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Sample records for vaccine strain reveals

  1. Sequence analysis of measles virus strains collected during the pre- and early-vaccination era in Denmark reveals a considerable diversity of ancient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Schöller, S.; Schierup, M. H.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 199 serum samples from patients with measles collected in Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands from 1964 to 1983 were analysed by PCR. Measles virus (MV) RNA could be detected in 38 (19%) of the samples and a total of 18 strains were subjected to partial sequence analysis...... is attributed to their having originated from the same primary isolate. Consequently, it is implied that a small number of clinical manifestations of MV worldwide from which strains similar to the vaccine strain were identified were vaccine related rather than being caused by members of a persistently...

  2. Challenge of Pigs with Classical Swine Fever Viruses after C-Strain Vaccination Reveals Remarkably Rapid Protection and Insights into Early Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Felicity J.; Johns, Helen L.; Sosan, Olubukola A.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Clifford, Derek J.; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination. PMID:22235283

  3. Rotavirus vaccine strain transmission by vaccinated infants in the foster home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Sugata, Ken; Koshiyama, Nozomi; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the transmission of rotavirus vaccine strains from vaccinated children to nonvaccinated siblings. We sought to fully elucidate the safety of rotavirus (RV) vaccination in closed contact circumstance, such as the foster home for future assessment of the vaccine safety in an neonatal intensive care unit. Stool samples were collected from 4 RV vaccinated (160 samples) and 23 unvaccinated (766 samples) infants. RV viral RNA loads were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RV vaccine strain RNA was persistently detected in stool samples collected from the four vaccine recipients and one unvaccinated infant, but not in the stool samples collected from the 22 other unvaccinated infants. The unvaccinated infant who tested positive for the RV vaccine strain was vaccinated prior to enrollment in this study. The quantitative real-time RT-PCR data revealed a peak viral RNA load 1 week after vaccination followed by a gradual decrease. The current study suggests that RV vaccination may be safe in a close contact environment because there was limited transmission from RV vaccinated to unvaccinated infants. J. Med. Virol. 89:79-84, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular typing of canine parvovirus strains circulating from 2008 to 2012 in an organized kennel in India reveals the possibility of vaccination failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mitesh; Chakravarti, Soumendu; Mohapatra, J K; Chug, P K; Dubey, Rahul; Upmanuyu, Vikramaditya; Narwal, P S; Kumar, Anil; Churamani, C P; Kanwar, N S

    2014-04-01

    Canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2), which emerged in 1978, is considered as the major viral enteric pathogen of the canine population. With the emergence of new antigenic variants and incidences of vaccine failure, CPV has become one of the dreaded diseases of the canines worldwide. The present study was undertaken in an organized kennel from North India to ascertain the molecular basis of the CPV outbreaks in the vaccinated dogs. 415 samples were collected over a 5year period (2008-2012). The outbreak of the disease was more severe in 2012 with high incidence of mortality in pups with pronounced clinical symptoms. Molecular typing based on the VP2 gene was carried out with the 11 isolates from different years and compared with the CPV prototype and the vaccine strains. All the isolates in the study were either new CPV-2a (2012 isolates) or new CPV-2b (2008 and 2011 isolates). There were amino acid mutations at the Tyr324Ile and at the Thr440Ala position in five isolates from 2012 indicating new CPV mutants spreading in India. The CPV vaccines used in the present study failed to generate protective antibody titer against heterogeneous CPV antigenic types. The findings were confirmed when the affected pups were treated with hyper-immune heterogeneous purified immunoglobulin's against CPV in dogs of different antigenic types. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. vaccination with newcastle disease vaccines strain i2 and lasota

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UP Employee

    SUMMARY. Vaccination trials and comparative immunogenicity study using Newcastle disease vaccine strain I2 (NDVI2) and NDV La Sota administered to commercial and local chickens through intraocular (i/o), intramuscular (i/m), drinking water (dw), untreated sorghum, parboiled sorghum, sorghum coated with gum ...

  6. Genome sequencing and analysis of BCG vaccine strains.

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    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine against tuberculosis (TB has been available for more than 75 years, one third of the world's population is still infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and approximately 2 million people die of TB every year. To reduce this immense TB burden, a clearer understanding of the functional genes underlying the action of BCG and the development of new vaccines are urgently needed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Comparative genomic analysis of 19 M. tuberculosis complex strains showed that BCG strains underwent repeated human manipulation, had higher region of deletion rates than those of natural M. tuberculosis strains, and lost several essential components such as T-cell epitopes. A total of 188 BCG strain T-cell epitopes were lost to various degrees. The non-virulent BCG Tokyo strain, which has the largest number of T-cell epitopes (359, lost 124. Here we propose that BCG strain protection variability results from different epitopes. This study is the first to present BCG as a model organism for genetics research. BCG strains have a very well-documented history and now detailed genome information. Genome comparison revealed the selection process of BCG strains under human manipulation (1908-1966. CONCLUSIONS: Our results revealed the cause of BCG vaccine strain protection variability at the genome level and supported the hypothesis that the restoration of lost BCG Tokyo epitopes is a useful future vaccine development strategy. Furthermore, these detailed BCG vaccine genome investigation results will be useful in microbial genetics, microbial engineering and other research fields.

  7. Experimental challenge of chicken vaccinated with commercially available H5 vaccines reveals loss of protection to some highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 strains circulating in Hong Kong/China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connie Leung, Y H; Luk, Geraldine; Sia, Sin-Fun; Wu, Yu-On; Ho, Chuk-Kwan; Chow, Kai-Chi; Tang, Shing-Chun; Guan, Yi; Malik Peiris, J S

    2013-08-02

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus continues to circulate in poultry in Asia and Africa posing a threat to both public and animal health. Vaccination, used as an adjunct to improved bio-security and stamping-out policies, contributed to protecting poultry in Hong Kong from HPAI H5N1 infection in 2004-2008 although the virus was repeatedly detected in dead wild birds. The detection of clade 2.3.4 H5N1 viruses in poultry markets and a farm in Hong Kong in 2008 raised the question whether this virus has changed to evade protection from the H5 vaccines in use. We tested the efficacy of three commercial vaccines (Nobilis, Poulvac and Harbin Re-5 vaccine) in specific pathogen free white leghorn chickens against a challenge with A/chicken/Hong Kong/8825-2/2008 (clade 2.3.4) isolated from vaccinated poultry in Hong Kong and A/chicken/Hong Kong/782/2009 (clade 2.3.2). Harbin Re5 vaccine provided the best, albeit not complete protection against challenge with the clade 2.3.4 virus. All three vaccines provided good protection from death and significantly reduced virus shedding following challenge with the clade 2.3.2 virus. Only Harbin Re-5 was able to completely protect chickens from virus shedding as well as mortality. Sera from vaccinated chickens had lower geometric hemagglutination inhibition titers against A/chicken/Hong Kong/8825-2/08, as compared to two other clade 2.3.4 and one clade 0 virus. Alignment of amino-acid sequences of the haemagglutinin of A/chicken/Hong Kong/8825-2/08 and the other H5 viruses revealed several mutations in positions including 69, 71, 83, 95, 133,140, 162, 183, 189, 194 and 270 (H5 numbering) which may correlate with loss of vaccine protection. Our results indicated that the tested HPAI H5N1 (2.3.4) virus has undergone antigenic changes that allow it to evade immunity from poultry vaccines. This highlights the need for continued surveillance and monitoring of vaccine induced immunity, with experimental vaccine challenge

  8. Genetic characterization of measles vaccine strains.

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    Bankamp, Bettina; Takeda, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wenbo; Rota, Paul A

    2011-07-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 9 measles vaccine strains were compared with the sequence of the Edmonston wild-type virus. AIK-C, Moraten, Rubeovax, Schwarz, and Zagreb are vaccine strains of the Edmonston lineage, whereas CAM-70, Changchun-47, Leningrad-4 and Shanghai-191 were derived from 4 different wild-type isolates. Nucleotide substitutions were found in the noncoding regions of the genomes as well as in all coding regions, leading to deduced amino acid substitutions in all 8 viral proteins. Although the precise mechanisms involved in the attenuation of individual measles vaccines remain to be elucidated, in vitro assays of viral protein functions and recombinant viruses with defined genetic modifications have been used to characterize the differences between vaccine and wild-type strains. Although almost every protein contributes to an attenuated phenotype, substitutions affecting host cell tropism, virus assembly, and the ability to inhibit cellular antiviral defense mechanisms play an especially important role in attenuation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2011.

  9. Detection of Novel Rotavirus Strain by Vaccine Postlicensure Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Payne, Daniel C.; Roy, Sunando; Foytich, Kimberly; Parashar, Umesh D.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance for rotavirus-associated diarrhea after implementation of rotavirus vaccination can assess vaccine effectiveness and identify disease-associated genotypes. During active vaccine postlicensure surveillance in the United States, we found a novel rotavirus genotype, G14P[24], in a stool sample from a child who had diarrhea. Unusual rotavirus strains may become more prevalent after vaccine implementation.

  10. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-10-06

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity.

  11. Frequency of adverse events after vaccination with different vaccinia strains.

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    Mirjam Kretzschmar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large quantities of smallpox vaccine have been stockpiled to protect entire nations against a possible reintroduction of smallpox. Planning for an appropriate use of these stockpiled vaccines in response to a smallpox outbreak requires a rational assessment of the risks of vaccination-related adverse events, compared to the risk of contracting an infection. Although considerable effort has been made to understand the dynamics of smallpox transmission in modern societies, little attention has been paid to estimating the frequency of adverse events due to smallpox vaccination. Studies exploring the consequences of smallpox vaccination strategies have commonly used a frequency of approximately one death per million vaccinations, which is based on a study of vaccination with the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain of vaccinia virus. However, a multitude of historical studies of smallpox vaccination with other vaccinia strains suggest that there are strain-related differences in the frequency of adverse events after vaccination. Because many countries have stockpiled vaccine based on the Lister strain of vaccinia virus, a quantitative evaluation of the adverse effects of such vaccines is essential for emergency response planning. We conducted a systematic review and statistical analysis of historical data concerning vaccination against smallpox with different strains of vaccinia virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed historical vaccination data extracted from the literature. We extracted data on the frequency of postvaccinal encephalitis and death with respect to vaccinia strain and age of vaccinees. Using a hierarchical Bayesian approach for meta-analysis, we estimated the expected frequencies of postvaccinal encephalitis and death with respect to age at vaccination for smallpox vaccines based on the NYCBH and Lister vaccinia strains. We found large heterogeneity between findings from different studies and a time-period effect

  12. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  13. Are vaccine strain, type or administration protocol risk factors for canine parvovirus vaccine failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, K D; Kelman, M; Ward, M P

    2017-10-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious and worldwide cause of serious and often fatal disease in dogs, despite the widespread availability of vaccines. Which vaccine-related factors are associated with vaccination failure is largely unknown, and there are no reports from Australia. In this study - the first national population-level CPV study of its kind ever conducted - we analysed data on 594 cases of apparent CPV vaccination failure reported from an Australian national surveillance system to determine whether vaccine strain, type or administration protocol are risk factors for vaccination failures. The strain of CPV used in vaccine manufacture was not significantly associated with vaccination failure in clinical practice. The vaccine type (killed versus attenuated vaccine) for puppies diagnosed with CPV was associated with a lower mean age at time of vaccination (P=0.0495). The age at administration of the last CPV vaccination a puppy received prior to presenting with disease was a significant (P=0.0334) risk factor for vaccination failure, irrespective of whether the vaccine was marketed for a 10-week or 12-week or greater vaccination finish protocol. There was also a strong negative correlation between age at last vaccination prior to disease and vaccination failure (Pfailure. This supports the hypothesis that the use of final vaccination in puppies at less than 16 weeks of age predisposes to vaccination failure and warrants a final age for vaccination recommendation to be at least 16 weeks for all canine parvovirus vaccines, especially in outbreak situations. The large number of cases identified in this study confirms that CPV vaccination failure is occurring in Australia. Veterinarians should consider CPV as a differential diagnosis in cases with appropriate clinical presentation, regardless of the reported vaccination status of the dog. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-03-03

    The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important.

  15. Genetic heterogeneity of L-Zagreb mumps virus vaccine strain

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    Mateljak-Lukacevic Sanja

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most often used mumps vaccine strains Jeryl Lynn (JL, RIT4385, Urabe-AM9, L-Zagreb and L-3 differ in immunogenicity and reactogenicity. Previous analyses showed that JL, Urabe-AM9 and L-3 are genetically heterogeneous. Results We identified the heterogeneity of L-Zagreb throughout the entire genome. Two major variants were defined: variant A being identical to the consensus sequence of viral seeds and vaccine(s and variant B which differs from variant A in three nucleotide positions. The difference between viral variants in L-Zagreb strain is insufficient for distinct viral strains to be defined. We demonstrated that proportion of variants in L-Zagreb viral population depends on cell substrate used for viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion L-Zagreb strain should be considered as a single strain composed of at least two variant viral genomes.

  16. Efficacy of strain RB51 vaccine in heifers against experimental brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poester, Fernando P; Gonçalves, Vítor S P; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L; Olsen, Steven C; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Lage, Andrey P

    2006-06-19

    With the goal of providing an additional tool for controlling bovine brucellosis in Brazil and evaluating the full calf dose in adult cattle, the efficacy of the rough Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine was tested in heifers. Thirty-three females of approximately 24 months of age were divided in two groups: one group (n=20) received the RB51 vaccine and the other group (n=13) were used as non-vaccinated control. Animals in the vaccinated group were split in two sub-groups. One sub-group (n=12) was vaccinated subcutaneously with 1.5x10(10) colony forming units (CFU) of RB51 at Day 0 of the experiment and the other sub-group (n=8) was vaccinated subcutaneously with 1.6x10(10) CFU of RB51 at 60 days of gestation (Day 260 of the experiment). All cattle were challenged between 6 and 7 months of pregnancy with 3x10(8) CFU of the virulent strain 2308 of B. abortus by the conjunctival route. Vaccination with RB51 vaccine did not result in the production of any antibodies against the O-side chain of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as measured by conventional serological tests (rose bengal plate agglutination test (RBPAT), standard tube agglutination test (STAT), and 2-mercaptoethanol test (2ME)). A total of 25% cumulative incidence of abortions was found in the vaccinated group, whereas in the control group the cumulative incidence was 62%. B. abortus RB51 was not isolated from any sample, and no abortions were produced by RB51 vaccination of females at 60 days of pregnancy. The results indicate that vaccination with RB51 prevented 59.4% of abortions, 58.6% of cow infections, and 61.0% of fetal infections. The relative risk (RR) revealed that non-vaccinated animals have 2.462 (95% CI 1.029-5.889) times higher risk of aborting than RB51-vaccinated animals.

  17. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  18. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Mycobacterium bovis and BCG Vaccine Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Ge

    2013-09-01

    BCG is the only licensed human vaccine currently available against TB. Derived from a virulent strain of M. bovis, the vaccine was thought to have struck a balance between reduced virulence and preserved immunogenicity. Nowadays, BCG vaccine strains used in different countries and vaccination programs show clear variations in their genomes and immune protective properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the proteomic profile on Mycobacterium bovis and five BCG strains Pasteur, Tokyo, Danish, Phipps and Birkhaug by Tandem Mass Tag® (TMT®)-labeling quantitative proteomic approach. In total, 420 proteins were identified and 377 of them were quantitated for their relative abundance. We reported the number and relationship of differential expressed proteins in BCG strains compared to M. bovis and investigated their functions by bioinformatics analysis. Several interesting up-regulated and down-regulated protein targets were found. The identified proteins and their quantitative expression profiles provide a basis for further understanding of the cellular biology of M. bovis and BCG vaccine strains, and hopefully would assist in the design of better anti-TB vaccine and drugs.

  19. Genome sequence of Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19 compared to virulent strains yields candidate virulence genes.

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    Oswald R Crasta

    Full Text Available The Brucella abortus strain S19, a spontaneously attenuated strain, has been used as a vaccine strain in vaccination of cattle against brucellosis for six decades. Despite many studies, the physiological and molecular mechanisms causing the attenuation are not known. We have applied pyrosequencing technology together with conventional sequencing to rapidly and comprehensively determine the complete genome sequence of the attenuated Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19. The main goal of this study is to identify candidate virulence genes by systematic comparative analysis of the attenuated strain with the published genome sequences of two virulent and closely related strains of B. abortus, 9-941 and 2308. The two S19 chromosomes are 2,122,487 and 1,161,449 bp in length. A total of 3062 genes were identified and annotated. Pairwise and reciprocal genome comparisons resulted in a total of 263 genes that were non-identical between the S19 genome and any of the two virulent strains. Amongst these, 45 genes were consistently different between the attenuated strain and the two virulent strains but were identical amongst the virulent strains, which included only two of the 236 genes that have been implicated as virulence factors in literature. The functional analyses of the differences have revealed a total of 24 genes that may be associated with the loss of virulence in S19. Of particular relevance are four genes with more than 60 bp consistent difference in S19 compared to both the virulent strains, which, in the virulent strains, encode an outer membrane protein and three proteins involved in erythritol uptake or metabolism.

  20. Molecular characterization of China rabies virus vaccine strain

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    Jiao Wenqiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabies virus (RV, the agent of rabies, can cause a severe encephalomyelitis in several species of mammals, including humans. As a human rabies vaccine strain employed in China, the genetic knowledge of the aG strain has not been fully studied. The main goal of the present study is to amplify the whole genome of aG strain, and genetic relationships between other vaccine strains and wild strains were analyzed. Results The entire genome of human rabies virus vaccine strain aG employed in China was sequenced; this is the second rabies virus vaccine strain from China to be fully characterized. The overall organization and the length of the genome were similar to that of other lyssaviruses. The length of aG strain was 11925nt, comprising a leader sequence of 58nt, nucleoprotein (N gene of 1353nt, phosphoprotein (P gene of 894 nt, matrix protein (M gene of 609nt, glycoprotein (G gene of 1575nt, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp,L gene of 6384nt, and a trailer region of 70 nt. There was TGAAAAAAA (TGA7 consensus sequence in the end of each gene, except AGA7 at the end of G gene. There was AACAYYYCT consensus start signal at the beginning of each gene. Conclusions In this report, we analyzed the full genome of China human rabies vaccine strain aG. Our studies indicated that the genome of aG retained the basic characteristics of RV. At gene level, N was the most conserved among the five coding genes, indicating this gene is the most appropriate for quantitative genotype definition. The phylogenetic analysis of the N indicated the aG strain clustered most closely with Japanese and Russian rabies vaccine strains, suggesting that they may share the same ancestor; also, the aG strain did not share high homology with wild strains isolated from China, making it may not be the best vaccine strain, more research is needed to elucidate the genetic relationship among the RV circulating in China.

  1. Assessment of a strain 19 brucellosis vaccination program in elk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maichak, Eric J.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Cross, Paul C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Edwards, William H.; Wise, Benjamin; Smith, Scott G.; Kreeger, Terry J.

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic diseases in wildlife present substantial challenges and risks to host populations, susceptible domestic livestock populations, and affected stakeholders. Brucellosis, a disease caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus, is endemic among elk (Cervus canadensis) attending winter feedgrounds and adjacent areas of western Wyoming, USA. To minimize transmission of brucellosis from elk to elk and elk to livestock, managers initiated a B. abortus strain 19 ballistic vaccination program in 1985. We used brucellosis prevalence (1971–2015) and reproductive outcome (2006–2015) data collected from female elk attending feedgrounds to assess efficacy of the strain 19 program while controlling for potentially confounding factors such as site and age. From our generalized linear models, we found that seroprevalence of brucellosis was 1) not lower following inception of vaccination; 2) not inversely associated with proportion of juveniles vaccinated over time; 3) not inversely associated with additional yearlings and adults vaccinated over time; and 4) associated more with feeding end-date than proportion of juveniles vaccinated. Using vaginal implant transmitters in adult females that were seropositive for brucellosis, we found little effect of vaccination coverage at reducing reproductive failures (i.e., abortion or stillbirth). Because we found limited support for efficacy of the strain 19 program, we support research to develop an oral vaccine and suggest that continuing other spatio-temporal management actions will be most effective to minimize transmission of brucellosis and reduce dependency of elk on supplemental winter feeding.

  2. Genotype analysis of ORF 62 identifies varicella-zoster virus infections caused by a vaccine strain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Byung Ok; Lee, Hoan Jong; Kang, Hyun Mi; Oh, Chi Eun; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to differentiate vaccine-type strains from wild-type strains and determine the genotype of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 51 Korean children. A sequencing analysis of ORF 62 identified two cases of herpes zoster caused by the vaccine-type virus, without a previous history of varicella, 22 months and 5 months after VZV vaccination. The wild-type strain was identified in the remaining children. A genotype analysis of ORF 22 amino acids revealed genotype J in all children except one. Genotype E was identified in an infant with varicella imported from Egypt.

  3. Development of mismatch amplification mutation assays for the differentiation of MS1 vaccine strain from wild-type Mycoplasma synoviae and MS-H vaccine strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga Mária; Grózner, Dénes; Bekő, Katinka; Dán, Ádám; Szabó, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae is an economically significant pathogen in the poultry industry, inducing respiratory disease and infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys, and eggshell apex abnormality in chickens. Eradication, medication and vaccination are the options for controlling M. synoviae infection. Currently there are two commercial, live, attenuated vaccines available against M. synoviae: the temperature sensitive MS-H vaccine strain and the NAD independent MS1 vaccine strain. Differentiation of vaccine strains from field isolates is essential during vaccination and eradication programs. The present study provides melt-curve and agarose gel based mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) to discriminate the MS1 vaccine strain from the MS-H vaccine strain and wild-type M. synoviae isolates. The assays are based on the A/C single nucleotide polymorphism at nt11 of a HIT family protein coding gene. The melt- and agarose-MAMAs reliably distinguish the MS1 vaccine strain genotype from the MS-H vaccine strain and wild-type M. synoviae isolate genotype from 102 template number/DNA sample. No cross-reactions with other avian Mycoplasma species were observed. The assays can be performed directly on clinical samples and they can be run simultaneously with the previously described MAMAs designed for the discrimination of the MS-H vaccine strain. The developed assays are applicable in laboratories with limited facilities and promote the rapid, simple and cost effective differentiation of the MS1 vaccine strain. PMID:28419134

  4. Diversity of Bacillus anthracis Strains in Georgia and of Vaccine Strains from the Former Soviet Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maya; Natidze, Merab; Rigvava, Sergo; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Raddadi, Noura; Borin, Sara; Chanishvili, Nina; Tediashvili, Marina; Sharp, Richard; Barbeschi, Maurizio; Visca, Paolo; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increased number of anthrax outbreaks in Georgia and the other Caucasian republics of the former Soviet Union, no data are available on the diversity of the Bacillus anthracis strains involved. There is also little data available on strains from the former Soviet Union, including the strains previously used for vaccine preparation. In this study we used eight-locus variable-number tandem repeat analyses to genotype 18 strains isolated from infected animals and humans at different sites across Georgia, where anthrax outbreaks have occurred in the last 10 years, and 5 strains widely used for preparation of human and veterinary vaccines in the former Soviet Union. Three different genotypes affiliated with the A3.a cluster were detected for the Georgian isolates. Two genotypes were previously shown to include Turkish isolates, indicating that there is a regional strain pattern in the South Caucasian-Turkish region. Four of the vaccine strains were polymorphic, exhibiting three different patterns of the cluster A1.a genotype and the cluster A3.b genotype. The genotype of vaccine strain 71/12, which is considered an attenuated strain in spite of the presence of both of the virulence pXO plasmids, appeared to be a novel genotype in the A1.a cluster. PMID:16885320

  5. FMD virus isolates: the candidate strains for polyvalent vaccine development in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayelet, G; Soressa, M; Sisay, T; Belay, A; Gelaye, E; Jembere, S; Skjerve, E; Asmare, K

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viruses with the aim of selecting appropriate vaccinal strain to control of FMD in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in two-dimensional virus neutralization assay to determine the antigenic relationship 'r' value between the candidate vaccine strains and field isolates. A total of 21 serotype O, 7 serotype A, and 8 serotype SAT 2 FMD viruses, which were isolated from cattle and swine. A couple of isolates from each serotype were identified as vaccine candidates in the trial (O-ETH/38/2005, O-ETH/58/2008, A-ETH/7/2008, A-ETH/6/2000, SAT2-ETH/76/2009 and SAT2-ETH/64/2009). The finding revealed all the vaccine candidate depicted high antigenic similarity, above the mean "r" value, to their own serotypes in the studied serotype population except for one serotype A field isolate, A-ETH/13/1981, with "r" value=0.14 and 0.25) which is significantly lower than the minimum requirement. In general, the result indicated that these candidate vaccinal strains can be used for polyvalent vaccine production in the country. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination in elk. I. Efficacy of reduced dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Walter E; Williams, Elizabeth S; Thorne, E Tom; Kreeger, Terry J; Stout, Glen; Bardsley, Katie; Edwards, Hank; Schurig, Gerhardt; Colby, Lesley A; Enright, Fred; Elzer, Philip H

    2002-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a serious zoonotic disease affecting some populations of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and bison (Bison bison) in the Greater Yellowstone Area, USA. The fear that elk and/or bison may spread Brucella abortus to livestock has prompted efforts to reduce or eliminate the disease in wildlife. Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine has recently been approved for use in cattle. Unlike strain 19 vaccine, RB51 does not cause false positive reactions on standard brucellosis serologic tests. If effective, it may become the vaccine of choice for wildlife. In February 1995, 45 serologically negative female elk calves were trapped and taken to the Sybille Wildlife Research and Conservation Education Unit near Wheatland, Wyoming, USA. In May 1995, 16 of these elk calves were hand-vaccinated with 1 x 10(9) colony forming units (CFU) of RB51, 16 were vaccinated with 1 x 10(8) CFU RB51 by biobullet, and 13 were given a saline placebo. The elk were bred in fall of 1996 and they were challenged with 1 x 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival inoculation in March 1997. Thirteen (100%) control elk aborted, 14 (88%) hand-vaccinated elk aborted, and 12 (75%) biobullet vaccinated elk aborted or produced nonviable calves. These results suggest that a single dose of 1 x 10(8) to 1 x 10(9) CFU RB51 does not provide significant protection against B. abortus induced abortion in elk. However, the vaccine appears to be safe at this dose and additional study may reveal a more effective RB51 vaccine regimen for elk.

  7. Immunogenicity and efficacy of Hoshino strain of Mumps Vaccine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report describes the immunogenicity and efficacy and long term immunity of Hoshino strain of Mumps (included in MMR Vaccine) in shahr-e-kord, Islamic Republic of Iran (I.R.Iran). A total of 338 Children aged 3-18 years were tested for Mumps IgG using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of ...

  8. Efficacy of Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 compared to the reference vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 in water buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Caporale

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 250 000 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis live in the Campania region of southern Italy where the breeding of this species is very popular. Of these animals, almost 150 000 are concentrated in the Caserta province where the prevalence of Brucella abortus in this species represents approximately 20% at herd level. The Italian brucellosis eradication programme provides a slaughter and vaccination strategy for this province. B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51 has become the official vaccine for the prevention of brucellosis in cattle in several countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RB51 in water buffalo compared to the B. abortus S19 vaccine (S19. The study was performed in accordance with a protocol described in mice. Female buffalo aged five months were inoculated. Five received a RB51 dosage on two occasions that was three times greater than that approved for use in cattle and a booster after one month, five received B. abortus S19 vaccine at the standard dosage and three controls received a phosphate buffer solution. Buffalo were then challenged with a virulent B. abortus strain 544 thirty days post vaccination. Antibodies that developed in the five animals vaccinated with RB51 were not detected by the Rose Bengal test or complement fixation test (CFT and were also tested by CFT prepared with RB51 antigen. After culling, B. abortus was cultured from the spleen, retropharyngeal and supra-mammary lymph nodes. A statistical evaluation was performed to assess the immunogenicity values obtained in buffalo vaccinated with S19, compared to those obtained in buffalo vaccinated with the RB51 vaccine and in the unvaccinated control group.

  9. Efficacy of Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 compared to the reference vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 in water buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Vincenzo; Bonfini, Barbara; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Di Provvido, Andrea; Forcella, Simona; Giovannini, Armando; Tittarelli, Manuela; Scacchia, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 250,000 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) live in the Campania region of southern Italy where the breeding of this species is very popular. Of these animals, almost 150,000 are concentrated in the Caserta province where the prevalence of Brucella abortus in this species represents approximately 20% at herd level. The Italian brucellosis eradication programme provides a slaughter and vaccination strategy for this province. B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51) has become the official vaccine for the prevention of brucellosis in cattle in several countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RB51 in water buffalo compared to the B. abortus S19 vaccine (S19). The study was performed in accordance with a protocol described in mice. Female buffalo aged five months were inoculated. Five received a RB51 dosage on two occasions that was three times greater than that approved for use in cattle and a booster after one month, five received B. abortus S19 vaccine at the standard dosage and three controls received a phosphate buffer solution. Buffalo were then challenged with a virulent B. abortus strain 544 thirty days post vaccination. Antibodies that developed in the five animals vaccinated with RB51 were not detected by the Rose Bengal test or complement fixation test (CFT) and were also tested by CFT prepared with RB51 antigen. After culling, B. abortus was cultured from the spleen, retropharyngeal and supra-mammary lymph nodes. A statistical evaluation was performed to assess the immunogenicity values obtained in buffalo vaccinated with S19, compared to those obtained in buffalo vaccinated with the RB51 vaccine and in the unvaccinated control group.

  10. vaccination with newcastle disease vaccines strain i2 and lasota

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UP Employee

    inoculated with 0.20 ml containing 10. 6.5. EID50/ml of the NDV kudu 113 virus strain. (Echeonwu et al., 1993) i/m at the leg muscle. All birds inoculated were observed for two weeks for clinical signs and the number of sick ..... intestines, proventriculus and caecal tonsils. Other lesions observed were tracheal congestion and ...

  11. Wild and attenuated vaccine RS-12 strains of mumps virus exhibit differences in amino acid sequences of their proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirezaie, B; Shahbazi, R; Safavieh, S S; Mohammad, A

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated mumps virus (MuV) RS-12 strain-based vaccine is one of several effective vaccines available in the prevention of mumps. Since previous studies have unveiled only about one-third of the attenuated vaccine RS-12 strain genome sequence, the rest of sequence and molecular basis for attenuation remained unsolved. Therefore, in this study, the full-length genome sequences of wild and attenuated RS-12 strains were determined and compared. The comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions at 9 positions leading to amino acid substitutions at 6 positions in P, V, I, M, and L proteins, while the remaining substitutions were silent. This result indicates that the observed mutations in P, V, I, M, and L proteins of MuV might be responsible for the attenuation of the RS-12 vaccine strain.

  12. Vaccination reduces macrophage infiltration in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue in pigs infected with a highly virulent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain

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    Vranckx Katleen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of enzootic pneumonia and is responsible for significant economic losses to the pig industry. To better understand the mode of action of a commercial, adjuvanted, inactivated whole cell vaccine and the influence of diversity on the efficacy of vaccination, we investigated samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs experimentally infected with either a low (LV or a highly virulent (HV M. hyopneumoniae strain. Non-vaccinated and sham-infected control groups were included. Lung tissue samples collected at 4 and 8 weeks post infection (PI were immunohistochemically tested for the presence of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and macrophages in the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT. The number of M. hyopneumoniae organisms in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was determined using quantitative PCR at 4 and 8 weeks PI. Serum antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae were determined at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks PI. Results The immunostaining revealed a lower density of macrophages in the BALT of the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups. The highest number of M. hyopneumoniae organisms in the BAL fluid was measured at 4 weeks PI for the HV strain and at 8 weeks PI for the LV strain. Vaccination reduced the number of organisms non-significantly, though for the HV strain the reduction was clinically more relevant than for the LV strain. At the level of the individual pigs, a higher lung lesion score was associated with more M. hyopneumoniae organisms in the lungs and a higher density of the investigated immune cells in the BALT. Conclusions In conclusion, the infiltration of macrophages after infection with M. hyopneumoniae is reduced by vaccination. The M. hyopneumoniae replication in the lungs is also reduced in vaccinated pigs, though the HV strain is inhibited more than the LV strain.

  13. Vaccination reduces macrophage infiltration in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue in pigs infected with a highly virulent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Katleen; Maes, Dominiek; Marchioro, Silvana B; Villarreal, Iris; Chiers, Koen; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2012-03-12

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of enzootic pneumonia and is responsible for significant economic losses to the pig industry. To better understand the mode of action of a commercial, adjuvanted, inactivated whole cell vaccine and the influence of diversity on the efficacy of vaccination, we investigated samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs experimentally infected with either a low (LV) or a highly virulent (HV) M. hyopneumoniae strain. Non-vaccinated and sham-infected control groups were included. Lung tissue samples collected at 4 and 8 weeks post infection (PI) were immunohistochemically tested for the presence of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and macrophages in the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT). The number of M. hyopneumoniae organisms in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was determined using quantitative PCR at 4 and 8 weeks PI. Serum antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae were determined at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks PI. The immunostaining revealed a lower density of macrophages in the BALT of the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups. The highest number of M. hyopneumoniae organisms in the BAL fluid was measured at 4 weeks PI for the HV strain and at 8 weeks PI for the LV strain. Vaccination reduced the number of organisms non-significantly, though for the HV strain the reduction was clinically more relevant than for the LV strain. At the level of the individual pigs, a higher lung lesion score was associated with more M. hyopneumoniae organisms in the lungs and a higher density of the investigated immune cells in the BALT. In conclusion, the infiltration of macrophages after infection with M. hyopneumoniae is reduced by vaccination. The M. hyopneumoniae replication in the lungs is also reduced in vaccinated pigs, though the HV strain is inhibited more than the LV strain.

  14. A Vero-cell-adapted vaccine donor strain of influenza A virus generated by serial passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weibin; Zhang, Hong; Han, Qinglin; Li, Li; Chen, Yixin; Xia, Ningshao; Chen, Ze; Shu, Yuelong; Xu, Ke; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-03

    A cell culture-based vaccine production system is preferred for the large-scale production of influenza vaccines and has advantages for generating vaccines against highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. Vero cells have been widely used in human vaccine manufacturing, and the safety of these cells has been well demonstrated. However, the most commonly used influenza-vaccine donor virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) virus, does not grow efficiently in Vero cells. Therefore, we adapted the PR8 virus to Vero cells by continuous passaging, and a high-growth strain was obtained after 20 passages. Sequence analysis and virological assays of the adapted strain revealed that mutations in four viral internal genes (NP, PB1, PA and NS1) were sufficient for adaptation. The recombinant virus harboring these mutations (PR8-4mut) displayed accelerated viral transport into the nucleus and increased RNP activity. Importantly, the PR8-4mut could serve as a backbone donor virus to support the growth of the H7N1, H9N2 and H5N1 avian viruses and the H1N1 and H3N2 human viruses in Vero cells without changing its pathogenicity in either chicken embryos or mice. Thus, our work describes the generation of a Vero-adapted, high-yield PR8-4mut virus that may serve as a promising candidate for an influenza-vaccine donor virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of vaccination with La Sota strain vaccine to control Newcastle disease in village chickens in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sulochana; Dhawan, Mamta; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste

    2017-02-01

    The efficacy of vaccination with Newcastle disease (ND) La Sota and R2B (Mukteswar) modified live strain vaccines was determined by experimental challenge and with ND La Sota vaccine under field conditions in Nepal. Booster vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine after a primary vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine, induced a geometric mean titre (GMT) of 5.0 log2 haemagglutination inhibition (HI) units, compared to a GMT of 6.0 log2 HI units following booster vaccination with R2B vaccine 1 month after primary vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine. Both vaccines provided 100% protection against challenge with a local field ND strain. Furthermore, booster vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine induced protective levels of antibody after field use in villages in Jhapa, and no outbreaks of ND occurred during the study period. The ND La Sota modified live vaccine is immunogenic and efficacious and is a suitable vaccine for use in vaccination programmes in village chickens in the rural areas of Nepal.

  16. In vitro permissivity of bovine cells for wild-type and vaccinal myxoma virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foucras Gilles

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV, a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe, non-replicative vaccine vector for non-host species. However, there is very little information concerning infection of non-laboratory animals species cells with MYXV. In this study, we investigated interactions between bovine cells and respectively a wild type strain (T1 and a vaccinal strain (SG33 of MYXV. We showed that bovine KOP-R, BT and MDBK cell lines do not support MYXV production. Electron microscopy observations of BT-infected cells revealed the low efficiency of viral entry and the production of defective virions. In addition, infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC occurred at a very low level, even following non-specific activation, and was always abortive. We did not observe significant differences between the wild type strain and the vaccinal strain of MYXV, indicating that SG33 could be used for new bovine vaccination strategies.

  17. [Comparison of genotype characteristics between the circulating mumps virus strain in Beijing area and the vaccine strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Zhang, Tie-gang; Chen, Li-juan; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Wei

    2009-11-01

    To compare the genetic characteristics of mumps virus strain circulating in Beijing with vaccine strain and to preliminarily analysis the reasons of vaccine ineffectiveness. The following methods were used: Isolation and identification of the mumps virus which had been circulating in Beijing, immunization history analysis, SH gene sequence analysis and comparison genotype homology with reference strains and analysis of the key amino acid sites of HN variation. In 38 mumps cases that virus had been isolated from, another seven cases were IgM negative. In 2007 and 2008, the positive rates on virus isolation, RT-PCR and IgM-decreased significantly, while the cases with immunization history had an increase. Cases without histories of vaccination had both higher positive rates on virus isolation and IgM. Thirty-eight strains belonged to F genotype virus, but vaccine strain was A genotype. The circulating viruses showed 5.6% sequence divergence on SH gene nucleotide and 16.0% - 18.1% from vaccine strain. Conservative hydrophobic amino acids on SH protein of some Beijing strains had changed. For example, there were 6 strains, from No.8: L-->F. The circulating viruses showed 2.3% sequence divergence on HN protein amino acid sequences and 4.2% - 5.3% from vaccine strain. Amino acids sites, which deciding the ability of cross-neutralization of the Beijing strains and vaccine strains were different. At the 354 and 356 sites, all the Beijing strains were different from the vaccine strains. The N-glycosylation sites on HN of Beijing strains were also different from those on vaccine strains. Locations 464 - 466 appeared to be NCS on Beijing strain, but locations 464 - 466 were NCR on the vaccine strains. Another 18 unknown function amino acids sites of all Beijing strains were different from those on vaccine strains. In recent years, genotype F became the main genotype of circulating strains in Beijing without genotype variation, but larger difference was found between them

  18. Genogrouping of vaccine breakdown strains (VBS) of feline calicivirus in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, K; Sakai, S; Takahasi, T; Sunaga, F; Murakami, M; Kiuchi, A; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Hara, M; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2007-05-01

    Although prevention of feline calcivirus (FCV) infection by vaccination has been attempted, and isolation of FCV, development of the disease, and a few fatal cases in vaccinated cats have been reported. Fifteen FCV strains isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with commercially available FCV vaccines (F9, FCV-255, and FC-7) were genogrouped. Molecular analysis of viral genomes involved the construction of a phylogenetic tree of capsid genes using the NJ method. Cat anti-F9 serum and rabbit anti-FCV-255 serum were used for virus neutralization tests. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of 15 virus isolates and those of the previously published and GenBank-deposited 9 global and 14 Japanese strains showed that 8 (53%) of the 15 virus isolates as well as the vaccine strains F9 and FCV-255 belonged to genogroup I (G(A)I), and 7 (47%) belonged to genogroup II (G(A)II). Of the 8 G(A)I strains, 2 were isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with an F9 strain live vaccine, 5 from cats vaccinated with an FCV-255-derived vaccine, and 1 from a cat vaccinated with an FC-7-derived vaccine. Of the 7 GAll strains, 5 were isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with the F9 strain live vaccine, 1 from a cat vaccinated with the FCV-255-derived vaccine, and 1 from a cat vaccinated with the FC-7-derived vaccine. These results indicate that more vaccine breakdown strains isolated from the cats vaccinated with the F9 strain-derived vaccine belong to G(A)II than to G(A)I, whereas more vaccine breakdown strains isolated from the cats vaccinated with the FCV-255 strain-derived vaccine belong to G(A)I than to G(A)II, and that when the FC-7 strain-derived vaccine is used, the vaccine breakdown strains belong almost equally to G(A)I and G(A)II. Thus, the genogroups of virus isolates varied with the vaccine strain used (p < 0.05). On the other hand, the neutralizing titres of feline anti-F9 serum and rabbit anti-FCV-255 serum against the 15 isolates were

  19. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Piccirillo

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV. Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains.

  20. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains.

  1. Titration of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine without neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinonthanawech, Naraporn; Surichan, Somchaiya; Namsai, Aphinya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert; Kongchanagul, Alita

    2016-11-01

    Formulation and quality control of trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine requires titration of infectivity of individual strains in the trivalent mix. This is usually performed by selective neutralization of two of the three strains and titration of the un-neutralized strain in cell culture or embryonated eggs. This procedure requires standard sera with high neutralizing titer against each of the three strains. Obtaining standard sera, which can specifically neutralize only the corresponding strain of influenza viruses and is able to completely neutralize high concentration of virus in the vaccine samples, can be a problem for many vaccine manufacturers as vaccine stocks usually have very high viral titers and complete neutralization may not be obtained. Here an alternative approach for titration of individual strain in trivalent vaccine without the selective neutralization is presented. This was done by detecting individual strains with specific antibodies in an end-point titration of a trivalent vaccine in cell culture. Similar titers were observed in monovalent and trivalent vaccines for influenza A H3N2 and influenza B strains, whereas the influenza A H1N1 strain did not grow well in cell culture. Viral interference among the vaccine strains was not observed. Therefore, providing that vaccine strains grow well in cell culture, this assay can reliably determine the potency of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A wide extent of inter-strain diversity in virulent and vaccine strains of alphaherpesviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriah L Szpara

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alphaherpesviruses are widespread in the human population, and include herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and 2, and varicella zoster virus (VZV. These viral pathogens cause epithelial lesions, and then infect the nervous system to cause lifelong latency, reactivation, and spread. A related veterinary herpesvirus, pseudorabies (PRV, causes similar disease in livestock that result in significant economic losses. Vaccines developed for VZV and PRV serve as useful models for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine. We present full genome sequence comparisons of the PRV vaccine strain Bartha, and two virulent PRV isolates, Kaplan and Becker. These genome sequences were determined by high-throughput sequencing and assembly, and present new insights into the attenuation of a mammalian alphaherpesvirus vaccine strain. We find many previously unknown coding differences between PRV Bartha and the virulent strains, including changes to the fusion proteins gH and gB, and over forty other viral proteins. Inter-strain variation in PRV protein sequences is much closer to levels previously observed for HSV-1 than for the highly stable VZV proteome. Almost 20% of the PRV genome contains tandem short sequence repeats (SSRs, a class of nucleic acids motifs whose length-variation has been associated with changes in DNA binding site efficiency, transcriptional regulation, and protein interactions. We find SSRs throughout the herpesvirus family, and provide the first global characterization of SSRs in viruses, both within and between strains. We find SSR length variation between different isolates of PRV and HSV-1, which may provide a new mechanism for phenotypic variation between strains. Finally, we detected a small number of polymorphic bases within each plaque-purified PRV strain, and we characterize the effect of passage and plaque-purification on these polymorphisms. These data add to growing evidence that even plaque-purified stocks of stable DNA viruses exhibit

  3. Development of live attenuated influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelingh, Kathleen L; Luke, Catherine J; Jin, Hong; Talaat, Kawsar R

    2014-07-01

    Avian and animal influenza viruses can sporadically transmit to humans, causing outbreaks of varying severity. In some cases, further human-to-human virus transmission does not occur, and the outbreak in humans is limited. In other cases, sustained human-to-human transmission occurs, resulting in worldwide influenza pandemics. Preparation for future pandemics is an important global public health goal. A key objective of preparedness is to gain an understanding of how to design, test, and manufacture effective vaccines that could be stockpiled for use in a pandemic. This review summarizes results of an ongoing collaboration to produce, characterize, and clinically test a library of live attenuated influenza vaccine strains (based on Ann Arbor attenuated Type A strain) containing protective antigens from influenza viruses considered to be of high pandemic potential.

  4. Genomic analysis of chimeric human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates derived from strains Towne and Toledo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Nicolás M; Lau, Betty; Kemble, George M; Lee, Ronzo; Mocarski, Edward S; Wilkinson, Gavin W G; Adler, Stuart P; McVoy, Michael A; Davison, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients and a major cause of congenital birth defects when acquired in utero. In the 1990s, four chimeric viruses were constructed by replacing genome segments of the high passage Towne strain with segments of the low passage Toledo strain, with the goal of obtaining live attenuated vaccine candidates that remained safe but were more immunogenic than the overly attenuated Towne vaccine. The chimeras were found to be safe when administered to HCMV-seronegative human volunteers, but to differ significantly in their ability to induce seroconversion. This suggests that chimera-specific genetic differences impacted the ability to replicate or persist in vivo and the consequent ability to induce an antibody response. To identify specific genomic breakpoints between Towne and Toledo sequences and establish whether spontaneous mutations or rearrangements had occurred during construction of the chimeras, complete genome sequences were determined. No major deletions or rearrangements were observed, although a number of unanticipated mutations were identified. However, no clear association emerged between the genetic content of the chimeras and the reported levels of vaccine-induced HCMV-specific humoral or cellular immune responses, suggesting that multiple genetic determinants are likely to impact immunogenicity. In addition to revealing the genome organization of the four vaccine candidates, this study provided an opportunity to probe the genetics of HCMV attenuation in humans. The results may be valuable in the future design of safe live or replication-defective vaccines that optimize immunogenicity and efficacy.

  5. Genetic strain modification of a live rabies virus vaccine widely used in Europe for wildlife oral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliquet, Florence; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Picard Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    In Europe, the main reservoir and vector of rabies has been the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Oral immunization of foxes with live vaccines, using attenuated rabies strains (SAD B19, SAD Bern), apathogenic mutants of an attenuated strain (SAG2) and the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine (V-RG), has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. Among all vaccines currently used for wildlife oral vaccination, one vaccine (marketed as SAD Bern strain) has been widely used in Europe since 1992 with the distribution of 17million of baits in 2011. Because of the potential environmental safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the full genome sequencing of this vaccine was undertaken and the sequence was characterized and compared with those of referenced rabies viruses. The vaccine showed higher similarity to the strains belonging to the SAD B19 vaccine virus strains than to the SAD Bern vaccines. This study is the first one reporting on virus strain identity changes in this attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  7. Outer Membrane Proteins of Brucella abortus Vaccinal and Field Strains and their Immune Response in Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukhshanda Munir*, M. Afzal1, M. Hussain2, S. M. S. Naqvi3 and A. Khanum3

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs of three strains of B. abortus i.e. S19, RB51 and a local field isolate of biotype 1 were isolated through disrupting cells to generate membranes by centrifugation and sodium lauryl sarcosinate solubilisation of inner membrane proteins. Distinct OMP profiles of each strain were seen on SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE analysis of S19 and field isolate revealed eight protein bands in each strain. The OMPs of S19 had molecular masses 89.0, 73.0, 53.7, 49.0, 38.0, 27.0, 22.3, and 17.7 kDa, while field isolate had OMPs of 151.3, 89.0, 75.8, 67.6, 37.0, 27.0, 24.0 and 19.0 kDa. B. abortus RB51 yielded 11 OMP bands ranging from 12.5 to 107.1 kDa, with 34.2, 15.8 and 12.5 kDa as additional OMPs. Western immunoblot analysis using antisera raised against all three strains in buffaloes indicated an almost similar pattern of immuno-reactive OMPs in S19 and field strain. Two OMPs of molecular weight 37-38 and 19 kDa were immuno-reactive in all strains in buffaloes. There is possibility of use of these OMPs in a recombinant vaccine for B. abortus. A distinct protein of molecular weight of 151.3 kDa was identified in field strain but not in both vaccine strains of B. abortus. Use of this OMP in a diagnostic assay may differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals.

  8. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Twine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation.In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS.This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work also highlights differences in the humoral immune response to

  9. Genetic and antigenic characterisation of serotype A FMD viruses from East Africa to select new vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Fufa D; Parida, Satya; Tekleghiorghis, Tesfaalem; Dekker, Aldo; Sangula, Abraham; Reeve, Richard; Haydon, Daniel T; Paton, David J; Mahapatra, Mana

    2014-10-07

    Vaccine strain selection for emerging foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outbreaks in enzootic countries can be addressed through antigenic and genetic characterisation of recently circulating viruses. A total of 56 serotype A FMDVs isolated between 1998 and 2012, from Central, East and North African countries were characterised antigenically by virus neutralisation test using antisera to three existing and four candidate vaccine strains and, genetically by characterising the full capsid sequence data. A Bayesian analysis of the capsid sequence data revealed the viruses to be of either African or Asian topotypes with subdivision of the African topotype viruses into four genotypes (Genotypes I, II, IV and VII). The existing vaccine strains were found to be least cross-reactive (good matches observed for only 5.4-46.4% of the sampled viruses). Three bovine antisera, raised against A-EA-2007, A-EA-1981 and A-EA-1984 viruses, exhibited broad cross-neutralisation, towards more than 85% of the circulating viruses. Of the three vaccines, A-EA-2007 was the best showing more than 90% in-vitro cross-protection, as well as being the most recent amongst the vaccine strains used in this study. It therefore appears antigenically suitable as a vaccine strain to be used in the region in FMD control programmes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Sequencing and characterization of Varicella-Zoster virus vaccine strain SuduVax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella-zoster virus (VZV causes chickenpox in children and shingles in older people. Currently, live attenuated vaccines based on the Oka strain are available worldwide. In Korea, an attenuated VZV vaccine has been developed from a Korean isolate and has been commercially available since 1994. Despite this long history of use, the mechanism for the attenuation of the vaccine strain is still elusive. We attempted to understand the molecular basis of attenuation mechanism by full genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses of the Korean vaccine strain SuduVax. Results SuduVax was found to contain a genome that was 124,759 bp and possessed 74 open reading frames (ORFs. SuduVax was genetically most close to Oka strains and these Korean-Japanese strains formed a strong clade in phylogenetic trees. SuduVax, similar to the Oka vaccine strains, underwent T- > C substitution at the stop codon of ORF0, resulting in a read-through mutation to code for an extended form of ORF0 protein. SuduVax also shared certain deletion and insertion mutations in ORFs 17, 29, 56 and 60 with Oka vaccine strains and some clinical strains. Conclusions The Korean VZV vaccine strain SuduVax is genetically similar to the Oka vaccine strains. Further comparative genomic and bioinformatics analyses will help to elucidate the molecular basis of the attenuation of the VZV vaccine strains.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Capripoxvirus Strain KSGP 0240 from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; Van Borm, Steven; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-10-20

    Capripoxviruses cause economically important diseases in domestic ruminants in regions endemic for these viruses. We report here the complete genome sequence of the KSGP 0240 vaccine strain from the live attenuated vaccine Kenyavac (JOVAC). Copyright © 2016 Vandenbussche et al.

  12. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of Vero cells infected with virulent and CV777 vaccine strain-like strains of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Hu, Han; Chen, Fangzhou; Li, Zhonghua; Ye, Shiyi; Cheng, Shuang; Zhang, Mengjia; He, Qigai

    2016-01-01

    The re-emerging porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) variant related diarrhea has been documented in China since late 2010 and now with global distribution. Currently, a virulent PEDV CH/YNKM-8/2013 and a CV777 vaccine strain-like AH-M have been successfully isolated from the clinical samples. To dissect out the underlying pathogenic mechanism of virulent PEDV and clarify the differences between virulent and CV777 vaccine strain-like PEDV infections, we performed an iTRAQ-based comparative quantitative proteomic study of Vero cells infected with both PEDV strains. A total of 661 and 474 differentially expressed proteins were identified upon virulent and CV777 vaccine strain-like isolates infection, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was employed to investigate the canonical pathways and functional networks involved in both PEDV infections. Comprehensive studies have revealed that the PEDV virulent strain suppressed protein synthesis of Vero cells through down-regulating mTOR as well as its downstream targets 4EBP1 and p70S6K activities, which were validated by immunoblotting. In addition, the virulent strain could activate NF-κB pathway more intensively than the CV777 vaccine strain-like isolate, and elicit stronger inflammatory cascades as well. These data might provide new insights for elucidating the specific pathogenesis of PEDV infection, and pave the way for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Porcine epidemic diarrhea is now worldwide distributed and causing huge economic losses to swine industry. The immunomodulation and pathogenesis between PEDV and host, as well as the difference between virulent and attenuated strains of PEDV infections are still largely unknown. In this study, we presented for the first application of proteomic analysis to compare whole cellular protein alterations induced by virulent and CV777 vaccine strain-like PEDV infections, which might contribute to understand the pathogenesis of PEDV and anti

  13. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...... not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum...... after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals...

  14. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  15. Safety and efficacy of reduced doses of Brucella melitensis strain Rev. 1 vaccine in pregnant Iranian fat-tailed ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ebrahimi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases and is a significant cause of abortion in animals. Brucella melitensis strain Rev. 1 is recommended as the most effective vaccine for small ruminants but the application of full doses in adult animals is restricted. This study was conducted to determine a proper reduced dose of vaccine which confers protection but which is not abortifacient in Iranian fat-tailed sheep. A total of 51 non-vaccinated pregnant ewes were divided into three main groups and several subgroups. Ewes in different groups were vaccinated at different stages of pregnancy and various subgroups were subcutaneously immunised with different quantities of the micro-organism (7.5 × 106, 106, 5 × 105. Ewes again became pregnant a year later and were challenged with the wild-type strain to evaluate the protection conferred. Results revealed that the proportion of vaccination-induced abortions was significantly higher in ewes immunised with 7.5 × 106 Rev. 1 organisms than in those which received 106 or 5 × 105 bacteria. While 80% of non-vaccinated ewes aborted after challenge, none of the vaccinated ewes aborted post-challenge. This study indicated that a reduced dose of Rev. 1 vaccine containing 106 or 5 × 105 live cells could be safely used to induce protection in Iranian fat-tailed sheep at various stages of pregnancy.

  16. A Web-Based Platform for Designing Vaccines against Existing and Emerging Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Vir, Pooja; Singla, Deepak; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Shailesh; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for saving millions of premature deaths every year due to tuberculosis. This paper describes a web portal developed for assisting researchers in designing vaccines against emerging Mtb strains using traditional and modern approaches. Firstly, we annotated 59 genomes of Mycobacterium species to understand similarity/dissimilarity between tuberculoid, non-tuberculoid and vaccine strains at genome level. Secondly, antigen-based vaccine candidates have been predicted in each Mtb strain. Thirdly, epitopes-based vaccine candidates were predicted/discovered in above antigen-based vaccine candidates that can stimulate all arms of immune system. Finally, a database of predicted vaccine candidates at epitopes as well at antigen level has been developed for above strains. In order to design vaccine against a newly sequenced genome of Mtb strain, server integrates three modules for identification of strain-, antigen-, epitope-specific vaccine candidates. We observed that 103,522 unique peptides (9mers) had the potential to induce an antibody response and/or promiscuous binder to MHC alleles and/or have the capability to stimulate T lymphocytes. In summary, this web-portal will be useful for researchers working on designing vaccines against Mtb including drug-resistant strains. The database is available freely at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/mtbveb/.

