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Sample records for vaccine safely induces

  1. The novel tuberculosis vaccine, AERAS-402, is safe in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG, and induces dose-dependent CD4 and CD8T cell responses.

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    Kagina, Benjamin M N; Tameris, Michele D; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hatherill, Mark; Abel, Brian; Hussey, Gregory D; Scriba, Thomas J; Mahomed, Hassan; Sadoff, Jerald C; Hanekom, Willem A; Mansoor, Nazma; Hughes, Jane; de Kock, Marwou; Whatney, Wendy; Africa, Hadn; Krohn, Colleen; Veldsman, Ashley; Kany, Angelique Luabeya Kany; Douoguih, Macaya; Pau, Maria Grazia; Hendriks, Jenny; McClainc, Bruce; Benko, Jacqueline; Snowden, Margaret A; Hokey, David A

    2014-10-14

    Efforts to reduce risk of tuberculosis disease in children include development of effective vaccines. Our aim was to test safety and immunogenicity of the new adenovirus 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine candidate AERAS-402 in infants, administered as a boost following a prime with the Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine. In a phase 1 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial, BCG-vaccinated infants aged 6-9 months were sequentially assigned to four study groups, then randomized to receive an increasing dose-strength of AERAS-402, or placebo. The highest dose group received a second dose of vaccine or placebo 56 days after the first. The primary study outcome was safety. Whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assessed immunogenicity. Forty-two infants received AERAS-402 and 15 infants received placebo. During follow-up of 182 days, an acceptable safety profile was shown with no serious adverse events or discontinuations related to the vaccine. AERAS-402 induced a specific T cell response. A single dose of AERAS-402 induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing single IFN-γ whereas two doses induced CD4T cells predominantly expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 together. CD8T cells were induced and were more likely to be present after 2 doses of AERAS-402. AERAS-402 was safe and immunogenic in healthy infants previously vaccinated with BCG at birth. Administration of the highest dose twice may be the most optimal vaccination strategy, based on the induced immunity. Multiple differences in T cell responses when infants are compared with adults vaccinated with AERAS-402, in the same setting and using the same whole blood intracellular cytokine assay, suggest specific strategies may be important for vaccination for each population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivated Eyedrop Influenza Vaccine Adjuvanted with Poly(I:C Is Safe and Effective for Inducing Protective Systemic and Mucosal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Do Kim

    Full Text Available The eye route has been evaluated as an efficient vaccine delivery routes. However, in order to induce sufficient antibody production with inactivated vaccine, testing of the safety and efficacy of the use of inactivated antigen plus adjuvant is needed. Here, we assessed various types of adjuvants in eyedrop as an anti-influenza serum and mucosal Ab production-enhancer in BALB/c mice. Among the adjuvants, poly (I:C showed as much enhancement in antigen-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody production as cholera toxin (CT after vaccinations with trivalent hemagglutinin-subunits or split H1N1 vaccine antigen in mice. Vaccination with split H1N1 eyedrop vaccine antigen plus poly(I:C showed a similar or slightly lower efficacy in inducing antibody production than intranasal vaccination; the eyedrop vaccine-induced immunity was enough to protect mice from lethal homologous influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1 virus challenge. Additionally, ocular inoculation with poly(I:C plus vaccine antigen generated no signs of inflammation within 24 hours: no increases in the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines nor in the infiltration of mononuclear cells to administration sites. In contrast, CT administration induced increased expression of IL-6 cytokine mRNA and mononuclear cell infiltration in the conjunctiva within 24 hours of vaccination. Moreover, inoculated visualizing materials by eyedrop did not contaminate the surface of the olfactory bulb in mice; meanwhile, intranasally administered materials defiled the surface of the brain. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the use of eyedrop inactivated influenza vaccine plus poly(I:C is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine strategy for inducing protective anti-influenza immunity.

  3. Need for a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus infection

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    Joo-Young Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of severe respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children worldwide. Despite its importance as a respiratory pathogen, there is currently no licensed vaccine for HRSV. Following failure of the initial trial of formalin-inactivated virus particle vaccine, continuous efforts have been made for the development of safe and efficacious vaccines against HRSV. However, several obstacles persist that delay the development of HRSV vaccine, such as the immature immune system of newborn infants and the possible Th2-biased immune responses leading to subsequent vaccine-enhanced diseases. Many HRSV vaccine strategies are currently being developed and evaluated, including live-attenuated viruses, subunit-based, and vector-based candidates. In this review, the current HRSV vaccines are overviewed and the safety issues regarding asthma and vaccine-induced pathology are discussed.

  4. Aluminum vaccine adjuvants: are they safe?

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    Tomljenovic, L; Shaw, C A

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum is an experimentally demonstrated neurotoxin and the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant. Despite almost 90 years of widespread use of aluminum adjuvants, medical science's understanding about their mechanisms of action is still remarkably poor. There is also a concerning scarcity of data on toxicology and pharmacokinetics of these compounds. In spite of this, the notion that aluminum in vaccines is safe appears to be widely accepted. Experimental research, however, clearly shows that aluminum adjuvants have a potential to induce serious immunological disorders in humans. In particular, aluminum in adjuvant form carries a risk for autoimmunity, long-term brain inflammation and associated neurological complications and may thus have profound and widespread adverse health consequences. In our opinion, the possibility that vaccine benefits may have been overrated and the risk of potential adverse effects underestimated, has not been rigorously evaluated in the medical and scientific community. We hope that the present paper will provide a framework for a much needed and long overdue assessment of this highly contentious medical issue.

  5. Genetically modified rabies virus ERA strain is safe and induces long-lasting protective immune response in dogs after oral vaccination.

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    Shuai, Lei; Feng, Na; Wang, Xijun; Ge, Jinying; Wen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Weiye; Qin, Lide; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-09-01

    Oral immunization in free-roaming dogs is one of the most practical approaches to prevent rabies for developing countries. The safe, efficient and long-lasting protective oral rabies vaccine for dogs is highly sought. In this study, rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain wild-type (rERA) and a genetically modified type (rERAG333E) containing a mutation from arginine to glutamic acid at residue 333 of glycoprotein (G333E) were generated by reverse genetic. The recombinant virus rERAG333E retained growth properties of similar to the parent strain rERA in BHK-21 cell culture. The G333E mutation showed genetic stability during passage into neuroblastoma cells and in the brains of suckling mice and was significantly reduced the virulence of rERA in mice. rERAG333E was immunogenic in dogs by intramuscular inoculation. Mice orally vaccinated with rERAG333E induced strong and one year longer virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) to RABV, and were completely protected from challenge with lethal street virus at 12months after immunization. Dogs received oral vaccination with rERAG333E induced strong protective RABV VNA response, which lasted for over 3years, and moderate saliva RABV-specific IgA. Moreover, sizeable booster responses to RABV VNA were induced by a second oral dose 1year after the first dose. These results demonstrated that the genetically modified ERA vaccine strain has the potential to serve as a safe and efficient oral live vaccine against rabies in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Acellular pertussis vaccines--safe alternative].

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    Szenborn, L; Saraczyńska, E

    2000-09-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the safety of various acellular vaccines (ACV) TripAcel, PacMarieux--Pasteur Merieux, Infanrix-SKB, Acel-P-Lederle and DTaP-SSI in 355 children, aged 7 weeks to 7 years, dismissed from immunization against pertussis with a whole-cell vaccine. All ACV contained varying concentrations of pertussis toxin; some vaccines contained filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin and/or agglutinogens. The indication of using ACV were adverse effects following immunization (AEFI) after wP vaccine (n = 29) and others reasons, mostly underlying perinatal and CNS pathology (n = 277). The 564 doses of ACV were given in 4 to 1 doses. Reaction forms and clinical follow-up were uniform throughout the study. Serious AEFI cases were not observed not only among children with CNS damage, but also in children with previous AEFI after DTwP vaccine. All ACV recipients consistently reported low rates of reactions in the 48 hours following immunization. We concluded that all investigated ACV were safe and well tolerated even in the group of high-risk children.

  7. Safe handling of vaccines: the rewards of rigorous routines.

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    Hefti, Kelly; David, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    A recent report published by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) entitled Vaccines for Children Program: Vulnerabilities in Vaccine Management has brought to public awareness the need for increased attention to safe handling of vaccines. The maximum benefit of receiving vaccines for vaccine-preventable diseases can only be attained when we ensure that safe storage and handling occurs through strict adherence to the vaccine cold chain. This compliance can best be accomplished by identifying a vaccine coordinator that is intimately familiar with the components of the vaccine cold chain and provides the necessary oversight to ensure that all links in the chain are maintained. Utilization of helpful resources, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) resources related to safe handling of vaccines, is central to a well defined process for vaccine handling. This adherence provides reassurance, both to patients receiving vaccine and providers administering it, that the safest and most effective vaccine is being delivered.

  8. Recombinant vaccinia DIs expressing simian immunodeficiency virus gag and pol in mammalian cells induces efficient cellular immunity as a safe immunodeficiency virus vaccine candidate.

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    Okamura, Tomotaka; Someya, Kenji; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    A highly attenuated vaccinia virus substrain of Dairen-I (DIs) shows promise as a candidate vector for eliciting positive immunity against immune deficiency virus. DIs was randomly obtained by serial 1-day egg passages of a chorioarantoic membrane-adapted Dairen strain (DIE), resulting in substantial genomic deletion, including various genes regulating the virus-host-range. To investigate the impact of that deletion and of the subsequent insertion of a foreign gene into that region of DIs on the ability of the DIs recombinant to induce antigen-specific immunity, we generated a recombinant vaccinia DIs expressing fulllength gag and pol genes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (rDIsSIV gag/pol) and studied the biological and immunological characteristics of the recombinant natural mutant. The rDIsSIV gag/pol developed a tiny plaque on the chick embryo fibroblast (CEF). Viral particles of rDIsSIV gag/pol as well as SIV Gag-like particles were electromicroscopically detected in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recombinant DIs strain grows well in CEF cells but not in mammalian cells. While rDIsSIV gag/pol produces SIV proteins in mammalian HeLa and CV-1 cells, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA) expressing SIV gag and pol genes (MVA/SIV239 gag/pol) clearly replicates in HeLa and CV-1 cell lines under synchronized growth conditions and produces the SIV protein in all cell lines. Moreover, intradermal administration of rDIsSIV gag/pol or of MVA/SIV239 gag/pol elicited similar levels of IFN-gamma spot-forming cells specific for SIV Gag. If the non-productive infection characteristically induced by recombinant DIs is sufficient to trigger immune induction, as we believe it is, then a human immunodeficiency virus vaccine employing the DIs recombinant would have the twin advantages of being both effective and safe.

  9. Is HPV vaccination in pregnancy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zwol, Ulla Bonde; Joergensen, J. S.; Lamont, R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of doses of HPV vaccine have been administered globally. Inadvertent administration of HPV vaccine during pregnancy occurs given that the main recipients of the vaccine are fertile young women, who might be unaware of their pregnancy at the time of their vaccination. To investigate...... the subject of HPV vaccine and pregnancy , the databases of PubMed and Embase were searched to find the relevant literature published in English within the last 10 y. Most of the evidence pertaining to fetal adverse events following HPV vaccination relates to spontaneous miscarriage. None of the relevant...... studies found any significantly increased rate of spontaneous abortion in the overall analyses. There was no indication of other HPV vaccine-associated adverse events in pregnancy or immediately post-conception. © 2016 Taylor & Francis....

  10. Vaccination for safe travel to India.

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    Mehta, Bharti; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Kumar, Vijay; Singh Choudhary, Satvinder

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide more than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year. India is one of the favorite tourist destinations around the world. International travel exposes travelers to a range of health risks. Traveling to India possess a threat to travelers with waterborne diseases like bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever; vector borne diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, and malaria; animal contact disease like rabies. Furthermore diseases spreading through behavior aspects cannot be ruled out hence posing a risk for hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C as well. Hence, before travel the travelers are advised about the risk of disease in the country or countries they plan to visit and the steps to be taken to prevent illness. Vaccination offers the possibility of avoiding a number of infectious diseases that may be countered abroad. There is no single vaccination schedule that fits all travelers. Each schedule must be individualized according to the traveler's previous immunizations, countries to be visited, type and duration of travel, and the amount of time available before departure.

  11. Conditional live virus as a novel approach towards a safe live attenuated HIV vaccine

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    Das, Atze T.; Zhou, Xue; Vink, Monique; Klaver, Bep; Berkhout, Ben

    2002-01-01

    To control the worldwide spread of HIV, a safe and effective prophylactic vaccine is urgently needed. Studies with the simian immunodeficiency virus demonstrated that a live attenuated virus can be effective as a vaccine, but serious concerns about the safety of such a vaccine virus have arisen. We

  12. MMR vaccination of children with egg allergy is safe

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    Andersen, Dorthe Vestergård; Jørgensen, Inger Merete

    2013-01-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination is part of the Danish Childhood Vaccination Programme. It is known that children may react with anaphylaxis to MMR vaccines containing traces of egg protein. In Denmark, national clinical guidelines recommend that children with egg allergy be referred...... to vaccination at a paediatric ward despite changed recommendations in other countries. The purpose of this study was to determine whether children with egg allergy presented with anaphylactic/allergic reactions to MMR vaccination and to discuss whether Danish recommendations should be upheld....

  13. Mucosal immune responses induced by transcutaneous vaccines.

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    Lawson, L B; Clements, J D; Freytag, L C

    2012-01-01

    The skin has been investigated as a site for vaccine delivery only since the late 1990s. However, much has been discovered about the cell populations that reside in the skin, their active role in immune responses, and the fate of trans- cutaneously applied antigens. Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a safe, effective means of inducing immune responses against a number of pathogens. One of the most notable benefits of TCI is the induction of immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. This chapter focuses on the transport of antigen into and beyond intact skin, the cutaneous sentinel cell populations that play a role in TCI, and the types of mucosal immune responses that have been generated. A number of in vivo studies in murine models have provided information about the broad responses induced by TCI. Cellular and humoral responses and protection against challenge have been noted in the gastrointestinal, reproductive, and respiratory tracts. Clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of this vaccine delivery route in humans. As with other routes of immunization, the type of vaccine formulation and choice of adjuvant may be critical for achieving appropriate responses and can be tailored to activate specific immune-responsive cells in the skin to increase the efficacy of TCI against mucosal pathogens.

  14. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

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    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  15. Plant-made vaccines against West Nile virus are potent, safe, and economically feasible.

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    Chen, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    The threat of West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics with increasingly severe neuroinvasive infections demands the development and licensing of effective vaccines. To date, vaccine candidates based on inactivated, live-attenuated, or chimeric virus, and viral DNA and WNV protein subunits have been developed. Some have been approved for veterinary use or are under clinical investigation, yet no vaccine has been licensed for human use. Reaching the milestone of a commercialized human vaccine, however, may largely depend on the economics of vaccine production. Analysis suggests that currently only novel low-cost production technologies would allow vaccination to outcompete the cost of surveillance and clinical treatment. Here, we review progress using plants to address the economic challenges of WNV vaccine production. The advantages of plants as hosts for vaccine production in cost, speed and scalability, especially those of viral vector-based transient expression systems, are discussed. The progress in developing WNV subunit vaccines in plants is reviewed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, and immunogenicity in animal models. The development of vaccines based on enveloped and non-enveloped virus-like particles is also discussed. These advancements suggest that plants may provide a production platform that offers potent, safe and affordable human vaccines against WNV. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The quest for a safe and effective canine distemper virus vaccine for black-footed ferrets

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    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.; Williams, Elizabeth S.; Becerra, Victor M.

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a systemic disease that is highly virulent to mustelids and other carnivore (Order Carnivora) species and is found worldwide. Endemic canine distemper in wild and domestic carnivores in the United States has made reintroduction of endangered black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) difficult in the absence of safe and effective CDV vaccines and vaccination practices. Toward this end, researchers have explored appropriate animal models and vaccine preparations in highly susceptible species. Published studies involving domestic ferrets (M. putorius furo) using Galaxy-D® and evaluating a recombinant canarypox-vectored vaccine for oral administration are reviewed. In addition, we present new findings in domestic and black-footed ferrets and Siberian polecats (M. eversmannii) that have extended our understanding of CDV in the black-footed ferret and other at-risk carnivore species. Original research presented here includes trials that determined an effective challenge dose (by route) of virulent CDV in domestic ferrets and Siberian polecats; the low likelihood of collateral vaccination with Galaxy-D; the adverse effect of modified-live virus boostering in black-footed ferrets receiving killed vaccine previously and the response of Siberian polecats receiving canarypoxvectored recombinant CDV vaccine (reCDV); the absence of an effect of reCDV vaccination on conception, pregnancy, and neonatal growth in Siberian polecats; and the apparent inefficacy of active reCDV vaccination during the period of passive immunity in young Siberian polecats. In the final section, we discuss emerging concerns and avenues for disease intervention that may present new opportunities to solve problems in vaccine safety, vaccine availability, field vaccine delivery, and other therapeutic modalities.

  17. A safe vaccine (DV-STM-07) against Salmonella infection prevents abortion and confers protective immunity to the pregnant and new born mice.

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    Negi, Vidya Devi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan G; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2010-02-10

    Pregnancy is a transient immuno-compromised condition which has evolved to avoid the immune rejection of the fetus by the maternal immune system. The altered immune response of the pregnant female leads to increased susceptibility to invading pathogens, resulting in abortion and congenital defects of the fetus and a subnormal response to vaccination. Active vaccination during pregnancy may lead to abortion induced by heightened cell mediated immune response. In this study, we have administered the highly attenuated vaccine strain DeltapmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07) in female mice before the onset of pregnancy and followed the immune reaction against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium in pregnant mice. Here we demonstrate that DV-STM-07 vaccine gives protection against Salmonella in pregnant mice and also prevents Salmonella induced abortion. This protection is conferred by directing the immune response towards Th2 activation and Th1 suppression. The low Th1 response prevents abortion. The use of live attenuated vaccine just before pregnancy carries the risk of transmission to the fetus. We have shown that this vaccine is safe as the vaccine strain is quickly eliminated from the mother and is not transmitted to the fetus. This vaccine also confers immunity to the new born mice of vaccinated mothers. Since there is no evidence of the vaccine candidate reaching the new born mice, we hypothesize that it may be due to trans-colostral transfer of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies. These results suggest that our vaccine DV-STM-07 can be very useful in preventing abortion in the pregnant individuals and confer immunity to the new born. Since there are no such vaccine candidates which can be given to the new born and to the pregnant women, this vaccine holds a very bright future to combat Salmonella induced pregnancy loss.

  18. A safe vaccine (DV-STM-07 against Salmonella infection prevents abortion and confers protective immunity to the pregnant and new born mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Devi Negi

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a transient immuno-compromised condition which has evolved to avoid the immune rejection of the fetus by the maternal immune system. The altered immune response of the pregnant female leads to increased susceptibility to invading pathogens, resulting in abortion and congenital defects of the fetus and a subnormal response to vaccination. Active vaccination during pregnancy may lead to abortion induced by heightened cell mediated immune response. In this study, we have administered the highly attenuated vaccine strain DeltapmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07 in female mice before the onset of pregnancy and followed the immune reaction against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium in pregnant mice. Here we demonstrate that DV-STM-07 vaccine gives protection against Salmonella in pregnant mice and also prevents Salmonella induced abortion. This protection is conferred by directing the immune response towards Th2 activation and Th1 suppression. The low Th1 response prevents abortion. The use of live attenuated vaccine just before pregnancy carries the risk of transmission to the fetus. We have shown that this vaccine is safe as the vaccine strain is quickly eliminated from the mother and is not transmitted to the fetus. This vaccine also confers immunity to the new born mice of vaccinated mothers. Since there is no evidence of the vaccine candidate reaching the new born mice, we hypothesize that it may be due to trans-colostral transfer of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies. These results suggest that our vaccine DV-STM-07 can be very useful in preventing abortion in the pregnant individuals and confer immunity to the new born. Since there are no such vaccine candidates which can be given to the new born and to the pregnant women, this vaccine holds a very bright future to combat Salmonella induced pregnancy loss.

  19. Conditional virus replication as an approach to a safe live attenuated human immunodeficiency virus vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Verhoef, Koen; Marzio, Giuseppe; Klaver, Bep; Vink, Monique; Zhou, Xue; Das, Atze T.

    2002-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts, no safe and effective vaccine has been developed for the prophylaxis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Studies with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model demonstrated that live attenuated viruses are the most

  20. Lack of evidence for safe vaccination with the Muguga cocktail in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Geysen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Geysen, D. & Berkvens, D., 2013, ‘Lack of evidence for safe vaccination with the Muguga cocktail in Sudan’, Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 80(1, Art. #571, 1 page. http:// dx.doi.org/10.4102/ojvr. v80i1.571

  1. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

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    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Jong Seok [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Gyeonggi-do, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Minkyoung [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Sang-Moo, E-mail: skang24@gsu.edu [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  2. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  3. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

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    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  4. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...... examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark....

  5. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Poly(ethylene glycol) Modified Silver Nanorods Can Be a Safe, Noncarrier Adjuvant for HIV Vaccine.

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    Liu, Ye; Balachandran, Yekkuni L; Li, Dan; Shao, Yiming; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-03-22

    One of the biggest obstacles for the development of HIV vaccines is how to sufficiently trigger crucial anti-HIV immunities via a safe manner. We herein integrated surface modification-dependent immunostimulation against HIV vaccine and shape-dependent biosafety and designed a safe noncarrier adjuvant based on silver nanorods coated by both polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Such silver nanorods can significantly elevate crucial immunities of HIV vaccine and overcome the toxicity, which is a big problem for other existing adjuvants. This study thus provided a principle for designing a safe and high-efficacy material for an adjuvant and allow researchers to really have a safe and effective prophylaxis against HIV. We expect this material approach to be applicable to other types of vaccines, whether they are preventative or therapeutic.

  6. Newcastle Disease Virus-Vectored Rabies Vaccine Is Safe, Highly Immunogenic, and Provides Long-Lasting Protection in Dogs and Cats ▿

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    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tao, Lihong; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Na; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Yang, Chinglai; Chen, Hualan; Bu, Zhigao

    2011-01-01

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, has shown promise as a vaccine vector for mammals. Here, we generated a recombinant avirulent NDV La Sota strain expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) and evaluated its potential to serve as a vaccine against rabies. The recombinant virus, rL-RVG, retained its high-growth property in chicken eggs, with titers of up to 109.8 50% egg infective doses (EID50)/ml of allantoic fluid. RVG expression enabled rL-RVG to spread from cell to cell in a rabies virus-like manner, and RVG was incorporated on the surface of the rL-RVG viral particle. RVG incorporation did not alter the trypsin-dependent infectivity of the NDV vector in mammalian cells. rL-RVG and La Sota NDV showed similar levels of sensitivity to a neutralization antibody against NDV and similar levels of resistance to a neutralization antibody against rabies virus. Animal studies demonstrated that rL-RVG is safe in several species, including cats and dogs, when administered as multiple high doses of recombinant vaccine. Intramuscular vaccination with rL-RVG induced a substantial rabies virus neutralization antibody response and provided complete protection from challenge with circulating rabies virus strains. Most importantly, rL-RVG induced strong and long-lasting protective neutralization antibody responses to rabies virus in dogs and cats. A low vaccine dose of 108.3 EID50 completely protected dogs from challenge with a circulating strain of rabies virus for more than a year. This is the first study to demonstrate that immunization with an NDV-vectored vaccine can induce long-lasting, systemic protective immunity against rabies. PMID:21632762

  7. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  8. Methodological issues and evidence of malfeasance in research purporting to show thimerosal in vaccines is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Brian; Kern, Janet; Geier, David; Haley, Boyd; Sykes, Lisa; King, Paul; Geier, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There are over 165 studies that have focused on Thimerosal, an organic-mercury (Hg) based compound, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, and found it to be harmful. Of these, 16 were conducted to specifically examine the effects of Thimerosal on human infants or children with reported outcomes of death; acrodynia; poisoning; allergic reaction; malformations; auto-immune reaction; Well's syndrome; developmental delay; and neurodevelopmental disorders, including tics, speech delay, language delay, attention deficit disorder, and autism. In contrast, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that Thimerosal is safe and there is "no relationship between [T]himerosal[-]containing vaccines and autism rates in children." This is puzzling because, in a study conducted directly by CDC epidemiologists, a 7.6-fold increased risk of autism from exposure to Thimerosal during infancy was found. The CDC's current stance that Thimerosal is safe and that there is no relationship between Thimerosal and autism is based on six specific published epidemiological studies coauthored and sponsored by the CDC. The purpose of this review is to examine these six publications and analyze possible reasons why their published outcomes are so different from the results of investigations by multiple independent research groups over the past 75+ years.

  9. Methodological Issues and Evidence of Malfeasance in Research Purporting to Show Thimerosal in Vaccines Is Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Hooker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are over 165 studies that have focused on Thimerosal, an organic-mercury (Hg based compound, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, and found it to be harmful. Of these, 16 were conducted to specifically examine the effects of Thimerosal on human infants or children with reported outcomes of death; acrodynia; poisoning; allergic reaction; malformations; auto-immune reaction; Well’s syndrome; developmental delay; and neurodevelopmental disorders, including tics, speech delay, language delay, attention deficit disorder, and autism. In contrast, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that Thimerosal is safe and there is “no relationship between [T]himerosal[-]containing vaccines and autism rates in children.” This is puzzling because, in a study conducted directly by CDC epidemiologists, a 7.6-fold increased risk of autism from exposure to Thimerosal during infancy was found. The CDC’s current stance that Thimerosal is safe and that there is no relationship between Thimerosal and autism is based on six specific published epidemiological studies coauthored and sponsored by the CDC. The purpose of this review is to examine these six publications and analyze possible reasons why their published outcomes are so different from the results of investigations by multiple independent research groups over the past 75+ years.

  10. Vaccination of horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs induces short-lasting antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra; Asbie, Sanda; Rohde, Jennifer; Glaser, Amy; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-07-24

    Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subsequently, four experimental vaccination trials were performed. First, we investigated antibody responses to three canine vaccines in B. burgdorferi-naïve horses. One killed bacterin vaccine induced antibodies against OspC. OspA antibodies were low for all three vaccines and lasted less than 16weeks. The second trial tested the impact of the vaccine dose using the OspA/OspC inducing bacterin vaccine in horses. A 2mL dose produced higher OspA and OspC antibody values than a 1mL dose. However, the antibody response again quickly declined, independent of dose. Third, the horses were vaccinated with 2 doses of a recombinant OspA vaccine. Previous vaccination and/or environmental exposure enhanced the magnitude and longevity of the OspA antibody response to about 20weeks. Last, the influence of intramuscular versus subcutaneous vaccine administration was investigated for the recombinant OspA vaccine. OspA antibody responses were not influenced by injection route. The current work highlights that commercial Lyme vaccines for dogs induce only transient antibody responses in horses which can also be of low magnitude. Protection from infection with B. burgdorferi should not be automatically assumed after vaccinating horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Canine distemper vaccination is a safe and useful preventive procedure for southern sea otters (Enhydra lutra nereis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, David A; Murray, Michael J; Casper, David R; Brownstein, Deborah; Kreuder-Johnson, Christine

    2009-12-01

    From 2002 to 2006, eight captive southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) at research and display institutions in California at risk of exposure to potentially lethal morbiliviruses were vaccinated with a commercial recombinant poxvirus vectored canine distemper (CD) vaccine. Serum-neutralizing (SN) antibody responses were followed for several years. The goal of this study was to determine whether 1) CD vaccination was a safe preventive medicine procedure for this species; 2) sea otters produce detectable SN antibodies in response to vaccination with this product; and 3) if this type of vaccination might be useful in response to a morbilivirus disease outbreak in free-ranging sea otters. Results indicate that a commercial recombinant vaccine is safe, provokes a measurable SN antibody response, and that vaccination may provide some protection from infection for free-ranging sea otters. It also resulted in the reevaluation of CD serology data that were previously published for free-ranging sea otters. Canine distemper, Enhydra lutris nereis, morbilivirus, sea otter, serology, vaccination.

