senescence, apoptosis, differentiation, and aging. We examined the effect of aging on intracellular NAD+ metabolism in the whole heart, lung, liver and kidney of female wistar rats. Our results are the first to show a significant decline in intracellular NAD+ levels and NAD:NADH ratio in all organs by middle age (i.e.12 months compared to young (i.e. 3 month old rats. These changes in [NAD(H] occurred in parallel with an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls (o- and m- tyrosine formation and decline in total antioxidant capacity in these organs. An age dependent increase in DNA damage (phosphorylated H2AX was also observed in these same organs. Decreased Sirt1 activity and increased acetylated p53 were observed in organ tissues in parallel with the drop in NAD+ and moderate over-expression of Sirt1 protein. Reduced mitochondrial activity of complex I-IV was also observed in aging animals, impacting both redox status and ATP production. The strong positive correlation observed between DNA damage associated NAD+ depletion and Sirt1 activity suggests that adequate NAD+ concentrations may be an important longevity assurance factor.

  10. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios P. Eleftheriou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (Cr is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER was less affected under Cr(VI stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific.

  11. The influence of coordination geometry and valency on the K-edge absorption near edge spectra of selected chromium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelouris, A.; Modrow, H.; Pantelouris, M.; Hormes, J.; Reinen, D.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the chromium K-edge are reported for a number of selected chromium compounds of known chemical structure. The spectra were obtained with use of synchrotron radiation available at the ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The compounds studied include the tetrahedrally coordinated compounds Ca 2 Ge 0.8 Cr 0.2 O 4 , Ba 2 Ge 0.1 Cr 0.9 O 4 , Sr 2 CrO 4 , Ca 2 (PO 4 ) x (CrO 4 ) 1-x Cl (x=0.25,0.5), Ca 5 (CrO 4 ) 3 Cl, CrO 3 , the octahedrally coordinated compounds Cr(II)-acetate, CrCl 3 , CrF 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , KCr(SO 4 ) 2 · 12H 2 O, CrO 2 and cubic coordinated metallic chromium. In these compounds chromium exhibits a wide range of formal oxidation states (0 to VI). The absorption features in the near edge region are shown to be characteristic of the spatial environment of the absorbing atom. The occurrence of a single pre-edge line easily allows one to distinguish between tetrahedral and octahedral coordination geometry, whereas the energy position of the absorption edge is found to be very sensitive to the valency of the excited chromium atom. Calculations of the ionisation potential of Cr in different oxidation states using the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock method (Froese-Fischer) confirm that the ionisation limit shifts to higher energy with increasing Cr valency. More detailed information on the electronic structure of the different compounds is gained by real-space full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code

  12. The influence of coordination geometry and valency on the K-edge absorption near edge spectra of selected chromium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelouris, A.; Modrow, H.; Pantelouris, M.; Hormes, J.; Reinen, D

    2004-05-10

    X-ray absorption spectra at the chromium K-edge are reported for a number of selected chromium compounds of known chemical structure. The spectra were obtained with use of synchrotron radiation available at the ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The compounds studied include the tetrahedrally coordinated compounds Ca{sub 2}Ge{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 4}, Ba{sub 2}Ge{sub 0.1}Cr{sub 0.9}O{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}, Ca{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub x}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl (x=0.25,0.5), Ca{sub 5}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl, CrO{sub 3}, the octahedrally coordinated compounds Cr(II)-acetate, CrCl{sub 3}, CrF{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, KCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 12H{sub 2}O, CrO{sub 2} and cubic coordinated metallic chromium. In these compounds chromium exhibits a wide range of formal oxidation states (0 to VI). The absorption features in the near edge region are shown to be characteristic of the spatial environment of the absorbing atom. The occurrence of a single pre-edge line easily allows one to distinguish between tetrahedral and octahedral coordination geometry, whereas the energy position of the absorption edge is found to be very sensitive to the valency of the excited chromium atom. Calculations of the ionisation potential of Cr in different oxidation states using the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock method (Froese-Fischer) confirm that the ionisation limit shifts to higher energy with increasing Cr valency. More detailed information on the electronic structure of the different compounds is gained by real-space full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code.

  13. The influence of coordination geometry and valency on the K-edge absorption near edge spectra of selected chromium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelouris, A.; Modrow, H.; Pantelouris, M.; Hormes, J.; Reinen, D.