  17. Capripox disease in Ethiopia: Genetic differences between field isolates and vaccine strain, and implications for vaccination failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaye, Esayas; Belay, Alebachew; Ayelet, Gelagay; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Yami, Martha; Loitsch, Angelika; Tuppurainen, Eeva; Grabherr, Reingard; Diallo, Adama; Lamien, Charles Euloge

    2015-07-01

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV), goatpox virus (GTPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) of the genus Capripoxvirus (CaPV) cause capripox disease in sheep, goats and cattle, respectively. These viruses are not strictly host-specific and their geographical distribution is complex. In Ethiopia, where sheep, goats and cattle are all affected, a live attenuated vaccine strain (KS1-O180) is used for immunization of both small ruminants and cattle. Although occurrences of the disease in vaccinated cattle are frequently reported, information on the circulating isolates and their relation to the vaccine strain in use are still missing. The present study addressed the parameters associated with vaccination failure in Ethiopia. Retrospective outbreak data were compiled and isolates collected from thirteen outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle at various geographical locations and years were analyzed and compared to the vaccine strain. Isolates of GTPV and LSDV genotypes were responsible for the capripox outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle, respectively, while SPPV was absent. Pathogenic isolates collected from vaccinated cattle were identical to those from the non-vaccinated ones. The vaccine strain, genetically distinct from the outbreak isolates, was not responsible for these outbreaks. This study shows capripox to be highly significant in Ethiopia due to low performance of the local vaccine and insufficient vaccination coverage. The development of new, more efficient vaccine strains, a GTPV strain for small ruminants and a LSDV for cattle, is needed to promote the acceptance by farmers, thus contribute to better control of CaPVs in Ethiopia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Strain BN-1 and Vaccine Strain BN-CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is associated with upper respiratory disease in cattle in many countries. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of the BPIV3 BN-1 strain, isolated from cattle in Japan, and the BN-CE vaccine strain, derived from the BN-1 strain by passages in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

  20. Humoral response to calicivirus in captive tigers given a dual-strain vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tara M; Harrison, Scott H; Sikarskie, James G; Armstrong, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The current feline vaccine with a single strain of calicivirus has been used for captive tigers, yet it may not protect against virulent systemic calicivirus infections. A cross-institutional study investigated the humoral response to a new dual-strain, killed-virus calicivirus vaccine for nine captive tigers. The subspecies of these tigers were Amur (Panthera tigris altaica), Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris), and Malayan (Panthera tigris jacksoni). Serum neutralization titers for virulent feline calicivirus strain FCV-DD1 were higher following dual-strain vaccine administration. There were no reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Dual-strain vaccination may afford broadened cross-protection against different calicivirus strains and is desirable to reduce the risk of virulent systemic calicivirus disease in tigers.

  1. Genetic instability of live, attenuated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Verhoef, K.; van Wamel, J. L.; Back, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Live, attenuated viruses have been the most successful vaccines in monkey models of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, there are several safety concerns about using such an anti-HIV vaccine in humans, including reversion of the vaccine strain to virulence and

  2. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against brucellosis in bison. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Molecular characterization of rotavirus strains from pre- and post-vaccination periods in a country with low vaccination coverage: the case of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Andrej; Sagadin, Martin; Kolenc, Marko; Poljšak-Prijatelj, Mateja

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccination started in Slovenia in 2007 on a voluntarily basis. The vaccination rate is relatively low (up to 27%) and no increasing trend is observed. We present rotavirus genotype distribution among children hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Slovenia. Eight consecutive rotavirus seasons were followed, from 2005/06 to 2012/13, and 113 strains of the most common rotavirus genotypes were randomly selected for molecular characterization of rotavirus VP7 and VP4 (VP8(∗)) genome segments. During the vaccine introduction period, from 2007 to 2013, rotavirus genotype prevalences changed, with G1P[8] decreasing from 74.1% to 8.7% between 2007/08 and 2010/11 seasons, replaced by G4P[8] and G2P[4], with up to 52.0% prevalence. Comparable analysis of VP7 and VP8(∗) genome fragments within G1P[8] genotype lineages revealed considerable differences for rotavirus strains circulating before and during the vaccination period. The G1P[8] rotavirus strains from the pre-vaccination period clustered in a phylogenetic tree within Rotarix®-like VP7 and VP8(∗) lineages. However, since 2007, the majority of G1P[8] strains have shifted to distant genetic lineages with lower nucleotide (88.1-94.0% for VP7 and 86.6-91.1% for VP8(∗)) and amino acid (93.8-95.2% for VP7 and 85.3-94.6% for VP8(∗)) identities to the vaccine Rotarix® strain. This change also resulted in a different deduced amino acid profile at the major VP7 and VP8(∗) antigenic epitopes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 produces low levels of M-like O-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2002-03-15

    Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough (R) stable vaccine strain used in cattle and is believed to be devoid of O-side chain. We analyzed by use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against seven previously defined O-polysaccharide (O-PS) epitopes the O-chain expression in strain RB51. Two MAbs specific for the C/Y (A=M) and C (M>A) epitopes showed low bindings in ELISA to strain RB51. O-chain expression was further confirmed by Western blot after SDS-PAGE of strain RB51. In particular, the MAb of C (M>A) specificity, showing preferential binding to M-dominant smooth (S) Brucella strains, revealed in strain RB51 a typical smooth-lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) pattern which resembled that of M-dominant S-LPS. Thus, the results clearly show that strain RB51 produces low levels of M-like O-antigen.

  5. A gE-negative BHV1 vaccine virus strain cannot perpetuate in cattle populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, M H; de Jong, M C; van Oirschot, J T

    2000-04-14

    Three identical transmission experiments were successively performed to quantitatively evaluate the possible transmission of a gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine strain among cattle. After intranasal inoculation, the vaccine virus was excreted in high titers in nasal fluids. However, the vaccine virus was transmitted to only one sentinel in one experiment, and not to any of the 10 sentinel cattle in the other two experiments. Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the expected number of cases per vaccine-inoculated animal, i.e. the transmission ratio R(0) of the vaccine strain, is significantly below 1. The R(0) was estimated to be 0.14. After intramuscular inoculation, shedding of vaccine virus was not detected. Therefore, we concluded that it is highly unlikely that this live gE-negative BHV1 vaccine strain will perpetuate in the cattle population.

  6. Evolutionary and bioinformatic analysis of the spike glycoprotein gene of H120 vaccine strain protectotype of infectious bronchitis virus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Pillai, Aravind S; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Khulape, Sagar Aashok; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2016-01-01

    The infectious bronchitis virus is a causative agent of avian infectious bronchitis (AIB), and is is an important disease that produces severe economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Recent AIB outbreaks in India have been associated with poor growth in broilers, drop in egg production, and thin egg shells in layers. The complete spike gene of Indian AIB vaccine strain was amplified and sequenced using a conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and is submitted to the GenBank (accession no KF188436). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the vaccine strain currently used belongs to H120 genotype, an attenuated strain of Massachusetts (Mass) serotype. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons have shown that the reported spike gene from Indian isolates have 71.8%-99% and 71.4%-96.9% genetic similarity with the sequenced H120 strain. The study identifies live attenuated IBV vaccine strain, which is routinely used for vaccination, for the first time. Based on nucleotide and amino acid relatedness studies of the vaccine strain with reported IBV sequences from India, it is shown that the current vaccine strain is efficient in controlling the IBV infection. Continuous monitoring of IBV outbreaks by sequencing for genotyping and in vivo cross protection studies for serotyping is not only important for epidemiological investigation but also for evaluation of efficacy of the current vaccine. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Strain predominance following exposure of vaccinated and naive pregnant gilts to multiple strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Kelly M; Mengeling, William L; Wesley, Ronald D

    2003-05-01

    Two studies were performed in order to test the relative ability of different strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to replicate and cross the placental barrier in pregnant gilts. Study 1 comprised 6 nonvaccinated gilts. Study 2 comprised 8 nonvaccinated gilts and 12 gilts that were vaccinated twice before conception. On, or about, gestation day 90 all gilts were simultaneously exposed to 20 field strains of PRRSV (all strains were distinguishable by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns). Gilts of study 1 were euthanized on day 7 postpartum. Gilts of study 2 were euthanized on, or about, gestation day 111. All gilts, pigs, and fetuses were tested for the presence and type of strain of PRRSV. Of 128 samples shown to contain PRRSV, 118 contained a single strain, 4 contained 2 strains, and 2 contained a strain or strains for which the RFLP pattern was undecipherable. Only 8 of the 20 strains were isolated from nonvaccinated gilts and their litters. And only 2 of the 20 strains (notably 2 of the same strains isolated from nonvaccinated gilts and their litters), were isolated from vaccinated gilts and their litters. Moreover, 1 of the 2 strains accounted for most (31 of 37; 84%) of the isolates from the vaccinated group. Collectively these results indicate that strains differ in their ability to replicate in pregnant gilts and cross the placental barrier. And they suggest that maternal immunity, although sometimes insufficient to prevent transplacental infection, can exert additional selective pressure.

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine bait containing ERA strain of attenuated rabies virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, K F; Black, J G; Charlton, K M; Johnston, D H; Rhodes, A J

    1987-01-01

    Ninety percent of foxes fed commercial ERA vaccine in a specially designed bait developed rabies serum neutralizing antibodies. The vaccine bait did not cause clinical signs of rabies when consumed by foxes, raccoons, skunks, dogs, cats, cattle and monkeys. When presented, in the laboratory, to wild rodents of the species Microtus, Mus musculus and Peromyscus, the vaccine baits caused vaccine-induced rabies only in Mus musculus. Laboratory mice of the CD-1 and CLL strain were susceptible to v...

  9. Genetic and antigenic characterization of serotype O FMD viruses from East Africa for the selection of suitable vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Jones, Katie; Mahapatra, Mana; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Paton, David J; Babu, Aravindh; Hutchings, Geoff; Parida, Satya

    2017-12-14

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Eastern Africa with circulation of multiple serotypes of the virus in the region. Most of the outbreaks are caused by serotype O followed by serotype A. The lack of concerted FMD control programmes in Africa has provided little incentive for vaccine producers to select vaccines that are tailored to circulating regional isolates creating further negative feedback to deter the introduction of vaccine-based control schemes. In this study a total of 80 serotype O FMD viruses (FMDV) isolated from 1993 to 2012 from East and North Africa were characterized by virus neutralisation tests using bovine antisera to three existing (O/KEN/77/78, O/Manisa and O/PanAsia-2) and three putative (O/EA/2002, O/EA/2009 and O/EA/2010) vaccine strains and by capsid sequencing. Genetically, these viruses were grouped as either of East African origin with subdivision into four topotypes (EA-1, 2, 3 and 4) or of Middle-East South Asian (ME-SA) topotype. The ME-SA topotype viruses were mainly detected in Egypt and Libya reflecting the trade links with the Middle East countries. There was good serological cross-reactivity between the vaccine strains and most of the field isolates analysed, indicating that vaccine selection should not be a major constraint for control of serotype O FMD by vaccination, and that both local and internationally available commercial vaccines could be used. The O/KEN/77/78 vaccine, commonly used in the region, exhibited comparatively lower percent in vitro match against the predominant topotypes (EA-2 and EA-3) circulating in the region whereas O/PanAsia-2 and O/Manisa vaccines revealed broader protection against East African serotype O viruses, even though they genetically belong to the ME-SA topotype. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of gyrB and rpoB gene mutations and differentially expressed proteins between a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence comparison between the full-length 2412 bp DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB) gene of a novobiocin resistant Aeromonas hydrophila AH11NOVO vaccine strain and that of its virulent parent strain AH11P revealed 10 missense mutations. Similarly, sequence comparison between the full-length 4092 bp RNA ...

  11. Vaccine-induced rabies case in a cow (Bos taurus): Molecular characterisation of vaccine strain in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuta, Vlad; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Barboi, Gheorghe; Motiu, Razvan; Barbuceanu, Florica; Vlagioiu, Constantin; Cliquet, Florence

    2016-09-22

    Rabies is a fatal neuropathogenic zoonosis caused by the rabies virus of the Lyssavirus genus, Rhabdoviridae family. The oral vaccination of foxes - the main reservoir of rabies in Europe - using a live attenuated rabies virus vaccine was successfully conducted in many Western European countries. In July 2015, a rabies vaccine strain was isolated from the brain tissues of a clinically suspect cow (Bos taurus) in Romania. The nucleotide analysis of both N and G gene sequences showed 100% identity between the rabid animal, the GenBank reference SAD B19 strain and five rabies vaccine batches used for the national oral vaccination campaign targeting foxes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Humoral Immune Response of Elks (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and Mice to Vaccination with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, Lesley A.

    1997-01-01

    Vaccine Brucella abortus strain RB51, unlike the wild strain 2308 and another vaccine strain (strain 19) does not induce anti-O-chain antibodies. An efficacious vaccine strain that fails to produce an O-chain and thus a lack of an anti-O-chain humoral response greatly simplifies identification of vaccinated versus field strain infected animals. The three primary objectives of this research were the following: 1) to develop a serological assay to detect anti-RB51 antibodies in vaccinated elk (...

  13. Molecular characterisation and nucleotide sequence analysis of canine parvovirus strains in vaccines in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukdeb Nandi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV‑2 is one of the most important viruses that causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and myocarditis of dogs worldwide. The picture has been complicated further due to the emergence of new mutants of CPV, namely: CPV‑2a, CPV‑2b and CPV‑2c. In this study, the molecular characterisation of strains present in the CPV vaccines available on the Indian market was performed using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The VP1/VP2 genes of two vaccine strains and a field strain (Bhopal were sequenced and the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared. The results indicated that the isolate belonged to CPV type 2b and the strains in the vaccines belonged to type CPV‑2. From the study, it is inferred that the CPV strain used in commercially available vaccine preparation differed from the strains present in CPV infection in dogs in India

  14. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava; Nielsen, Jens; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse

    2014-06-04

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals, together with archival samples from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2gif and subsequently CSFV challenged, were analysed for specific antibodies using ELISAs and for homologous neutralising antibodies. In animals vaccinated with CP7_E2gif, neutralising antibodies were detected from day 10. However, the sera remained negative for anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies whereas pigs vaccinated with C-strain seroconverted against CSFV by 14 days after vaccination, as determined by a CSFV-E2 specific blocking ELISA. One week after subsequent CSFV challenge, a strong anti-CSFV E2 reaction was detected in CP7_E2gif vaccinated pigs and anti-E(rns) antibodies were detected from 10 days after infection. In conclusion, CP7_E2gif has the potential to be used as a DIVA vaccine in combination with detection of anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Different levels of immunogenicity of two strains of Fowlpox virus as recombinant vaccine vectors eliciting T-cell responses in heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Matthew G; van Maurik, Andre; Zago, Manola; Newton, Angela T; Anderson, Richard J; Howard, M Keith; Schneider, Jörg; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    The FP9 strain of F has been described as a more immunogenic recombinant vaccine vector than the Webster FPV-M (FPW) strain (R. J. Anderson et al., J. Immunol. 172:3094-3100, 2004). This study expands the comparison to include two separate recombinant antigens and multiple, rather than single, independent viral clones derived from the two strains. Dual-poxvirus heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens using individual clones of recombinant FP9 or FPW in combination with recombinant modified V Ankara expressing the same antigen were evaluated for their ability to elicit T-cell responses against recombinant antigens from Plasmodium berghei (circumsporozoite protein) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein). Gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays of the responses to specific epitopes confirmed the approximately twofold-greater cellular immunogenicity of FP9 compared to FPW, when given as the priming or boosting immunization. Equality of transgene expression in mouse cells infected with the two strains in vitro was verified by Western blotting. Directed partial sequence analysis and PCR analysis of FPW and comparison to available whole-genome sequences revealed that many loci that are mutated in the highly attenuated and culture-adapted FP9 strain are wild type in FPW, including the seven multikilobase deletions. These "passage-specific" alterations are hypothesized to be involved in determining the immunogenicity of fowlpox virus as a recombinant vaccine vector.

  16. Vibrio cholerae classical biotype strains reveal distinct signatures in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Munirul; Islam, M Tarequl; Rashed, Shah Manzur; Johura, Fatema-tuz; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales, Rosario; Mendez, Jose Luis; Navarro, Armando; Watanabe, Haruo; Hasan, Nur-A; Colwell, Rita R; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical (CL) biotype caused the fifth and sixth pandemics, and probably the earlier cholera pandemics, before the El Tor (ET) biotype initiated the seventh pandemic in Asia in the 1970s by completely displacing the CL biotype. Although the CL biotype was thought to be extinct in Asia and although it had never been reported from Latin America, V. cholerae CL and ET biotypes, including a hybrid ET, were found associated with areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1991 and 1997. In this study, CL biotype strains isolated from areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1983 and 1997 were characterized in terms of major phenotypic and genetic traits and compared with CL biotype strains isolated in Bangladesh between 1962 and 1989. According to sero- and biotyping data, all V. cholerae strains tested had the major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics specific for the CL biotype. Antibiograms revealed the majority of the Bangladeshi strains to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, furazolidone, ampicillin, and gentamicin, while the Mexican strains were sensitive to all of these drugs, as well as to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI-digested genomic DNA revealed characteristic banding patterns for all of the CL biotype strains although the Mexican strains differed from the Bangladeshi strains in 1 to 2 DNA bands. The difference was subtle but consistent, as confirmed by the subclustering patterns in the PFGE-based dendrogram, and can serve as a regional signature, suggesting the pre-1991 existence and evolution of the CL biotype strains in the Americas, independent from Asia.

  17. Live Brucella abortus rough vaccine strain RB51 stimulates enhanced innate immune response in vitro compared to rough vaccine strain RB51SOD and virulent smooth strain 2308 in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Naveen; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Heid, Bettina; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Makris, Melissa R; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2011-01-10

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, coccobacillary, facultative intracellular pathogens. B. abortus strain 2308 is a pathogenic strain affecting cattle and humans. Rough B. abortus strain RB51, which lacks the O-side chain of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is the live attenuated USDA approved vaccine for cattle in the United States. Strain RB51SOD, which overexpresses Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), has been shown to confer better protection than strain RB51 in a murine model. Protection against brucellosis is mediated by a strong CD4+ Th(1) and CD8+ Tc(1) adaptive immune response. In order to stimulate a robust adaptive response, a solid innate immune response, including that mediated by dendritic cells, is essential. As dendritic cells (DCs) are highly susceptible to Brucella infection, it is possible that pathogenic strains could limit the innate and thereby adaptive immune response. By contrast, vaccine strains could limit or bolster the innate and subsequent adaptive immune response. Identifying how Brucella vaccines stimulate innate and adaptive immunity is critical for enhancing vaccine efficacy. The ability of rough vaccine strains RB51 and RB51SOD to stimulate DC function has not been characterized. We report that live rough vaccine strain RB51 induced significantly better (p ≤ 0.05) DC maturation and function compared to either strain RB51SOD or smooth virulent strain 2308, based on costimulatory marker expression and cytokine production. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Proteomic profile of culture filtrate from the Brazilian vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Moreau compared to M. bovis BCG Pasteur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degrave Wim M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB and comprises a heterogeneous family of sub-strains with genotypic and phenotypic differences. The World Health Organization (WHO affirms that the characterization of BCG sub-strains, both on genomic and proteomic levels, is crucial for a better comprehension of the vaccine. In addition, these studies can contribute in the development of a more efficient vaccine against TB. Here, we combine two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE and mass spectrometry to analyse the proteomic profile of culture filtrate proteins (CFPs from M. bovis BCG Moreau, the Brazilian vaccine strain, comparing it to that of BCG Pasteur. CFPs are considered of great importance given their dominant immunogenicity and role in pathogenesis, being available for interaction with host cells since early infection. Results The 2DE proteomic map of M. bovis BCG Moreau CFPs in the pH range 3 - 8 allowed the identification of 158 spots corresponding to 101 different proteins, identified by MS/MS. Comparison to BCG Pasteur highlights the great similarity between these BCG strains. However, quantitative analysis shows a higher expression of immunogenic proteins such as Rv1860 (BCG1896, Apa, Rv1926c (BCG1965c, Mpb63 and Rv1886c (BCG1923c, Ag85B in BCG Moreau when compared to BCG Pasteur, while some heat shock proteins, such as Rv0440 (BCG0479, GroEL2 and Rv0350 (BCG0389, DnaK, show the opposite pattern. Conclusions Here we report the detailed 2DE profile of CFPs from M. bovis BCG Moreau and its comparison to BCG Pasteur, identifying differences that may provide relevant information on vaccine efficacy. These findings contribute to the detailed characterization of the Brazilian vaccine strain against TB, revealing aspects that may lead to a better understanding of the factors leading to BCG's variable protective efficacy against TB.

  19. Serotype diversity and reassortment between human and animal rotavirus strains: implications for rotavirus vaccine programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Jon R; Laird, Ashley R; Bielfelt, Brittany; Griffin, Dixie D; Banyai, Krisztian; Ramachandran, Madhu; Jain, Vivek; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Nakagomi, Osamu; Kirkwood, Carl D; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Bresee, Joseph S; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I

    2005-09-01

    The development of rotavirus vaccines that are based on heterotypic or serotype-specific immunity has prompted many countries to establish programs to assess the disease burden associated with rotavirus infection and the distribution of rotavirus strains. Strain surveillance helps to determine whether the most prevalent local strains are likely to be covered by the serotype antigens found in current vaccines. After introduction of a vaccine, this surveillance could detect which strains might not be covered by the vaccine. Almost 2 decades ago, studies demonstrated that 4 globally common rotavirus serotypes (G1-G4) represent >90% of the rotavirus strains in circulation. Subsequently, these 4 serotypes were used in the development of reassortant vaccines predicated on serotype-specific immunity. More recently, the application of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction genotyping, nucleotide sequencing, and antigenic characterization methods has confirmed the importance of the 4 globally common types, but a much greater strain diversity has also been identified (we now recognize strains with at least 42 P-G combinations). These studies also identified globally (G9) or regionally (G5, G8, and P2A[6]) common serotype antigens not covered by the reassortant vaccines that have undergone efficacy trials. The enormous diversity and capacity of human rotaviruses for change suggest that rotavirus vaccines must provide good heterotypic protection to be optimally effective.

  20. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, V; Blixenkrone-Møller, M; Elia, G; Lucente, M S; Cirone, F; Decaro, N; Nielsen, L; Bányai, K; Carmichael, L E; Buonavoglia, C

    2011-02-01

    Both egg- and cell-adapted canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines are suspected to retain residual virulence, especially if administered to immuno-suppressed animals, very young pups or to highly susceptible animal species. In the early 1980s, post-vaccine encephalitis was reported in dogs from various parts of Britain after administration of a particular batch of combined CDV Rockborn strain/canine adenovirus type-1 vaccine, although incrimination of the Rockborn strain was subsequently retracted. Notwithstanding, this, and other reports, led to the view that the Rockborn strain is less attenuated and less safe than other CDV vaccines, and the Rockborn strain was officially withdrawn from the markets in the mid 1990s. By sequencing the H gene of the strain Rockborn from the 46th laboratory passage, and a commercial vaccine (Candur(®) SH+P, Hoechst Rousell Vet GmbH), the virus was found to differ from the commonly used vaccine strain, Onderstepoort (93.0% nt and 91.7% aa), and to resemble more closely (99.6% nt and 99.3% aa) a CDV strain detected in China from a Lesser Panda (Ailurus fulgens). An additional four CDV strains matching (>99% nt identity) the Rockborn virus were identified in the sequence databases. Also, Rockborn-like strains were identified in two vaccines currently in the market. These findings indicate that Rockborn-like viruses may be recovered from dogs or other carnivores with distemper, suggesting cases of residual virulence of vaccines, or circulation of vaccine-derived Rockborn-like viruses in the field. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethical analyses of vaccines grown in human cell strains derived from abortion: arguments and Internet search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard Kent

    2004-10-22

    The fact that certain vaccines are grown in cell strains derived decades ago from an aborted fetus is a concern for some. To understand such concerns, a standardized search identified internet sites discussing vaccines and abortion. Ethical concerns raised include autonomy, conscience, coherence, and immoral material complicity. Two strategies to analyse moral complicity show that vaccination is ethical: the abortions were past events separated in time, agency, and purpose from vaccine production. Rubella disease during pregnancy results in many miscarriages and malformations. Altruism, the burden of rubella disease, and protection by herd immunity argue for widespread vaccination although autonomous decisions and personal conscience should be respected.

  2. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-07-17

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine.

  3. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71, both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD, are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024 isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine.

  4. Strain predominance following exposure of vaccinated and naive pregnant gilts to multiple strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lager, Kelly M.; Mengeling, William L.; Wesley, Ronald D.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies were performed in order to test the relative ability of different strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to replicate and cross the placental barrier in pregnant gilts. Study 1 comprised 6 nonvaccinated gilts. Study 2 comprised 8 nonvaccinated gilts and 12 gilts that were vaccinated twice before conception. On, or about, gestation day 90 all gilts were simultaneously exposed to 20 field strains of PRRSV (all strains were distinguishable by restricti...

  5. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Elia, G.

    2011-01-01

    to differ from the commonly used vaccine strain, Onderstepoort (93.0% nt and 91.7% aa), and to resemble more closely (99.6% nt and 99.3% aa) a CDV strain detected in China from a Lesser Panda (Ailurus fulgens). An additional four CDV strains matching (>99% nt identity) the Rockborn virus were identified...

  6. Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine: immune response after calfhood vaccination and field investigation in Italian cattle population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Manuela; Bonfini, Barbara; De Massis, Fabrizio; Giovannini, Armando; Di Ventura, Mauro; Nannini, Donatella; Caporale, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Immune response to Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine was measured in cattle vaccinated at calfhood. After an increase at day 6 post-vaccination (pv), the antibody level recorded in the 10 vaccinated animals remained constant for two months, and then progressively decreased. All vaccinated animals remained negative from day 162 pv to the end of the study (day 300 pv). Only at days 13 and 14 pv the RB51-CFT showed 100% sensitivity (credibility interval (CI) 76.2%-100%). The results indicate that the possibility to use RB51-CFT for the identification of cattle vaccinated at calfhood with RB51 is limited in time. A field investigation was carried out on 26,975 sera collected on regional basis from the Italian cattle population. The study outcomes indicate that in case of RB51-CFT positive results observed in officially Brucellosis-free (OBF) areas and, in any case, when an illegal use of RB51 vaccine is suspected, the use of the RB51-CFT alone is not sufficient to identify all the vaccinated animals. The design of a more sophisticated diagnostic protocol including an epidemiological investigation, the use of RB51-CFT, and the use of the skin test with RB51 as antigen is deemed more appropriate for the identification of RB51 vaccinated animals.

  7. Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Vaccine: Immune Response after Calfhood Vaccination and Field Investigation in Italian Cattle Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Tittarelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune response to Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine was measured in cattle vaccinated at calfhood. After an increase at day 6 post-vaccination (pv, the antibody level recorded in the 10 vaccinated animals remained constant for two months, and then progressively decreased. All vaccinated animals remained negative from day 162 pv to the end of the study (day 300 pv. Only at days 13 and 14 pv the RB51-CFT showed 100% sensitivity (credibility interval (CI 76.2%–100%. The results indicate that the possibility to use RB51-CFT for the identification of cattle vaccinated at calfhood with RB51 is limited in time. A field investigation was carried out on 26,975 sera collected on regional basis from the Italian cattle population. The study outcomes indicate that in case of RB51-CFT positive results observed in officially Brucellosis-free (OBF areas and, in any case, when an illegal use of RB51 vaccine is suspected, the use of the RB51-CFT alone is not sufficient to identify all the vaccinated animals. The design of a more sophisticated diagnostic protocol including an epidemiological investigation, the use of RB51-CFT, and the use of the skin test with RB51 as antigen is deemed more appropriate for the identification of RB51 vaccinated animals.

  8. Genotypic characterization by multi locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis international Bordetella pertussis vaccine strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fatah Moghadam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1930's first whole cell pertussis vaccines became available to the public heralding a dramatic success in overcoming the global burden of the disease. To date only a handful of B. pertussis strains have been used by international/local pertussis vaccine manufacturers. Inevitable well-documented genetic changes in the world population of this pathogen have prompted serious questions on suitability of traditional vaccine strains protect human against currently circulating wild isolates of Bordetella pertussis. Objective: Analyzing the genetic diversity within the most frequently-used vaccine strains of B. pertussis in the world Methods: A recently developed multi locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA genotyping system along with a bioinforamtic piece of analysis was conducted on 11 strain / substrains of B137, B203 (10536, C393, Cs, E476, Tohama I, J445 (134, B202 and J446 (509 plus 2 sub-strains of 134 and 509 that are used at Razi institute for preparation of pertussis vaccine. In this study have used 6 individual loci of VNTR1, VNTR3a, VNTR3b, VNTR4, VNTR5 and VNTR6. Findings: Six distinct genotypes were recognized among the examined strains by comparing our data with the Dutch MLVA databank. These were all new and not reported before in the database. Conclusion: This observation reiterates on necessity for detection of predominant native strains to include in vaccine preparations suitable for different countries.

  9. Molecular characterisation and ovine live vaccine 1B evaluation toward a Chlamydophila abortus strain isolated from springbok antelope abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, M; Bernard, F; Lecu, A; Ollivet-Courtois, F; Rodolakis, A

    2004-11-15

    Chlamydiosis is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution. The reservoir of susceptible hosts is large and includes birds and both domestic and wild mammals. Chlamydial infection, determined serologically, seems to be widespread among wild ruminants in the Paris zoo (France). In February 2003, an abortion case was reported within the springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) herd of the zoo. PCR assay using primers targeting the polymorph membrane protein gene (pmp) family was performed on both vaginal swab and placenta samples revealing the presence of Chlamydophila. The inoculation into chicken embryos of an infected placenta extract led to the successful isolation of a C. abortus strain referred to as ASb1. The omp1 gene coding the major outer membrane protein (momp) and the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region of ASb1 were compared to those of various strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The RFLP analysis showed that this isolate belonged to Chlamydophila abortus species and is highly related to known domestic ruminant's strains causing abortion. The efficacy of a live vaccine 1B, based on a temperature-sensitive mutant of the ovine abortion reference strain AB7, was tested. Protection-challenge experiments in a mouse model show that the ASb1 strain led to mice abortions and that vaccination with 1B vaccine provided them with effective protection.

  10. A effective DNA vaccine against diverse genotype J infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus strains prevalent in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liming; Zhao, Jingzhuang; Liu, Miao; Kurath, Gael; Ren, Guangming; LaPatra, Scott E.; Yin, Jiasheng; Liu, Hongbai; Feng, Jian; Lu, Tongyan

    2017-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is the most important pathogen threatening the aquaculture of salmonid fish in China. In this study, a DNA vaccine, designated pIHNch-G, was constructed with the glycoprotein (G) gene of a Chinese IHNV isolate SD-12 (also called Sn1203) of genotype J. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the expression of the Mx-1 gene in the muscle (vaccine delivery site) and anterior kidney, and the titers of the neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the vaccine efficacy. To assess the potential utility of the vaccine in controlling IHNV throughout China, the cross protective efficacy of the vaccine was determined by challenging fish with a broad range of IHNV strains from different geographic locations in China. A single 100 ng dose of the vaccine conferred almost full protection to rainbow trout fry (3 g) against waterborne or intraperitoneal injection challenge with IHNV strain SD-12 as early as 4 days post-vaccination (d.p.v.), and significant protection was still observed at 180 d.p.v. Intragenogroup challenges showed that the DNA vaccine provided similar protection to the fish against all the Chinese IHNV isolates tested, suggesting that the vaccine can be widely used in China. Mx-1 gene expression was significantly upregulated in the muscle tissue (vaccine delivery site) and anterior kidney in the vaccinated rainbow trout at both 4 and 7 d.p.v. Similar levels of neutralizing antibodies were determined with each of the Chinese IHNV strains at 60 and 180 d.p.v. This DNA vaccine should play an important role in the control of IHN in China.

  11. Application of reverse genetics for producing attenuated vaccine strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    In this study, reverse genetics was applied to produce vaccine candidate strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5N1 subtype. The H5 subtype vaccine strains were generated by a reverse genetics method in a biosafety level 2 facility. The strain contained the HA gene from the H5N1 subtype HPAIV attenuated by genetic modification at the cleavage site, the NA gene derived from the H5N1 subtype HPAI or the H5N3 subtype of avian influenza virus and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Vaccination with an inactivated recombinant virus with oil-emulsion completely protected chickens from a homologous viral challenge with a 640 HAU or 3,200 HAU/vaccination dose. Vaccination with a higher dose of antigen, 3,200 HAU, was effective at increasing survival and efficiently reduced viral shedding even when challenged by a virus of a different HA clade. The feasibility of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) was demonstrated against a challenge with H5N1 HPAIVs when the recombinant H5N3 subtype viruses were used as the antigens of the vaccine. Our study demonstrated that the use of reverse genetics would be an option to promptly produce an inactivated vaccine with better matching of antigenicity to a circulating strain.

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in cross bred cattle calves in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rashmi; Basera, Sanjay Singh; Tewari, Kamal; Yadav, Shweta; Joshi, Sumit; Singh, Brajesh; Mukherjee, Falguni

    2012-03-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine has been evaluated in an organised dairy farm in India. All the cattle (r = 29) vaccinated with strain RB51 'responded' to the vaccine as demonstrated by iELISA using acetone killed strain RB51 antigen. The percentage responders at day 35, 60 and 90 post vaccination were 100%, 95% and 20%, respectively. Strain RB51 was able to elicit a good IFN-gamma response from vaccinated animals. The post-vaccination time point analysis indicated that the cumulative IFN-gamma response of whole blood from vaccinates stimulated with heat killed RB51 antigen was elicited in 80% of calves at 60 days post vaccination. Absence of strain RB51 in the secretions and excretion and lack of local or systemic reaction indicated the safety of the vaccine.

  13. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  14. Herpes zoster due to Oka vaccine strain of varicella zoster virus in an immunosuppressed child post cord blood transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yumin; Smith, David; Sadlon, Tania; Scott, Julius X; Goldwater, Paul N

    2007-10-01

    A 5-year-old boy was vaccinated with the Oka strain of varicella zoster virus vaccine before cord blood transplant for chronic granulomatous disease in 2005. In 2006, he developed herpes zoster on his left arm. DNA from the vesicular rash confirmed the Oka vaccine strain of varicella zoster virus caused this complication. He responded well to 10 days of aciclovir treatment.

  15. Progress towards Rapid Detection of Measles Vaccine Strains: a Tool To Inform Public Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jill K

    2017-03-01

    Rapid differentiation of vaccine from wild-type strains in suspect measles cases is a valuable epidemiological tool that informs the public health response to this highly infectious disease. Few public health laboratories sequence measles virus-positive specimens to determine genotype, and the vaccine-specific real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay described by F. Roy et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 55:735-743, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01879-16) offers a rapid, easily adoptable method to identify measles vaccine strains in suspect cases. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Live attenuated nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus vaccine provides broad cross protection against new variant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T-H; Kim, M-S; Jang, J-H; Lee, D-H; Park, J-K; Youn, H-N; Lee, J-B; Park, S-Y; Choi, I-S; Song, C-S

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections cause great economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide, and the emergence of new variant strains complicates disease control. The present study investigated the genetic and protectotypic features of newly emerged Korean IBV strains. A phylogenetic analysis showed that several recent isolates formed 2 different clusters (new cluster 1 and 2), which were distinct from other preexisting clusters. New cluster 1 IBV strains represented recombinants between Korean nephropathogenic strain KM91 and the QXIBV strain. New cluster 2 IBV strains showed low amino acid homology (vaccines (H120 and K2 strain) against these new isolates. In cross-protection studies, the H120 strain did not provide sufficient protection against these variants. However, highly attenuated nephropathogenic IBV vaccine, K2 strain, provided significantly higher levels of protection against variants compared with chickens vaccinated with H120 (P vaccine could be helpful for the reduction of economic losses caused by newly evolving IBV recombinants (new cluster 1) and variants (new cluster 2).

  17. Egg quality in laying hens exposed to Mycoplasma gallisepticum F-strain attenuated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, L D S; Santos, F F D; Togashi, C K; Abreu, D L D C; Pimentel, J C; Sesti, L; Pereira, V L D A; Nascimento, E R D

    2017-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes coughing, ocular and nasal discharge, reduction in feed intake, lower and uneven growth, decline in egg production and quality, and increase in mortality. Among the attenuated vaccination strains, MGF can reduce clinical signs and lesions in layer hens, stimulate immune responses of cellular and humoral basis, act as an instrument of competitive exclusion in relation to field strains, and reduce the use of antimicrobials. This study aimed to investigate the effects of attenuated MG F-strain vaccination on egg quality in 3 groups of 30 hens each, being one control and 2 vaccinated. Vaccination was applied by ocular route at 8 and 12 wk of age. Comparisons were made among unvaccinated hens; vaccinated at 8 wk of age; and vaccinated at 8 and 12 wk of age. There were no statistical differences in eggshell thickness and weight among groups. Eggs from twice vaccinated birds yielded a Haugh unit significantly lower than the other groups without affecting egg classification. There was no significant difference in ELISA results between the vaccinated groups. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Abortion and premature birth in cattle following vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluegel Dougherty, Amanda M; Cornish, Todd E; O'Toole, Donal; Boerger-Fields, Amy M; Henderson, Owen L; Mills, Ken W

    2013-09-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is the vaccine strain currently licensed for immunizing cattle against brucellosis in the United States. Most cattle are vaccinated as heifer calves at 4-12 months of age. Adult cattle may be vaccinated in selected high-risk situations. Two herds of pregnant adult cattle in the brucellosis-endemic area of Wyoming were vaccinated with a standard label dose (1.0-3.4 × 10(10) organisms) of RB51. Reproductive losses in the vaccinated herds were 5.3% (herd A) and 0.6% (herd B) and included abortions, stillbirths, premature calves, and unbred cows (presumed early abortion). Brucella abortus was cultured from multiple tissues of aborted and premature calves (7/9), and from placenta. Isolates were identified as B. abortus strain RB51 by standard strain typing procedures and a species-specific polymerase chain reaction. Bronchopneumonia with intralesional bacteria and placentitis were observed microscopically. There was no evidence of involvement of other infectious or toxic causes of abortion. Producers, veterinarians, and laboratory staff should be alert to the risk of abortion when pregnant cattle are vaccinated with RB51, to potential human exposure, and to the importance of distinguishing field from vaccinal strains of B. abortus.

  19. Parenteral vaccination of domestic pigs with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, William C; Olsen, Steven C; Bricker, Betsy J

    2006-10-01

    To determine the immunogenicity and efficacy of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) as a vaccine in domestic pigs. Sixty-eight 6-week-old crossbred domestic pigs and twenty-four 4-month-old gilts. In experiment 1, pigs were vaccinated IM (n = 51) with 2 x 10(10) CFUs of SRB51 or sham inoculated (17). Periodic blood samples were obtained to perform blood cultures, serologic evaluations, and cell-mediated immunity assays. Necropsies were performed at selected times between weeks 1 and 23 after vaccination to determine vaccine clearance. In experiment 2, gilts were similarly vaccinated (n = 18) or sham inoculated (8) and similar samples were obtained after vaccination. Gilts were bred and challenged conjunctivally with 5.0 x 10(7) CFUs of virulent Brucella suis strain 3B. Necropsies were performed on gilts and on fetuses or neonates after abortion or parturition, respectively. Bacterial cultures and serologic evaluations were performed on samples obtained at necropsy to determine vaccine efficacy. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses did not differ between vaccinates and controls. After vaccination, SRB51 was not isolated from blood cultures of either group and was isolated from lymphoid tissues of 3 pigs at 2 weeks (n = 2) and 4 weeks (1) after vaccination. No differences were found in isolation of B suis or in seroconversion between vaccinated and control gilts and between their neonates or aborted fetuses. Parenteral vaccination with SRB51 does not induce humoral or cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccination with SRB51 did not protect gilts or their neonates and fetuses from virulent challenge with B suis.

  20. Enhancing heterologous protection in pigs vaccinated with chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing the full-length sequences of shuffled structural genes of multiple heterologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Debin; Cao, Dianjun; Lynn Heffron, C; Yugo, Danielle M; Rogers, Adam J; Overend, Christopher; Matzinger, Shannon R; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Opriessnig, Tanja; LeRoith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-25

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of arguably the most economically important global swine disease. The extensive genetic variation of PRRSV strains is a major obstacle for heterologous protection of current vaccines. Previously, we constructed a panel of chimeric viruses containing only the ectodomain sequences of DNA-shuffled structural genes of different PRRSV strains in the backbone of a commercial vaccine, and found that one chimeric virus had an improved cross-protection efficacy. In this present study, to further enhance the cross-protective efficacy against heterologous strains, we constructed a novel chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 containing the full-length sequences of shuffled structural genes (ORFs 3-6) from 6 heterologous PRRSV strains in the backbone of PRRSV strain VR2385. We showed that the chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies in pigs against two heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination and challenge study in 48 pigs revealed that the chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 conferred an enhanced cross-protection when challenged with heterologous virus strain NADC20 or a contemporary heterologous strain RFLP 1-7-4. The results suggest that the chimera VR2385-S3456 may be a good PRRSV vaccine candidate for further development to confer heterologous protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of fowl cholera vaccine: I. Protection of Pasteurella multocida local isolate vaccine against challenge of homologous and heterologous strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida locally isolated from chicken and ducks (BCC 299, BCC 2331, DY1, DY2, 12TG, 15TG andimported strains (BCC 1359, 1362; HEDDLESTON group 1 and 6 respectively had been tested for its pathogenicity in theprevious study. The aims of this experiment were to study the preparation of local isolate pasteurellosis vaccines and to determine the protective effect of that vaccines in chicken against the highly pathogenic local isolates of P. multocida. Killed monovalent, bivalent and polyvalent pasteurellosis vaccines were prepared and each was adjunvanted with aluminum hydroxide gel at a final concentration of 1.5% and the cell concentration was equal to the No 10 of MacFarland tube standard. Each of the vaccine prepared was used to vaccinated on a group of six week old of layer chicken (8 per group. Each chicken was subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml of vaccine, four weeks later each was boostered with similar vaccine with the same dose. Two weeks after giving the boostered vaccine each group of chicken were challenged, half with life bacterium of P. Multocida BCC 2331 and other with DY2. Any chick which survive after challenge was designated as protected by vaccination. Before vaccination 1 ml of blood was drawn from each of chicken and then two weeks apart up to challenge. Serum from each sample was separated and kept in deep freeze until tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Chicken vaccinated with killed whole cell P. multocida vaccines of monovalent (BCC 2331 or DY2 and bivalent (BCC 2331 + DY2 were protected against challenge with live bacterium of either BCC 2331 or DY2 at rate 67-100%. There was no protection in chicken vaccinated with either BCC 299, DY1, 12TG, 15TG, BCC 1359, or 1362 killed vaccine. Similarly no protection of chicken vaccinated with either DY1 + BCC299, 12TG + 15TG or BCC 1359 + BCC 1362 bivalent vaccines. The protection rate of the polyvalent local isolate vaccine was at average 50-75%. All

  2. Frequency of Adverse Events after Vaccination with Different Vaccinia Strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Wallinga, Jacco; Teunis, Peter F M; Xing, Shuqin; Mikolajczyk, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large quantities of smallpox vaccine have been stockpiled to protect entire nations against a possible reintroduction of smallpox. Planning for an appropriate use of these stockpiled vaccines in response to a smallpox outbreak requires a rational assessment of the risks of

  3. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  4. The establishment of sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents for BCG vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagg, Belinda; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Ho, Mei M

    2014-11-12

    As the latest addition to the sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine, an international collaborative study was completed to evaluate the suitability of a candidate BCG Moreau-RJ sub-strain as a WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine. This follows the recent replacement of the WHO 1st International Reference Preparation for BCG vaccine, by three sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine (Danish 1331, Tokyo 172-1 and Russian BCG-I) in order to complete the coverage of most predominant sub-strains used for BCG vaccine production and distribution for use worldwide. The study used cultural viable count and modified ATP assays to quantify the preparation and multiplex PCR to confirm the identity of the sub-strain. The establishment of this WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine of Moreau-RJ sub-strain was approved by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization meeting in October 2012. This preparation is available for distribution by NIBSC-MHRA, UK. The data from real-time stability monitoring demonstrated that these Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine are very stable in storage condition at -20°C. They serve as the valuable source of BCG Reference Reagents for use as comparators (1) for viability assays (such as cultural viable count and modified ATP assays); (2) for in vivo assays (such as the absence of virulent mycobacteria, dermal reactivity and protection assays) in the evaluation of candidate TB vaccines in non-clinical models; (3) for identity assays using molecular biology techniques. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Development, validation and field evaluation of a quantitative real-time PCR able to differentiate between field Mycoplasma synoviae and the MS-H-live vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, R; Feberwee, A; Landman, W J M

    2017-08-01

    A quantitative PCR (qPCR) able to differentiate between field Mycoplasma synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain was developed, validated and evaluated. It was developed using nucleotide differences in the obg gene. Analytical specificity and sensitivity assessed using DNA from 194 M. synoviae field samples, three different batches of MS-H vaccine and from 43 samples representing four other avian Mycoplasma species proved to be 100%. The detection limit for field M. synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain was 10(2-3) and 10(2) colony-forming units PCR equivalents/g trachea mucus, respectively. The qPCR was able to detect both, field M. synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain in ratios of 1:100 determined both using spiked and field samples. One hundred and twenty samples from M. synoviae-infected non-vaccinated birds, 110 samples from M. synoviae-vaccinated birds from a bird experiment and 224 samples from M. synoviae negative (serology and PCR) birds were used to determine the relative sensitivity and specificity using a previously described M. synoviae PCR as reference. The relative sensitivity and specificity for field M. synoviae were 95.0% and 99.6%, respectively, and 94.6% and 100% for the MS-H-live vaccine, respectively. Field validation and confirmation by multi locus sequence typing revealed that the qPCR correctly distinguished between MS-H and field M. synoviae. Evaluation of the differentiating M. synoviae qPCR in three commercial flocks suggested transmission of MS-H-live vaccine from vaccinated to non-vaccinated flocks at the same farm. Furthermore, it showed evidence for the colonization with field M. synoviae in MS-H-vaccinated flocks.

  6. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  8. Innocuousness of conjunctival vaccination with Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1 in pregnant Iranian fat-tailed ewes

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Alamian; Ramin Bagheri Nejad; Hamid Reza Jalali; Armin Kalantari; Afshar Etemadi

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1 is the most effective vaccine against brucellosis in sheep and goats. In Iran, mass vaccination is carried out all over the country in which adult animals are immunized by subcutaneous injection of reduced doses of the vaccine. However, due to antibody responses elicited by vaccination, concomitant implementation of test-andslaughter is impossible. To overcome the problem, vaccination through conjunctival route is recommended. In this study, serological respon...

  9. United States rotavirus strain surveillance from 2005 to 2008: genotype prevalence before and after vaccine introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Jennifer J; Teel, Elizabeth N; Kerin, Tara K; Freeman, Molly M; Esona, Mathew D; Gentsch, Jon R; Cortese, Margaret M; Parashar, Umesh D; Glass, Roger I; Bowen, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    A live, attenuated rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq®, was approved in 2006 for immunization of infants in the United States. To monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes before and after vaccine introduction, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted strain surveillance with the National Rotavirus Strain Surveillance System. Over 3 rotavirus seasons, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, and 2007-2008, National Rotavirus Strain Surveillance System laboratories collected rotavirus-positive stool specimens and submitted them to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rotavirus strains were G- and P-genotyped by multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or nucleotide sequencing. During 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 seasons, G1 was the dominant G-type but in the 2007-2008 season, G3 replaced G1 as the most frequently detected strain. Four genotypes, G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], and G9P[8] were detected in every season. Uncommon strains observed during the study period were G2P[8], G1P[6], G2P[6], G4P[6], G1P[4], G3P[9], G12P [6], and G12P[8]. The mean age of rotavirus cases in the 2007-2008 season increased significantly in patients less than 3 years old compared with the 2 previous seasons. : The increased overall prevalence of G3P [8] strains in 2007-2008, the first rotavirus season with reasonable rotavirus vaccine coverage, was consistent with Australian reports of G3 dominance following RotaTeq introduction. However, these strain changes in both countries have occurred in the context of large declines in severe rotavirus disease and we cannot rule out that they are simply the result of naturally occurring changes in rotavirus strain prevalence. These findings underscore the need for careful monitoring of strains to assess possible vaccine pressure-induced changes and vaccine effectiveness against various rotavirus genotypes.

  10. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Shanley, Crystal A; Verma, Deepshikha; Zilavy, Andrew; Stapleton, Margaret C; Furney, Synthia K; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field.

  11. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Henao-Tamayo

    Full Text Available To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field.

  12. Serological and bacteriological responses of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) vaccinated with two doses of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Anil; Diptee, Michael; Asgarali, Zinora; Campbell, Mervyn; Adesiyun, Abiodun Adewale

    2012-10-01

    Thirty-two water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves aged 6–10 months were used to evaluate serological responses to Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccination in a dose-response study and to compare the use of two selective media for the isolation of RB51. The animals were randomly divided into three treatment groups. Groups I-III received the recommended vaccine dose (RD) twice 4 weeks apart, RD twice 18 weeks apart and saline once, respectively. Lymph nodes were excised from the three groups and subjected to bacteriological examination to determine the frequency of detection of RB51. Pre- and post-vaccination blood samples were collected and tested for B. abortus antibodies using the buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT), complement fixation test (CFT), and dot-blot assay. Sera taken at all post-inoculation weeks (PIW) were negative for field strain B. abortus using the BPAT. Antibody responses to RB51 were demonstrated in all vaccinates but not in controls by CFT and dot-blot assay from 1 PIW up to 16 weeks following booster vaccination. The agreement for both assays was 80.7% and there was a linear interdependence with a Pearson's correlation coefficient value of 0.578. The frequency of isolation of RB51 from the two selective media used was not significantly different (P > 0.05).

  13. Antigenic and genetic comparison of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75 against currently circulating viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Mana; Yuvaraj, S.; Madhanmohan, M.; Subramaniam, S.; Pattnaik, B.; Paton, D.J.; Srinivasan, V.A.; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype O is the most common cause of FMD outbreaks in India and three of the six lineages that have been described are most frequently detected, namely Ind2001, PanAsia and PanAsia 2. We report the full capsid sequence of 21 serotype O viruses isolated from India between 2002 and 2012. All these viruses belong to the Middle East–South Asia (ME–SA) topotype. The serological cross-reactivity of a bovine post-vaccination serum pool raised against the current Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75,was tested by virus neutralisation test with the 23 Indian field isolates, revealing a good match between the vaccine and the field isolates. The cross reactivity of the O/IND/R2/75 vaccine with 19 field isolates from other countries (mainly from Asia and Africa) revealed a good match to 79% of the viruses indicating that the vaccine strain is broadly cross-reactive and could be used to control FMD in other countries. Comparison of the capsid sequences of the serologically non-matching isolates with the vaccine strain sequence identified substitutions in neutralising antigenic sites 1 and 2, which could explain the observed serological differences. PMID:25500306

  14. Comparison of the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D-204 strain to its virulent parental strain Asibi by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Ryman, Kate D; Barrett, Alan D T

    2014-02-01

    The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence.

  15. Which influenza vaccine formulation should be used in Kenya? A comparison of influenza isolates from Kenya to vaccine strains, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiboci, Lilian W; Mott, Joshua A; Kikwai, Gilbert; Arunga, Geoffrey; Xu, Xiyan; Mayieka, Lilian; Emukule, Gideon O; Muthoka, Phillip; Njenga, M Kariuki; Fields, Barry S; Katz, Mark A

    2016-05-17

    Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which influenza virus strains should be included in a northern hemisphere (NH) and a southern hemisphere (SH) influenza vaccine. To determine the best vaccine formulation for Kenya, we compared influenza viruses collected in Kenya from April 2007 to May 2013 to WHO vaccine strains. We collected nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens from patients with respiratory illness, tested them for influenza, isolated influenza viruses from a proportion of positive specimens, tested the isolates for antigenic relatedness to vaccine strains, and determined the percentage match between circulating viruses and SH or NH influenza vaccine composition and schedule. During the six years, 7.336 of the 60,072 (12.2%) NP/OP specimens we collected were positive for influenza: 30,167 specimens were collected during the SH seasons and 3717 (12.3%) were positive for influenza; 2903 (78.1%) influenza A, 902 (24.2%) influenza B, and 88 (2.4%) influenza A and B positive specimens. We collected 30,131 specimens during the NH seasons and 3978 (13.2%) were positive for influenza; 3181 (80.0%) influenza A, 851 (21.4%) influenza B, and 54 (1.4%) influenza A and B positive specimens. Overall, 362/460 (78.7%) isolates from the SH seasons and 316/338 (93.5%) isolates from the NH seasons were matched to the SH and the NH vaccine strains, respectively (pvaccines, respectively, matched circulating strains in terms of vaccine strains and timing. In six years of surveillance in Kenya, influenza circulated at nearly equal levels during the SH and the NH influenza seasons. Circulating viruses were matched to vaccine strains. The vaccine match decreased when both vaccine strains and timing were taken into consideration. Either vaccine formulation could be suitable for use in Kenya but the optimal timing for influenza vaccination needs to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 SRP Vaccine in Orally Challenged Goats and Strain Persistence Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Jacob M; Foster, Derek M; Rogers, Anna T; Sylvester, Hannah J; Griffith, Emily H; Jacob, Megan E

    2017-03-01

    Small ruminants have been implicated in outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at livestock exhibitions throughout the United States. Additionally, goat meat or milk may serve as a reservoir for foodborne transmission of the organism. These associations highlight the public health importance of an effective strategy to reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding in goats. We examined the efficacy of the SRP® vaccine in goats orally challenged with E. coli O157:H7. Mixed-breed goats (n = 14) were randomly allocated into vaccinated and unvaccinated treatments (n = 7 per treatment). Goats were housed with a vaccinated and unvaccinated animal in each pen. Feces were collected for 3 weeks, then at necropsy, gastrointestinal contents were collected to determine the concentration of E. coli O157:H7. Three isolates per positive sample were saved and evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to assess strain persistence over time. The mean concentration of E. coli O157:H7 in the feces of goats was numerically reduced in the vaccinated treatment; however, it was not statistically significant. In addition, the total number of days goats were fecal positive for E. coli O157:H7 were not different between vaccinated and unvaccinated treatments. Pulsotypes of isolates revealed that goats initially shed two of the four challenge strains of E. coli O157:H7, after which there was a distinct shift to two different strains. Further work is needed to evaluate cost-effective intervention strategies that reliably reduce E. coli O157:H7 shedding in goats, particularly those that may reduce the risk of transmission at public events, including petting zoos and fairs.