  12. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice : Influence of the route of vaccine administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal

  13. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Updated data on effective and safe immunizations with live-attenuated vaccines for children after living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Hoshino, Ken; Takahashi, Takao; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2015-01-29

    Although immunizations using live-attenuated vaccines are not recommended for children post-liver transplant due to their theoretical risks, they will inevitably encounter vaccine-preventable viral diseases upon returning to real-life situations. The window of opportunity for vaccination is usually limited prior to transplantation because these children often have unstable disease courses. Also, vaccine immunity does not always persist after transplantation. Beginning in 2002, subcutaneous immunizations with four individual live-attenuated vaccines (measles, rubella, varicella, and mumps) to pediatric patients following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) were performed for those who fulfilled the clinical criteria, including humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Written informed consent was collected. We included the study on 70 immunizations for 18 cases that we reported in 2008 (Shinjoh et al., 2008). A total of 196 immunizations were administered to 48 pediatric post-LDLT recipients. Of these, 144 were first immunizations and 52 were repeated immunizations following LDLT. The seroconversion rates at the first dose for measles (AIK-C), rubella (TO-336), varicella (Oka), and mumps (Hoshino) were 100% (36/36), 100% (35/35), 70% (23/33), and 75% (24/32), respectively. Antibody levels did not fall over time in patients immunized with rubella vaccine. Three mild cases of breakthrough varicella were observed. Two cases with transient parotid gland swelling were observed after mumps immunization. Two admissions because of fever at 2-3 weeks after the measles vaccine were reported but the patients had no symptoms of measles. Immunizations using selected live-attenuated vaccines were safe and effective for post-LDLT children who were not severely immunosuppressed. However, with the exception of rubella, repeated immunization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaccine-induced canine distemper in European mink, Mustela lutreola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Smith, M R; Rideout, B A; Mikolon, A B; Appel, M J; Morris, P J; Shima, A L; Janssen, D J

    1997-09-01

    This report describes vaccine-induced canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in four European mink (Mustela lutreola) induced by the administration of a multivalent, avian-origin vaccine. Clinical signs consisting of seizures, ataxia, facial twitching, oculonasal discharge, hyperkeratosis of footpads, and anorexia developed 16-20 days postvaccination. Conjunctival smears from one animal were positive for CDV antigen by direct fluorescent antibody testing, confirming the clinical diagnosis. The four mink died 16-26 days postvaccination. Gross and microscopic lesions that were diagnostic for CDV infection included interstitial pneumonia, lymphoid depletion, nonsuppurative encephalitis, and dermatitis. Vaccine-strain virus was isolated from tissues of three animals. Cases of vaccine-induced distemper in mustelids using avian-origin vaccine have seldom been reported.

  16. Population-based HPV vaccination programmes are safe and effective: 2017 update and the impetus for achieving better global coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Bloem, Paul N

    2017-09-06

    Persistent oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of cervical cancer, as well as cancers of the anus, penis, vulva, vagina and oropharynx. There is good evidence that prophylactic HPV vaccines are immunogenic and effective against targeted-type HPV infections and type-specific genital lesions, including high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), when administered prior to HPV infection. There is good evidence that HPV vaccines are safe in population usage, with the most frequent adverse event being injection-site reactions. There is evidence to support some cross-protection against non-targeted types occurring following the administration of HPV vaccines. There is limited evidence suggesting that HPV vaccines may be beneficial in preventing future disease in women treated for high-grade CIN. This chapter focuses on the accumulated evidence regarding the global use of the three licensed HPV vaccines including safety, immunogenicity, duration of protection, effectiveness, coverage to date and barriers to higher coverage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Temperature effects on vaccine induced immunity to viruses in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    a problem in terms of inducing a protective immune response by vaccination in aquaculture, since it is often desirable to vaccinate fish during autumn, winter, or spring. In experimental vaccination trials with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a DNA-vaccine encoding the viral glycoprotein of viral...... haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), non-specific as well as specific immune mechanisms seemed to be delayed at low temperature. At five weeks post vaccination fish kept at 5C had no detectable response of neutralising antibodies while two thirds of the fish kept at 15C had sero-converted. While protective...... immunity was still established at both temperatures, specificity analysis suggested that protection at the lower temperature was mainly due to non-specific innate antiviral mechanisms, which appeared to last longer at low temperature. This was presumably related to a prolonged persistence of the vaccine...

  18. Lipopeptide-adjuvanted respiratory syncytial virus virosomes : A safe and immunogenic non-replicating vaccine formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegmann, Toon; Kamphuis, Tobias; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Goud, Ellen; de Haan, Aalzen; Wilschut, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory disease in children and the elderly. There is no registered RSV vaccine. Early experimental non-replicating vaccines have been found to exacerbate RSV symptoms upon infection causing enhanced respiratory disease. Here we show that

  19. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with inducible suicidal mutants of Leishmania amazonensis elicits immunity against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shraddha; Samant, Mukesh; Khare, Prashant; Misra, Pragya; Dutta, Sujoy; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Sharma, Sharad; Chang, Kwang Poo; Dube, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    Leishmania, naturally residing in the phagolysosomes of macrophages, is a suitable carrier for vaccine delivery. Genetic complementation of these trypanosomatid protozoa to partially rectify their defective heme-biosynthesis renders them inducible with delta-aminolevulinate to develop porphyria for selective photolysis, leaving infected host cells unscathed. Delivery of released "vaccines" to antigen-presenting cells is thus expected to enhance immune response, while their self-destruction presents added advantages of safety. Such suicidal L. amazonensis was found to confer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy on hamsters against L. donovani. Neither heat-killed nor live parasites without suicidal induction were effective. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with the suicidal mutants reduced the parasite loads by 99% and suppressed the development of disease. These suppressions were accompanied by an increase in Leishmania-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity and lymphoproliferation as well as in the levels of splenic iNOS, IFN-gamma, and IL-12 expressions and of Leishmania-specific IgG2 in the serum. Moreover, a single intravenous administration of T cells from vaccinated hamsters was shown to confer on naïve animals an effective cellular immunity against L. donovani challenges. The absence of lesion development at vaccination sites and parasites in the draining lymphnodes, spleen and liver further indicates that the suicidal mutants provide a safe platform for vaccine delivery against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

  20. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  1. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both...

  2. VACCINATION AGAINST HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: A SAFE SOLUTION TO THE GLOBAL PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Galitskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases caused by human papilloma virus (HPV, in recent years has become more urgent, not only for physicians, scientists, but also for patients. This is due to the high contagiousness of HPV, its prevalence and, of course, proved oncogenicity. Creation and introduction of preventive vaccines against the most common HPV types played a definite role in the global health, and, of course, raised the attention of doctors and the public to human papillomavirus infection and associated diseases. At the same time propaganda against vaccination blocks the widespread adoption of this disease prevention in our country. In this paper, we introduce the American experience of monitoring vaccination adverse events.Key words: human papillomavirus infection, prevention, vaccination, adverse events, monitoring, children.

  3. Unveiling Unexpected Immune Activities Induced by Your Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. Hurwitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern-day vaccine design, a good pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is measured by its ability to induce opsonic antibodies. These antibodies label bacteria for phagocytosis by neutrophils and thereby overcome the capsule’s barrier function. Doyle and Pirofski have raised a serious challenge to the current paradigm by describing anti-capsular antibodies that are highly protective but nonopsonic [C.R. Doyle and L. Pirofski, mBio 7(1:e02260-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02260-15]. In fact, some functions are not related to neutrophils or phagocytosis at all. An increased awareness of these activities is critical not only for accurate comparisons of vaccine candidates but also for improvements in vaccination outcomes in settings of neutropenia. When vaccine developers select a single gatekeeper assay (e.g., an opsonophagocytic assay for bacteria or a neutralization assay for viruses, promising vaccine candidates may be missed. Doyle and Pirofski stress that multiple functions, not just one, should be investigated to enhance discovery of antibody mechanisms and to best assess vaccine-induced correlates of immune protection.

  4. Seasonal split influenza vaccine induced IgE sensitization against influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Takuji; Nishimura, Naoko; Ozaki, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Suzuki, Eitaro; Miyata, Akiko; Okada, Kenji; Ihara, Toshiaki

    2015-11-09

    Although anaphylaxis is an extremely rare vaccine-associated adverse event, it occurred in young children following administration of the 2011/12 seasonal split influenza vaccine, which contained 2-phenoxyethanol as the preservative. These children had high levels of IgE antibodies against influenza vaccine components. We herein investigated why these children were sensitized. One hundred and seventeen series of serum samples were obtained immediately before, and one month after the first and second immunizations with the HA split vaccine of 2011/12. Forty-two sequential serum samples were collected in the acute and convalescent phases (2 and 4 weeks) after natural infection with H1N1 Pdm in 2009. IgE antibodies developed following the vaccination of young children with seasonal split vaccines, whereas no significant IgE response was observed following natural infection with H1N1 Pdm 2009. The prevalence of IgE antibodies was not influenced by outbreaks of H1N1 Pdm. Repeated immunization with the HA split vaccine induced IgE sensitization against the influenza vaccine irrespective of the H1N1, H3N2, or B influenza subtypes. The reasons why anaphylaxis only occurred in recipients of the influenza vaccine containing 2-phenoxyethanol are still being investigated, and the size distribution of antigen particles may have shifted to a slightly larger size. Since the fundamental reason was IgE sensitization, current split formulation for the seasonal influenza vaccine needs to be reconsidered to prevent the induction of IgE sensitization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with inducible suicidal mutants of Leishmania amazonensis elicits immunity against visceral leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shraddha; Samant, Mukesh; Khare, Prashant; Misra, Pragya; Dutta, Sujoy; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Sharma, Sharad; Chang, Kwang Poo; Dube, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, naturally residing in the phagolysosomes of macrophages, is a suitable carrier for vaccine delivery. Genetic complementation of these trypanosomatid protozoa to partially rectify their defective heme-biosynthesis renders them inducible with δ-aminolevulinate to develop porphyria for selective photolysis, leaving infected host-cells unscathed. Delivery of released “vaccines” to antigen-presenting cells is thus expected to enhance immune response, while their self-destruction presents added advantages of safety. Such suicidal-L. amazonensis was found to confer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy on hamsters against L. donovani. Neither heat-killed nor live parasites without suicidal induction were effective. Photodynamic vaccination of hamsters with the suicidal-mutants reduced the parasite loads by 99% and suppressed the development of disease. These suppressions were accompanied by an increase in Leishmania-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity and lymphoproliferation as well as in the levels of splenic iNOS, IFN-γ and IL-12 expressions and of Leishmania-specific IgG2 in the serum. Moreover, a single intravenous administration of T-cells from vaccinated hamsters was shown to confer on naïve animals an effective cellular immunity against L. donovani challenges. The absence of lesion development at vaccination sites and parasites in the draining lymphnodes, spleen and liver further indicates that the suicidal mutants provide a safe platform for vaccine delivery against experimental visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:19053149

  6. A bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 vaccine is safe and immunogenic in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Walker, Robert E; Lee, Min-Shi; Reisinger, Keith S; Ward, Joel I; Yogev, Ram; Blatter, Mark M; Yeh, Sylvia H; Karron, Ruth A; Sangli, Chithra; Eubank, Lane; Coelingh, Kathleen L; Cordova, Julie M; August, Marilyn J; Mehta, Harshvardhan B; Chen, Wendy; Mendelman, Paul M

    2005-04-01

    A phase 2 trial was conducted to assess in young infants the safety, tolerability, infectivity, and immunogenicity of multiple doses of an intranasal vaccine using bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV3). One hundred ninety-two healthy 2-month-old infants were randomized 1 : 1 : 1 to receive 1x10(5) median tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) bPIV3 vaccine, 1x10(6) TCID(50) bPIV3 vaccine, or placebo at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months of age. Safety information was collected by use of diary sheets and telephone interviews. Nasal wash and serum specimens were collected for assessment of infectivity and immunogenicity. The safety profiles of both dosages of bPIV3 were similar to that of placebo, with the exception of fever with temperature of >/=38.1 degrees C after dose 2 only, occurring in 34% of the 1x10(5) TCID(50) group, 35% of the 1x10(6) TCID(50) group, and 12% of the placebo group (P<.01). No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. The cumulative vaccine infectivity (isolation of bPIV3 and/or bPIV3 seroconversion) after dose 3 was similar in the 2 vaccine groups (87% in the 1x10(5) TCID(50) group and 77% in the 1x10(6) TCID(50) group) (P=.46). Seroconversion rates after dose 3, assessed by means of hemagglutination inhibition assay, after adjustment for decrease in maternal antibody titers, were 67% in the 1x10(5) TCID(50) group, 57% in the 1x10(6) TCID(50) group, and 12% in the placebo group (P<.01). Isolation of bPIV3 was common after dose 1, dose 2, or dose 3, but only 1 of 51 participants in the vaccine groups had bPIV3 isolated after dose 4. Multiple doses of bPIV3 vaccine were well tolerated and immunogenic in young infants.

  7. Unsecured intracranial aneurysms and induced hypertension in cerebral vasospasm: is induced hypertension safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Johannes; Güresir, Erdem; Vatter, Hartmut; Berkefeld, Joachim; Seifert, Volker; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    Induced hypertension is an established therapy to treat cerebral vasospasm (CVS) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to prevent delayed ischemic deficits. Currently, there is minimal evidence available assessing the risk of induced hypertension in the presence of unsecured aneurysms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of induced hypertension on the rupturing of unsecured aneurysms in treating CVS. We conducted a retrospective analysis between 1999 and 2009. Patients with unsecured aneurysms treated with induced hypertension were identified and stratified as having (1) additional unruptured unsecured aneurysms or (2) ruptured unsecured aneurysms. Hemodynamic parameters were analyzed and any bleeding recorded. Forty-five patients were included. Of those, 41 had 71 additional unruptured unsecured aneurysms and four patients had four ruptured unsecured aneurysms. The mean size of unsecured aneurysms was: 4.0 ± 1.9 mm (additional unruptured) and 5.3 ± 2.2 mm (ruptured), respectively. No aneurysm ruptured during therapy. Combining our data with previously published studies, there appears to be no increase of risk for aneurysm rupture by induced hypertension when compared to the natural history (0.5% for group 1, 2.9% for group 2). These data corroborate that induced hypertension may be a safe treatment option to prevent cerebral infarction in CVS, even in the presence of unsecured aneurysms. Our findings suggest that induced hypertension does not increase rupture of unsecured aneurysms. Given the high risk for cerebral infarction in severe CVS, we conclude that induced hypertension should not be omitted due to the presence of unsecured aneurysms.

  8. Antibody response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in vaccinated pigs with or without maternal antibodies induced by sow vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Terreni, M; Guazzetti, S; Cavirani, S

    2006-06-01

    Vaccination with bacterins is an important tool for the control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection of pigs. Because such vaccination often involves piglets that have suckled M. hyopneumoniae antibody-positive dams it is important to understand the effect of pre-existing (passively acquired) antibody on vaccine-induced immunity. To investigate this issue experimentally, 20 sows that were seronegative for M. hyopneumoniae were selected from a M. hyopneumoniae-infected herd and then randomly allocated to one of four treatment groups (five sows/group): Group A, vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group B, vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets; Group C, non-vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group D, non-vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets. Sows (Groups A and B) were vaccinated 14 days before farrowing and seroconverted within the next 14 days. Conversely, none of the non-vaccinated sows was seropositive at farrowing. Piglets (Groups A and C) were vaccinated when they were 7 days of age. Regardless of treatments none of the piglets had any evidence of an active immune response until many of those of Groups A and C and a few of those of Groups B and D seroconverted after it had been shown that at least some pigs of all groups had been naturally infected with a field strain of M. hyopneumoniae. This pattern of immune responsiveness (i.e. the collective results of Groups A, B, C and D) suggested that vaccination of pigs had primed their immune system for subsequent exposure to M. hyopneumoniae, and that passively acquired antibody had little or no effect on either a vaccine-induced priming or a subsequent anamnestic response. According to the statistical analysis sow serological status did not interfere with the antibody response in early vaccinated piglets. In conclusion, the results pointed out that early vaccination of piglets may assist M. hyopneumoniae control independently from the serological status of sows.

  9. Vaccine-Induced Acute Metabolic Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute metabolic crisis occurring in 7 children (6 at ages 3-9 months, and 1 at 5 years, between 3 and 12 hours after administration of Japanese encephalitis, diphtheria, and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, and measles vaccines, is reported from Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China.

  10. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  11. Acute metabolic crisis induced by vaccination in seven Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanling; Sujan, Sayami; Sun, Fang; Zhang, Yuehua; Jiang, Yuwu; Song, Jinqing; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2006-08-01

    Seven Chinese patients (5 males and 2 females) with vaccination-induced acute metabolic crisis were reported. Only one male with 21-hydroxylase deficiency had been diagnosed before vaccination. In the remaining six patients, the preexisting diagnoses were not confirmed before the vaccination. Acute metabolic crisis occurred in seven patients between 3 and 12 hours after the administration of Japanese encephalitis, diphtheria, and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, or measles vaccines. Patients 1 and 2 displayed acute adrenal insufficiencies at the ages of 5 years and 3 months, respectively. Patient 3 had presented with mild motor retardation previously. Patients 4 to 7 were previously healthy, but suffered from fever, seizures, coma, acidosis, and hypoglycemia after being vaccinated. Glutaric aciduria type 1 was evident in case 4. Leigh syndromes were present in Patients 5, 6, and 7. They all died from respiratory failure before 2 years of age. Symmetric foci, cystic cavitations with neuronal loss, and vascular proliferation were observed by postmortem examination. Among the seven patients, although the vaccines were not the primary cause of the acute metabolic crisis, the severe acute episodes occurred coincidentally.

  12. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting angiogenesis is an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. The vascular endothelialcadherin (VE-cad) regulated angiogenesis is a potential target for anti-angiogenesis. Here, we develop a fusion vaccine plasmid DNA pSec-MBD2-VE-cad from VE-cad and murine beta defensin2 (MBD2) to induce immunity for ...

  13. Modeling maternal fetal RSV F vaccine induced antibody transfer in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Gregory M; Fries, Louis F; Smith, Gale; Kpamegan, Eloi; Lu, Hanxin; Guebre-Xabier, Mimi; Hickman, Somia P; Flyer, David

    2015-11-25

    Protection of newborns and young infants against RSV disease via maternal immunization mediated by transplacental transfer of antibodies is under evaluation in third-trimester pregnant women with the RSV recombinant F nanoparticle vaccine (RSV F vaccine). Since the hemichorial placental architecture in guinea pigs and humans is similar, the guinea pig model was employed to assess RSV F vaccine immunogenicity in pregnant sows and to compare RSV-specific maternal antibody levels in their pups. Thirty (30) presumptive pregnant guinea pigs were immunized on gestational day 25 and 46 with placebo (PBS), 30μg RSV F, or 30μg RSV F+400μg aluminum phosphate. Sera at delivery/birth (sows/pups) and 15 and 30 days post-partum (pups) were analyzed for the presence of anti-F IgG, palivizumab-competitive antibody (PCA) and RSV/A microneutralization (MN). The rates of pregnancy and stillbirth were similar between controls and vaccinees. The vaccine induced high levels of anti-F IgG, PCA and MN in sows, with the highest levels observed in adjuvanted vaccinees. Placental transfer to pups was proportional to the maternal antibody levels, with concentration effects observed for all immune measures. The RSV F vaccine was safe and immunogenic in pregnant guinea pigs and supported robust transplacental antibody transfer to their pups. Relative concentration of antibodies in the pups was observed even in the presence of high levels of maternal antibody. Guinea pigs may be an important safety and immunogenicity model for preclinical assessment of candidate vaccines for maternal immunization. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaccine-induced HIV seropositivity/reactivity in noninfected HIV vaccine recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cristine J; Metch, Barbara; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W; Baden, Lindsey R

    2010-07-21

    Induction of protective anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immune responses is the goal of an HIV vaccine. However, this may cause a reactive result in routine HIV testing in the absence of HIV infection. To evaluate the frequency of vaccine-induced seropositivity/reactivity (VISP) in HIV vaccine trial participants. Three common US Food and Drug Administration-approved enzyme immunoassay (EIA) HIV antibody kits were used to determine VISP, and a routine diagnostic HIV algorithm was used to evaluate VISP frequency in healthy, HIV-seronegative adults who completed phase 1 (n = 25) and phase 2a (n = 2) vaccine trials conducted from 2000-2010 in the United States, South America, Thailand, and Africa. Vaccine-induced seropositivity/reactivity, defined as reactive on 1 or more EIA tests and either Western blot-negative or Western blot-indeterminate/atypical positive (profile consistent with vaccine product) and HIV-1-negative by nucleic acid testing. Among 2176 participants free of HIV infection who received a vaccine product, 908 (41.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 39.6%-43.8%) had VISP, but the occurrence of VISP varied substantially across different HIV vaccine product types: 399 of 460 (86.7%; 95% CI, 83.3%-89.7%) adenovirus 5 product recipients, 295 of 552 (53.4%; 95% CI, 49.2%-57.7%) recipients of poxvirus alone or as a boost, and 35 of 555 (6.3%; 95% CI, 4.4%-8.7%) of DNA-alone product recipients developed VISP. Overall, the highest proportion of VISP (891/2176 tested [40.9%]) occurred with the HIV 1/2 (rDNA) EIA kit compared with the rLAV EIA (150/700 tested [21.4%]), HIV-1 Plus O Microelisa System (193/1309 tested [14.7%]), and HIV 1/2 Peptide and HIV 1/2 Plus O (189/2150 tested [8.8%]) kits. Only 17 of the 908 participants (1.9%) with VISP tested nonreactive using the HIV 1/2 (rDNA) kit. All recipients of a glycoprotein 140 vaccine (n = 70) had VISP, with 94.3% testing reactive with all 3 EIA kits tested. Among 901 participants with VISP and a Western

  15. Epidemiology of autoimmune reactions induced by vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R T; Pless, R; Destefano, F

    2001-05-01

    In order for vaccinations to 'work', the immune system must be stimulated. The concern that immunizations may lead to the development of autoimmune disease (AID) has been questioned. Since AID occur in the absence of immunizations, it is unlikely that immunizations are a major cause of AID. Epidemiological studies are needed, however, to assess whether immunizations may increase the risk in some susceptible individuals. This paper discusses the evidence for and against vaccination as a risk factor for AID. Evidence for immunizations leading to AID come from several sources including animal studies, single and multiple case reports, and ecologic association. However more rigorous investigation has failed to confirm most of the allegations. Unfortunately the question remains difficult to address because for most AIDs, there is limited knowledge of the etiology, background incidence and other risk factors for their development. This information is necessary, in the absence of experimental evidence derived from controlled studies, for any sort of adequate causality assessment using the limited data that are available. Several illustrative examples are discussed to highlight what is known and what remains to be explored, and the type of epidemiological evidence that would be required to better address the issues. Examples include the possible association of immunization and multiple sclerosis (and other demyelinating diseases), type 1 diabetes mellitus, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Influenza vaccines: from whole virus preparations to recombinant protein technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against influenza represents our most effective form of prevention. Historical approaches toward vaccine creation and production have yielded highly effective vaccines that are safe and immunogenic. Despite their effectiveness, these historical approaches do not allow for the incorporation of changes into the vaccine in a timely manner. In 2013, a recombinant protein-based vaccine that induces immunity toward the influenza virus hemagglutinin was approved for use in the USA. This vaccine represents the first approved vaccine formulation that does not require an influenza virus intermediate for production. This review presents a brief history of influenza vaccines, with insight into the potential future application of vaccines generated using recombinant technology.

  17. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  18. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice: influence of the route of vaccine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal virus infection in mice. Whole inactivated virus-induced cross-protection was found to be mediated primarily by flu-specific CD8+ T cells. As it has been demonstrated that the route of vaccine administration strongly influences both the quantity and quality of vaccine-induced immunity, in this study, we determined which route of WIV administration induces optimal heterosubtypic cross-protection. We compared the magnitude of the immune response and heterosubtypic protection against lethal A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) infection after subcutaneous (SC), intramuscular (IM), and intranasal (IN) vaccination with A/NIBRG-14 (H5N1) WIV. Subcutaneous and IM administration was superior to IN administration of influenza WIV in terms of flu-specific CD8+ T-cell induction and protection of mice against lethal heterosubtypic challenge. Surprisingly, despite the very low flu-specific CD8+ T-cell responses detected in IN-vaccinated mice, these animals were partially protected, most likely due to cross-reactive IgA antibodies. The results of this study show that the magnitude of WIV-induced flu-specific CD8+ T-cell activity depends on the applied vaccination route. We conclude that parenteral administration of WIV vaccine, in particular IM injection, is superior to IN vaccine delivery for the induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection and generally appears to elicit stronger immune responses than mucosal vaccination with WIV. © 2013 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A serum-free, purified vero cell rabies vaccine is safe and as immunogenic as the reference vaccine Verorab for pre-exposure use in healthy adults: results from a randomized controlled phase-II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Sylvie; Guinet-Morlot, Françoise; Minutello, Maria; Donazzolo, Yves; Rouzier, Regine; Chassard, Didier; Fitoussi, Serge; Hou, Victor

    2013-04-26

    Verorab was licensed in 1985 for both pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis of rabies. The next generation purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV-NG) is a highly purified vaccine. We performed a phase II clinical study in adults in France to assess its immunological non-inferiority and clinical safety for pre-exposure prophylaxis. In a randomized phase-II trial, 384 healthy adult subjects were randomized (2:1) to receive a three-dose primary series of PVRV-NG or Verorab. One year later, the PVRV-NG group received a PVRV-NG booster while the Verorab group participants were randomized to receive a booster of PVRV-NG or Verorab for. Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) were evaluated on days 0, 28 (subgroup), 42, months 6, 12 and 12+14 days. Safety was evaluated for seven days after each dose. Adverse event between doses, until 28 days after the final dose was recorded. Serious adverse events were recorded up to 6 months after the last dose. The criterion for non-inferiority was met in the per-protocol analysis set and confirmed in the full analysis set (FAS). In the FAS, 99.6% and 100% of subjects had RVNA titers ≥0.5 IU/mL in PVRV-NG and Verorab groups, respectively. While RVNA levels gradually decreased over the 12-month period, at 6 and 12 months after vaccination >89% and >77%, respectively, in both groups had RVNA titers ≥0.5 IU/mL. The PVRV-NG booster induced a strong response, irrespective of the vaccine given for the primary series. PVRV-NG was safe and well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to Verorab for unsolicited adverse events and solicited systemic reactions. The incidence of solicited injection-site reactions was lower with PVRV-NG than with Verorab after the primary series and the booster dose. PVRV-NG was shown to be at least as immunogenic as Verorab and to present a similar safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissection of antibody specificities induced by yellow fever vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Vratskikh

    Full Text Available The live attenuated yellow fever (YF vaccine has an excellent record of efficacy and one dose provides long-lasting immunity, which in many cases may last a lifetime. Vaccination stimulates strong innate and adaptive immune responses, and neutralizing antibodies are considered to be the major effectors that correlate with protection from disease. Similar to other flaviviruses, such antibodies are primarily induced by the viral envelope protein E, which consists of three distinct domains (DI, II, and III and is presented at the surface of mature flavivirions in an icosahedral arrangement. In general, the dominance and individual variation of antibodies to different domains of viral surface proteins and their impact on neutralizing activity are aspects of humoral immunity that are not well understood. To gain insight into these phenomena, we established a platform of immunoassays using recombinant proteins and protein domains that allowed us to dissect and quantify fine specificities of the polyclonal antibody response after YF vaccination in a panel of 51 vaccinees as well as determine their contribution to virus neutralization by serum depletion analyses. Our data revealed a high degree of individual variation in antibody specificities present in post-vaccination sera and differences in the contribution of different antibody subsets to virus neutralization. Irrespective of individual variation, a substantial proportion of neutralizing activity appeared to be due to antibodies directed to complex quaternary epitopes displayed on the virion surface only but not on monomeric E. On the other hand, DIII-specific antibodies (presumed to have the highest neutralizing activity as well as broadly flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies were absent or present at very low titers. These data provide new information on the fine specificity as well as variability of antibody responses after YF vaccination that are consistent with a strong influence of individual

  1. 76 FR 32364 - Collaboration in Regulatory Science and Capacity To Advance Global Access to Safe Vaccines and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... sustainable global influenza vaccines production capacity. These financial and intellectual investments in... agriculture and food production--all of which are vulnerable in the absence of functional regulatory..., specifically influenza vaccines. Sustainable vaccine production capacity cannot be achieved in the absence of...