    2004-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the chromium K-edge are reported for a number of selected chromium compounds of known chemical structure. The spectra were obtained with use of synchrotron radiation available at the ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The compounds studied include the tetrahedrally coordinated compounds Ca 2Ge 0.8Cr 0.2O 4, Ba 2Ge 0.1Cr 0.9O 4, Sr 2CrO 4, Ca 2(PO 4) x(CrO 4) 1- xCl ( x=0.25,0.5), Ca 5(CrO 4) 3Cl, CrO 3, the octahedrally coordinated compounds Cr(II)-acetate, CrCl 3, CrF 3, Cr 2O 3, KCr(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O, CrO 2 and cubic coordinated metallic chromium. In these compounds chromium exhibits a wide range of formal oxidation states (0 to VI). The absorption features in the near edge region are shown to be characteristic of the spatial environment of the absorbing atom. The occurrence of a single pre-edge line easily allows one to distinguish between tetrahedral and octahedral coordination geometry, whereas the energy position of the absorption edge is found to be very sensitive to the valency of the excited chromium atom. Calculations of the ionisation potential of Cr in different oxidation states using the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock method (Froese-Fischer) confirm that the ionisation limit shifts to higher energy with increasing Cr valency. More detailed information on the electronic structure of the different compounds is gained by real-space full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code.

  14. Core-electron binding energies from self-consistent field molecular orbital theory using a mixture of all-electron real atoms and valence-electron model atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, C.M.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The chemistry of large systems such as clusters may be readily investigated by valence-electron theories based on model potentials, but such an approach does not allow for the examination of core-electron binding energies which are commonly measured experimentally for such systems. Here we merge our previously developed Gaussian based valence-electron model potential theory with all-electron ab initio theory to allow for the calculation of core orbital binding energies when desired. For the atoms whose cores are to be examined, we use the real nuclear changes, all of the electrons, and the appropriate many-electron basis sets. For the rest of the system we use reduced nuclear charges, the Gaussian based model potentials, only the valence electrons, and appropriate valence-electron basis sets. Detailed results for neutral Al 2 are presented for the cases of all-electron, mixed real--model, and model--model SCF--MO calculations. Several different all-electron and valence electron calculations have been done to test the use of the model potential per se, as well as the effect of basis set choice. The results are in all cases in excellent agreement with one another. Based on these studies, a set of ''double-zeta'' valence and all-electron basis functions have been used for further SCF--MO studies on Al 3 , Al 4 , AlNO, and OAl 3 . For a variety of difference combinations of real and model atoms we find excellent agreement for relative total energies, orbital energies (both core and valence), and Mulliken atomic populations. Finally, direct core-hole-state ionic calculations are reported in detail for Al 2 and AlNO, and noted for Al 3 and Al 4 . Results for corresponding frozen-orbital energy differences, relaxed SCF--MO energy differences, and relaxation energies are in all cases in excellent agreement (never differing by more than 0.07 eV, usually by somewhat less). The study clearly demonstrates the accuracy of the mixed real--model theory

  15. Adjustment of valence state of Pu and Np in nitric solution containing N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine and monomethylhydrazine by electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.; Ye, G.A.; Cong, H.F. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)] [and others

    2012-07-01

    A study of the electrochemical behaviors of N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) in nitric acid solution on Pt electrodes were carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) methods. The diffusion coefficients of DMHAN and MMH were obtained by CV. The values are found to be 0.53 x 10{sup -6}6 cm{sup 2}/s D{sub (DMHAN)} and 0.88 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s D{sub (MMH)}. The equilibrium potentials (+0.47 V vs. SCE for DMHAN and +0.31 V vs. SCE for MMH) were also measured using Tafel curves. Various valence states of Pu and Np in HNO{sub 3} solution containing DMHAN and MMH in the electrolytic process were investigated by an electrolytic cell using a platinum as the anode and a titanium plate as the cathode. In this procedure, MMH was first electro-oxidized on the Pt anode and Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV) on the Ti cathode. After MMH was entirely consumed, the accumulation of HNO{sub 2} (due to the electrochemical reduction of nitric acid on the Ti cathode) caused a significantly fast catalytic reaction of DMHAN with HNO{sub 3} to form HNO{sub 2}. HNO{sub 2} can oxidize Pu(III) to Pu(IV) quickly. As a result, both oxidation states of Pu and Np were found to be tetravalent in the post-electrolysis solution. A convenient method to keep the post-electrolysis solution at 70 C was used to adjust the oxidation state of Np in it's pentavalent state while retaining the tetravalent state of Pu. This study developed an electrolytic process for the preparation of 2AF feed (the feed of Pu purification cycle) in APOR (Advanced Purex Process Based on Organic Reductants) process by electrochemically oxidizing Pu(III) and selectively adjusting the valence state of neptunium to either Np(IV) or Np(V). (orig.)