  17. Genetic variations of live attenuated plague vaccine strains (Yersinia pestis EV76 lineage) during laboratory passages in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Yang, Xianwei; Xiao, Xiao; Anisimov, Andrey P; Li, Dongfang; Yan, Yanfeng; Zhou, Dongsheng; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Carniel, Elisabeth; Achtman, Mark; Yang, Ruifu; Song, Yajun

    2014-08-01

    Plague, one of the most devastating infectious diseases in human history, is caused by the bacterial species Yersinia pestis. A live attenuated Y. pestis strain (EV76) has been widely used as a plague vaccine in various countries around the world. Here we compared the whole genome sequence of an EV76 strain used in China (EV76-CN) with the genomes of Y. pestis wild isolates to identify genetic variations specific to the EV76 lineage. We identified 6 SNPs and 6 Indels (insertions and deletions) differentiating EV76-CN from its counterparts. Then, we screened these polymorphic sites in 28 other strains of EV76 lineage that were stored in different countries. Based on the profiles of SNPs and Indels, we reconstructed the parsimonious dissemination history of EV76 lineage. This analysis revealed that there have been at least three independent imports of EV76 strains into China. Additionally, we observed that the pyrE gene is a mutation hotspot in EV76 lineages. The fine comparison results based on whole genome sequence in this study provide better understanding of the effects of laboratory passages on the accumulation of genetic polymorphisms in plague vaccine strains. These variations identified here will also be helpful in discriminating different EV76 derivatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jinrong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV, can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Results Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2 proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. Conclusions These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains

  19. Effectiveness of Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine Against a Diverse Range of Circulating Strains in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish; Pedreira, Cristina; De Oliveira, Lúcia Helena; Tate, Jacqueline; Leshem, Eyal; Mercado, Juan; Umaña, Jazmina; Balmaceda, Angel; Reyes, Martha; Kerin, Tara; McDonald, Sharla; Gentsch, Jon; Bowen, Michael D; Parashar, Umesh

    2016-05-01

    Because >60 rotavirus strains have been reported worldwide, concerns exist about strain replacement after the introduction of rotavirus vaccines, particularly in developing countries with diverse strains and lower efficacy. We used the case-control design in 4 hospitals in Nicaragua to assess strain-specific vaccine effectiveness (VE) of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) against rotavirus diarrhea. Cases were identified through prospective strain surveillance with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for 3 years among children hospitalized for diarrhea, and controls were children negative for rotavirus. We enrolled 1178 case-patients, 1082 (92%) with G and P typing, and 4927 controls. A different strain predominated each year with increasing age of the vaccine-eligible cohort during the study period: G2P[4] in 2008 (97%; mean age, 11.9 months), G1P[8] in 2009 (55%; mean age, 17.0 months), and G3P[8] in 2010 (78%; mean age, 17.3 months). Overall VE was 45% (95% confidence interval, 25%-59%). Regardless of the strain, VE estimates were 12%-79% lower among children aged ≥12 months relative to those 6-11 months of age. The lower VE for G3P[8] was related to the higher mean age of cases (17.3 months) compared with the G2P[4] strains (11.9 months), with a significant trend (R(2)= 0.819;P< .001) of declining effectiveness with increasing mean age of the cases. Introduction of RotaTeq did not result in sustained emergence of any particular strain in Nicaragua. Variation in strain-specific effectiveness was due to an age-related decline in effectiveness rather than differences in protection against the observed strains. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. The efficacy of CP7_E2alf: an animal study involving piglets from C–strain vaccinated sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    Outbreaks of Classical Swine Fever (CSF) in the European Union have caused enormous economical losses. To facilitate the possibility of free trade with pigs and their products, a chimeric live DIVA vaccine CP7_E2alf was developed. Most likely, passive immunity against CSF virus in populations...... previously vaccinated with C-strain interferes with the efficacy of CP7_E2alf vaccination. To study the interaction with maternal antibodies, the efficacy of CP7_E2alf in piglets from C-strain vaccinated sows was examined. At 5 or at 8 weeks of age, piglets were vaccinated with CP7_E2alf. The vaccinated...... piglets together with mock-vaccinated littermate controls were challenged 2 weeks post vaccination with highly virulent CSFV Kozlov. The results showed that CP7_E2alf is effective in preventing mortality, severe clinical signs and pathological lesions in piglets vaccinated at 5 or at 8 weeks of age...

  1. Genomic and antigenic characterization of bovine parainfluenza-3 viruses in the United States including modified live virus vaccine (MLV) strains and field strains from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; Neill, J D; Saliki, J T; Landis, C; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2017-05-02

    This study investigated the genetic and antigenic characterization of parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V) of cattle. Using molecular tests including real time PCR and viral genome sequencing, PI3V strains could be separated into PI3V types, including PI3V A, PI3V B, and PI3V C. Isolates from cattle with bovine respiratory disease clinical signs and commercial vaccines in the U.S. with MLV PI3V were typed using these molecular tests. All the MLV vaccine strains tested were PI3V A. In most cases PI3V field strains from calves receiving MLV vaccines were types heterologous to the vaccine type A. Also antigenic differences were noted as PI3V C strains had lower antibody levels than PI3V A in serums from cattle receiving MLV PI3V A vaccines. This study further demonstrates there is genetic variability of U.S. PI3V strains and also antigenic variability. In addition, isolates from cattle with BRD signs and receiving MLV vaccines may have heterologous types to the vaccines, and molecular tests should be performed to differentiate field from vaccine strains. Potentially the efficacy of current PI3V A vaccines should be evaluated with other types such a PI3V B and PI3V C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of a new tetravalent coryza vaccine against emerging variant type B strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Anton A C; van den Berg, Karin; Malo, Aris

    2003-06-01

    Outbreaks of infectious coryza have been reported in vaccinated flocks in different countries, indicating that new serotype(s) of Haemophilus paragallinarum may have evolved. Several field isolates from vaccinated flocks in the US, Ecuador, Argentina and Zimbabwe were examined and, apart from one serotype C strain, all were typed as serotype B. An inactivated commercial trivalent vaccine, containing serotypes A, B and C, protected against challenge with the serotype C isolate but protection against challenge with serotype B isolates was weaker, suggesting that they might represent a new variant immunotype. An experimental tetravalent oil adjuvant vaccine, containing one of the serotype B isolates, appeared immunogenic against all isolates after one vaccination. Its efficacy and safety were further tested in layer chickens housed under field conditions. Chickens were vaccinated at 8 and 16 weeks of age while controls were unvaccinated. Vaccinates and controls were challenged with type A, B, C and variant type B at 25, 45 or 65 weeks of age. There was good protection (P<0.05) against all four immunotypes after all challenges. No systemic reactions were observed and local reactions were similar to those found with the commercial trivalent vaccine. The tetravalent vaccine may therefore be a good choice for control of new field isolates.

  3. Innocuousness of conjunctival vaccination with Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1 in pregnant Iranian fat-tailed ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Alamian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1 is the most effective vaccine against brucellosis in sheep and goats. In Iran, mass vaccination is carried out all over the country in which adult animals are immunized by subcutaneous injection of reduced doses of the vaccine. However, due to antibody responses elicited by vaccination, concomitant implementation of test-andslaughter is impossible. To overcome the problem, vaccination through conjunctival route is recommended. In this study, serological responses of six pregnant Iranian fat-tailed ewes to conjunctival vaccination with standard doses of the vaccine were evaluated using modified Rose Bengal test, serum agglutination test and indirect ELISA. Besides, vaccine strain excretion in milk and vaginal discharges was also examined by microbiological culture of milk and vaginal swab samples taken one day post-parturition. Animals were vaccinated during the second half of gestation. As the results, antibody titers of five (83.3% ewes decreased to the levels not detectable by the tests within three months after vaccination. No vaccine-induced abortions occurred and vaccinated ewes delivered healthy lambs 50.33±15.56 (mean ± standard deviation days post-vaccination. Vaccine strain was not isolated from milk and vaginal swab samples. Generally, our study shows full doses of B. melitensis strain Rev.1 can be used conjunctively to vaccinate pregnant Iranian sheep during late pregnancy without abortifacient effects, prolonged antibody responses and vaccine strain excretion in milk and vaginal discharges. Nevertheless, further studies are required to determine safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine in field conditions.

  4. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette?Gu?rin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differen...

  5. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differences affect BCG efficacy remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed comparative analyses of the virulence and efficacy of 13 BCG strains, representing different genetic lineages, in SCID and BALB/c mice. Our results show that BCG strains of the DU2 group IV (BCG-Phipps, BCG-Frappier, BCG-Pasteur, and BCG-Tice) exhibit the highest levels of virulence, and BCG strains of the DU2 group II (BCG-Sweden, BCG-Birkhaug) are among the least virulent group. These distinct levels of virulence may be explained by strain-specific duplications and deletions of genomic DNA. There appears to be a general trend that more virulent BCG strains are also more effective in protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Our findings have important implications for current BCG vaccine programs and for future TB vaccine development. PMID:26643797

  6. Efficacy evaluation of the C-strain-based vaccines against the subgenotype 2.1d classical swine fever virus emerging in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuzi; Ji, Shengwei; Lei, Jian-Lin; Xiang, Guang-Tao; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yao; Meng, Xing-Yu; Zheng, Guanglai; Zhang, En-Yu; Wang, Yimin; Du, Ming-Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; He, Xi-Jun; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The disease has been controlled following extensive vaccination with the lapinized attenuated vaccine C-strain for decades in China. However, frequent CSF outbreaks occurred recently in a large number of C-strain-vaccinated pig farms in China and a new subgenotype 2.1d of CSFV has been reported to be responsible for the outbreaks. Here we analyzed the molecular variations and antigenic differences among the C-strain-based commercial vaccines of different origins from different manufacturers in China, and reevaluated the vaccines against the emerging subgenotype 2.1d strain of CSFV. The results showed that the C-strain adapted to the continuous ST cell line (CST) contain a unique M290K variation on the E2 protein, compared to those of primary BT cells (CBT) or rabbit origin (CRT) and the traditional C-strain sequences available in the GenBank database. Serum neutralization test revealed the antigenic differences between CST and CBT or CRT. Notably, the neutralizing titers of porcine anti-C-strain sera against the CSFV isolate of subgenotype 2.1d were significantly lower than those against C-strain or Shimen strain. The C-strain-vaccinated, subgenotype 2.1d HLJZZ2014 strain-challenged pigs did not show any clinical signs and all survived. However, these pigs displayed mild pathological and histological lesions, and the CSFV viral RNA was detected in the various tissue and blood samples. Taken together, the C-strain-based vaccines of different origins showed molecular variations and antigenic differences, and could provide clinical but not pathological and virological protection against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV emerging in China. Further investigation is needed to comprehensively assess the efficacy of C-strain of different doses against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Zeller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out.

  8. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; Tamim, Sana; McAllen, John K; Kirkness, Ewen F; Akopov, Asmik; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction) to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out.

  9. Use of the complement fixation and brucellin skin tests to identify cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Massis, F; Giovannini, A; Di Emidio, B; Ronchi, G F; Tittarelli, M; Di Giannatale, E; Di Ventura, M; Nannini, D; Caporale, V

    2005-01-01

    In the European Union, RB51 vaccine can be used only under strictly controlled conditions for the immunisation of cattle at risk of infection with Brucella abortus. A test is therefore necessary to distinguish vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The complement fixation test with RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT), dot-blot and gamma-interferon used to identify vaccinated animals have been described, but sensitivity of the tests has been poor and positivity transient after calfhood vaccination. To avail of a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool, the authors produced, controlled and evaluated an experimental brucellin prepared from strain RB51 (RB51 brucellin). The potency of this brucellin was evaluated in guinea-pigs sensitised with RB51 and compared with a commercially available brucellin. Both allergens produced similar biological activity in guinea-pigs. The RB51 brucellin skin test was performed in 10 cattle 414 days after calfhood vaccination with RB51 when they were negative to the RB51-CFT. The skin test revealed 60% sensitivity (with a confidence interval of 95%, CI 30.8%-83.3%) and 100% specificity (CI 60.7%-100%). These findings limit the use of the skin test only for screening to detect RB51 vaccinated herds, not individual animals. Nevertheless, following intradermal inoculation of RB51 brucellin, a transient antibody increase to the RB51-CFT was observed, from day 9 to day 20 post inoculation with RB51 brucellin. This transient antibody increase, when evaluated in parallel with the RB51 brucellin skin test results, enables detection of individual vaccinated animals (sensitivity 100%; CI 76.2%-100%).

  10. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lanzilao

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189 and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618 strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine

  11. Exploitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reporter strains to probe the impact of vaccination at sites of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Sukumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a major public health problem, with an effective vaccine continuing to prove elusive. Progress in vaccination strategies has been hampered by a lack of appreciation of the bacterium's response to dynamic changes in the host immune environment. Here, we utilize reporter Mtb strains that respond to specific host immune stresses such as hypoxia and nitric oxide (hspX'::GFP, and phagosomal maturation (rv2390c'::GFP, to investigate vaccine-induced alterations in the environmental niche during experimental murine infections. While vaccination undoubtedly decreased bacterial burden, we found that it also appeared to accelerate Mtb's adoption of a phenotype better equipped to survive in its host. We subsequently utilized a novel replication reporter strain of Mtb to demonstrate that, in addition to these alterations in host stress response, there is a decreased percentage of actively replicating Mtb in vaccinated hosts. This observation was supported by the differential sensitivity of recovered bacteria to the front-line drug isoniazid. Our study documents the natural history of the impact that vaccination has on Mtb's physiology and replication and highlights the value of reporter Mtb strains for probing heterogeneous Mtb populations in the context of a complex, whole animal model.

  12. Inactive vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus .

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    Darminto

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to evaluate an application of an inactive Newcastle disease (ND vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus (NDV. In this research . the Ira strain of velogenic ND virus was grown in specific pathogen free (SPF eggs and then was inactivated by formalin at a final concentration of 1 :1,000 at 4°C. The inactive antigen was then emulsified with an oil adjuvant or aluminium hydroxide gel before being administered for vaccination in layers and compared to a commercial inactive ND vaccine . Results indicated that application of these inactivated ND vaccines for booster vaccination following vaccination with an active lentogenic ND virus in pullets nearly producing eggs, resulted in high antibody titre which persisted for considerable long period of time and capable of protecting layers from sick of ND and from reducing egg production . Hence, it could be concluded that the inactivated vaccine emulsified in either oil-adjuvant (lanolin-paraffin or aluminium hydroxide gel were considered to be highly immunogenic and capable of protecting layers from sick of ND and from reducing egg production

  13. Different Levels of Immunogenicity of Two Strains of Fowlpox Virus as Recombinant Vaccine Vectors Eliciting T-Cell Responses in Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Cottingham, Matthew G; van Maurik, Andre; Zago, Manola; Newton, Angela T.; Richard J Anderson; Howard, M. Keith; Schneider, Jörg; Skinner, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The FP9 strain of Fowlpox virus has been described as a more immunogenic recombinant vaccine vector than the Webster FPV-M (FPW) strain (R. J. Anderson et al., J. Immunol. 172:3094-3100, 2004). This study expands the comparison to include two separate recombinant antigens and multiple, rather than single, independent viral clones derived from the two strains. Dual-poxvirus heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens using individual clones of recombinant FP9 or FPW in combination with recom...

  14. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  15. A diagnostic protocol to identify water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Manuela; Atzeni, Marcello; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Ferri, Nicola; Marchi, Enrico; Martucciello, Alessandra; De Massis, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The use of live vaccine strain RB51 for vaccination of domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) at risk of infection with Brucella abortus is permitted notwithstanding the plans for the eradication and only under strict veterinary control. The antibodies induced by RB51 vaccination are not detectable using conventional diagnostic techniques; therefore, it is necessary to have a specific diagnostic tool able to discriminate vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The combination of a complement fixation test (CFT) with specific RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT) and a brucellin skin test has been demonstrated to be a reliable diagnostic system to identify single cattle (Bos taurus) vaccinated with RB51. So far, no data are available in the international scientific literature regarding the use of this test association in water buffalo. For this reason the suitability of this test combination has been evaluated in a water buffalo herd. One hundred twenty-seven animals farmed in a herd of Salerno province (Campania, Southern Italy), in the context of a presumptive unauthorized use of RB51 vaccine were chosen for this study. All tested animals resulted negative to Rose Bengal test (RBT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for the detection of specific antibodies against Brucella field strains. Seventy-one animals (56%) developed RB51 antigen-specific CFT (RB51-CFT) antibodies against RB51 vaccine in a first sampling, while 104 animals (82%) gave positive result to a second serum sampling conducted 11 days after the intradermal inoculation of the RB51 brucellin. One hundred and seven animals (84%) showed a positive reaction to the RB51-CFT in at least 1 sampling, while 111 animals (87%) resulted positive to the RB51 brucellin skin test. Thus, analysing the results of the 3 testing in parallel, 119 animals (94%) were positive to at least 1 of the performed tests. The results suggest that the use in parallel of the RB51 brucellin skin test with RB51-CFT may represent a reliable

  16. Characterization of Brucella abortus mutant strain Δ22915, a potential vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanqing; Tian, Mingxing; Li, Peng; Liu, Jiameng; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2017-04-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella spp., is an important zoonosis worldwide. Vaccination is an effective strategy for protection against Brucella infection in livestock in developing countries and in wildlife in developed countries. However, current vaccine strains including S19 and RB51 are pathogenic to humans and pregnant animals, limiting their use. In this study, we constructed the Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S2308 mutant strain Δ22915, in which the putative lytic transglycosylase gene BAB_RS22915 was deleted. The biological properties of mutant strain Δ22915 were characterized and protection of mice against virulent S2308 challenge was evaluated. The mutant strain Δ22915 showed reduced survival within RAW264.7 cells and survival in vivo in mice. In addition, the mutant strain Δ22915 failed to escape fusion with lysosomes within host cells, and caused no observable pathological damage. RNA-seq analysis indicated that four genes associated with amino acid/nucleotide transport and metabolism were significantly upregulated in mutant strain Δ22915. Furthermore, inoculation of ∆22915 at 10 5 colony forming units induced effective host immune responses and long-term protection of BALB/c mice. Therefore, mutant strain ∆22915 could be used as a novel vaccine candidate in the future to protect animals against B. abortus infection.

  17. Influenza immunization elicits antibodies specific for an egg-adapted vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Donald D; Stewart, Shaun M; Lee, Jiwon; Ferdman, Jack; Bajic, Goran; Do, Khoi T; Ernandes, Michael J; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Settembre, Ethan C; Dormitzer, Philip R; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Finco, Oretta; Kang, Tae Hyun; Ippolito, Gregory C; Georgiou, George; Kepler, Thomas B; Haynes, Barton F; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Schmidt, Aaron G; Harrison, Stephen C

    2016-12-01

    For broad protection against infection by viruses such as influenza or HIV, vaccines should elicit antibodies that bind conserved viral epitopes, such as the receptor-binding site (RBS). RBS-directed antibodies have been described for both HIV and influenza virus, and the design of immunogens to elicit them is a goal of vaccine research in both fields. Residues in the RBS of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) determine a preference for the avian or human receptor, α-2,3-linked sialic acid and α-2,6-linked sialic acid, respectively. Transmission of an avian-origin virus between humans generally requires one or more mutations in the sequences encoding the influenza virus RBS to change the preferred receptor from avian to human, but passage of a human-derived vaccine candidate in chicken eggs can select for reversion to avian receptor preference. For example, the X-181 strain of the 2009 new pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, derived from the A/California/07/2009 isolate and used in essentially all vaccines since 2009, has arginine at position 226, a residue known to confer preference for an α-2,3 linkage in H1 subtype viruses; the wild-type A/California/07/2009 isolate, like most circulating human H1N1 viruses, has glutamine at position 226. We describe, from three different individuals, RBS-directed antibodies that recognize the avian-adapted H1 strain in current influenza vaccines but not the circulating new pandemic 2009 virus; Arg226 in the vaccine-strain RBS accounts for the restriction. The polyclonal sera of the three donors also reflect this preference. Therefore, when vaccines produced from strains that are never passaged in avian cells become widely available, they may prove more capable of eliciting RBS-directed, broadly neutralizing antibodies than those produced from egg-adapted viruses, extending the established benefits of current seasonal influenza immunizations.

  18. Identification of a new genetic marker in Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine strain MS-H and development of a strategy using polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting curve analysis for differentiating MS-H from field strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Konsak, Barbara M; Olaogun, Olusola M; Agnew-Crumptona, Rebecca; Kanci, Anna; Marenda, Marc S; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2017-10-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is an economically important avian pathogen worldwide, causing subclinical respiratory tract infection and infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys. A temperature-sensitive (ts(+)) live attenuated vaccine MS-H, derived from the Australian field strain 86079/7NS, is now widely used in many countries to control the disease induced by MS. Differentiation of MS-H vaccine from field strains is crucial for monitoring vaccination programs in commercial poultry. Comparison of genomic sequences of MS-H and its parent strain revealed an adenine deletion at nucleotide position 468 of the MS-H oppF-1 gene. This mutation was shown to be unique to MS-H in further comparative analyses of oppF-1 genes of MS-H re-isolates and field strains from Australia and other countries. Based on this single nucleotide, a combination of nested PCR and high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was used to evaluate its potential for use in differentiation of MS-H from field strains. The mean genotype confidence percentages of 99.27 and 48.20 for MS-H and field strains, respectively, demonstrated the high discriminative power of the newly developed assay (oppF PCR-HRM). A set of 13 tracheal swab samples collected from MS-H vaccinated specific pathogen free birds and commercial chicken flocks infected with MS were tested using the oppF PCR-HRM test and results were totally consistent with those obtained using vlhA genotyping. The nested-PCR HRM method established in this study proved to be a rapid, simple and cost effective tool for discriminating the MS-H vaccine strain from Australian and international strains in pure cultures and on tracheal swabs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic characterisation of the rabies virus vaccine strains used for oral immunization of foxes in Poland to estimate the effectiveness of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowska, Anna; Żmudziński, Jan Franciszek

    2015-02-01

    The main reservoir of rabies virus in Poland has been the red fox. To control rabies in wildlife, oral immunization of foxes was introduced in 1993. The vaccine is effective when it confers immunity against the virus circulating in the environment. To assess the above issue, a study of the molecular characteristics of 570-bp fragments of the N and G genes of vaccine strains SAD B19 and SAD Bern against street virus strains was performed. The results confirmed the similarity of the vaccine strains and rabies virus strains circulating in the environment and also demonstrate the genetic stability of vaccine strains that have been distributed in Poland for 20 years.

  20. Efficacy of Dart or Booster Vaccination with Strain RB51 in Protecting Bison against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, S. C.; Johnson, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (hand RB51), by single pneumatic dart delivery (dart RB51), or as two vaccinations approximately 13 months apart (booster RB51) in comparison to control bison. All bison were challenged intraconjunctivally in midgestation with 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 (S2308). Bison were necropsied and sampled within 72 h of abortion or delivery of a live calf....

  1. Dynamics of Dual Infection with Campylobacter jejuni Strains in Chickens Reveals Distinct Strain-to-Strain Variation in Infection Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Suzanne; Kemmett, Kirsty; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni may be isolated from the same commercial broiler flock, little is known about the infection dynamics of different genotypes within individuals or their colonization sites within the gut. Single experimental infections with C. jejuni M1 (sequence type 137, clonal complex 45) and C. jejuni 13126 (sequence type 21, clonal complex 21) revealed that 13126 colonized the ceca at significantly higher levels. The dissemination and colonization sites of the two C. jejuni strains then were examined in an experimental broiler flock. Two 33-day-old broiler chickens were infected with M1 and two with 13126, and 15 birds were left unchallenged. Cloacal swabs were taken postinfection to determine the colonization and shedding of each strain. By 2 days postinfection (dpi), 8/19 birds were shedding M1 whereas none were shedding 13126. At 8 dpi, all birds were shedding both strains. At 18 dpi, liver and cecal levels of each isolate were quantified, while in 10 birds they also were quantified at nine sites throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. 13126 was found throughout the GI tract, while M1 was largely restricted to the ceca and colon. The livers of 7/19 birds were culture positive for 13126 only. These data show that 13126 has a distinctly different infection biology than strain M1. It showed slower colonization of the lower GI tract but was more invasive and able to colonize at a high level throughout the GI tract. The finding that C. jejuni strains have markedly different infection ecologies within the chicken has implications for control in the poultry industry and suggests that the contamination risk of edible tissues is dependent on the isolate involved. PMID:25107966

  2. Genetic Vaccination against Experimental Infection with Myotropic Parasite Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fernando Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier studies, we reported that a heterologous prime-boost regimen using recombinant plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector, both containing Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding trans-sialidase (TS and amastigote surface protein (ASP 2, provided protective immunity against experimental infection with a reticulotropic strain of this human protozoan parasite. Herein, we tested the outcome of genetic vaccination of F1 (CB10XBALB/c mice challenged with myotropic parasite strains (Brazil and Colombian. Initially, we determined that the coadministration during priming of a DNA plasmid containing the murine IL-12 gene improved the immune response and was essential for protective immunity elicited by the heterologous prime-boost regimen in susceptible male mice against acute lethal infections with these parasites. The prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination of resistant female mice led to a drastic reduction in the number of inflammatory infiltrates in cardiac and skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of infection with either strain. Analysis of the electrocardiographic parameters showed that prophylactic vaccination reduced the frequencies of sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block. Our results confirmed that prophylactic vaccination using the TS and ASP-2 genes benefits the host against acute and chronic pathologies caused by T. cruzi and should be further evaluated for the development of a veterinary or human vaccine against Chagas disease.

  3. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C

    2012-05-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 10(10) to 2.0 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 10(10) CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity.

  4. A rapid minor groove binder PCR method for distinguishing the vaccine strain Brucella abortus 104M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Wenlong; Qin, Lide; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yueyong; Tan, Pengfei; Chen, Yuqi; Mao, Kairong; Chen, Yiping

    2018-01-24

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease caused by Gram-negative Brucella bacteria. Immunisation with attenuated vaccine is an effective method of prevention, but it can interfere with diagnosis. Live, attenuated Brucella abortus strain 104M has been used for the prevention of human brucellosis in China since 1965. However, at present, no fast and reliable method exists that can distinguish this strain from field strains. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based assays offer a new approach for such discrimination. SNP-based minor groove binder (MGB) and Cycleave assays have been used for rapid identification of four Brucella vaccine strains (B. abortus strains S19, A19 and RB51, and B. melitensis Rev1). The main objective of this study was to develop a PCR assay for rapid and specific detection of strain 104M. We developed a SNP-based MGB PCR assay that could successfully distinguish strain 104M from 18 representative strains of Brucella (B. abortus biovars 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9, B. melitensis biovars 1, 2 and 3, B. suis biovars 1, 2, 3 and 4, B. canis, B. neotomae, and B. ovis), four Brucella vaccine strains (A19, S19, S2, M5), and 55 Brucella clinical field strains. The assay gave a negative reaction with four non-Brucella species (Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Streptococcus suis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The minimum sensitivity of the assay, evaluated using 10-fold dilutions of chromosomal DNA, was 220 fg for the 104M strain and 76 fg for the single non-104M Brucella strain tested (B. abortus A19). The assay was also reproducible (intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation = 0.006-0.022 and 0.012-0.044, respectively). A SNP-based MGB PCR assay was developed that could straightforwardly and unambiguously distinguish B. abortus vaccine strain 104M from non-104M Brucella strains. Compared to the classical isolation and identification approaches of bacteriology, this real-time PCR assay has substantial advantages in terms of

  5. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotavirus A genotype G1P[8]: a novel method to distinguish wild-type strains from the Rotarix® vaccine strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana L Rose

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are important enteric pathogens for humans and animals. Group A rotaviruses (RV-A are the most common agents of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children and vaccination is the most effective method to reduce RV-A-associated diseases. G1P[8], the most prevalent RV-A genotype worldwide, is included in the RV-A vaccine Rotarix®. The discrimination between wild-type G1P[8] and vaccine G1P[8] strains is an important topic in the study of RV-A epidemiology to manage outbreaks and to define control measures for vaccinated children. In this study, we developed a novel method to segregate the wild-type and vaccine strains using restriction endonucleases. The dsRNA from the Rotarix® vaccine was sequenced and the NSP3 gene was selected as the target gene. The vaccine strain has a restriction pattern that is different than that of wild-type RV-A G1P[8] isolates after digestion with the restriction endonuclease BspHI. This pattern could be used as a marker for the differentiation of wild-type G1P[8] strains from the vaccine strain.

  7. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the partial tams1 gene sequence of a vaccine strain of Theileria annulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The polypeptide Tams1 is an immunodominant major merozoite piroplasm surface antigen of the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata and is highly variable. In this study, the partial nucleotide (nt sequence of the Tams1 (522 nt gene of Iranian vaccine strain (Vaccine-ir68 recovered from an outbreak of disease in Iran was determined and compared with the corresponding sequences of eighteen previously published Tams1 genes. According to sequencing result, a novel amino acid substitution at the Tams1 region (K→Q was found exclusively in isolate Vaccine-ir68. Genetic distance values, estimated from the sequence data, revealed striking sequence homology (approximately 99% between Vaccine-ir68 isolate and Tunisian isolates, showing that they were same isolates of T. annulata which were spread in these areas. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the sequence alignment of 19 Tams1 coding regions was distinctly divided into five lineages. There might be some unknown tick carrier birds immigrating to the different geographical regions. These birds have an effective role to distribute the T. annulata species in North Africa, Palestine and Iran.

  8. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Otto, Thomas D.; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B.; Adroub, Sabir A.; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G.; Behr, Marcel A.; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  9. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Abdallah M; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Otto, Thomas D; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B; Adroub, Sabir A; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G; Behr, Marcel A; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-10-21

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains.

  10. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Abdallah

    2015-10-21

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains.

  11. Oral Vaccination against Bubonic Plague Using a Live Avirulent Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisnick, Thierry; Ave, Patrick; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the possibility of using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a live vaccine against plague because it shares high genetic identity with Y. pestis while being much less virulent, genetically much more stable, and deliverable orally. A total of 41 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were screened by PCR for the absence of the high pathogenicity island, the superantigens YPM, and the type IV pilus and the presence of the pYV virulence plasmid. One strain (IP32680) fulfilled these criteria. This strain was avirulent in mice upon intragastric or subcutaneous inoculation and persisted for 2 months in the mouse intestine without clinical signs of disease. IP32680 reached the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver without causing major histological lesions and was cleared after 13 days. The antibodies produced in vaccinated animals recognized both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis antigens efficiently. After a subcutaneous challenge with Y. pestis CO92, bacteria were found in low amounts in the organs and rarely in the blood of vaccinated animals. One oral IP32680 inoculation protected 75% of the mice, and two inoculations induced much higher antibody titers and protected 88% of the mice. Our results thus validate the concept that an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain can be an efficient, inexpensive, safe, and easy-to-produce live vaccine for oral immunization against bubonic plague. PMID:18505804

  12. Oral vaccination against bubonic plague using a live avirulent Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisnick, Thierry; Ave, Patrick; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the possibility of using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a live vaccine against plague because it shares high genetic identity with Y. pestis while being much less virulent, genetically much more stable, and deliverable orally. A total of 41 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were screened by PCR for the absence of the high pathogenicity island, the superantigens YPM, and the type IV pilus and the presence of the pYV virulence plasmid. One strain (IP32680) fulfilled these criteria. This strain was avirulent in mice upon intragastric or subcutaneous inoculation and persisted for 2 months in the mouse intestine without clinical signs of disease. IP32680 reached the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver without causing major histological lesions and was cleared after 13 days. The antibodies produced in vaccinated animals recognized both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis antigens efficiently. After a subcutaneous challenge with Y. pestis CO92, bacteria were found in low amounts in the organs and rarely in the blood of vaccinated animals. One oral IP32680 inoculation protected 75% of the mice, and two inoculations induced much higher antibody titers and protected 88% of the mice. Our results thus validate the concept that an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain can be an efficient, inexpensive, safe, and easy-to-produce live vaccine for oral immunization against bubonic plague.

  13. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three capripoxvirus vaccine strains against lumpy skin disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Getachew; Abie, Getnet; Gizaw, Daniel; Wubete, Alehegn; Kidane, Membere; Asgedom, Hagos; Bayissa, Berecha; Ayelet, Gelagay; Oura, Christopher A L; Roger, Francois; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M

    2015-06-22

    The safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three commercially available vaccines against lumpy skin disease (LSD) in cattle have been evaluated using a combination of vaccine challenge experiments and the monitoring of immune responses in vaccinated animals in the field. The three vaccines evaluated in the study included two locally produced (Ethiopian) vaccines (lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) Neethling and Kenyan sheep and goat pox (KSGP) O-180 strain vaccines) and a Gorgan goat pox (GTP) vaccine manufactured by Jordan Bio-Industries Centre (JOVAC). The latter vaccine was evaluated for the first time in cattle against LSDV. The Ethiopian Neethling and KSGPO-180 vaccines failed to provide protection in cattle against LSDV, whereas the Gorgan GTP vaccine protected all the vaccinated calves from clinical signs of LSD. There was no significant difference in protective efficacy detected between two dosage levels (P=0.2, P=0.25, and P=0.1 for KSGP, Neethling and Gorgan vaccines, respectively). Additionally, the Gorgan GTP vaccinated cattle showed stronger levels of cellular immune responses measured using Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions at the vaccination site indicating higher levels of immunogenicity produced by the GTPV vaccine in cattle, as opposed to the other two vaccines. This study indicated, for the first time, that the Gorgan GTP vaccine can effectively protect cattle against LSDV and that the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine were not protective. The results emphasise the need for molecular characterization of the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine seed viruses used for vaccine production in Ethiopia. In addition, the potency and efficacy testing process of the Ethiopian LSD Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccines should be re-evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Antigenic Dominants of VP7 in G9 and G1 Rotavirus Strains Circulating in La Rioja, Argentina, with the Vaccine Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffia, Valeria I; Díaz Ariza, María Del Carmen; Silvera, Alejandro; Sabini, Liliana I; Cordoba, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    A massive vaccination in Argentina was implemented recently. The antigenic dominants of VP7 in G9 and G1 rotavirus strains, circulating in La Rioja, Argentina with strain vaccines were compared. From 2000 to 2010 in several attention centers of La Rioja, at northwestern Argentina, 418 stool samples from children younger than 5 years old were collected. Ninety were positive by immunochromatography and 51 were genotyped by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction followed by nested-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with type-specific primers. Six G9 strains and four G1 strains were sequenced by MACROGEN Korea. The phylogenetic analysis was conducted in MEGA 6.0. The 940 bp were aligned using CLUSTALW and the tree was inferred using the UPGMA method. The antigenic dominants of VP7, 7-1a, 7-1b, and 7-2 were studied using BioEdit, 7.2.5. In the comparison between G9-lineage III d rotavirus (RV) strains circulating in La Rioja with ROTAVAC vaccine strain, three differences were detected corresponding to 100, 211, and 145 positions. In the comparison between G1-Lineage 1 strains and G1 Rotarix and G1 RotaTeq, three differences were observed in 94, 123, and 217 positions. All these positions were important for the escape to neutralization for study with monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, the differences between the G1 strains in La Rioja, Argentina and the G1 components of the RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccine strains are few, but important for the escape immunologic, and need to be monitored for appropriate evaluation of long-term impact of vaccine used in Argentina. Nevertheless, the VP7 antigenic regions of G9 RV strains circulating in La Rioja and ROTAVAC vaccine strains are different to other zones of Argentina and could play an important role in the failure of vaccine response in these regions and Argentina.

  16. Biological characterization of clones derived from the edmonston strain of measles virus in comparison with schwarz and CAM-70 vaccine strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Junqueira Borges

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Four virus clones were derived from the Edmonston strain of measles virus by repeated plaque purification. These clones were compared with the vaccine strains Schwarz and CAM-70 in terms of biological activities including plaque formation, hemagglutination, hemolysis and replication in Vero cells and chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF. Two clones of intermediate plaque yielded mixed plaque populations on subcultivation whereas the other two, showing small and large plaque sizes, showed stable plaque phenotypes. The vaccine strains showed consistent homogeneous plaque populations. All the Edmonston clones showed agglutination of monkey erythrocytes in isotonic solution while both vaccine strains hemagglutinated only in the presence of high salt concentrations. Variation in the hemolytic activity was observed among the four clones but no hemolytic activity was detected for the vaccine virus strains. Vaccine strains replicated efficiently both in Vero cells and CEF. All four clones showed efficient replication in Vero cells but different replication profiles in CEF. Two of them replicated efficiently, one was of intermediate efficiency and the other showed no replication in CEF. Two of the clones showed characteristics similar to vaccine strains. One in terms of size and homogeneity of plaques, the other for a low hemolytic activity and both for the efficiency of propagation in CEF.

  17. Which influenza vaccine formulation should be used in Kenya? A comparison of influenza isolates from Kenya to vaccine strains, 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waiboci, L.W.; Mott, J.A.; Kikwai, G.; Arunga, G.; Xu, X.; Mayieka, L.; Emukule, G.O.; Muthoka, P.; Njenga, M.K.; Fields, B.S.; Katz, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which influenza virus strains should be included in a northern hemisphere (NH) and a southern hemisphere (SH) influenza vaccine. To determine the best vaccine formulation for Kenya, we compared influenza viruses collected in

  18. Generation of a Genetically Stable High-Fidelity Influenza Vaccine Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Tadasuke; Mori, Kotaro; Ushirogawa, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Naoki; Nobusawa, Eri; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Nagata, Kyosuke; Saito, Mineki

    2017-03-15

    Vaccination is considered the most effective preventive means for influenza control. The development of a master virus with high growth and genetic stability, which may be used for the preparation of vaccine viruses by gene reassortment, is crucial for the enhancement of vaccine performance and efficiency of production. Here, we describe the generation of a high-fidelity and high-growth influenza vaccine master virus strain with a single V43I amino acid change in the PB1 polymerase of the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) master virus. The PB1-V43I mutation was introduced to increase replication fidelity in order to design an H1N1 vaccine strain with a low error rate. The PR8-PB1-V43I virus exhibited good replication compared with that of the parent PR8 virus. In order to compare the efficiency of egg adaptation and the occurrence of gene mutations leading to antigenic alterations, we constructed 6:2 genetic reassortant viruses between the A(H1N1)pdm09 and the PR8-PB1-V43I viruses; hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) were from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, and the other genes were from the PR8 virus. Mutations responsible for egg adaptation mutations occurred in the HA of the PB1-V43I reassortant virus during serial egg passages; however, in contrast, antigenic mutations were introduced into the HA gene of the 6:2 reassortant virus possessing the wild-type PB1. This study shows that the mutant PR8 virus possessing the PB1 polymerase with the V43I substitution may be utilized as a master virus for the generation of high-growth vaccine viruses with high polymerase fidelity, low error rates of gene replication, and reduced antigenic diversity during virus propagation in eggs for vaccine production. IMPORTANCE Vaccination represents the most effective prophylactic option against influenza. The threat of emergence of influenza pandemics necessitates the ability to generate vaccine viruses rapidly. However, as the influenza virus exhibits a high mutation rate

  19. Efficacy of the oral rabies virus vaccine strain SPBN GASGAS in foxes and raccoon dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freuling, Conrad M; Eggerbauer, Elisa; Finke, Stefan; Kaiser, Christiane; Kaiser, Christian; Kretzschmar, Antje; Nolden, Tobias; Ortmann, Steffen; Schröder, Charlotte; Teifke, Jens P; Schuster, Peter; Vos, Ad; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Müller, Thomas

    2017-10-14

    To test the immunogenicity and efficacy of a new oral rabies virus vaccine strain SPBN GASGAS in wildlife target species, one group of foxes and two groups of raccoon dogs were offered a bait containing 1.7 ml of the vaccine (10 6.6  FFU/ml; 10 6.8  FFU/dose) and subsequently challenged approximately 180 days later with a fox rabies virus isolate. One group of raccoon dogs (n=30) received the same challenge dose (10 0.7  MICLD 50 /ml) as the red foxes (n=29). The other group with raccoon dogs (n=28) together with 8 animals that received the vaccine dose by direct instillation into the oral cavity (DIOC) were infected with a 40-fold higher dose of the challenge virus (10 2.3  MICLD 50 /ml). All but one of the 29 vaccinated foxes survived the challenge infection; meanwhile all 12 control foxes succumbed to rabies. Twenty-eight of 30 vaccinated raccoon dogs challenged with the same dose survived the infection, however only six of 12 control animals succumbed. When the higher challenge dose was administered, all 12 control animals died from rabies and all 36 vaccinated animals (28 baited plus 8 DIOC) survived. Blood samples were collected at different time points post vaccination and examined by both RFFIT and ELISA. The kinetics of the measured immune response was similar for both species, although in RFFIT slightly higher values were observed in foxes than in raccoon dogs. However, the immune response as measured in ELISA was identical for both species. The oral rabies virus vaccine SPBN GASGAS meets the efficacy requirements for live rabies virus vaccines as laid down by the European Pharmacopoeia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular characteristics of Polish field strains of Marek's disease herpesvirus isolated from vaccinated chickens

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    Kozdruń Wojciech

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Twenty-nine Marek's disease virus (MDV strains were isolated during a 3 year period (2007-2010 from vaccinated and infected chicken flocks in Poland. These strains had caused severe clinical symptoms and lesions. In spite of proper vaccination with mono- or bivalent vaccines against Marek's disease (MD, the chickens developed symptoms of MD with paralysis. Because of this we decided to investigate possible changes and mutations in the field strains that could potentially increase their virulence. We supposed that such mutations may have been caused by recombination with retroviruses of poultry - especially reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV. Methods In order to detect the possible reasons of recent changes in virulence of MDV strains, polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses for meq oncogene and for long-terminal repeat (LTR region of REV were conducted. The obtained PCR products were sequenced and compared with other MDV and REV strains isolated worldwide and accessible in the GeneBank database. Results Sequencing of the meq oncogene showed a 68 basepair insertion and frame shift within 12 of 24 field strains. Interestingly, the analyses also showed 0.78, 0.8, 0.82, 1.6 kb and other random LTR-REV insertions into the MDV genome in 28 of 29 of strains. These genetic inserts were present after passage in chicken embryo kidney cells suggesting LTR integration into a non-functional region of the MDV genome. Conclusion The results indicate the presence of a recombination between MDV and REV under field conditions in Polish chicken farms. The genetic changes within the MDV genome may influence the virus replication and its features in vivo. However, there is no evidence that meq alteration and REV insertions are related to the strains' virulence.

  1. Legionella pneumophila pangenome reveals strain-specific virulence factors

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    Peris-Bondia Francesc

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila is a gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a form of epidemic pneumonia. It has a water-related life cycle. In industrialized cities L. pneumophila is commonly encountered in refrigeration towers and water pipes. Infection is always via infected aerosols to humans. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate Legionella from buildings, it still contaminates the water systems. The town of Alcoy (Valencian Region, Spain has had recurrent outbreaks since 1999. The strain "Alcoy 2300/99" is a particularly persistent and recurrent strain that was isolated during one of the most significant outbreaks between the years 1999-2000. Results We have sequenced the genome of the particularly persistent L. pneumophila strain Alcoy 2300/99 and have compared it with four previously sequenced strains known as Philadelphia (USA, Lens (France, Paris (France and Corby (England. Pangenome analysis facilitated the identification of strain-specific features, as well as some that are shared by two or more strains. We identified: (1 three islands related to anti-drug resistance systems; (2 a system for transport and secretion of heavy metals; (3 three systems related to DNA transfer; (4 two CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats systems, known to provide resistance against phage infections, one similar in the Lens and Alcoy strains, and another specific to the Paris strain; and (5 seven islands of phage-related proteins, five of which seem to be strain-specific and two shared. Conclusions The dispensable genome disclosed by the pangenomic analysis seems to be a reservoir of new traits that have mainly been acquired by horizontal gene transfer and could confer evolutionary advantages over strains lacking them.

  2. Safety of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in non-target ungulates and coyotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeger, Terry J; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Olsen, Steven C; Edwards, William H; Cook, Walter E

    2002-07-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) and bison (Bison bison) in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA; USA). It is possible that an oral brucellosis vaccine could be developed and disseminated in the GYA to reduce disease transmission. Should this occur, non-target species other than elk and bison may come in contact with the vaccine resulting in morbidity or mortality. To assess biosafety, bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis; n = 10), pronghorn (Antilocapra americana; n = 9), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus; n = 11), moose (Alces alces shirasi; n = 10), and coyotes (Canis latrans; n = 24) were given a single oral dose of at least 1.0 x 10(10) colony-forming units of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine (RB51). Animals were randomly divided into vaccinated and control groups. Ungulates were captured, blood sampled, and swabs taken from the nares, rectum, and vagina for bacterial culture on day 0, 42, and 84 post-inoculation (PI). On day 42, the vaccinated group became a control group and vice versa in a crossover design. Blood and swab samples were taken from coyotes on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 PI. There was no crossover for the coyote study. Two coyotes from each group were also euthanized and cultured for RB51 on days 42, 84, 168, and 336 PI. Blood samples were analyzed for hematologic changes and antibodies to RB51 using a modified dot-blot assay. No morbidity or mortality as a result of vaccination was observed in any animal. There were no differences in hematologic parameters at any time for ungulate species; vaccinated coyotes had higher hematocrit, hemoglobin, and eosinophil counts (P RB51. Strain RB51 was cultured from oropharyngeal lymph nodes from one coyote 42 days PI and from a moose 117 days PI. This study suggested that a single oral dose of RB51 was safe in these species.

  3. Tularemia vaccine: Safety, reactogenicity, "Take" skin reactions, and antibody responses following vaccination with a new lot of the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain - A phase 2 randomized clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Mark J; Stapleton, Jack T; Keitel, Wendy A; Frey, Sharon E; Chen, Wilbur H; Rouphael, Nadine; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Beck, Allison; Winokur, Patricia L; El Sahly, Hana M; Patel, Shital M; Atmar, Robert L; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin; El-Kamary, Samer S; Pasetti, Marcela F; Sztein, Marcelo B; Hill, Heather; Goll, Johannes B

    2017-08-24

    Tularemia is caused by Francisella tularensis, a gram-negative bacterium that has been weaponized as an aerosol. For protection of personnel conducting biodefense research, the United States Army required clinical evaluation of a new lot of tularemia live vaccine strain manufactured in accordance with Current Good Manufacturing Practices. A phase 2 randomized clinical trial compared the new lot (DVC-LVS) to the existing vaccine that has been in use for decades (USAMRIID-LVS). The vaccines were delivered by scarification to 228 participants. Safety, reactogenicity, take and/or antibody levels were assessed on days 0, 1, 2, 8, 14, 28, 56, and 180. Both vaccines were safe and had acceptable reactogenicity profiles during six months of follow-up. There were no serious or grade 3 and 4 laboratory adverse events. Moderate systemic reactogenicity (mostly headache or feeling tired) was reported by ∼23% of participants receiving either vaccine. Injection site reactogenicity was mostly mild itchiness and pain. The frequencies of vaccine take skin reactions were 73% (95% CI, 64, 81) for DVC-LVS and 80% (95% CI, 71, 87) for USAMRIID-LVS. The 90% CI for the difference in proportions was -6.9% (-16.4, 2.6). The rates of seroconversion measured by microagglutination assay on days 28 or 56 were 94% (95% CI, 88, 98; n=98/104) for DVC-LVS and 94% (95% CI, 87, 97; n=103/110) for USAMRIID-LVS (p=1.00). Day 14 sera revealed more rapid seroconversion for DVC-LVS relative to USAMRIID-LVS: 82% (95% CI, 73, 89) versus 55% (95% CI, 45, 65), respectively (p<0.0001). The DVC-LVS vaccine had similar safety, reactogenicity, take and antibody responses compared to the older USAMRIID vaccine, and was superior for early (day 14) antibody production. Vaccination take was not a sensitive surrogate for seroconversion in a multi-center study where personnel at five research clinics performed assessments. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01150695. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  4. Overexpression of Protective Antigen as a Novel Approach To Enhance Vaccine Efficacy of Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; He, Yongqun; Cravero, Silvio; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.

    2000-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain that is currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. We reasoned that overexpression of a protective antigen(s) of B. abortus in strain RB51 should enhance its vaccine efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein of B. abortus in strain RB51. This was accomplished by transforming strain RB51 with a broad-host-r...

  5. Evaluation of Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Strains for Broad Protection against Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Maddux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are difficult to treat, producing a burden on healthcare and the economy. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes, cause infections outside of the intestine, and are causative agents of hospital-acquired infections. Developing a prevention strategy against this pathogen is challenging due to its antibiotic resistance and antigenic diversity. E. coli common pilus (ECP is frequently found in ExPEC strains and may serve as a common antigen to induce protection against several ExPEC serotypes. In addition, live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV strains have been used to prevent Salmonella infection and can also be modified to deliver foreign antigens. Thus, the objective of this study was to design a RASV to produce ECP on its surface and assess its ability to provide protection against ExPEC infections. To constitutively display ECP in a RASV strain, we genetically engineered a vector (pYA4428 containing aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and E. coli ecp genes and introduced it into RASV χ9558. RASV χ9558 containing an empty vector (pYA3337 was used as a control to assess protection conferred by the RASV strain without ECP. We assessed vaccine efficacy in in vitro bacterial inhibition assays and mouse models of ExPEC-associated human infections. We found that RASV χ9558(pYA4428 synthesized the major pilin (EcpA and tip pilus adhesin (EcpD on the bacterial surface. Mice orally vaccinated with RASV χ9558(pYA3337 without ECP or χ9558(pYA4428 with ECP, produced anti-Salmonella LPS and anti-E. coli EcpA and EcpD IgG and IgA antibodies. RASV strains showed protective potential against some E. coli and Salmonella strains as assessed using in vitro assays. In mouse sepsis and urinary tract infection challenge models, both vaccines had significant protection in some internal organs. Overall, this work showed that RASVs can elicit

  6. Overexpression of Protective Antigen as a Novel Approach To Enhance Vaccine Efficacy of Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; He, Yongqun; Cravero, Silvio; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.

    2000-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain that is currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. We reasoned that overexpression of a protective antigen(s) of B. abortus in strain RB51 should enhance its vaccine efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein of B. abortus in strain RB51. This was accomplished by transforming strain RB51 with a broad-host-range plasmid, pBBR1MCS, containing the sodC gene along with its promoter. Strain RB51 overexpressing SOD (RB51SOD) was tested in BALB/c mice for its ability to protect against challenge infection with virulent strain 2308. Mice vaccinated with RB51SOD, but not RB51, developed antibodies and cell-mediated immune responses to Cu/Zn SOD. Strain RB51SOD vaccinated mice developed significantly (P RB51 alone. The presence of the plasmid alone in strain RB51 did not alter its vaccine efficacy. Also, overexpression of SOD did not alter the attenuation characteristic of strain RB51. PMID:10816475

  7. Characterization of field isolates of Suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus) as derivatives of attenuated vaccine strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Medveczky, I.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1992-01-01

    Field isolates of suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus) from Poland and Hungary were identified by restriction fragment pattern analysis as derivatives of attenuated vaccine strains. The Polish isolates were found to be related to the BUK-TK-900 strain (Suivac A) which is widely used...... as a live vaccine in Poland, and the Hungarian isolates were related to the Bartha K-61 vaccine strain widely used in Hungary. Pigs experimentally infected with derivatives of BUK-TK-900 or BUK-TK-900 itself were found to develop gI-antibodies, while pigs infected with derivatives of Bartha K-61 showed a g...

  8. Live attenuated Shigella dysenteriae type 1 vaccine strains overexpressing shiga toxin B subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2011-12-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) is unique among the Shigella species and serotypes in the expression of Shiga toxin which contributes to more severe disease sequelae and the ability to cause explosive outbreaks and pandemics. S. dysenteriae 1 shares characteristics with other Shigella species, including the capability of causing clinical illness with a very low inoculum (10 to 100 CFU) and resistance to multiple antibiotics, underscoring the need for efficacious vaccines and therapeutics. Following the demonstration of the successful attenuating capacity of deletion mutations in the guaBA operon in S. flexneri 2a vaccine strains in clinical studies, we developed a series of S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine candidates containing the fundamental attenuating mutation in guaBA. All strains are devoid of Shiga toxin activity by specific deletion of the gene encoding the StxA subunit, which encodes enzymatic activity. The StxB subunit was overexpressed in several derivatives by either plasmid-based constructs or chromosomal manipulation to include a strong promoter. All strains are attenuated for growth in vitro in the HeLa cell assay and for plaque formation and were safe in the Serény test and immunogenic in the guinea pigs. Each strain induced robust serum and mucosal anti-S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses and protected against wild-type challenge. Two strains engineered to overexpress StxB induced high titers of Shiga toxin neutralizing antibodies. These candidates demonstrate the potential for a live attenuated vaccine to protect against disease caused by S. dysenteriae 1 and potentially to protect against the toxic effects of other Shiga toxin 1-expressing pathogens.

  9. Live Attenuated Shigella dysenteriae Type 1 Vaccine Strains Overexpressing Shiga Toxin B Subunit ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) is unique among the Shigella species and serotypes in the expression of Shiga toxin which contributes to more severe disease sequelae and the ability to cause explosive outbreaks and pandemics. S. dysenteriae 1 shares characteristics with other Shigella species, including the capability of causing clinical illness with a very low inoculum (10 to 100 CFU) and resistance to multiple antibiotics, underscoring the need for efficacious vaccines and therapeutics. Following the demonstration of the successful attenuating capacity of deletion mutations in the guaBA operon in S. flexneri 2a vaccine strains in clinical studies, we developed a series of S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine candidates containing the fundamental attenuating mutation in guaBA. All strains are devoid of Shiga toxin activity by specific deletion of the gene encoding the StxA subunit, which encodes enzymatic activity. The StxB subunit was overexpressed in several derivatives by either plasmid-based constructs or chromosomal manipulation to include a strong promoter. All strains are attenuated for growth in vitro in the HeLa cell assay and for plaque formation and were safe in the Serény test and immunogenic in the guinea pigs. Each strain induced robust serum and mucosal anti-S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses and protected against wild-type challenge. Two strains engineered to overexpress StxB induced high titers of Shiga toxin neutralizing antibodies. These candidates demonstrate the potential for a live attenuated vaccine to protect against disease caused by S. dysenteriae 1 and potentially to protect against the toxic effects of other Shiga toxin 1-expressing pathogens. PMID:21969003

  10. Comparative genomics of Bordetella pertussis reveals progressive gene loss in Finnish strains.

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    Eriikka Heikkinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bordetella pertussis is a gram-negative bacterium that infects the human respiratory tract and causes pertussis or whooping cough. The disease has resurged in many countries including Finland where the whole-cell pertussis vaccine has been used for more than 50 years. Antigenic divergence has been observed between vaccine strains and clinical isolates in Finland. To better understand genome evolution in B. pertussis circulating in the immunized population, we developed an oligonucleotide-based microarray for comparative genomic analysis of Finnish strains isolated during the period of 50 years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The microarray consisted of 3,582 oligonucleotides (70-mer and covered 94% of 3,816 ORFs of Tohama I, the strain of which the genome has been sequenced. Twenty isolates from 1953 to 2004 were studied together with two Finnish vaccine strains and two international reference strains. The isolates were selected according to their characteristics, e.g. the year and place of isolation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Genomic DNA of the tested strains, along with reference DNA of Tohama I strain, was labelled and hybridized. The absence of genes as established with microarrays, was confirmed by PCR. Compared with the Tohama I strain, Finnish isolates lost 7 (8.6 kb to 49 (55.3 kb genes, clustered in one to four distinct loci. The number of lost genes increased with time, and one third of lost genes had functions related to inorganic ion transport and metabolism, or energy production and conversion. All four loci of lost genes were flanked by the insertion sequence element IS481. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the progressive gene loss occurred in Finnish B. pertussis strains isolated during a period of 50 years and confirmed that B. pertussis is dynamic and is continuously evolving, suggesting that the bacterium may use gene loss as one strategy to adapt to highly immunized populations.