  2. Women's attitudes to safe-induced abortion in Iran: Findings from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhani, Nader; Cleary, Michelle; Zarei, Abbas; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-01-01

    To explore attitudes to safe-induced abortion among pregnant women in Iran. In Islamic teachings, abortion is generally forbidden. However in specific circumstances, abortion may be permitted and currently, in Iran, the law allows termination of pregnancy only if three specialist physicians confirm that the pregnancy outcome may be harmful for the mother during pregnancy or after birth. Pilot, descriptive survey. A 15-item structured questionnaire focusing on attitudes to safe-induced abortion was developed and pilot tested. Participants were pregnant women who were referred to the Legal Medical Centre (July-December 2015) to obtain permission for abortion. On obtaining their informed consent, the women were asked to respond to each item if they agreed (Yes) or disagreed (No). Only their age, education, employment, marital status and religion were obtained. Of the 80 survey participants referred for a safe-induced abortion, 90% were carrying foetuses with a diagnosed congenital malformation and 10% were experiencing complications of pregnancy that endangered their health. The majority of women (85%) perceived abortion to be dangerous to health; 86% indicated that partners should be involved in decision-making about abortion, while 83% believed that public health officials should have complete control of abortion law. There is a need to improve women's and couples' awareness and practice of effective contraceptive methods. Further research is needed to better understand the complex issues that lead to unintended pregnancies and abortions considering religious beliefs and cultural and legal contexts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Histamine and mast cell activator compound 48/80 are safe but inefficient systemic adjuvants for gilthead seabream vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez González, N E; Cabas, I; Montero, J; García Alcázar, A; Mulero, V; García Ayala, A

    2017-07-01

    Histamine has a key role in the regulation of inflammatory and innate immune responses in vertebrates. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), a marine hermaphrodite teleost of great commercial value, was the first fish species shown to possess histamine-containing mast cells (MCs) at mucosal tissues. MCs are highly abundant in the peritoneal exudate of gilthead seabream and compound 48/80 (Co 48/80), often used to promote MC activation and histamine release, is able to promote histamine release from gilthead seabream MCs in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of histamine and Co 48/80 on the immune responses of gilthead seabream. For this purpose, histamine and Co 48/80 were intraperitoneally injected alone or combined with 109 heat-killed Vibrio anguillarum cells and their effects on head kidney and peritoneal exudate were analyzed. The results indicated that although histamine and Co 48/80 were both able to alter the percentage of peritoneal exudate and head kidney immune cell types, only Co 48/80 increased reactive oxygen species production by peritoneal leukocytes. In addition, histamine, but not Co 48/80, was able to slightly impair the humoral adaptive immune response, i.e. production of specific IgM to V. anguillarum. Notably, both histamine and Co 48/80 reduced the expression of the gene encoding histamine receptor H2 in peritoneal exudate leukocytes. These results show for the first time in fish that although systemic administration of histamine and Co 48/80 is safe, neither compound can be regarded as an efficient adjuvant for gilthead seabream vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MF59-adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine induces immunologic memory and heterotypic antibody responses in non-elderly and elderly adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Banzhoff

    Full Text Available Pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1 has the potential to cause a major global pandemic in humans. Safe and effective vaccines that induce immunologic memory and broad heterotypic response are needed.Healthy adults aged 18-60 and > 60 years (n = 313 and n = 173, respectively were randomized (1:1 to receive two primary and one booster injection of 7.5 microg or 15 microg doses of a subunit MF59-adjuvanted H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1 vaccine. Safety was monitored until 6 months after booster. Immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI, single radial hemolysis (SRH and microneutralization assays (MN. Mild injection-site pain was the most common adverse reaction. No serious adverse events relating to the vaccine were reported. The humoral immune responses to 7.5 microg and 15 microg doses were comparable. The rates for seroprotection (HI>40; SRH>25 mm(2; MN > or = 40 after the primary vaccination ranged 72-87%. Six months after primary vaccination with the 7.5 microg dose, 18% and 21% of non-elderly and elderly adults were seroprotected; rates increased to 90% and 84%, respectively, after the booster vaccination. In the 15 microg group, seroprotection rates among non-elderly and elderly adults increased from 25% and 62% after primary vaccination to 92% and 88% after booster vaccination, respectively. A heterologous immune response to the H5N1/turkey/Turkey/05 strain was elicited after second and booster vaccinations.Both formulations of MF59-adjuvanted influenza H5N1 vaccine were well tolerated. The European Union requirement for licensure for pre-pandemic vaccines was met by the lower dose tested. The presence of cross-reactive antibodies to a clade 2 heterologous strain demonstrates that this vaccine may be appropriate for pre-pandemic programs.(ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00311480.

  5. Intranasal vaccination of recombinant H5N1 HA1 proteins fused with foldon and Fc induces strong mucosal immune responses with neutralizing activity: Implication for developing novel mucosal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Li, Ye; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lili; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Yusen; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus remains a threat to public health because of its continued spread in poultry in some countries and its ability to infect humans with high mortality rate, calling for the development of effective and safe vaccines against H5N1 infection. Here, we constructed 4 candidate vaccines by fusing H5N1 hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) with foldon (HA1-Fd), human IgG Fc (HA1-Fc), foldon and Fc (HA1-FdFc) or His-tag (HA1-His). We then compared their ability to induce mucosal immune responses and neutralizing antibodies in the presence or absence of Poly(I:C) and CpG adjuvants via the intranasal route. Without an adjuvant, HA1-FdFc could elicit appreciable humoral immune responses and local mucosal IgA antibodies in immunized mice, while other vaccine candidates only induced background immune responses. In the presence of Poly(I:C) and CpG, both HA1-Fd and HA1-Fc elicited much higher levels of serum IgG and local mucosal IgA antibodies than HA1-His. Poly(I:C) and CpG could also augment the neutralizing antibody responses induced by these 4 vaccine candidates in the order of HA1-FdFc > HA1-Fc > HA1-Fd > HA1-His. These results suggest that both Fd and Fc potentiate the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1 protein and that Poly(I:C) and CpG serve as efficient mucosal adjuvants in promoting efficacy of these vaccine candidates to induce strong systemic and local antibody responses and potent neutralizing antibodies, providing a useful strategy to develop effective and safe mucosal H5N1 vaccines.

  6. Vaccine-induced protection of rhesus macaques against plasma viremia after intradermal infection with a European lineage 1 strain of West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babs E Verstrepen

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV causes human and animal disease with outbreaks in several parts of the world including North America, the Mediterranean countries, Central and East Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Particularly in elderly people and individuals with an impaired immune system, infection with WNV can progress into a serious neuroinvasive disease. Currently, no treatment or vaccine is available to protect humans against infection or disease. The goal of this study was to develop a WNV-vaccine that is safe to use in these high-risk human target populations. We performed a vaccine efficacy study in non-human primates using the contemporary, pathogenic European WNV genotype 1a challenge strain, WNV-Ita09. Two vaccine strategies were evaluated in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta using recombinant soluble WNV envelope (E ectodomain adjuvanted with Matrix-M, either with or without DNA priming. The DNA priming immunization was performed with WNV-DermaVir nanoparticles. Both vaccination strategies successfully induced humoral and cellular immune responses that completely protected the macaques against the development of viremia. In addition, the vaccine was well tolerated by all animals. Overall, The WNV E protein adjuvanted with Matrix-M is a promising vaccine candidate for a non-infectious WNV vaccine for use in humans, including at-risk populations.

  7. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Vectored by a Stable Chimeric and Replication-Deficient Sendai Virus Protects Mice without Inducing Enhanced Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Marian Alexander; Gori-Savellini, Gianni; Gandolfo, Claudia; Papa, Guido; Kaufmann, Christine; Felder, Eva; Ginori, Alessandro; Disanto, Maria Giulia; Spina, Donatella; Cusi, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory infections in children and elderly people, and no marketed vaccine exists. In this study, we generated and analyzed a subunit vaccine against RSV based on a novel genome replication-deficient Sendai virus (SeV) vector. We inserted the RSV F protein, known to be a genetically stable antigen, into our vector in a specific way to optimize the vaccine features. By exchanging the ectodomain of the SeV F protein for its counterpart from RSV, we created a chimeric vectored vaccine that contains the RSV F protein as an essential structural component. In this way, the antigen is actively expressed on the surfaces of vaccine particles in its prefusion conformation, and as recently reported for other vectored vaccines, the occurrence of silencing mutations of the transgene in the vaccine genome can be prevented. In addition, its active gene expression contributes to further stimulation of the immune response. In order to understand the best route of immunization, we compared vaccine efficacies after intranasal (i.n.) or intramuscular (i.m.) immunization of BALB/c mice. Via both routes, substantial RSV-specific immune responses were induced, consisting of serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies, as well as cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, i.n. immunization was also able to stimulate specific mucosal IgA in the upper and lower respiratory tract. In virus challenge experiments, animals were protected against RSV infection after both i.n. and i.m. immunization without inducing vaccine-enhanced disease. Above all, the replication-deficient SeV appeared to be safe and well tolerated.IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory diseases in young children and elderly people worldwide. There is a great demand for a licensed vaccine. Promising existing vaccine approaches based on live-attenuated vaccines or viral vectors have suffered from unforeseen drawbacks related to immunogenicity

  8. A single-dose cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding tetanus toxin fragment C induces sustained levels of protective tetanus toxin antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Rob; Nakai, Toru; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Fairweather, Neil F; Sesardic, Dorothea; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-04-26

    The current commercially available vaccine used to prevent tetanus disease following infection with the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani is safe and effective. However, tetanus remains a major source of mortality in developing countries. In 2008, neonatal tetanus was estimated to have caused >59,000 deaths, accounting for 1% of worldwide infant mortality, primarily in poorer nations. The cost of multiple vaccine doses administered by injection necessary to achieve protective levels of anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies is the primary reason for low vaccine coverage. Herein, we show that a novel vaccine strategy using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine platform induces protective levels of anti-tetanus antibodies that are durable (lasting >13 months) in mice following only a single dose. This study demonstrates the ability of a 'single-dose' CMV-based vaccine strategy to induce durable protection, and supports the potential for a tetanus vaccine based on CMV to impact the incidence of tetanus in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peru-15 (Choleragarde(®)), a live attenuated oral cholera vaccine, is safe and immunogenic in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive adults in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasuwan, W; Kim, Y H; Sah, B K; Suwanagool, S; Kim, D R; Anekthananon, A; Lopez, A L; Techasathit, W; Grahek, S L; Clemens, J D; Wierzba, T F

    2015-09-11

    Many areas with endemic and epidemic cholera report significant levels of HIV transmission. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over 95% of reported cholera cases occur in Africa, which also accounts for nearly 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS globally. Peru-15, a promising single dose live attenuated oral cholera vaccine (LA-OCV), was previously found to be safe and immunogenic in cholera endemic areas. However, no data on the vaccine's safety among HIV-seropositive adults had been collected. This study was a double-blinded, individually randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolling HIV-seropositive adults, 18-45 years of age, conducted in Bangkok, Thailand, to assess the safety of Peru-15 in a HIV-seropositive cohort. 32 HIV infected subjects were randomized to receive either a single oral dose of the Peru-15 vaccine with a buffer or a placebo (buffer only). No serious adverse events were reported during the follow-up period in either group. The geometric mean fold (GMF) rise in V. cholerae O1 El Tor specific antibody titers between baseline and 7 days after dosing was 32.0 (pcholerae was isolated from the stool of one vaccinee, and found to be genetically identical to the Peru-15 vaccine strain. There were no significant changes in HIV viral load or CD4 T-cell counts between vaccine and placebo groups. Peru-15 was shown to be safe and immunogenic in HIV-seropositive Thai adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Short- and long-term immunogenicity and protection induced by non-replicating smallpox vaccine candidates in mice and comparison with the traditional 1st generation vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier-Rembert, Audrey; Drillien, Robert; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Garin, Daniel; Crance, Jean-Marc

    2008-03-25

    This study assessed three non-replicating smallpox vaccine candidates (modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), NYVAC and HR) for their immunogenicity and ability to protect mice against an intranasal cowpox virus challenge and compared them with the traditional replicating vaccine. A single immunisation with the non-replicating vaccines induced a complete protection from death at short-term, but was not fully protective when mice were challenged 150 days post-vaccination with protection correlated with the specific neutralizing antibodies and CD4(+) T-cells responses. Prime-boost vaccination enabled effective long-term protection from death for mice vaccinated with MVA, but protection from disease and CD4(+) T-cell level were lower than the ones induced by the traditional vaccine over the long-term period. Further investigations are necessary with MVA to determine the optimal conditions of immunisation to induce at long-term immunogenicity and protection observed with the 1st generation smallpox vaccine.

  11. Flu Vaccine Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety Information Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ... of flu vaccines monitored? Egg Allergy Are flu vaccines safe? Flu vaccines have good safety record. Hundreds ...

  12. Seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated genotypes induced by the bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Sara L; Godi, Anna; Jit, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2017-07-13

    Human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated remarkable efficacy against persistent infection and disease associated with vaccine-incorporated genotypes and a degree of efficacy against some genetically related, non-vaccine-incorporated genotypes. The vaccines differ in the extent of cross-protection against these non-vaccine genotypes. Data supporting the role for neutralizing antibodies as a correlate or surrogate of cross-protection are lacking, as is a robust assessment of the seroconversion rates against these non-vaccine genotypes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available data on vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated HPV genotypes. Of 304 articles screened, 9 were included in the analysis representing ca. 700 individuals. The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV31 for the bivalent vaccine (86%; 95%CI 78-91%) was higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (61%; 39-79%; p=0.011). The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV45 for the bivalent vaccine (50%; 37-64%) was also higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (16%; 6-36%; p=0.007). Seropositivity against HPV33, HPV52 and HPV58 were similar between the vaccines. Mean seropositivity rates across non-vaccine genotypes were positively associated with the corresponding vaccine efficacy data reported from vaccine trials. These data improve our understanding of vaccine-induced functional antibody specificity against non-vaccine incorporated genotypes and may help to parameterize vaccine-impact models and improve patient management in a post-vaccine setting. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation of B Cell Affinity Maturation Explains Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 Sidhartha Chaudhury, Jaques Reifman, and Anders Wallqvist Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags... vaccine based on the highly polymorphic malaria Ag apical membrane antigen-1. Our simulations show how polyvalent apical membrane Ag-1 vaccination

  14. Use of an inactivated vaccine for prevention of parvovirus-induced reproductive failure in gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T T; Whitacre, M D; Robison, O W

    1987-01-15

    Gilts from dams that had been inoculated with inactivated porcine parvovirus (PPV) vaccine before breeding became seronegative to PPV by 26 weeks of age. Vaccination of these gilts with inactivated PPV vaccine at 32 weeks of age resulted in an antibody response that peaked at about 2 weeks after vaccination, with -log10 mean hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody titers of less than 2. In the first-year group (82 gilts), HI titers gradually decreased, 20% of the gilts being seronegative by 6 to 7 weeks after vaccination and 75% being seronegative by 16 weeks after vaccination. In the second-year group, 93 gilts were infected naturally by a field strain of PPV at about 11 weeks after single vaccination with inactivated PPV. Additionally, in the second year, 20 vaccinated and 6 nonvaccinated gilts were immune-challenged with virulent PPV at 10 to 12 weeks after vaccination. Neither field nor challenge PPV infection of vaccinated pregnant gilts caused reproductive failure, even though some of the gilts became seronegative for PPV before challenge. Our findings suggest that single vaccination of gilts with inactivated PPV vaccine should give adequate protection from PPV-induced reproductive failure, even though serum HI titers decrease to an undetectable level shortly before PPV infection.

  15. Percutaneous CT-Guided Ablation in the Hepatic Dome: Artificially Induced Pneumothorax for Safe Transpleural Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Guedes Moreira Valle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ablative therapies have become a great alternative to surgical treatment of hepatic nodules. Some technical difficulties may negatively influence the effectiveness of this therapy, such as lesions located near the diaphragm. The transthoracic approach is commonly used to access these lesions. However, it is associated with an increased risk of complications, such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, alveolar bleeding, and others.We report a case of a radiofrequency ablation of a lesion in the hepatic dome, where an artificially induced pneumothorax was performed to guarantee a safe and effective access. The air was easily injected by a spinal needle and later aspirated by a single-lumen catheter. Induced pneumothorax shoud be considered in ablation of hepatic dome lesions, mainly when the transhepatic access is not appropriate.

  16. Vaccination with IL-6 analogues induces autoantibodies to IL-6 and influences experimentally induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Pia; Jensen, Lene; Andersson, Christina

    2007-01-01

    ; yet they appear healthy and do not exhibit overt clinical or laboratory abnormalities. We induced comparable levels of aAb-IL-6 in different mouse strains by vaccination with immunogenic IL-6 analogues. We observed that the induced aAb-IL-6 protected against collagen-induced arthritis and experimental...... allergic encephalitis. Furthermore, aAb-IL-6 carrying mice displayed increased plasma TNFalpha concentrations upon challenge with LPS. Taken together, induction of IL-6 autoantibodies was possible in different mouse strains. The autoantibodies influenced experimental inflammation. This immunotherapeutic...

  17. Safe administration of a gelatin-containing vaccine in an adult with galactose-α-1,3-galactose allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Michelle L; Waibel, Kirk H

    2015-03-03

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) are associated with delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian food products and gelatin-based foods (Commins et al., J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;123:426; Caponetto et al., J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013;1:302). We describe a patient with α-Gal allergy who successfully tolerated the live zoster vaccine and we review anaphylactic reactions reported to this vaccine. Our patient, who tolerated a vaccine containing the highest gelatin content, is reassuring but continued safety assessment of gelatin-containing vaccines for this patient cohort is recommended as there are multiple factors for this patient cohort that influence the reaction risk. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Therapeutic vaccine against Streptococcus sobrinus-induced caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, M; Tavares, D; Fonseca, A J M M; Faria, R; Ribeiro, A; Silvério Cabrita, A M; Ferreira, P

    2004-04-01

    Streptococcus sobrinus produces a virulence-associated immunomodulatory protein (VIP) which suppresses the host-specific immune response and induces the early production of IL-10. In this study, we evaluated the effects of therapeutic immunization with this VIP on the incidence of caries in S. sobrinus-infected rats. Groups of Wistar rats were orally infected with S. sobrinus and fed with sucrose-sweetened drinking water ad libitum. Five days later, rats were immunized intranasally with active or heat-inactivated VIP plus alum as adjuvant or PBS plus adjuvant (sham-immunized). After 3 wks, all rats were re-immunized as above. Evaluation of dental caries showed that VIP-immunized animals had significantly fewer enamel sulcal and proximal caries lesions than did the sham-immunized animals (p vaccine against dental caries.

  19. Serological response to rabies virus induced by commercial vaccines in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Martins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The antibody response to rabies virus (RABV induced by commercial vaccines in heifers was investigated. For this, 84 heifers were vaccinated twice (30 days interval with each of four vaccines (G1 = 14 animals; G2 = 24; G3 = 22 and G4 = 24 and received a booster vaccination 360 days later. Serum samples collected at different intervals after vaccination and 30 days after booster were submitted to a virus neutralizing (VN assay for RABV antibodies. Thirty days after the second vaccine dose, 92% of the immunized animals presented VN titers ≥0.5UI/mL (geometric medium titers [GMT] 1.7 to 3.8UI/mL. At the day of the booster (360 days post-vaccination; however, the percentage of animals harboring antibody titers ≥0.5UI/mL had dropped to 31% (0-80% of the animals, depending on the vaccine, resulting in lower GMT (0.1 to 0.6UI/mL. Booster vaccination at day 360 resulted in a detectable anamnestic response in all groups, resulting in 83% of animals (65 to 100% harboring VN titers ≥0.5UI/mL thirty days later (GMT 0.6 to 4.3UI/mL. These results indicated that these vaccines were able to induce an adequate anti-RABV response in all animals after prime vaccination (and after booster as well. However, the titers decreased, reaching titers <0.5UI/mL in approximately 70% of animals within the interval before the recommended booster. Thus, booster vaccination for rabies in cattle using the current vaccines should be performed before the recommended one-year interval, as to maintain neutralizing antibodies levels in most vaccinated animals.

  20. Eye mucosa: an efficient vaccine delivery route for inducing protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyoung Yul; Han, Soo Jung; Cha, Hye-Ran; Seo, Sang-Uk; Song, Joo-Hye; Chung, So-Hyang; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2010-09-15

    The external part of the eye shares mucosa-associated common characteristics and is an obvious entry site for foreign Ags. We assessed the potential of eyedrop vaccination for effective delivery of vaccines against viral or bacterial infection in mice. Both OVA-specific IgG Ab in serum and IgA Ab in mucosal compartments were induced by eyedrops of OVA with cholera toxin (CT). Eyedrop vaccination of influenza A/PR/8 virus (H1N1) induced both influenza virus-specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses and protected mice completely against respiratory infection with influenza A/PR/8 virus. In addition, eyedrop vaccination of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains induced LPS-specific Ab and complete protection against oral challenge of virulent Salmonella. Unlike with the intranasal route, eyedrop vaccinations did not redirect administered Ag into the CNS in the presence of CT. When mice were vaccinated by eyedrop, even after the occlusion of tear drainage from eye to nose, Ag-specific systemic IgG and mucosal IgA Abs could be induced effectively. Of note, eyedrops with OVA plus CT induced organogenesis of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue and increased microfold cell-like cells on the conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue in the nictitating membrane on conjunctiva, the mucosal side of the external eye. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the eyedrop route is an alternative to mucosal routes for administering vaccines.

  1. IL-22-induced antimicrobial peptides are key determinants of mucosal vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyat, M; Bouzourene, H; Ouyang, W; Iovanna, J; Renauld, J-C; Velin, D

    2017-01-01

    Despite the recent description of the mucosal vaccine-induced reduction of Helicobacter pylori natural infection in a phase 3 clinical trial, the absence of immune correlates of protection slows the final development of the vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the role of interleukin (IL)-22 in mucosal vaccine-induced protection. Gastric IL-22 levels were increased in mice intranasally immunized with urease+cholera toxin and challenged with H. felis, as compared with controls. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a peak of CD4 + IL-22 + IL-17 + T cells infiltrating the gastric mucosa occurred in immunized mice in contrast to control mice. The inhibition of the IL-22 biological activity prevented the vaccine-induced reduction of H. pylori infection. Remarkably, anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) extracted from the stomachs of vaccinated mice, but not from the stomachs of non-immunized or immunized mice, injected with anti-IL-22 antibodies efficiently killed H. pylori in vitro. Finally, H. pylori infection in vaccinated RegIIIβ-deficient mice was not reduced as efficiently as in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-22 has a critical role in vaccine-induced protection, by promoting the expression of AMPs, such as RegIIIβ, capable of killing Helicobacter. Therefore, it can be concluded that urease-specific memory Th17/Th22 cells could constitute immune correlates of vaccine protection in humans.

  2. Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine induces non-specific immune responses in Japanese flounder against Nocardia seriolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Goshi; Kondo, Hidehiro; Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo

    2012-08-01

    Nocardiosis caused by Nocardia seriolae has been causing severe loss of fish production, so that an effective vaccine is urgently needed. Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG) is a live attenuated vaccine for tuberculosis, which is effective against various infectious diseases including nocardiosis in mammals. In this study, the protective efficacy of BCG against N. seriolae was evaluated in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus and antigen-specific immune responses induced in BCG vaccinated fish were investigated. Cumulative mortality of BCG-vaccinated fish was 21.4% whereas that of PBS-injected fish was 56.7% in N. seriolae challenge. However, gene expression level of IFN-γ was only slightly up-regulated in BCG-vaccinated fish after injection of N. seriolae antigen. In order to reveal non-specific immune responses induced by BCG vaccination, transcriptome of the kidney after BCG vaccination was investigated using oligo DNA microarray. Gene expression levels of antimicrobial peptides such as C-type and G-type lysozyme were significantly up-regulated after BCG vaccination. Consistently, BCG vaccination appeared to increase the bacteriolysis activity of the serum against Micrococcus luteus and N. seriolae. These results suggest that BCG-vaccinated Japanese flounder fight N. seriolae infection mainly by non-specific immune responses such as by the production of bacteriolytic lysozymes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Algorithmic Assessment of Vaccine-Induced Selective Pressure and Its Implications on Future Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mones S. Abu-Asab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttrial assessment of a vaccine's selective pressure on infecting strains may be realized through a bioinformatic tool such as parsimony phylogenetic analysis. Following a failed gonococcal pilus vaccine trial of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of pilin DNA and predicted peptide sequences from clinical isolates to assess the extent of the vaccine's effect on the type of field strains that the volunteers contracted. Amplified pilin DNA sequences from infected vaccinees, placebo recipients, and vaccine specimens were phylogenetically analyzed. Cladograms show that the vaccine peptides have diverged substantially from their paternal isolate by clustering distantly from each other. Pilin genes of the field clinical isolates were heterogeneous, and their peptides produced clades comprised of vaccinated and placebo recipients' strains indicating that the pilus vaccine did not exert any significant selective pressure on gonorrhea field strains. Furthermore, sequences of the semivariable and hypervariable regions pointed out heterotachous rates of mutation and substitution.

  4. H5N1 whole-virus vaccine induces neutralizing antibodies in humans which are protective in a mouse passive transfer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Howard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H5N1 vaccines have been extensively tested in clinical trials and consistently demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic; however, clinical efficacy is difficult to evaluate in the absence of wide-spread human disease. A lethal mouse model has been utilized which allows investigation of the protective efficacy of active vaccination or passive transfer of vaccine induced sera following lethal H5N1 challenge. METHODS: We used passive transfer of immune sera to investigate antibody-mediated protection elicited by a Vero cell-derived, non-adjuvanted inactivated whole-virus H5N1 vaccine. Mice were injected intravenously with H5N1 vaccine-induced rodent or human immune sera and subsequently challenged with a lethal dose of wild-type H5N1 virus. RESULTS: Passive transfer of H5N1 vaccine-induced mouse, guinea pig and human immune sera provided dose-dependent protection of recipient mice against lethal challenge with wild-type H5N1 virus. Protective dose fifty values for serum H5N1 neutralizing antibody titers were calculated to be ≤1∶11 for all immune sera, independently of source species. CONCLUSIONS: These data underpin the confidence that the Vero cell culture-derived, whole-virus H5N1 vaccine will be effective in a pandemic situation and support the use of neutralizing serum antibody titers as a correlate of protection for H5N1 vaccines.

  5. Human T cell responses induced by vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Boesen, H; Pedersen, B K

    1997-01-01

    Many aspects of the widely used bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis are still the subject of controversy. There is a huge variation in efficacy from one clinical trial to another and no relationship between vaccine-induced skin test conversion and subsequent protection. We...

  6. Innovative approach to safely induce controlled lipolysis by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-mediated hyperthermic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, Maria Rosaria; Pandolfi, Laura; Malatesta, Manuela; Colombo, Miriam; Collico, Veronica; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Tambalo, Stefano; Lasconi, Chiara; Vurro, Federica; Boschi, Federico; Mannucci, Silvia; Sbarbati, Andrea; Prosperi, Davide; Calderan, Laura

    2017-10-27

    During last years, evidence has been provided on the involvement of overweight and obesity in the pathogenesis and aggravation of several life-threatening diseases. Here, we demonstrate that, under appropriate administration conditions, polyhedral iron oxide nanoparticles are efficiently and safely taken up by 3T3 cell line-derived adipocytes (3T3 adipocytes) in vitro. Since these nanoparticles proved to effectively produce heat when subjected to alternating magnetic field, 3T3 adipocytes were submitted to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-mediated hyperthermia treatment (SMHT), with the aim of modulating their lipid content. Notably, the treatment resulted in a significant delipidation persisting for at least 24h, and in the absence of cell death, damage or dedifferentiation. Interestingly, transcript expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a key gene involved in canonical lipolysis, was not modulated upon SMHT, suggesting the involvement of a novel/alternative mechanism in the effective lipolysis observed. By applying the same experimental conditions successfully used for 3T3 adipocytes, SMHT was able to induce delipidation also in primary cultures of human adipose-derived adult stem cells. The success of this pioneering approach in vitro opens promising perspectives for the application of SMHT in vivo as an innovative safe and physiologically mild strategy against obesity, potentially useful in association with balanced diet and healthy lifestyle. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer: Safety, association of clinical effects with vaccine-induced immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seledtsova, G V; Shishkov, A A; Kaschenko, E A; Seledtsov, V I

    2016-10-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that xenogeneic vaccines can be very effective in breaking the immune tolerance to human tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). We assessed adverse effects, as well as clinical and immune responses induced by a lyophilized xenogeneic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from murine melanoma B16 and carcinoma LLC cells in 60 stage IV colorectal cancer patients. Neither grade III/IV toxicities, nor laboratory and clinical signs of systemic severe autoimmune disorders were documented in any XPV-treated patient. Clinical effects of various grades (complete response, partial response and disease stabilization) with duration of no shorter than 6 months was observed in 25 (41.67%) vaccinated patients. The average survival time of the XPV-treated patients was markedly longer than that of the clinically matched control patients (20 vs. 7 months). The overall 3-year survival rate in the XPV-treated and control group was 16.7% (10 patients) and 0%, respectively. Following a course of ten XPV vaccinations, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation assays revealed increased T-cell immune responses to human Caco-2 colon adenocarcinoma-associated antigens. In addition, relative contents of CD25+ FoxP3+regulatory T-cells in patients with proven immunotherapy-mediated clinical effects (responders) were significantly decreased in the blood, which was paralleled by marked increases in serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-alpha (IFN-α), IFN-ɣ, and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-1, IL-4, and IL-6 were not affected in both responder and non-responder patients. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the safety, clinical feasibility and immunogenicity of xenogeneic composite cell vaccine administration in colorectal cancer patients. This is the first demonstration that clinical effects of such a vaccine are associated with vaccine-induced, proinflammatory

  8. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  9. Combination of Protein and Viral Vaccines Induces Potent Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses and Enhanced Protection from Murine Malaria Challenge▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, Claire L.; Birkett, Ashley J.; Moore, Anne C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2007-01-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circums...