  16. Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

  17. A model on valence state evaluation of TRU nuclides in reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Gunzo; Fujine, Sachio; Yoshida, Zenko; Maeda, Mitsuru; Motoyama, Satoshi.

    1998-02-01

    A mathematical model was developed to evaluate the valence state of TRU nuclides in reprocessing process solutions. The model consists of mass balance equations, Nernst equations, reaction rate equations and electrically neutrality equations. The model is applicable for the valence state evaluation of TRU nuclides in both steady state and transient state conditions in redox equilibrium. The valence state which is difficult to measure under high radiation and multi component conditions is calculated by the model using experimentally measured data for the TRU nuclide concentrations, nitric acid and redox reagent concentrations, electrode potential and solution temperature. (author)

  18. Photoion mass spectroscopy and valence photoionization of hypoxanthine, xanthine and caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyer, Vitaliy, E-mail: vitaliy.feyer@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Plekan, Oksana [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy)] [Institute of Electron Physics, 21 Universitetska St., 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine); Richter, Robert [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, CP10, I-00016 Monterotondo Scalo (Italy)] [CNR-Laboratorio Nazionale TASC-INFM, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Prince, Kevin C. [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy)] [CNR-Laboratorio Nazionale TASC-INFM, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy)

    2009-03-30

    Photoionization mass spectra of hypoxanthine, xanthine and caffeine were measured using the photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique and noble gas resonance radiation at energies from 8.4 to 21.2 eV for ionization. The fragmentation patterns for these compounds show that hydrogen cyanide is the main neutral loss species at higher photon energies, while photoionization below 16.67 eV led predominantly to the parent ion. The valence photoelectron spectra of this family of molecules were measured over an extended energy range, including the inner C, N and O 2s valence orbitals. The observed ion fragments were related to ionization of the valence orbitals.

  19. CzEngVallex: a Bilingual Czech-English Valency Lexicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urešová Zdeňka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new bilingual Czech-English verbal valency lexicon (called CzEng-Vallex representing a relatively large empirical database. It includes 20,835 aligned valency frame pairs (i.e., verb senses which are translations of each other and their aligned arguments. This new lexicon uses data from the Prague Czech-English Dependency Treebank and also takes advantage of the existing valency lexicons for both languages: the PDT-Vallex for Czech and the EngVallex for English. The CzEngVallex is available for browsing as well as for download in the LINDAT/CLARIN repository.

  20. Environmental factors associated with baseline and serial changes in fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in spice mill workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Walt, Anita; Baatjies, Roslynn; Singh, Tanusha; Jeebhay, Mohamed F

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the determinants of high fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO; >50 ppb) and serial changes in FeNO over a 24-hour period in spice mill workers at risk of work-related allergic respiratory disease and asthma. A cross-sectional study of 150 workers used European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) questionnaires, Phadiatop, serum-specific IgE (garlic, chilli pepper, wheat; Phadia, ImmunoCAP), spirometry and FeNO. A hand-held portable nitric oxide sampling device (NIOX MINO, Aerocrine AB) measured FeNO before and after the 8-hour shift and after 24 hours from baseline. The mean age of workers was 33 years; 71% were male, 46% current smokers and 45% atopic. Among workers with garlic sensitisation, 13% were monosensitised and 6% were co-sensitised to chilli pepper. Baseline preshift FeNO geometric mean (GM=14.9 ppb) was similar to the mean change across shift (GM=15.4 ppb) and across the 24-hour period (GM=15.8 ppb). In multivariate linear models, smoking (β=-0.507) and atopy (β=0.433) were strongly associated with FeNO. High FeNO (>50 ppb) was significantly associated with asthma-like symptoms due to spice dust (OR=5.38, CI 1.01 to 28.95). Sensitisation to chilli pepper was more strongly correlated with FeNO (r=0.32) and FeNO>50 ppb (OR=17.04, p=0.005) than garlic. FeNO increase (>12%) across 24 hours demonstrated a strong association with elevated exposures to spice dust particulate (OR=3.77, CI 1.01 to 14.24). This study suggests that chilli pepper sensitisation is associated with high FeNO (>50 ppb), more strongly compared with garlic, despite the low prevalence of sensitisation to chilli. Elevated inhalant spice dust particulate is associated with a delayed elevation of FeNO across the 24-hour period. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/