  11. High definition viral vaccine strain identity and stability testing using full-genome population data--The next generation of vaccine quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höper, Dirk; Freuling, Conrad M; Müller, Thomas; Hanke, Dennis; von Messling, Veronika; Duchow, Karin; Beer, Martin; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2015-10-26

    Vaccines are the most effective prophylactic public health tools. With the help of vaccines, prevention of infectious disease spread and, in concert with other measures, even eradication has become possible. Until now, licensing and quality control require the determination of consensus genome sequences of replication competent infectious agents contained in vaccines. Recent improvements in sequencing technologies now enable the sequencing of complete genomes and the genetic analysis of populations with high reliability and resolution. The latter is particularly important for RNA viruses, which consist of fluctuating heterogeneous populations rather than genetically stable entities. This information now has to be integrated into the existing regulatory framework, challenging both licensing authorities and vaccine producers to develop new quality control criteria. Commercially available modified-live oral rabies vaccines and their precursor strains were deep-sequenced to assess strain identity and relations between strains based on population diversity. Strain relations were inferred based on the Manhattan distances calculated between the compositions of the viral populations of the strains. We provide a novel approach to assess viral strain relations with high resolution and reliability by deep sequencing with subsequent analysis of the overall genetic diversity within the viral populations. A comparison of our novel approach of inferring strain relations based on population data with consensus sequence analysis clearly shows that consensus sequence analysis of diverse viral populations can be misleading. Therefore, for quality control of viral vaccines deep sequencing analysis is to be preferred over consensus sequence analysis. The presented methodology allows for routine integration of deep sequencing data in vaccine quality control and licensing for highly reliable assessment of strain identity and stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vector Development for the Expression of Foreign Proteins in the Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerci, Diego J.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Vigliocco, Ana M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    A vector for the expression of foreign antigens in the vaccine strain Brucella abortus S19 was developed by using a DNA fragment containing the regulatory sequences and the signal peptide of the Brucella bcsp31 gene. This fragment was cloned in broad-host-range plasmid pBBR4MCS, resulting in plasmid pBEV. As a reporter protein, a repetitive antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. The recombinant fusion protein is stably expressed and secreted into the Brucella periplasmic space, inducing a good antibody response against the T. cruzi antigen. The expression of the repetitive antigen in Brucella neither altered its growth pattern nor generated a toxic or lethal effect during experimental infection. The application of this strategy for the generation of live recombinant vaccines and the tagging of B. abortus S19 vaccine is discussed. This is the first time that a recombinant protein has been expressed in the periplasm of brucellae. PMID:9673273

  13. The genetic match between vaccine strains and circulating seasonal influenza A viruses in Vietnam, 2001-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Cuong D; Hoang, Phuong M V; Nguyen, Hang L K; Nguyen, Hien T; Nguyen, Thach C; Le, Thanh T; Dennis, David T; Kapella, Bryan K; Kile, James C; Le, Mai Q

    2013-11-01

    Vietnam is currently developing domestic capability to manufacture influenza vaccines but information on the genetic and antigenic characteristics of locally circulating seasonal influenza viruses is limited. To assess the relevance of WHO recommended vaccine strains to the situation in Vietnam, we analyzed the genetic relatedness of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of seasonal influenza A viruses circulating in Vietnam from 2001 to 2009 to WHO recommended vaccine strains over the same period. We sequenced the HA gene of 32 H1N1 and 44 H3N2 seasonal influenza A isolates from laboratory-based sentinel surveillance sites in Hanoi from 2001 to 2005 and from a national influenza surveillance system from 2005 to 2009. H1 and H3 HA phylogenetic trees rooted to vaccine strains A/Beijing/295/1995 (H1N1) and A/Moscow/10/1999 (H3N2), respectively, were constructed with contemporary HA sequences of isolates from neighboring countries. We found some genetic differences between seasonal influenza H3N2 viruses and three WHO influenza vaccine strains recommended for use in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the 2001-2004 and 2007-2008 seasons and close genetic identity of circulating H3N2 strains with the recommended WHO Southern Hemisphere vaccine strains for 2004 and 2009 seasons. The genetic similarity of circulating H1N1 strains with the WHO recommended vaccine strains are described for the study period 2001-2009. The HA gene of seasonal influenza virus strains in Vietnam (especially influenza A/H3N2) showed varying degrees of genetic identity compared with those of the Northern or Southern Hemisphere vaccine strains recommended by WHO. The close relatedness of the HA of Vietnamese strains and contemporary strains from nearby countries indicate a good genetic match of circulating strains during study period. Greater representation of virus isolates from South East Asia in the vaccine strain selection process is desirable of influenza vaccine development in Vietnam. © 2012

  14. Evaluation of antigens stability of tobacco seeds as edible vaccine against VTEC strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rossi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants have represent a promising alternative for biopharmaceutical proteins (Ma et al., 2003; Rossi et al., 2014. Many plant based edible vaccines have been shown to be effective in inducing local immune responses (Rossi et al., 2013. Edible vaccines can activate both mucosal and systemic immunity, as they come in contact with the digestive tract lining. This dual effect would provide first-line defense against pathogens invading through the mucosa. The antigens are released in the intestines are taken up by M cells that are present over the Payer’s patches (in the ileum and the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. Edible vaccines represent an important worldwide goal for the prevention of the enteric diseases, also in livestock. In particular, the enteric infections are a significant clinical problem in pigs. Verocytotoxic Escherichia (E. coli strains are responsible for serious enterotoxaemia that causes important economic losses in the pig industry. The production of a vaccine for oral administration of transgenic seeds could be a practical and efficient system to prevent the infection and to reduce the antibiotic use. This study was focused on tobacco plants, previously transformed by agroinfection for the seed-specific expression of antigenic proteins (F18 adhesive fimbriae and the B subunit of the Vt2e toxin as model of edible vaccines against verocytotoxic E. coli strains. The dietary administration of transgenic tobacco seeds promotes a significant increase in the number of mucosal IgA-producing cells of the tunica propria in both small and large intestine in mice (Rossi et al., 2013. A protective effect of oral administration of transgenic tobacco seeds was also observed against verocytotoxic Escherichia coli infection in piglets (Rossi et al., 2014. The aim of this study was to assess the seed-expression stability, that is a important requirement in the vaccine production, of F 18 and Vt2e-B heterologous genes into the progeny of

  15. Human rotavirus strains circulating in Venezuela after vaccine introduction: predominance of G2P[4] and reemergence of G1P[8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzi, Esmeralda; Piñeros, Oscar A; Oropeza, M Daniela; Naranjo, Laura; Suárez, José A; Fernández, Rixio; Zambrano, José L; Celis, Argelia; Liprandi, Ferdinando

    2017-03-21

    Rotavirus (RV) is the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide. Despite Venezuela was among the first developing countries to introduce RV vaccines into their national immunization schedules, RV is still contributing to the burden of diarrhea. Concerns exist about the selective pressure that RV vaccines could exert on the predominant types and/or emergence of new strains. To assess the impact of RV vaccines on the genotype distribution 1 year after the vaccination was implemented, a total of 912 fecal specimens, collected from children with acute gastroenteritis in Caracas from February 2007 to April 2008, were screened, of which 169 (18.5%) were confirmed to be RV positive by PAGE. Rotavirus-associated diarrhea occurred all year-round, although prevailed during the coolest and driest months among unvaccinated children under 24 months old. Of 165 RV strains genotyped for G (VP7) and P (VP4) by seminested multiplex RT-PCR, 77 (46.7%) were G2P[4] and 63 (38.2%) G1P[8]. G9P[8], G3P[8] and G2P[6] were found in a lower proportion (7.3%). Remarkable was also the detection of <5% of uncommon combinations (G8P[14], G8P[4], G1P[4] and G4P[4]) and 3.6% of mixed infections. A changing pattern of G/P-type distribution was observed during the season studied, with complete predominance of G2P[4] from February to June 2007 followed by its gradual decline and the reemergence of G1P[8], predominant since January 2008. Phylogenetic analysis of VP7 and VP4 genes revealed a high similarity among G2P[4] and global strains belonging to G2-II and P[4]-V lineages. The amino acid substitution 96D → N, related with reemergence of the G2 genotype elsewhere, was observed. The G1P[8] strains from Caracas were grouped into the lineages G1-I and P[8]-III, along with geographically remote G1P[8] rotaviruses, but they were rather distant from Rotarix ® vaccine and pre-vaccine strains. Unique amino acid substitutions observed on neutralization domains of the VP7 sequence from

  16. Predicted strain coverage of a meningococcal multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB in Portugal.

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    Maria João Simões

    Full Text Available Although the incidence of meningococcal disease has been declining over the past decade in Portugal MenB meningococci is still an important cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of this study was to estimate the strain coverage of the 4CMenB vaccine in Portugal in order to support health policies for prevention and control of meningococcal disease.Since 2002 the clinical and laboratory notification of meningococcal disease is mandatory in Portugal. National database includes since then all confirmed cases notified to the reference laboratory or to the Directorate of Health. Strains included in this study were all the invasive MenB isolated from the 1st July 2011 to the 30th June 2015, sent to the reference laboratory. To predict the vaccine strain coverage of the 4CMenB the expression and cross-reactivity of the surface antigens fHbp, NadA, NHBA were assessed by the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS whereas PorA typing was performed by sequencing. The presence of at least one antigen with a Relative Potency (RP greater than its MATS-positive bactericidal threshold RP value or the presence of PorA VR2 = 4 was considered to be predictive for a strain to be covered by the 4CMenB vaccine.The estimated 4CMenB strain coverage in Portugal was 67.9%. The percentage of strain coverage in each of the four epidemiological years ranged from 63.9% to 73.7%. Strains covered by one antigen represent 32.1% of the total of isolates, 29.2% of strains were covered by two antigens and 6.6% by three antigens. No strain had all the four antigens. Antigens that most contributed for coverage were NHBA and fHbp. Data from Portugal is in accordance with the MATS predicted strain coverage in five European countries (England and Wales, France, Germany, Italy and Norway that pointed to 78% coverage for strains collected in the epidemiological year 2007-2008.

  17. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning of Clostridium septicum vaccine strain alpha toxin gene in E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Bozorgkhoo; Pilehchian Langroudi; Khaki; Jabbari; Moradi Bidhendi; Moosawi Shoshtari

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium septicum a Gram positive anaerobic bacterium produces several toxins including alpha, beta, gamma and delta. C. septicum alpha toxin is lethal and is responsible for a serious disease known as gas gangrene. The aim of the present study was to molecular cloning and sequencing of C. septicum vaccine strain alpha toxin gene. Genomic DNA was extracted using standard phenol and chloroform extraction method, and the target gene was amplified through PCR by specific primers. Quality and ...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Goatpox Virus Strain Gorgan Obtained Directly from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijs, Elisabeth; Vandenbussche, Frank; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; De Clercq, Kris; Van Borm, Steven

    2016-10-13

    This is a report of the complete genome sequence of the goatpox virus strain Gorgan, which was obtained directly from a commercial live attenuated vaccine (Caprivac, Jordan Bio-Industries Centre). Copyright © 2016 Mathijs et al.

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Four African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Tetravalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the four virus strains included in a South African commercial tetravalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26607890

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of the Three African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Trivalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the three virus strains included in a South African commercial trivalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26294618

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of New Zealand strain meningococcal serogroup B OMV vaccine in healthy adults: beginning of epidemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, V; Lennon, D; Rasanathan, K; O'Hallahan, J; Oster, P; Stewart, J; Tilman, S; Aaberge, I; Feiring, B; Nokleby, H; Rosenqvist, E; White, K; Reid, S; Mulholland, K; Wakefield, M J; Martin, D

    2006-02-27

    As the first step towards control of a strain specific epidemic of meningococcal disease in New Zealand (NZ), this study, an observer-blind, randomised controlled trial in 75 healthy adults, evaluated safety and immunogenicity of two different dosages of a meningococcal group B vaccine administered in a three dose regime. The "tailor-made" outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine (candidate vaccine) developed using a New Zealand meningococcal group B strain (B:4:P1.7b,4) was well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Similar local and systemic reactions were observed in those receiving the New Zealand candidate vaccine and the control parent Norwegian vaccine (MenBvac). A four-fold rise in serum bactericidal antibodies (SBAb) against the vaccine strain 4-6 weeks after the third vaccination was achieved in 100% of New Zealand candidate vaccine 2,519 microg participants and in 87% of 50 microg participants. The safety and immunogenicity profile observed in this study of healthy adults enabled studies in children to be initiated using 25 microg dosage.

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Theileria annulata Infected Cell Line S15 Iran Vaccine Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Gh

    2012-01-01

    Bovine theileriosis results from infection with obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. The phylogenetic relationships between two isolates of Theileria annulata, and 36 Theileria spp., as well as 6 outgroup including Babesia spp. and coccidian protozoa were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence. The target DNA segment was amplified by PCR. The PCR product was used for direct sequencing. The length of the 18S rRNA gene of all Theileria spp. involved in this study was around 1,400 bp. A phylogenetic tree was inferred based on the 18S rRNA gene sequence of the Iran and Iraq isolates, and other species of Theileria available in GenBank. In the constructed tree, Theileria annulata (Iran vaccine strain) was closely related to other T. annulata from Europe, Asia, as well as T. lestoquardi, T. parva and T. taurotragi all in one clade. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA gene suggested that the percent identity of the sequence of Iran vaccine strain was completely the same as Iraq sequence (100% identical), but the similarity of Iran vaccine strain with other T. annulata reported from China, Spain and Italy determined the 97.9 to 99.9% identity.

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Theileria Annulata Infected Cell Line S15 Iran Vaccine Strain

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    Gh Habibi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bovine theileriosis results from infection with obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. The phylogenetic relationships between two isolates of Theileria annulata, and 36 Theileria spp., as well as 6 outgroup including Babesia spp. and coccidian protozoa were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence.Methods: The target DNA segment was amplified by PCR. The PCR product was used for direct sequencing. The length of the 18S rRNA gene of all Theileria spp. involved in this study was around 1,400 bp. Results: A phylogenetic tree was inferred based on the 18S rRNA gene sequence of the Iran and Iraq isolates, and other species of Theileria available in GenBank. In the constructed tree, Theileria annulata (Iran vaccine strain was closely related to other T. annulata from Europe, Asia, as well as T. lestoquardi, T. parva and T. taurotragi all in one clade.Conclusion: Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA gene suggested that the percent identity of the sequence of Iran vaccine strain was completely the same as Iraq sequence (100% identical, but the similarity of Iran vaccine strain with other T. annulata reported from China, Spain and Italy determined the 97.9 to 99.9% identity.

  5. Complete genome sequence analysis of candidate human rotavirus vaccine strains RV3 and 116E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippinger, Christine M; Patton, John T; McDonald, Sarah M

    2010-09-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) cause severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children; yet, several strains have been isolated from newborns showing no signs of clinical illness. Two of these neonatal strains, RV3 (G3P[6]) and 116E (G9P[11]), are currently being developed as live-attenuated vaccines. In this study, we sequenced the eleven-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes of cell culture-adapted RV3 and 116E and compared their genes and protein products to those of other RVs. Using amino acid alignments and structural predictions, we identified residues of RV3 or 116E that may contribute to attenuation or influence vaccine efficacy. We also discovered residues of the VP4 attachment protein that correlate with the capacity of some P[6] strains, including RV3, to infect newborns versus older infants. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the molecular determinants of RV3 and 116E attenuation and are expected to aid in the ongoing development of these vaccine candidates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

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    Dedeke Rockx-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  7. Immune responses of elk to initial and booster vaccinations with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Fach, S J; Palmer, M V; Sacco, R E; Stoffregen, W C; Waters, W R

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that currently available brucellosis vaccines induce poor or no protection in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). In this study, we characterized the immunologic responses of elk after initial or booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strains RB51 (SRB51) and 19 (S19). Elk were vaccinated with saline or 10(10) CFU of SRB51 or S19 (n=seven animals/treatment) and booster vaccinated with a similar dosage of the autologous vaccine at 65 weeks. Compared to nonvaccinates, elk vaccinated with SRB51 or S19 had greater (P0.05) from the responses of nonvaccinated elk. Gamma interferon production in response to autologous or nonautologous Brucella antigens did not differ (P>0.05) between controls and vaccinates after booster vaccination. Flow cytometric techniques suggested that proliferation occurred more frequently in immunoglobulin M-positive cells, with differences between vaccination and control treatments in CD4+ and CD8+ subset proliferation detected only at 22 weeks after initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, one technique ([3H]thymidine incorporation) suggested that proliferative responses to SRB51 antigen, but not S19 antigen, were greater (PBrucella antigens in S19 or SRB51 vaccinates after booster vaccination. Although some cellular immune responses were detected after initial or booster vaccination of elk with SRB51 or S19, our data suggest that responses tend to be transient and much less robust than previously reported in SRB51-vaccinated cattle (Bos taurus) or bison (Bison bison). These data may explain why the vaccination of elk with S19 and SRB51 induces poor protection against brucellosis.

  8. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

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    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  9. Protective efficacy of a Classical swine fever virus C-strain deletion mutant and ability to differentiate invected from vaccinated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, J.A.; Ketelaar, J.H.E.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) continues to be the most economically damaging pig disease in the world. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination with the live C-strain vaccine. This vaccine, however, does not enable the serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals

  10. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Matthew B; Kouriba, Bourema; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Angov, Evelina; Coulibaly, Drissa; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Blackwelder, William C; Wu, Yukun; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W Ripley; Vekemans, Johan; Lanar, David E; Dutta, Sheetij; Diggs, Carter; Soisson, Lorraine; Heppner, D Gray; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V; Thera, Mahamadou A

    2017-01-01

    The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA) testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90) (49% vs. 16%, pvaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (pvaccination (day 364) and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov, registry number NCT00460525.

  11. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

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    Maria Dolores Fernandez-Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation.

  12. Low 2012-13 influenza vaccine effectiveness associated with mutation in the egg-adapted H3N2 vaccine strain not antigenic drift in circulating viruses.

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    Danuta M Skowronski

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE is generally interpreted in the context of vaccine match/mismatch to circulating strains with evolutionary drift in the latter invoked to explain reduced protection. During the 2012-13 season, however, detailed genotypic and phenotypic characterization shows that low VE was instead related to mutations in the egg-adapted H3N2 vaccine strain rather than antigenic drift in circulating viruses.Component-specific VE against medically-attended, PCR-confirmed influenza was estimated in Canada by test-negative case-control design. Influenza A viruses were characterized genotypically by amino acid (AA sequencing of established haemagglutinin (HA antigenic sites and phenotypically through haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay. H3N2 viruses were characterized in relation to the WHO-recommended, cell-passaged vaccine prototype (A/Victoria/361/2011 as well as the egg-adapted strain as per actually used in vaccine production. Among the total of 1501 participants, influenza virus was detected in 652 (43%. Nearly two-thirds of viruses typed/subtyped were A(H3N2 (394/626; 63%; the remainder were A(H1N1pdm09 (79/626; 13%, B/Yamagata (98/626; 16% or B/Victoria (54/626; 9%. Suboptimal VE of 50% (95%CI: 33-63% overall was driven by predominant H3N2 activity for which VE was 41% (95%CI: 17-59%. All H3N2 field isolates were HI-characterized as well-matched to the WHO-recommended A/Victoria/361/2011 prototype whereas all but one were antigenically distinct from the egg-adapted strain as per actually used in vaccine production. The egg-adapted strain was itself antigenically distinct from the WHO-recommended prototype, and bore three AA mutations at antigenic sites B [H156Q, G186V] and D [S219Y]. Conversely, circulating viruses were identical to the WHO-recommended prototype at these positions with other genetic variation that did not affect antigenicity. VE was 59% (95%CI:16-80% against A(H1N1pdm09, 67% (95%CI: 30-85% against B

  13. Enhanced immune response of red deer (Cervus elaphus) to live rb51 vaccine strain using composite microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of nearly worldwide distribution. The occurrence of the infection in humans is largely dependent on the prevalence of brucellosis in animal reservoirs, including wildlife. The current vaccine used for cattle Brucella abortus strain RB51, has proven ineffective in protecting bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus nelsoni) from infection and abortion. To test possible improvements in vaccine efficacy, a novel approach of immunization was examined from April 2004 to November 2006 using alginate composite microspheres containing a nonimmunogenic, eggshell-precursor protein of the parasite Fasciola hepatica (Vitelline protein B, VpB) to deliver live vaccine strain RB51. Red deer (Cervus elaphus), used as a model for elk, were vaccinated orally (PO) or subcutaneously (SC) with 1.5x10(10) viable organisms per animal. Humoral responses postvaccination (immunoglobulin G [IgG] levels), assessed at different time points, indicated that capsules containing live RB51 elicited an anti-Brucella specific IgG response. Furthermore, the encapsulated vaccine elicited a cell-mediated response that the nonencapsulated vaccinates failed to produce. Finally, red deer were challenged with B. abortus strain 19 by conjunctival exposure. Only animals that received encapsulated RB51 vaccine by either route exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial counts in their spleens. These data suggest that alginate-VpB microspheres provide a method to enhance the RB51 vaccine performance in elk.

  14. Porcine rotavirus strain Gottfried-based human rotavirus candidate vaccines: construction and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yasutaka; Jones, Ronald W; Ross, Jerri; Kapikian, Albert Z

    2005-05-31

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis remains the leading cause of severe diarrheal disease in infants and young children worldwide, and thus, a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine is urgently needed in both developing and developed countries. Various candidate rotavirus vaccines that were developed by us and others have been or are being evaluated in different populations in various parts of the world. We have recently confirmed that a porcine rotavirus Gottfried strain bears a P (VP4) serotype (P2B[6]) closely related to human rotavirus P serotype 2A[6] which is of epidemiologic importance in some regions of the world. Based on the modified Jennerian approach to immunization, we have constructed 11 Gottfried-based single VP7 or VP4 gene substitution reassortant vaccine candidates which could provide: (i) an attenuation phenotype of a porcine rotavirus in humans; and (ii) antigenic coverage for G serotypes 1-6 and 8-10 and P serotype 1A[8], 1B[4] and 2A[6]. In addition, following immunization of guinea pigs with Gottfried VP4, we found low but consistent levels of neutralizing antibodies to VP4 with P1A[8] or P1B[4] specificity, both of which are of global epidemiologic importance. Thus, porcine-based VP7 reassortant rotavirus vaccines may provide an advantage over rhesus- or bovine-based VP7 reassortant vaccines since the VP4s of the latter vaccines do not evoke antibodies capable of neutralizing the viruses bearing P1A[8], P1B[4] or P2A[6] VP4.

  15. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Ehrlichia ruminantium Pathogenic Strain and Its High-Passaged Attenuated Strain Reveals Virulence and Attenuation-Associated Proteins.

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    Isabel Marcelino

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular bacterium Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER causes heartwater, a fatal tick-borne disease in livestock. In the field, ER strains present different levels of virulence, limiting vaccine efficacy, for which the molecular basis remains unknown. Moreover, there are no genetic tools currently available for ER manipulation, thus limiting the knowledge of the genes/proteins that are essential for ER pathogenesis and biology. As such, to identify proteins and/or mechanisms involved in ER virulence, we performed the first exhaustive comparative proteomic analysis between a virulent strain (ERGvir and its high-passaged attenuated strain (ERGatt. Despite their different behaviors in vivo and in vitro, our results from 1DE-nanoLC-MS/MS showed that ERGvir and ERGatt share 80% of their proteins; this core proteome includes chaperones, proteins involved in metabolism, protein-DNA-RNA biosynthesis and processing, and bacterial effectors. Conventional 2DE revealed that 85% of the identified proteins are proteoforms, suggesting that post-translational modifications (namely glycosylation are important in ER biology. Strain-specific proteins were also identified: while ERGatt has an increased number and overexpression of proteins involved in cell division, metabolism, transport and protein processing, ERGvir shows an overexpression of proteins and proteoforms (DIGE experiments involved in pathogenesis such as Lpd, AnkA, VirB9 and B10, providing molecular evidence for its increased virulence in vivo and in vitro. Overall, our work reveals that ERGvir and ERGatt proteomes are streamlined to fulfill their biological function (maximum virulence for ERGvir and replicative capacity for ERGatt, and we provide both pioneering data and novel insights into the pathogenesis of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  16. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Ehrlichia ruminantium Pathogenic Strain and Its High-Passaged Attenuated Strain Reveals Virulence and Attenuation-Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Isabel; Ventosa, Miguel; Pires, Elisabete; Müller, Markus; Lisacek, Frédérique; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiery, Nathalie; Coelho, Ana Varela

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER) causes heartwater, a fatal tick-borne disease in livestock. In the field, ER strains present different levels of virulence, limiting vaccine efficacy, for which the molecular basis remains unknown. Moreover, there are no genetic tools currently available for ER manipulation, thus limiting the knowledge of the genes/proteins that are essential for ER pathogenesis and biology. As such, to identify proteins and/or mechanisms involved in ER virulence, we performed the first exhaustive comparative proteomic analysis between a virulent strain (ERGvir) and its high-passaged attenuated strain (ERGatt). Despite their different behaviors in vivo and in vitro, our results from 1DE-nanoLC-MS/MS showed that ERGvir and ERGatt share 80% of their proteins; this core proteome includes chaperones, proteins involved in metabolism, protein-DNA-RNA biosynthesis and processing, and bacterial effectors. Conventional 2DE revealed that 85% of the identified proteins are proteoforms, suggesting that post-translational modifications (namely glycosylation) are important in ER biology. Strain-specific proteins were also identified: while ERGatt has an increased number and overexpression of proteins involved in cell division, metabolism, transport and protein processing, ERGvir shows an overexpression of proteins and proteoforms (DIGE experiments) involved in pathogenesis such as Lpd, AnkA, VirB9 and B10, providing molecular evidence for its increased virulence in vivo and in vitro. Overall, our work reveals that ERGvir and ERGatt proteomes are streamlined to fulfill their biological function (maximum virulence for ERGvir and replicative capacity for ERGatt), and we provide both pioneering data and novel insights into the pathogenesis of this obligate intracellular bacterium. PMID:26691135

  17. Optimized development of a candidate strain of inactivated EV71 vaccine and analysis of its immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenghong; Wang, Jingjing; Liu, Longding; Zhao, Hongling; Shi, Haijing; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Li, Qihan

    2010-12-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) is one of the main etiologic agents responsible for periodic epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). The prevention and control of EV71 epidemics with effective anti-viral agents and vaccines is very important for public health. Because the pathogenesis of EV71 in the human body is not completely clear and genetic variations in the virus during its replication are difficult to control, we have focused on the development of an inactivated whole-virus vaccine. In this study, we screened 16 strains isolated from different areas of China and selected one strain for the development of an inactivated EV71 vaccine. The results of our study suggest that the FY-23K-B strain, which is a candidate strain for an EV71 inactivated vaccine, satisfied the requirements of vaccine production in terms of genetic stability, biological activity, and good immunogenicity. The experimentally inactivated vaccine produced using this strain was capable of inducing an immune response and offered protection to rhesus monkeys against future virus attacks.

  18. Efficacy of an inactivated bivalent vaccine against the prevalent strains of Newcastle disease and H9N2 avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huiming; Xu, Hongjun; Ma, Zengbin; Zhang, Guozhong

    2017-03-16

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza subtype H9N2 (H9N2 AI) are two of the most important diseases of poultry, causing severe economic losses in the global poultry industry. Vaccination is an effective way to prevent and control the spread of ND virus (NDV) and H9N2 AI virus (AIV), but the antigenic differences between the current circulating strains and the vaccine strains might account for recent ND and H9N2 AI outbreaks in vaccinated poultry flocks. We developed an inactivated bivalent H9N2 and NDV vaccine based on the current prevalent strains of H9N2 AIV and NDV in China and evaluated its efficacy in chickens in this study. The results indicated that the inactivated bivalent vaccine could induce a fast antibody response in vaccinated chickens. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer in the sera increased rapidly, and the highest HI titer was observed at 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv) with a mean titre of 8.6 log2 for NDV and 9.5 log2 for H9N2. Up until 15 wpv, HI titers were still detectable at a high level of over 6 log2. The immunized chickens showed no signs of disease after challenge at 3 wpv with the prevalent strains of NDV and H9N2 AIV isolated in 2012-2014. Moreover, viral shedding was completely inhibited in vaccinated chickens after challenge with H9N2 AIV and inhibited by at least 90% with NDV compared to the controls at 5dpc. Our findings suggest that the inactivated NDV and H9N2 vaccine induces a fast and strong antibody response in vaccinated chickens and is efficacious in poultry against NDVs and H9N2 AIVs.

  19. Identification of the immunogenic spore and vegetative proteins of Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain A16R.

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    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available Immunoproteomics was used to screen the immunogenic spore and vegetative proteins of Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain A16R. The spore and vegetative proteins were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride membranes, and then western blotting was performed with rabbit immune serum against B.anthracis live spores. Immunogenic spots were cut and digested by trypsin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed to identify the proteins. As a result, 11 and 45 immunogenic proteins were identified in the spores and vegetative cells, respectively; 26 of which have not been reported previously. To verify their immunogenicity, 12 of the identified proteins were selected to be expressed, and the immune sera from the mice vaccinated by the 12 expressed proteins, except BA0887, had a specific western blot band with the A16R whole cellular lytic proteins. Some of these immunogenic proteins might be used as novel vaccine candidates themselves or for enhancing the protective efficacy of a protective-antigen-based vaccine.

  20. Experimental evaluation of a commercial footrot vaccine against native Canadian strains of Dichelobacter nodosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morck, D W; Gard, M S; Olson, M E

    1994-01-01

    Two serotypes of the anaerobic bacterium Dichelobacter nodosus were used to experimentally infect young sheep resulting in infectious pododermatitis or footrot characteristic of the natural disease in sheep. The specific serotypes of D. nodosus were reisolated from the feet and identified using immunofluorescent microscopy of hoof scrapings. Prior immunization of sheep with a commercially available bacterin containing whole cell preparations of ten strains of D. nodosus resulted in serum IgG reactive to a serotype of D. nodosus common to the vaccine. Immunization also produced serum IgG reactive to a serotype of D. nodosus not incorporated in the vaccine. A less severe infection occurred in the immunized sheep than in the controls regardless of the serotype of bacteria used to infect them. Clinical lameness and lesion severity were milder in sheep infected with the serotype of D. nodosus common to the vaccine. Western blot analysis of sera from convalescent sheep showed cross-reactive antibodies to nonfimbrial cell surface proteins, as well as bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Such cross-reactivity may explain the partial protection seen in animals infected with a serotype distinctive from the ones in the vaccine. Despite the historical emphasis of fimbrial immunogens in ovine footrot this study using a new model of experimental ovine footrot suggests other surface antigens may also be important in protective immunity. Images Fig. 3. PMID:8004537

  1. Identification of an IS711 Element Interrupting the wboA Gene of Brucella abortus Vaccine Strain RB51 and a PCR Assay To Distinguish Strain RB51 from Other Brucella Species and Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; McQuiston, John R.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Halling, Shirley M.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 is a natural stable attenuated rough mutant derived from the virulent strain 2308. The genetic mutations that are responsible for the roughness and the attenuation of strain RB51 have not been identified until now. Also, except for an assay based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no other simple method to differentiate strain RB51 from its parent strain 2308 is available. In the present study, we demonstrate that the wboA gene encoding a glycosyltransferase, an enzyme essential for the synthesis of O antigen, is disrupted by an IS711 element in B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Exploiting this feature, we developed a PCR assay that distinguishes strain RB51 from all other Brucella species and strains tested. PMID:10473532

  2. Molecular characterization of canine parvovirus strains in Argentina: Detection of the pathogenic variant CPV2c in vaccinated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Marina Gallo; Mattion, Nora; Bucafusco, Danilo; Fogel, Fernando; Remorini, Patricia; La Torre, Jose

    2009-08-01

    PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers was used to detect canine parvovirus (CPV) DNA in 38 rectal swabs from Argentine domestic dogs with symptoms compatible with parvovirus disease. Twenty-seven out of 38 samples analyzed were CPV positive. The classical CPV2 strain was not detected in any of the samples, but nine samples were identified as CPV2a variant and 18 samples as CPV2b variant. Further sequence analysis revealed a mutation at amino acid 426 of the VP2 gene (Asp426Glu), characteristic of the CPV2c variant, in 14 out of 18 of the samples identified initially by PCR as CPV2b. The appearance of CPV2c variant in Argentina might be dated at least to the year 2003. Three different pathogenic CPV variants circulating currently in the Argentine domestic dog population were identified, with CPV2c being the only variant affecting vaccinated and unvaccinated dogs during the year 2008.

  3. Risk analysis of inter-species reassortment through a Rift Valley fever phlebovirus MP-12 vaccine strain.

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    Hoai J Ly

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The causative agent, Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV, belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Phenuiviridae and causes high rates of abortions in ruminants, and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. Viral maintenance by mosquito vectors has led to sporadic RVF outbreaks in ruminants and humans in endemic countries, and effective vaccination of animals and humans may minimize the impact of this disease. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine strain is one of the best characterized RVFV strains, and was conditionally approved as a veterinary vaccine in the U.S. Live-attenuated RVF vaccines including MP-12 strain may form reassortant strains with other bunyavirus species. This study thus aimed to characterize the occurrence of genetic reassortment between the MP-12 strain and bunyavirus species closely related to RVFV. The Arumowot virus (AMTV and Gouleako goukovirus (GOLV, are transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa. The results of this study showed that GOLV does not form detectable reassortant strains with the MP-12 strain in co-infected C6/36 cells. The AMTV also did not form any reassortant strains with MP-12 strain in co-infected C6/36 cells, due to the incompatibility among N, L, and Gn/Gc proteins. A lack of reassortant formation could be due to a functional incompatibility of N and L proteins derived from heterologous species, and due to a lack of packaging via heterologous Gn/Gc proteins. The MP-12 strain did, however, randomly exchange L-, M-, and S-segments with a genetic variant strain, rMP12-GM50, in culture cells. The MP-12 strain is thus unlikely to form any reassortant strains with AMTV or GOLV in nature.

  4. Efficacy of strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection and vertical transmission against Brucella abortus in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Ariful; Khatun, Mst Minara; Baek, Byeong-Kirl; Lee, Sung-Il

    2009-09-01

    Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1. Virgin female SD rats (n = 48) two months of age were divided into two groups: one group (n = 24) received RB51 vaccine intraperitoneally with 3 x 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) and the other group (n = 24) was used as non-vaccinated control. Non-vaccinated and RB51-vaccinated rats were challenged with 1.5 x 10(9) CFU of virulent B. abortus biotype 1 six weeks after vaccination. Three weeks after challenge, all rats were bred. Verification of RB51-vaccine induced protection in SD rats was determined by bacteriological, serological and molecular screening of maternal and fetal tissues at necropsy. The RB51 vaccine elicited 81.25% protection in SD rats against infection with B. abortus biotype 1. Offspring from rats vaccinated with RB51 had a decreased (p RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

  5. Ovine rotavirus strain LLR-85-based bovine rotavirus candidate vaccines: construction, characterization and immunogenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji-Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Hai-Jun; Yu, Li

    2010-11-20

    Group A bovine rotaviruses (BRVs) are the most important cause of diarrheal diseases in neonatal calves and cause significant morbidity and mortality in the young animals, and epidemiologic surveillance of bovine rotavirus G genotypes conducted in various cattle populations throughout the world has shown that approximately 90% of the bovine rotavirus isolates belong to G6 and G10. Based on the modified Jennerian approach to immunization, we constructed and characterized a reassortant rotavirus stain, which bears a single bovine rotavirus VP7 gene encoding G genotype 6 specificity while the remaining 10 genes are derived from the ovine attenuated rotavirus LLR-85. The reassortant rotavirus strain, named as R191, and its parental virus strain LLR-85 were combined as bivalent vaccine candidates to inoculate the colostrums-deprived neonatal calves for evaluation of the immunogenicity. The calves were orally inoculated with the reassortant R191 (group 1), the parental rotavirus LLR-85 (group 2), or combined the R191 and LLR-85 (group 3), and serum specimens were detected to determine the immune response of IgG and IgA antibodies. Results showed that seroconversion to positivity for IgG and IgA antibodies occurred at postinoculation day (PID) 10 in all of the inoculated calves, and the highest titers of the serum IgG (range 1:800 to 1:6400) and IgA (range 1:800 to 1:3200) antibodies were obtained at PID 21 for all calves. Meanwhile, virus shedding was detected after inoculation, showing that the inoculated virus was positive in 2 of 77 fecal specimens (2.6%) collected from the inoculated calves during the first 7 days of oral inoculation with the rotavirus vaccine candidates. The results suggested that the rotavirus strains R191 and LLR-85 are promising bivalent vaccine candidates for the prevention of bovine G6 and G10 rotavirus infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased efficacy of inactivated vaccine candidates prepared with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains of predominant genotypes in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, S Y; Kwon, Y K; Song, C S; Lee, H J; Jeong, O M; Choi, B K; Jung, S C; Kang, M S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has been a major causative agent of food-borne human disease, mainly due to consumption of contaminated food animal products. In particular, ducks serve as a reservoir of serovar Typhimurium, and are one of the common sources of human infection. To prevent infection of ducks, and therefore minimize human infection, it is critical to control the persistent epidemic strains in ducks. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity and virulence of serovar Typhimurium isolates from ducks in Korea to identify the predominant strains that might be used as efficient vaccine candidates for ducks. Among the isolates, 2 representative isolates (ST26 and ST76) of predominant genotypes were selected as vaccine strains on the basis of genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA microarrays. Two-week-old ducks were then injected intramuscularly with inactivated vaccine candidates prepared using ST26 or ST76 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck or 10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck), and oral challenge with a highly virulent serovar Typhimurium strain (10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was carried out 2 wk later. Shedding of the challenge strain was significantly decreased in group 2 after vaccination. The antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all vaccinated groups were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the unvaccinated control group. Overall, vaccination with ST26 or ST76 reduced bacterial shedding and colonization in internal organs, and induced elevated antibody response. In particular, serovar Typhimurium ST26 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was the most effective vaccine candidate, which can provide efficient protection against serovar Typhimurium in ducks with higher effectiveness compared to a commercial vaccine currently used worldwide. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Effects of time-specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation overlays on prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum vaccination on blood characteristics of commercial laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, E D; Vance, A M; Branton, S L; Collier, S D; Gerard, P D

    2009-05-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts-11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (ts-11MG) vaccination alone or in combination with subsequent time-specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculations on the blood characteristics of commercial laying hens. The following 4 treatments were utilized: 1) sham vaccination at 10 wk of age, 2) vaccination of ts-11MG at 10 wk, 3) ts-11MG at 10 wk overlaid by FMG inoculation at 22 wk, and 4) ts-11MG at 10 wk overlaid by FMG at 45 wk. Parameters measured in both trials were whole blood hematocrit, plasma protein, serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and serum calcium. No significant age x treatment interactions and no significant age or treatment main effects were observed for any of the blood parameters investigated, except for serum calcium. At wk 22, serum calcium concentrations were increased by vaccination with ts-11MG at 10 wk, and levels were further increased when the ts-11MG vaccination at 10 wk was overlaid by an FMG inoculation at 22 wk. These results suggest that ts-11MG vaccination at 10 wk of age alone or combined with F-strain inoculum overlays at either 22 or 45 wk may be used without any consequential effects on hematocrit or the lipid and protein levels in the blood of commercial layers. Because elevations in serum calcium were not associated with changes in hen performance, as reported in a previous companion article, it is further suggested that prelay ts-11MG vaccination before FMG inoculation overlays during lay may provide adequate protection against field strain M. gallisepticum infections while being innocuous to layer performance.

  8. Increased level of protection of respiratory tract and kidney by combining different infectious bronchitis virus vaccines against challenge with nephropathogenic Brazilian genotype subcluster 4 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, J J; Brandao, P; Torres, C A; Koopman, R; Villarreal, L Y

    2015-10-01

    Genotyping of seven infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains isolated in Brazil showed that all belonged to the common Brazilian genotype and that these strains were closest to the subcluster of strain IBV/Brazil/2007/USP-19. Pathotyping of four selected Brazilian strains showed that they all caused a considerable level of ciliostasis in the trachea but at a somewhat lower level than did M41 and Brazilian strains 50/96, 57/96, 62/96 and 64/96 representing four different serotypes that had been reported earlier. In contrast to the M41 challenge strain, all Brazilian isolates replicated in kidney tissue in a high percentage of non-vaccinated challenged birds, clearly showing that they are nephropathogenic. As for the tracheal protection, the results using Massachusetts (Mass) vaccination against the recent strains seemed to show protection higher on average than for the strains reported earlier. A single or twofold vaccination with a Mass vaccine resulted in a mean tracheal protection level against the four challenge strains of 92% and 90%, respectively, whereas a single and twofold vaccination with a Mass vaccine halved the percentage of infected kidneys (14% and 13%, respectively, P protection of 99% and a reduction of the percentage of infected kidneys to a mean of 2%. This was a significantly (P protection than that achieved by a single or twofold Mass vaccination, showing the added value of the 793B vaccination following priming with a vaccine of the Mass type.

  9. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

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    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90 (49% vs. 16%, p<0.0001; and 71.8% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.02. From baseline to day 90, 3D7 GIA in the vaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (p<0.0001. In AMA1 vaccinees, 3D7 GIA activity subsequently returned to baseline one year after vaccination (day 364 and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials

  10. Retention of 1.2 kbp of 'novel' genomic sequence in two European field isolates and some vaccine strains of Fowlpox virus extends open reading frame fpv241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmin, Susan A; Manvell, Ruth; Gough, Richard E; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of variant fowlpox viruses (FWPVs) and increasing field use of recombinants against avian influenza H5N1 emphasize the need to monitor vaccines and to distinguish them from field strains. Five commercial vaccines, two laboratory viruses and two European field isolates were characterized by PCR and sequencing at 18 loci differing between attenuated FP9 and its pathogenic progenitor. PCR failed to discriminate between the viruses and sequence determination revealed no significant differences at any locus, except for a polymorphic locus encompassed by deletion 24 (9.3 kbp) in FP9. Surprisingly, 'novel' previously unreported sequence (spanning 1.2 kbp) was found in both European field isolates and three of the vaccines. It was absent from the other two vaccines, removed by a 1.2 kbp deletion identical to that surprisingly also observed in the completely sequenced genome of FPV USDA. This locus (H9) adds a potentially useful tool for discriminating between FWPV field isolates and vaccines.

  11. Reversion to virulence evaluation of a 9R vaccine strain of Salmonella enterica serovar gallinarum in commercial brown layers

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    AS Okamoto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The live vaccine Cevac S. Gallinarum, made from a rough strain of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Gallinarum is used for preventing fowl typhoid, a disease that still causes considerable economic losses in countries with a developing poultry industry. The objective of this paper was to evaluate a possible reversion to virulence of the strain used in a vaccine in commercial brown layers. Only Salmonella-free chicks were utilized. One hundred twenty (120 12-day-old Dekalb brown layers divided in two trials were used. The first trial had six groups of 15 birds each. Birds of group 1 were vaccinated with 10 doses of Cevac S. Gallinarum subcutaneously and 10 doses orally, in a total of 20 doses of vaccine. Then the birds of groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 received inocula that contained feces and a pool of organs with fragments of liver, heart, spleen, and cecal tonsils obtained from the immediately previous group. The second trial had three groups with 10 birds each. Birds in group 7 received inocula containing a pool of organs from birds of group 5 from trial 1, whilst the birds in group 8 were vaccinated subcutaneously with one dose of vaccine. Both trials included negative control groups (6 and 9. Throughout the experimental period, birds were monitored for reactions to the vaccination on the site of administration, clinical signs, and post-mortem lesions. In each passage, in addition to the birds euthanized to provide the inocula material, two birds from each group were euthanized for assessment of possible lesions, and their organs (liver, heart, spleen and cecal tonsils were cultured in an attempt to isolate the vaccine strain. Except for one bird from group 1, that had a local reaction on the site of vaccination - a small vesicle with less that 0.5 mm that persisted until the third day post vaccination -, no other bird had any local reaction to the vaccine or any visible clinical alteration. Birds in group 8 did not present any

  12. Meningococcal B Vaccine Failure With a Penicillin-Resistant Strain in a Young Adult on Long-Term Eculizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Lucidarme, Jay; Bingham, Coralie; Warwicker, Paul; Goodship, Tim; Borrow, Ray; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2017-09-01

    We describe a case of invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant strain in a fully immunized young adult on long-term complement inhibitor therapy and daily penicillin chemoprophylaxis. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human complement C5 protein and inhibits the terminal complement pathway. It is currently recommended for the treatment of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathies. An unwanted complication of inhibiting complement, however, is an increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease. Here, we report the first case of meningococcal group B vaccine failure in a young adult receiving eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. She developed invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant meningococcal group B strain 4 months after receiving 2 doses of meningococcal group B vaccine while on oral penicillin prophylaxis against meningococcal infection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Effectiveness of Brucella abortus Strain 19 single calfhood vaccination in elk (Cervus elaphus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, Thomas J.; Jones, Lee C.; Coffin, Kenneth; Sweeney, Steven J.; Williams, Beth; Quist, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Brucellosis in Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) bison and elk has been a source of controversy and focus of the Greater Yellowstone Interagency Brucellosis Committee (GYIBC) for years. Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the 3 states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho and all three states currently are classified as “brucellosis free” with regard to livestock. Yet free-ranging elk that attend feedgrounds in the GYA, and bison in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, still have high seroprevalence to the disease and are viewed as a threat to the state-federal cooperative national brucellosis eradication program. Recently, cattle in eastern Idaho were found infected with brucellosis and transmission was apparently from fed elk. The GYIBC, formed of state and federal agencies involved in wildlife and livestock management in the 3 states, has committed to eventual elimination of the disease from wildlife. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is one of the methods currently employed. Effective wildlife vaccination depends on dose efficacy, deliverability, and safety to non-targeted species. We commenced a single-dose efficacy study of vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) in elk in 1999.

  14. Antibody dynamics in Holstein Friesian heifers vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19, using seven serological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, N P; Vanzini, V R; Torioni de Echaide, S; Valentini, B S; De Lucca, G; Aufranc, C; Canal, A; Vigliocco, A; Nielsen, K

    2002-01-01

    The serological response induced by Brucella abortus strain 19 was evaluated in 52 Holstein females from a brucellosis-free herd using seven serological tests. Each calf was vaccinated at an age of 4 and 8 months old with 3 x 10(10) CFU B. abortus S19 and the antibody response was determined as the proportion of positive results to each test. The antibody dynamics, measured with the buffered plate antigen (BPA) test and the rapid automated presumptive (RAP) test, were similar. The proportion of positive reactions in these tests reached 100% one week after vaccination and remained at this level for seven weeks, after which the proportion of positive samples slowly declined to 8% (BPA) and 2% (RAP) at week 50. The response in the indirect enzyme immunoassay (i-ELISA) was similar, but shorter than that observed with the BPA/RAP. The antibody dynamic, measured using the seroagglutination test (SAT) in parallel with the 2-mercaptoethanol (2-Me) test and the complement fixation test (CFT) were similar to the RAP/BPA, but of slightly shorter duration. The competitive ELISA (c-ELISA) was positive in all animals for 3 weeks, followed by a rapid decline. The fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) reached a maximum of 68.5% positive animals at week 4 and then declined. Based on these data, the c-ELISA and FPA discriminated residual antibody activity due to vaccination more efficiently than the other tests.

  15. Development of stable Vibrio cholerae O1 Hikojima type vaccine strains co-expressing the Inaba and Ogawa lipopolysaccharide antigens.

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    Stefan L Karlsson

    Full Text Available We describe here the development of stable classical and El Tor V. cholerae O1 strains of the Hikojima serotype that co-express the Inaba and Ogawa antigens of O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mutation of the wbeT gene reduced LPS perosamine methylation and thereby gave only partial transformation into Ogawa LPS on the cell surface. The strains express approximately equal amounts of Inaba- and Ogawa-LPS antigens which are preserved after formalin-inactivation of the bacteria. Oral immunizations of both inbred and outbred mice with formalin-inactivated whole-cell vaccine preparations of these strains elicited strong intestinal IgA anti-LPS as well as serum vibriocidal antibody responses against both Inaba and Ogawa that were fully comparable to the responses induced by the licensed Dukoral vaccine. Passive protection studies in infant mice showed that immune sera raised against either of the novel Hikojima vaccine strains protected baby mice against infection with virulent strains of both serotypes. This study illustrates the power of using genetic manipulation to improve the properties of bacteria strains for use in killed whole-cell vaccines.

  16. Pathotypic and Sequence Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses from Vaccinated Chickens Reveals Circulation of Genotype II, IV and XIII and in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakhesara, S J; Prasad, V V S P; Pal, J K; Jhala, M K; Prajapati, K S; Joshi, C G

    2016-10-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a highly contagious disease which continuously haunts the global poultry industry. The nature and molecular epidemiology of NDVs prevalent in recent outbreaks in India is poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize NDVs prevalent in vaccinated flocks in India using whole-genome sequencing and biological pathotyping. Twelve field isolates were collected from outbreaks which occurred in different parts of India and characterized as velogenic based on their intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) and amino acid sequence at the F protein cleavage site. All 12 of the field isolates and five commonly used vaccine strains were selected for whole-genome sequencing using Ion Torrent PGM technology, yielding complete genome sequences for ten field isolates and all vaccine strains. The genome of all isolates was found to be 15 192 nt long with a high level of conservation across multiple genomic features with APMV-I viruses. Phylogenetic analysis and evolutionary distance calculations placed the isolates in genotypes II, IV and XIII. Revisiting other recently reported strains provided preliminary evidence of genotypes VI, VII and XVIII circulating in India. Comparison between the field and vaccine virus sequences revealed unique genomic and amino acid differences in important antigenic regions of the F and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) genes which can be targeted for site directed mutagenesis to evaluate the impact of these substitutions on virus pathogenicity. This study highlights the requirement to evaluate current vaccines through systematic protection assays to determine protection efficacy against field isolates. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Yellow fever virus isolated from a fatal post vaccination event: an experimental comparative study with the 17DD vaccine strain in the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Guerreiro Rodrigues

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the pathogenicity of the virus strain GOI 4191 that was isolated from a fatal adverse event after yellow fever virus (YFV vaccination, an experimental assay using hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus as animal model and YFV 17DD vaccine strain as virus reference was accomplished. The two virus strains were inoculated by intracerebral, intrahepatic and subcutaneous routes. The levels of viremia, antibody response, and aminotransferases were determined in sera; while virus, antigen and histopathological changes were determined in the viscera. No viremia was detected for either strain following infection; the immune response was demonstrated to be more effective to strain GOI 4191; and no significant aminotransferase levels alterations were detected. Strain GOI 4191 was recovered only from the brain of animals inoculated by the IC route. Viral antigens were detected in liver and brain by immunohistochemical assay. Histothological changes in the viscera were characterized by inflammatory infiltrate, hepatocellular necrosis, and viral encephalitis. Histological alterations and detection of viral antigen were observed in the liver of animals inoculated by the intrahepatic route. These findings were similar for both strains used in the experiment; however, significant differences were observed from those results previously reported for wild type YFV strains.

  18. The genomic termini of wild-type and vaccine strains of measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Bankamp, Bettina; Xu, Wenbo; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2006-12-01

    The genomic termini from 18 strains of measles virus (MV) including wild-type MVs from the pre-vaccine period, recent wild-type isolates and various vaccine strains were sequenced. The first 25 nucleotides of the 3' terminus and last 52 nucleotides of the 5' terminus were conserved in all of the viruses examined. Nucleotides 26 and 42 of the 3' leader were A and G, respectively, in all genotype A viruses except Edmonston wild-type (Ed-WT). All non-genotype A viruses and Ed-WT had U in both positions. No consistent substitution pattern was found in the 5' trailer region of the genome. The nucleotide substitutions at positions 26 and 42 in the 3' leader region were introduced into a MV-CAT mini-genome to test for their effect on the production of reporter protein in both a vaccinia T7-driven, plasmid-based replication assay as well as in a helper virus system. Regardless of the source of the polymerase proteins or the natural leader sequence of the helper viruses, the mini-genome 26A42G produced more CAT protein than 26U42U. The nucleotide substitution at 26 had the greatest effect on CAT production. These results indicated that naturally occurring nucleotide variations in the 3' leader region can affect the levels of reporter protein synthesis, and presumably affected the level of replication of the virus.