  10. HPV induced cervical carcinogenesis: molecular basis and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A M; Backsch, C; Schneider, A; Dürst, M

    2002-11-01

    Association of infection with papillomavirus and dysplasia of the cervix uteri has been firmly established. There are only few cervical cancers where no HPV DNA is detectable. The mechanism of epithelial cell immortalization by interaction with tumour suppressor genes p53 and pRb by viral oncogenes E6 and E7 is elucidated. Progression of the HPV infected cell to a malignant phenotype involves further modification of host gene expression and/or mutations. The appearance of chromosomal aberrations can lead to mutational inactivation or loss of tumour suppressor genes (TSG), activation and amplification of oncogenes, with importance for the process of carcinogenesis. Oncogene amplification, with exception of few reports, seems not to be a major mechanism in cervical carcinogenesis. In contrast, cytogenetic and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) results from CIN and invasive cancer demonstrate alterations at specific chromosomal regions, pointing at localisation of TSG. Genetic alterations at chromosomes 3p, 6p, 1lq were frequently found early in tumour development Primary invasive carcinoma showed additional allelic losses at chromosome arms 6q, 17p and 18q. Useful biological diagnostic and prognostic markers for high-risk HPV infection and malignant progression may be p16NK4 p27Kip, and NET-I/C4.8. Putative senescence genes relevant for HPV-induced carcinogenesis are localized on chromosomes 2, 4 and 10. Genes for Telomerase suppression are presumably located on chromosomes 3, 4 and 6. Natural immune responses to HPV infection exist Therefore, immune therapy is an attractive possibility for prevention and therapy of HPV infection. To date, vaccine development has reached clinical evaluation. Prophylaxis aims at the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies to capsid proteins. Virus-like particle vaccines are currently tested in clinical trials. Due to the long lag period between infection and clinical manifestation trials will take a long time until conclusive results are

  11. Brucella abortus strain RB51 leucine auxotroph as an environmentally safe vaccine for plasmid maintenance and antigen overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Seleem, Mohamed N; Contreras, Andrea; Purwantini, Endang; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M

    2008-11-01

    To avoid potentiating the spread of an antibiotic resistance marker, a plasmid expressing a leuB gene and a heterologous antigen, green fluorescent protein (GFP), was shown to complement a leucine auxotroph of cattle vaccine strain Brucella abortus RB51, which protected CD1 mice from virulent B. abortus 2308 and elicited GFP antibodies.

  12. A replication defective recombinant Ad5 vaccine expressing Ebola virus GP is safe and immunogenic in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledgerwood, J. E.; Costner, P.; Desai, N.; Holman, L.; Enama, M. E.; Yamshchikov, G.; Mulangu, S.; Hu, Z.; Andrews, C. A.; Sheets, R. A.; Koup, R. A.; Roederer, M.; Bailer, R.; Mascola, J. R.; Pau, M. G.; Sullivan, N. J.; Goudsmit, J.; Nabel, G. J.; Graham, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Ebola virus causes irregular outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever in equatorial Africa. Case mortality remains high; there is no effective treatment and outbreaks are sporadic and unpredictable. Studies of Ebola virus vaccine platforms in non-human primates have established that the induction of

  13. Dissecting polyclonal vaccine-induced humoral immunity against HIV using Systems Serology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Amy W.; Kumar, Manu P.; Arnold, Kelly B.; Yu, Wen Han; Schoen, Matthew K.; Dunphy, Laura J.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn; Mahan, Alison E.; Hoffner, Michelle; Streeck, Hendrik; Ackerman, Margaret E.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Pau, Maria G.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Barouch, Dan H.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Alter, Galit

    2017-01-01

    While antibody titers and neutralization are considered the gold standard for the selection of successful vaccines, these parameters are often inadequate predictors of protective immunity. As antibodies mediate an array of extra-neutralizing Fc-functions, when neutralization fails to predict protection, investigating Fc-mediated activity may help identify immunological correlates and mechanism(s) of humoral protection. Here, we used an integrative approach termed Systems Serology to analyze relationships among humoral responses elicited in four HIV vaccine-trials. Each vaccine regimen induced a unique humoral “Fc-fingerprint”. Moreover, analysis of case:control data from the first moderately protective HIV vaccine trial, RV144, pointed to mechanistic insights into immune complex composition that may underlie protective immunity to HIV. Thus, multi-dimensional relational comparisons of vaccine humoral fingerprints offer a unique approach for the evaluation and design of novel vaccines against pathogens for which correlates of protection remain elusive. PMID:26544943

  14. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-07-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied.

  15. Global threshold dynamics of an SIVS model with waning vaccine-induced immunity and nonlinear incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyuan; Martcheva, Maia; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing the spread of infectious diseases. For many diseases, vaccine-induced immunity is not life long and the duration of immunity is not always fixed. In this paper, we propose an SIVS model taking the waning of vaccine-induced immunity and general nonlinear incidence into consideration. Our analysis shows that the model exhibits global threshold dynamics in the sense that if the basic reproduction number is less than 1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable implying the disease dies out; while if the basic reproduction number is larger than 1, then the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable indicating that the disease persists. This global threshold result indicates that if the vaccination coverage rate is below a critical value, then the disease always persists and only if the vaccination coverage rate is above the critical value, the disease can be eradicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. One-Health: a Safe, Efficient, Dual-Use Vaccine for Humans and Animals against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and Rabies Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirblich, Christoph; Coleman, Christopher M; Kurup, Drishya; Abraham, Tara S; Bernbaum, John G; Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E; Johnson, Reed F; Frieman, Matthew B; Schnell, Matthias J

    2017-01-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2012 and is a highly pathogenic respiratory virus. There are no treatment options against MERS-CoV for humans or animals, and there are no large-scale clinical trials for therapies against MERS-CoV. To address this need, we developed an inactivated rabies virus (RABV) that contains the MERS-CoV spike (S) protein expressed on its surface. Our initial recombinant vaccine, BNSP333-S, expresses a full-length wild-type MERS-CoV S protein; however, it showed significantly reduced viral titers compared to those of the parental RABV strain and only low-level incorporation of full-length MERS-CoV S into RABV particles. Therefore, we developed a RABV-MERS vector that contained the MERS-CoV S1 domain of the MERS-CoV S protein fused to the RABV G protein C terminus (BNSP333-S1). BNSP333-S1 grew to titers similar to those of the parental vaccine vector BNSP333, and the RABV G-MERS-CoV S1 fusion protein was efficiently expressed and incorporated into RABV particles. When we vaccinated mice, chemically inactivated BNSP333-S1 induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Next, we challenged both vaccinated mice and control mice with MERS-CoV after adenovirus transduction of the human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4) receptor and then analyzed the ability of mice to control MERS-CoV infection. Our results demonstrated that vaccinated mice were fully protected from the MERS-CoV challenge, as indicated by the significantly lower MERS-CoV titers and MERS-CoV and mRNA levels in challenged mice than those in unvaccinated controls. These data establish that an inactivated RABV-MERS S-based vaccine may be effective for use in animals and humans in areas where MERS-CoV is endemic. Rabies virus-based vectors have been proven to be efficient dual vaccines against rabies and emergent infectious diseases such as Ebola virus. Here we show that inactivated rabies virus particles containing the MERS-CoV S1 protein induce potent immune

  18. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year...... period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons...... treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations....

  19. Vaccine induced autoimmunity: The price we pay for a flawed vaccine design and safety process

    OpenAIRE

    Arumugham, Vinu

    2017-01-01

    Catalase is an autoantigen associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). H. pylori catalase exhibits significant homology to human catalase and was therefore determined to be unsuitable as a vaccine antigen. However, catalase from other organisms which have similar homology, contaminate many approved vaccines.

  20. Montanide ISA™ 201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces improved immune responses and protection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Pervaiz; Kalaivanan, Ramya; Sied, Nuru; Mamo, Bedaso; Kishore, Subodh; Suryanarayana, V V S; Kondabattula, Ganesh

    2013-07-18

    Despite significant advancements in modern vaccinology, inactivated whole virus vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remain the mainstay for prophylactic and emergency uses. Many efforts are currently devoted to improve the immune responses and protective efficacy of these vaccines. Adjuvants, which are often used to potentiate immune responses, provide an excellent mean to improve the efficacy of FMD vaccines. This study aimed to evaluate three oil adjuvants namely: Montanide ISA-201, ISA-206 (SEPPIC, France) and GAHOL (an in-house developed oil-adjuvant) for adjuvant potential in inactivated FMD vaccine. Groups of cattle (n=6) were immunized once intramuscularly with monovalent FMDV 'O' vaccine formulated in these adjuvants, and humoral (serum neutralizing antibody, IgG1 and IgG2) and cellular (lymphoproliferation) responses were measured. Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted vaccine induced earlier and higher neutralizing antibody responses as compared to the two other adjuvants. All the adjuvants induced mainly serum IgG1 isotype antibody responses against FMDV. However, Montanide ISA-201 induced relatively higher IgG2 responses than the other two adjuvants. Lymphoproliferative responses to recall FMDV antigen were relatively higher with Montanide ISA-201, although not always statistically significant. On homologous FMDV challenge at 30 days post-vaccination, 100% (6/6) of the cattle immunized with Montanide-201 adjuvanted vaccine were protected, which was superior to those immunized with ISA-206 (66.6%, 4/6) or GAHOL adjuvanted vaccine (50%, 3/6). Virus replication following challenge infection, as determined by presence of the viral genome in oropharynx and non-structural protein serology, was lowest with Montanide ISA-201 adjuvant. Collectively, these results indicate that the Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces enhanced immune responses and protective efficacy in cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diversion of HIV-1 Vaccine-induced Immunity by gp41-Microbiota Cross-reactive Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M.; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, Julie; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    A HIV-1 DNA prime-recombinant Adenovirus Type 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells was to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were non-neutralizing, and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next generation sequencing of an IGHV repertoire prior to vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally-related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. PMID:26229114

  2. Antigenic differences between vaccine and circulating wild-type mumps viruses decreases neutralization capacity of vaccine-induced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, M; Lang-Balija, M; Ivancic-Jelecki, J; Košutić-Gulija, T; Ljubin-Sternak, S; Forcic, D

    2013-06-01

    A recent resurgence of mumps in doubly vaccinated cohorts has been observed, identifying genotype G as the current predominant genotype. In this study, the neutralization efficacy of guinea pig sera immunized with three vaccine viruses: L-Zagreb, Urabe AM9 and JL5, was tested against seven mumps viruses: three vaccine strains and four wild-type strains (two of genotype G, one of genotype C, one of genotype D) isolated during 1998-2011. All sera neutralized all viruses although at different levels. The neutralization efficiency of sera decreases several fold by temporal order of virus isolation. Therefore, we concluded that gradual evolution of mumps viruses, rather than belonging to a certain genotype, results in an antigenic divergence from the vaccine strains that decrease the neutralization capacity of vaccine-induced antibodies. Moreover, the amino-acid sequence alignment revealed three new potentially relevant regions for escape from neutralization, i.e. 113-130, 375-403 and 440-443.

  3. Vaccination protects rats from methamphetamine-induced impairment of behavioral responding for food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüedi-Bettschen, Daniela; Wood, Sherri L; Gunnell, Melinda G; West, C Michael; Pidaparthi, Rama R; Carroll, F Ivy; Blough, Bruce E; Owens, S Michael

    2013-09-23

    (+)-Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is a chronic disease that interferes with fundamental brain-mediated behaviors and biological functions like eating. These studies present preclinical efficacy and safety profiles for a METH conjugate vaccine (IC(KLH)-SMO9) designed to treat METH abuse. ICKLH-SMO9 efficacy and safety were assessed over a 16-week period by monitoring general health and stability of responding in a food maintained behavioral paradigm. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for food reinforcers until stable behavior was established. Rats (n=9/group) were then immunized with 100 μg of a control antigenic carrier protein (IC(KLH)-Cys) or IC(KLH)-SMO9 in Alhydrogel adjuvant, with booster immunizations at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Health, immunization site and behavior were assessed daily. No adverse effects were found. During weeks 14-16, when antibody titers and METH affinity (K(d)=13.9 ± 1.7 nM) were maximal, all rats received progressively higher METH doses (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) every 3-4 days, followed by behavioral testing. Even though the lower METH doses from 0.3 to 1.0 mg/kg produced no impairment in food maintained behavior, 3.0-mg/kg in control rats showed significantly (pMETH dose, even though METH serum concentrations showed profound increases due to anti-METH antibody binding. These findings suggest the IC(KLH)-SMO9 vaccine is effective and safe at reducing adverse METH-induced effects, even at high METH doses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by self-amplifying mRNA vaccines encoding bacterial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Chiarot, Emiliano; Giovani, Cinzia; Buccato, Scilla; Bonacci, Stefano; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Margarit, Immaculada; Geall, Andrew; Bensi, Giuliano; Maione, Domenico

    2017-01-05

    Nucleic acid vaccines represent an attractive approach to vaccination, combining the positive attributes of both viral vectors and live-attenuated vaccines, without the inherent limitations of each technology. We have developed a novel technology, the Self-Amplifying mRNA (SAM) platform, which is based on the synthesis of self-amplifying mRNA formulated and delivered as a vaccine. SAM vaccines have been shown to stimulate robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and non-human primates against a variety of viral antigens, thus representing a safe and versatile tool against viral infections. To assess whether the SAM technology could be used for a broader range of targets, we investigated the immunogenicity and efficacy of SAM vaccines expressing antigens from Group A (GAS) and Group B (GBS) Streptococci, as models of bacterial pathogens. Two prototype bacterial antigens (the double-mutated GAS Streptolysin-O (SLOdm) and the GBS pilus 2a backbone protein (BP-2a)) were successfully expressed by SAM vectors. Mice immunized with both vaccines produced significant amounts of fully functional serum antibodies. The antibody responses generated by SAM vaccines were capable of conferring consistent protection in murine models of GAS and GBS infections. Inclusion of a eukaryotic secretion signal or boosting with the recombinant protein resulted in higher specific-antibody levels and protection. Our results support the concept of using SAM vaccines as potential solution for a wide range of both viral and bacterial pathogens, due to the versatility of the manufacturing processes and the broad spectrum of elicited protective immune response. Copyright © 2016 GSK Vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of immune responses induced by inactivated, live attenuated and DNA vaccines against Japanese encephalitis virus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieqiong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Na; Fan, Dongying; Liang, Guodong; Gao, Na; An, Jing

    2013-08-28

    Vaccination is the most effective countermeasure for protecting individuals from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. There are two types of JEV vaccines currently used in China: the Vero cell-derived inactivated vaccine and the live attenuated vaccine. In this study, we characterized the immune response and protective efficacy induced in mice by the inactivated vaccine, live attenuated vaccine and the DNA vaccine candidate pCAG-JME, which expresses JEV prM-E proteins. We found that the live attenuated vaccine conferred 100% protection and resulted in the generation of high levels of specific anti-JEV antibodies and cytokines. The pCAG-JME vaccine induced protective immunity as well as the live attenuated vaccine. Unexpectedly, immunization with the inactivated vaccine only induced a limited immune response and partial protection, which may be due to the decreased activity of dendritic cells and the expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells observed in these mice. Altogether, our results suggest that the live attenuated vaccine is more effective in providing protection against JEV infection than the inactivated vaccine and that pCAG-JME will be a potential JEV vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis infection induces vaginal CD4+ T-cell infiltration in a mouse model: a vaccine strategy to reduce vaginal infection and HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey D; Garber, Gary E

    2015-07-15

    Complications related to the diagnosis and treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis infection, as well as the association between T. vaginalis infection and increased transmission of and susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus, highlight the need for alternative interventions. We tested a human-safe, aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted whole-cell T. vaginalis vaccine for efficacy in a BALB/c mouse model of vaginal infection. A whole-cell T. vaginalis vaccine was administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice, using a prime-boost vaccination schedule. CD4(+) T-cell infiltration in the murine vaginal tissue and local and systemic levels of immunoglobulins were measured at time points up to 4 weeks following infection. Vaccination reduced the incidence and increased the clearance of T. vaginalis infection and induced both systemic and local humoral immune responses. CD4(+) T cells were detected in vaginal tissues following intravaginal infection with T. vaginalis but were not seen in uninfected mice. The presence of CD4(+) T cells following T. vaginalis infection can potentially increase susceptibility to and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. The vaccine induces local and systemic immune responses and confers significantly greater protection against vaginal infection than seen in unvaccinated mice (P vaginalis infection that could also influence the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Vaccine-induced canine distemper in a lesser panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, M; Montali, R J; Brownstein, D; James, A E; Appel, M J

    1976-11-01

    A fatal disease occurred in a lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens) 2 weeks after vaccination with modified live distemper vaccine. The disease clinically resembled canine distemper. Pathologically there was giant cell pneumonia, with canine distemper viral inclusion bodies in pulmonary and digestive tract epithelium. Viral isolates were indicative of an attenuated strain rather than virulent types.

  8. Basophils help establish protective immunity induced by irradiated larval vaccination for filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrero, Marina N.; Morris, C. Paul; Mitre, Blima K.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mueller, Ellen; Karasuyama, Hajime; Mitre, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Basophils are increasingly recognized as playing important roles in the immune response towards helminths. In this study, we evaluated the role of basophils in vaccine-mediated protection against filariae, tissue-invasive parasitic nematodes responsible for diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. Protective immunity and immunological responses were assessed in BALB/c mice vaccinated with irradiated L3 stage larvae and depleted of basophils with weekly injections of anti-CD200R3 antibody. Depletion of basophils after administration of the vaccination regimen but before challenge infection did not alter protective immunity. In contrast, basophil depletion initiated prior to vaccination and continued after challenge infection significantly attenuated the protective effect conferred by vaccination. Vaccine-induced cellular immune responses to parasite antigen were substantially decreased in basophil-depleted mice, with significant decreases in CD4+ T-cell production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, skin mast cell numbers, which increased significantly after vaccination with irradiated L3 larvae, were unchanged after vaccination in basophil-depleted mice. These findings demonstrate that basophils help establish the immune responses responsible for irradiated L3 vaccine protection. PMID:23777951

  9. Transcriptional profiling of mycobacterial antigen-induced responses in infants vaccinated with BCG at birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Adrian VS

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel tuberculosis (TB vaccines recently tested in humans have been designed to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG. Because BCG vaccination is used extensively in infants, this population group is likely to be the first in which efficacy trials of new vaccines will be conducted. However, our understanding of the complexity of immunity to BCG in infants is inadequate, making interpretation of vaccine-induced immune responses difficult. Methods To better understand BCG-induced immunity, we performed gene expression profiling in five 10-week old infants routinely vaccinated with BCG at birth. RNA was extracted from 12 hour BCG-stimulated or purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD-stimulated PBMC, isolated from neonatal blood collected 10 weeks after vaccination. RNA was hybridised to the Sentrix® HumanRef-8 Expression BeadChip (Illumina to measure expression of >16,000 genes. Results We found that ex vivo stimulation of PBMC with PPD and BCG induced largely similar gene expression profiles, except that BCG induced greater macrophage activation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway, including PPAR-γ, involved in activation of the alternative, anti-inflammatory macrophage response was down-regulated following stimulation with both antigens. In contrast, up-regulation of genes associated with the classic, pro-inflammatory macrophage response was noted. Further analysis revealed a decrease in the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, including integrin alpha M (ITGAM, which is known to be important for entry of mycobacteria into the macrophage. Interestingly, more leukocyte genes were down-regulated than up-regulated. Conclusion Our results suggest that a combination of suppressed and up-regulated genes may be key in determining development of protective immunity to TB induced by vaccination with BCG.

  10. Eyedrop Vaccination Induced Systemic and Mucosal Immunity against Influenza Virus in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Yoon

    Full Text Available We investigated eyedrop vaccination (EDV in pre-clinical development for immunological protection against influenza and for potential side effects involving ocular inflammation and the central nervous system (CNS. Live attenuated influenza EDV, CA07 (H1N1, PZ-4 (H1N2 and Uruguay (H3N2, induced both systemic and mucosal virus-specific antibody responses in ferrets. In addition, EDV resulted in a clinically significant protection against viral challenge, and suppression of viral replication in nasal secretion and lung tissue. Regarding safety, we found that administered EDV flow through the tear duct to reach the base of nasal cavity, and thus do not contact the olfactory bulb. All analyses for potential adverse effects due to EDV, including histological and functional examinations, did not reveal significant side effects. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EDV as effective, while being a safe administration route with minimum local side effects, CNS invasion, or visual function disturbance.

  11. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Peters

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  12. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathan C; Kimblin, Nicola; Secundino, Nagila; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lawyer, Phillip; Sacks, David L

    2009-06-01

    Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM)+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  13. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  14. Human T cell responses induced by vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Boesen, H; Pedersen, B K

    1997-01-01

    depending on the prevaccination sensitivity to PPD. Previously sensitized donors mounted a potent and highly accelerated recall response within the first week of BCG vaccination. Nonsensitized donors, in contrast, exhibited a gradually increasing responsiveness to mycobacterial Ags, reaching maximal levels......Many aspects of the widely used bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis are still the subject of controversy. There is a huge variation in efficacy from one clinical trial to another and no relationship between vaccine-induced skin test conversion and subsequent protection. We...... have studied in vitro cell-mediated immune responses primed by BCG vaccination in 22 healthy Danish donors with different levels of in vitro purified protein derivative (PPD) reactivity before vaccination. The study demonstrated a markedly different development of reactivity to mycobacterial Ags...

  15. HIV DNA-Adenovirus Multiclade Envelope Vaccine Induces gp41 Antibody Immunodominance in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qifeng; Williams, Wilton B; Saunders, Kevin O; Seaton, Kelly E; Wiehe, Kevin J; Vandergrift, Nathan; Von Holle, Tarra A; Trama, Ashley M; Parks, Robert J; Luo, Kan; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kepler, Thomas B; Marshall, Dawn J; Montefiori, David C; Sutherland, Laura L; Alam, Munir S; Whitesides, John F; Bowman, Cindy M; Permar, Sallie R; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Seed, Patrick C; Van Rompay, Koen K A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-11-01

    Dominant antibody responses in vaccinees who received the HIV-1 multiclade (A, B, and C) envelope (Env) DNA/recombinant adenovirus virus type 5 (rAd5) vaccine studied in HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) efficacy trial 505 (HVTN 505) targeted Env gp41 and cross-reacted with microbial antigens. In this study, we asked if the DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced a similar antibody response in rhesus macaques (RMs), which are commonly used as an animal model for human HIV-1 infections and for testing candidate HIV-1 vaccines. We also asked if gp41 immunodominance could be avoided by immunization of neonatal RMs during the early stages of microbial colonization. We found that the DNA/rAd5 vaccine elicited a higher frequency of gp41-reactive memory B cells than gp120-memory B cells in adult and neonatal RMs. Analysis of the vaccine-induced Env-reactive B cell repertoire revealed that the majority of HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies in both adult and neonatal RMs were targeted to gp41. Interestingly, a subset of gp41-reactive antibodies isolated from RMs cross-reacted with host antigens, including autologous intestinal microbiota. Thus, gp41-containing DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced dominant gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies derived from blood memory B cells in RMs as observed in the HVTN 505 vaccine efficacy trial. These data demonstrated that RMs can be used to investigate gp41 immunodominance in candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Moreover, colonization of neonatal RMs occurred within the first week of life, and immunization of neonatal RMs during this time also induced a dominant gp41-reactive antibody response.IMPORTANCE Our results are critical to current work in the HIV-1 vaccine field evaluating the phenomenon of gp41 immunodominance induced by HIV-1 Env gp140 in RMs and humans. Our data demonstrate that RMs are an appropriate animal model to study this phenomenon and to determine the immunogenicity in new HIV-1 Env trimer vaccine designs. The demonstration of gp41 immunodominance in

  16. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  17. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E; Bygum, Anette

    2016-11-02

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons. Two patients had skin biopsies performed from their skin lesions, and 2 patients had the nodules surgically removed. Forty-two children had a patch-test performed with 2% aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum and 39 of them (92%) had a positive reaction. The persistent skin reactions were treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations.

  18. Effective antitumor peptide vaccines can induce severe autoimmune pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Hussein; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Rodriguez, Paulo; Celis, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has shown a tremendous success in treating cancer. Unfortunately, this success is frequently associated with severe autoimmune pathology. In this study, we used the transgenic RIP-gp mouse model to assess the antitumor therapeutic benefit of peptide vaccination while evaluating the possible associated autoimmune pathology. We report that palmitoylated gp33-41 peptide and poly-IC adjuvant vaccine (BiVax) generated ∼ 5-10 % of antigen specific T cell responses in wild type and sup...

  19. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  20. Microneedle delivery of trivalent influenza vaccine to the skin induces long-term cross-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Lee, Su-Hwa; Choi, Won-Hyung; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Goo, Tae-Won; Lee, Ju-Hie; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2016-12-01

    A painless self-immunization method with effective and broad cross-protection is urgently needed to prevent infections against newly emerging influenza viruses. In this study, we investigated the cross-protection efficacy of trivalent influenza vaccine containing inactivated A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2) and B/Lee/40 after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with this vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin provided 100% protection against lethal challenges with heterologous pandemic strain influenza A/California/04/09, heterogeneous A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 viruses 8 months after boost immunization. Cross-reactive serum IgG antibody responses against heterologous influenza viruses A/California/04/09, A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 were induced at high levels. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were also maintained at high levels against these heterogeneous viruses. Microneedle vaccination induced substantial levels of cross-reactive IgG antibody responses in the lung and cellular immune responses, as well as cross-reactive antibody-secreting plasma cells in the spleen. Viral loads in the lung were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. All mice survived after viral challenges. These results indicate that skin vaccination with trivalent vaccine using a microneedle array could provide protection against seasonal epidemic or new pandemic strain of influenza viruses.

  1. Whole-Cell Cancer Vaccines Induce Large Antibody Responses to Carbohydrates and Glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li; Schrump, David S; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2016-12-22

    Whole-cell cancer vaccines are a promising strategy for treating cancer, but the characteristics of a favorable immune response are not fully understood. New insights could enable development of better vaccines, discovery of new antigens, and identification of biomarkers of efficacy. Using glyco-antigen microarrays, we demonstrate that GVAX Pancreas (a granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-modified whole-cell tumor vaccine) induces large immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M responses to many antigens, including tumor-associated carbohydrates, blood group antigens, α-Gal, and bovine fetuin. Antibody responses to α-Gal, a glycan found in fetal bovine serum (FBS) used to produce the vaccine, correlated inversely with overall survival and appear to compete with productive responses to the vaccine. H1299 lysate vaccine, produced with FBS, also induced responses to α-Gal and fetuin but not K562-GM, which is produced in serum-free medium. Our results provide new potential biomarkers to evaluate productive/unproductive immune responses and suggest that removal/reduction of FBS could improve the efficacy of whole-cell vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Troy J; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p

  3. HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses induced by Listeria vector vaccines are maintained in mice subsequently infected with a model helminth parasite, Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac T; Paterson, Yvonne; Nyhoff, Lindsay; Harn, Donald A

    2013-11-19

    In areas co-endemic for helminth parasites and HIV/AIDS, infants are often administered vaccines prior to infection with immune modulatory helminth parasites. Systemic Th2 biasing and immune suppression caused by helminth infection reduces cell-mediated responses to vaccines such as tetanus toxoid and BCG. Therefore, we asked if infection with helminthes post-vaccination, alters already established vaccine induced immune responses. In our model, mice are vaccinated against HIV-1 Gag using a Listeria vaccine vector (Lm-Gag) in a prime-boost manner, then infected with the human helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. This allows us to determine if established vaccine responses are maintained or altered after helminth infection. Our second objective asked if helminth infection post-vaccination alters the recipient's ability to respond to a second boost. Here we compared responses between uninfected mice, schistosome infected mice, and infected mice that were given an anthelminthic, which occurred coincident with the boost or four weeks prior, as well as comparing to un-boosted mice. We report that HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses generated by Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines are maintained following subsequent chronic schistosome infection, providing further evidence that Listeria vector vaccines induce potent vaccine-specific responses that can withstand helminth infection. We also were able to demonstrate that administration of a second Listeria boost, which markedly enhanced the immune response, was minimally impacted by schistosome infection, or anthelminthic therapy. Surprisingly, we also observed enhanced antibody responses to HIV Gag in vaccinated mice subsequently infected with schistosomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccine-induced myositis with intramuscular sterile abscess formation: MRI and ultrasound findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Bekci, Tumay; Selcuk, Mustafa Bekir [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Dabak, Nevzat [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Samsun Medical Park Hospital, Department of Radiology, Samsun (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    Although limb swelling is a well-known complication of vaccination, its rarity and wide band of differential diagnosis of limb swelling make it a diagnostic challenge. In this case report, we describe three cases of vaccine-induced myositis with intramuscular sterile abscess formation in patients with limb swelling and their magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography findings. Both radiologists and clinicians should be familiar with this rare entity, its clinical and imaging spectrum, and follow-up strategies. (orig.)

  5. Vaccine delivery to the oral cavity using coated microneedles induces systemic and mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhe; Tao, Wenqian; Krebs, Shelly J; Sutton, William F; Haigwood, Nancy L; Gill, Harvinder S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using coated microneedles to deliver vaccines into the oral cavity to induce systemic and mucosal immune responses. Microneedles were coated with sulforhodamine, ovalbumin and two HIV antigens. Coated microneedles were inserted into the inner lower lip and dorsal surface of the tongue of rabbits. Histology was used to confirm microneedle insertion, and systemic and mucosal immune responses were characterized by measuring antigen-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) in saliva, respectively. Histological evaluation of tissues shows that coated microneedles can penetrate the lip and tongue to deliver coatings. Using ovalbumin as a model antigen it was found that the lip and the tongue are equally immunogenic sites for vaccination. Importantly, both sites also induced a significant (p Microneedle-based oral cavity vaccination was also compared to the intramuscular route using two HIV antigens, a virus-like particle and a DNA vaccine. Microneedle-based delivery to the oral cavity and the intramuscular route exhibited similar (p > 0.05) yet significant (p microneedle-based oral cavity vaccination group stimulated a significantly higher (p microneedles to induce systemic IgG and secretory IgA in saliva, and could offer a versatile technique for oral mucosal vaccination.