  19. [History of development of the live poliomyelitis vaccine from Sabin attenuated strains in 1959 and idea of poliomyelitis eradication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkevich, V A

    2013-01-01

    In 1958 Poliomyelitis Institute in Moscow and Institute of Experimental Medicine in St. Petersburg received from A. Sabin the attenuated strains of poliomyelitis virus. The characteristics of the strains were thoroughly studied by A. A. Smorodintsev and coworkers. They found that the virulence of the strains fluctuated slightly in 10 consecutive passages through the intestine of the non-immune children. A part of the Sabin material was used by A. A. Smorodintsev and M. P. Chumakov in the beginning of 1959 for immunizing approximately 40000 children in Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia. Epidemic poliomyelitis rate in these republics decreased from approximately 1000 cases yearly before vaccination to less than 20 in the third quarter of 1959. This was a convincing proof of the efficacy and safety of the vaccine from the attenuated Sabin strains. In 1959, according to A. Sabin's recommendation, a technology of live vaccine production was developed at the Poliomyelitis Institute, and several experimental lots of vaccine were prepared. In the second part of 1959, 13.5 million children in USSR were immunized. The epidemic poliomyelitis rate decreased 3-5 times in different regions without paralytic cases, which could be attributed to the vaccination. These results were the final proof of high efficiency and safety of live poliomyelitis vaccine from the attenuated Sabin strains. Based on these results, A. Sabin and M. P. Chumakov suggested in 1960 the idea of poliomyelitis eradication using mass immunization of children with live vaccine. 72 million persons up to 20 years old were vaccinated in USSR in 1960 with a 5 times drop in the paralytic rate. 50-year-long use of live vaccine results in poliomyelitis eradication in almost all countries worldwide. More than 10 million children were rescued from the death and palsy. Poliomyelitis eradication in a few countries where it still exists depends not on medical services but is defined by the attitude of their leaders to fight

  20. Genetic diversity of circulating rotavirus strains in Tanzania prior to the introduction of vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina J Moyo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tanzania currently rolls out vaccination against rotavirus-diarrhea, a major cause of child illness and death. As the vaccine covers a limited number of rotavirus variants, this study describes the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus among children under two years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, prior to implementation of vaccination. METHODS: Stool specimens, demographic and clinical information, were collected from 690 children admitted to hospital due to diarrhea (cases and 545 children without diarrhea (controls during one year. Controls were inpatient or children attending child health clinics. Rotavirus antigen was detected using ELISA and positive samples were typed by multiplex semi-nested PCR and sequencing. RESULTS: The prevalence of rotavirus was higher in cases (32.5% than in controls (7.7%, P<0.001. The most common G genotypes were G1 followed by G8, G12, and G4 in cases and G1, G12 and G8 in controls. The Tanzanian G1 variants displayed 94% similarity with the Rotarix vaccine G1 variant. The commonest P genotypes were P[8], P[4] and P[6], and the commonest G/P combination G1 P[8] (n = 123, G8 P[4] and G12 P[6]. Overall, rotavirus prevalence was higher in cool (23.9% than hot months (17.1% of the year (P = 0.012. We also observed significant seasonal variation of G genotypes. Rotavirus was most frequently found in the age group of four to six months. The prevalence of rotavirus in cases was lower in stunted children (28.9% than in non-stunted children (40.1%, P = 0.003 and lower in HIV-infected (15.4%, 4/26 than in HIV-uninfected children (55.3%, 42/76, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: This pre-vaccination study shows predominance of genotype G1 in Tanzania, which is phylogenetically distantly related to the vaccine strains. We confirm the emergence of genotype G8 and G12. Rotavirus infection and circulating genotypes showed seasonal variation. This study also suggests that rotavirus may not be an opportunistic pathogen in

  1. T-bet regulates immunity to Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection, particularly in lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Amanda A; Foreman, Oded; Bosio, Catharine M; Elkins, Karen L

    2014-04-01

    Upregulation of the transcription factor T-bet is correlated with the strength of protection against secondary challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Thus, to determine if this mediator had direct consequences in immunity to LVS, we examined its role in infection. Despite substantial in vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) levels, T-bet-knockout (KO) mice infected intradermally (i.d.) or intranasally (i.n.) with LVS succumbed to infection with doses 2 log units less than those required for their wild-type (WT) counterparts, and exhibited significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lung and spleen. Lungs of LVS-infected T-bet-KO mice contained fewer lymphocytes and more neutrophils and interleukin-17 than WT mice. LVS-vaccinated T-bet-KO mice survived lethal LVS intraperitoneal secondary challenge but not high doses of LVS i.n. challenge, independently of the route of vaccination. Immune T lymphocytes from the spleens of i.d. LVS-vaccinated WT or KO mice controlled intracellular bacterial replication in an in vitro coculture system, but cultures with T-bet-KO splenocyte supernatants contained less IFN-γ and increased amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, immune T-bet-KO lung lymphocytes were greatly impaired in controlling intramacrophage growth of LVS; this functional defect is the likely mechanism underpinning the lack of respiratory protection. Taken together, T-bet is important in host resistance to primary LVS infection and i.n. secondary challenge. Thus, T-bet represents a true, useful correlate for immunity to LVS.

  2. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C S

    2012-06-01

    This study characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (hand RB51), by single pneumatic dart delivery (dart RB51), or as two vaccinations approximately 13 months apart (booster RB51) in comparison to control bison. All bison were challenged intraconjunctivally in midgestation with 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 (S2308). Bison were necropsied and sampled within 72 h of abortion or delivery of a live calf. Compared to nonvaccinated bison, bison in the booster RB51 treatment had a reduced (P RB51 and dart RB51) did not differ (P > 0.05) from the control group in the incidence of abortion or recovery of S2308 from uterine, mammary, fetal, or maternal tissues at necropsy. Compared to nonvaccinated animals, all RB51 vaccination groups had reduced (P RB51 group having reduced (P RB51 enhances protective immunity against Brucella challenge compared to single vaccination with RB51 by hand or by pneumatic dart. Our study also suggests that an initial vaccination of calves followed by booster vaccination as yearlings should be an effective strategy for brucellosis control in bison.

  3. Immune responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Boyle, S M; Schurig, G G; Sriranganathan, N N

    2009-04-01

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) or a recombinant RB51 strain overexpressing superoxide dismutase (sodC) and glycosyltransferase (wboA) genes (RB51+sodC,wboA). Bison were vaccinated with saline only or with 4.6 x 10(10) CFU of RB51 or 7.4 x 10(10) CFU of RB51+sodC,wboA (n = eight animals/treatment). Bison vaccinated with RB51 or RB51+sodC,wboA had greater (P RB51 after vaccination than did nonvaccinates. However, bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA cleared the vaccine strain from draining lymph nodes faster than bison vaccinated with the parental RB51 strain. Immunologic responses of bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA were similar to responses of bison vaccinated with RB51. Pregnant bison were intraconjunctivally challenged in midgestation with 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. Bison vaccinated with RB51, but not RB51+sodC,wboA vaccinates, had greater protection from abortion, fetal/uterine, mammary, or maternal infection than nonvaccinates. Our data suggest that the RB51+sodC,wboA strain is less efficacious as a calfhood vaccine for bison than the parental RB51 strain. Our data also suggest that the RB51 vaccine is a currently available management tool that could be utilized to help reduce brucellosis in free-ranging bison.

  4. Isolation of an attenuated myxoma virus field strain that can confer protection against myxomatosis on contacts of vaccinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, J; Pagès-Manté, A; March, R; Morales, M; Ramírez, M A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Torres, J M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty MV strains obtained from a survey of field strains currently circulating throughout Spain were analyzed for their virulence and horizontal spreading among rabbits by contact transmission. A virus strain with suitable characteristics to be used as a potential vaccine against myxomatosis in wild rabbit populations was selected. Following inoculation, the selected MV strain elicited high levels of MV specific antibodies and induced protection of rabbits against a virulent MV challenge. Furthermore, the attenuated MV was transmitted to 9 out of 16 uninoculated rabbits by contact, inducing protection against myxomatosis.

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine compared with two trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines containing alternate B strains in adults: A phase 3, randomized noninferiority study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, John T; Albano, Frank R; Sawlwin, Daphne C; Graves Jones, Alison; Airey, Jolanta; Formica, Neil; Matassa, Vince; Leong, Jane

    2017-04-04

    Vaccination is the most effective means of influenza prevention. Efficacy of trivalent vaccines may be enhanced by including both B strain lineages. This phase 3, double-blind study assessed the immunogenicity and safety/tolerability of a quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4) versus the United States (US)-licensed 2014-2015 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3-Yamagata [IIV3-YAM]; Afluria) and IIV3 containing the alternate Victoria B strain (IIV3-VIC) in adults ≥18years. Participants (n=3484) were randomized 2:1:1 and stratified by age to receive IIV4 (n=1741), IIV3-YAM (n=871), or IIV3-VIC (n=872). The primary objective was to demonstrate noninferiority of the immunological response to IIV4 versus IIV3-YAM and IIV3-VIC. Noninferiority was assessed by hemagglutination inhibition geometric mean titer (GMT) ratio (IIV3/IIV4; upper bound of two-sided 95% confidence interval [CI]≤1.5) and seroconversion rate (SCR) difference (IIV3 - IIV4; upper bound of two-sided 95% CI≤10%) for vaccine strains. Solicited local and systemic adverse events (AEs) were assessed for 7days postvaccination, AEs recorded for 28days postvaccination, and serious AEs for 6months postvaccination. IIV4 elicited a noninferior immune response for matched strains, and superior response for unmatched B strains not contained in IIV3 comparators. Adjusted GMT ratios (95% CI) for A/H1N1, A/H3N2, B/YAM, and B/VIC strains were 0.93 (0.88, 0.99), 0.93 (0.88, 0.98), 0.87 (IIV3-YAM; 0.82, 0.93), and 0.95 (IIV3-VIC; 0.88, 1.03), respectively. Corresponding values for SCR differences (95% CI) were -1.1 (-4.5, 2.3), -1.7 (-5.0, 1.7), -3.2 (IIV3-YAM; -7.4, 0.9), and -1.6 (IIV3-VIC; -5.8, 2.5). AEs were generally mild and experienced by 52.9% of participants. Serious AEs were reported with a slightly higher frequency with IIV4 (2.3%) versus IIV3-YAM (1.6%) and IIV3-VIC (1.5%). IIV4 demonstrated immunological noninferiority to the US-licensed IIV3, and superiority for unmatched B strains

  6. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  7. Efficiency of live attenuated and inactivated rabies viruses in prophylactic and post exposure vaccination against the street virus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F; Ahmad, W; Duan, M; Liu, Z; Guan, Z; Zhang, M; Qiao, B; Li, Y; Song, Y; Song, Y; Chen, Y; Amjad Ali, M

    2015-06-01

    Rabies remains an enigmatic and widely discussed global infectious disease and causes an increasing number of deaths. The currently used highly effective prophylactic and post exposure (p.e.) vaccination depends solely upon inexpensive, effective and safe vaccines to counteract the spread of the disease. In this study, the potential of an attenuated Chinese rabies vaccine (SRV9) strain in prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against the street strain of rabies virus (RV) was evaluated in mice. Prophylactic vaccination consisting of one intramuscular (i.m.) dose of SRV9 protected 100% of mice from intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with a lethal dose of the street virus. The latter was detected in the brain of mice at day 6 post challenge by RT-PCR. Post exposure vaccination was performed at days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 post infection (p.i.) with either SRV9 or inactivated rabies vaccine. The survival rates after i.m. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days were 70%, 50%, 30%, 20%, 10%, and 0%, respectively; the corresponding survival rates for the inactivated rabies vaccine were 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. However, 100%, 90%, 70%, 50%, 20%, 10%, and 10% of mice survived after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days. The increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the infiltration of CD19+ B cells into the central nervous system after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 are regarded as prerequisites for the clearance of the street virus. The obtained data suggest that SRV9 is a promising candidate for prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against rabies infection and that it exhibits a potential for the control of rabies in China.

  8. A novel rapid direct haemagglutination-inhibition assay for measurements of humoral immune response against non-haemagglutinating Fowlpox virus strains in vaccinated chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon N. Wambura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fowlpox (FP is a serious disease in chickens caused by Fowlpox virus (FPV. One method currently used to control FPV is vaccination followed by confirmation that antibody titres are protective using the indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA. The direct haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is not done because most FPV strains do not agglutinate chicken red blood cells (RBCs. A novel FPV strain TPV-1 which agglutinates chicken RBCs was discovered recently and enabled a direct HI assay to be conducted using homologous sera. This study is therefore aimed at assessing the direct HI assay using a recently discovered novel haemagglutinating FPV strain TPV-1 in chickens vaccinated with a commercial vaccine containing a non-haemagglutinating FPV.Chicks vaccinated with FPV at 1 day-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT of log2 3.7 at 7 days after vaccination and log2 8.0 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. Chickens vaccinated at 6 weeks-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT of log2 5.0 at 7 days after vaccination and log2 8.4 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. The GMT recorded 28 days after vaccination was slightly higher in chickens vaccinated at 6-week-old than in chicks vaccinated at one-day-old. However, this difference was not significant (P > 0.05. All vaccinated chickens showed “takes”. No antibody response to FPV and “takes” were detected in unvaccinated chickens (GMT 0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a simple and rapid direct HI assay using the FPV TPV-1 strain as antigen may be used to measure antibody levels in chickens vaccinated with non-haemagglutinating strains of FPV, and that the titres are comparable to those obtained by indirect IHA. Keywords: Veterinary medicine, Veterinary science, Vaccines, Immunology, Zoology

  9. Genetic diversity of circulating rotavirus strains in Tanzania prior to the introduction of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Sabrina J; Blomberg, Bjørn; Hanevik, Kurt; Kommedal, Oyvind; Vainio, Kirsti; Maselle, Samuel Y; Langeland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Tanzania currently rolls out vaccination against rotavirus-diarrhea, a major cause of child illness and death. As the vaccine covers a limited number of rotavirus variants, this study describes the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus among children under two years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, prior to implementation of vaccination. Stool specimens, demographic and clinical information, were collected from 690 children admitted to hospital due to diarrhea (cases) and 545 children without diarrhea (controls) during one year. Controls were inpatient or children attending child health clinics. Rotavirus antigen was detected using ELISA and positive samples were typed by multiplex semi-nested PCR and sequencing. The prevalence of rotavirus was higher in cases (32.5%) than in controls (7.7%, PG genotypes were G1 followed by G8, G12, and G4 in cases and G1, G12 and G8 in controls. The Tanzanian G1 variants displayed 94% similarity with the Rotarix vaccine G1 variant. The commonest P genotypes were P[8], P[4] and P[6], and the commonest G/P combination G1 P[8] (n = 123), G8 P[4] and G12 P[6]. Overall, rotavirus prevalence was higher in cool (23.9%) than hot months (17.1%) of the year (P = 0.012). We also observed significant seasonal variation of G genotypes. Rotavirus was most frequently found in the age group of four to six months. The prevalence of rotavirus in cases was lower in stunted children (28.9%) than in non-stunted children (40.1%, P = 0.003) and lower in HIV-infected (15.4%, 4/26) than in HIV-uninfected children (55.3%, 42/76, Pgenotype G1 in Tanzania, which is phylogenetically distantly related to the vaccine strains. We confirm the emergence of genotype G8 and G12. Rotavirus infection and circulating genotypes showed seasonal variation. This study also suggests that rotavirus may not be an opportunistic pathogen in children infected with HIV.

  10. Immune Responses and Protection against Experimental Brucella suis Biovar 1 Challenge in Nonvaccinated or B. abortus Strain RB51-Vaccinated Cattle▿

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, S C; Hennager, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty Hereford heifers approximately 9 months of age were vaccinated with saline (control) or 2 × 1010 CFU of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine. Immunologic responses after inoculation demonstrated significantly greater (P < 0.05) antibody and proliferative responses to RB51 antigens in cattle vaccinated with RB51 than in the controls. Pregnant cattle received a conjunctival challenge at approximately 6 months of gestation with 107 CFU of B. suis bv. 1 strains isolated from nat...

  11. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA: Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P Sanders

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the

  12. Molecular characterization of rotavirus strains detected during a clinical trial of a human rotavirus vaccine in Blantyre, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Dove, Winifred; Doan, Yen Hai; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey; Todd, Stacy; Steele, A Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2014-01-01

    The human, G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix) significantly reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes in a clinical trial in South Africa and Malawi, but vaccine efficacy was lower in Malawi (49.5%) than reported in South Africa (76.9%) and elsewhere. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular relationships of circulating wild-type rotaviruses detected during the clinical trial in Malawi to RIX4414 (the strain contained in Rotarix) and to common human rotavirus strains. Of 88 rotavirus-positive, diarrhoeal stool specimens, 43 rotaviruses exhibited identifiable RNA migration patterns when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The genes encoding VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 of 5 representative strains possessing genotypes G12P[6], G1P[8], G9P[8], and G8P[4] were sequenced. While their VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotype designations were confirmed, the VP6 (I) and NSP4 (E) genotypes were either I1E1 or I2E2, indicating that they were of human rotavirus origin. RNA-RNA hybridization using 21 culture-adapted strains showed that Malawian rotaviruses had a genomic RNA constellation common to either the Wa-like or DS-1 like human rotaviruses. Overall, the Malawi strains appear similar in their genetic make-up to rotaviruses described in countries where vaccine efficacy is greater, suggesting that the lower efficacy in Malawi is unlikely to be explained by the diversity of circulating strains. PMID:22520123

  13. Comparison of the efficacy of Brucella abortus strain RB51 and Brucella melitensis Rev. 1 live vaccines against experimental infection with Brucella melitensis in pregnant ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Idrissi, A H; Benkirane, A; el Maadoudi, M; Bouslikhane, M; Berrada, J; Zerouali, A

    2001-12-01

    To test the efficacy of rough Brucella strain vaccines in sheep, a vaccine recently developed in cattle (Brucella abortus strain RB51) was assessed in comparison with the conventional Rev. 1 vaccine. Forty-five ewes from twelve to fourteen months of age, from brucellosis-free flocks, were allotted to three groups of fifteen ewes each. Group one was vaccinated by the conjunctival route with 1.73 x 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) of Rev. 1 vaccine. Group two was vaccinated subcutaneously with 11 x 10(9) CFU of RB51 vaccine and group three was considered as a control. All sheep were challenged at two to three months of gestation with 5 x 10(7) CFU of virulent B. melitensis H38. Vaccination with RB51 vaccine did not result in the production of any antibodies against the O-side chain of lipopolysaccharide, as measured by conventional serological tests (Rose Bengal plate test and complement fixation test). Protection of sheep against abortion and excretion of virulent Brucella strain in vaginal fluid, aborted foetuses and/or non viable lambs at parturition and abortion was significantly lower than that afforded by Rev. 1 vaccine. The difference compared to the control group was not significant. Data from this study suggest that the RB51 vaccine used for cattle vaccination does not provide effective protection of sheep against abortion induced by B. melitensis.

  14. A trivalent virus-like particle vaccine elicits protective immune responses against seasonal influenza strains in mice and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M Ross

    Full Text Available There is need for improved human influenza vaccines, particularly for older adults who are at greatest risk for severe disease, as well as to address the continuous antigenic drift within circulating human subtypes of influenza virus. We have engineered an influenza virus-like particle (VLP as a new generation vaccine candidate purified from the supernatants of Sf9 insect cells following infection by recombinant baculoviruses to express three influenza virus proteins, hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA, and matrix 1 (M1. In this study, a seasonal trivalent VLP vaccine (TVV formulation, composed of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 and influenza B VLPs, was evaluated in mice and ferrets for the ability to elicit antigen-specific immune responses. Animals vaccinated with the TVV formulation had hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI antibody titers against all three homologous influenza virus strains, as well as HAI antibodies against a panel of heterologous influenza viruses. HAI titers elicited by the TVV were statistically similar to HAI titers elicited in animals vaccinated with the corresponding monovalent VLP. Mice vaccinated with the TVV had higher level of influenza specific CD8+ T cell responses than a commercial trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV. Ferrets vaccinated with the highest dose of the VLP vaccine and then challenged with the homologous H3N2 virus had the lowest titers of replicating virus in nasal washes and showed no signs of disease. Overall, a trivalent VLP vaccine elicits a broad array of immunity and can protect against influenza virus challenge.

  15. The vaccination of human beings with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new series of volunteers

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    Humberto Menezes

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Five human volunteers were vaccinated with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and followed-up for one year. Except for a few cases of questionable results presented by only one Laboratory, ali the other clinicai, parasitological and serological tests remained negative during that period.

  16. Brucella abortus strain RB51 leucine auxotroph as an environmentally safe vaccine for plasmid maintenance and antigen overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Seleem, Mohamed N; Contreras, Andrea; Purwantini, Endang; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M

    2008-11-01

    To avoid potentiating the spread of an antibiotic resistance marker, a plasmid expressing a leuB gene and a heterologous antigen, green fluorescent protein (GFP), was shown to complement a leucine auxotroph of cattle vaccine strain Brucella abortus RB51, which protected CD1 mice from virulent B. abortus 2308 and elicited GFP antibodies.

  17. Genetic and antigenetic charactersation of serotype a FMD viruses from East Africa to select new vaccine strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bari, F.D.; Parida, S.; Tekleghiorghis, T.; Dekker, A.; Sangula, A.; Reeve, R.; Haydon, D.T.; Paton, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine strain selection for emerging foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outbreaks in enzootic countries can be addressed through antigenic and genetic characterisation of recently circulating viruses. A total of 56 serotype A FMDVs isolated between 1998 and 2012, from Central, East and North

  18. Study on the efficacy and safety of different antigens and oil formulations of infectious coryza vaccines containing an NAD-independent strain of Avibacterium paragallinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dungu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess and compare three different formulations of the new Onderstepoort infectious coryza (IC quadrivalent vaccine, which contain an NAD-independent strain of Avibacterium paragallinarum (previously known as Haemophilus paragallinarum, and a commercial IC vaccine, not containing an NAD-independent strain, for their safety and ability to protect chickens of varying ages against virulent challenges with four different serovars of A. paragallinarum, including the NAD-independent strain of the C-3 serovar. Four groups of 140 chickens each were vaccinated at the age of 17 weeks and revaccinated at the age of 19 weeks with each of the four vaccine formulations. A similar sized group of non-vaccinated chickens was used as control. Two rounds of challenge were conducted: a group of chicken in each vaccination group was challenged between 31 and 35 weeks of age, while another group was challenged between 51 and 55 weeks of age. The ''in-contact'' challenge model was used in this experiment. For each vaccination group, the four challenge strains representing four local serovars were used in each challenge round. The efficacy of the vaccines was compared based on overall protection levels obtained and the duration of protection. The safety of the different vaccines was determined by the severity of post-vaccination reactions. The need for the incorporation of the NAD-independent strain in the vaccine was evidenced by the low protection level against NAD-independent challenge recorded in the group of birds vaccinated with the commercial vaccine. The results obtained confirmed not only the variation in virulence of different South African serovars, with serovar C-3 being the most virulent and serovar B having almost no virulence but also the age related increase in susceptibility. The importance of a suitable formulation of the vaccine is discussed.

  19. An ELISA for the evaluation of gamma interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Manuela; De Massis, Fabrizio; Bonfini, Barbara; Di Ventura, Mauro; Scacchia, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) implemented for the detection of gamma interferon (gamma interferon) production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 are presented. A purified protein fraction derived from RB51 (RB51 brucellin) has been used as antigenic stimulus for whole blood. The test was evaluated for 300 days in ten heifers vaccinated at calfhood with 10 x 10(9) colony-forming units of RB51 and in five control heifers. All animals came from officially brucellosis-free herds. Vaccinated animals started to give positive results from day 17 post vaccination (pv) until day 239 pv. All vaccinated animals gave a positive reaction at least once (with a stimulation index exceeding 2.5). Nevertheless, if sampling on day 20 pv is excluded (90% of vaccinated animals gave positive results), the sensitivity of the test varies from 20% to 70%, with a 40% average. A stimulation index over 2.5 was also recorded in three control animals. The results suggest that the gamma-interferon test is not suitable for the detection of cattle vaccinated with RB51, either at the individual or at the herd level.

  20. An ELISA for the evaluation of gamma interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Tittarelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA implemented for the detection of gamma interferon (g-interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 are presented. A purified protein fraction derived from RB51 (RB51 brucellin has been used as antigenic stimulus for whole blood. The test was evaluated for 300 days in ten heifers vaccinated at calfhood with 10 × 109 colony-forming units of RB51 and in five control heifers. All animals came from officially brucellosis-free herds. Vaccinated animals started to give positive results from day 17 post vaccination (pv until day 239 pv. All vaccinated animals gave a positive reaction at least once (with a stimulation index exceeding 2.5. Nevertheless, if sampling on day 20 pv is excluded (90% of vaccinated animals gave positive results, the sensitivity of the test varies from 20% to 70%, with a 40% average. A stimulation index over 2.5 was also recorded in three control animals. The results suggest that the g-interferon test is not suitable for the detection of cattle vaccinated with RB51, either at the individual or at the herd level.

  1. The early use of yellow fever virus strain 17D for vaccine production in Brazil - a review

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    Paulo Roberto Post

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of yellow fever (YF virus 17D strain for vaccine production adapted in Brazil since its introduction in 1937 was reviewed. This was possible due to the availability of official records of vaccine production. The retrieved data highlight the simultaneous use of several serially passaged 17D substrain viruses for both inocula and vaccine preparation that allowed uninterrupted production. Substitution of these substrain viruses became possible with the experience gained during quality control and human vaccination. Post-vaccinal complications in humans and the failure of some viruses in quality control tests (neurovirulence for monkeys indicated that variables needed to be reduced during vaccine production, leading to the development of the seed lot system. The 17DD substrain, still used today, was the most frequently used substrain and the most reliable in terms of safety and efficacy. For this reason, it is possible to derive an infectious cDNA clone of this substrain combined with production in cell culture that could be used to direct the expression of heterologous antigens and lead to the development of new live vaccines.

  2. Characterization of Recombinant B. abortus Strain RB51SOD Toward Understanding the Uncorrelated Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Induced by RB51SOD Compared to Its Parent Vaccine Strain RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianguo; Larson, Charles B.; Ramaker, Megan Ann; Quandt, Kimberly; Wendte, Jered M.; Ku, Kimberly P.; Chen, Fang; Jourdian, George W.; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Schurig, Gerhardt G.; He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen for several mammals, including humans. Live attenuated B. abortus strain RB51 is currently the official vaccine used against bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. Overexpression of protective B. abortus antigen Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) in a recombinant strain of RB51 (strain RB51SOD) significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against virulent B. abortus challenge in a mouse model. ...

  3. Characterization of recombinant B. abortus strain RB51SOD towards understanding the uncorrelated innate and adaptive immune responses induced by RB51SOD compared to its parent vaccine strain RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Jianguo eZhu; Jianguo eZhu; Charles Bradford Larson; Megan Ann Ramaker; Kimberly eQuandt; Jered eWendte; Kimberly eKu; Fang eChen; George eJourdian; Ramesh eVemulapalli; Gerhardt G. Schurig; Yongqun Oliver eHe

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen for several mammals, including humans. Live attenuated B. abortus strain RB51 is currently the official vaccine used against bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. Overexpression of protective B. abortus antigen Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) in a recombinant strain of RB51 (strain RB51SOD) significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against virulent B. abortus challenge in a mouse model. ...

  4. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reed, Steven G.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-12-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants.

  5. Antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralizes a heterologous wild-type mumps virus associated with a large outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Steven A; Qi, Li; Audet, Susette A; Sullivan, Bradley; Carbone, Kathryn M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A; Sirota, Lev; Beeler, Judy

    2008-08-15

    Recent mumps outbreaks in older vaccinated populations were caused primarily by genotype G viruses, which are phylogenetically distinct from the genotype A vaccine strains used in the countries affected by the outbreaks. This finding suggests that genotype A vaccine strains could have reduced efficacy against heterologous mumps viruses. The remote history of vaccination also suggests that waning immunity could have contributed to susceptibility. To examine these issues, we obtained consecutive serum samples from children at different intervals after vaccination and assayed the ability of these samples to neutralize the genotype A Jeryl Lynn mumps virus vaccine strain and a genotype G wild-type virus obtained during the mumps outbreak that occurred in the United States in 2006. Although the geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers against the genotype G virus were approximately one-half the titers measured against the vaccine strain, and although titers to both viruses decreased with time after vaccination, antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralized the outbreak-associated virus at all time points tested.

  6. Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine immunogenicity test: Evaluation of three mice (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and two challenge strains (544 and 2308).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Karina Leite; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Pauletti, Rebeca Barbosa; Poester, Fernando Padilla; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of different mouse strains (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and different challenge strains (Brucella abortus 544 and 2308) in the study of B. abortus vaccine (S19 and RB51) immunogenicity test in the murine model. No significant difference in B. abortus vaccine potency assay was found with the use of B. abortus 544 or B. abortus 2308 as challenge strain. Results of variance analysis showed an interaction between treatment and mouse strain; therefore these parameters could not be compared separately. When CD-1 groups were compared, those vaccinated showed significantly lower counts than non-vaccinated ones (PRB51). Similar results were observed on BALB/c groups. However, in Swiss mouse groups, S19 was more protective than RB51 (PRB51 vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Revealing the genetic determinants of Pks-pathogenicity island in clinical strains of enterobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkina, S V; Bondarenko, V M; Naboka, Iu L; Miroshnichenko, E A

    2011-01-01

    Detection by PCR the frequency of clbB, clbN, clbA H clbQ genes of Pks-pathogenicity island in clinical strains ofenterobacteria. 112 strains various genera and species of enterobacteria, including 16 museum and 96 clinical are investigated. Isolated strains represents Escherichia species (n = 68), Klebsiella (n = 16), Enterobacter (n = 9), Serratia (n = 7) and others minor species of Enterobacteriaceae family (n = 12). Fifty nine strains isolated from urine of urinary tract infection, 26 isolates from intestines of patients with dysbiosis and 11--from children with complications after a liver transplantation. A total bacterial isolates were screened by multiplex PCRforthe presence ofclbB, clbN, clbA and clbQ genes. Among 41 uropathogenic E.coli it is revealed 15 (36,6%) Pks-positive strains carring all of clbB, clbN, clbA ? clbQ genes, that composed 27,1% from total number of the enterobacteria, isolates from urine. Among 44 clinical isolates of various species of enterobacteria only one Pks-positive strain K. pneumoniae was revealed. Strains enterobacteria, isolated at pyoinflammatory complications after liver transplantation (n = 11) and isolates from intestinal tract in dysbiosis (n = 26), were Pks-negative. The clbB, clbN, clbA ? clbQ genes of the Pks-island which have been detected in 36,6 % E. coli urological strains are markers of pathogenicity of clinical isolates of extraintestinal origin and advisable of their detection by PCR.

  8. Phylogenomics of Brazilian epidemic isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii reveals relationships of global outbreak strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M.; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) species are emerging pathogens that cause various diseases including skin and respiratory infections. The species has undergone recent taxonomic nomenclature refinement, and is currently recognized as two subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (MAB-A) and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii (MAB-B). The recently reported outbreaks of MAB-B in surgical patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2009 and in cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2006 to 2012 underscore the need to investigate the genetic diversity of clinical MAB strains. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of two Brazilian MAB-B epidemic isolates (CRM-0019 and CRM-0020) derived from an outbreak of skin infections in Rio de Janeiro, two unrelated MAB strains from patients with pulmonary infections in the United States (US) (NJH8 and NJH11) and one type MAB-B strain (CCUG 48898) and compared them to 25 publically available genomes of globally diverse MAB strains. Genome-wide analyses of 27,598 core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed that the two Brazilian derived CRM strains are nearly indistinguishable from one another and are more closely related to UK outbreak isolates infecting CF patients than to strains from the US, Malaysia or France. Comparative genomic analyses of six closely related outbreak strains revealed geographic-specific large-scale insertion/deletion variation that corresponds to bacteriophage insertions and recombination hotspots. Our study integrates new genome sequence data with existing genomic information to explore the global diversity of infectious M. abscessus isolates and to compare clinically relevant outbreak strains from different continents. PMID:24055961

  9. Comparative evaluation of two vaccine candidates against experimental leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major infection in four inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhnini, Fouad; Chenik, Mehdi; Laouini, Dhafer; Louzir, Hechmi; Cazenave, Pierre André; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-11-01

    Experimental leishmaniasis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are the most investigated murine models that were used for the preclinical evaluation of Leishmania vaccine candidates. We have previously described two new inbred mouse strains named PWK and MAI issued from feral founders that also support the development of experimental leishmaniasis due to L. major. In this study, we sought to determine whether different mouse inbred strains generate concordant or discordant results when used to evaluate the potential of Leishmania proteins to protect against experimental leishmaniasis. To this end, two Leishmania proteins, namely, LACK (for Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase) and LmPDI (for L. major protein disulfide isomerase) were compared for their capacity to protect against experimental leishmaniasis in PWK, MAI, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 inbred mouse strains. Our data show that the capacity of Leishmania proteins to confer protection depends on the mouse strain used, stressing the important role played by the genetic background in shaping the immune response against the pathogen. These results may have important implications for the preclinical evaluation of candidate Leishmania vaccines: rather than using a single mouse strain, a panel of different inbred strains of various genetic backgrounds should be tested in parallel. The antigen that confers protection in the larger range of inbred strains may have better chances to be also protective in outbred human populations and should be selected for clinical trials.

  10. Monitoring the long-term molecular epidemiology of the pneumococcus and detection of potential 'vaccine escape' strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan A Pandya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the pneumococcal protein conjugate vaccines reduce the incidence in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, serotype replacement remains a major concern. Thus, serotype-independent protection with vaccines targeting virulence genes, such as PspA, have been pursued. PspA is comprised of diverse clades that arose through recombination. Therefore, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST-defined clones could conceivably include strains from multiple PspA clades. As a result, a method is needed which can both monitor the long-term epidemiology of the pneumococcus among a large number of isolates, and analyze vaccine-candidate genes, such as pspA, for mutations and recombination events that could result in 'vaccine escape' strains.We developed a resequencing array consisting of five conserved and six variable genes to characterize 72 pneumococcal strains. The phylogenetic analysis of the 11 concatenated genes was performed with the MrBayes program, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis with the DNA Sequence Polymorphism program (DnaSP, and the recombination event analysis with the recombination detection package (RDP.The phylogenetic analysis correlated with MLST, and identified clonal strains with unique PspA clades. The DnaSP analysis correlated with the serotype-specific diversity detected using MLST. Serotypes associated with more than one ST complex had a larger degree of sequence polymorphism than a serotype associated with one ST complex. The RDP analysis confirmed the high frequency of recombination events in the pspA gene.The phylogenetic tree correlated with MLST, and detected multiple PspA clades among clonal strains. The genetic diversity of the strains and the frequency of recombination events in the mosaic gene, pspA were accurately assessed using the DnaSP and RDP programs, respectively. These data provide proof-of-concept that resequencing arrays could play an important role within research and clinical laboratories in both

  11. Protection against shigellosis caused by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 4 in guinea pigs using Escherichia albertii DM104 as a live vaccine candidate strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fatema Moni; Rahman, Mohammed Ziaur; Sarkar, Md Murshed Hasan; Rabbi, Fazle; Khan, Sirajul Islam; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we reported the induction of protective immunity by environmental Escherichia albertii strain DM104 against Shigella dysenteriae in guinea pig model. In this study, we assessed three different immunization routes, such as intranasal, oral, and intrarectal routes, and revealed differences in immune responses by measuring both the serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody titers. Protective efficacy of different routes of immunization was also determined by challenging immunized guinea pigs against live S. dysenteriae. It was found that intranasal immunization showed promising results in terms of antibody response and protective efficacy. All these results reconfirm our previous findings and additionally point out that the intranasal immunization of the environmental E. albertii strain DM104 in guinea pig model can be a better live vaccine candidate against shigellosis.

  12. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals similarities and dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains response to nitrogen availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23, under low (67 mg/L and high nitrogen (670 mg/L regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12 h, 24 h and 96 h. Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12 h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this

  13. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Similarities and Dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strains Response to Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Catarina; García-Martínez, José; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23), under low (67 mg/L) and high nitrogen (670 mg/L) regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12h, 24h and 96h). Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this nutrient in the grape

  14. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-08-08

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  16. Reduced cerebral infection of Neospora caninum in BALB/c mice vaccinated with recombinant Brucella abortus RB51 strains expressing N. caninum SRS2 and GRA7 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Gulani, Jatinder; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Boyle, Stephen M; Lindsay, David S; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-09-30

    Neospora caninum, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of bovine neosporosis, an important disease affecting the reproductive performance of cattle worldwide. Currently there is no effective vaccine available to prevent N. caninum infection in cattle. In this study, we examined the feasibility of developing a live, recombinant N. caninum vaccine using Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 as the expression and delivery vector. We generated two recombinant RB51 strains each expressing SRS2 (RB51/SRS2) or GRA7 (RB51/GRA7) antigens of N. caninum. BALB/c mice immunized by single intraperitoneal inoculation of the recombinant RB51 strains developed IgG antibodies specific to the respective N. caninum antigen. In vitro stimulation of splenocytes from the vaccinated mice with specific antigen resulted in the production of interferon-gamma, but not IL-5 or IL-10, suggesting the development of a Th1 type immune response. Upon challenge with N. caninum tachyzoites, mice vaccinated with strain RB51/SRS2, but not RB51/GRA7, showed significant resistance to cerebral infection when compared to the RB51 vaccinated mice, as determined by the tissue parasite load using a real-time quantitative TaqMan assay. Interestingly, mice vaccinated with either strain RB51 or RB51/GRA7 also contained significantly lower parasite burden in their brains compared to those inoculated with saline. Mice vaccinated with strain RB51/SRS2 or RB51/GRA7 were protected to the same extent as the strain RB51 vaccinated mice against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308. These results suggest that a recombinant RB51 strain expressing an appropriate protective antigen(s), such as SRS2 of N. caninum, can confer protection against both neosporosis and brucellosis.

  17. Recombinant BCG: Innovations on an old vaccine. Scope of BCG strains and strategies to improve long lasting memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliane C da Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin, an attenuated vaccine derived from Mycobacterium bovis, is the current vaccine of choice against tuberculosis (TB. Despite its protection against active TB in children, BCG has failed to protect adults against TB infection and active disease development, especially in developing countries where the disease is endemic. Currently, there is a significant effort towards the development of a new TB vaccine. This review article aims to address publications on recombinant BCG (rBCG published in the last 5 years, to highlight the strategies used to develop rBCG, with a focus on the criteria used to improve immunological memory and protection compared with BCG. The literature review was done in April 2013, using the key words tuberculosis, rBCG vaccine and memory. This review discusses the BCG strains and strategies currently used for the modification of BCG, including: overexpression of M. tuberculosis (Mtb immunodominant antigens already present in BCG; gene insertion of immunodominant antigens from Mtb absent in the BCG vaccine; combination of introduction and over expression of genes that are lost during the attenuation process of BCG; BCG modifications for the induction of CD8+ T cell immune responses and cytokines expressing rBCG. Among the vaccines discussed, VPM1002, also called rBCGΔureC::hly, is currently in human clinical trials. Much progress has been made in the effort to improve BCG, with some promising candidates, but considerable work is still required to address functional long-lasting memory.

  18. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Differentiation between wild-type and vaccines strains of varicella zoster virus (VZV) based on four single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L; Xu, S; Maple, P A C; Xu, W; Brown, K E

    2017-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection (chickenpox) results in latency and subsequent reactivation manifests as shingles. Effective attenuated vaccines (vOka) are available for prevention of both illnesses. In this study, an amplicon-based sequencing method capable of differentiating between VZV wild-type (wt) strains and vOka vaccine is described. A total of 44 vesicular fluid specimens collected from 43 patients (16 from China and 27 from the UK) with either chickenpox or shingles were investigated, of which 10 had received previous vaccination. Four sets of polymerase chain reactions were set up simultaneously with primers amplifying regions encompassing four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), '69349-106262-107252-108111'. Nucleotide sequences were generated by Sanger sequencing. All samples except one had a wt SNP profile of 'A-T-T-T'. The sample collected from a patient who received vaccine 7-10 days ago, along with VZV vaccine preparations, Zostavax and Baike-varicella gave a SNP profile 'G-C-C-C'. The results show that this method can distinguish vaccine-derived virus from wt viruses from main four clades, (clades 1-4) and should be of utility worldwide.

  20. Glycan analysis in cell culture-based influenza vaccine production: influence of host cell line and virus strain on the glycosylation pattern of viral hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Hennig, René; Genzel, Yvonne; Jordan, Ingo; Sandig, Volker; Reichl, Udo

    2009-07-09

    Mammalian cell culture processes are commonly used for production of recombinant glycoproteins, antibodies and viral vaccines. Since several years there is an increasing interest in cell culture-based influenza vaccine production to overcome limitations of egg-based production systems, to improve vaccine supply and to increase flexibility in vaccine manufacturing. With the switch of the production system several key questions concerning the possible impact of host cell lines on antigen quality, passage-dependent selection of certain viral phenotypes or changes in hemagglutinin (HA) conformation have to be addressed to guarantee safety and efficiency of vaccines. In contrast to the production of recombinant glycoproteins, comparatively little is known regarding glycosylation of HA, derived from mammalian cell cultures. Within this study, a capillary DNA-sequencer (based on CGE-LIF technology), was utilized for N-glycan analysis of three different influenza virus strains, which were replicated in six different cell lines. Detailed results concerning the influence of the host cell line on complexity and composition of the HA N-glycosylation pattern, are presented. Strong host cell but also virus type and subtype dependence of HA N-glycosylation was found. Clear differences were already observed, by N-glycan fingerprint comparison. Further structural investigations of the N-glycan pools revealed that host cell dependence of HA N-glycosylation was mainly related to minor variations of the (monomeric) constitution of single N-glycans. To some extent, shifts in the N-glycan pool composition regarding the proportion of different N-glycan types were observed. In contrast to this, a principal switch of the N-glycan type attached to HA was observed when comparing different virus types (A and B) and subtypes (H1N1 and H3N2).

  1. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Hou

    Full Text Available The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs. Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells.

  2. An interferon inducing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine candidate elicits protection against challenge with the heterologous virulent type 2 strain VR-2385 in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Eve; Ma, Zexu; Zhang, Yanjin; de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Shen, Huigang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2017-01-03

    Achieving consistent protection by vaccinating pigs against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) remains difficult. Recently, an interferon-inducing PRRSV vaccine candidate strain A2MC2 was demonstrated to be attenuated and induced neutralizing antibodies. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of passage 90 of A2MC2 (A2P90) to protect pigs against challenge with moderately virulent PRRSV strain VR-2385 (92.3% nucleic acid identity with A2MC2) and highly virulent atypical PRRSV MN184 (84.5% nucleic acid identity with A2MC2). Forty 3-week old pigs were randomly assigned to five groups including a NEG-CONTROL group (non-vaccinated, non-challenged), VAC-VR2385 (vaccinated, challenged with strain VR-2385), VR2385 (challenged with strain VR-2385), VAC-MN184 (vaccinated, challenged with strain MN184) and a MN184 group (challenged with MN184 virus). Vaccination was done at 3weeks of age followed by challenge at 8weeks of age. No viremia was detectable in any of the vaccinated pigs; however, by the time of challenge, 15/16 vaccinated pigs had seroconverted based on ELISA and had neutralizing antibodies against a homologous strain with titers ranging from 8 to 128. Infection with VR-2385 resulted in mild-to-moderate clinical disease and lesions. For VR-2385 infected pigs, vaccination significantly lowered PRRSV viremia and nasal shedding by 9days post challenge (dpc), significantly reduced macroscopic lung lesions, and significantly increased the average daily weight gain compared to the non-vaccinated pigs. Infection with MN184 resulted in moderate-to-severe clinical disease and lesions regardless of vaccination status; however, vaccinated pigs had significantly less nasal shedding by dpc 5 compared to non-vaccinated pigs. Under the study conditions, the A2P90 vaccine strain was attenuated without detectable shedding, improved weight gain, and offered protection to the pigs challenged with VR-2385 by reduction of virus load and

  3. Genetic clustering of Borna disease virus natural animal isolates, laboratory and vaccine strains strongly reflects their regional geographical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Dürrwald, Ralf; Herzog, Sibylle; Ehrensperger, Felix; Lussy, Helga; Nowotny, Norbert

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed insights into the genetic evolution and variability of Borna disease virus (BDV). Phylogenetic analyses were performed on field viruses originating from naturally infected animals, the BDV vaccine strain 'Dessau', four widely used laboratory strains and the novel BDV subtype No/98. Four regions of the BDV genome were analysed: the complete p40, p10 and p24 genes and the 5'-untranslated region of the X/P transcript. BDV isolates from the same geographical area exhibited a clearly higher degree of identity to each other than to BDV isolates from other regions, independent of host species and year of isolation. Five different clusters could be established within endemic areas, corresponding to the geographical regions from which the viruses originated: (i) a Swiss, Austrian and Liechtenstein Rhine valley group, related closely to the geographically bordering Baden-Wurttemberg and Bavaria II group (ii) in the western part of Germany; (iii) a third group, called Bavaria I group, limited in occurrence to Bavaria; (iv) a southern Saxony-Anhalt and bordering northern Saxony group, bound to the territories of these federal states in the eastern part of Germany; and (v) a mixed group, consisting of samples from different areas of Germany; however, these were mainly from the federal states of Thuringia and Lower Saxony. The laboratory strains and the vaccine strain clustered within these groups according to their geographical origins. All field and laboratory strains, as well as the vaccine strain, clearly segregated from the recently described and highly divergent BDV strain No/98, which originated from an area in Austria where Borna disease is not endemic.

  4. Rotavirus strain surveillance for three years following the introduction of rotavirus vaccine into Belém, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Sylvia F S; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Oliveira, Alessilva; Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Soares, Luana S; Müller, Elza Caroline; Brasil, Patrícia; Tuboi, Suely; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Colindres, Rómulo

    2015-08-01

    The monovalent human rotavirus (RV) vaccine, RIX4414 (Rotarix™, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) was introduced into Brazil's Expanded Program on Immunization in March 2006. One year after vaccine introduction, the G2P[4] strain was found to be predominant, with an apparent extinction of many non-G2 strains. This study investigated the diversity of circulating strains in the three years following RIX4414 introduction. Between May 2008 and May 2011, stool samples were collected from children aged ≥12 weeks who were hospitalized for severe lab confirmed RV-gastroenteritis (≥3 liquid or semi-liquid motions over a 24-h period for G- and P-types were determined by RT-PCR assays. During the first year of surveillance nucleotide sequencing was used for typing those samples not previously typed by RT-PCR. A total of 1,726 of 10,030 severe gastroentertis hospitalizations (17.2%) were due to severe RVGE. G2P[4] was detected in 57.2% of circulating strains over the whole study period, however it predominated during the first 20 months from May 2008 to January 2009. G1P[8] increased in the last part of the study period from May 2010 to May 2011 and represented 36.6% (112/306) of the circulating strains. G2P[4] was the predominant RV strain circulating during the first 20 months of the study, followed by G1P[8]. These findings probably reflect a natural fluctuation in RV strains over time, rather than a vaccine-induced selective pressure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of polymyxin B and environmental conditions on isolation of Brucella species and the vaccine strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Allen E; Halling, Shirley M

    2010-03-01

    Brucella are resistant to polymyxin B (PB), but their relative susceptibility to PB and its derivative, colistin (COL) has not been rigorously or systematically studied. Comparative susceptibility of Brucella reference strains, vaccine strain RB51, and Brucella isolates from marine mammals to these two cationic peptides were determined by Etest. Vast differences among Brucella species were found in susceptibility to both PB and COL. Brucella demonstrated similar pattern of relative susceptibility to PB as that of COL, but they were less susceptible to COL. Both B. melitensis and B. suis were the least susceptible to polymyxins and rough strains were more susceptible to both PB and COL than the smooth except for the BvrR mutant. Strains were generally less susceptible to PB when cultured in CO(2) rather than ambient air; some became more susceptible in acidified medium. Results show that environment cultural conditions must be considered when selecting for CO(2)-independent strains of Brucella especially the vaccine strain RB51 on selective media containing PB. Our observations extend basic knowledge of the differential resistance of Brucella to polymyxins. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. PrPSc-Specific Antibody Reveals C-Terminal Conformational Differences between Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Eri; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Gregory J; Suzuki, Akio; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Caughey, Byron

    2016-05-15

    Understanding the structure of PrP(Sc) and its strain variation has been one of the major challenges in prion disease biology. To study the strain-dependent conformations of PrP(Sc), we purified proteinase-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(RES)) from mouse brains with three different murine-adapted scrapie strains (Chandler, 22L, and Me7) and systematically tested the accessibility of epitopes of a wide range of anti-PrP and anti-PrP(Sc) specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that epitopes of most anti-PrP antibodies were hidden in the folded structure of PrP(RES), even though these epitopes are revealed with guanidine denaturation. However, reactivities to a PrP(Sc)-specific conformational C-terminal antibody showed significant differences among the three different prion strains. Our results provide evidence for strain-dependent conformational variation near the C termini of molecules within PrP(Sc) multimers. It has long been apparent that prion strains can have different conformations near the N terminus of the PrP(Sc) protease-resistant core. Here, we show that a C-terminal conformational PrP(Sc)-specific antibody reacts differently to three murine-adapted scrapie strains. These results suggest, in turn, that conformational differences in the C terminus of PrP(Sc) also contribute to the phenotypic distinction between prion strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Concomitant administration of diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from Sabin strains (DTaP-sIPV) with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Japanese infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Yokokawa, Ruriko; Rong, Han Shi; Kishino, Hiroyuki; Stek, Jon E; Nelson, Margaret; Lawrence, Jody

    2017-06-03

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Most children are infected with rotavirus, and the health and economic burdens of rotavirus gastroenteritis on healthcare systems and families are considerable. In 2012 pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) and diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from Sabin strains (DTaP-sIPV) were licensed in Japan. We examined the immunogenicity and safety of DTaP-sIPV when administrated concomitantly with RV5 in Japanese infants. A total of 192 infants 6 to 11 weeks of age randomized to Group 1 (N = 96) received DTaP-sIPV and RV5 concomitantly, and Group 2 (N = 96) received DTaP-sIPV and RV5 separately. Antibody titer to diphtheria toxin, pertussis antigens (PT and FHA), tetanus toxin, and poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 were measured at 4 to 6 weeks following 3-doses of DTaP-sIPV. Seroprotection rates for all components of DTaP-sIPV were 100% in both groups, and the geometric mean titers for DTaP-sIPV in Group 1 were comparable to Group 2. Incidence of systemic AEs (including diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and nasopharyngitis) were lower in Group 1 than in Group 2. All vaccine-related AEs were mild or moderate in intensity. There were no vaccine-related serious AEs, no deaths, and no cases of intussusception during the study. Concomitant administration of DTaP-sIPV and RV5 induced satisfactory immune responses to DTaP-sIPV and acceptable safety profile. The administration of DTaP-sIPV given concomitantly with RV5 is expected to facilitate compliance with the vaccination schedule and improve vaccine coverage in Japanese infants.

  8. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains by multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; de Faria, Ana Paula Paiva; Pauletti, Rebeca Barbosa; Santana, Jordana Almeida; Caldeira, George Afonso Vítor; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Titze-de-Almeida, Ricardo; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the present study were (i) to assess the in vitro genetic stability of S19 and RB51 Brucella abortus vaccines strains and (ii) to evaluate the ability of multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) as a tool to be used in the quality control of live vaccines against brucellosis. Sixty-three batches of commercial S19 (n=53) and RB51 (n=10) vaccines, produced between 2006 and 2009, were used in this study. S19 and RB51 vaccines were obtained from, respectively, seven and two different manufacturers. Ten in vitro serial passages were performed on reference strains and on selected batches of commercial vaccines. All batches, reference strains and strains of serial passages were typed by the MLVA16. The results demonstrated that B. abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains are genetically stable and very homogeneous in their respective groups. Anyway, batches of S19 from one manufacturer and batches of RB51 from another presented genotypes distincts from the reference vaccine strains. In both cases, differences were found on locus Bruce07, which had addition of one repeat unit in the case of S19 batches and the deletion of one repeat unit in the case of RB51 batches. In summary, MLVA16 proved to be a molecular tool capable of discriminating small genomic variations and should be included in in vitro official tests. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    ...), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development...

  10. Selection of vaccine strains for serotype O foot-and-mouth disease viruses (2007-2012) circulating in Southeast Asia, East Asia and Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Mana; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Aviso, Sharie; Babu, Aravindh; Hutchings, Geoff; Parida, Satya

    2017-12-18

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Southeast Asia (SEA) and East Asia with circulation of multiple serotypes and multiple genotypes within each serotype of the virus. Although countries like Japan and South Korea in the Far East were free of FMD, in 2010 FMD serotype O (O/Mya-98) outbreaks were recorded and since then South Korea has experienced several FMD outbreaks despite regular vaccination. In this study a total of 85 serotype O FMD viruses (FMDV) isolated from 2007 to 2012 from SEA, East Asia and Far East were characterized by virus neutralisation tests using antisera to four existing (O/HKN/6/83, O/IND/R2/75, O/SKR/2010 and O/PanAsia-2) and one putative (O/MYA/2009) vaccine strains, and by full capsid sequencing. Serological studies revealed broad cross-reactivity with the vaccine strains; O/PanAsia-2 exhibited a good match with 95.3%, O/HKN/6/83 with 91.8%, O/IND/R2/75 with 80%, and the putative strain O/MYA/2009 with 89.4% isolates employed in this study. Similarly O/PanAsia-2 and O/IND/R2/75 vaccines showed a good match with all eight viruses belonging to O-Ind-2001d sublineage whereas the vaccines of O/Mya-98 lineage, O/MYA/2009 and O/SKR/2010 exhibited the lowest match indicating their unsuitability to protect infections from O-Ind-2001d viruses. A Bayesian analysis of the capsid sequence data indicated these circulating viruses (n = 85) to be of either SEA or Middle East-South Asian (ME-SA) topotype. The ME-SA topotype viruses were mainly detected in Lao PDR, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand reflecting the trade links with the Indian subcontinent, and also within the SEA countries. Implications of these results in the context of FMD control in SEA and East Asian countries are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Will [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  12. Full genome characterisation of bluetongue virus serotype 6 from the Netherlands 2008 and comparison to other field and vaccine strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Maan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In mid September 2008, clinical signs of bluetongue (particularly coronitis were observed in cows on three different farms in eastern Netherlands (Luttenberg, Heeten, and Barchem, two of which had been vaccinated with an inactivated BTV-8 vaccine (during May-June 2008. Bluetongue virus (BTV infection was also detected on a fourth farm (Oldenzaal in the same area while testing for export. BTV RNA was subsequently identified by real time RT-PCR targeting genome-segment (Seg- 10, in blood samples from each farm. The virus was isolated from the Heeten sample (IAH "dsRNA virus reference collection" [dsRNA-VRC] isolate number NET2008/05 and typed as BTV-6 by RT-PCR targeting Seg-2. Sequencing confirmed the virus type, showing an identical Seg-2 sequence to that of the South African BTV-6 live-vaccine-strain. Although most of the other genome segments also showed very high levels of identity to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7 to 100%, Seg-10 showed greatest identity (98.4% to the BTV-2 vaccine (RSAvvv2/02, indicating that NET2008/05 had acquired a different Seg-10 by reassortment. Although Seg-7 from NET2008/05 was also most closely related to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7/100% nt/aa identity, the Seg-7 sequence derived from the blood sample of the same animal (NET2008/06 was identical to that of the Netherlands BTV-8 (NET2006/04 and NET2007/01. This indicates that the blood contained two different Seg-7 sequences, one of which (from the BTV-6 vaccine was selected during virus isolation in cell-culture. The predominance of the BTV-8 Seg-7 in the blood sample suggests that the virus was in the process of reassorting with the northern field strain of BTV-8. Two genome segments of the virus showed significant differences from the BTV-6 vaccine, indicating that they had been acquired by reassortment event with BTV-8, and another unknown parental-strain. However, the route by which BTV-6 and BTV-8 entered northern Europe was not established.