  6. Acceptability of Aujeszky's disease vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimman, T G

    1992-01-01

    Vaccines against Aujeszky's disease are not only used to prevent the clinical consequences of a field infection, but also to support eradication of the virus. The current Aujeszky's disease vaccines (ADV) protect against severe clinical signs of disease and they reduce but usually do not prevent virus multiplication and excretion or the establishment of latency after infection. Vaccines also limit virus multiplication after reactivation. The efficacy of vaccination is reduced by passively acquired maternal antibodies. The mechanisms that afford immunity to the virus are only poorly understood. No simple parameters for immunity are therefore available. The European Pharmacopoeia formulates requirements for inactivated and live ADV vaccines for parenteral use. The vaccines must be safe; they must not induce local or systemic reactions; they must not be transmitted to unvaccinated pigs; they must not be transmitted by semen and across the placenta; the attenuation must be irreversible (live vaccines); the inactivation must be complete (inactivated vaccines); they must prevent mortality and limit growth retardation after challenge infection; the vaccine must not contain contaminating micro-organisms and viruses. No requirements have been formulated with regard to reduction of excretion of challenge virus after experimental infection, efficacy in pigs with maternal antibodies, reproducibility of efficacy studies, reduction of virus transmission under field conditions, the presence of a serological marker, safety for other species, and safety and efficacy of intranasally administered vaccines. Future developments should be directed to the development and evaluation of ADV vaccines that are able to limit transmission of the virus.

  7. Combination of protein and viral vaccines induces potent cellular and humoral immune responses and enhanced protection from murine malaria challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Claire L; Birkett, Ashley J; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2007-12-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (CSP). Mice were then challenged with P. berghei sporozoites to determine the protective efficacies of different vaccine regimens. Two immunizations with the protein vaccine CV-1866, based on the hepatitis B core antigen particle, induced strong humoral immunity to the repeat region of CSP that was weakly protective against sporozoite challenge. Prime-boost with the viral vector vaccines, FP9 followed by MVA, induced strong T-cell immunity to the CD8+ epitope Pb9 and partially protected animals from challenge. Physically mixing CV-1866 with FP9 or MVA and then immunizing with the resultant combinations in a prime-boost regimen induced both cellular and humoral immunity and afforded substantially higher levels of protection (combination, 90%) than either vaccine alone (CV-1866, 12%; FP9/MVA, 37%). For diseases such as malaria in which different potent immune responses are required to protect against different stages, using combinations of partially effective vaccines may offer a more rapid route to achieving deployable levels of efficacy than individual vaccine strategies.

  8. Polyclonal HER2-specific antibodies induced by vaccination mediate receptor internalization and degradation in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sustained HER2 signaling at the cell surface is an oncogenic mechanism in a significant proportion of breast cancers. While clinically effective therapies targeting HER2 such as mAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors exist, tumors overexpressing HER2 eventually progress despite treatment. Thus, abrogation of persistent HER2 expression at the plasma membrane to synergize with current approaches may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. Methods We generated polyclonal anti-HER2 antibodies (HER2-VIA) by vaccinating mice with an adenovirus expressing human HER2, and assessed their signaling effects in vitro and anti-tumor effects in a xenograft model. In addition, we studied the signaling effects of human HER2-specific antibodies induced by vaccinating breast cancer patients with a HER2 protein vaccine. Results HER2-VIA bound HER2 at the plasma membrane, initially activating the downstream kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 and Akt, but subsequently inducing receptor internalization in clathrin-coated pits in a HER2 kinase-independent manner, followed by ubiquitination and degradation of HER2 into a 130 kDa fragment phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 1,221/1,222 and 1,248. Following vaccination of breast cancer patients with the HER2 protein vaccine, HER2-specific antibodies were detectable and these antibodies bound to cell surface-expressed HER2 and inhibited HER2 signaling through blocking tyrosine 877 phosphorylation of HER2. In contrast to the murine antibodies, human anti-HER2 antibodies induced by protein vaccination did not mediate receptor internalization and degradation. Conclusion These data provide new insight into HER2 trafficking at the plasma membrane and the changes induced by polyclonal HER2-specific antibodies. The reduction of HER2 membrane expression and HER2 signaling by polyclonal antibodies induced by adenoviral HER2 vaccines supports human clinical trials with this strategy for those breast cancer patients

  9. BCG vaccination induces HIV target cell activation in HIV-exposed infants in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasper, Melanie A; Hesseling, Anneke C; Mohar, Isaac; Myer, Landon; Azenkot, Tali; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Hanekom, Willem; Cotton, Mark F; Crispe, I Nicholas; Sodora, Donald L; Jaspan, Heather B

    2017-04-06

    BACKGROUND. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered at birth to protect infants against tuberculosis throughout Africa, where most perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurs. We examined whether BCG vaccination alters the levels of activated HIV target T cells in HIV-exposed South African infants. METHODS. HIV-exposed infants were randomized to receive routine (at birth) or delayed (at 8 weeks) BCG vaccination. Activated and CCR5-expressing peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, monocyte, and NK cell frequencies were evaluated by flow cytometry and immune gene expression via PCR using Biomark (Fluidigm). RESULTS. Of 149 infants randomized, 92% (n = 137) were retained at 6 weeks: 71 in the routine BCG arm and 66 in the delayed arm. Routine BCG vaccination led to a 3-fold increase in systemic activation of HIV target CD4+CCR5+ T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+) at 6 weeks (0.25% at birth versus 0.08% in delayed vaccination groups; P = 0.029), which persisted until 8 weeks of age when the delayed arm was vaccinated. Vaccination of the infants in the delayed arm at 8 weeks resulted in a similar increase in activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells. The increase in activated T cells was associated with increased levels of MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), IL12RB1, and IFN-α1 transcripts within peripheral blood mononuclear cells but minimal changes in innate cells. CONCLUSION. BCG vaccination induces immune changes in HIV-exposed infants, including an increase in the proportion of activated CCR5+CD4+ HIV target cells. These findings provide insight into optimal BCG vaccine timing to minimize the risks of HIV transmissions to exposed infants while preserving potential benefits conferred by BCG vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02062580. FUNDING. This trial was sponsored by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (MV-00-9-900-01871-0-00) and the Thrasher Foundation (NR-0095); for details, see Acknowledgments.

  10. How common are long-lasting, intensely itching vaccination granulomas and contact allergy to aluminium induced by currently used pediatric vaccines? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfors, Elisabet; Hermansson, Göran; Nyström Kronander, Ulla; Falk, Lars; Valter, Lars; Trollfors, Birger

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of long-lasting, intensely itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site for aluminium (Al)-adsorbed vaccines (vaccination granulomas) was investigated in a prospective cohort study comprising 4,758 children who received either a diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Infanrix®, Pentavac®) alone or concomitant with a pneumococcal conjugate (Prevenar). Both vaccines were adsorbed to an Al adjuvant. Altogether 38 children (0.83 %) with itching granulomas were identified, epicutaneously tested for Al sensitisation and followed yearly. Contact allergy to Al was verified in 85 %. The median duration of symptoms was 22 months in those hitherto recovered. The frequency of granulomas induced by Infanrix® was >0.66 % and by Prevenar >0.35 %. The risk for granulomas increased from 0.63 to 1.18 % when a second Al-adsorbed vaccine was added to the schedule. Long-lasting itching vaccination granulomas are poorly understood but more frequent than previously known after infant vaccination with commonly used diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The risk increases with the number of vaccines given. Most children with itching granulomas become contact allergic to aluminium. Itching vaccination granulomas are benign but may be troublesome and should be recognised early in primary health care to avoid unnecessary investigations, anxiety and mistrust.

  11. Safe sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sex; Sexually transmitted - safe sex; GC - safe sex; Gonorrhea - safe sex; Herpes - safe sex; HIV - safe sex; ... contact. STIs include: Chlamydia Genital herpes Genital warts Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV HPV Syphilis STIs are also called ...

  12. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  13. Oral Vaccination with Lipid-Formulated BCG Induces a Long-lived, Multifunctional CD4+ T Cell Memory Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancelet, Lindsay R.; Aldwell, Frank E.; Rich, Fenella J.; Kirman, Joanna R.

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4+ T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4+ T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4+ T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4+ T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4+ T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines. PMID:23049885

  14. Antibody Immunity Induced by H7N9 Avian Influenza Vaccines: Evaluation Criteria, Affecting Factors, and Implications for Rational Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenglei Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV infections in humans have public health authorities around the world on high alert for the potential development of a human influenza pandemic. Currently, the newly-emerged highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N9 virus poses a dual challenge for public health and poultry industry. Numerous H7N9 vaccine candidates have been generated using various platforms. Immunization trials in animals and humans showed that H7N9 vaccines are apparently poorly immunogenic because they induced low hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibody titers. However, H7N9 vaccines elicit comparable levels of total hemagglutinin (HA-reactive IgG antibody as the seasonal influenza vaccines, suggesting H7N9 vaccines are as immunogenic as their seasonal counterparts. A large fraction of overall IgG antibody is non-neutralizing antibody and they target unrecognized epitopes outside of the traditional antigenic sites in HA. Further, the Treg epitope identified in H7 HA may at least partially contribute to regulation of antibody immunity. Here, we review the latest advances for the development of H7N9 vaccines and discuss the influence of serological criteria on evaluation of immunogenicity of H7N9 vaccines. Next, we discuss factors affecting antibody immunity induced by H7N9 vaccines, including the change in antigenic epitopes in HA and the presence of the Treg epitope. Last, we present our perspectives for the unique features of antibody immunity of H7N9 vaccines and propose some future directions to improve or modify antibody response induced by H7N9 vaccines. This perspective would provide critical implications for rational design of H7N9 vaccines for human and veterinary use.

  15. Is Montgomery tracheal Safe-T-Tube clinical failure induced by biofilm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusconi, Massimo; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Delfini, Andrea; De Virgilio, Armando; Taddei, Anna Rita; Vassalli, Carlo; Conte, Michela; Del Sette, Fausto; Benincasa, Anna Teresa; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2013-08-01

    Montgomery Safe-T-Tube deterioration and early biofilm colonization may explain the discomfort claimed by many patients and clinical failures. The aim of the study was to analyze the deterioration of Montgomery Safe-T-Tube morphological and mechanical properties in vivo in 16 patients by using microbiological methods, optical and electron microscopy, and engineering tests. Prospective controlled study at a single medical center. University hospital. The study, conducted from April 2007 to February 2012 at the "Sapienza" University of Rome, was designed to collect 2 Montgomery Safe-T-Tubes from each patient. The first was removed 3 to 15 days after insertion (group A) and the second at least 90 days after (group B). Specimens underwent microbiologic assays, electron microscopic analysis, immunocytologic analysis, and mechanical tests. Microorganisms were not isolated in 2 group A cases (12%), whereas they were in all group B cases. Biofilm was identified in 11 of 16 (69%) group A samples and in 16 of 16 (100%) group B samples (P = .0149) using scanning electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry showed monocyte-granulocyte line cells producing interleukin-1β on the external surfaces of Montgomery Safe-T-Tubes. The tensile test showed that the wear related to the longer period of use makes Montgomery Safe-T-Tubes more rigid than newer ones. Early biofilm colonization takes place in Montgomery Safe-T-Tubes in most cases. The mechanical decay could be justified in part by the destructive biofilm activity and by the release of inflammatory effectors and enzymes.

  16. Experimental Leishmania major infection suppresses HIV-1 DNA vaccine induced cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tara M; Nelson, Robin; Artis, David; Scott, Phillip; Boyer, Jean D

    2004-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic in the developing world represents a major global crisis and an effective vaccine is imperative. However, many parasites are common in developing countries and can result in a state of chronic immune activation that is polarized towards a Th2 profile and which can potentially impair responses to vaccines or other infectious challenges. In this study we demonstrate that experimental Leishmania major infection of BALB/c mice inhibits responses to a DNA-based HIV-1 gag vaccine. L. major infection in BALB/c results in a polarized Th2 immune response. In this study naïve BALB/c mice immunized with the HIV-1 gag DNA vaccine mounted a cellular immune response against the vaccine antigen, HIV-1 gag. CD8+ T lymphocytes were able to respond in vitro to HIV-1 gag stimulation and secrete interferon (IFN)-gamma. However, L. major-infected, vaccinated BALB/c mice had a significantly reduced number of IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells following in vitro stimulation with gag antigen. These data suggest that parasitic infection, which results in a Th2 profile, reduces the efficacy of DNA vaccines that are designed to induce antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Targeting Vaccine-Induced Extrafollicular Pathway of B Cell Differentiation Improves Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Shannon L; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P; Meuwissen, Samantha; Plummer, Joseph R; McGettigan, James P

    2017-04-15

    Vaccine-induced B cells differentiate along two pathways. The follicular pathway gives rise to germinal centers (GCs) that can take weeks to fully develop. The extrafollicular pathway gives rise to short-lived plasma cells (PCs) that can rapidly secrete protective antibodies within days of vaccination. Rabies virus (RABV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) requires rapid vaccine-induced humoral immunity for protection. Therefore, we hypothesized that targeting extrafollicular B cell responses for activation would improve the speed and magnitude of RABV PEP. To test this hypothesis, we constructed, recovered, and characterized a recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing murine B cell activating factor (BAFF) (rRABV-mBAFF). BAFF is an ideal molecule to improve early pathways of B cell activation, as it links innate and adaptive immunity, promoting potent B cell responses. Indeed, rRABV-mBAFF induced a faster, higher antibody response in mice and enhanced survivorship in PEP settings compared to rRABV. Interestingly, rRABV-mBAFF and rRABV induced equivalent numbers of GC B cells, suggesting that rRABV-mBAFF augmented the extrafollicular B cell pathway. To confirm that rRABV-mBAFF modulated the extrafollicular pathway, we used a signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP)-deficient mouse model. In response to antigen, SAP-deficient mice form extrafollicular B cell responses but do not generate GCs. rRABV-mBAFF induced similar anti-RABV antibody responses in SAP-deficient and wild-type mice, demonstrating that BAFF modulated immunity through the extrafollicular and not the GC B cell pathway. Collectively, strategies that manipulate pathways of B cell activation may facilitate the development of a single-dose RABV vaccine that replaces current complicated and costly RABV PEP. IMPORTANCE Effective RABV PEP is currently resource- and cost-prohibitive in regions of the world where RABV is most prevalent. In order to diminish the requirements for

  18. Can VHS virus bypass the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination in rainbow trout?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability...... and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly...... pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus...

  19. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D.; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M.; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N.; Frost, Kathy L.; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K.; Maslow, Joel N.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Yao, Xiao-jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract. PMID:28589934

  20. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N; Frost, Kathy L; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K; Maslow, Joel N; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B; Kobinger, Gary P

    2017-06-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract.

  1. Management of vaccine-induced infectious bursal disease in chicks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred two-week old cockerel chicks and forty two-week old turkey poults were each admlnistered two doses of IBD vaccine of chick embryo cell culture origin. This produced clinical infectious bursal disease in the cockerel chicks but the turkey poults did not suffer clinical infection. Administration of an antibiotic- ...

  2. based polypeptide vaccine against cow mastitis induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use against viruses and bacteria and in cancer immunotherapy [3,4]. To date, research has shown that many proteins are good candidates for mastitis vaccine, including clumping factor A (ClfA) and elastin binding protein (EbpS) of S. aureus [5,6], outer membrane protein C (OmpC) and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of ...

  3. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... the mechanisms for manipulating the immune system, tumor immunotherapy, especially, targeting angiogenesis ... delivery system for transfection. The effects of resulting vaccine and underlying mechanism were investigated in ..... Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of T-cadherin in human hepatocellular ...

  4. PD-1 blockade enhances the vaccination-induced immune response in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonios, Joseph P; Soto, Horacio; Everson, Richard G; Orpilla, Joey; Moughon, Diana; Shin, Namjo; Sedighim, Shaina; Yong, William H; Li, Gang; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Liau, Linda M; Prins, Robert M

    2016-07-07

    DC vaccination with autologous tumor lysate has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in preclinical and clinical studies. While the vaccine appears capable of inducing T cell infiltration into tumors, the effectiveness of active vaccination in progressively growing tumors is less profound. In parallel, a number of studies have identified negative costimulatory pathways, such as programmed death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1), as relevant mediators of the intratumoral immune responses. Clinical responses to PD-1 pathway inhibition, however, have also been varied. To evaluate the relevance to established glioma, the effects of PD-1 blockade following DC vaccination were tested in intracranial (i.c.) glioma tumor- bearing mice. Treatment with both DC vaccination and PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in long-term survival, while neither agent alone induced a survival benefit in animals with larger, established tumors. This survival benefit was completely dependent on CD8+ T cells. Additionally, DC vaccine plus PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in the upregulation of integrin homing and immunologic memory markers on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In clinical samples, DC vaccination in GBM patients was associated with upregulation of PD-1 expression in vivo, while ex vivo blockade of PD-1 on freshly isolated TILs dramatically enhanced autologous tumor cell cytolysis. These findings strongly suggest that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in the adaptive immune resistance of established GBM in response to antitumor active vaccination and provide us with a rationale for the clinical translation of this combination therapy.

  5. HIV-1 vaccine induced immune responses in newborns of HIV-1 infected mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Elizabeth J; Johnson, Daniel C; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Tomaras, Georgia D; McNamara, James; Read, Jennifer S; Douglas, Steven D; Deville, Jaime; Gurwith, Marc; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Lambert, John S

    2006-07-13

    Breast milk transmission continues to account for a large proportion of cases of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 worldwide. An effective HIV-1 vaccine coupled with either passive immunization or short-term antiretroviral prophylaxis represents a potential strategy to prevent breast milk transmission. This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine with and without a subunit envelope boost in infants born to HIV-1-infected women. : Placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in the US were immunized with a prime-boost regimen using a canarypox virus HIV-1 vaccine (vCP1452) and a recombinant glycoprotein subunit vaccine (rgp120). Infants (n = 30) were randomized to receive: vCP1452 alone, vCP1452 + rgp120, or corresponding placebos. Local reactions were mild or moderate and no significant systemic toxicities occurred. Subjects receiving both vaccines had gp120-specific binding serum antibodies that were distinguishable from maternal antibody. Repeated gp160-specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in 75%. Neutralizing activity to HIV-1 homologous to the vaccine strain was observed in 50% of the vCP1452 + rgp120 subjects who had lost maternal antibody by week 24. In some infants HIV-1-specific proliferative and antibody responses persisted until week 104. HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were detected in two subjects in each treatment group; the frequency of HIV-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses did not differ between vaccine and placebo recipients. The demonstration of vaccine-induced immune responses in early infancy supports further study of HIV-1 vaccination as a strategy to reduce breast milk transmission.

  6. Non-pathogenic colonization with Chlamydia in the gastrointestinal tract as oral vaccination for inducing transmucosal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luying; Zhu, Cuiming; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Nu; Morrison, Sandra; Morrison, Richard; Xue, Min; Zhong, Guangming

    2017-11-13

    Chlamydia has been detected in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. We now report that gastrointestinal Chlamydia muridarum is able to induce robust transmucosal protection in mice. C. muridarum colonization in the gastrointestinal tract correlated with both a shortened course of C. muridarum genital infection and stronger protection against subsequent genital tract challenge infection. Mice pre-inoculated intragastrically with C. muridarum became highly resistant to subsequent C. muridarum infection in the genital tract, resulting in prevention of pathology in the upper genital tract. The transmucosal protection in the genital tract was rapidly induced, durable and dependent on MHC class II but not class I antigen presentation. Although deficiency in CD4+ T cells only partially reduced the transmucosal protection, depletion of CD4+ T cells from B cell-deficient mice completely abolished the protection, suggesting a synergistic role of both CD4+ T and B cells in the gastrointestinal C. muridarum-induced transmucosal immunity. However, the same protective immunity did not significantly affect C. muridarum colonization in the gastrointestinal tract. The long-lasting colonization with C. muridarum was restricted to the gastrointestinal tract and nonpathogenic to either gastrointestinal or extra-gastrointestinal tissues. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal C. muridarum did not alter gut microbiota or the development of gut mucosal resident memory T cells to a non-chlamydial infection. Thus, Chlamydia may be developed into a safe and orally deliverable replicating vaccine for inducing transmucosal protection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. A single intranasal administration of virus-like particle vaccine induces an efficient protection for mice against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yue-Ying; Fu, Yuan-Hui; Yan, Yi-Fei; Hua, Ying; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Song, Jing-Dong; Peng, Xiang-Lei; Huang, Jiaqiang; Hong, Tao; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pediatric pathogen causing acute viral respiratory disease in infants and young children. However, no licensed vaccines are currently available. Virus-like particles (VLPs) may bring new hope to producing RSV VLP vaccine with high immunogenicity and safety. Here, we constructed the recombinants of matrix protein (M) and fusion glycoprotein (F) of RSV, respectively into a replication-deficient first-generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which were used to co-infect Vero cells to assemble RSV VLPs successfully. The resulting VLPs showed similar immunoreactivity and function to RSV virion in vitro. Moreover, Th1 polarized response, and effective mucosal virus-neutralizing antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses were induced by a single intranasal (i.n.) administration of RSV VLPs rather than intramuscular (i.m.) inoculation, although the comparable RSV F-specific serum IgG and long-lasting RSV-specific neutralizing antibody were detected in the mice immunized by both routes. Upon RSV challenge, VLP-immunized mice showed increased viral clearance but decreased signs of enhanced lung pathology and fewer eosinophils compared to mice immunized with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). In addition, a single i.n. RSV VLP vaccine has the capability to induce RSV-specific long-lasting neutralizing antibody responses observable up to 15 months. Our results demonstrate that the long-term and memory immune responses in mice against RSV were induced by a single i.n. administration of RSV VLP vaccine, suggesting a successful approach of RSV VLPs as an effective and safe mucosal vaccine against RSV infection, and an applicable and qualified platform of FGAd-infected Vero cells for VLP production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Protection against bovine tuberculosis induced by oral vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG is not enhanced by co-administration of mycobacterial protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D Neil; Aldwell, Frank E; Vordermeier, H Martin; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buddle, Bryce M

    2011-12-15

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) delivered to calves by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce protection against bovine tuberculosis. A study was conducted in cattle to determine if a combination of a low dose of oral BCG and a protein vaccine could induce protective immunity to tuberculosis while not sensitising animals to tuberculin. Groups of calves (10 per group) were vaccinated by administering 2 × 10(7)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG orally or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and a protein vaccine comprised of M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) formulated with the adjuvants Chitin and Gel 01 and delivered by the intranasal route, or CFP formulated with Emulsigen and the TLR2 agonist Pam(3)CSK(4) and administered by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. Two further groups were vaccinated with the CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) vaccines alone. Positive control groups were given 10(8)CFU oral BCG or 10(6)CFU s.c. BCG while a negative control group was non-vaccinated. All animals were challenged with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and euthanized and necropsied at 16 weeks following challenge. Groups of cattle vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU or 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG showed significant reductions in seven, three and four pathological or microbiological disease parameters, respectively, compared to the results for the non-vaccinated group. There was no evidence of protection in calves vaccinated with the combination of oral BCG and CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) or oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or vaccinated with the protein vaccines alone. Positive responses in the comparative cervical skin test at 12 weeks after vaccination were only observed in animals vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU oral BCG or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01. In conclusion, co-administration of a protein vaccine, administered by either systemic or mucosal routes with oral

  9. Pre-Vaccination Frequencies of Th17 Cells Correlate with Vaccine-Induced T-Cell Responses to Survivin-Derived Peptide Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køllgaard, Tania; Ugurel-Becker, Selma; Idorn, Manja

    2015-01-01

    as well as clinical outcome in metastatic melanoma patients vaccinated with survivin-derived peptides. Notably, we observed dysfunctional Th1 and cytotoxic T cells, i.e. down-regulation of the CD3ζchain (p=0.001) and an impaired IFNγ-production (p=0.001) in patients compared to healthy donors, suggesting......Various subsets of immune regulatory cells are suggested to influence the outcome of therapeutic antigen-specific anti-tumor vaccinations. We performed an exploratory analysis of a possible correlation of pre-vaccination Th17 cells, MDSCs, and Tregs with both vaccination-induced T-cell responses...... an altered activity of immune regulatory cells. Moreover, the frequencies of Th17 cells (p=0.03) and Tregs (p=0.02) were elevated as compared to healthy donors. IL-17-secreting CD4+ T cells displayed an impact on the immunological and clinical effects of vaccination: Patients characterized by high...

  10. The role of Toll-like receptor-4 in pertussis vaccine-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooi Frits R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis is an important causative agent of pertussis, an infectious disease of the respiratory tract. After introduction of whole-cell vaccines (wP in the 1950's, pertussis incidence has decreased significantly. Because wP were found to be reactogenic, in most developed countries they have been replaced by acellular vaccines (aP. We have previously shown a role for Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4 in pertussis-infected mice and the pertussis toxin (Ptx-IgG response in wP-vaccinated children, raising the issue of the relative importance of Tlr4 in wP vaccination of mice. Here we analyze the effects of wP and aP vaccination and B. pertussis challenge, in Tlr4-deficient C3H/HeJ and wild-type C3H/HeOuJ mice. aP consists of Ptx, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA, and pertactin (Prn. Results We show an important role of Tlr4 in wP and (to a lesser extent aP vaccination, induction of Th1 and Th17 cells by wP but not aP vaccination, and induction of Th17 cells by infection, confirming data by Higgins et al. (J Immunol 2006, 177:7980–9. Furthermore, in Tlr4-deficient mice, compared to wild-type controls (i after vaccination only, Ptx-IgG (that was induced by aP but not wP vaccination, FHA-IgG, and Prn-IgG levels were similar, (ii after infection (only, lung IL-1α and IL-1β expression were lower, (iii after wP vaccination and challenge, Prn-IgG level and lung IL-5 expression were higher, while lung IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 expression were lower, and lung pathology was absent, and (iv after aP vaccination and challenge, Prn-IgG level and lung IL-5 expression were higher, while Ptx-IgG level was lower. Conclusion Tlr4 does not influence the humoral response to vaccination (without challenge, plays an important role in natural immunity, wP and aP efficacy, and induction of Th1 and Th17 responses, is critical for lung pathology and enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine production after w

  11. Inducing Mucosal IgA: A Challenge for Vaccine Adjuvants and Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyaka, Prosper N

    2017-07-01

    Mucosal IgA or secretory IgA (SIgA) are structurally equipped to resist chemical degradation in the harsh environment of mucosal surfaces and enzymes of host or microbial origin. Production of SIgA is finely regulated, and distinct T-independent and T-dependent mechanisms orchestrate Ig α class switching and SIgA responses against commensal and pathogenic microbes. Most infectious pathogens enter the host via mucosal surfaces. To provide a first line of protection at these entry ports, vaccines are being developed to induce pathogen-specific SIgA in addition to systemic immunity achieved by injected vaccines. Mucosal or epicutaneous delivery of vaccines helps target the inductive sites for SIgA responses. The efficacy of such vaccines relies on the identification and/or engineering of vaccine adjuvants capable of supporting the development of SIgA alongside systemic immunity and delivery systems that improve vaccine delivery to the targeted anatomic sites and immune cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Persistence of yellow fever vaccine-induced antibodies after solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyplosz, B; Burdet, C; François, H; Durrbach, A; Duclos-Vallée, J C; Mamzer-Bruneel, M-F; Poujol, P; Launay, O; Samuel, D; Vittecoq, D; Consigny, P H

    2013-09-01

    Immunization using live attenuated vaccines represents a contra-indication after solid organ transplantation (SOT): consequently, transplant candidates planning to travel in countries where yellow fever is endemic should be vaccinated prior to transplantation. The persistence of yellow fever vaccine-induced antibodies after transplantation has not been studied yet. We measured yellow-fever neutralizing antibodies in 53 SOT recipients vaccinated prior to transplantation (including 29 kidney recipients and 18 liver recipients). All but one (98%) had protective titers of antibodies after a median duration of 3 years (min.: 0.8, max.: 21) after transplantation. The median antibody level was 40 U/L (interquartile range: 40-80). For the 46 patients with a known or estimated date of vaccination, yellow-fever antibodies were still detectable after a median time of 13 years (range: 2-32 years) post-immunization. Our data suggest there is long-term persistence of antibodies to yellow fever in SOT recipients who have been vaccinated prior to transplantation. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Recombinant proteins as vaccines for protection against disease induced by infection with mink astrovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    and polypeptides of the capsid protein of a novel mink astrovirus strain denoted DK7627. Such polynucleotides and polypeptides may be used for the production of vaccines against mink astrovirus which may induce pre-weaning diarrhoea in minks. The invention furthermore relates to vectors, host cells, compositions...

  14. The therapeutic HIV Env C5/gp41 vaccine candidate Vacc-C5 induces specific T cell regulation in a phase I/II clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Kristin; Sommerfelt, Maja; Ökvist, Mats; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Margarita; Kvale, Dag

    2017-03-24

    Levels of non-neutralising antibodies (AB) to the C5 domain of HIV Env gp120 are inversely related to progression of HIV infection. In this phase I/II clinical study we investigated safety of Vacc-C5, a peptide-based therapeutic vaccine candidate corresponding to C5/gp41732-744 as well as the effects on pre-existing AB levels to C5/gp41732-744, immune activation and T cell responses including exploratory assessments of Vacc-C5-induced T cell regulation. Our hypothesis was that exposure of the C5 peptide motif may have detrimental effects due to several of its HLA-like features and that enhancement of non-neutralising anti-C5 AB by vaccination could reduce C5 exposure and thereby chronic immune activation. Thirty-six HIV patients on effective antiretroviral therapy were randomised to one of three dose levels of Vacc-C5 administered intramuscularly with Alhydrogel or intradermally with GM-CSF as adjuvant through initial immunisation and two booster periods over 26 weeks. Vacc-C5-specific AB were measured by ELISA and T cell responses by both IFN-γ ELISPOT and proliferative assays analysed by flow cytometry. Immune regulation was assessed by functional blockade of the two inhibitory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β in parallel cultures. Non-parametric statistical tests were applied. Vacc-C5 was found safe and well tolerated in all patients. Only marginal changes in humoral and cellular responses were induced, without any effect on immune activation. Overall, anti-Vacc-C5 AB levels seemed to decrease compared to pre-existing levels. Whereas Vacc-C5-specific CD8+ T cell proliferative responses increased after the first booster period (p = 0.020; CD4+, p = 0.057), they were reduced after the second. In contrast, Vacc-C5-induced T cell regulation increased after completed vaccination (p ≤ 0.027) and was lower at baseline in the few AB responders identified (p = 0.027). The therapeutic HIV vaccine candidate Vacc-C5 safely induced only marginal immune responses

  15. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  16. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  17. Risk of immunodeficiency virus infection may increase with vaccine-induced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbusch, Matthias; Ignatius, Ralf; Temchura, Vladimir; Nabi, Ghulam; Tippler, Bettina; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Salazar, Andres M; Sauermann, Ülrike; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Uberla, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of novel complementary prime-boost immunization regimens in a nonhuman primate model for HIV infection, rhesus monkeys primed by different DNA vaccines were boosted with virus-like particles (VLP) and then challenged by repeated low-dose rectal exposure to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Characteristic of the cellular immune response after the VLP booster immunization were high numbers of SIV-specific, gamma interferon-secreting cells after stimulation with inactivated SIV particles, but not SIV peptides, and the absence of detectable levels of CD8(+) T cell responses. Antibodies specific to SIV Gag and SIV Env could be induced in all animals, but, consistent with a poor neutralizing activity at the time of challenge, vaccinated monkeys were not protected from acquisition of infection and did not control viremia. Surprisingly, vaccinees with high numbers of SIV-specific, gamma interferon-secreting cells were infected fastest during the repeated low-dose exposures and the numbers of these immune cells in vaccinated macaques correlated with susceptibility to infection. Thus, in the absence of protective antibodies or cytotoxic T cell responses, vaccine-induced immune responses may increase the susceptibility to acquisition of immunodeficiency virus infection. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that virus-specific T helper cells mediate this detrimental effect and contribute to the inefficacy of past HIV vaccination attempts (e.g., STEP study).

  18. Trivalent combination vaccine induces broad heterologous immune responses to norovirus and rotavirus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Tamminen

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV and norovirus (NoV are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1 derived virus-like particles (VLPs of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6, the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50% as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes.

  19. Effects of immunomodulators on the response induced by vaccines against autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciani, Dante J

    2017-11-01

    A promising treatment for T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases is the induction of immune tolerance by modulating the immune response against self-antigens, an objective that may be achieved by vaccination. There are two main types of vaccines currently under development. The tolerogenic vaccines, composed of proteins formed by a cytokine fused to a self-antigen, which usually induce tolerance by eliminating the T-cells that are immune reactive against the self-antigen. The immunogenic vaccines, comprised of a self-antigen plus a sole Th2 adjuvant either free or conjugated, that alleviate autoimmunity by switching the immune response against the self-antigen, from a damaging pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 to an anti-inflammatory Th2 immunity. Another type of vaccines is the DNA vaccines, where cells transiently express the self-antigen encoded by DNA, which induces a Th2 immunity. Actually, DNA vaccines can benefit from the presence of an adjuvant that elicits a systemic sole Th2 immunity to enhance the initially weak immune response characteristic of these vaccines. While in the tolerogenic vaccines, cytokines are the endogenous immunomodulators, in the immunogenic vaccines, the adjuvants are exogenous agents that elicit Th2 immunity with a production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antibodies against the self-antigen. Because the commonly used Th2 adjuvant alum, fails to induce an effective immunity in the elderly population, it is unlikely that it would be widely used. Another Th2 adjuvant, the oil/water emulsions mixed with the antigen, while effective in vaccines against infectious agents, due to potential aldehydes in their formulation may be not suitable for autoimmune vaccines. A unique compound is glatiramer, which seems to be both a random polypeptide antigen and an immune modulator that biases the response to Th2 immunity. Its mechanism of action seems to implicate binding to MHC-II, which alters the outcome of T-cell signaling, leading to anergy

  20. Effective antitumor peptide vaccines can induce severe autoimmune pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Hussein; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Rodriguez, Paulo; Celis, Esteban

    2017-09-19

    Immunotherapy has shown a tremendous success in treating cancer. Unfortunately, this success is frequently associated with severe autoimmune pathology. In this study, we used the transgenic RIP-gp mouse model to assess the antitumor therapeutic benefit of peptide vaccination while evaluating the possible associated autoimmune pathology. We report that palmitoylated gp33-41 peptide and poly-IC adjuvant vaccine (BiVax) generated ∼ 5-10 % of antigen specific T cell responses in wild type and supposedly immune tolerant RIP-gp mice. Boosting with BiVax in combination with αCD40 antibody (TriVax) or BiVax in combination with IL-2/αIL-2 antibody complexes (IL2Cx) significantly increased the immune responses (∼30-50%). Interestingly, although both boosts were equally effective in generating vast T cell responses, BiVax/IL2Cx showed better control of tumor growth than TriVax. However, this effect was associated with high incidence of diabetes in an antigen and CD8 dependent fashion. T cell responses generated by BiVax/IL2Cx, but not those generated by TriVax were highly resistant to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signals. Nevertheless, PD-1 blockade enhanced the ability of TriVax to control tumor growth but increased the incidence of diabetes. Finally, we show that severe autoimmunity by BiVax/IL2Cx was prevented while preserving outstanding antitumor responses by utilizing a tumor antigen not expressed in the pancreas. Our data provides a clear evidence that peptide based vaccines can expand vast endogenous T cell responses which effectively control tumor growth but with high potential of autoimmune pathology.

  1. Effective antitumor peptide vaccines can induce severe autoimmune pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Hussein; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Rodriguez, Paulo; Celis, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has shown a tremendous success in treating cancer. Unfortunately, this success is frequently associated with severe autoimmune pathology. In this study, we used the transgenic RIP-gp mouse model to assess the antitumor therapeutic benefit of peptide vaccination while evaluating the possible associated autoimmune pathology. We report that palmitoylated gp33-41 peptide and poly-IC adjuvant vaccine (BiVax) generated ∼ 5-10 % of antigen specific T cell responses in wild type and supposedly immune tolerant RIP-gp mice. Boosting with BiVax in combination with αCD40 antibody (TriVax) or BiVax in combination with IL-2/αIL-2 antibody complexes (IL2Cx) significantly increased the immune responses (∼30-50%). Interestingly, although both boosts were equally effective in generating vast T cell responses, BiVax/IL2Cx showed better control of tumor growth than TriVax. However, this effect was associated with high incidence of diabetes in an antigen and CD8 dependent fashion. T cell responses generated by BiVax/IL2Cx, but not those generated by TriVax were highly resistant to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signals. Nevertheless, PD-1 blockade enhanced the ability of TriVax to control tumor growth but increased the incidence of diabetes. Finally, we show that severe autoimmunity by BiVax/IL2Cx was prevented while preserving outstanding antitumor responses by utilizing a tumor antigen not expressed in the pancreas. Our data provides a clear evidence that peptide based vaccines can expand vast endogenous T cell responses which effectively control tumor growth but with high potential of autoimmune pathology. PMID:29050282

  2. Improvement of DC vaccine with ALA-PDT induced immunogenic apoptotic cells for skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jie; Fan, Zhixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Peiru; Yang, Degang; Zhang, Linglin; Chen, Wei R; Wang, Xiuli

    2015-07-10

    Dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines have emerged as a promising immunotherapy for cancers. However, most DC vaccines so far have achieved only limited success in cancer treatment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established cancer treatment strategy, can cause immunogenic apoptosis to induce an effective antitumor immune response. In this study, we developed a DC-based cancer vaccine using immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT. The maturation of DCs induced by PDT-treated apoptotic cells was evaluated using electron microscopy, FACS, and ELISA. The anti-tumor immunity of ALA-PDT-DC vaccine was tested with a mouse model. We observed the maturations of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT treated tumor cells, including morphology maturation (enlargement of dendrites and increase of lysosomes), phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, DC80, and CD86), and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12, and to induce T cell proliferation). Most interestingly, PDT-induced apoptotic tumor cells are more capable of potentiating maturation of DCs than PDT-treated or freeze/thaw treated necrotic tumor cells. ALA-PDT-DC vaccine mediated by apoptotic cells provided protection against tumors in mice, far stronger than that of DC vaccine obtained from freeze/thaw treated tumor cells. Our results indicate that immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells can be more effective in enhancing a DC-based cancer vaccine, which could improve the clinical application of PDT-DC vaccines.

  3. A combined nucleocapsid vaccine induces vigorous SARS-CD8+ T-cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Ali; Aucoin, Susan; Tadesse, Helina; Frost, Rita; Ghorbani, Masoud; Soare, Catalina; Naas, Turaya; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cell-mediated immune responses play a crucial role in controlling viral replication. As such, a candidate SARS vaccine should elicit broad CD8+ T-cell immune responses. Several groups of mice were immunized alone or in combination with SARS-nucleocapsid immunogen. A high level of specific SARS-CD8+ T-cell response was demonstrated in mice that received DNA encoding the SARS-nucleocapsid, protein and XIAP as an adjuvant. We also observed that co-administration of a plasmid expressing nucleocapsid, recombinant protein and montanide/CpG induces high antibody titers in immunized mice. Moreover, this vaccine approach merits further investigation as a potential candidate vaccine against SARS. PMID:16115319

  4. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette

    2004-01-01

    A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene...... elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion...... of CD8+ T cells reduced, but did not abolish, enhancement of disease. Mice vaccinated with a construct encoding a class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitope and beta2m suffered more severe weight loss after RSV infection than unvaccinated RSV-infected mice, although RSV-specific CD8...

  5. Human vaccination against RH5 induces neutralizing antimalarial antibodies that inhibit RH5 invasion complex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Ruth O; Silk, Sarah E; Elias, Sean C

    2017-01-01

    The development of a highly effective vaccine remains a key strategic goal to aid the control and eventual eradication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In recent years, the reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (RH5) has emerged as the most promising blood-stage P. falciparum candidate antigen...... to date, capable of conferring protection against stringent challenge in Aotus monkeys. We report on the first clinical trial to our knowledge to assess the RH5 antigen - a dose-escalation phase Ia study in 24 healthy, malaria-naive adult volunteers. We utilized established viral vectors, the replication......-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and the attenuated orthopoxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), encoding RH5 from the 3D7 clone of P. falciparum. Vaccines were administered i.m. in a heterologous prime-boost regimen using an 8-week interval and were well tolerated. Vaccine-induced anti-RH5...

  6. New advances in mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-10-01

    The ICI 2013 Mucosal Vaccine Workshop presentations covered a wide range of topics, these mainly fell into three categories: (i) Understanding the interactions of host and microbes, specifically commensal pathogens and improving the antigen uptake via the (microfold cells) M cells to induce effective IgA antibody immunity at the gut mucosa; (ii) effective plant-based vaccines and (iii) development of prophylactic and therapeutic mucosal-based vaccine strategies for virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza and human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers. How to improve the efficacy of oral vaccines, novel intranasal mucosal adjuvants and a unique intra-cheek delivery method were also discussed. Presenters emphasized the differences associated with systemic and mucosal vaccination, specifically, how mucosal vaccines unlike systemic delivery can induce effective immunity at the first line of defence. Collectively, the workshop provided insights into recent developments in the mucosal vaccine research field, highlighting the complexities associated with designing safe and effective mucosal vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and

  8. Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis SO2 vaccine candidate is unable to induce cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Aporta

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulent strains inhibit apoptosis and trigger cell death by necrosis of host macrophages to evade innate immunity, while non-virulent strains induce typical apoptosis activating a protective host response. As part of the characterization of a novel tuberculosis vaccine candidate, the M. tuberculosis phoP mutant SO2, we sought to evaluate its potential to induce host cell death. The parental M. tuberculosis MT103 strain and the current vaccine against tuberculosis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG were used as comparators in mouse models in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that attenuated SO2 was unable to induce apoptotic events neither in mouse macrophages in vitro nor during lung infection in vivo. In contrast, virulent MT103 triggers typical apoptotic events with phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation and nuclear condensation and fragmentation. BCG strain behaved like SO2 and did not induce apoptosis. A clonogenic survival assay confirmed that viability of BCG- or SO2-infected macrophages was unaffected. Our results discard apoptosis as the protective mechanism induced by SO2 vaccine and provide evidence for positive correlation between classical apoptosis induction and virulent strains, suggesting apoptosis as a possible virulence determinant during M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine. Why should my child get the rotavirus vaccine? The rotavirus vaccine: Protects your child from rotavirus, ... work to care for your sick child). Is rotavirus vaccine safe? Both rotavirus vaccines (RotaTeq and Rotarix) are ...

  10. Safe Zones for Shock-Protection of Fragile Components during Impact-Induced Clatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Goyal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Clattering motion that occurs when flat objects strike the ground at an oblique angle is studied through a simple, tractable, model of a rigid bar with arbitrary, but symmetric, mass distribution and coefficient of restitution. The maximum velocity changes, or velocity shocks, that occur at various locations of the bar as it clatters to rest, are presented. It is shown that different parts of the bar can be subjected to sequences of velocity changes that are both higher, and lower, than those encountered in a single clatter-free impact. The implication that the drop-tolerance of an electronic product can be increased by configuring it to have ‘safe zones’ – where the velocity shocks are lower – for the placement of fragile components, is analysed. It is shown, through example, that a significant safe zone can be created in the center of the product by configuring it to have a low moment of inertia and by minimizing coefficient of restitution.

  11. Development of a vaccine to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture: vaccination of sheep with methanogen fractions induces antibodies that block methane production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D N; Pedersen, G; Denis, M; Dey, D; Janssen, P H; Buddle, B M

    2010-02-01

    To develop an understanding of the immune responses of ruminants to methanogens, and to provide proof of a concept that harnessing the immune system of ruminants is a potentially viable approach to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Four subcellular fractions, namely cytoplasmic, two cell-wall preparations, and cell wall-derived proteins were prepared from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1. Twenty sheep (10 months of age) were vaccinated with these fractions or with whole cells (n=4 per group). Sheep were re-vaccinated once after 3 weeks, and antibody responses to M. ruminantium M1 antigens in sera and saliva measured using ELISA at 2 weeks after the second vaccination. Antigens recognised by the antisera were visualised using Western blotting. The antisera were tested in vitro for their impact on M. ruminantium M1, measuring the effect on cell growth, methane production, and ability to induce agglutination. Basal levels (pre-vaccination) of antibodies against M. ruminantium M1 antigens were low. Vaccination with the antigenic fractions induced strong antibody responses in serum. Both IgG and IgA responses to methanogen antigens were detected in saliva following vaccination. Western blot analysis of the antisera indicated reactivity of antibodies, and a wide range of proteins was present in the different methanogen fractions. Antisera against the various fractions agglutinated methanogens in an in-vitro assay. In addition, these antisera decreased the growth of a pure culture of a methanogen and production of methane in vitro. Antigens from methanogens are immunogenic in ruminants, and antisera from sheep vaccinated with fractions of methanogens have a significant impact on these organisms, inducing cell agglutination, and decreasing growth of methanogens and production of methane. Only antisera to selected methanogen fractions were able to achieve these effects. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a vaccination strategy to mitigate emission

  12. The impact of assumptions regarding vaccine-induced immunity on the public health and cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination: Is one dose sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Desmond; de Ridder, Marc; Van Effelterre, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis A vaccination stimulates memory cells to produce an anamnestic response. In this study, we used a mathematical model to examine how long-term immune memory might convey additional protection against clinical/icteric infections. Dynamic and decision models were used to estimate the expected number of cases, and the costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), respectively. Several scenarios were explored by assuming: (1) varying duration of vaccine-induced immune memory, (2) and/or varying levels of vaccine-induced immune memory protection (IMP), (3) and/or varying levels of infectiousness in vaccinated individuals with IMP. The base case analysis assumed a time horizon of 25 y (2012 - 2036), with additional analyses over 50 and 75 y. The analyses were conducted in the Mexican public health system perspective. In the base case that assumed no vaccine-induced IMP, the 2-dose hepatitis A vaccination strategy was cost-effective compared with the 1-dose strategy over the 3 time horizons. However, it was not cost-effective if we assumed additional IMP durations of at least 10 y in the 25-y horizon. In the 50- and 75-y horizons, the 2-dose strategy was always cost-effective, except when 100% reduction in the probability of icteric Infections, 75% reduction in infectiousness, and mean durations of IMP of at least 50 y were assumed. This analysis indicates that routine vaccination of toddlers against hepatitis A virus would be cost-effective in Mexico using a single-dose vaccination strategy. However, the cost-effectiveness of a second dose depends on the assumptions of additional protection by IMP and the time horizon over which the analysis is performed.

  13. Comparison of Vaccine-Induced Effector CD8 T Cell Responses Directed against Self- and Non-Self-Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara R; Sørensen, Maria R; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    . Prophylactic vaccination with adenoviral vectors expressing either TRP-2 (Ad-Ii-TRP-2) or GP100 (Ad-Ii-GP100) had little or no effect on the growth of s.c. B16 melanomas, and only Ad-Ii-TRP-2 was able to induce a marginal reduction of B16 lung metastasis. In contrast, vaccination with a similar vector...

  14. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  15. Early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of Canine distemper virus induces robust protection against distemper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Young mink kits (n = 8)were vaccinated withDNA plasmids encoding the viral haemagglutinin protein (H) of a vaccine strain of Canine distemper virus (CDV). Virus neutralising (VN) antibodieswere induced after 2 immunisations and after the third immunisation all kits had high VN antibody titres...

  16. Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmi...

  17. Use of Oral Cholera Vaccine and Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in a Long-Standing Refugee Camp, Thailand, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobie, Heather M; Phares, Christina R; Wannemuehler, Kathleen A; Nyangoma, Edith; Taylor, Eboni M; Fulton, Anna; Wongjindanon, Nuttapong; Aung, Naw Rody; Travers, Phillipe; Date, Kashmira

    2016-12-01

    Oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) are relatively new public health interventions, and limited data exist on the potential impact of OCV use on traditional cholera prevention and control measures-safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH). To assess OCV acceptability and knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) regarding cholera and WaSH, we conducted cross-sectional surveys, 1 month before (baseline) and 3 and 12 months after (first and second follow-up) a preemptive OCV campaign in Maela, a long-standing refugee camp on the Thailand-Burma border. We randomly selected households for the surveys, and administered questionnaires to female heads of households. In total, 271 (77%), 187 (81%), and 199 (85%) households were included in the baseline, first and second follow-up surveys, respectively. Anticipated OCV acceptability was 97% at baseline, and 91% and 85% of household members were reported to have received 1 and 2 OCV doses at first follow-up. Compared with baseline, statistically significant differences (95% Wald confidence interval not overlapping zero) were noted at first and second follow-up among the proportions of respondents who correctly identified two or more means of cholera prevention (62% versus 78% and 80%), reported boiling or treating drinking water (19% versus 44% and 69%), and washing hands with soap (66% versus 77% and 85%); a significant difference was also observed in the proportion of households with soap available at handwashing areas (84% versus 90% and 95%), consistent with reported behaviors. No significant difference was noted in the proportion of households testing positive for Escherichia coli in stored household drinking water at second follow-up (39% versus 49% and 34%). Overall, we observed some positive, and no negative changes in cholera- and WaSH-related KAPs after an OCV campaign in Maela refugee camp. OCV campaigns may provide opportunities to reinforce beneficial WaSH-related KAPs for comprehensive cholera prevention and control.

  18. Vaccination with Enzymatically Cleaved GPI-Anchored Proteins from Schistosoma mansoni Induces Protection against Challenge Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente P. Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flatworm Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease that occurs throughout the developing world. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization with an antischistosomiasis vaccine combined with drug treatment. In the search for potential vaccine candidates, numerous tegument antigens have been assessed. As the major interface between parasite and mammalian host, the tegument plays crucial roles in the establishment and further course of schistosomiasis. Herein, we evaluated the potential of a GPI fraction, containing representative molecules located on the outer surface of adult worms, as vaccine candidate. Immunization of mice with GPI-anchored proteins induced a mixed Th1/Th2 type of immune response with production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and low levels of IL-5 into the supernatant of splenocyte cultures. The protection engendered by this vaccination protocol was confirmed by 42% reduction in worm burden, 45% reduction in eggs per gram of hepatic tissue, 29% reduction in the number of granulomas per area, and 53% reduction in the granuloma fibrosis. Taken together, the data herein support the potential of surface-exposed GPI-anchored antigens from the S. mansoni tegument as vaccine candidate.

  19. Vaccination with enzymatically cleaved GPI-anchored proteins from Schistosoma mansoni induces protection against challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Vicente P; Pinheiro, Carina S; Figueiredo, Barbara C P; Assis, Natan R G; Morais, Suellen B; Caliari, Marcelo V; Azevedo, Vasco; Castro-Borges, William; Wilson, R Alan; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2012-01-01

    The flatworm Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease that occurs throughout the developing world. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization with an antischistosomiasis vaccine combined with drug treatment. In the search for potential vaccine candidates, numerous tegument antigens have been assessed. As the major interface between parasite and mammalian host, the tegument plays crucial roles in the establishment and further course of schistosomiasis. Herein, we evaluated the potential of a GPI fraction, containing representative molecules located on the outer surface of adult worms, as vaccine candidate. Immunization of mice with GPI-anchored proteins induced a mixed Th1/Th2 type of immune response with production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and low levels of IL-5 into the supernatant of splenocyte cultures. The protection engendered by this vaccination protocol was confirmed by 42% reduction in worm burden, 45% reduction in eggs per gram of hepatic tissue, 29% reduction in the number of granulomas per area, and 53% reduction in the granuloma fibrosis. Taken together, the data herein support the potential of surface-exposed GPI-anchored antigens from the S. mansoni tegument as vaccine candidate.

  20. Sublingual injection of microparticles containing glycolipid ligands for NKT cells and subunit vaccines induces antibody responses in oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLyria, Elizabeth S; Zhou, Dapeng; Lee, Jun Soo; Singh, Shailbala; Song, Wei; Li, Fenge; Sun, Qing; Lu, Hongzhou; Wu, Jinhui; Qiao, Qian; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Chun; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Shen, Haifa

    2015-03-20

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a unique type of innate immune cells which exert paradoxical roles in animal models through producing either Th1 or Th2 cytokines and activating dendritic cells. Alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), a synthetic antigen for NKT cells, was found to be safe and immune stimulatory in cancer and hepatitis patients. We recently developed microparticle-formulated αGalCer, which is selectively presented by dendritic cells and macrophages, but not B cells, and thus can avoid the anergy of NKT cells. In this study, we have examined the immunogenicity of microparticles containing αGalCer and protein vaccine components through sublingual injection in mice. The results showed that sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin triggered IgG responses in serum (titer >1:100,000), which persisted for more than 3months. Microparticles containing ovalbumin alone also induced comparable level of IgG responses. However, immunoglobulin subclass analysis showed that sublingually injected microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced 20 fold higher Th1 biased antibody (IgG2c) than microparticles containing OVA alone (1:20,000 as compared to 1:1000 titer). Sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced secretion of both IgG (titer >1:1000) and IgA (titer=1:80) in saliva secretion, while microparticles containing ovalbumin alone only induced secretion of IgG in saliva. Our results suggest that sublingual injection of microparticles and their subsequent trafficking to draining lymph nodes may induce adaptive immune responses in mucosal compartments. Ongoing studies are focused on the mechanism of antigen presentation and lymphocyte biology in the oral cavity, as well as the toxicity and efficacy of these candidate microparticles for future applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PMA Induces Vaccine Adjuvant Activity by the Modulation of TLR Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dool-Ri Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands are being developed for use as vaccine adjuvants and as immunomodulators because of their ability to stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Flagellin, a TLR5 ligand, was reported to show potent mucosal vaccine adjuvant activity. To identify ligands that potentiate the adjuvant activity of flagellin, we screened a plant library using HEK293T cells transiently cotransfected with phTLR5 and pNF-κB-SEAP plasmids. The 90% EtOH extract from Croton tiglium showed significant NF-κB transactivation in a TLR5-independent manner along with the increase of a flagellin activity. We have studied to characterize an active component from Croton tiglium and to elucidate the action mechanisms. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA was isolated as an active component of Croton tiglium by activity-guided fractionation, column chromatography, HPLC, NMR, and MS. PMA at a range of nM induced PKC-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in both TLR5− and TLR5+ assay systems. In in vivo mouse vaccination model, PMA induced antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses and increased IL-12 production corresponding to T cell responses in spleen lymphocytes. These results suggest that PMA would serve as an efficacious mucosal vaccine adjuvant.

  2. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  3. Helminth Protein Vaccine Induced Follicular T Helper Cell for Enhancement of Humoral Immunity against Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein vaccines combined with adjuvants have been widely used to induce immune responses, especially the humoral immune response, against molecular targets including parasites. Follicular T helper (Tfh cells are the specialized providers of B-cell help, however, the induction of Tfh cells in protein vaccination has been rarely studied. Here, we report that the Schistosoma japonicum recombinant protein (SjGST-32 combined with tacrolimus (FK506 augmented the induction of Tfh cells, which expressed the canonical markers CXCR5, BCL6, and IL-21, and enhanced the humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the expression of IL-21R on germinal center (GC B cells and memory B cells increased in immunized mice, which indicated that IL-21 from the induced Tfh cells interacted with IL-21R for activation of B cells and maintenance of long-lived humoral immunity. Our results suggest that helminth protein vaccine combined with FK506 induces Tfh cell for stimulating humoral immune responses and inducing long-lived humoral immunity.