  13. Full Genome Characterisation of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 6 from the Netherlands 2008 and Comparison to Other Field and Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S.; van Rijn, Piet A.; van Gennip, René G. P.; Sanders, Anna; Wright, Isabel M.; Batten, Carrie; Hoffmann, Bernd; Eschbaumer, Michael; Oura, Chris A. L.; Potgieter, Abraham C.; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Mertens, Peter P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In mid September 2008, clinical signs of bluetongue (particularly coronitis) were observed in cows on three different farms in eastern Netherlands (Luttenberg, Heeten, and Barchem), two of which had been vaccinated with an inactivated BTV-8 vaccine (during May-June 2008). Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection was also detected on a fourth farm (Oldenzaal) in the same area while testing for export. BTV RNA was subsequently identified by real time RT-PCR targeting genome-segment (Seg-) 10, in blood samples from each farm. The virus was isolated from the Heeten sample (IAH “dsRNA virus reference collection” [dsRNA-VRC] isolate number NET2008/05) and typed as BTV-6 by RT-PCR targeting Seg-2. Sequencing confirmed the virus type, showing an identical Seg-2 sequence to that of the South African BTV-6 live-vaccine-strain. Although most of the other genome segments also showed very high levels of identity to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7 to 100%), Seg-10 showed greatest identity (98.4%) to the BTV-2 vaccine (RSAvvv2/02), indicating that NET2008/05 had acquired a different Seg-10 by reassortment. Although Seg-7 from NET2008/05 was also most closely related to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7/100% nt/aa identity), the Seg-7 sequence derived from the blood sample of the same animal (NET2008/06) was identical to that of the Netherlands BTV-8 (NET2006/04 and NET2007/01). This indicates that the blood contained two different Seg-7 sequences, one of which (from the BTV-6 vaccine) was selected during virus isolation in cell-culture. The predominance of the BTV-8 Seg-7 in the blood sample suggests that the virus was in the process of reassorting with the northern field strain of BTV-8. Two genome segments of the virus showed significant differences from the BTV-6 vaccine, indicating that they had been acquired by reassortment event with BTV-8, and another unknown parental-strain. However, the route by which BTV-6 and BTV-8 entered northern Europe was not established. PMID:20428242

  14. HI responses induced by seasonal influenza vaccination are associated with clinical protection and with seroprotection against non-homologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luytjes, Willem; Enouf, Vincent; Schipper, Maarten; Gijzen, Karlijn; Liu, Wai Ming; van der Lubben, Mariken; Meijer, Adam; van der Werf, Sylvie; Soethout, Ernst C

    2012-07-27

    Vaccination against influenza induces homologous as well as cross-specific hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses. Induction of cross-specific HI responses may be essential when the influenza strain does not match the vaccine strain, or even to confer a basic immune response against a pandemic influenza virus. We carried out a clinical study to evaluate the immunological responses after seasonal vaccination in healthy adults 18-60 years of age, receiving the yearly voluntary vaccination during the influenza season 2006/2007. Vaccinees of different age groups were followed for laboratory confirmed influenza (LCI) and homologous HI responses as well as cross-specific HI responses against the seasonal H1N1 strain of 2008 and pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (H1N1pdm09) were determined. Homologous HI titers that are generally associated with protection (i.e. seroprotective HI titers ≥40) were found in more than 70% of vaccinees. In contrast, low HI titers before and after vaccination were significantly associated with seasonal LCI. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against drifted seasonal H1N1 were found in 69% of vaccinees. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were also significantly induced, especially in the youngest age group. More specifically, cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were inversely correlated with age. We did not find a correlation between the subtype of influenza which was circulating at the age of birth of the vaccinees and cross-specific HI response against H1N1pdm09. These data indicate that the HI titers before and after vaccination determine the vaccination efficacy. In addition, in healthy adults between 18 and 60 years of age, young adults appear to be best able to mount a cross-protective HI response against H1N1pdm09 or drifted seasonal influenza after seasonal vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A live oral Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine does not result in protective immunity comparable to that of a virulent strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Riber, Ulla; Ståhl, Marie

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the cause of proliferative enteropathy, an economically important enteric disease in pigs that causes weight loss and failure to thrive. The disease is controllable with antibiotics and an attenuated live oral vaccine (Enterisol®) is used for prophylaxis. Still...... these interventions have not resulted in eradication of the bacteria, which is abundantly present in most pig herds in many countries, including Denmark. In the experimental study we present here, weaned pigs received the oral L. intracellularis vaccine or a virulent field strain (Re-I pigs). The latter resulting...... in subclinical disease. Both groups were treated with antibiotics from day 21 to 26 and challenged at day 49 with the virulent strain. A control group (CC) only received challenge. We here report on clinical outcome, L. intracellularis infection of the intestines and immunological responses. While Re-I pigs had...

  16. Genome comparison of Candida orthopsilosis clinical strains reveals the existence of hybrids between two distinct subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryszcz, Leszek P; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-05-01

    The Candida parapsilosis species complex comprises a group of emerging human pathogens of varying virulence. This complex was recently subdivided into three different species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis. Within the latter, at least two clearly distinct subspecies seem to be present among clinical isolates (Type 1 and Type 2). To gain insight into the genomic differences between these subspecies, we undertook the sequencing of a clinical isolate classified as Type 1 and compared it with the available sequence of a Type 2 clinical strain. Unexpectedly, the analysis of the newly sequenced strain revealed a highly heterozygous genome, which we show to be the consequence of a hybridization event between both identified subspecies. This implicitly suggests that C. orthopsilosis is able to mate, a so-far unanswered question. The resulting hybrid shows a chimeric genome that maintains a similar gene dosage from both parental lineages and displays ongoing loss of heterozygosity. Several of the differences found between the gene content in both strains relate to virulent-related families, with the hybrid strain presenting a higher copy number of genes coding for efflux pumps or secreted lipases. Remarkably, two clinical strains isolated from distant geographical locations (Texas and Singapore) are descendants of the same hybrid line, raising the intriguing possibility of a relationship between the hybridization event and the global spread of a virulent clone.

  17. Serological response to administration of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in beef and dairy heifers, using needle-free and standard needle-based injection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to compare immunologic responses of heifers vaccinated with 10**10 colony-forming units (CFU) of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) by standard needle-and-syringe system or a needle-free injection system. Heifers were randomly assigned to control and vaccination gro...

  18. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing

  19. A gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccine strain is not re-excreted nor transmitted in an experimental cattle population after corticosteroid treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, M H; de Jong, M C; van Oirschot, J T

    2000-04-03

    To study possible reactivation and to quantify subsequent transmission of a live gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine strain in cattle populations, four experiments were performed. Two groups of cattle were each tested twice for the possibility of reactivation. Inoculation with a gE-negative BHV1 vaccine was done either intramuscularly or intranasally and treatment with corticosteroids in an attempt to reactivate vaccine virus, was done after 6 or 11 weeks, and again after 6 months. To quantify transmission of vaccine virus following possible reactivation, each cattle was housed together with one susceptible contact-cattle. Contact-infections were monitored using virus shedding and antibody responses. After corticosteroid treatments, re-excretion of virus was never detected in cattle that had been inoculated with the gE-negative BHV1 vaccine strain. Contact cattle did not shed gE-negative BHV1, nor mounted any antibody response against BHV1. In contrast, positive control cattle, inoculated intranasally with wild-type BHV1, re-excreted virus in high titers in nasal fluids and transmitted the virus to contact cattle. Based on these results, the transmission ratio R(0) of the vaccine strain was zero. We concluded that it is highly unlikely that the live gE-negative BHV1 vaccine strain will be re-excreted after possible reactivation, and consequently, it is even less likely that reactivated vaccine virus will spread in the cattle population.

  20. Reassortment of high-yield influenza viruses in vero cells and safety assessment as candidate vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jinghui; Ma, Lei; Cun, Yina; Song, Shaohui; Liao, Guoyang

    2017-01-02

    Vaccination is the practiced and accessible measure for preventing influenza infection. Because chicken embryos used for vaccine production have various insufficiencies, more efficient methods are needed. African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells are recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a safe substitute for influenza vaccine production for humans. However, the influenza virus usually had low-yield in Vero cells, which limits the usage of Vero cellular vaccines. This study used 2 high-yield influenza viruses in Vero cells: A/Yunnan/1/2005Va (H3N2) and B/Yunnan/2/2005Va (B) as donor viruses. It used 3 wild strain viruses to reassort new adaptation viruses, including: A/Tianjin/15/2009(H1N1), A/Fujian/196/2009(H3N2), and B/Chongqing/1384/2010(B). These three new viruses could maintain the characteristic of high-yield in Vero cells. Furthermore, they could keep the immunogenic characteristics of the original wild influenza viruses. Importantly, these viruses were shown as safe in chicken embryo and guinea pigs assessment systems. These results provide an alternative method to produce influenza vaccine based on Vero cells.

  1. A PfRH5-based vaccine is efficacious against heterologous strain blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum infection in aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Alexander D; Baldeviano, G Christian; Lucas, Carmen M; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Crosnier, Cécile; Bartholdson, S Josefin; Diouf, Ababacar; Miura, Kazutoyo; Lambert, Lynn E; Ventocilla, Julio A; Leiva, Karina P; Milne, Kathryn H; Illingworth, Joseph J; Spencer, Alexandra J; Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Alanine, Daniel G W; Turner, Alison V; Moorhead, Jeromy T; Edgel, Kimberly A; Wu, Yimin; Long, Carole A; Wright, Gavin J; Lescano, Andrés G; Draper, Simon J

    2015-01-14

    Antigenic diversity has posed a critical barrier to vaccine development against the pathogenic blood-stage infection of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To date, only strain-specific protection has been reported by trials of such vaccines in nonhuman primates. We recently showed that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5), a merozoite adhesin required for erythrocyte invasion, is highly susceptible to vaccine-inducible strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibody. In vivo efficacy of PfRH5-based vaccines has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that PfRH5-based vaccines can protect Aotus monkeys against a virulent vaccine-heterologous P. falciparum challenge and show that such protection can be achieved by a human-compatible vaccine formulation. Protection was associated with anti-PfRH5 antibody concentration and in vitro parasite-neutralizing activity, supporting the use of this in vitro assay to predict the in vivo efficacy of future vaccine candidates. These data suggest that PfRH5-based vaccines have potential to achieve strain-transcending efficacy in humans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intersubspecific subcongenic mouse strain analysis reveals closely linked QTLs with opposite effects on body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollah, Md Bazlur R; Ishikawa, Akira

    2011-06-01

    A previous genome-wide QTL study revealed many QTLs affecting postnatal body weight and growth in an intersubspecific backcross mouse population between the C57BL/6J (B6) strain and wild Mus musculus castaneus mice captured in the Philippines. Subsequently, several closely linked QTLs for body composition traits were revealed in an F(2) intercross population between B6 and B6.Cg-Pbwg1, a congenic strain on the B6 genetic background carrying the growth QTL Pbwg1 on proximal chromosome 2. However, no QTL affecting body weight has been duplicated in the F(2) population, except for mapping an overdominant QTL that causes heterosis of body weight. In this study, we developed 17 intersubspecific subcongenic strains with overlapping and nonoverlapping castaneus regions from the B6.Cg-Pbwg1 congenic strain in order to search for and genetically dissect QTLs affecting body weight into distinct closely linked loci. Phenotypic comparisons of several developed subcongenic strains with the B6 strain revealed that two closely linked but distinct QTLs that regulate body weight, named Pbwg1.11 and Pbwg1.12, are located on an 8.9-Mb region between D2Mit270 and D2Mit472 and on the next 3.6-Mb region between D2Mit205 and D2Mit182, respectively. Further analyses using F(2) segregating populations obtained from intercrosses between B6 and each of the two selected subcongenic strains confirmed the presence of these two body weight QTLs. Pbwg1.11 had an additive effect on body weight at 6, 10, and 13 weeks of age, and its castaneus allele decreased it. In contrast, the castaneus allele at Pbwg1.12 acted in a dominant fashion and surprisingly increased body weight at 6, 10, and 13 weeks of age despite the body weight of wild castaneus mice being 60% of that of B6 mice. These findings illustrate the complex genetic nature of body weight regulation and support the importance of subcongenic mouse analysis to dissect closely linked loci.

  3. Cloning and expression of Clostridium perfringens type D vaccine strain epsilon toxin gene in E. coli as a recombinant vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziminia, Parastoo; Pilehchian-Langroudi, Reza; Esmaeilnia, Kasra

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a Gram-positive obligate anaerobic bacterium, is able to form resistant spores which are widely distributed in the environment. C. perfringens is subdivided into five types A to E based on its four major alpha, beta, epsilon and iota toxins. The aim of the present study was cloning and expression of C. perfringens type D vaccine strain epsilon toxin gene. Genomic DNA was extracted and the epsilon toxin gene was amplified using Pfu DNA polymerase. The PCR product was cloned into pJET1.2/blunt cloning vector. The recombinant vector (pJETε) was sequenced using universal primers. At the next step epsilon toxin gene was subcloned into pET22b(+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli Rosetta (DE3) host strain. The recombinant protein has been expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3) cells after subcloning of C. perfringens etx gene (1008 bp) into the expression vector. We concluded that E. coli Rosetta strain was suitable for the expression of recombinant C. perfringens epsilon toxin protein from pET22ε expression vector. This recombinant cell can be used for further research on recombinant vaccine development.

  4. Genetic Determinants of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Strain SA14-14-2 That Govern Attenuation of Virulence in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2015-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of the live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) SA14-14-2 vaccine are attributed to mutations that accumulated in the viral genome during its derivation. However, little is known about the contribution that is made by most of these mutations to virulence attenuation and vaccine immunogenicity. Here, we generated recombinant JEV (rJEV) strains containing JEV SA14-14-2 vaccine-specific mutations that are located in the untranslated regions (UTRs) and seven protein genes or are introduced from PCR-amplified regions of the JEV SA14-14-2 genome. The resulting mutant viruses were evaluated in tissue culture and in mice. The authentic JEV SA14-14-2 (E) protein, with amino acid substitutions L107F, E138K, I176V, T177A, E244G, Q264H, K279M, A315V, S366A, and K439R relative to the wild-type rJEV clone, was essential and sufficient for complete attenuation of neurovirulence. Individually, the nucleotide substitution T39A in the 5' UTR (5'-UTR-T39A), the capsid (C) protein amino acid substitution L66S (C-L66S), and the complete NS1/2A genome region containing 10 mutations each significantly reduced virus neuroinvasion but not neurovirulence. The levels of peripheral virulence attenuation imposed by the 5'-UTR-T39A and C-L66S mutations, individually, were somewhat mitigated in combination with other vaccine strain-specific mutations, which might be compensatory, and together did not affect immunogenicity. However, a marked reduction in immunogenicity was observed with the addition of the NS1/2A and NS5 vaccine virus genome regions. These results suggest that a second-generation recombinant vaccine can be rationally engineered to maximize levels of immunogenicity without compromising safety. The live-attenuated JEV SA14-14-2 vaccine has been vital for controlling the incidence of disease caused by JEV, particularly in rural areas of Asia where it is endemic. The vaccine was developed >25 years ago by passaging wild-type JEV strain SA14 in tissue

  5. Complete molecular genome analyses of equine rotavirus A strains from different continents reveal several novel genotypes and a largely conserved genotype constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Miño, Samuel; Papp, Hajnalka; Potgieter, Christiaan; Novo, Luis; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Garaicoechea, Lorena; Badaracco, Alejandra; Lengyel, György; Kisfali, Péter; Cullinane, Ann; Collins, P J; Ciarlet, Max; O'Shea, Helen; Parreño, Viviana; Bányai, Krisztián; Barrandeguy, María; Van Ranst, Marc

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the complete genome sequences of seven equine group A rotavirus (RVA) strains (RVA/Horse-tc/GBR/L338/1991/G13P[18], RVA/Horse-wt/IRL/03V04954/2003/G3P[12] and RVA/Horse-wt/IRL/04V2024/2004/G14P[12] from Europe; RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E30/1993/G3P[12], RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E403/2006/G14P[12] and RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E4040/2008/G14P[12] from Argentina; and RVA/Horse-wt/ZAF/EqRV-SA1/2006/G14P[12] from South Africa) were determined. Multiple novel genotypes were identified and genotype numbers were assigned by the Rotavirus Classification Working Group: R9 (VP1), C9 (VP2), N9 (NSP2), T12 (NSP3), E14 (NSP4), and H7 and H11 (NSP5). The genotype constellation of L338 was unique: G13-P[18]-I6-R9-C9-M6-A6-N9-T12-E14-H11. The six remaining equine RVA strains showed a largely conserved genotype constellation: G3/G14-P[12]-I2/I6-R2-C2-M3-A10-N2-T3-E2/E12-H7, which is highly divergent from other known non-equine RVA genotype constellations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the sequences of these equine RVA strains are related distantly to non-equine RVA strains, and that at least three lineages exist within equine RVA strains. A small number of reassortment events were observed. Interestingly, the three RVA strains from Argentina possessed the E12 genotype, whereas the three RVA strains from Ireland and South Africa possessed the E2 genotype. The unusual E12 genotype has until now only been described in Argentina among RVA strains collected from guanaco, cattle and horses, suggesting geographical isolation of this NSP4 genotype. This conserved genetic configuration of equine RVA strains could be useful for future vaccine development or improvement of currently used equine RVA vaccines.

  6. Real-time RT-PCR assays to differentiate wild-type group A rotavirus strains from Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine strains in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rashi; Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Ian Tam, Ka; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Two live-attenuated RVA vaccines, Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for routine immunization of all infants. Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccines have substantially reduced RVA associated mortality but occasionally have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases identified in vaccinees and their contacts. High-throughput assays are needed to monitor the prevalence of vaccine strains in AGE cases and emergence of new vaccine-derived strains following RVA vaccine introduction. In this study, we have developed quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for detection of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for vaccine specific targets in the genomes of Rotarix(®) (NSP2, VP4) and RotaTeq(®) (VP6, VP3-WC3, VP3-human) and validated on sequence confirmed stool samples containing vaccine strains, wild-type RVA strains, and RVA-negative stools. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Rotarix(®) NSP2 and VP4 qRT-PCR assays exhibited 92-100% sensitivity, 99-100% specificity, 94-105% efficiency, and a limit of detection of 2-3 copies per reaction. RotaTeq(®) VP6, VP3-WC3, and VP3-human qRT-PCR assays displayed 100% sensitivity, 94-100% specificity, 91-102% efficiency and limits of detection of 1 copy, 2 copies, and 140 copies, respectively. These assays permit rapid identification of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples from clinical and surveillance studies and will be helpful in determining the frequency of vaccine strain-associated AGE.

  7. Genomes of Gardnerella Strains Reveal an Abundance of Prophages within the Bladder Microbiome.

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    Kema Malki

    Full Text Available Bacterial surveys of the vaginal and bladder human microbiota have revealed an abundance of many similar bacterial taxa. As the bladder was once thought to be sterile, the complex interactions between microbes within the bladder have yet to be characterized. To initiate this process, we have begun sequencing isolates, including the clinically relevant genus Gardnerella. Herein, we present the genomic sequences of four Gardnerella strains isolated from the bladders of women with symptoms of urgency urinary incontinence; these are the first Gardnerella genomes produced from this niche. Congruent to genomic characterization of Gardnerella isolates from the reproductive tract, isolates from the bladder reveal a large pangenome, as well as evidence of high frequency horizontal gene transfer. Prophage gene sequences were found to be abundant amongst the strains isolated from the bladder, as well as amongst publicly available Gardnerella genomes from the vagina and endometrium, motivating an in depth examination of these sequences. Amongst the 39 Gardnerella strains examined here, there were more than 400 annotated prophage gene sequences that we could cluster into 95 homologous groups; 49 of these groups were unique to a single strain. While many of these prophages exhibited no sequence similarity to any lytic phage genome, estimation of the rate of phage acquisition suggests both vertical and horizontal acquisition. Furthermore, bioinformatic evidence indicates that prophage acquisition is ongoing within both vaginal and bladder Gardnerella populations. The abundance of prophage sequences within the strains examined here suggests that phages could play an important role in the species' evolutionary history and in its interactions within the complex communities found in the female urinary and reproductive tracts.

  8. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  9. Closely related Campylobacter jejuni strains from different sources reveal a generalist rather than a specialist lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are human intestinal pathogens of global importance. Zoonotic transmission from livestock animals or animal-derived food is the likely cause for most of these infections. However, little is known about their general and host-specific mechanisms of colonization, or virulence and pathogenicity factors. In certain hosts, Campylobacter species colonize persistently and do not cause disease, while they cause acute intestinal disease in humans. Results Here, we investigate putative host-specificity using phenotypic characterization and genome-wide analysis of genetically closely related C. jejuni strains from different sources. A collection of 473 fresh Campylobacter isolates from Germany was assembled between 2006 and 2010 and characterized using MLST. A subset of closely related C. jejuni strains of the highly prevalent sequence type ST-21 was selected from different hosts and isolation sources. PCR typing of strain-variable genes provided evidence that some genes differed between these strains. Furthermore, phenotypic variation of these strains was tested using the following criteria: metabolic variation, protein expression patterns, and eukaryotic cell interaction. The results demonstrated remarkable phenotypic diversity within the ST-21 group, which however did not correlate with isolation source. Whole genome sequencing was performed for five ST-21 strains from chicken, human, bovine, and food sources, in order to gain insight into ST-21 genome diversity. The comparisons showed extensive genomic diversity, primarily due to recombination and gain of phage-related genes. By contrast, no genomic features associated with isolation source or host were identified. Conclusions The genome information and phenotypic data obtained in vitro and in a chicken infection model provided little evidence of fixed adaptation to a specific host. Instead, the dominant C. jejuni ST-21 appeared to be characterized by phenotypic

  10. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  11. Rapid and Reliable Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Differentiation of Brucella Live Vaccine Strains from Field Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucellosis is a major zoonotic disease responsible for substantial social and economic problems, particularly in the developing world. One element that can implemented as part of control programs tackling animal disease is the use of one of the OIE recommended vaccines to protect against either Bru...

  12. Private Selective Sweeps Identified from Next-Generation Pool-Sequencing Reveal Convergent Pathways under Selection in Two Inbred Schistosoma mansoni Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Julie A. J.; Toulza, Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Parrinello, Hugues; Roquis, David; Boissier, Jérôme; Rognon, Anne; Moné, Hélène; Mouahid, Gabriel; Buard, Jérôme; Mitta, Guillaume; Grunau, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background The trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, the causative agents of schistosomiasis, are among the most prevalent parasites in humans, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. In this study, we focused on two well-characterized strains of S. mansoni, to explore signatures of selection. Both strains are highly inbred and exhibit differences in life history traits, in particular in their compatibility with the intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed high throughput sequencing of DNA from pools of individuals of each strain using Illumina technology and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and copy number variations (CNV). In total, 708,898 SNPs were identified and roughly 2,000 CNVs. The SNPs revealed low nucleotide diversity (π = 2×10−4) within each strain and a high differentiation level (Fst = 0.73) between them. Based on a recently developed in-silico approach, we further detected 12 and 19 private (i.e. specific non-overlapping) selective sweeps among the 121 and 151 sweeps found in total for each strain. Conclusions/Significance Functional annotation of transcripts lying in the private selective sweeps revealed specific selection for functions related to parasitic interaction (e.g. cell-cell adhesion or redox reactions). Despite high differentiation between strains, we identified evolutionary convergence of genes related to proteolysis, known as a key virulence factor and a potential target of drug and vaccine development. Our data show that pool-sequencing can be used for the detection of selective sweeps in parasite populations and enables one to identify biological functions under selection. PMID:24349597

  13. Revealing differences in metabolic flux distributions between a mutant strain and its parent strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955.

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    Cheng Zhong

    Full Text Available A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 using DEC (diethyl sulfate and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0% compared with parent strain (17.0%. It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53-6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain.

  14. A comparison of the reactivity and immunogenicity of RA 27/3 strain rubella vaccine prepared in WI-38 or MRC5 human diploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zealley, H; Edmond, E; Inglis, J M; Shepherd, W M; Langford, D T

    1986-07-01

    The immunogenicity and clinical reactivity of rubella vaccine derived from WI-38 or MRC5 human diploid cells was compared in 125 seronegative adolescent females. Seroconversion rates, assessed by single radial haemolysis testing of paired pre- and post-vaccination samples exceeded 98% (56/57 and 68/68 vaccinees, respectively) for both vaccines. Quantitative assessment of rubella-specific antibodies in 53 post-vaccination sera by an ELISA technique also failed to reveal any difference in immunogenicity between the vaccines. Assessable calendar records documenting the occurrence of local and systemic signs and symptoms in the four weeks following vaccination were returned by 106 subjects. No important statistically significant difference in parameters of clinical reactivity between the vaccine groups was observed although the incidence of pain at the injection site was found to be significantly higher for vaccinees receiving WI-38 derived vaccine.

  15. An integrated metagenomics pipeline for strain profiling reveals novel patterns of bacterial transmission and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Rodriguez-Mueller, Beltran; Garud, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    We present the Metagenomic Intra-species Diversity Analysis System (MIDAS), which is an integrated computational pipeline for quantifying bacterial species abundance and strain-level genomic variation, including gene content and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from shotgun metagenomes. Our method leverages a database of more than 30,000 bacterial reference genomes that we clustered into species groups. These cover the majority of abundant species in the human microbiome but only a small proportion of microbes in other environments, including soil and seawater. We applied MIDAS to stool metagenomes from 98 Swedish mothers and their infants over one year and used rare SNPs to track strains between hosts. Using this approach, we found that although species compositions of mothers and infants converged over time, strain-level similarity diverged. Specifically, early colonizing bacteria were often transmitted from an infant’s mother, while late colonizing bacteria were often transmitted from other sources in the environment and were enriched for spore-formation genes. We also applied MIDAS to 198 globally distributed marine metagenomes and used gene content to show that many prevalent bacterial species have population structure that correlates with geographic location. Strain-level genetic variants present in metagenomes clearly reveal extensive structure and dynamics that are obscured when data are analyzed at a coarser taxonomic resolution. PMID:27803195

  16. Unique features of a Japanese 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' strain revealed by whole genome sequencing.

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    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol, in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative 'Ca. L. asiaticus' Japanese isolate Ishi-1 was determined by metagenomic analysis of DNA extracted from 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllids and leaf midribs. The 1.19-Mb genome has an average 36.32% GC content. Annotation revealed 13 operons encoding rRNA and 44 tRNA genes, but no typical bacterial pathogenesis-related genes were located within the genome, similar to the Floridian psy62 and Chinese gxpsy. In contrast to other 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains, the genome of the Japanese Ishi-1 strain lacks a prophage-related region.

  17. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  18. Immune Responses and Protection against Experimental Challenge after Vaccination of Bison with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 or RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, S. C.; Boyle, S. M.; Schurig, G. G.; Sriranganathan, N. N.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) or a recombinant RB51 strain overexpressing superoxide dismutase (sodC) and glycosyltransferase (wboA) genes (RB51+sodC,wboA). Bison were vaccinated with saline only or with 4.6 × 101...

  19. Cross-protective efficacy of engineering serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine against the two pandemic strains in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haixue; Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Jin, Ye; Zhu, Zixiang; Guo, Jianhong; Cao, Weijun; Liu, Huanan; He, Jijun; Zhang, Keshan; Li, Dan; Liu, Xiangtao

    2015-10-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious vesicular disease that affects domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. Recently, a series of outbreaks of type A FMDV occurred in Southeast Asian countries, China, the Russia Federation, Mongolia, Kazakhstan and South Korea. The FMD virus (A/GDMM/CHA/2013) from China's Guangdong province (2013) is representative of those responsible for the latest epidemic, and has low amino acid identity (93.9%) in VP1 protein with the epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 from Wuhan, China in 2009. Both of isolates belong to the Sea-97 genotype of ASIA topotype. Therefore, the application of a new vaccine strain with cross-protective efficacy is of fundamental importance to control the spread of the two described pandemic strains. A chimeric strain rA/P1-FMDV constructed by our lab previously through replacing the P1 gene in the vaccine strain O/CHA/99 with that from the epidemic stain A/WH/CHA/09, has been demonstrated to exhibit good growth characteristics in culture, and the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine can provide protection against epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 in cattle. However, it is still unclear whether the vaccine produces efficient protection against the new pandemic strain (A/GDMM/CHA/2013). Here, vaccine matching and pig 50% protective dose (PD50) tests were performed to assess the vaccine potency. The vaccine matching test showed cross-reactivity of sera from full dose vaccine vaccinated pigs with A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 isolates, with average r1 values of 0.94±0.12 and 0.68±0.06 (r1≥0.3), which indicates that the rA/P1-FMDV vaccine is likely to confer good cross-protection against the two isolates. When challenged with two pandemic isolates A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 strain, the vaccine achieved 12.51 PD50 and 10.05 PD50 per dose (2.8μg), respectively. The results indicated that the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine could protect pigs against both A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 pandemic isolates

  20. Analysis of DNA-vaccinated fish reveals viral antigen in muscle, kidney, and thymus, and transient histopathologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was used in a systematic study to analyze vaccine tissue distribution, persistence, expression patterns, and histopathologic effects. Vaccine plasmid pIHNw-G, containing the gene for the viral glycoprotein, was detected immediately after intramuscular injection in all tissues analyzed, including blood, but at later time points was found primarily in muscle tissue, where it persisted to 90 days. Glycoprotein expression was detected in muscle, kidney, and thymus tissues, with levels peaking at 14 days and becoming undetectable by 28 days. Histologic examination revealed no vaccine-specific pathologic changes at the standard effective dose of 0.1 ??g DNA per fish, but at a high dose of 50 ??g an increased inflammatory response was evident. Transient damage associated with needle injection was localized in muscle tissue, but by 90 days after vaccination no damage was detected in any tissue, indicating the vaccine to be safe and well tolerated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  1. SINE polymorphism reveals distinct strains of Entamoeba histolytica from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shraddha; Banyal, Neha; Singh, Mukul; Mandal, A K; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal parasite causing significant morbidity and mortality in the developing world. More tools are needed to understand the epidemiology and molecular pathogenesis of amebiasis. Virulence pattern of E. histolytica could be linked with the genotype of a strain. Several loci showing insertion polymorphism of retrotransposable short interspersed nuclear elements EhSINE1 and EhSINE2 have been reported among laboratory strains of E. histolytica. The present study was undertaken to validate this observation in clinical isolates from north India. Our results indicate that the Indian samples show a different propensity of SINE retention or loss at two of the polymorphic loci compared with non-Indian samples. Statistical analysis of different loci revealed Locus 17 of EhSINE1as a potential geographical marker for distinguishing Indian isolates from non Indian isolates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recombinant BCG: Innovations on an Old Vaccine. Scope of BCG Strains and Strategies to Improve Long-Lasting Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated vaccine derived from Mycobacterium bovis, is the current vaccine of choice against tuberculosis (TB). Despite its protection against active TB in children, BCG has failed to protect adults against TB infection and active disease development, especially in developing countries where the disease is endemic. Currently, there is a significant effort toward the development of a new TB vaccine. This review article aims to address publications on recombinant BCG (rBCG) published in the last 5 years, to highlight the strategies used to develop rBCG, with a focus on the criteria used to improve immunological memory and protection compared with BCG. The literature review was done in April 2013, using the key words TB, rBCG vaccine, and memory. This review discusses the BCG strains and strategies currently used for the modification of BCG, including: overexpression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens already present in BCG; gene insertion of immunodominant antigens from Mtb absent in the BCG vaccine; combination of introduction and overexpression of genes that are lost during the attenuation process of BCG; BCG modifications for the induction of CD8+ T-cell immune responses and cytokines expressing rBCG. Among the vaccines discussed, VPM1002, also called rBCGΔureC:hly, is currently in human clinical trials. Much progress has been made in the effort to improve BCG, with some promising candidates, but considerable work is still required to address functional long-lasting memory. PMID:24778634

  3. Biology of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica live vaccine strain in the tick vector Dermacentor variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Rinosh J; Reichard, Mason V; Morton, Rebecca J; Kocan, Katherine M; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2012-01-01

    The γ-proteobacterium Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of seasonal tick-transmitted tularemia epizootics in rodents and rabbits and of incidental infections in humans. The biology of F. tularensis in its tick vectors has not been fully described, particularly with respect to its quanta and duration of colonization, tissue dissemination, and transovarial transmission. A systematic study of the colonization of Dermacentor variabilis by the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS) was undertaken to better understand whether D. variabilis may serve as an inter-epizootic reservoir for F. tularensis. Colony-reared larva, nymph, and adult D. variabilis were artificially fed LVS via glass capillary tubes fitted over the tick mouthparts, and the level of colonization determined by microbial culture. Larvae and nymphs were initially colonized with 8.8 ± 0.8 × 10(1) and 1.1 ± 0.03 × 10(3) CFU/tick, respectively. Post-molting, a significant increase in colonization of both molted nymphs and adults occurred, and LVS persisted in 42% of molted adult ticks at 126 days post-capillary tube feeding. In adult ticks, LVS initially colonized the gut, disseminated to hemolymph and salivary glands by 21 days, and persisted up to 165 days. LVS was detected in the salivary secretions of adult ticks after four days post intra-hemocoelic inoculation, and LVS recovered from salivary gland was infectious to mice with an infectious dose 50% of 3 CFU. LVS in gravid female ticks colonized via the intra-hemocoelic route disseminated to the ovaries and then to the oocytes, but the pathogen was not recovered from the subsequently-hatched larvae. This study demonstrates that D. variabilis can be efficiently colonized with F. tularensis using artificial methods. The persistence of F. tularensis in D. variabilis suggests that this tick species may be involved in the maintenance of enzootic foci of tularemia in the central United States.

  4. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  5. Caenorhabditis briggsae recombinant inbred line genotypes reveal inter-strain incompatibility and the evolution of recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Ross

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae is an emerging model organism that allows evolutionary comparisons with C. elegans and exploration of its own unique biological attributes. To produce a high-resolution C. briggsae recombination map, recombinant inbred lines were generated from reciprocal crosses between two strains and genotyped at over 1,000 loci. A second set of recombinant inbred lines involving a third strain was also genotyped at lower resolution. The resulting recombination maps exhibit discrete domains of high and low recombination, as in C. elegans, indicating these are a general feature of Caenorhabditis species. The proportion of a chromosome's physical size occupied by the central, low-recombination domain is highly correlated between species. However, the C. briggsae intra-species comparison reveals striking variation in the distribution of recombination between domains. Hybrid lines made with the more divergent pair of strains also exhibit pervasive marker transmission ratio distortion, evidence of selection acting on hybrid genotypes. The strongest effect, on chromosome III, is explained by a developmental delay phenotype exhibited by some hybrid F2 animals. In addition, on chromosomes IV and V, cross direction-specific biases towards one parental genotype suggest the existence of cytonuclear epistatic interactions. These interactions are discussed in relation to surprising mitochondrial genome polymorphism in C. briggsae, evidence that the two strains diverged in allopatry, the potential for local adaptation, and the evolution of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities. The genetic and genomic resources resulting from this work will support future efforts to understand inter-strain divergence as well as facilitate studies of gene function, natural variation, and the evolution of recombination in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  6. Prevention of vertical transmission of Neospora caninum in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 expressing N. caninum protective antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Jain, Neeta; Lindsay, David S; Schurig, Gerhardt S; Boyle, Stephen M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-11-01

    Bovine abortions caused by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum have been responsible for severe economic losses to the cattle industry. Infected cows either experience abortion or transmit the parasite transplacentally at a rate of up to 95%. Neospora caninum vaccines that can prevent vertical transmission and ensure disruption in the life cycle of the parasite greatly aid in the management of neosporosis in the cattle industry. Brucella abortus strain RB51, a commercially available vaccine for bovine brucellosis, can also be used as a vector to express plasmid-encoded proteins from other pathogens. Neospora caninum protective antigens MIC1, MIC3, GRA2, GRA6 and SRS2 were expressed in strain RB51. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with a recombinant strain RB51 expressing N. caninum antigen or irradiated tachyzoites, boosted 4 weeks later and then bred. Antigen-specific IgG, IFN-gamma and IL-10 were detected in vaccinated pregnant mice. Vaccinated mice were challenged with 5 x 10(6)N. caninum tachyzoites between days 11-13 of pregnancy. Brain tissue was collected from pups 3 weeks after birth and examined for the presence of N. caninum by real-time PCR. The RB51-MIC3, RB51-GRA6, irradiated tachyzoite vaccine, pooled strain RB51-Neospora vaccine, RB51-MIC1 and RB51-SRS2 vaccines elicited approximately 6-38% protection against vertical transmission. However, the differences in parasite burden in brain tissue of pups from the control and vaccinated groups were highly significant for all groups. Thus, B. abortus strain RB51 expressing the specific N. caninum antigens induced substantial protection against vertical transmission of N. caninum in mice.

  7. An outbreak of mumps with genetic strain variation in a highly vaccinated student population in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willocks, L J; Guerendiain, D; Austin, H I; Morrison, K E; Cameron, R L; Templeton, K E; DE Lima, V R F; Ewing, R; Donovan, W; Pollock, K G J

    2017-11-01

    An outbreak of mumps within a student population in Scotland was investigated to assess the effect of previous vaccination on infection and clinical presentation, and any genotypic variation. Of the 341 cases, 79% were aged 18-24. Vaccination status was available for 278 cases of whom 84% had received at least one dose of mumps containing vaccine and 62% had received two. The complication rate was 5·3% (mainly orchitis), and 1·2% were admitted to hospital. Genetic sequencing of mumps virus isolated from cases across Scotland classified 97% of the samples as genotype G. Two distinct clusters of genotype G were identified, one circulating before the outbreak and the other thereafter, suggesting the virus that caused this outbreak was genetically different from the previously circulating virus. Whilst the poor vaccine effectiveness we found may be due to waning immunity over time, a contributing factor may be that the current mumps vaccine is less effective against some genotypes. Although the general benefits of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine should continue to be promoted, there may be value in reassessing the UK vaccination schedule and the current mumps component of the MMR vaccine.

  8. Differences of circulating Bordetella pertussis population in Argentina from the strain used in vaccine production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fingermann, M; Fernández, J; Sisti, F; Rodríguez, M E; Gatti, B; Bottero, D; Graieb, A; Gaillard, M E; Ayala, S González; Mooi, F R; Lopardo, H; Hozbor, D

    2006-01-01

    In Argentina, as in other countries, the number of pertussis cases has been increasing, even in highly vaccinated zones. Many reports suggest that the decline of vaccine efficacy due to antigenic shifts in the circulating Bordetella pertussis might be among the factors that contribute to pertussis

  9. Annually repeated influenza vaccination improves humoral responses to several influenza virus strains in healthy elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. de Bruijn (Iris); E.J. Remarque (Edmond); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); S. le Cessie (Saskia); N. Masurel (Nic); G.L. Ligthart (Gerard)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe benefit of annually repeated influenza vaccination on antibody formation is still under debate. In this study the effect of annually repeated influenza vaccination on haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody formation in the elderly is investigated. Between 1990 and 1993 healthy

  10. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Novel Vaccine Containing Binary Toxin for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile Disease with Enhanced Efficacy against NAP1 Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Secore

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infections (CDI are a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the developed world. The main virulence factors of the bacterium are the large clostridial toxins (LCTs, TcdA and TcdB, which are largely responsible for the symptoms of the disease. Recent outbreaks of CDI have been associated with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, such as NAP1/BI/027, many strains of which also produce a third toxin, binary toxin (CDTa and CDTb. These hypervirulent strains have been associated with increased morbidity and higher mortality. Here we present pre-clinical data describing a novel tetravalent vaccine composed of attenuated forms of TcdA, TcdB and binary toxin components CDTa and CDTb. We demonstrate, using the Syrian golden hamster model of CDI, that the inclusion of binary toxin components CDTa and CDTb significantly improves the efficacy of the vaccine against challenge with NAP1 strains in comparison to vaccines containing only TcdA and TcdB antigens, while providing comparable efficacy against challenge with the prototypic, non-epidemic strain VPI10463. This combination vaccine elicits high neutralizing antibody titers against TcdA, TcdB and binary toxin in both hamsters and rhesus macaques. Finally we present data that binary toxin alone can act as a virulence factor in animal models. Taken together, these data strongly support the inclusion of binary toxin in a vaccine against CDI to provide enhanced protection from epidemic strains of C. difficile.

  12. EBOLA VACCINE. VSV-EBOV rapidly protects macaques against infection with the 2014/15 Ebola virus outbreak strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Robertson, Shelly J; Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Strong, James E; Kobinger, Gary; Best, Sonja M; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-08-14

    The latest Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic spread rapidly through Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, creating a global public health crisis and accelerating the assessment of experimental therapeutics and vaccines in clinical trials. One of those vaccines is based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (VSV-EBOV), a live-attenuated vector with marked preclinical efficacy. Here, we provide the preclinical proof that VSV-EBOV completely protects macaques against lethal challenge with the West African EBOV-Makona strain. Complete and partial protection was achieved with a single dose given as late as 7 and 3 days before challenge, respectively. This indicates that VSV-EBOV may protect humans against EBOV infections in West Africa with relatively short time to immunity, promoting its use for immediate public health responses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Silk Yields of Two Silkworm Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Cocoon and silk yields are the most important characteristics of sericulture. However, few studies have examined the genes that modulate these features. Further studies of these genes will be useful for improving the products of sericulture. JingSong (JS and Lan10 (L10 are two strains having significantly different cocoon and silk yields. In the current study, RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were performed on both strains in order to determine divergence of the silk gland, which controls silk biosynthesis in silkworms. Compared with L10, JS had 1375 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 738 up-regulated genes and 673 down-regulated genes. Nine enriched gene ontology (GO terms were identified by GO enrichment analysis based on these DEGs. KEGG enrichment analysis results showed that the DEGs were enriched in three pathways, which were mainly associated with the processing and biosynthesis of proteins. The representative genes in the enrichment pathways and ten significant DEGs were further verified by qPCR, the results of which were consistent with the RNA-Seq data. Our study has revealed differences in silk glands between the two silkworm strains and provides a perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms determining silk yield.

  14. Comparative genomics of three Methanocellales strains reveal novel taxonomic and metabolic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Zhe; Lu, Yahai

    2015-06-01

    Methanocellales represents a new order of methanogens, which is widespread in environments and plays specifically the important role in methane emissions from paddy fields. To gain more insights into Methanocellales, comparative genomic studies were performed among three Methanocellales strains through the same annotation pipeline. Genetic relationships among strains revealed by genome alignment, pan-genome reconstruction and comparison of amino average identity suggest that they should be classified in different genera. In addition, multiple copies of cell cycle regulator proteins were identified for the first time in Archaea. Core metabolisms were reconstructed, predicting certain unique and novel features for Methanocellales, including a set of methanogenesis genes potentially organized toward specialization in utilizing low concentrations of H2, a new route of disulfide reduction catalysed by a disulfide-reducing hydrogenase (Drh) complex phylogenetically related to sulfate-reducing prokaryotes, an oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a sophisticated nitrogen uptake and regulation system as well as a versatile sulfur utilization system. These core metabolisms are largely conserved among the three strains, but differences in gene copy number and metabolic diversity are evident. The present study thus adds new dimensions to the unique ecophysiology of Methanocellales and offers a road map for further experimental characterization of this methanogen lineage. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Lactococcus garvieae Strains Isolated from Different Sources Reveals Candidate Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Miyauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is a major pathogen for fish. Two complete (ATCC 49156 and Lg2 and three draft (UNIUD074, 8831, and 21881 genome sequences of L. garvieae have recently been released. We here present the results of a comparative genomic analysis of these fish and human isolates of L. garvieae. The pangenome comprised 1,542 core and 1,378 dispensable genes. The sequenced L. garvieae strains shared most of the possible virulence genes, but the capsule gene cluster was found only in fish-pathogenic strain Lg2. The absence of the capsule gene cluster in other nonpathogenic strains isolated from mastitis and vegetable was also confirmed by PCR. The fish and human isolates of L. garvieae contained the specific two and four adhesin genes, respectively, indicating that these adhesion proteins may be involved in the host specificity differences of L. garvieae. The discoveries revealed by the pangenomic analysis may provide significant insights into the biology of L. garvieae.

  16. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE PROTECTIVE EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT VACCINATION PROGRAMS AGAINST A VIRULENT FIELD STRAIN OF THE NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS IN BROILERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sarcheshmei

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Despite the intensive vaccination programs used for controlling Newcastle disease (ND in the Iranian poultry industry, outbreaks of ND have been reported in poultry farms. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of vaccines for the protection against ND infection and virus-shedding period of velogenic Newcastle disease virus (vNDV field strain after different immunization schemes. Eight groups of commercial broiler chickens were used. Six groups were vaccinated with different vaccination programs using commercial live and inactivated ND vaccines. All groups, except for group 8, were challenged with a virulent field isolate (104EID50/bird at 28 days of age. Clinical signs, mortality rate and gross lesions were investigated. Antibody titers were assayed by hemagglutination inhibition test and fecal virus shedding was determined for 14 days post challenge (dpc with 3-day intervals by the RT-PCR method. All unvaccinated-challenged control birds died. Vaccination with these ND vaccines protected chickens from clinical disease. The mortality rate in the vaccinated groups was significantly lower than in the positive control group. However, vaccinated chickens shed the challenge virus in fecal samples. Although the different vaccination regimens displayed close degrees of protection against the disease, the best protection was observed in broilers primed with the live B1 vaccine via eye drop simultaneously with inactivated vaccine at 8 days of age and boosted with B1 or LaSota via drinking water on day 18. In conclusion, the currently used vaccines with different vaccination schemes can protect chickens against the disease in areas where ND is endemic, while the spread of the field virus to other flocks cannot be prevented.

  17. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  18. EFFECTS OF STRAIN, CAGE DENSITY AND POSITION ON IMMUNE RESPONSE TO VACCINES AND BLOOD PARAMETERS IN LAYER PULLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. BOZKURT

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Two thousand 1-day-old layer chicks were used in the study from Lohman Brown, Isa Brown, Lohman White and Bowans White breeds. The chicks were placed in the at 3 cage densities (211.8, 274.5 and 370.6 cm2 per bird and on 3 positions (as top, middle and bottom tiers. All birds were kept under standard management policy and a commercial vaccination program was practiced. Total specific antibody titres to Infectious Brochitis Virus (IBV, Infectious Bursal Desease Virus (IBDV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV and Egg Drop Syndrome Virus (EDSV vaccines at the ages of 5, 10 and 20 weeks were serologically determined by ELISA. Cellmediated immune response was also evaluated. In commercial white egg laying strains specific antibody titres to IBV, IBDV, NDV and EDSV vaccines were greater than in Brown egg layer strains. Keeping in cage created more stress in Brown egg laying chicks than those in white egg laying chicks. As cage density increased, the ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes (H/L ratio slightly increased. Cage position had no influence on the titres of antibodies to IBV and IBDV vaccines but the position of cage in pullets where chicks were stocked, from top to bottom, NDV and EDSV antibody titre decreased and percentage of heterophils, H/L ratio and basophil rates were low. These findings suggest that cage-related stress could be decreased, resistance to diseases and finally well-being of hens may be improved if hens are kept under proper position and density within cage systems with respect to their physiological and behavioral characteristics that controlled by genes.

  19. Mucosal immunization induces a higher level of lasting neutralizing antibody response in mice by a replication-competent smallpox vaccine: vaccinia Tiantan strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Haibo; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m.), intranasal (i.n.), oral (i.o.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  20. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m., intranasal (i.n., oral (i.o., and subcutaneous (s.c. inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  1. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos F Kremmydas

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, and two genes (sup5 and sup6 which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  2. Prevention of lethal experimental infection of C57BL/6 mice by vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51 expressing Neospora caninum antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Duncan, Robert B; Lindsay, David S; Schurig, Gerhart S; Boyle, Stephen M; Kasimanickam, Ramanathan; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-11-01

    Bovine abortions caused by the intracellular protozoal parasite Neospora caninum are a major concern to cattle industries worldwide. A strong Th1 immune response is required for protection against N. caninum. Brucella abortus strain RB51 is currently used as a live, attenuated vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Strain RB51 can also be used as an expression vector for heterologous protein expression. In this study, putative protective antigens of N. caninum MIC1, MIC3, GRA2, GRA6 and SRS2, were expressed individually in B. abortus strain RB51. The ability of each of the recombinant RB51 strains to induce N. caninum-specific immunity was assessed in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were immunised by two i.p. inoculations, 4 weeks apart. Five weeks after the second immunisation, spleen cells from the vaccinated mice secreted high levels of IFN-gamma and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation with N. caninum whole cell lysate antigens. N. caninum-specific antibodies of both IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes were detected in the serum of the vaccinated mice. Mice in the vaccinated and control groups were challenged with 2 x 10(7)N. caninum tachyzoites i.p. and observed for 28 days after vaccination. All unvaccinated control mice died within 7 days. Mice in the MIC1 and GRA6 vaccine groups were completely protected while the mice in the SRS2, GRA2 and MIC3 vaccinated groups were partially protected and experienced 10-50% mortality. The non-recombinant RB51 vector control group experienced an average protection of 69%. These results suggest that expression of protective antigens of N. caninum in B. abortus strain RB51 is a novel approach towards the development of a multivalent vaccine against brucellosis and neosporosis.

  3. Biology of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica live vaccine strain in the tick vector Dermacentor variabilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinosh J Mani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The γ-proteobacterium Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of seasonal tick-transmitted tularemia epizootics in rodents and rabbits and of incidental infections in humans. The biology of F. tularensis in its tick vectors has not been fully described, particularly with respect to its quanta and duration of colonization, tissue dissemination, and transovarial transmission. A systematic study of the colonization of Dermacentor variabilis by the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS was undertaken to better understand whether D. variabilis may serve as an inter-epizootic reservoir for F. tularensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colony-reared larva, nymph, and adult D. variabilis were artificially fed LVS via glass capillary tubes fitted over the tick mouthparts, and the level of colonization determined by microbial culture. Larvae and nymphs were initially colonized with 8.8 ± 0.8 × 10(1 and 1.1 ± 0.03 × 10(3 CFU/tick, respectively. Post-molting, a significant increase in colonization of both molted nymphs and adults occurred, and LVS persisted in 42% of molted adult ticks at 126 days post-capillary tube feeding. In adult ticks, LVS initially colonized the gut, disseminated to hemolymph and salivary glands by 21 days, and persisted up to 165 days. LVS was detected in the salivary secretions of adult ticks after four days post intra-hemocoelic inoculation, and LVS recovered from salivary gland was infectious to mice with an infectious dose 50% of 3 CFU. LVS in gravid female ticks colonized via the intra-hemocoelic route disseminated to the ovaries and then to the oocytes, but the pathogen was not recovered from the subsequently-hatched larvae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that D. variabilis can be efficiently colonized with F. tularensis using artificial methods. The persistence of F. tularensis in D. variabilis suggests that this tick species may be involved in the maintenance of

  4. Rotavirus Strain Trends During the Postlicensure Vaccine Era: United States, 2008-2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowen, Michael D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Teel, Elizabeth N; Gautam, Rashi; Sturgeon, Michele; Azimi, Parvin H; Baker, Carol J; Bernstein, David I; Boom, Julie A; Chappell, James; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M; Englund, Janet A; Halasa, Natasha B; Harrison, Christopher J; Johnston, Samantha H; Klein, Eileen J; McNeal, Monica M; Moffatt, Mary E; Rench, Marcia A; Sahni, Leila C; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Staat, Mary A; Szilagyi, Peter G; Weinberg, Geoffrey A; Wikswo, Mary E; Parashar, Umesh D; Payne, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    .... The New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) has conducted active surveillance for RVA at pediatric hospitals and emergency departments at 3-7 geographically diverse sites in the United States since 2006...

  5. Diversity of Vibrio navarrensis Revealed by Genomic Comparison: Veterinary Isolates Are Related to Strains Associated with Human Illness and Sewage Isolates While Seawater Strains Are More Distant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Keike; Kukuc, Cindy; Bier, Nadja; Taureck, Karin; Hammerl, Jens A; Strauch, Eckhard

    2017-01-01

    Strains of Vibrio navarrensis are present in aquatic environments like seawater, rivers, and sewage. Recently, strains of this species were identified in human clinical specimens. In this study, V. navarrensis strains isolated from livestock in Germany were characterized that were found in aborted fetuses and/or placentas after miscarriages. The veterinary strains were analyzed using phenotypical and genotypical methods and compared to isolates from marine environments of the Baltic Sea and North Sea. The investigated phenotypical traits were similar in all German strains. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to evaluate a phylogenetic relationship by performing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. For the SNP analysis, WGS data of two American human pathogenic strains and two Spanish environmental isolates from sewage were included. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of five protein-coding housekeeping genes (gyrB, pyrH, recA, atpA, and rpoB), was additionally performed. Both phylogenetic analyses reveal a greater distance of the environmental seawater strains to the other strains. The phylogenetic tree constructed from concatenated sequences of housekeeping genes places veterinary, human pathogenic and Spanish sewage strains into one cluster. Presence and absence of virulence-associated genes were investigated based on WGS data and confirmed by PCR. However, this analysis showed no clear pattern for the potentially pathogenic strains. The detection of V. navarrensis in human clinical specimens strongly suggests that this species should be regarded as a potential human pathogen. The identification of V. navarrensis strains in domestic animals implicates a zoonotic potential of this species. This could indicate a potential threat for humans, as according to the "One Health" concept, human, animal, and environmental health are linked. Future studies are necessary to search for reservoirs of these bacteria in the environment and/or in

  6. Enhanced and persistent antibody response against homologous and heterologous strains elicited by a MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry; Bravo, Lulu; Ceballos, Ana; Mitha, Essack; Gray, Glenda; Quiambao, Beatriz; Patel, Sanjay S; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Bock, Hans; Nazaire-Bermal, Nancy; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Cioppa, Giovanni Della; Narasimhan, Vas

    2014-10-21

    Non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines show only modest efficacy in young children. This study compared the immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety of the MF59-adjuvanted trivalent subunit vaccine (aTIV) with two non-adjuvanted trivalent vaccines, TIV-1, the non-adjuvanted version of aTIV, and TIV-2, a split virion vaccine. 6078 children received two doses of aTIV (n=3125), TIV-1 (n=1479), or TIV-2 (n=1474) four weeks apart (Days 1 and 29). Children aged 6 to vaccination (Day 50), the aTIV group showed significantly higher geometric mean HI titers and seroconversion rates than the TIV-1 or TIV-2 groups against all homologous and heterologous strains. The difference was enhanced at HI titers ≥110. aTIV elicited a faster, more persistent antibody response, with significantly higher titers in the aTIV group after one vaccination (Day 29) and after six months (Day 209) than in either TIV group. aTIV was more reactogenic than were TIV-1 and TIV-2 but rates of severe adverse events were very low for all three vaccines. In infants and young children, the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine induced substantially faster (after one dose), higher, persistent HI titers than the non-adjuvanted vaccines, with consistently higher seroprotection rates at increased threshold HI titers. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01346592. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Longitudinal genotyping of Candida dubliniensis isolates reveals strain maintenance, microevolution, and the emergence of itraconazole resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleischhacker, M

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the population structure of 208 Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from 29 patients (25 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 4 HIV negative) as part of a longitudinal study. The isolates were identified as C. dubliniensis by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and then genotyped using the Cd25 probe specific for C. dubliniensis. The majority of the isolates (55 of 58) were unique to individual patients, and more than one genotype was recovered from 15 of 29 patients. A total of 21 HIV-positive patients were sampled on more than one occasion (2 to 36 times). Sequential isolates recovered from these patients were all closely related, as demonstrated by hybridization with Cd25 and genotyping by PCR. Six patients were colonized by the same genotype of C. dubliniensis on repeated sampling, while strains exhibiting altered genotypes were recovered from 15 of 21 patients. The majority of these isolates demonstrated minor genetic alterations, i.e., microevolution, while one patient acquired an unrelated strain. The C. dubliniensis strains could not be separated into genetically distinct groups based on patient viral load, CD4 cell count, or oropharyngeal candidosis. However, C. dubliniensis isolates obtained from HIV-positive patients were more closely related than those recovered from HIV-negative patients. Approximately 8% (16 of 194) of isolates exhibited itraconazole resistance. Cross-resistance to fluconazole was only observed in one of these patients. Two patients harboring itraconazole-resistant isolates had not received any previous azole therapy. In conclusion, longitudinal genotyping of C. dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients reveals that isolates from the same patient are generally closely related and may undergo microevolution. In addition, isolates may acquire itraconazole resistance, even in the absence of prior azole therapy.

  8. Preparation for emergence of an Eastern European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain in Western Europe: Immunization with modified live virus vaccines or a field strain confers partial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renson, P; Fablet, C; Le Dimna, M; Mahé, S; Touzain, F; Blanchard, Y; Paboeuf, F; Rose, N; Bourry, O

    2017-05-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes huge economic losses for the swine industry worldwide. In the past several years, highly pathogenic strains that lead to even greater losses have emerged. For the Western European swine industry, one threat is the possible introduction of Eastern European PRRSV strains (example Lena genotype 1.3) which were shown to be more virulent than common Western resident strains under experimental conditions. To prepare for the possible emergence of this strain in Western Europe, we immunized piglets with a Western European PRRSV field strain (Finistere: Fini, genotype 1.1), a new genotype 1 commercial modified live virus (MLV) vaccine (MLV1) or a genotype 2 commercial MLV vaccine (MLV2) to evaluate and compare the level of protection that these strains conferred upon challenge with the Lena strain 4 weeks later. Results show that immunization with Fini, MLV1 or MLV2 strains shortened the Lena-induced hyperthermia. In the Fini group, a positive effect was also demonstrated in growth performance. The level of Lena viremia was reduced for all immunized groups (significantly so for Fini and MLV2). This reduction in Lena viremia was correlated with the level of Lena-specific IFNγ-secreting cells. In conclusion, we showed that a commercial MLV vaccine of genotype 1 or 2, as well as a field strain of genotype 1.1 may provide partial clinical and virological protection upon challenge with the Lena strain. The cross-protection induced by these immunizing strains was not related with the level of genetic similarity to the Lena strain. The slightly higher level of protection established with the field strain is attributed to a better cell-mediated immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a Streptococcus gordonii vaccine strain expressing Schistosoma japonicum Sj-F1 and evaluation of using this strain for intranasal immunization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linqian; Liu, Wei; Yang, Ming; Peng, Dan; Chen, Liyu

    2013-04-01

    Schistosomiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease. Currently, chemotherapy is the main effective method to treat schistosomiasis; however, it does not prevent reinfection. No effective vaccine is currently available to prevent schistosomiasis. Sj-F1 (GenBank accession number AY261995) is a novel gene that was discovered through screening adult Schistosoma japonicum worm cDNA library with female S. japonicum antigen-immunized sera. Streptococcus gordonii, a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, has been a prime candidate in recent investigations toward developing a live oral vaccine vector. One of the approaches for the surface expression of heterologous antigens in S. gordonii is to surface-localize them with the M6 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes. Here, we develop a recombinant S. gordonii strain that expresses the M6-Sj-F1 fusion protein on the bacterial surface. Intranasal immunization in mice with such M6-Sj-F1-expressing S. gordonii bacteria induced strong serum IgG, serum IgA, and saliva IgA against Sj-F1. The results of protective immunity against a challenge with cercariae of S. japonicum showed statistically significant protection following this treatment, with a worm reduction rate of 21.45% and an egg reduction rate of 34.77%. Our data indicate that the described M6-Sj-F1-expressing S. gordonii is highly immunogenic and can partially protect mice from challenge infection with S. japonicum. Intranasal immunization with recombinant S. gordonii may be an alternative to developing a novel S. japonicum vaccine in a safe, effective, and feasible way.

  10. Comparative Genomics Revealed Genetic Diversity and Species/Strain-Level Differences in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Three Probiotic Bifidobacterial Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Horigome, Ayako; Sugahara, Hirosuke; Hashikura, Nanami; Minami, Junichi; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium animalis are widely used as probiotics in the food industry. Although numerous studies have revealed the properties and functionality of these strains, it is uncertain whether these characteristics are species common or strain specific. To address this issue, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 49 strains belonging to these three bifidobacterial species to describe their genetic diversity and to evaluate species-level differences. There were 166 common clusters between strains of B. breve and B. longum, whereas there were nine common clusters between strains of B. animalis and B. longum and four common clusters between strains of B. animalis and B. breve. Further analysis focused on carbohydrate metabolism revealed the existence of certain strain-dependent genes, such as those encoding enzymes for host glycan utilisation or certain membrane transporters, and many genes commonly distributed at the species level, as was previously reported in studies with limited strains. As B. longum and B. breve are human-residential bifidobacteria (HRB), whereas B. animalis is a non-HRB species, several of the differences in these species' gene distributions might be the result of their adaptations to the nutrient environment. This information may aid both in selecting probiotic candidates and in understanding their potential function as probiotics. PMID:26236711

  11. Comparative Genomics Revealed Genetic Diversity and Species/Strain-Level Differences in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Three Probiotic Bifidobacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Odamaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium animalis are widely used as probiotics in the food industry. Although numerous studies have revealed the properties and functionality of these strains, it is uncertain whether these characteristics are species common or strain specific. To address this issue, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 49 strains belonging to these three bifidobacterial species to describe their genetic diversity and to evaluate species-level differences. There were 166 common clusters between strains of B. breve and B. longum, whereas there were nine common clusters between strains of B. animalis and B. longum and four common clusters between strains of B. animalis and B. breve. Further analysis focused on carbohydrate metabolism revealed the existence of certain strain-dependent genes, such as those encoding enzymes for host glycan utilisation or certain membrane transporters, and many genes commonly distributed at the species level, as was previously reported in studies with limited strains. As B. longum and B. breve are human-residential bifidobacteria (HRB, whereas B. animalis is a non-HRB species, several of the differences in these species’ gene distributions might be the result of their adaptations to the nutrient environment. This information may aid both in selecting probiotic candidates and in understanding their potential function as probiotics.

  12. An H10N8 influenza virus vaccine strain and mouse challenge model based on the human isolate A/Jiangxi-Donghu/346/13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Hirsh, Ariana; Krammer, Florian

    2015-02-25

    Three human cases of H10N8 viruses were reported in China in late 2013 and early 2014, two of which were fatal. This was the first time the H10N8 subtype has been detected in humans and no vaccine candidates or antibody therapy has been developed for these viruses so far. We developed an H10N8 vaccine candidate virus based on A/Jiangxi-Donghu/346/13 that can also be used in a murine challenge model for vaccine and monoclonal antibody research. The vaccine virus is a 6:2 re-assortant virus expressing the surface glycoproteins of A/Jiangxi-Donghu/346/13 on an A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone. Vaccination with inactivated challenge virus or recombinant hemagglutinin or neuraminidase derived from this strain protected mice from viral challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cyanobacterial biofuels: new insights and strain design strategies revealed by computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdrich, Philipp; Knoop, Henning; Steuer, Ralf; Klamt, Steffen

    2014-09-19

    Cyanobacteria are increasingly recognized as promising cell factories for the production of renewable biofuels and chemical feedstocks from sunlight, CO2, and water. However, most biotechnological applications of these organisms are still characterized by low yields. Increasing the production performance of cyanobacteria remains therefore a crucial step. In this work we use a stoichiometric network model of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in combination with CASOP and minimal cut set analysis to systematically identify and characterize suitable strain design strategies for biofuel synthesis, specifically for ethanol and isobutanol. As a key result, improving upon other works, we demonstrate that higher-order knockout strategies exist in the model that lead to coupling of growth with high-yield biofuel synthesis under phototrophic conditions. Enumerating all potential knockout strategies (cut sets) reveals a unifying principle behind the identified strain designs, namely to reduce the ratio of ATP to NADPH produced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Accordingly, suitable knockout strategies seek to block cyclic and other alternate electron flows, such that ATP and NADPH are exclusively synthesized via the linear electron flow whose ATP/NADPH ratio is below that required for biomass synthesis. The products of interest are then utilized by the cell as sinks for reduction equivalents in excess. Importantly, the calculated intervention strategies do not rely on the assumption of optimal growth and they ensure that maintenance metabolism in the absence of light remains feasible. Our analyses furthermore suggest that a moderately increased ATP turnover, realized, for example, by ATP futile cycles or other ATP wasting mechanisms, represents a promising target to achieve increased biofuel yields. Our study reveals key principles of rational metabolic engineering strategies in cyanobacteria towards biofuel production. The results clearly show that achieving

  14. Multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT of strains from Turkey and Cyprus reveals a novel monophyletic L. donovani sensu lato group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Gouzelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New foci of human CL caused by strains of the Leishmania donovani (L. donovani complex have been recently described in Cyprus and the Çukurova region in Turkey (L. infantum situated 150 km north of Cyprus. Cypriot strains were typed by Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis (MLEE using the Montpellier (MON system as L. donovani zymodeme MON-37. However, multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT has shown that this zymodeme is paraphyletic; composed of distantly related genetic subgroups of different geographical origin. Consequently the origin of the Cypriot strains remained enigmatic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Cypriot strains were compared with a set of Turkish isolates obtained from a CL patient and sand fly vectors in south-east Turkey (Çukurova region; CUK strains and from a VL patient in the south-west (Kuşadasi; EP59 strain. These Turkish strains were initially analyzed using the K26-PCR assay that discriminates MON-1 strains by their amplicon size. In line with previous DNA-based data, the strains were inferred to the L. donovani complex and characterized as non MON-1. For these strains MLEE typing revealed two novel zymodemes; L. donovani MON-309 (CUK strains and MON-308 (EP59. A population genetic analysis of the Turkish isolates was performed using 14 hyper-variable microsatellite loci. The genotypic profiles of 68 previously analyzed L. donovani complex strains from major endemic regions were included for comparison. Population structures were inferred by combination of bayesian model-based and distance-based approaches. MLMT placed the Turkish and Cypriot strains in a subclade of a newly discovered, genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group, suggesting that the Cypriot strains may originate from Turkey. CONCLUSION: The discovery of a genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group in the south-eastern Mediterranean stresses the importance of species genetic characterization towards better understanding

  15. Cell culture (Vero) derived whole virus (H5N1) vaccine based on wild-type virus strain induces cross-protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Howard, M Keith; Spruth, Martin; Wodal, Walter; Brühl, Peter; Gerencer, Marijan; Crowe, Brian A; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Livey, Ian; Reiter, Manfred; Mayerhofer, Ines; Tauer, Christa; Grillberger, Leopold; Mundt, Wolfgang; Falkner, Falko G; Barrett, P Noel

    2007-08-10

    The rapid spread and the transmission to humans of avian influenza virus (H5N1) have induced world-wide fears of a new pandemic and raised concerns over the ability of standard influenza vaccine production methods to rapidly supply sufficient amounts of an effective vaccine. We report here on a robust and flexible strategy which uses wild-type virus grown in a continuous cell culture (Vero) system to produce an inactivated whole virus vaccine. Candidate vaccines based on clade 1 and clade 2 influenza H5N1 strains were developed and demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in animal models. The vaccines induce cross-neutralising antibodies, highly cross-reactive T-cell responses and are protective in a mouse challenge model not only against the homologous virus but also against other H5N1 strains, including those from another clade. These data indicate that cell culture-grown whole virus vaccines, based on the wild-type virus, allow the rapid high yield production of a candidate pandemic vaccine.

  16. Safety and efficacy of Mycoplasma gallisepticum TS-11 vaccine for the protection of layer pullets against challenge with virulent M. gallisepticum R-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bíró, Judit; Povazsán, J; Korösi, L; Glávits, R; Hufnagel, L; Stipkovits, L

    2005-08-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum TS-11 vaccine was studied for its safety and protective ability in 49-day-old M. gallisepticum-free and Mycoplasma synoviae-free commercial Tetra SL layer chickens. Sixty birds were distributed into four groups: 15 were unvaccinated but were challenged with M. gallisepticum R-strain, 15 were vaccinated by eye drop and then challenged with virulent M. gallisepticum R-strain 4 weeks post vaccination, 15 were designated as controls without vaccination and challenge, and 15 received TS-11 vaccine but no challenge. Based on the post-challenge clinical signs, body weight gain, gross pathological examination of air sacs and peritoneum, histological examination of the trachea, lung, spleen and liver, and reisolation of mycoplasmas from inner organs, the TS-11 vaccine is safe and does not produce clinical signs, a major decrease of body weight gain or pathological lesions. Vaccination induced a slight serological response to M. gallisepticum antigen in serum plate agglutination and blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests and prevented development clinical signs of airsacculitis, peribronchitis and interstitial pneumonia on M. gallisepticum challenge.

  17. Construction of an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A vaccine strain harboring defined mutations in htrA and yncD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunyue; Xiong, Kun; Chen, Zhijin; Hu, Xiaomei; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Yiran; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2015-08-01

    The global epidemic features of enteric fever have changed greatly in recent years. The incidence of enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A has progressively increased. In some areas of Asia, infections with S. Paratyphi A have exceeded those with S. Typhi, resulting in S. Paratyphi A becoming the main causative agent of enteric fever. However, two currently licensed typhoid vaccines do not confer adequate cross-protection against S. Paratyphi A infection. Therefore, development of specific vaccines against enteric fever caused by S. Paratyphi A is urgently needed. In the present study, an attenuated strain was constructed by double deletion of the htrA and yncD genes in a wild-type strain of S. Paratyphi A and its safety and immunogenicity assessed. In a mouse model, the 50% lethal dose of the double deletion mutant and the wild-type strain were 3.0 × 10(8) CFU and 1.9 × 10(3) CFU, respectively, suggesting that the double deletion resulted in remarkably decreased bacterial virulence. Bacterial colonization of the double deletion mutant in the livers and spleens of infected mice was strikingly less than that of the wild-type strain. A single nasal administration of the attenuated vaccine candidate elicited high concentrations of anti-LPS and anti-flagellin IgG in a mouse model and protected immunized mice against lethal challenge with the wild-type strain. Thus, our findings suggest that the attenuated vaccine strain is a promising candidate worthy of further evaluation both as a human enteric fever vaccine and as a vaccine delivery vector for heterologous antigens. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. RAPD-PCR reveals genetic polymorphism among Leishmania major strains from Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazidi, Rihab; Bettaieb, Jihene; Ghawar, Wissem; Jaouadi, Kaouther; Châabane, Sana; Zaatour, Amor; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-07-14

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (L.) major is endemoepidemic in the Center and South of Tunisia. The clinical course of the disease varies widely among different patients and geographic regions. Although genetic diversity in L. major parasites has been suggested as a potential factor influencing their pathogenic variability, little information on genetic polymorphism among L. major strains is available in the literature. This work aimed to estimate the genetic variability within different isolates of L. major. Our sample comprised 39 isolates (confirmed as L. major by restriction fragment length polymorphism typing) from patients experiencing the same clinical manifestations but living in different regions of Tunisia where L. major is endemic. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR marker polymorphism was estimated by calculating Nei and Li's genetic distances and by an analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Analysis of the genetic diversity among the isolates revealed a high level of polymorphism (43 %) among them. AMOVA indicated that the highest variability (99 %) existed within the study regions. Our results revealed a heterogeneous genetic profile for L. major with similar clinical manifestations occurring within the different geographical regions. Additional L. major isolates from patients, insect vectors, and reservoir hosts from different endemic foci should be collected for further analysis.

  19. Secreted Expression of the Cap Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 in Classical Swine Fever Virus C-Strain: Potential of C-Strain Used as a Vaccine Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingkai Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bivalent vaccines based on live attenuated viruses expressing a heterologous protein are an attractive strategy to address co-infections with various pathogens in the field. Considering the excellent efficacy and safety of the lapinized live attenuated vaccine C-strain (HCLV strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV, we proposed that C-strain has the potential as a viral vector for developing bivalent vaccines. To this end, we generated three recombinant viruses based on C-strain, one expressing the capsid (Cap gene of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 with the nuclear localization signal (NLS (rHCLV-2ACap, and the other two expressing the PCV2 Cap gene without the NLS yet containing the signal peptide of the prolactin gene (rHCLV-pspCap or that of the ubiquitin-specific peptidase gene (rHCLV-uspCap. All the recombinant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus and produced high-level anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies (NAbs in rabbits. Interestingly, rHCLV-uspCap and rHCLV-pspCap, but not rHCLV-2ACap, elicited detectable anti-Cap and -PCV2 NAbs in rabbits. Taken together, our data demonstrate that C-strain can be used as a viral vector to develop bivalent vaccines.

  20. Vaccine-induced cellular immune responses differ from innate responses in susceptible and resistant strains of mice infected with Coccidioides posadasii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitz, Lisa F; Dial, Sharon M; Perrill, Robert; Casement, Rachael; Galgiani, John N

    2008-12-01

    Susceptibility to Coccidioides spp. varies widely in humans and other mammals and also among individuals within a species. Among strains of mice with various susceptibilities, immunohistopathology revealed that C57BL/6 mice were highly susceptible to the disease following intranasal infection, DBA/2n mice were intermediate, and Swiss-Webster mice were innately resistant. Resistant Swiss-Webster mice developed prominent perivascular/peribronchiolar lymphocytic cuffing and well-formed granulomas with few fungal elements and debris in the necrotic center, surrounded by a mantle of macrophages, lymphocytes, and fibrocytes. Susceptible C57BL/6 mice became moribund between 14 and 18 days postinfection, with overwhelming numbers of neutrophils and spherules and very few T cells, the drastic reduction of which was associated with failure and death, while intermediate DBA/2n mice controlled the fungal burden but demonstrated progressive lung inflammation with prominent suppuration, and they deteriorated clinically. Vaccinated C57BL/6 mice had an early and robust lymphocyte response, which included significantly higher Mac2(+), CD3(+), and CD4(+) cell scores on day 18 than those of innately resistant SW mice and DBA/2n mice; they also had prominent perivascular/peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltrates not present in their unvaccinated counterparts, and they appeared to be resolving lesions by day 56 compared to the other two strains, based on significantly lower disease scores and observably smaller and fewer lesions with few spherules and neutrophils.

  1. Vaccine-induced protection of rhesus macaques against plasma viremia after intradermal infection with a European lineage 1 strain of West Nile virus.

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    Babs E Verstrepen

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV causes human and animal disease with outbreaks in several parts of the world including North America, the Mediterranean countries, Central and East Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Particularly in elderly people and individuals with an impaired immune system, infection with WNV can progress into a serious neuroinvasive disease. Currently, no treatment or vaccine is available to protect humans against infection or disease. The goal of this study was to develop a WNV-vaccine that is safe to use in these high-risk human target populations. We performed a vaccine efficacy study in non-human primates using the contemporary, pathogenic European WNV genotype 1a challenge strain, WNV-Ita09. Two vaccine strategies were evaluated in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta using recombinant soluble WNV envelope (E ectodomain adjuvanted with Matrix-M, either with or without DNA priming. The DNA priming immunization was performed with WNV-DermaVir nanoparticles. Both vaccination strategies successfully induced humoral and cellular immune responses that completely protected the macaques against the development of viremia. In addition, the vaccine was well tolerated by all animals. Overall, The WNV E protein adjuvanted with Matrix-M is a promising vaccine candidate for a non-infectious WNV vaccine for use in humans, including at-risk populations.

  2. Inactivated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine induces limited cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses against 2009 pandemic and 1934 PR8 H1N1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J; Tay, Joshua K; Chen, Mark I C; Phoon, M C; Xie, M L; Wu, Y; Lee, Cynthia X X; Yap, Jonathan; Sakharkar, K R; Sakharkar, M K; Lin, Raymond T; Cui, Lin; Kelly, Paul M; Leo, Yee Sin; Tan, Yee Joo; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-10-04

    In June 2009, we conducted a prospective study in Singapore on 51 individuals to determine their serologic responses before and following receipt of the 2009 Southern Hemisphere seasonal influenza vaccine. Paired serum samples were obtained before and 3-4 weeks after vaccination. Virus microneutralization assays were performed to quantify antibodies against A/Brisbane/59/2007 vaccine, pandemic H1N1-2009 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 H1N1 strains. Post-vaccination, 43%, 12% and 24% of subjects displayed a 4-fold or greater rise in neutralizing antibody titers against the three strains, respectively. There was a positive correlation among individuals who showed increased titers to both pandemic H1N1-2009 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 (pvaccination confers a certain degree of cross-protection to other H1N1 strains. The correlation in cross-reactive antibody titers to A/Puerto Rico/08/34 and pandemic H1N1-2009 implies that previous exposure to pre-1957 H1N1 strains may confer some protection against the 2009 pandemic strain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Immunogenicity of influenza virus H5N2 vaccine strain samples produced by roller cultivation in media with plant derived components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurkova, N A; Desheva, Iu A; Shishkina, L N; Stavskiĭ, E A; Rudenko, L G

    2011-01-01

    Study in CBA line mice of immunogenicity of cold adapted reassortant influenza virus H5N2 vaccine strain samples produced in rollers in MDCK and Vero cell cultures by using plant derived components. Antibody levels in blood sera and nasal swabs, lungs and small intestine of experimental vaccine strain sample immunized mice were evaluated by using HI reaction in accordance with WHO recommendations. Reassortant vaccine strain A/17/duck/Potsdam/86/92 (H5N2) produced in MDCK and Vero cells by using plant derived components (rice and soy flour hydrolyzate and plant protease based nutrient medium) after intranasal immunization of mice induced local and humoral antibodies, and the latter not only against homologous virus, but also against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strains A/ Chicken/Suzdalka/Nov-11/2005 and A/Chicken/Kurgan/05/2005. Immunogenicity studies of reassortant influenza virus A/17/duck/Potsdam/86/92 (H5N2) vaccine strain samples cultivated in MDCK and Vero cells by using media with plant derived components in mice show high levels of humoral and secretory immunity.

  4. Genetic analyses of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains reveal distinct phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, R S; Jones, J B; Lacy, G H; Stromberg, V K; Norman, D J

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 175 Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains isolated from 10 Araceae hosts was done to identify pathogen variation. The strains were subjected to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction and four major phylogenetic clusters were generated. A subset of 40 strains isolated from Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, and Syngonium was further defined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and fatty acid methyl ester analysis and the same four phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of representative strains in the first three clusters using DNA-DNA hybridization and multilocus sequence analysis supports the previous reclassification of strains in cluster I, including the X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae pathovar reference strain (LMG695), to X. citri. Our research findings indicate that strains in cluster I, isolated primarily from anthurium, probably represent an undescribed pathovar. Other phylogenetic subclusters consisting primarily of strains isolated from xanthosoma and philodendron in clusters III and IV, respectively, may yet represent other undescribed species or pathovars of Xanthomonas.

  5. R5 clade C SHIV strains with tier 1 or 2 neutralization sensitivity: tools to dissect env evolution and to develop AIDS vaccines in primate models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagadenahalli B Siddappa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 clade C (HIV-C predominates worldwide, and anti-HIV-C vaccines are urgently needed. Neutralizing antibody (nAb responses are considered important but have proved difficult to elicit. Although some current immunogens elicit antibodies that neutralize highly neutralization-sensitive (tier 1 HIV strains, most circulating HIVs exhibiting a less sensitive (tier 2 phenotype are not neutralized. Thus, both tier 1 and 2 viruses are needed for vaccine discovery in nonhuman primate models.We constructed a tier 1 simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipEL, by inserting an "early," recently transmitted HIV-C env into the SHIV-1157ipd3N4 backbone [1] encoding a "late" form of the same env, which had evolved in a SHIV-infected rhesus monkey (RM with AIDS. SHIV-1157ipEL was rapidly passaged to yield SHIV-1157ipEL-p, which remained exclusively R5-tropic and had a tier 1 phenotype, in contrast to "late" SHIV-1157ipd3N4 (tier 2. After 5 weekly low-dose intrarectal exposures, SHIV-1157ipEL-p systemically infected 16 out of 17 RM with high peak viral RNA loads and depleted gut CD4+ T cells. SHIV-1157ipEL-p and SHIV-1157ipd3N4 env genes diverge mostly in V1/V2. Molecular modeling revealed a possible mechanism for the increased neutralization resistance of SHIV-1157ipd3N4 Env: V2 loops hindering access to the CD4 binding site, shown experimentally with nAb b12. Similar mutations have been linked to decreased neutralization sensitivity in HIV-C strains isolated from humans over time, indicating parallel HIV-C Env evolution in humans and RM.SHIV-1157ipEL-p, the first tier 1 R5 clade C SHIV, and SHIV-1157ipd3N4, its tier 2 counterpart, represent biologically relevant tools for anti-HIV-C vaccine development in primates.

  6. R5 clade C SHIV strains with tier 1 or 2 neutralization sensitivity: tools to dissect env evolution and to develop AIDS vaccines in primate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B; Watkins, Jennifer D; Wassermann, Klemens J; Song, Ruijiang; Wang, Wendy; Kramer, Victor G; Lakhashe, Samir; Santosuosso, Michael; Poznansky, Mark C; Novembre, Francis J; Villinger, François; Else, James G; Montefiori, David C; Rasmussen, Robert A; Ruprecht, Ruth M

    2010-07-21

    HIV-1 clade C (HIV-C) predominates worldwide, and anti-HIV-C vaccines are urgently needed. Neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses are considered important but have proved difficult to elicit. Although some current immunogens elicit antibodies that neutralize highly neutralization-sensitive (tier 1) HIV strains, most circulating HIVs exhibiting a less sensitive (tier 2) phenotype are not neutralized. Thus, both tier 1 and 2 viruses are needed for vaccine discovery in nonhuman primate models. We constructed a tier 1 simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipEL, by inserting an "early," recently transmitted HIV-C env into the SHIV-1157ipd3N4 backbone [1] encoding a "late" form of the same env, which had evolved in a SHIV-infected rhesus monkey (RM) with AIDS. SHIV-1157ipEL was rapidly passaged to yield SHIV-1157ipEL-p, which remained exclusively R5-tropic and had a tier 1 phenotype, in contrast to "late" SHIV-1157ipd3N4 (tier 2). After 5 weekly low-dose intrarectal exposures, SHIV-1157ipEL-p systemically infected 16 out of 17 RM with high peak viral RNA loads and depleted gut CD4+ T cells. SHIV-1157ipEL-p and SHIV-1157ipd3N4 env genes diverge mostly in V1/V2. Molecular modeling revealed a possible mechanism for the increased neutralization resistance of SHIV-1157ipd3N4 Env: V2 loops hindering access to the CD4 binding site, shown experimentally with nAb b12. Similar mutations have been linked to decreased neutralization sensitivity in HIV-C strains isolated from humans over time, indicating parallel HIV-C Env evolution in humans and RM. SHIV-1157ipEL-p, the first tier 1 R5 clade C SHIV, and SHIV-1157ipd3N4, its tier 2 counterpart, represent biologically relevant tools for anti-HIV-C vaccine development in primates.

  7. Brucella abortus detected in cheese from the Amazon region: differentiation of a vaccine strain (B19) from the field strain in the states of Pará, Amapá and Rondônia, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Jacqueline; Moraes, Carina M. de; Cleyzer L. Silva; Gustavo A. Sales; Lara B. Keid; Paulo C.M. Matos; Lara,Ana P.S.S.; Moraes,Carla C.G. de

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Brucellosis is an infectious-contagious disease responsible for significant economic losses to the meat and milk supply chain, because it causes reproductive disorders in animals and is a chronic anthropozoonosis. This study was designed to detect the DNA of Brucella spp. in cheese and to differentiate between a vaccine strain (B19) and the field strain. Sixty-six samples of different cheeses which are produced and marketed in three states of the Brazilian Amazon region (Amapá [5 sa...

  8. Brucella abortus detected in cheese from the Amazon region: differentiation of a vaccine strain (B19 from the field strain in the states of Pará, Amapá and Rondônia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract: Brucellosis is an infectious-contagious disease responsible for significant economic losses to the meat and milk supply chain, because it causes reproductive disorders in animals and is a chronic anthropozoonosis. This study was designed to detect the DNA of Brucella spp. in cheese and to differentiate between a vaccine strain (B19 and the field strain. Sixty-six samples of different cheeses which are produced and marketed in three states of the Brazilian Amazon region (Amapá [5 samples], Pará [55 samples] and Rondônia [6 samples] were evaluated. Thirty-nine of these samples were from cheeses made from cow's milk, and 27 were from cheeses made from buffalo milk. Four of the 66 samples were from cheeses produced in milk processing plants regulated by the Federal Inspection Service (Serviço de Inspeção Federal; nine of the samples were from cheeses produced in processing plants regulated by the State Inspection Service (Serviço de Inspeção Estadual; five of the samples were from artisanal cheeses; and the remaining 48 samples were from informally produced cheese. DNA was obtained from the samples following a DNA extraction protocol, and PCR was conducted using primers B4 and B5 to detect Brucella spp. Primers eri1 and eri2 were used to differentiate the field strain from the B19 vaccine strain. The results showed that 21.21% (14/66 of the samples were positive for Brucella spp., of which 21.43% (3/14 were positive for the B. abortus field strain, and 7.14% (1/14 were identified as harboring vaccine strain B19. These results demonstrate that it is possible to identify Brucella spp. in cheese from the Amazon region using the PCR technique and to differentiate the B. abortus field strain from the B19 vaccine strain.

  9. ORAL LIVE TULAREMIA VACCINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously reported data on the pathogenesis and immunogenicity of live vaccine strain LVS have been sufficiently encouraging to warrant an...potential for oral immunization with live tularemia vaccine prepared from strain LVS.

  10. Complete genome sequence of the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas protegens Cab57 discovered in Japan reveals strain-specific diversity of this species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Noda, Naomi; Someya, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    The biocontrol strain Pseudomonas sp. Cab57 was isolated from the rhizosphere of shepherd's purse growing in a field in Hokkaido by screening the antibiotic producers. The whole genome sequence of this strain was obtained by paired-end and whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the gaps between the contigs were closed using gap-spanning PCR products. The P. sp. Cab57 genome is organized into a single circular chromosome with 6,827,892 bp, 63.3% G+C content, and 6,186 predicted protein-coding sequences. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and whole genome analysis, strain Cab57 was identified as P. protegens. As reported in P. protegens CHA0 and Pf-5, four gene clusters (phl, prn, plt, and hcn) encoding the typical antibiotic metabolites and the reported genes associated with Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway of these strains are fully conserved in the Cab57 genome. Actually strain Cab57 exhibited typical Gac/Rsm activities and antibiotic production, and these activities were enhanced by knocking out the retS gene (for a sensor kinase acting as an antagonist of GacS). Two large segments (79 and 115 kb) lacking in the Cab57 genome, as compared with the Pf-5 genome, accounted for the majority of the difference (247 kb) between these genomes. One of these segments was the complete rhizoxin analog biosynthesis gene cluster (ca. 79 kb) and another one was the 115-kb mobile genomic island. A whole genome comparison of those relative strains revealed that each strain has unique gene clusters involved in metabolism such as nitrite/nitrate assimilation, which was identified in the Cab57 genome. These findings suggest that P. protegens is a ubiquitous bacterium that controls its biocontrol traits while building up strain-specific genomic repertoires for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and niche adaptation.

  11. Immune responses and protection against experimental Brucella suis biovar 1 challenge in nonvaccinated or B. abortus strain RB51-vaccinated cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Hennager, S G

    2010-12-01

    Twenty Hereford heifers approximately 9 months of age were vaccinated with saline (control) or 2 × 10(10) CFU of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine. Immunologic responses after inoculation demonstrated significantly greater (P RB51 antigens in cattle vaccinated with RB51 than in the controls. Pregnant cattle received a conjunctival challenge at approximately 6 months of gestation with 10(7) CFU of B. suis bv. 1 strains isolated from naturally infected cattle. The fluorescence polarization assay and the buffered acid plate agglutination test had the highest sensitivities in detecting B. suis-infected cattle between 2 and 12 weeks after experimental infection. Serologic responses and lymphocyte proliferative responses to B. suis antigens did not differ between control and RB51 vaccinees after experimental infection. No abortions occurred in cattle in either treatment group after challenge, although there appeared to be an increased incidence of retained placenta after parturition in both the control and the RB51 vaccination treatment groups. Our data suggest that the mammary gland is a preferred site for B. suis localization in cattle. Vaccination with RB51 did not reduce B. suis infection rates in maternal or fetal tissues. In conclusion, although B. suis is unlikely to cause abortions and fetal losses in cattle, our data suggest that RB51 vaccination will not protect cattle against B. suis infection after exposure.

  12. [Hog cholera virus: influence of colostral passive antibody on immune response of pig following vaccination with the rabbit adapted Chinese strain (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, M; Tereszczuk, S; Corthier, G; Aynaud, J M

    1977-01-01

    Using the rabbit adapted chinese strain of Hog cholera, active immunization of piglets having passive colostral antibodies was studied. 65 piglets born from 11 sows were used. Concerning sows, vaccination was performed 5-6 months and 1 month before service (3 sows), 30 days (2 sows) and 60 days (3 sows) after service. Divided in 5 lots, piglets were vaccinated at 4 different periods after birth (15, 30, 60 and 90 days). Hog cholera immunity was determined for each animal by means of kinetic of serum neutralizing antibodies and resistance to virulent challenge performed 5 months after birth. High levels of neutralizing antibodies were observed in serum of each vaccinated sow at the time of farrowing. In piglets having ingested low quantities of colostrum, vaccination induces a good antigenic stimulation characterized by a normal humoral immune response and challenge resistance. But in piglets having ingested a normal quantities of colostrum, colostral passive antibodies have a partial or complete suppressive effect on primary immune response which is characterized by a delay in serum antibodies formation and by a low level at the time of challenge. According the conditions of sows vaccination, differences were observed in the properties of colostral passive antibodies (intensity of suppressive effect on active immune response, in vitro "avidity" for Hog cholera virus, mean value of half-life) present in piglets serum. On practical aspect, vaccination with the chinese strain becomes fully effective in piglets having passive immunity when they are 30-60 days old.

  13. Rapid, Simple and Cost-Effective Molecular Method to Differentiate the Temperature Sensitive (ts+) MS-H Vaccine Strain and Wild-Type Mycoplasma synoviae Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga Mária; Pásztor, Alexandra; Erdélyi, Károly; Felde, Orsolya; Povazsán, János; Kőrösi, László; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae infection in chickens and turkeys can cause respiratory disease, infectious synovitis and eggshell apex abnormality; thus it is an economically important pathogen. Control of M. synoviae infection comprises eradication, medication or vaccination. The differentiation of the temperature sensitive (ts+) MS-H vaccine strain from field isolates is crucial during vaccination programs. Melt-curve and agarose gel based mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) are provided in the present study to distinguish between the ts+ MS-H vaccine strain, its non-temperature sensitive re-isolates and wild-type M. synoviae isolates based on the single nucleotide polymorphisms at nt367 and nt629 of the obg gene. The two melt-MAMAs and the two agarose-MAMAs clearly distinguish the ts+ MS-H vaccine strain genotype from its non-temperature sensitive re-isolate genotype and wild-type M. synoviae isolate genotype, and no cross-reactions with other Mycoplasma species infecting birds occur. The sensitivity of the melt-MAMAs and agarose-MAMAs was 103 and 104 copy numbers, respectively. The assays can be performed directly on clinical samples and they can be run simultaneously at the same annealing temperature. The assays can be performed in laboratories with limited facilities, using basic real-time PCR machine or conventional thermocycler coupled with agarose gel electrophoresis. The advantages of the described assays compared with previously used methods are simplicity, sufficient sensitivity, time and cost effectiveness and specificity. PMID:26207635

  14. Microarray karyotyping of commercial wine yeast strains reveals shared, as well as unique, genomic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Barbara; Levine, R Paul; Sherlock, Gavin

    2005-01-01

    Background Genetic differences between yeast strains used in wine-making may account for some of the variation seen in their fermentation properties and may also produce differing sensory characteristics in the final wine product itself. To investigate this, we have determined genomic differences among several Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains by using a "microarray karyotyping" (also known as "array-CGH" or "aCGH") technique. Results We have studied four commonly used commercial wine yeast strains, assaying three independent isolates from each strain. All four wine strains showed common differences with respect to the laboratory S. cerevisiae strain S288C, some of which may be specific to commercial wine yeasts. We observed very little intra-strain variation; i.e., the genomic karyotypes of different commercial isolates of the same strain looked very similar, although an exception to this was seen among the Montrachet isolates. A moderate amount of inter-strain genomic variation between the four wine strains was observed, mostly in the form of depletions or amplifications of single genes; these differences allowed unique identification of each strain. Many of the inter-strain differences appear to be in transporter genes, especially hexose transporters (HXT genes), metal ion sensors/transporters (CUP1, ZRT1, ENA genes), members of the major facilitator superfamily, and in genes involved in drug response (PDR3, SNQ1, QDR1, RDS1, AYT1, YAR068W). We therefore used halo assays to investigate the response of these strains to three different fungicidal drugs (cycloheximide, clotrimazole, sulfomethuron methyl). Strains with fewer copies of the CUP1 loci showed hypersensitivity to sulfomethuron methyl. Conclusion Microarray karyotyping is a useful tool for analyzing the genome structures of wine yeasts. Despite only small to moderate variations in gene copy numbers between different wine yeast strains and within different isolates of a given strain, there was enough

  15. Microarray karyotyping of commercial wine yeast strains reveals shared, as well as unique, genomic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine R Paul

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic differences between yeast strains used in wine-making may account for some of the variation seen in their fermentation properties and may also produce differing sensory characteristics in the final wine product itself. To investigate this, we have determined genomic differences among several Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains by using a "microarray karyotyping" (also known as "array-CGH" or "aCGH" technique. Results We have studied four commonly used commercial wine yeast strains, assaying three independent isolates from each strain. All four wine strains showed common differences with respect to the laboratory S. cerevisiae strain S288C, some of which may be specific to commercial wine yeasts. We observed very little intra-strain variation; i.e., the genomic karyotypes of different commercial isolates of the same strain looked very similar, although an exception to this was seen among the Montrachet isolates. A moderate amount of inter-strain genomic variation between the four wine strains was observed, mostly in the form of depletions or amplifications of single genes; these differences allowed unique identification of each strain. Many of the inter-strain differences appear to be in transporter genes, especially hexose transporters (HXT genes, metal ion sensors/transporters (CUP1, ZRT1, ENA genes, members of the major facilitator superfamily, and in genes involved in drug response (PDR3, SNQ1, QDR1, RDS1, AYT1, YAR068W. We therefore used halo assays to investigate the response of these strains to three different fungicidal drugs (cycloheximide, clotrimazole, sulfomethuron methyl. Strains with fewer copies of the CUP1 loci showed hypersensitivity to sulfomethuron methyl. Conclusion Microarray karyotyping is a useful tool for analyzing the genome structures of wine yeasts. Despite only small to moderate variations in gene copy numbers between different wine yeast strains and within different isolates of a given

  16. Protection from persistent infection with a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1b strain by a modified-live vaccine containing BVDV types 1a and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza 3 virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda

    2011-06-24

    Recent studies showed that BVDV-1b subgenotype is dominant in North and South American field BVDV isolates. However, nearly all commercially available BVDV-1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. In order to study the efficacy of BVDV-1a vaccine against BVDV-1b infection, this study was designed to evaluate a modified-live vaccine (MLV) containing BVDV-1a and BVDV-2 strains for its efficacy in prevention of persistent infection of fetuses against BVDV-1b strain, when the heifers were vaccinated prior to breeding. Heifers were vaccinated subcutaneously with a single dose of the MLV and bred four weeks after vaccination. The pregnant heifers were challenged with a non-cytopathic BVDV-1b strain at approximately 80 days of gestation. Vaccinated heifers were protected from clinical disease and viremia caused by the BVDV-1b virus. At approximately 155 days of gestation, the fetuses were harvested and tissue samples of thymus, lungs, spleen, kidney and intestines were collected for virus isolation. BVDV was isolated from 100% of the fetuses in the non-vaccinated control group, and from only one fetus (4.3%) from the vaccinated group. Results demonstrated that the MLV containing BVDV-1a and BVDV-2 strains provided 96% protection from fetal persistent infection caused by the BVDV-1b strain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface topological differences of phage infected uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains, revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Bassamah; Jamil, Nusrat; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an advance microscopic technique that provides three dimensional structures of cell surfaces with high resolution. In the present study AFM was used for comparative analysis of surface topology of phage infected and uninfected Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cells. Two UPEC strains NE and HN were isolated from urine samples of Urinary tract infection patients and their specific narrow host range lytic phages 3S and HNΦ were isolated from the sewage of different areas. On the basis of one step growth curve both phages characterized as short latent period phages with latency period of about 30 min. On AFM analysis significant difference in topology of healthy and infected cells were observed. It was hypothesized that progeny of both lytic phages released out from their respective host cells in different manner. The image of 3S infected UPEC host cells (NE) revealed multiple internal projections which showed progeny phages released out from host cells through these multiple sites. Whereas images of HNΦ infected HN host cells showed central depression which illustrated that new phages released out through single exit point from the middle of cell. These results are significant to extend future studies on isolated phages as an effective tool for phage therapy.

  18. An unusual mechanism of bacterial gene expression revealed for the RNase P protein of Thermus strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltens, Ralph; Gößringer, Markus; Willkomm, Dagmar K.; Urlaub, Henning; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2003-01-01

    The RNase P protein gene (rnpA) completely overlaps the rpmH gene (encoding ribosomal protein L34) out of frame in the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. This results in the synthesis of an extended RNase P protein (C5) of 163 aa and, by inference, of 240 aa in the related strain Thermus filiformis. Start codons of rnpA and rpmH, apparently governed by the same ribosome binding site, are separated by only 4 nt, which suggests a regulatory linkage between L34 and C5 translation and, accordingly, between ribosome and RNase P biosynthesis. Within the sequence encoding the N-terminal extensions and downstream of rpmH, several Thermus species exhibit in-frame deletions/insertions, suggesting relaxed constraints for sequence conservation in this region. Roughly the N-terminal third of T. thermophilus C5 was further shown to be dispensable for RNase P function in vitro by using a precursor tRNAGly substrate from the same organism. Taken together, these data reveal a mode of gene expression that is to our knowledge unprecedented in bacteria. PMID:12719542

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals contrasting stress response to uranium in two nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains, differentially tolerant to uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Acharya, Celin; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Response of two native cyanobacterial strains to uranium exposure was studied. • Anabaena L-31 exhibited higher tolerance to uranium as compared to Anabaena 7120. • Uranium exposure differentially affected the proteome profiles of the two strains. • Anabaena L-31 showed better sustenance of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. • Anabaena L-31 displayed superior oxidative stress defense than Anabaena 7120. - Abstract: Two strains of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena, native to Indian paddy fields, displayed differential sensitivity to exposure to uranyl carbonate at neutral pH. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and Anabaena sp. strain L-31 displayed 50% reduction in survival (LD{sub 50} dose), following 3 h exposure to 75 μM and 200 μM uranyl carbonate, respectively. Uranium responsive proteome alterations were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by protein identification by MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The two strains displayed significant differences in levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, and oxidative stress alleviation, commensurate with their uranium tolerance. Higher uranium tolerance of Anabaena sp. strain L-31 could be attributed to sustained photosynthesis and carbon metabolism and superior oxidative stress defense, as compared to the uranium sensitive Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Significance: Uranium responsive proteome modulations in two nitrogen-fixing strains of Anabaena, native to Indian paddy fields, revealed that rapid adaptation to better oxidative stress management, and maintenance of metabolic and energy homeostasis underlies superior uranium tolerance of Anabaena sp. strain L-31 compared to Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  20. Comparative evaluation of live marker vaccine candidates "CP7_E2alf" and "flc11" along with C-strain "Riems" after oral vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blome, S.; Aebischer, A.; Lange, E.; Hofmann, M.; Leifer, I.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Koenen, F.; Beer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the tremendous socio-economic impact of classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks, emergency vaccination scenarios are continuously under discussion. Unfortunately, all currently available vaccines show restrictions either in terms of marker capacities or immunogenicity. Recent research efforts

  1. A gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1, vaccine strain in not re-excreted nor transmitted in an experimental cattle population after corticosteroid treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2000-01-01

    To study possible reactivation and to quantify subsequent transmission of a live gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine strain in cattle populations, four experiments were performed. Two groups of cattle were each tested twice for the possibility of reactivation. Inoculation with a

  2. The Vero cell-derived, inactivated, SA14-14-2 strain-based vaccine (Ixiaro) for prevention of Japanese encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erra, Elina O; Kantele, Anu

    2015-01-01

    With an estimated 68,000 cases each year, Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Vaccination against the disease is recommended for endemic populations and also for travelers at risk. Recently, a Vero cell-derived, inactivated, SA14-14-2 strain-based JE vaccine (JE-VC) became available for travelers from non-endemic regions, replacing the traditional mouse brain-derived vaccines. First licensed in 2009, JE-VC is currently available in Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia and several other countries. In 2013, the vaccine was approved by the European Medicines Agency and the US Food and Drug Administration for use in children. This review summarizes current data on the immunogenicity, safety and clinical use of JE-VC.

  3. Community analysis of pigment patterns from 37 microalgae strains reveals new carotenoids and porphyrins characteristic of distinct strains and taxonomic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serive, Benoît; Nicolau, Elodie; Bérard, Jean-Baptiste; Kaas, Raymond; Pasquet, Virginie; Picot, Laurent; Cadoret, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplankton, with an estimated 30 000 to 1 000 000 species clustered in 12 phyla, presents a high taxonomic and ecophysiological diversity, reflected by the complex distribution of pigments among the different algal classes. High performance liquid chromatography is the gold standard method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of phytoplankton pigments in seawater and culture samples, but only a few pigments can be used as robust chemotaxonomic markers. A major challenge is thus to identify new ones, characteristic of a strain, species, class or taxon that cannot be currently identified on the basis of its pigment signature. Using an optimized extraction process coupled to a HPLC de-replication strategy, we examined the pigment composition of 37 microalgae strains, representative of the broad taxonomic diversity of marine and freshwater species (excluding cyanobacteria). For each species, the major pigments already described were unambiguously identified. We also observed the presence of several minor unidentified pigments in each chromatogram. The global analysis of pigment compositions revealed a total of 124 pigments, including 98 pigments or derivatives unidentified using the standards. Absorption spectra indicated that 35 corresponded to chlorophyll/porphyrin derivatives, 57 to carotenoids and six to derivatives having both spectral signatures. Sixty-one of these unidentified or new carotenoids and porphyrin derivatives were characteristic of particular strains or species, indicating their possible use as highly specific chemotaxonomic markers capable of identifying one strain out of the 37 selected. We developed a graphical analysis using Gephi software to give a clear representation of pigment communities among the various phytoplankton strains, and to reveal strain-characteristic and shared pigments. This made it possible to reconstruct the taxonomic evolution of microalgae classes, on the basis of the conservation, loss, and/or appearance of

  4. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions.

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    Jessica B Hostetler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC, and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion.We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further suggesting that the proteins

  5. Sister Dehalobacter Genomes Reveal Specialization in Organohalide Respiration and Recent Strain Differentiation Likely Driven by Chlorinated Substrates

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    Shuiquan eTang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of two closely related Dehalobacter strains (strain CF and strain DCA were assembled from the metagenome of an anaerobic enrichment culture that reductively dechlorinates chloroform (CF, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA. The 3.1 Mbp genomes of strain CF (that dechlorinates CF and 1,1,1-TCA and strain DCA (that dechlorinates 1,1-DCA each contain 17 putative reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh genes. These two genomes were systematically compared to three other available organohalide-respiring Dehalobacter genomes (Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23, Dehalobacter sp. strain E1 and Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB, and to the genomes of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain Y51. This analysis compared 42 different metabolic and physiological categories. The genomes of strains CF and DCA share 90% overall average nucleotide identity and greater than 99.8% identity over a 2.9 Mbp alignment that excludes large insertions, indicating that these genomes differentiated from a close common ancestor. This differentiation was likely driven by selection pressures around two orthologous reductive dehalogenase genes, cfrA and dcrA, that code for the enzymes that reduce CF or 1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-DCA. The many reductive dehalogenase genes found in the five Dehalobacter genomes cluster into two small conserved regions and were often associated with Crp/Fnr transcriptional regulators. Specialization is on-going on a strain-specific basis, as some strains but not others have lost essential genes in the Wood-Ljungdahl (strain E1 and corrinoid biosynthesis pathways (strains E1 and PER-K23. The gene encoding phosphoserine phosphatase, which catalyzes the last step of serine biosynthesis, is missing from all five Dehalobacter genomes, yet D. restrictus can grow without serine, suggesting an alternative or unrecognized biosynthesis route exists. In contrast to Dehalococcoides mccartyi

  6. Sister Dehalobacter Genomes Reveal Specialization in Organohalide Respiration and Recent Strain Differentiation Likely Driven by Chlorinated Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuiquan; Wang, Po Hsiang; Higgins, Steven A; Löffler, Frank E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of two closely related Dehalobacter strains (strain CF and strain DCA) were assembled from the metagenome of an anaerobic enrichment culture that reductively dechlorinates chloroform (CF), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA). The 3.1 Mbp genomes of strain CF (that dechlorinates CF and 1,1,1-TCA) and strain DCA (that dechlorinates 1,1-DCA) each contain 17 putative reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes. These two genomes were systematically compared to three other available organohalide-respiring Dehalobacter genomes (Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23, Dehalobacter sp. strain E1 and Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB), and to the genomes of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain Y51. This analysis compared 42 different metabolic and physiological categories. The genomes of strains CF and DCA share 90% overall average nucleotide identity and >99.8% identity over a 2.9 Mbp alignment that excludes large insertions, indicating that these genomes differentiated from a close common ancestor. This differentiation was likely driven by selection pressures around two orthologous reductive dehalogenase genes, cfrA and dcrA, that code for the enzymes that reduce CF or 1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-DCA. The many reductive dehalogenase genes found in the five Dehalobacter genomes cluster into two small conserved regions and were often associated with Crp/Fnr transcriptional regulators. Specialization is on-going on a strain-specific basis, as some strains but not others have lost essential genes in the Wood-Ljungdahl (strain E1) and corrinoid biosynthesis pathways (strains E1 and PER-K23). The gene encoding phosphoserine phosphatase, which catalyzes the last step of serine biosynthesis, is missing from all five Dehalobacter genomes, yet D. restrictus can grow without serine, suggesting an alternative or unrecognized biosynthesis route exists. In contrast to D. mccartyi, a complete heme biosynthesis

  7. Diversity of rotavirus strains circulating in Northern Brazil after introduction of a rotavirus vaccine: high prevalence of G3P[6] genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Soares, Luana; de Fátima Dos Santos Guerra, Sylvia; do Socorro Lima de Oliveira, Alessilva; da Silva Dos Santos, Fabiola; de Fátima Costa de Menezes, Euzeni Maria; Mascarenhas, Joana d'Arc Pereira; Linhares, Alexandre C

    2014-06-01

    Rotavirus A (RVA) is the most common cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide, causing 453,000 deaths annually. In Brazil, the most frequent genotype identified was G1 during almost three decades in the pre-vaccination period; however, after anti-rotavirus vaccine introduction, there was a predominance of G2 genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the G and P genotypes of rotaviruses isolated from children under 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis in the Northern region of Brazil, and discuss the emergence of G3P[6] genotype. A total of 783 stool specimens were obtained between January 2011 and March 2012. RVA antigen was detected in 33% (272/783) of samples using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and type-specificity was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The most common binary combination was G2P[4], representing 41% of cases, followed by G3P[6] (15%), G1P[8] (8%), G3P[8] (4%), G9P[8] (3%), and G12P[6] (2%). G3P[6] strains were analyzed further and phylogenetic analysis of VP7 gene showed that G3 strains clustered into lineage I and showed a high degree of amino acid identity with vaccine strain RV3 (95.1-95.6%). For VP4 sequences, G3P[6] clustered into lineage Ia. It was demonstrated by the first time the emergence of unusual genotype G3P[6] in the Amazon region of Brazil. This genotype shares neither VP7 nor VP4 specificity with the used vaccine and may represent a challenge to vaccination strategies. A continuous monitoring of circulating strains is therefore needed during the post-vaccine era in Brazil. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparative Genomics of Gardnerella vaginalis Strains Reveals Substantial Differences in Metabolic and Virulence Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoman, Carl J.; Yildirim, Suleyman; Thomas, Susan M.; Durkin, A. Scott; Torralba, Manolito; Sutton, Granger; Buhay, Christian J.; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon P.; Muzny, Donna M.; Qin, Xiang; Gibbs, Richard A.; Leigh, Steven R.; Stumpf, Rebecca; White, Bryan A.; Highlander, Sarah K.; Nelson, Karen E.; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gardnerella vaginalis is described as a common vaginal bacterial species whose presence correlates strongly with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Here we report the genome sequencing and comparative analyses of three strains of G. vaginalis. Strains 317 (ATCC 14019) and 594 (ATCC 14018) were isolated from the vaginal tracts of women with symptomatic BV, while Strain 409-05 was isolated from a healthy, asymptomatic individual with a Nugent score of 9. Principal Findings Substantial genomic rearrangement and heterogeneity were observed that appeared to have resulted from both mobile elements and substantial lateral gene transfer. These genomic differences translated to differences in metabolic potential. All strains are equipped with significant virulence potential, including genes encoding the previously described vaginolysin, pili for cytoadhesion, EPS biosynthetic genes for biofilm formation, and antimicrobial resistance systems, We also observed systems promoting multi-drug and lantibiotic extrusion. All G. vaginalis strains possess a large number of genes that may enhance their ability to compete with and exclude other vaginal colonists. These include up to six toxin-antitoxin systems and up to nine additional antitoxins lacking cognate toxins, several of which are clustered within each genome. All strains encode bacteriocidal toxins, including two lysozyme-like toxins produced uniquely by strain 409-05. Interestingly, the BV isolates encode numerous proteins not found in strain 409-05 that likely increase their pathogenic potential. These include enzymes enabling mucin degradation, a trait previously described to strongly correlate with BV, although commonly attributed to non-G. vaginalis species. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that all three strains are able to thrive in vaginal environments, and therein the BV isolates are capable of occupying a niche that is unique from 409-05. Each strain has significant virulence potential, although

  9. Salmonella typhi vaccine strain CVD 908 expressing the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum: strain construction and safety and immunogenicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C; Hone, D; Noriega, F R; Tacket, C O; Davis, J R; Losonsky, G; Nataro, J P; Hoffman, S; Malik, A; Nardin, E; Sztein, M B; Heppner, D G; Fouts, T R; Isibasi, A; Levine, M M

    1994-04-01

    rcsp, encoding amino acids 21-398 of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), under control of tacP was integrated into the chromosomal delta aroC locus of attenuated delta aroC, delta aroD Salmonella typhi CVD 908. By immunoblot and ELISA, rCSP expression was greater from a multicopy plasmid than from the single chromosomal gene. CVD 908 omega (delta aroC1019::tacP-rcsp) was well tolerated by 10 volunteers who were fed two doses of 5 x 10(7) organisms 8 days apart. Seven subjects excreted the vaccine strain for 1-3 days. All subjects developed serologic responses to O and H antigens of the live vector, whereas 3 vaccinees responded to the foreign antigen: 1 developed an 80-fold rise in serum anti-sporozoite antibody, another had a 4-fold rise in antibody to a recombinant portion of CSP (residues 309-345), while a third vaccinee developed CSP-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. This is the first report of attenuated S. typhi eliciting a human serologic or a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a foreign protein. Improved foreign gene expression should enhance immunogenicity.