  4. Successful Vaccination Induces Multifunctional Memory T-Cell Precursors Associated with Early Control of Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Hyung; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Capone, Stefania; Caggiari, Laura; De Re, Valli; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Rehermann, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims T cells are an important component for development of a vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV), but little is known about the features of successful vaccine-induced T cells. Methods We compared the phenotype, function, and kinetics of vaccine-induced and infection-induced T cells in chimpanzees with HCV infection using multicolor flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Results In chimpanzees successfully vaccinated with recombinant adenovirus and DNA against HCV NS3-NS5, HCV-specific T cells appeared earlier, maintained better functionality, and persisted at higher frequencies, for a longer time after HCV-challenge, than those of mock-vaccinated chimpanzees. Vaccine-induced T cells displayed higher levels of CD127, a marker of memory precursors, and lower levels of programmed death (PD)-1 than infection-induced T cells. Vaccine-induced, but not infection-induced T cells, were multifunctional; their ability to secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α correlated with early expression of CD127 but not PD-1. Based on a comparison of vaccine-induced and infection-induced T cells from the same chimpanzee, the CD127+ memory precursor phenotype was induced by the vaccine itself, rather than by low viremia. In contrast, PD-1 induction correlated with viremia, and levels of intrahepatic PD-1, PD-L1, and 2,5-OAS-1 mRNAs correlated with peak titers of HCV. Conclusions Compared with infection, vaccination induced HCV-specific CD127+ T cells with high functionality that persisted at higher levels for a longer time. Control of viremia prevented upregulation of PD-1 on T cells, and induction of PD-1, PD-L1, and 2,5-OAS-1 in the liver. Early development of a memory T-cell phenotype and, via control of viremia, attenuation of the inhibitory PD1–PD-L1 pathway might be necessary components of successful vaccine-induced protection against HCV. PMID:22705008

  5. A prime/boost DNA/Modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine expressing recombinant Leishmania DNA encoding TRYP is safe and immunogenic in outbred dogs, the reservoir of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Connor; Antoniou, Maria; Ruiz-Argüello, Maria Begoña; Alcami, Antonio; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Courtenay, Orin

    2009-02-11

    Previous studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime/boost vaccines expressing tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) and Leishmania homologue of the mammalian receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) against Leishmania major challenge in mice, which was consistent with results from TRYP protein/adjuvant combinations in non-human primates. This study aimed to conduct safety and immunogenicity trials of these DNA/MVA vaccines in dogs, the natural reservoir host of Leishmania infantum, followed-up for 4 months post-vaccination. In a cohort of 22 uninfected outbred dogs, blinded randomised administration of 1000 microg (high dose) or 100 microg (low dose) DNA prime (day 0) and 1x10(8)pfu MVA boost (day 28) was shown to be safe and showed no clinical side effects. High dose DNA/MVA vaccinated TRYP dogs produced statistically higher mean levels of the type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma than controls in whole blood assays (WBA) stimulated with the recombinant vaccine antigen TRYP, up to the final sampling at day 126, and in the absence of challenge with Leishmania. TRYP vaccinated dogs also demonstrated significantly higher TRYP-specific total IgG and IgG2 subtype titres than in controls, and positive in vivo intradermal reactions at day 156 in the absence of natural infection, observed in 6/8 TRYP vaccinated dogs. No significant increases in IFN-gamma in LACK-stimulated WBA, or in LACK-specific IgG levels, were detected in LACK vaccinated dogs compared to controls, and only 2/9 LACK vaccinated dogs demonstrated DTH responses at day 156. In all groups, IgG1 subclass responses and antigen-specific stimulation of IL-10 were similar to controls demonstrating an absence of Th2/T(reg) response, as expected in the absence of in vivo restimulation or natural/experimental challenge with Leishmania. These collective results indicate significant antigen-specific type-1 responses and in vivo memory phase cellular immune

  6. Effects of interferon-γ knockdown on vaccine-induced immunity against Marek's disease in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Kamran; Wootton, Sarah K; Barjesteh, Neda; Golovan, Serguei; Bendall, Andrew; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ has been shown to be associated with immunity to Marek's disease virus (MDV). The overall objective of this study was to investigate the causal relationship between IFN-γ and vaccine-conferred immunity against MDV in chickens. To this end, 3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting chicken IFN-γ, which had previously been shown to reduce IFN-γ expression in vitro, and a control siRNA were selected to generate recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV) expressing short-hairpin small interfering RNAs (shRNAs). An MDV challenge trial was then conducted: chickens were vaccinated with herpesvirus of turkey (HVT), administered the rAAAV expressing shRNA, and then challenged with MDV. Tumors were observed in 4 out of 10 birds that were vaccinated with HVT and challenged but did not receive any rAAAV, 5 out of 9 birds that were administered the rAAAV containing IFN-γ shRNA, and 2 out of 10 birds that were administered a control enhanced green fluorescent protein siRNA. There was no significant difference in MDV genome load in the feather follicle epithelium of the birds that were cotreated with the vaccine and the rAAAV compared with the vaccinated MDV-infected birds. These results suggest that AAAV-based vectors can be used for the delivery of shRNA into chicken cells. However, administration of the rAAAV expressing shRNA targeting chicken IFN-γ did not seem to fully abrogate vaccine-induced protection.

  7. Vaccination using live attenuated Leishmania donovani centrin deleted parasites induces protection in dogs against Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Souza, Daniel Menezes; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; de Mendonça, Ludmila Zanandreis; Lemos-Giunchetti, Denise da Silveira; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nakhasi, Hira L; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-03

    Live attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites such as LdCen(-/-) have been shown elicit protective immunity against leishmanial infection in mice and hamster models. Previously, we have reported on the induction of strong immunogenicity in dogs upon vaccination with LdCen(-/-) including an increase in immunoglobulin isotypes, higher lymphoproliferative response, higher frequencies of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T cells, increased secretion of TNF-α and IL-12/IL-23p40 and, finally, decreased secretion of IL-4. To further explore the potential of LdCen(-/-) parasites as vaccine candidates, we performed a 24-month follow up of LdCen(-/-) immunized dogs after challenge with virulent Leishmania infantum, aiming determination of parasite burden by qPCR, antibody production (ELISA) and cellular responses (T cell activation and cytokine production) by flow cytometry and sandwich ELISA. Our data demonstrated that vaccination with a single dose of LdCen(-/-) (without any adjuvant) resulted in the reduction of up to 87.3% of parasite burden after 18 months of virulent challenge. These results are comparable to those obtained with commercially available vaccine in Brazil (Leishmune(®)). The protection was associated with antibody production and CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses, as well as T cell activation and significantly higher production of IFN-γ, IL-12/IL-23p40 and TNF-α, which was comparable to responses induced by immunization with Leishmune(®), with significant differences when compared to control animals (Placebo). Moreover, only animals immunized with LdCen(-/-) expressed lower levels of IL-4 when compared to animals vaccinated either with Leishmune(®) or PBS. Our results support further studies aiming to demonstrate the potential of genetically modified live attenuated L. donovani vaccine to control L. infantum transmission in endemic areas for CVL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alterations in regulatory T cells induced by specific oligosaccharides improve vaccine responsiveness in mice.

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    Marcel A Schijf

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet(+ (Th1 activated CD69(+CD4(+ T cells (p<0.001 and reduced percentage of Gata-3(+ (Th2 activated CD69(+CD4(+T cells (p<0.001 was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4(+Foxp3(+ could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 (+ /T-bet(+ (Th1-Tregs was significantly reduced (p<0.05 in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response.These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines.

  9. New gorilla adenovirus vaccine vectors induce potent immune responses and protection in a mouse malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Keith; Stefaniak, Maureen; Chen, Ping; Patterson, Noelle B; Liao, Grant; Weng, Shaojie; Krepkiy, Svetlana; Ekberg, Greg; Torano, Holly; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Gowda, Kalpana; Sonawane, Sharvari; Belmonte, Arnel; Abot, Esteban; Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Moormann, Ann; Vulule, John; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L; Brough, Douglas E; Bruder, Joseph T

    2017-07-03

    A DNA-human Ad5 (HuAd5) prime-boost malaria vaccine has been shown to protect volunteers against a controlled human malaria infection. The potency of this vaccine, however, appeared to be affected by the presence of pre-existing immunity against the HuAd5 vector. Since HuAd5 seroprevalence is very high in malaria-endemic areas of the world, HuAd5 may not be the most appropriate malaria vaccine vector. This report describes the evaluation of the seroprevalence, immunogenicity and efficacy of three newly identified gorilla adenoviruses, GC44, GC45 and GC46, as potential malaria vaccine vectors. The seroprevalence of GC44, GC45 and GC46 is very low, and the three vectors are not efficiently neutralized by human sera from Kenya and Ghana, two countries where malaria is endemic. In mice, a single administration of GC44, GC45 and GC46 vectors expressing a murine malaria gene, Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), induced robust PyCSP-specific T cell and antibody responses that were at least as high as a comparable HuAd5-PyCSP vector. Efficacy studies in a murine malaria model indicated that a prime-boost regimen with DNA-PyCSP and GC-PyCSP vectors can protect mice against a malaria challenge. Moreover, these studies indicated that a DNA-GC46-PyCSP vaccine regimen was significantly more efficacious than a DNA-HuAd5-PyCSP regimen. These data suggest that these gorilla-based adenovectors have key performance characteristics for an effective malaria vaccine. The superior performance of GC46 over HuAd5 highlights its potential for clinical development.

  10. Mucosal and systemic anti-GAG immunity induced by neonatal immunization with HIV LAMP/gag DNA vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Maciel, Milton; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Piubelli, Orlando; de Brito, Cyro Alves; Melo, Andrea; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2011-04-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing mucosal immunity in early postnatal life until adulthood, protecting early sexual initiation, should be considered as strategies to vaccination against HIV. The HIV-1 GAG protein as a chimera with the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP/gag), encoded by a DNA vaccine, is targeted to the endosomal/lysosomal compartment that contains class II MHC molecules and has been shown to be immunogenic in adult mice. Assuming that one such strategy could help to overcome the immunological immaturity in the early postnatal period, we have evaluated the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of LAMP/gag immunization in neonatal mice. Intranasal immunization with LAMP/gag vaccine induced higher levels of sIgA and IgG anti-GAG antibodies in intestinal washes than did the gag vaccine. The combination of ID injections and the IN protocol with the chimeric vaccine promoted the increase of Ab levels in sera. Both vaccines induced splenic IFN-γ- secreting cells against GAG peptide pools, as well as in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function, and increased the percentage of CD8+ T cells to the immunodominant class I peptide in gut and spleen. However, only the chimeric vaccine was able to enhance Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in response to class II GAG peptide and to enhance IL-4-secreting cells against GAG peptides and p24 protein stimuli. Long-lasting humoral and cellular responses were detected until adult age, following neonatal immunization with the chimeric vaccine. The LAMP/gag vaccination was able to induce potent GAG-specific T and B cell immune responses in early life which are essential to elicit sustained and long-lasting mucosal and systemic humoral response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

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    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  12. Attenuation of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice by vaccinating against TGF-β1.

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    Xiaobao Fan

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 is the pivotal pro-fibrogenic cytokine in hepatic fibrosis. Reducing the over-produced expression of TGF-β1 or blocking its signaling pathways is considered to be a promising therapeutic strategy for hepatic fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of attenuating hepatic fibrosis by vaccination against TGF-β1 with TGF-β1 kinoids. Two TGF-β1 kinoid vaccines were prepared by cross-linking TGF-β1-derived polypeptides (TGF-β1(25-[41-65] and TGF-β1(30-[83-112] to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH. Immunization with the two TGF-β1 kinoids efficiently elicited the production of high-levels of TGF-β1-specific antibodies against in BALB/c mice as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blotting. The antisera neutralized TGF-β1-induced growth-inhibition on mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu and attenuated TGF-β1-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation, α-SMA, collagen type 1 alpha 2 (COL1A2, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 expression in the rat hepatic stellate cell (HSC line, HSC-T6. Vaccination against TGF-β1 with the kinoids significantly suppressed CCl4-induced collagen deposition and the expression of α-SMA and desmin, attenuated hepatocyte apoptosis and accelerated hepatocyte proliferation in BALB/c mice. These results demonstrated that immunization with the TGF-β1 kinoids efficiently attenuated CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis and liver injury. Our study suggests that vaccination against TGF-β1 might be developed into a feasible therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic fibrotic liver diseases.

  13. Fragmentation of SIV-gag vaccine induces broader T cell responses.

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    Adel Benlahrech

    Full Text Available High mutation rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV allows escape from T cell recognition preventing development of effective T cell vaccines. Vaccines that induce diverse T cell immune responses would help overcome this problem. Using SIV gag as a model vaccine, we investigated two approaches to increase the breadth of the CD8 T cell response. Namely, fusion of vaccine genes to ubiquitin to target the proteasome and increase levels of MHC class I peptide complexes and gene fragmentation to overcome competition between epitopes for presentation and recognition.three vaccines were compared: full-length unmodified SIV-mac239 gag, full-length gag fused at the N-terminus to ubiquitin and 7 gag fragments of equal size spanning the whole of gag with ubiquitin-fused to the N-terminus of each fragment. Genes were cloned into a replication defective adenovirus vector and immunogenicity assessed in an in vitro human priming system. The breadth of the CD8 T cell response, defined by the number of distinct epitopes, was assessed by IFN-γ-ELISPOT and memory phenotype and cytokine production evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed an increase of two- to six-fold in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused fragments compared to the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag. In contrast, although proteasomal targeting was achieved, there was a marked reduction in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag compared to the full-length unmodified gene, but there were no differences in the number of epitope responses induced by non-ubiquitinated full-length gag and the ubiquitin-fused mini genes. Fragmentation and ubiquitination did not affect T cell memory differentiation and polyfunctionality, though most responses were directed against the Ad5 vector.Fragmentation but not fusion with ubiquitin increases the breadth of the CD8 T vaccine response against SIV-mac239 gag. Thus gene fragmentation of HIV vaccines may maximise

  14. Human CD4+ T cell epitopes from vaccinia virus induced by vaccination or infection.

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    J Mauricio Calvo-Calle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4(+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4(+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4(+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens.

  15. Human CD4+ T Cell Epitopes from Vaccinia Virus Induced by Vaccination or Infection

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    Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Strug, Iwona; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Baker, Stephen P; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens. PMID:17937498

  16. Humoral Immune Response Induced by PLGA Micro Particle Coupled Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine in Chickens

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    Sanganagouda K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted for evaluating the humoral immune responses induced by Poly Lactide-co-Glycolide Acid (PLGA microspheres coupled inactivated Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV vaccine in comparison to an ‘in-house’ prepared inactivated and a live commercial vaccine. PLG microparticles containing inactivated NDV were prepared by a double emulsion technique based on solvent evaporation method. The size of the NDV coupled PLG microparticles was determined by Electron Microscopy. NDV coupled PLG microparticles were spherical having smooth surface, hollow core inside with no pores on the surface. The experiment was conducted in four groups of chickens (n=15. The encapsulation efficiency of NDV coupled PLG microparticles was determined by protein estimation and HA activity in elute. The mean (± SE size of PLG microspheres was found to be 2.409 ± 0.65 µm. The mean percent of encapsulation efficiency of PLG microspheres coupled to NDV was assessed based on the total protein content and HA activity in elute was found to be 8.03 ± 0.50 and 12.5 ± 0.00, respectively. In conclusion, the results of the experiment showed that PLGA coupled NDV vaccine elicited stronger and prolonged humoral immune response in chickens, in comparison to the other tested vaccines, as assessed by haemagglutination inhibition and enzyme linked immuno sorbent asaay titers.

  17. BCG Δzmp1 vaccine induces enhanced antigen specific immune responses in cattle.

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    Khatri, Bhagwati; Whelan, Adam; Clifford, Derek; Petrera, Agnese; Sander, Peter; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2014-02-07

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes major economy and public health problem in numerous countries. In Great Britain, despite the use of a test-and-slaughter strategy, the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle has steadily risen in recent years. One strategy being considered to reduce the burden of bTB in cattle is the development of an efficient vaccine. The only current potentially available vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has demonstrated variable efficacy in both humans and cattle and the development of improved vaccination strategies for cattle is a research priority. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity in cattle of two recombinant BCG strains, namely BCG Pasteur Δzmp1::aph and BCG Danish Δzmp1. By applying a recently defined predictive immune-correlate of protection (T cell memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT), we have compared these two recombinant BCG with wild-type BCG Danish SSI. Our results demonstrated that both strains induced superior T cell memory responses compared to wild-type BCG. These data provide support for the prioritisation of testing BCG Danish Δzmp1 in vaccination/M. bovis challenge studies to determine its protective efficacy. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

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    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-09

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective Protection Induced by a Monovalent DNA Vaccine against Dengue Virus (DV Serotype 1 and a Bivalent DNA Vaccine against DV1 and DV2 in Mice

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    Xiaoyan Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DV is the causal pathogen of dengue fever, which is one of the most rapidly spread mosquito-borne disease worldwide and has become a severe public health problem. Currently, there is no specific treatment for dengue; thus, a vaccine would be an effective countermeasure to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Although, the chimeric Yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine has been approved in some countries, it is still necessary to develop safer, more effective, and less costly vaccines. In this study, a DNA vaccine candidate pVAX1-D1ME expressing the prME protein of DV1 was inoculated in BALB/c mice via intramuscular injection or electroporation, and the immunogenicity and protection were evaluated. Compared with traditional intramuscular injection, administration with 50 μg pVAX1-D1ME via electroporation with three immunizations induced persistent humoral and cellular immune responses and effectively protected mice against lethal DV1 challenge. In addition, immunization with a bivalent vaccine consisting of pVAX1-D1ME and pVAX1-D2ME via electroporation generated a balanced IgG response and neutralizing antibodies against DV1 and DV2 and could protect mice from lethal challenge with DV1 and DV2. This study sheds new light on developing a dengue tetravalent DNA vaccine.

  20. Baculovirus-vectored multistage Plasmodium vivax vaccine induces both protective and transmission-blocking immunities against transgenic rodent malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Masanori; Iyori, Mitsuhiro; Blagborough, Andrew M; Fukumoto, Shinya; Funatsu, Tomohiro; Sinden, Robert E; Yoshida, Shigeto

    2014-10-01

    A multistage malaria vaccine targeting the pre-erythrocytic and sexual stages of Plasmodium could effectively protect individuals against infection from mosquito bites and provide transmission-blocking (TB) activity against the sexual stages of the parasite, respectively. This strategy could help prevent malaria infections in individuals and, on a larger scale, prevent malaria transmission in communities of endemicity. Here, we describe the development of a multistage Plasmodium vivax vaccine which simultaneously expresses P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (PvCSP) and P25 (Pvs25) protein of this species as a fusion protein, thereby acting as a pre-erythrocytic vaccine and a TB vaccine, respectively. A new-concept vaccine platform based on the baculovirus dual-expression system (BDES) was evaluated. The BDES-Pvs25-PvCSP vaccine displayed correct folding of the Pvs25-PvCSP fusion protein on the viral envelope and was highly expressed upon transduction of mammalian cells in vitro. This vaccine induced high levels of antibodies to Pvs25 and PvCSP and elicited protective (43%) and TB (82%) efficacies against transgenic P. berghei parasites expressing the corresponding P. vivax antigens in mice. Our data indicate that our BDES, which functions as both a subunit and DNA vaccine, can offer a promising multistage vaccine capable of delivering a potent antimalarial pre-erythrocytic and TB response via a single immunization regimen. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Mucosal vaccine design and delivery.

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    Woodrow, Kim A; Bennett, Kaila M; Lo, David D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are a major portal of entry for many human pathogens that are the cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Vaccines capable of eliciting mucosal immune responses can fortify defenses at mucosal front lines and protect against infection. However, most licensed vaccines are administered parenterally and fail to elicit protective mucosal immunity. Immunization by mucosal routes may be more effective at inducing protective immunity against mucosal pathogens at their sites of entry. Recent advances in our understanding of mucosal immunity and identification of correlates of protective immunity against specific mucosal pathogens have renewed interest in the development of mucosal vaccines. Efforts have focused on efficient delivery of vaccine antigens to mucosal sites that facilitate uptake by local antigen-presenting cells to generate protective mucosal immune responses. Discovery of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants are also being sought to enhance the magnitude and quality of the protective immune response.

  2. Modulation of innate immune mechanisms to enhance vaccine induced immunity: Role of co-inhibitory molecules

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    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several anti-leishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models including genetically modified live attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells i.e., dendritic cells (DC and macrophages (M. Further, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs, and to condition the infected M towards anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of anti-microbial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-, IL-12 and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1 effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Further, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and TH2 biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of co-inhibitory ligands such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200 and Tim-3 that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase thus limiting the direct application of these results from these studies to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the co-stimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this

  3. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on

  4. T lymphocytes subsets and cytokine pattern induced by vaccination against bovine brucellosis employing S19 calfhood vaccination and adult RB51 revaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lage, Andrey P

    2014-10-21

    The aims of this study were to address the protective immune response induced by S19 vaccination (n=10) and RB51 revaccination, in pregnant (n=9) and non-pregnant (n=10) S19 calfhood-vaccinated cattle as follows: evaluate the in vitro CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes specific proliferation, and in vitro expression of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells and IL-4 by CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD21(+) lymphocytes subset. Upon in vitro stimulation with γ-irradiated Brucella abortus 2308, blood mononuclear cells from S19 vaccinated and RB51 revaccinated cows exhibited significantly higher proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) T-cells compared to non-vaccinated animals. RB51 revaccination, regardless of the pregnancy status, did not enhance the proliferation of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells nor IFN-γ or IL-4 production. Data from the present study suggest that cattle's cellular immune response induced after brucellosis vaccination and revaccination is due to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, being CD4(+) T-cells the main source of IFN-γ. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a rough Brucella suis vaccine delivered orally or parenterally to feral swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis strain 353-1 is a stable vaccine strain that is clinically safe, does not cause positive serologic responses on conventional brucellosis surveillance tests, and induces humoral and cellular immunity in swine after vaccination. In this study, we evaluated tissue clearance and immunologi...

  6. Strategies for design and application of enteric viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Roth, James A; Saif, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Enteric viral infections in domestic animals cause significant economic losses. The recent emergence of virulent enteric coronaviruses [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV)] in North America and Asia, for which no vaccines are available, remains a challenge for the global swine industry. Vaccination strategies against rotavirus and coronavirus (transmissible gastroenteritis virus) infections are reviewed. These vaccination principles are applicable against emerging enteric infections such as PEDV. Maternal vaccines to induce lactogenic immunity, and their transmission to suckling neonates via colostrum and milk, are critical for early passive protection. Subsequently, in weaned animals, oral vaccines incorporating novel mucosal adjuvants (e.g., vitamin A, probiotics) may provide active protection when maternal immunity wanes. Understanding intestinal and systemic immune responses to experimental rotavirus and transmissible gastroenteritis virus vaccines and infection in pigs provides a basis and model for the development of safe and effective vaccines for young animals and children against established and emerging enteric infections.

  7. StreptInCor: a candidate vaccine epitope against S. pyogenes infections induces protection in outbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postol, Edilberto; Alencar, Raquel; Higa, Fabio T; Freschi de Barros, Samar; Demarchi, Lea M F; Kalil, Jorge; Guilherme, Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) can result in several diseases, particularly in children. S. pyogenes M protein is the major virulence factor, and certain regions of its N-terminus can trigger autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic fever in susceptible individuals with untreated group A streptococcal pharyngitis. In a previous study, we utilized a large panel of human peripheral blood cells to define the C-terminal protective epitope StreptInCor (medical identity), which does not induce autoimmune reactions. We recently confirmed the results in HLA-transgenic mice. In the present study, we extended the experimental assays to outbred animals (Swiss mice). Herein, we demonstrate high titers of StreptInCor-specific antibodies, as well as appropriate T-cell immune responses. No cross-reaction to cardiac myosin was detected. Additionally, immunized Swiss mice exhibited 87% survival one month after challenge with S. pyogenes. In conclusion, the data presented herein reinforce previous results in humans and animals and further emphasize that StreptInCor could be an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of S. pyogenes infections.

  8. StreptInCor: a candidate vaccine epitope against S. pyogenes infections induces protection in outbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilberto Postol

    Full Text Available Infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes can result in several diseases, particularly in children. S. pyogenes M protein is the major virulence factor, and certain regions of its N-terminus can trigger autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic fever in susceptible individuals with untreated group A streptococcal pharyngitis. In a previous study, we utilized a large panel of human peripheral blood cells to define the C-terminal protective epitope StreptInCor (medical identity, which does not induce autoimmune reactions. We recently confirmed the results in HLA-transgenic mice. In the present study, we extended the experimental assays to outbred animals (Swiss mice. Herein, we demonstrate high titers of StreptInCor-specific antibodies, as well as appropriate T-cell immune responses. No cross-reaction to cardiac myosin was detected. Additionally, immunized Swiss mice exhibited 87% survival one month after challenge with S. pyogenes. In conclusion, the data presented herein reinforce previous results in humans and animals and further emphasize that StreptInCor could be an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of S. pyogenes infections.

  9. Spontaneous and Vaccine-Induced Clearance of Mus Musculus Papillomavirus 1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rosie T; Wang, Joshua W; Peng, Shiwen; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Wang, Chenguang; Cannella, Fabiana; Chang, Yung-Nien; Viscidi, Raphael P; Best, Simon R A; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard B S

    2017-08-01

    Mus musculus papillomavirus 1 (MmuPV1/MusPV1) induces persistent papillomas in immunodeficient mice but not in common laboratory strains. To facilitate the study of immune control, we sought an outbred and immunocompetent laboratory mouse strain in which persistent papillomas could be established. We found that challenge of SKH1 mice (Crl:SKH1-Hrhr) with MmuPV1 by scarification on their tail resulted in three clinical outcomes: (i) persistent (>2-month) papillomas (∼20%); (ii) transient papillomas that spontaneously regress, typically within 2 months (∼15%); and (iii) no visible papillomas and viral clearance (∼65%). SKH1 mice with persistent papillomas were treated by using a candidate preventive/therapeutic naked-DNA vaccine that expresses human calreticulin (hCRT) fused in frame to MmuPV1 E6 (mE6) and mE7 early proteins and residues 11 to 200 of the late protein L2 (hCRTmE6/mE7/mL2). Three intramuscular DNA vaccinations were delivered biweekly via in vivo electroporation, and both humoral and CD8 T cell responses were mapped and measured. Previously persistent papillomas disappeared within 2 months after the final vaccination. Coincident virologic clearance was confirmed by in situ hybridization and a failure of disease to recur after CD3 T cell depletion. Vaccination induced strong mE6 and mE7 CD8 + T cell responses in all mice, although they were significantly weaker in mice that initially presented with persistent warts than in those that spontaneously cleared their infection. A human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-targeted version of the DNA vaccine also induced L2 antibodies and protected mice from vaginal challenge with an HPV16 pseudovirus. Thus, MmuPV1 challenge of SKH1 mice is a promising model of spontaneous and immunotherapy-directed clearances of HPV-related disease. IMPORTANCE High-risk-type human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) cause 5% of all cancer cases worldwide, notably cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancers. Since preventative HPV

  10. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury: how much contrast is safe?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keaney, John J

    2013-02-14

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are used in many investigations that a patient may undergo during the course of an in-patient stay. For the vast majority of patients, exposure to CM has no sequelae; however, in a small percentage, it can result in a worsening in renal function termed contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). CI-AKI is one of the leading causes of in-hospital renal dysfunction. It is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality as well as an increased length of hospital stay and costs. Unfortunately, the results of extensive research into pharmacological inventions to prevent CI-AKI remain disappointing. In this article, we briefly outline the pathophysiological mechanisms by which iodinated CM may cause CI-AKI and discuss the evidence for reducing CI-AKI by limiting contrast volumes. In particular, we review the data surrounding the use of contrast volume to glomerular filtration rate ratios, which can be used by clinicians to effectively lower the incidence of CI-AKI in their patients.

  11. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, L.; Lorenzen, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides Protection by 4 days post...... vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination...... against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site...

  12. Immunization after kidney transplantation-what is necessary and what is safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotton, Camille N

    2014-10-01

    Many transplant recipients are not protected against vaccine-preventable illnesses, primarily because vaccination is still an underutilized tool both before and after transplantation. This missed opportunity for protection can result in substantial morbidity, graft loss and mortality. Immunization strategies should be formulated early in the course of renal disease to maximize the likelihood of vaccine-induced immunity, particularly as booster or secondary antibody responses are less affected by immune compromise than are primary or de novo antibody responses in naive vaccine recipients. However, live vaccines should be avoided in immunocompromised hosts. Although some concern has been raised regarding increased HLA sensitization after vaccination, no clinical data to suggest harm currently exists; overall, non-live vaccines seem to be immunogenic, protective and safe. In organ transplant recipients, some vaccines are indicated based on specific risk factors and certain vaccines, such as hepatitis B, can protect against donor-derived infection. Vaccines given to close contacts of renal transplant recipients can provide an additional layer of protection against infectious diseases. In this article, optimal vaccination of adult transplant recipients, including safety, efficacy, indication and timing, is reviewed.

  13. A plant-expressed conjugate vaccine breaks CD4+ tolerance and induces potent immunity against metastatic Her2+ breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Allen, Alex; Bui-Minh, Duc; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Cavallo, Federica; Gleba, Yuri; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Klimyuk, Victor; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passive antibody therapy for cancer is an effective but costly treatment modality. Induction of therapeutically potent anticancer antibodies by active vaccination is an attractive alternative but has proven challenging in cancer due to tolerogenic pressure in patients. Here, we used the clinically relevant cancer target Her2, known to be susceptible to targeting by antibody therapy, to demonstrate how potent antibody can be induced by vaccination. A novel 44kD Her2 protein fragment was generated and found to be highly effective at inducing anti-Her2 antibody including trastuzumab-like reactivities. In the tolerant and spontaneous BALB-neuT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer this Her2-targeting vaccine was only effective if the fragment was conjugated to a foreign immunogenic carrier; Fragment C of tetanus toxin. Only the conjugate vaccine induced high affinity anti-Her2 antibody of multiple isotypes and suppressed tumor development. The magnitude of CD4+ T-cell help and breadth of cytokines secreted by the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells induced to the foreign antigen was critical. We used a highly efficient plant-based bio-manufacturing process for protein antigens, magnICON, for vaccine expression, to underpin feasibility of future clinical testing. Hence, our novel Her2-targeting conjugate vaccine combines preclinical efficacy with clinical deliverability, thus setting the scene for therapeutic testing. PMID:27471642

  14. [Development of current smallpox vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksiutov, R A; Gavrilova, E V; Shchelkunov, S N

    2011-01-01

    The review gives data on the history of smallpox vaccination and shows the high topicality of designing the current safe vaccines against orthopoxviruses. Four generations of live smallpox, protein subunit, and DNA vaccines are considered. Analysis of the data published leads to the conclusion that it is promising to use the up-to-date generations of safe smallpox subunit or DNA vaccines for mass primary immunization with possible further revaccination with classical live vaccine.