  10. Vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells protect against respiratory syncytial virus strain A2-line19F-induced pathogenesis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Stokes, Kate L; Currier, Michael G; Sakamoto, Kaori; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Celis, Esteban; Moore, Martin L

    2012-12-01

    CD8(+) T cells may contribute to vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Compared to CD8(+) T cells responding to RSV infection, vaccine-elicited anti-RSV CD8(+) T cells are less well defined. We used a peptide vaccine to test the hypothesis that vaccine-elicited RSV-specific CD8(+) T cells are protective against RSV pathogenesis. BALB/c mice were treated with a mixture (previously termed TriVax) of an M2(82-90) peptide representing an immunodominant CD8 epitope, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly(I·C), and a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody. TriVax vaccination induced potent effector anti-RSV CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Mice were challenged with RSV strain A2-line19F, a model of RSV pathogenesis leading to airway mucin expression. Mice were protected against RSV infection and against RSV-induced airway mucin expression and cellular lung inflammation when challenged 6 days after vaccination. Compared to A2-line19F infection alone, TriVax vaccination followed by challenge resulted in effector CD8(+) T cells with greater cytokine expression and the more rapid appearance of RSV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the lung. When challenged 42 days after TriVax vaccination, memory CD8(+) T cells were elicited with RSV-specific tetramer responses equivalent to TriVax-induced effector CD8(+) T cells. These memory CD8(+) T cells had lower cytokine expression than effector CD8(+) T cells, and protection against A2-line19F was partial during the memory phase. We found that vaccine-elicited effector anti-RSV CD8(+) T cells protected mice against RSV infection and pathogenesis, and waning protection correlated with reduced CD8(+) T cell cytokine expression.

  11. Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Protect against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain A2-Line19F-Induced Pathogenesis in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Stokes, Kate L.; Currier, Michael G.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Celis, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cells may contribute to vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Compared to CD8+ T cells responding to RSV infection, vaccine-elicited anti-RSV CD8+ T cells are less well defined. We used a peptide vaccine to test the hypothesis that vaccine-elicited RSV-specific CD8+ T cells are protective against RSV pathogenesis. BALB/c mice were treated with a mixture (previously termed TriVax) of an M282-90 peptide representing an immunodominant CD8 epitope, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly(I·C), and a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody. TriVax vaccination induced potent effector anti-RSV CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Mice were challenged with RSV strain A2-line19F, a model of RSV pathogenesis leading to airway mucin expression. Mice were protected against RSV infection and against RSV-induced airway mucin expression and cellular lung inflammation when challenged 6 days after vaccination. Compared to A2-line19F infection alone, TriVax vaccination followed by challenge resulted in effector CD8+ T cells with greater cytokine expression and the more rapid appearance of RSV-specific CD8+ T cells in the lung. When challenged 42 days after TriVax vaccination, memory CD8+ T cells were elicited with RSV-specific tetramer responses equivalent to TriVax-induced effector CD8+ T cells. These memory CD8+ T cells had lower cytokine expression than effector CD8+ T cells, and protection against A2-line19F was partial during the memory phase. We found that vaccine-elicited effector anti-RSV CD8+ T cells protected mice against RSV infection and pathogenesis, and waning protection correlated with reduced CD8+ T cell cytokine expression. PMID:23015695

  12. Activity of polymerase proteins of vaccine and wild-type measles virus strains in a minigenome replication assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankamp, Bettina; Kearney, Sean P; Liu, Xin; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2002-07-01

    The relative activities of five measles virus (MV) polymerase (L) proteins were compared in an intracellular, plasmid-based replication assay. When coexpressed with N and P proteins from an attenuated strain, L proteins from two attenuated viruses directed the production of up to eight times more reporter protein from an MV minigenome than the three wild-type L proteins. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the differences in reporter protein production correlated with mRNA transcription levels. Increased activity of polymerases from attenuated viruses equally affected mRNA transcription and minigenome replication. The higher level of transcription may be a consequence of increased template availability or may be an independent effect of the elevated activity of the attenuated polymerases. Coexpression of wild-type L proteins with homologous N and P proteins did not affect the activity of the wild-type polymerases, indicating that the differential activity was a function of the L proteins alone. Use of a minigenome that incorporated two nucleotide changes found in the genomic leader of the three wild-type viruses did not raise the activity of the wild-type L proteins. These data demonstrate that increased polymerase activity differentiates attenuated from wild-type viruses and suggest that functions involved in RNA synthesis contribute to the attenuated phenotype of MV vaccine strains.

  13. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-02

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, responsible for listeriosis a rare but severe infection disease, can survive in the food processing environment for month or even years. So-called persistent L. monocytogenes strains greatly increase the risk of (re)contamination of food products, and are therefore a great challenge for food safety. However, our understanding of the mechanism underlying persistence is still fragmented. In this study we compared the exoproteome of three persistent strains with the reference strain EGDe under mild stress conditions using 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis including all differentially abundant protein spots showed that the exoproteome of strain EGDe (sequence type (ST) 35) is distinct from that of the persistent strain R479a (ST8) and the two closely related ST121 strains 4423 and 6179. Phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus ST genes showed similar grouping of the strains. Comparing the exoproteome of strain EGDe and the three persistent strains resulted in identification of 22 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 16 proteins. Six proteins were significantly increased in the persistent L. monocytogenes exoproteomes, among them proteins involved in alkaline stress response (e.g. the membrane anchored lipoprotein Lmo2637 and the NADPH dehydrogenase NamA). In parallel the persistent strains showed increased survival under alkaline stress, which is often provided during cleaning and disinfection in the food processing environments. In addition, gene expression of the proteins linked to stress response (Lmo2637, NamA, Fhs and QoxA) was higher in the persistent strain not only at 37 °C but also at 10 °C. Invasion efficiency of EGDe was higher in intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells compared to the persistent strains. Concurrently we found higher expression of proteins involved in virulence in EGDe e.g. the actin-assembly-inducing protein ActA and the

  14. Establishment of the 3rd national standard for lot release testing of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunmi; Moon, Hyungsil; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Do Keun; Chung, Hye Joo; Park, Yong Keun; Oh, Ho Jung

    2016-07-02

    In Korea, 2 inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccines from Nakayama-NIH and Beijing-1 strain have been utilized to date. The 1(st) national standard for lot release testing of the JE vaccine was established in 2002. The 2(nd) national standard, established in 2007, is currently in use for JE vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) potency testing. However, the supply of this standard is expected to be exhausted by 2015, necessitating the establishment of a new national standard with quality equivalent to that of the existing standard. Quality control tests were performed to verify that the new standard candidate material was equivalent to that of the 2(nd) national standard, proving its appropriateness for potency testing of JE vaccine. In addition, based on the results of a collaborative study conducted among 4 institutions including Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, the potency of the new national standard material was determined to be 2.69 neutralizing-antibody titer (log10) per vial. Therefore, the newly established national standard material is expected to be used for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine lot release in Korea.

  15. Multilocus Sequence Typing Reveals Relevant Genetic Variation and Different Evolutionary Dynamics among Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Scortichini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Forty-five Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis (Xaj strains originating from Juglans regia cultivation in different countries were molecularly typed by means of MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST, using acnB, gapA, gyrB and rpoD gene fragments. A total of 2.5 kilobases was used to infer the phylogenetic relationship among the strains and possible recombination events. Haplotype diversity, linkage disequilibrium analysis, selection tests, gene flow estimates and codon adaptation index were also assessed. The dendrograms built by maximum likelihood with concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed two major and two minor phylotypes. The same haplotype was found in strains originating from different continents, and different haplotypes were found in strains isolated in the same year from the same location. A recombination breakpoint was detected within the rpoD gene fragment. At the pathovar level, the Xaj populations studied here are clonal and under neutral selection. However, four Xaj strains isolated from walnut fruits with apical necrosis are under diversifying selection, suggesting a possible new adaptation. Gene flow estimates do not support the hypothesis of geographic isolation of the strains, even though the genetic diversity between the strains increases as the geographic distance between them increases. A triplet deletion, causing the absence of valine, was found in the rpoD fragment of all 45 Xaj strains when compared with X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306. The codon adaptation index was high in all four genes studied, indicating a relevant metabolic activity.

  16. Antagonistic pleiotropy and fitness trade-offs reveal specialist and generalist traits in strains of canine distemper virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko M Nikolin

    Full Text Available Theoretically, homogeneous environments favor the evolution of specialists whereas heterogeneous environments favor generalists. Canine distemper is a multi-host carnivore disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV. The described cell receptor of CDV is SLAM (CD150. Attachment of CDV hemagglutinin protein (CDV-H to this receptor facilitates fusion and virus entry in cooperation with the fusion protein (CDV-F. We investigated whether CDV strains co-evolved in the large, homogeneous domestic dog population exhibited specialist traits, and strains adapted to the heterogeneous environment of smaller populations of different carnivores exhibited generalist traits. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the SLAM binding region revealed higher similarity between sequences from Canidae species than to sequences from other carnivore families. Using an in vitro assay, we quantified syncytia formation mediated by CDV-H proteins from dog and non-dog CDV strains in cells expressing dog, lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from dog strains produced significantly higher values with cells expressing dog SLAM than with cells expressing lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from strains of non-dog species produced similar values in all three cell types, but lower values in cells expressing dog SLAM than the values obtained for CDV-H proteins from dog strains. By experimentally changing one amino acid (Y549H in the CDV-H protein of one dog strain we decreased expression of specialist traits and increased expression of generalist traits, thereby confirming its functional importance. A virus titer assay demonstrated that dog strains produced higher titers in cells expressing dog SLAM than cells expressing SLAM of non-dog hosts, which suggested possible fitness benefits of specialization post-cell entry. We provide in vitro evidence for the expression of specialist and generalist traits by CDV strains, and fitness trade-offs across carnivore host environments caused by

  17. Genome sequencing of a virulent avian Pasteurella multocida strain GX-Pm reveals the candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengjie; Sizhu, Suolang; Luo, Qingping; Xu, Xuewen; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Anding

    2016-04-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. First genomic study was performed on an avirulent avian strain Pm70, and until 2013, two genomes of virulent avian strains X73 and P1059 were sequenced. Comparative genome study supplied important information for further study on the pathogenesis of fowl cholera. In the previous study, a capsular serotype A strain GX-Pm was isolated from the liver of a chicken, which died during an outbreak of fowl cholera in 2011. The strain showed multiple drug resistance and was highly virulent to chickens. Therefore, the present study performed the genome sequencing and a comparative genomic analysis to reveal the candidate genes involved in virulence of P. multocida. Sequenced draft genome sequence of GX-Pm was 2,292,886 bp, contained 2941 protein-coding genes, 5 genomic islands, 4 IS elements and 2 prophage regions. Notability, all the predicted drug-resistance genes were included in predicted genomic islands. A comparative genome study on virulent avian strains P1059, X73 and GX-Pm with the avirulent avian strain Pm 70 indicated that 475 unique genes were only identified in either of virulent strains but absent in the avirulent strain. Among these genes, 20 genes were contained within genomes of all three virulent strains, including a few of putative virulence genes. Further characterization of the pathogenic functions of these genes would benefit the understanding of pathogenesis of fowl cholera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The patterns of in vitro cell-death and inflammatory cytokines induced by distinct BCG vaccine strains are differentially induced in human mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, C; Hacker, M; Moraes, M; Castello-Branco, L; Silva, F; Antas, P

    2018-01-02

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains among the world's leading cause of mortality. For its control, studies of TB vaccines are needed. Since live-attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only TB vaccine currently in use, studies on the protective role of BCG are required. In this study, we analyzed host cells purified directly from whole blood of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative volunteers, comprising adult healthy donors (HD) and neonates (umbilical cord bloods, UCB), with the aim to directly compare in vitro immune responses with distinct BCG strains in human mononuclear cells. The Moreau, Pasteur, and Danish BCG strains were used to infect mononuclear cells in vitro for 48 h; bacilli viability and cell-death were subsequently detected by flow cytometry. In addition, cell culture supernatants were used in cytokine detection assays. Overall, the Moreau BCG strain induced higher levels of apoptosis than the Pasteur and Danish BCG strains in both the HD and UCB groups (p-value BCG infection. The Moreau BCG strain, exclusively, induced Th1 cytokines at the highest levels in cells from adults (p-value BCG strains, whereas TGF-β1 levels were reduced significantly (p-value BCG vaccine. As expected, eight out of 22 pro-inflammatory cytokines were secreted at significant levels (p-value BCG-infected cell cultures, in the HD group only. When analyzing these results, we excluded confounding factors related to storage and viability of the BCG strains used. These findings suggest that Moreau BCG is a more potent immunostimulating agent than the Pasteur and Danish BCG strains. Clinical trials will be needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Effect of genetic strains (Ross 308, Cobb 500 and Hubbard F15 on immune response against Newcastle disease vaccine in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Mayahi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immune responses are crucial for optimal health and can be affected by several factors including host genetics. The increasing need for chicken meat has provoked producers to try to optimize breeding through genetic methods. We expect that new broiler lines have shorter breeding period and grow fast, be resistant to disease, be robust (characterized by a high level of utilization of nutrients and a good metabolism, have a high viability rate, powerful skeleton, have high flexible capacity and show consistent growth. Unluckily, genetic advancement has also led to several negative influences. So, in broiler chickens, changes are now found which not happened before or were relatively unusual. These changes involve: pulmonary hypertension syndrome, limb disease ,sudden death syndrome, abnormal bone growth, subclinical diseases such as Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens, immunosuppression and sensitivity of chickens to mycotoxin intoxication. Objectives: The recent study was performed to examine the effects of genetic strain of broiler chickens on immune response against Newcastle disease vaccine. So three genetic strains of broiler chickens including Ross 308, Cobb 500, and Hubbard F15 were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: 36ooo one-day-old broiler chicks Hubbard F15, Cobb-500 and Ross308, were divided into 3 equal groups with 2 replicates and 6000 birds per replicate. The birds were reared under similar conditions from one-day-old to 49 days of age. All groups were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and on 7, 17, 27, 35, 42, 48 days and antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine was determined by HI test. Results: The Cobb 500 and Hubbard stains respectively had the highest and the lowest immune response against Newcastle diseases vaccine. Ross 308 had second status among strains. Conclusions: On the basis of present study Cobb 500 and Ross308 chickens

  20. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  1. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  2. Pre-Clinical Development of BCG.HIVACAT, an Antibiotic-Free Selection Strain, for HIV-TB Pediatric Vaccine Vectored by Lysine Auxotroph of BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saubi, Narcís; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Gea-Mallorqui, Ester; Rosario, Maximillian; Gatell, Josep Maria; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT) system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer) strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVACAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs). We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVACAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVACAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVACAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVACAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth. PMID:22927933

  3. Pre-clinical development of BCG.HIVA(CAT, an antibiotic-free selection strain, for HIV-TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcís Saubi

    Full Text Available In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVA(CAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA(CAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVA(CAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA(CAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA(CAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVA(CAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVA(CAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth.

  4. A glycoprotein E gene-deleted bovine herpesvirus 1 as a candidate vaccine strain

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    M. Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1 defective in glycoprotein E (gE was constructed from a Brazilian genital BoHV-1 isolate, by replacing the full gE coding region with the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene for selection. Upon co-transfection of MDBK cells with genomic viral DNA plus the GFP-bearing gE-deletion plasmid, three fluorescent recombinant clones were obtained out of approximately 5000 viral plaques. Deletion of the gE gene and the presence of the GFP marker in the genome of recombinant viruses were confirmed by PCR. Despite forming smaller plaques, the BoHV-1△gE recombinants replicated in MDBK cells with similar kinetics and to similar titers to that of the parental virus (SV56/90, demonstrating that the gE deletion had no deleterious effects on replication efficacy in vitro. Thirteen calves inoculated intramuscularly with BoHV-1△gE developed virus neutralizing antibodies at day 42 post-infection (titers from 2 to 16, demonstrating the ability of the recombinant to replicate and to induce a serological response in vivo. Furthermore, the serological response induced by recombinant BoHV-1△gE could be differentiated from that induced by wild-type BoHV-1 by the use of an anti-gE antibody ELISA kit. Taken together, these results indicated the potential application of recombinant BoHV-1 △gE in vaccine formulations to prevent the losses caused by BoHV-1 infections while allowing for differentiation of vaccinated from naturally infected animals.

  5. Laboratory-Cultured Strains of the Sea Anemone Exaiptasia Reveal Distinct Bacterial Communities

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Sarrias, Marcela

    2017-05-02

    Exaiptasia is a laboratory sea anemone model system for stony corals. Two clonal strains are commonly used, referred to as H2 and CC7, that originate from two genetically distinct lineages and that differ in their Symbiodinium specificity. However, little is known about their other microbial associations. Here, we examined and compared the taxonomic composition of the bacterial assemblages of these two symbiotic Exaiptasia strains, both of which have been cultured in the laboratory long-term under identical conditions. We found distinct bacterial microbiota for each strain, indicating the presence of host-specific microbial consortia. Putative differences in the bacterial functional profiles (i.e., enrichment and depletion of various metabolic processes) based on taxonomic inference were also detected, further suggesting functional differences of the microbiomes associated with these lineages. Our study contributes to the current knowledge of the Exaiptasia holobiont by comparing the bacterial diversity of two commonly used strains as models for coral research.

  6. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF FIVE RAT STRAINS REVEAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODES IN THE ANTIGEN PROCESSING PATHWAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases can help decode the transcriptional program that governs cellular behavior. We hypothesized that co-transcribed, intra-pathway, functionally coherent genes can be r...

  7. CLINICAL STUDIES OF REACTOGENICITY, SAFETY AND IMMUNOGENICITY OF LIVE MONOVALENT INFLUENZA VACCINE (STRAIN А/17/CALIFORNIA/2009/38 — H1N1 IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Bushmenkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of performed pre-clinical and clinical studies with volunteers 18-60 years old allowed registration of vaccine «INFLUVIR» (live monovalent vaccine for the prophylaxis of influenza A/H1N1, strain A/17/California/2009/38 (H1N1, developed by NPO «Microgen» in Russian Federation so timely vaccination campaign was performed. As a result, the level of morbidity with influenza A/H1N1 in Russia was decreased, and development of complication was prevented. Clinical studies in different groups of children were performed for the purpose of widening indications for vaccine «INFLUVIR» administration. According to the results of studies vaccine «INFLUVIR» has good tolerability and safety, low reactogenicity, and significant immunogenicity. This fact will allow changing of present normative documentation and administration of «INFLUVIR» in children of different age for prophylaxis of influenza A/H1N1.Key words: children, influenza, virus A/H1N1, live influenza vaccine, tolerability, safety, immunogenicity.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:101-105

  8. Genomic analysis of six new Geobacillus strains reveals highly conserved carbohydrate degradation architectures and strategies

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    Phillip eBrumm

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the whole genome sequences of six new Geobacillus xylanolytic strains along with the genomic analysis of their capability to degrade carbohydrates.. The six sequenced Geobacillus strains described here have a range of GC contents from 43.9% to 52.5% and clade with named Geobacillus species throughout the entire genus. We have identified a ~200 kb unique super-cluster in all six strains, containing five to eight distinct carbohydrate degradation clusters in a single genomic region, a feature not seen in other genera. The Geobacillus strains rely on a small number of secreted enzymes located within distinct clusters for carbohydrate utilization, in contrast to most biomass-degrading organisms which contain numerous secreted enzymes located randomly throughout the genomes. All six strains are able to utilize fructose, arabinose, xylose, mannitol, gluconate, xylan, and α-1,6-glucosides. The gene clusters for utilization of these seven substrates have identical organization and the individual proteins have a high percent identity to their homologs. The strains show significant differences in their ability to utilize inositol, sucrose, lactose, α-mannosides, α-1,4-glucosides and arabinan.

  9. Rumen cellulosomics: divergent fiber-degrading strategies revealed by comparative genome-wide analysis of six ruminococcal strains.

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    Bareket Dassa

    Full Text Available A complex community of microorganisms is responsible for efficient plant cell wall digestion by many herbivores, notably the ruminants. Understanding the different fibrolytic mechanisms utilized by these bacteria has been of great interest in agricultural and technological fields, reinforced more recently by current efforts to convert cellulosic biomass to biofuels.Here, we have used a bioinformatics-based approach to explore the cellulosome-related components of six genomes from two of the primary fiber-degrading bacteria in the rumen: Ruminococcus flavefaciens (strains FD-1, 007c and 17 and Ruminococcus albus (strains 7, 8 and SY3. The genomes of two of these strains are reported for the first time herein. The data reveal that the three R. flavefaciens strains encode for an elaborate reservoir of cohesin- and dockerin-containing proteins, whereas the three R. albus strains are cohesin-deficient and encode mainly dockerins and a unique family of cell-anchoring carbohydrate-binding modules (family 37.Our comparative genome-wide analysis pinpoints rare and novel strain-specific protein architectures and provides an exhaustive profile of their numerous lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. This work provides blueprints of the divergent cellulolytic systems in these two prominent fibrolytic rumen bacterial species, each of which reflects a distinct mechanistic model for efficient degradation of cellulosic biomass.

  10. Expression of Glycoproteins in Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Varicella Zoster Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-18

    with 50 |lg/ml ethidium bromide in H2O for 15 to 30 min. The gel was then placed on a UV box that emits at 254 nm. Nucleic acid molecules binding...Characterization of protein products encoded by OPV . Now that the transcripts mapping to 0RF14 for both VZV strains Scott and Oka had been analyzed...approaches were used to investigate this: in vivo tunicamycin treatment and in vitro endoglycosidase degradation . These indirect methods had to be

  11. The genome of the heartworm, Dirofilaria immitis, reveals drug and vaccine targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godel, Christelle; Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Ludin, Philipp; Nilsson, Daniel; Comandatore, Francesco; Wrobel, Nicola; Thompson, Marian; Schmid, Christoph D; Goto, Susumu; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Bandi, Claudio; Epe, Christian; Kaminsky, Ronald; Blaxter, Mark; Mäser, Pascal

    2012-11-01

    The heartworm Dirofilaria immitis is an important parasite of dogs. Transmitted by mosquitoes in warmer climatic zones, it is spreading across southern Europe and the Americas at an alarming pace. There is no vaccine, and chemotherapy is prone to complications. To learn more about this parasite, we have sequenced the genomes of D. immitis and its endosymbiont Wolbachia. We predict 10,179 protein coding genes in the 84.2 Mb of the nuclear genome, and 823 genes in the 0.9-Mb Wolbachia genome. The D. immitis genome harbors neither DNA transposons nor active retrotransposons, and there is very little genetic variation between two sequenced isolates from Europe and the United States. The differential presence of anabolic pathways such as heme and nucleotide biosynthesis hints at the intricate metabolic interrelationship between the heartworm and Wolbachia. Comparing the proteome of D. immitis with other nematodes and with mammalian hosts, we identify families of potential drug targets, immune modulators, and vaccine candidates. This genome sequence will support the development of new tools against dirofilariasis and aid efforts to combat related human pathogens, the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and river blindness.

  12. Plant root transcriptome profiling reveals a strain-dependent response during Azospirillum-rice cooperation

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    Benoît eDrogue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation involving Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria results in improvements of plant growth and health. While pathogenic and symbiotic interactions are known to induce transcriptional changes for genes related to plant defence and development, little is known about the impact of phytostimulating rhizobacteria on plant gene expression. This study aims at identifying genes significantly regulated in rice roots upon Azospirillum inoculation, considering possible favored interaction between a strain and its original host cultivar. Genome-wide analyses of Oryza sativa japonica cultivars Cigalon and Nipponbare were performed, by using microarrays, seven days post inoculation with A. lipoferum 4B (isolated from Cigalon or Azospirillum sp. B510 (isolated from Nipponbare and compared to the respective non-inoculated condition. A total of 7,384 genes were significantly regulated, which represent about 16 % of total rice genes. A set of 34 genes is regulated by both Azospirillum strains in both cultivars, including a gene orthologous to PR10 of Brachypodium, and these could represent plant markers of Azospirillum-rice interactions. The results highlight a strain-dependent response of rice, with 83 % of the differentially expressed genes being classified as combination-specific. Whatever the combination, most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in primary metabolism, transport, regulation of transcription and protein fate. When considering genes involved in response to stress and plant defence, it appears that strain B510, a strain displaying endophytic properties, leads to the repression of a wider set of genes than strain 4B. Individual genotypic variations could be the most important driving force of rice roots gene expression upon Azospirillum inoculation. Strain-dependent transcriptional changes observed for genes related to auxin and ethylene signalling highlight the complexity of hormone signalling networks in the Azospirillum

  13. Substitutions at residues 300 and 389 of the VP2 capsid protein serve as the minimal determinant of attenuation for canine parvovirus vaccine strain 9985-46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehata, Go; Sato, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Morimasa; Takahashi, Takuo; Kainuma, Risa; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Oshima, Sho; Noro, Taichi; Oishi, Eiji

    2017-11-01

    Identifying molecular determinants of virulence attenuation in live attenuated canine parvovirus (CPV) vaccines is important for assuring their safety. To this end, we identified mutations in the attenuated CPV 9985-46 vaccine strain that arose during serial passage in Crandell-Rees feline kidney cells by comparison with the wild-type counterpart, as well as minimal determinants of the loss of virulence. Four amino acid substitutions (N93K, G300V, T389N and V562L) in VP2 of strain 9985-46 significantly restricted infection in canine A72 cells. Using an infectious molecular clone system, we constructed isogenic CPVs of the parental virulent 9985 strain carrying single or double mutations. We observed that only a single amino acid substitution in VP2, G300V or T389N, attenuated the virulent parental virus. Combinations of these mutations further attenuated CPV to a level comparable to that of 9985-46. Strains with G300V/T389N substitutions did not induce clinical symptoms in experimentally infected pups, and their ability to infect canine cells was highly restricted. We found that another G300V/V562L double mutation decreased affinity of the virus for canine cells, although its pathogenicity to dogs was maintained. These results indicate that mutation of residue 300, which plays a critical role in host tropism, is not sufficient for viral attenuation in vivo, and that attenuation of 9985-46 strain is defined by at least two mutations in residues 300 and 389 of the VP2 capsid protein. This finding is relevant for quality control of the vaccine and provides insight into the rational design of second-generation live attenuated vaccine candidates.

  14. Histomorphometric characteristics of immune cells in small intestine of pigs perorally immunized with vaccine candidate F18ac+ nonenterotoxigenic E. coli strain

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    I. Valpotic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Colidiarrhea and colienterotoxemia caused by F4+ and/or F18+ enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC strains are the most prevalent infections of suckling and weaned pigs. Here we tested the immunogenicity and protective effectiveness of attenuated F18ac+ non-ETEC vaccine candidate strain against challenge infection with F4ac+ ETEC strain by quantitative phenotypic analysis of small intestinal leukocyte subsets in weaned pigs. We also evaluated levamisole as an immune response modifier (IRM and its adjuvanticity when given in the combination with the experimental vaccine. The pigs were parenterally immunized with either levamisole (at days -2, -1 and 0 or with levamisole and perorally given F18ac+ non-ETEC strain (at day 0, and challenged with F4ac+ ETEC strain 7 days later. At day 13 the pigs were euthanatized and sampled for immunohistological/histomorphometrical analyses. Lymphoid CD3+, CD45RA+, CD45RC+, CD21+, IgA+ and myeloid SWC3+ cell subsets were identified in jejunal and ileal epithelium, lamina propria and Peyer’s patches using the avidin-biotin complex method, and their numbers were determined by computer-assisted histomorphometry. Quantitative immunophenotypic analyses showed that levamisole treated pigs had highly increased numbers of jejunal CD3+, CD45RC+ and SWC3+ cells (p<0.05 as compared to those recorded in nontreated control pigs. In the ileum of these pigs we have recorded that only CD21+ cells were significantly increased (p<0.01. The pigs that were treated with levamisole adjuvanted experimental vaccine had significantly increased numbers of all tested cell subsets in both segments of the small intestine. It was concluded that levamisole adjuvanted F18ac+ non-ETEC vaccine was a requirement for the elicitation of protective gut immunity in this model; nonspecific immunization with levamisole was less effective, but confirmed its potential as an IRM.

  15. Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) post-vaccinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, a vaccine strain denominated T1/44 has been introduced to Ethiopia to prepare vaccines for field use. A total of 228 cattle were vaccinated with vaccines produced from this seed strain in three different zones of Ethiopia. Post - vaccinal reaction affected the vaccinated animals with over all attack rate of 1.02% (95% ...

  16. Ductile strain rates measurements reveal continental crust long-term deformation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P. H.; Sassier, C.; Gardien, V.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Any discussion on the long-term crustal rheology is hindered by our poor knowledge of deformation rates in the deep crust. These rates have only been estimated to be ≤10-15 and ≥10-13 s-1 in the "stable" and highly deforming zones respectively, and measured in a few peculiar cases. Because quartz ribbons are ubiquitous in continental shear zones, the quartz-strain-rate-metry (QRS) method, based on experimentally calibrated quartz piezometers and ductile flow laws, could provide deformation rates measurements in many geological contexts. However, the results are highly sensitive on the deformation temperature that is difficult to measure. Furthermore, results vary by three orders of magnitude depending on the chosen piezometer and rheological law. If recent technical progress allow measuring more precisely the deformation temperature, it is still not clear what is the most accurate piezometer - rheological law association. We solved that dilemma by comparing strain rates measured by the QRS method with a reference one measured with another method on the same outcrop of the Ailao Shan - Red River (ASRR) shear zone. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4 x10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons sampled in site C1 show large grains recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM), themselves recrystallized at lower temperature by sub-grain rotation (SGR). The mean recrystallized quartz grain size for the SGR event range between 74.0 and 79.3 μm. The associated stresses, measured with Shimizu (JSG, 2008) piezometer, range between 35.2 and 38.1 MPa. Conditions of deformation of P≈ 1.5 kbar and T≈ 430°C were inferred by combining several thermobarometers on quartz, such as TitaniQ, fluid inclusions microthermometry and crystallographic fabrics. The calculated strain rate with five flow laws and three piezometers range between 3

  17. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8

  18. Genetic differences between Tunisian camel and sheep strains of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus revealed by SSCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudni-M’rad M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ovine and dromedary Echinococcus granulosus isolates from Tunisia were identified as G1 and G6 strains based on polymorphism of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxydase CO1. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP was used in order to examine the genetic variation within and between Tunisian G1 and G6 strains and to estimate the extent of selfing. The dromedary isolates are genetically distinct from sheep isolates (high value of genetic variation between populations: Fst = 0.46. No significant deficiency in heterozygotes was found in sheep isolates, whereas heterozygote deficiency (suggesting selfing was found in a limited number of camel isolates.

  19. Effects of time-specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation overlays on prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum vaccination on digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, A M; Branton, S L; Collier, S D; Gerard, P D; Peebles, E D

    2009-05-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts-11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (ts-11MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays at 2 different age periods during lay on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens. In each trial, the following 4 treatments were utilized: sham vaccination at 10 wk of age, ts-11MG vaccination at 10 wk of age, ts-11MG at 10 wk of age overlaid by FMG inoculation at 22 wk of age, and ts-11MG at 10 wk of age overlaid by FMG at 45 wk of age. Necropsies were performed at the end of both trials (58 wk of age), using 2 birds from each of 4 replicate units per treatment, to observe treatment effects on the following parameters: liver weight, liver lipid and moisture concentrations, incidence of fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome, ovary weight, number of mature ovarian follicles, and the total and segmental weights, lengths, and histologies of the oviduct and small intestine. Treatments affected only vaginal length as a percentage of total oviduct length. Vaginas were relatively longer in hens that had only been vaccinated with ts-11MG at 10 wk in comparison to all the other treatment groups, including controls. Except for relative vaginal length, the digestive and reproductive organs of layers were not influenced by the ts-11MG and FMG treatment regimens imposed in this study. These results confirm that when coupled with FMG inoculations during lay, prelay ts-11MG vaccinations may be a practical substitute for prelay FMG inoculations for providing continual protection against field-strain M. gallisepticum infections in layers.

  20. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg (Arwen); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically

  1. Efficacy of marker vaccine candidate CP7 E2alf in piglets with maternally derived C-strain antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    2012-01-01

    Marker vaccines offer the possibility to differentiate classical swine fever (CSF) infected from CSF vaccinated animals based on serology and their implementation will ensure free trade with pigs. Therefore, new generations of promising marker vaccines have been developed, among them the chimeric...

  2. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    One alternative in the Bison remote vaccination environmental impact statement (EIS) for Yellowstone National Park includes inoculation of both calves and yearlings. Although RB51 vaccination of bison does protect against experimental challenge, it was unknown whether booster vaccination might enhan...

  3. Genetically modified rabies virus ERA strain is safe and induces long-lasting protective immune response in dogs after oral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Lei; Feng, Na; Wang, Xijun; Ge, Jinying; Wen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Weiye; Qin, Lide; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-09-01

    Oral immunization in free-roaming dogs is one of the most practical approaches to prevent rabies for developing countries. The safe, efficient and long-lasting protective oral rabies vaccine for dogs is highly sought. In this study, rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain wild-type (rERA) and a genetically modified type (rERAG333E) containing a mutation from arginine to glutamic acid at residue 333 of glycoprotein (G333E) were generated by reverse genetic. The recombinant virus rERAG333E retained growth properties of similar to the parent strain rERA in BHK-21 cell culture. The G333E mutation showed genetic stability during passage into neuroblastoma cells and in the brains of suckling mice and was significantly reduced the virulence of rERA in mice. rERAG333E was immunogenic in dogs by intramuscular inoculation. Mice orally vaccinated with rERAG333E induced strong and one year longer virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) to RABV, and were completely protected from challenge with lethal street virus at 12months after immunization. Dogs received oral vaccination with rERAG333E induced strong protective RABV VNA response, which lasted for over 3years, and moderate saliva RABV-specific IgA. Moreover, sizeable booster responses to RABV VNA were induced by a second oral dose 1year after the first dose. These results demonstrated that the genetically modified ERA vaccine strain has the potential to serve as a safe and efficient oral live vaccine against rabies in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary immunity and durable protection induced by the ID93/GLA-SE vaccine candidate against the hyper-virulent Korean Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Cho, Sang-Nae; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Shin, Sung Jae

    2016-04-27

    The majority of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates advanced to clinical trials have been evaluated preclinically using laboratory-adapted strains. However, it has been proposed that challenge with clinical isolates in preclinical vaccine testing could provide further and more practical validation. Here, we tested the ID93/GLA-SE TB vaccine candidate against the clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain K (Mtb K) belonging to the Beijing family, the most prevalent Mtb strain in South Korea. Mice immunized with ID93/GLA-SE exhibited a significant reduction in bacteria and reduced lung inflammation against Mtb K when compared to non-immunized controls. In addition, we analyzed the immune responses in the lungs of ID93/GLA-SE-immunized mice, and showed that ID93/GLA-SE was able to elicit sustained Th1-biased immune responses including antigen-specific multifunctional CD4(+) T cell co-producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 as well as a high magnitude of IFN-γ response for up to 10 weeks post-challenge. Notably, further investigation of T cell subsets in the lung following challenge showed remarkable generation of CD8(+) central memory T cells by ID93/GLA-SE-immunization. Our findings showed that ID93/GLA-SE vaccine confers a high level of robust protection against the hypervirulent Mtb Beijing infection which was characterized by pulmonary Th1-polarized T-cell immune responses. These findings may also provide relevant information for potential utility of this vaccine candidate in East-Asian countries where the Beijing genotype is highly prevalent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. RNA-Seq Analyses for Two Silkworm Strains Reveals Insight into Their Susceptibility and Resistance to Beauveria bassiana Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Xing

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The silkworm Bombyx mori is an economically important species. White muscardine caused by Beauveria bassiana is the main fungal disease in sericulture, and understanding the silkworm responses to B. bassiana infection is of particular interest. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in two silkworm strains Haoyue (HY, sensitive to B. bassiana and Kang 8 (K8, resistant to B. bassiana using an RNA-seq approach. For each strain, three biological replicates for immersion treatment, two replicates for injection treatment and three untreated controls were collected to generate 16 libraries for sequencing. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between treated samples and untreated controls, and between the two silkworm strains, were identified. DEGs and the enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways of the two strains exhibited an obvious difference. Several genes encoding cuticle proteins, serine proteinase inhibitors (SPI and antimicrobial peptides (AMP and the drug metabolism pathway involved in toxin detoxification were considered to be related to the resistance of K8 to B. bassiana. These results revealed insight into the resistance and susceptibility of two silkworm strains against B. bassiana infection and provided a roadmap for silkworm molecular breeding to enhance its resistance to B. bassiana.

  6. RNA-Seq Analyses for Two Silkworm Strains Reveals Insight into Their Susceptibility and Resistance to Beauveria bassiana Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dongxu; Yang, Qiong; Jiang, Liang; Li, Qingrong; Xiao, Yang; Ye, Mingqiang; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-10

    The silkworm Bombyx mori is an economically important species. White muscardine caused by Beauveria bassiana is the main fungal disease in sericulture, and understanding the silkworm responses to B. bassiana infection is of particular interest. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in two silkworm strains Haoyue (HY, sensitive to B. bassiana) and Kang 8 (K8, resistant to B. bassiana) using an RNA-seq approach. For each strain, three biological replicates for immersion treatment, two replicates for injection treatment and three untreated controls were collected to generate 16 libraries for sequencing. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between treated samples and untreated controls, and between the two silkworm strains, were identified. DEGs and the enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of the two strains exhibited an obvious difference. Several genes encoding cuticle proteins, serine proteinase inhibitors (SPI) and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) and the drug metabolism pathway involved in toxin detoxification were considered to be related to the resistance of K8 to B. bassiana. These results revealed insight into the resistance and susceptibility of two silkworm strains against B. bassiana infection and provided a roadmap for silkworm molecular breeding to enhance its resistance to B. bassiana.

  7. Maternal mismatches in farmed tilapia strains (Oreochromis spp.) in the Philippines as revealed by mitochondrial COI gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, June Feliciano F; Ventolero, Minerva Fatimae H; Santos, Mudjekeewis D

    2017-07-01

    The introduction of genetically enhanced tilapia has significantly boosted the performance of Philippine aquaculture industry. While enhanced strains contribute to the increase in tilapia production, genetic characterization of present tilapia stocks is critical to maintain their quality and to ensure the genetic gains are sustained. To understand and determine the genetic relationship of the genetically enhanced strains produced in the Philippines, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene using DNA barcoding approach was analyzed. Specimens representing 10 genetically enhanced strains (GIFT, FaST, GET-EXCEL, GST, SST, COLD, YY-male, GMT, Molobicus, and BEST), three red tilapia (Taiwan red, Florida red, and FAC-red), and two pure lines (initially identified as O. aureus and O. spilurus) were collected, sequenced, and identified using DNA barcoding. Results revealed that farmed tilapias consisted of four different Oreochromis species. As expected, COI could not distinguish individuals at the strain level but surprisingly, mismatch between the species of maternal origin and present-day offspring was observed. This particular result may pose a question on the genetic purity and integrity of the strains being distributed to farmers and suggests a re-evaluation of the effectiveness of major tilapia breeding centers in maintaining their stocks.

  8. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  9. Extensive genetic diversity and substructuring among zebrafish strains revealed through copy number variant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kim H.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Chong, Wilson W. S.; Chen, Jin Yun Helen; Yoo, Paulo; David, Sthuthi; Peterson, Samuel M.; Raj, Towfique; Choy, Kwong Wai; Stranger, Barbara E.; Williamson, Robin E.; Zon, Leonard I.; Freeman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) represent a substantial source of genomic variation in vertebrates and have been associated with numerous human diseases. Despite this, the extent of CNVs in the zebrafish, an important model for human disease, remains unknown. Using 80 zebrafish genomes, representing three commonly used laboratory strains and one native population, we constructed a genome-wide, high-resolution CNV map for the zebrafish comprising 6,080 CNV elements and encompassing 14.6% of the zebrafish reference genome. This amount of copy number variation is four times that previously observed in other vertebrates, including humans. Moreover, 69% of the CNV elements exhibited strain specificity, with the highest number observed for Tubingen. This variation likely arose, in part, from Tubingen's large founding size and composite population origin. Additional population genetic studies also provided important insight into the origins and substructure of these commonly used laboratory strains. This extensive variation among and within zebrafish strains may have functional effects that impact phenotype and, if not properly addressed, such extensive levels of germ-line variation and population substructure in this commonly used model organism can potentially confound studies intended for translation to human diseases. PMID:22203992

  10. The complete genome sequence of Dickeya zeae EC1 reveals substantial divergence from other Dickeya strains and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianuan; Cheng, Yingying; Lv, Mingfa; Liao, Lisheng; Chen, Yufan; Gu, Yanfang; Liu, Shiyin; Jiang, Zide; Xiong, Yuanyan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2015-08-04

    Dickeya zeae is a bacterial species that infects monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Two antibiotic-like phytotoxins named zeamine and zeamine II were reported to play an important role in rice seed germination, and two genes associated with zeamines production, i.e., zmsA and zmsK, have been thoroughly characterized. However, other virulence factors and its molecular mechanisms of host specificity and pathogenesis are hardly known. The complete genome of D. zeae strain EC1 isolated from diseased rice plants was sequenced, annotated, and compared with the genomes of other Dickeya spp.. The pathogen contains a chromosome of 4,532,364 bp with 4,154 predicted protein-coding genes. Comparative genomics analysis indicates that D. zeae EC1 is most co-linear with D. chrysanthemi Ech1591, most conserved with D. zeae Ech586 and least similar to D. paradisiaca Ech703. Substantial genomic rearrangement was revealed by comparing EC1 with Ech586 and Ech703. Most virulence genes were well-conserved in Dickeya strains except Ech703. Significantly, the zms gene cluster involved in biosynthesis of zeamines, which were shown previously as key virulence determinants, is present in D. zeae strains isolated from rice, and some D. solani strains, but absent in other Dickeya species and the D. zeae strains isolated from other plants or sources. In addition, a DNA fragment containing 9 genes associated with fatty acid biosynthesis was found inserted in the fli gene cluster encoding flagellar biosynthesis of strain EC1 and other two rice isolates but not in other strains. This gene cluster shares a high protein similarity to the fatty acid genes from Pantoea ananatis. Our findings delineate the genetic background of D. zeae EC1, which infects both dicotyledons and monocotyledons, and suggest that D. zeae strains isolated from rice could be grouped into a distinct pathovar, i.e., D. zeae subsp. oryzae. In addition, the results of this study also unveiled that the zms gene cluster presented in

  11. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C; Rhyan, Jack C; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P; Hennager, Steven G; Pavuk, Alana A; Sprino, Phillip J; Boyle, Stephen M; Berrier, Randall J; Salman, Mo D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk.

  12. Vaccination of elk (Cervus canadensis with Brucella abortus strain RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase genes does not induce adequate protection against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline eNol

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosytransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk

  13. Comparison of the Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis Isolates Circulating in Saint Petersburg between 1998 and 2000 with Russian Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourova, Natacha; Caro, Valérie; Weber, Christian; Thiberge, Sabine; Chuprinina, Raisa; Tseneva, Galina; Guiso, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis isolates circulating in Saint Petersburg that were collected between 1998 and 2000 and compared them with isolates collected 40 years ago and Russian vaccine strains. The analysis involved serotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA after digestion with XbaI and SpeI, and sequencing of the ptxS1 and prn genes, which encode the S1 subunit of the pertussis toxin and the major adhesin pertactin, respectively. The Russian isolates were classified in five of the six pulsed-field gel electrophoresis groups identified in other European countries. The B. pertussis isolates currently circulating in Saint Petersburg differed from the Russian whole-cell vaccine strains and the isolates collected in the prevaccine era. However, their repartition in the major pulsed-field gel electrophoresis groups was slightly different from that of isolates collected in countries that have had a high level of vaccine coverage for a long time, probably because the level of vaccine coverage in Saint Petersburg has increased only recently, after decreasing until the early 1990s. Most of the B. parapertussis isolates studied were similar to those circulating in France. However, some variants were observed, perhaps because B. parapertussis infections are more common in children in this area. PMID:12904379

  14. High prevalence of G12P[8] rotavirus strains in Rio Branco, Acre, Western Amazon, in the post-rotavirus vaccine introduction period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Mayara A O; Pinheiro, Helder H C; Silva, Rita S U; Linhares, Alexandre C; Silva, Luciana D; Gabbay, Yvone B; Silva, Mônica C M; Loureiro, Edvaldo C B; Soares, Luana S; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to provide a molecular characterization of circulating rotavirus (RVA) strains in Rio Branco, Acre, in the post-rotavirus vaccination period, particularly with regard to the emerging, increasingly prevalent G12P[8] genotype. A total of 488 fecal specimens from diarrheic and non-diarrheic children were obtained between January and December 2012. RVA detection was initially performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, followed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. RVA was detected in 18.3% (44/241) of the children with acute diarrhea and in 1.2% (3/247) of the non-diarrheic children (P fever (83.3%, 10/12) and vomiting (66.7%, 8/12). Most of the cases occurred in August (58.3%, 7/12), 75% (9/12) of which having received the full vaccination scheme with Rotarix™. For the first time G12 was reported at relative high prevalence in Brazil. Our findings warrant further monitoring studies on the molecular characterization of circulating RVA strains after rotavirus vaccine introduction in Brazil and elsewhere, since the occurrence of either unusual our emerging genotypes may pose a challenge to vaccination strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Bioluminescence Imaging of Colonization and Clearance Dynamics of Brucella Suis Vaccine Strain S2 in Mice and Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiwen; Li, Zhiping; Li, Bo; Chi, Hang; Li, Jiakuan; Fan, Hongchao; Yao, Ruizhi; Li, Qianxue; Dong, Xiaolin; Chen, Man; Qu, Han; Wang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Weicun; Wang, Yutian; Sun, Yu; Sun, Rui; Qian, Jun; Xia, Zhiping

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a plasmid-based lux bio-reporter for use to obtain in vivo images of Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 (B.suis S2) infection with high resolution and good definition. The pBBR-lux (pBBR1MCS-2-lxCDABE) plasmid that carries the luxCDABE operon was introduced into B. suis S2 by electroporation yielding B. suis S2-lux. The spatial and temporal transit of B. suis S2 in mice and guinea pigs was monitored by bioluminescence imaging. The plasmid pBBR-lux is stable in vivo and does not appear to impact the virulence or growth of bacteria. This sensitive luciferase reporter could represent B. suis S2 survival in real time. B. suis S2 mainly colonized the lungs, liver, spleen, and uterus in mice and guinea pigs as demonstrated by bioluminescence imaging. The plasmid-based lux bioreporter strategy can be used to obtain high resolution in vivo images of B. suis S2 infection in mice and guinea pigs.

  16. [COLD-ADAPTED A/KRASNODAR/101/35/59 (H2N2) STRAIN--A PROMISING STRAIN-DONOR OF ATTENUATION FOR PROCURATION OF LIVE INFLUENZA VACCINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markushin, S G; Tsfasman, T M; Terekhov, A V; Lisovskaya, K V; Akopova, I I

    2015-01-01

    Study of ts, ca, att phenotype, immunogenicity and protective effectiveness of reassortants obtained by a way of recombination of a new influenza cold-adapted (ca) strain donor of attenuation A/Krasnodar/101/35/59 (H2N2) and virulent strain of influenza virus. Viruses were used: ca strain A/Krasnodar/101/35.59 (H2N2), virulent strains: A/Kumamoto/102/02 (H3N2) and A/Bern/07/95. For determination of ts and ca phenotype, titration of viruses in chicken embryos was carried out simultaneously at optimal, decreased and increased temperature. Protective effect of immunization was evaluated during intranasal infection of mice with a virulent strain of influenza virus. All the obtained reassortants possessed 6 internal genes from strain-donor of attenuation and 2 genes, coding HA and NA-proteins from virulent strains. Ca reassortants were characterized by ts and ca phenotype, had antigenic specificity and good immunogenicity, had high protective effectiveness. The data obtained indicate on the perspectiveness of ca strain A/Krasnodar/101/35/59 (H2N2)as a donor of attenuation for live influenza vaccines.

  17. [Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of Bordetella pertussis strains collected in the Czech Republic in 1967-2015: spread of a variant adapted to the population with a high vaccination coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lžičařová, D; Zavadilová, J; Musílek, M; Jandová, Z; Křížová, P; Fabiánová, K

    To perform multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of B. pertussis strains from the collection of the National Reference Laboratory for Diphtheria and Pertussis (NRL/DIPE), National Institute of Public Health (NIPH), Prague. The study strains were isolated from clinical specimens collected mostly in the Czech Republic over a nearly 50-year period from 1967 to 2015 (June). The isolates from three periods characterized by different vaccination strategies and trends in pertussis are compared for genetic diversity and distribution of MLVA types (MT). Based on the results obtained, the suitability for use of MLVA in the analysis of epidemic outbreaks of B. pertussis in the Czech Republic is considered. DNA samples extracted from B. pertussis strains included in the present study were examined by MLVA using the standard protocol. Data were processed by means of the eBURST algorithm and the calculation of the Simpson diversity index (DI) was used for the statistical analysis. Data were analyzed as a whole and also separately for strains from the three periods: 1967-1980, 1990-2007, and 2008-2015 (June). Fourteen different MT were detected in the study strains, with three of them not being reported before. The most common MTs were MT27 and MT29. MT29 was predominant in 1967-1980 while MT27 was the most prevalent in 1990-2007 and 2008-2015 (June). The DI was the lowest (0.49) in 2008-2015 (June), and comparably higher DIs were calculated for the two previous periods (i.e. 0.667 for 1967-1980 and 0.654 for 1990-2007). MLVA revealed a decrease in genetic diversity and shifts in MT distribution of B. pertussis strains isolated from clinical specimens in the Czech Republic from 1967 to 2015 (June). These shifts in the Czech Republic can be characterized as a progressive increase in global MTs at the expense of the locally unique ones. The most common MT, similarly to other geographical areas with long-term high vaccination coverage, is MT27. The results of

  18. An Inducible Operon Is Involved in Inulin Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum Strains, as Revealed by Comparative Proteogenomics and Metabolic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntin, Nirunya; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, François P; Paulin, Lars; Boeren, Sjef; Shetty, Sudarshan A; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-01-15

    The draft genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Asian fermented foods, infant feces, and shrimp intestines were sequenced and compared to those of well-studied strains. Among 28 strains of L. plantarum, variations in the genomic features involved in ecological adaptation were elucidated. The genome sizes ranged from approximately 3.1 to 3.5 Mb, of which about 2,932 to 3,345 protein-coding sequences (CDS) were predicted. The food-derived isolates contained a higher number of carbohydrate metabolism-associated genes than those from infant feces. This observation correlated to their phenotypic carbohydrate metabolic profile, indicating their ability to metabolize the largest range of sugars. Surprisingly, two strains (P14 and P76) isolated from fermented fish utilized inulin. β-Fructosidase, the inulin-degrading enzyme, was detected in the supernatants and cell wall extracts of both strains. No activity was observed in the cytoplasmic fraction, indicating that this key enzyme was either membrane-bound or extracellularly secreted. From genomic mining analysis, a predicted inulin operon of fosRABCDXE, which encodes β-fructosidase and many fructose transporting proteins, was found within the genomes of strains P14 and P76. Moreover, pts1BCA genes, encoding sucrose-specific IIBCA components involved in sucrose transport, were also identified. The proteomic analysis revealed the mechanism and functional characteristic of the fosRABCDXE operon involved in the inulin utilization of L. plantarum The expression levels of the fos operon and pst genes were upregulated at mid-log phase. FosE and the LPXTG-motif cell wall anchored β-fructosidase were induced to a high abundance when inulin was present as a carbon source. Inulin is a long-chain carbohydrate that may act as a prebiotic, which provides many health benefits to the host by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria in the colon. While certain lactobacilli can catabolize

  19. Development and evaluation of a novel vaccine against prevalent invasive multi-drug resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab H. Bahy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen that causes serious invasive infections, such as septicemia, meningitis and pneumonia in addition to mild upper respiratory tract infections. Protection from pneumococcal diseases is thought to be mediated mainly by serotype-specific antibodies to capsular antigens. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine consists of sugars (polysaccharides from the capsule of the bacterium S. pneumoniae that are conjugated to a carrier protein. Three pneumococcal conjugated vaccines, each directed against a group of serotypes, are registered in Egypt; however, local vaccine production is required to cover the most prevalent serotypes. In this work, capsular polysaccharide from the most current and prevalent serotypes in Egypt were extracted, purified and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA. The polysaccharide protein conjugate was purified through ultrafiltration technique and molecular size distribution was compared to an available vaccine. The immunogenicity of the prepared vaccine was examined via two methods: First, by measuring the levels of the elicited antibodies in the sera of the vaccinated mice; second, by challenging the vaccinated groups of mice with approximately 107 CFU of each specific serotype and determining the degree of protection the developled vaccine offers. Our results show that the developed conjugated capsular polysaccharide vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in mice. This finding illustrates the importance of tracking the most recent and predominant peneumococcal serotypes to generate effective vaccines, instead of using expensive imported vaccines with large number of serotypes which might not be even present in the community.

  20. Immunologic responses of bison to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51: comparison of parenteral to ballistic delivery via compressed pellets or photopolymerized hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Steven C; Christie, R J; Grainger, D W; Stoffregen, W S

    2006-02-27

    This study compared responses of bison calves to 10(10)CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) delivered by parenteral or ballistic methods. Two types of biobullet payloads were evaluated; compacted SRB51 pellets or SRB51 encapsulated in photopolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels. Bison were vaccinated with saline, parenteral SRB51 alone, or in combination with Spirovac, or ballistically with compressed SRB51 or hydrogel biobullets. Bison parenterally vaccinated with SRB51 had greater (P<0.05) immunologic responses when compared to control bison. Co-administration of Spirovac as an adjuvant did not influence immunologic responses. As compared to compressed SRB51 biobullets, ballistic vaccination with hydrogel biobullets increased cellular immune responses at some sampling times. Our data suggest that hydrogel formulations of SRB51 may be a superior alternative to compressed SRB51 tablets for ballistic vaccination of bison. Although preliminary, data suggests that immunologic responses of bison to SRB51 hydrogel bullets are similar to responses after parenteral vaccination with SRB51.