  15. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. © The Author 2016. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Effects of an oxycodone conjugate vaccine on oxycodone self-administration and oxycodone-induced brain gene expression in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pravetoni

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid abuse is an increasing public health concern in the USA. A vaccine comprising a hapten (OXY conjugated to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (OXY-KLH has been shown to attenuate the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone. Here, the vaccine's ability to prevent acquisition of intravenous (i.v. oxycodone self-administration was studied in rats. Effects of vaccination on oxycodone-induced changes in the expression of several genes within the mesolimbic system, which are regulated by chronic opiate use, were also examined. Vaccination with OXY-KLH reduced the proportion of rats acquiring i.v. self-administration of oxycodone under a fixed ratio (FR 3 schedule of reinforcement compared to control rats immunized with the unconjugated KLH carrier protein. Vaccination significantly reduced the mean number of infusions at FR3, total number of infusions, and total oxycodone intake during the entire protocol. Compared to oxycodone self-administering control rats immunized with the carrier alone, rats vaccinated with the OXY-KLH immunogen showed increased levels of adenylate cyclase 5 (Adcy5 and decreased levels of early growth response protein 2 (Egr2 and the early immediate gene c-Fos in the striatum. These data suggest that vaccination with OXY-KLH can attenuate the reinforcing effects of oxycodone at a clinically-relevant exposure level. Analysis of mRNA expression identified some addiction-relevant markers that may be of interest in understanding oxycodone effects or the protection provided by vaccination.

  17. Vaccine-induced rabies case in a cow (Bos taurus): Molecular characterisation of vaccine strain in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuta, Vlad; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Barboi, Gheorghe; Motiu, Razvan; Barbuceanu, Florica; Vlagioiu, Constantin; Cliquet, Florence

    2016-09-22

    Rabies is a fatal neuropathogenic zoonosis caused by the rabies virus of the Lyssavirus genus, Rhabdoviridae family. The oral vaccination of foxes - the main reservoir of rabies in Europe - using a live attenuated rabies virus vaccine was successfully conducted in many Western European countries. In July 2015, a rabies vaccine strain was isolated from the brain tissues of a clinically suspect cow (Bos taurus) in Romania. The nucleotide analysis of both N and G gene sequences showed 100% identity between the rabid animal, the GenBank reference SAD B19 strain and five rabies vaccine batches used for the national oral vaccination campaign targeting foxes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunoinformatics Approach in Designing Epitope-based Vaccine Against Meningitis-inducing Bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae Type b)

    OpenAIRE

    Hilyatuz Zahroh; Ahmad Ma’rup; Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan; Arli Aditya Parikesit

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis infection is one of the major threats during Hajj season in Mecca. Meningitis vaccines are available, but their uses are limited in some countries due to religious reasons. Furthermore, they only give protection to certain serogroups, not to all types of meningitis-inducing bacteria. Recently, research on epitope-based vaccines has been developed intensively. Such vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines in that they are safer to use and well responded to the a...

  19. Vaccine allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the increasing numbers of vaccine administrations are associated with increased reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Whilst the general adverse reactions including allergic reactions caused by the vaccine itself or the vaccine components, are rare, they can in some circumstances be serious and even fatal. In accordance with many IgE-mediated reactions and immediate-type allergic reactions, the primary allergens are proteins. The proteins most often implicated in vaccine allergies are egg and gelatin, with perhaps rare reactions to yeast or latex. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the injectable influenza vaccine can be safely administered, although with appropriate precautions, to patients with severe egg allergy, as the current influenza vaccines contain small trace amounts of egg protein. If an allergy is suspected, an accurate examination followed by algorithms is vital for correct diagnosis, treatment and decision regarding re-vaccination in patients with immediate-type reactions to vaccines. Facilities and health care professionals should be available to treat immediate hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis) in all settings where vaccines are administered.

  20. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  1. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  2. Transcriptional changes induced by candidate malaria vaccines and correlation with protection against malaria in a human challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunachie, Susanna; Berthoud, Tamara; Hill, Adrian V S; Fletcher, Helen A

    2015-09-29

    The complexity of immunity to malaria is well known, and clear correlates of protection against malaria have not been established. A better understanding of immune markers induced by candidate malaria vaccines would greatly enhance vaccine development, immunogenicity monitoring and estimation of vaccine efficacy in the field. We have previously reported complete or partial efficacy against experimental sporozoite challenge by several vaccine regimens in healthy malaria-naïve subjects in Oxford. These include a prime-boost regimen with RTS,S/AS02A and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the CSP antigen, and a DNA-prime, MVA-boost regimen expressing the ME TRAP antigens. Using samples from these trials we performed transcriptional profiling, allowing a global assessment of responses to vaccination. We used Human RefSeq8 Bead Chips from Illumina to examine gene expression using PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from 16 human volunteers. To focus on antigen-specific changes, comparisons were made between PBMC stimulated with CSP or TRAP peptide pools and unstimulated PBMC post vaccination. We then correlated gene expression with protection against malaria in a human Plasmodium falciparum malaria challenge model. Differentially expressed genes induced by both vaccine regimens were predominantly in the IFN-γ pathway. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed antigen-specific effects on genes associated with IFN induction and proteasome modules after vaccination. Genes associated with IFN induction and antigen presentation modules were positively enriched in subjects with complete protection from malaria challenge, while genes associated with haemopoietic stem cells, regulatory monocytes and the myeloid lineage modules were negatively enriched in protected subjects. These results represent novel insights into the immune repertoires involved in malaria vaccination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible vaccines are sub-unit vaccines where the selected genes are introduced into the plants and the transgenic plant is then induced to manufacture the encoded protein. Edible vaccines are mucosal-targeted vaccines where stimulation of both systematic and mucosal immune network takes place. Foods under study ...

  4. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral administration of synthetic selenium nanoparticles induced robust Th1 cytokine pattern after HBs antigen vaccination in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mehdi; Mavandadnejad, Faranak; Yazdi, Mohammad H; Faghfuri, Elnaz; Hashemi, Hura; Homayouni-Oreh, Somayeh; Farhoudi, Ramin; Shahverdi, Ahmad R

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is known as a life-threatening liver infection and leads to chronic liver disease if left untreated. Nevertheless, the prevalence of HBV infection has been reduced by an approved vaccination approach using recombinant Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Alum, known as the HBV vaccine. Alum can be used as an adjuvant to increase HBsAg immunogenicity as a strong Th2 stimulator. There is a vital need to stimulate Th1 immunity by HBsAg vaccination; however, the present vaccine does not induce a prophylactic immune response in some groups. The main aim of the present study was to induce a Th1 cytokine pattern and stimulate an immune response after HBsAg vaccination. Experimental mice were fed selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) and were later immunized with 5μg of Hepatitis B Vaccine. After a period of 30 days, the experimental animals were given two booster doses of SeNPs during their vaccination course. Group one, i.e., the control vaccine group, was only administered the HBsAg vaccine. The two treated groups, Groups 2 and 3, were daily fed different doses of SeNPs (100μg and 200μg, respectively) via gavage. Group four was considered the control group and was only given phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Lymphocyte proliferation, IFN-γ and IL-4 levels, total antibody and the isotypes of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgM were measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The administration of SeNPs and the HBs antigen vaccine affected the lymphocyte proliferation; moreover, the total antibody responses also increased the IFN-γ level and induced a Th1 response. The present study proposed that the administration of SeNPs with a conventional HBs antigen vaccine induces a better immune response with a Th1 bias. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  7. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    Full Text Available The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs, have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  8. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  9. HIV vaccines: progress to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, C Mee Ling; Andersen, Christopher R; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2011-03-05

    The quest for an effective and safe HIV-1 vaccine has been and still is the aspiration of many scientists and clinicians worldwide. Until recently, the hopes for an effective vaccine were thwarted by the disappointing results and early termination in September 2007 of the STEP study, which saw a subgroup of male vaccine recipients at an increased risk of HIV-1 infection, and the failure of earlier trials of vaccines based on recombinant envelope proteins to provide any level of protection. The results of the STEP study raised important questions in the field of HIV vaccines, including the use of recombinant adenovirus vectors as immunogens, the rationale for the development of T-cell-based vaccines and the development pathway for these vaccines, in terms of assessment of immunogenicity and the challenge models used. The study of neutralizing antibodies has demonstrated that the induction of high-titre, broadly neutralizing antibodies in the majority of recipients is likely to be highly problematic. However, the results of the RV144 Thai trial released in September 2009 have brought new optimism to the field. This study employed envelope-based immunogens delivered as a priming vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus vector and boosting with recombinant proteins. This regimen provided modest protection to HIV-1 infection in a low-risk population. Although the correlates of protection are currently unknown, extensive studies are underway to try to determine these. Neutralizing antibodies were not induced in the RV144 study; however, considerable titres of binding antibodies to HIV-1 viral envelope (Env) were. It is speculated that these antibodies may have provided a means of protection by a mechanism such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, no CD8+ T-cell responses were induced, but robust CD4+ T-cell responses were, and correlates of protection are being sought by analysing the quality of this aspect of the vaccine-induced immune response

  10. Mucosal immunization induces a higher level of lasting neutralizing antibody response in mice by a replication-competent smallpox vaccine: vaccinia Tiantan strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Haibo; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m.), intranasal (i.n.), oral (i.o.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  11. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m., intranasal (i.n., oral (i.o., and subcutaneous (s.c. inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  12. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  13. Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii ROP54 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zou, Yang; Chen, Kai; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular protozoan, which infects most of the warm-blooded animals, causing serious public health problems and enormous economic losses worldwide. The rhoptry effector protein 54 (ROP54) has been indicated as a virulence factor that promotes Toxoplasma infection by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles, which can modulate some aspects of the host immune response. In order to evaluate the immuno-protective value of ROP54, we constructed a eukaryotic recombinant plasmid expressing T. gondii ROP54 and intramuscularly immunized Kunming mice with this recombinant plasmid against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. All mice immunized with pVAX-ROP54 elicited a high level of specific antibody responses, a significant increase of lymphocyte proliferation, and a significant level of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12p70), in addition to an increased production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). These results demonstrated that pVAX-ROP54 induced significant cellular and humoral (Th1/Th2) immune responses, which extended the survival time (13.0±1.15days for pVAX-ROP54 vs 6.7±0.48days for pVAX I, 6.8±0.42days for PBS and 6.5±0.53 for blank control) and significantly reduced cyst burden (35.9% for pVAX-ROP54, 1% for pVAX I and 2% for PBS, compared with blank control) of immunized mice. These results indicate that the recombinant ROP54 plasmid can provide partial protection and might be a potential vaccine candidate against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Host proteome correlates of vaccine-mediated enhanced disease in a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, A. van; Brand, H.K.; Waal, L. de; Bijl, M. van der; Jong, V.L.; Kuiken, T.; Amerongen, G. van; Ham, H.J. van den; Eijkemans, M.J.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Hermans, P.W.; Andeweg, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. Despite over 50 years of research, to date no safe and efficacious RSV vaccine has been licensed. Many experimental vaccination strategies failed to induce balanced T-helper (Th) responses and

  15. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  16. An H7N1 Influenza Virus Vaccine Induces Broadly Reactive Antibody Responses against H7N9 in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Margine, Irina; Hirsh, Ariana; Sjursen, Haakon; Zambon, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Emerging H7N9 influenza virus infections in Asia have once more spurred the development of effective prepandemic H7 vaccines. However, many vaccines based on avian influenza viruses—including H7—are poorly immunogenic, as measured by traditional correlates of protection. Here we reevaluated sera from an H7N1 human vaccine trial performed in 2006. We examined cross-reactive antibody responses to divergent H7 strains, including H7N9, dissected the antibody response into head- and stalk-reactive antibodies, and tested the in vivo potency of these human sera in a passive-transfer H7N9 challenge experiment with mice. Although only a low percentage of vaccinees induced neutralizing antibody responses against the homologous vaccine strain and also H7N9, we detected strong cross-reactivity to divergent H7 hemagglutinins (HAs) in a large proportion of the cohort with a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, H7N1 vaccination induced antibodies to both the head and stalk domains of the HA, which is in sharp contrast to seasonal inactivated vaccines. Finally, we were able to show that both neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies improved in vivo virus clearance in a passive-transfer H7N9 challenge mouse model. PMID:24943383

  17. A chimeric protein-based malaria vaccine candidate induces robust T cell responses against Plasmodium vivax MSP119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Singh, Balwan; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; da Costa Lima-Junior, Josué; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Lozano, Jose Manuel; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-10-06

    The most widespread Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, poses a significant public health threat. An effective vaccine is needed to reduce global malaria burden. Of the erythrocytic stage vaccine candidates, the 19 kDa fragment of the P. vivax Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (PvMSP119) is one of the most promising. Our group has previously defined several promiscuous T helper epitopes within the PvMSP1 protein, with features that allow them to bind multiple MHC class II alleles. We describe here a P. vivax recombinant modular chimera based on MSP1 (PvRMC-MSP1) that includes defined T cell epitopes genetically fused to PvMSP119. This vaccine candidate preserved structural elements of the native PvMSP119 and elicited cytophilic antibody responses, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing PvMSP119. Although CD8+ T cells that recognize blood stage antigens have been reported to control blood infection, CD8+ T cell responses induced by P. falciparum or P. vivax vaccine candidates based on MSP119 have not been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first time a protein based subunit vaccine has been able to induce CD8+ T cell against PvMSP119. The PvRMC-MSP1 protein was also recognized by naturally acquired antibodies from individuals living in malaria endemic areas with an antibody profile associated with protection from infection. These features make PvRMC-MSP1 a promising vaccine candidate.

  18. Evaluation of vaccination with Neospora caninum protein for prevention of fetal loss associated with experimentally induced neosporosis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mark C; Tuo, Wenbin; Dubey, J P

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate the immunologic response of a killed tachyzoite vaccine against Neospora caninum and its effectiveness in preventing fetal loss associated with experimentally induced neosporosis in sheep. 30 Dorset ewes. Ewes were randomly allocated to receive vaccination on days 1 and 60 of the study with a killed N caninum tachyzoite preparation in a commercially available adjuvant or a saline-adjuvant mixture. A ram was placed on pasture with the ewes from days 15 to 60. Blood was collected from ewes before primary and booster vaccinations and prior to experimental challenge with N caninum tachyzoite performed on day 90; sera were assessed via Neospora agglutination (NA) and immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) assays. Blood was collected from lambs before they suckled, and sera were tested for antibodies against N caninum. Of the 14 vaccinated ewes that became pregnant, 12 gave birth to live-born lambs; in contrast, 5 of 11 pregnant control ewes gave birth to live-born lambs. Whereas vaccination improved fetal survival in pregnant ewes challenged with N caninum tachyzoites, it did not appear to have any appreciable effect on transmission of N caninum to offspring, as indicated by results of NA and IFA assays. The N caninum tachyzoite vaccine used in this study appeared to provide protection against fetal loss associated with experimentally induced neosporosis in a high proportion of pregnant ewes.

  19. Overexpression of Interleukin-7 Extends the Humoral Immune Response Induced by Rabies Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Zhou, Ming; Luo, Zhaochen; Zhang, Yachun; Cui, Min; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2017-04-01

    Rabies continues to present a public health threat in most countries of the world. The most efficient way to prevent and control rabies is to implement vaccination programs for domestic animals. However, traditional inactivated vaccines used in animals are costly and have relatively low efficiency, which impedes their extensive use in developing countries. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop single-dose and long-lasting rabies vaccines. However, little information is available regarding the mechanisms underlying immunological memory, which can broaden humoral responses following rabies vaccination. In this study, a recombinant rabies virus (RABV) that expressed murine interleukin-7 (IL-7), referred to here as rLBNSE-IL-7, was constructed, and its effectiveness was evaluated in a mouse model. rLBNSE-IL-7 induced higher rates of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and germinal center (GC) B cells from draining lymph nodes (LNs) than the parent virus rLBNSE. Interestingly, rLBNSE-IL-7 improved the percentages of long-lived memory B cells (Bmem) in the draining LNs and plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) for up to 360 days postimmunization (dpi). As a result of the presence of the long-lived PCs, it also generated prolonged virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs), resulting in better protection against a lethal challenge than that seen with rLBNSE. Moreover, consistent with the increased numbers of Bmem and PCs after a boost with rLBNSE, rLBNSE-IL-7-immunized mice promptly produced a more potent secondary anti-RABV neutralizing antibody response than rLBNSE-immunized mice. Overall, our data suggest that overexpressing IL-7 improved the induction of long-lasting primary and secondary antibody responses post-RABV immunization.IMPORTANCE Extending humoral immune responses using adjuvants is an important method to develop long-lasting and efficient vaccines against rabies. However, little information is currently available regarding prolonged immunological

  20. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  1. DNA vaccine encoding myristoylated membrane protein (MMP) of rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) induces protective immunity in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) causes severe mass mortalities in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) in Korea. In this study, we investigated the potential of viral membrane protein to induce antiviral status protecting rock bream against RBIV infection. We found that fish administered with ORF008L (myristoylated membrane protein, MMP) vaccine exhibited significantly higher levels of survival compared to ORF007L (major capsid protein, MCP). Moreover, ORF008L-based DNA vaccinated fish showed significant protection at 4 and 8 weeks post vaccination (wpv) than non-vaccinated fish after infected with RBIV (6.7 × 10 5 ) at 23 °C, with relative percent survival (RPS) of 73.36% and 46.72%, respectively. All of the survivors from the first RBIV infection were strongly protected (100% RPS) from re-infected with RBIV (1.1 × 10 7 ) at 100 dpi. In addition, the MMP (ORF008L)-based DNA vaccine significantly induced the gene expression of TLR3 (14.2-fold), MyD88 (11.6-fold), Mx (84.7-fold), ISG15 (8.7-fold), PKR (25.6-fold), MHC class I (13.3-fold), Fas (6.7-fold), Fas ligand (6.7-fold), caspase9 (17.0-fold) and caspase3 (15.3-fold) at 7 days post vaccination in the muscle (vaccine injection site). Our results showed the induction of immune responses and suggest the possibility of developing preventive measures against RBIV using myristoylated membrane protein-based DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Duration of immunity induced by an equine influenza and tetanus combination vaccine formulation adjuvanted with ISCOM-Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldens, J G M; Pouwels, H G W; Derks, C G G; Van de Zande, S M A; Hoeijmakers, M J H

    2010-10-08

    Equine influenza is a contagious disease caused by equine influenza virus which belongs to the orthomyxovirus family. Outbreaks of equine influenza cause severe economic loses to the horse industry and consequently horses in competition are required to be regularly vaccinated against equine influenza. Unlike the existing inactivated vaccines, Equilis Prequenza Te is the only one able to induce protection against clinical disease and virus excretion after a primary vaccination course consisting of two vaccine applications 4-6 weeks apart until the recommended time of the third vaccination. In this paper we describe the duration of immunity profile, tested in an experimental setting according to European legislation, of this inactivated equine influenza and tetanus combination vaccine. In addition to influenza antigen, the formulation contains a second generation ISCOM (the so called ISCOMatrix) as an adjuvant. The vaccine aims at the induction of protection from the primary vaccination course until the time of annual revaccination 12 months later, against challenge with a virulent equine influenza strain. The protection against A/equine/Kentucky/95 (H3N8) at the time of annual revaccination was evidenced by a significant reduction of clinical signs of influenza, a significant reduction of virus excretion and a significant reduction of fever. The effect of the annual revaccination on the duration of immunity against influenza and tetanus was also studied by serology. For tetanus, as a consequence of the 24 months duration of immunity, an alternating annual vaccination schedule consisting of Prequenza and Prequenza Te is proposed after the first three doses of Prequenza Te. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenoviral Vector Vaccination Induces a Conserved Program of CD8+ T Cell Memory Differentiation in Mouse and Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bolinger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following exposure to vaccines, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses develop as long-term memory pools. Vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, e.g., those developed for HCV, are able to induce and sustain substantial CD8+ T cell populations. How such populations evolve following vaccination remains to be defined at a transcriptional level. We addressed the transcriptional regulation of divergent CD8+ T cell memory pools induced by an adenovector encoding a model antigen (beta-galactosidase. We observe transcriptional profiles that mimic those following infection with persistent pathogens, murine and human cytomegalovirus (CMV. Key transcriptional hallmarks include upregulation of homing receptors and anti-apoptotic pathways, driven by conserved networks of transcription factors, including T-bet. In humans, an adenovirus vaccine induced similar CMV-like phenotypes and transcription factor regulation. These data clarify the core features of CD8+ T cell memory following vaccination with adenovectors and indicate a conserved pathway for memory development shared with persistent herpesviruses.

  4. The site of administration influences both the type and the magnitude of the immune response induced by DNA vaccine electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; De Beuckelaer, Ans; De Koker, Stefaan; Lambricht, Laure; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Reschner, Anca; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Grooten, Johan; Préat, Véronique

    2015-06-22

    We investigated the influence of the site of administration of DNA vaccine on the induced immune response. DNA vaccines were administered by electroporation at three different sites: tibial cranial muscle, abdominal skin and ear pinna. Aiming to draw general conclusions about DNA vaccine delivery, we successively used several plasmids encoding either luciferase and ovalbumin as models or gp160 and P1A as vaccines against HIV and P815 mastocytoma, respectively. Low levels and duration of luciferase transgene expression were observed after electroporation of the abdominal skin, partly explaining its lower immunogenic performance as compared to the other sites of administration. Analyses of OT-I CD8+ and OT-II CD4+ T cell responses highlighted the differential impact of the delivery site on the elicited immune response. Muscle electroporation induced the strongest humoral immune response and both muscle and ear pinna sites induced cellular immunity against gp160. Ear pinna delivery generated the highest level of CTL responses against P1A but electroporation of muscle and ear pinna were equally efficient in delaying P815 growth and improving mice survival. The present study demonstrated that the site of administration is a key factor to be tested in the development of DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine applied by needle-free intradermal delivery induces cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses, and the infection is widely prevalent in swine herds throughout the world. Current commercial influenza vaccines for pigs induce a narrow immune response and are not very effective against antigenically diverse viruses. To control...... influenza in pigs, the development of more effective swine influenza vaccines inducing broader cross-protective immune responses is needed. Previously, we have shown that a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine using vectors containing antibiotic resistance genes induced a broadly protective immune response...... of the optimized DNA vaccine were evaluated in groups of five to six pigs. The DNA vaccine consisted of six selected influenza genes of pandemic origin, including internally expressed matrix and nucleoprotein and externally expressed hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. RESULTS: Needle-free vaccination of growing pigs...

  6. CD47 Plays a Role as a Negative Regulator in Inducing Protective Immune Responses to Vaccination against Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Youri; Lee, Yu-Na; Bian, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-08-01

    An integrin-associated protein CD47, which is a ligand for the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein α, is expressed on B and T cells, as well as on most innate immune cells. However, the roles of CD47 in the immune responses to viral infection or vaccination remain unknown. We investigated the role of CD47 in inducing humoral immune responses after intranasal infection with virus or immunization with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs). Virus infection or vaccination with VLPs containing hemagglutinin from A/PR8/34 influenza virus induced higher levels of antigen-specific IgG2c isotype dominant antibodies in CD47-deficient (CD47KO) mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. CD47KO mice with vaccination showed greater protective efficacy against lethal challenge, as evidenced by no loss in body weight and reduced lung viral titers compared to WT mice. In addition, inflammatory responses which include cytokine production, leukocyte infiltrates, and gamma interferon-producing CD4(+) T cells, as well as an anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10), were reduced in the lungs of vaccinated CD47KO mice after challenge with influenza virus. Analysis of lymphocytes indicated that GL7(+) germinal center B cells were induced at higher levels in the draining lymph nodes of CD47KO mice compared to those in WT mice. Notably, CD47KO mice exhibited significant increases in the numbers of antigen-specific memory B cells in spleens and plasma cells in bone marrow despite their lower levels of background IgG antibodies. These results suggest that CD47 plays a role as a negative regulator in inducing protective immune responses to influenza vaccination. Molecular mechanisms that control B cell activation to produce protective antibodies upon viral vaccination remain poorly understood. The CD47 molecule is known to be a ligand for the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein α and expressed on the surfaces of most immune cell types. CD47 was previously demonstrated to play

  7. Reduction in fluoride-induced genotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells after substituting high fluoride-containing water with safe drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Santosh; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of mice with 15 mg l(-1) sodium fluoride (NaF) for 30 days increased the number of cell death, chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and 'cells with chromatid breaks' (aberrant cells) compared with control. The present study was intended to determine whether the fluoride (F)-induced genotoxicity could be reduced by substituting high F-containing water after 30 days with safe drinking water, containing 0.1 mg F ions l(-1). A significant fall in percentage of CAs and aberrant cells after withdrawal of F-treatment following 30 days of safe water treatment in mice was observed which was highest after 90 days, although their levels still remained significantly high compared with the control group. This observation suggests that F-induced genotoxicity could be reduced by substituting high F-containing water with safe drinking water. Further study is warranted with different doses and extended treatment of safe water to determine whether the induced damages could be completely reduced or not. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. An update on the use of laser technology in skin vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyuan; Wang, Ji; Shah, Dilip; Wu, Mei X

    2013-11-01

    Vaccination via skin often induces stronger immune responses than via muscle. This, in line with potential needle-free, painless delivery, makes skin a very attractive site for immunization. Yet, despite decades of effort, effective skin delivery is still in its infant stage and safe and potent adjuvants for skin vaccination remain largely undefined. We have shown that laser technologies including both fractional and non-fractional lasers can greatly augment vaccine-induced immune response without incurring any significant local and systemic side effects. Laser illumination at specific settings can accelerate the motility of antigen-presenting cells or trigger release of 'danger' signals stimulating the immune system. Moreover, several other groups including the authors explore laser technologies for needle-free transcutaneous vaccine delivery. As these laser-mediated resurfacing technologies are convenient, safe and cost-effective, their new applications in vaccination warrant clinical studies in the very near future.

  9. Regression of Human Papillomavirus Intraepithelial Lesions Is Induced by MVA E2 Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 107 MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2–treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally. PMID:25275724

  10. A goat poxvirus-vectored peste-des-petits-ruminants vaccine induces long-lasting neutralization antibody to high levels in goats and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiye; Hu, Sen; Qu, Linmao; Hu, Qianqian; Zhang, Qian; Zhi, Haibing; Huang, Kehe; Bu, Zhigao

    2010-07-05

    Recombinant capripoxvirus (CPV) is a promising candidate differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) vaccine against peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR). In order for recombinant CPV to be successfully used in the field, there should exist dependable indicators for quality control of vaccine products, surveillance and vaccination evaluation. Viral neutralization antibody (VNA) is correlated to protection against PPR and is a technically feasible indicator for this purpose. The immunogenicity of this vectored vaccine in goats and sheep, however, has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we generated two recombinant CPV viruses, rCPV-PPRVH and rCPV-PPRVF, that express PPR virus (PPRV) glycoproteins H and F, respectively. Vaccination studies with different dosages of recombinant viruses showed that rCPV-PPRVH was a more potent inducer of PPRV VNA than rCPV-PPRVF. One dose of rCPV-PPRVH was enough to seroconvert 80% of immunized sheep. A second dose induced significantly higher PPRV VNA titers. There was no significant difference in PPRV VNA responses between goats and sheep. Subcutaneous inoculation also induced a significant PPRV VNA response. PPRV VNA could be detected for over 6 months in more than 80% of vaccinated goats and sheep. Boost vaccination at 6-month intervals induced significant re-boost efficacy of PPRV VNA in goats and sheep. More over, two doses of rCPV-PPRVH could completely overcome the interference caused by pre-existing immunity to the CPV vaccine backbone in animals. Vaccination with rCPV-PPRVH also protected goats from virulent CPV challenge. Our results demonstrate that VNA can serve as a dependent indicator for effective vaccination and immune protection of animals in the field. The recombinant CPV vaccine used in our studies could be a practical and useful candidate DIVA vaccine in countries where PPR newly emerges or where stamp-out plans are yet to be implemented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SAFE Newsletter

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Center of Excellence SAFE – “Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe” – is a cooperation of the Center for Financial Studies and Goethe University Frankfurt. It is funded by the LOEWE initiative of the State of Hessen (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz). SAFE brings together more than 40 professors and just as many junior researchers who are all dedicated to conducting research in support of a sustainable financial architecture. The Center has...

  12. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, Lourdes; Lorenzen, Ellen; Bovo, Giuseppe; Evensen, Øystein; Lapatra, Scott; Lorenzen, Niels

    2009-02-18

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides protection by 4 days post vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site expressed both G proteins. This study confirms the applied potential of using a combined DNA vaccination for protection of fish against two different rhabdoviral diseases.

  13. Enhancement of immune response induced by DNA vaccine cocktail expressing complete LACK and TSA genes against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Jorjani, Ogholniaz; Sharifi, Zohreh; Dalimi, Abdolhossein; Hassan, Zuhair M; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh; Khoshzaban, Fariba; Hezarjaribi, Hajar Ziaei

    2013-04-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important disease in humans. Leishmania homologue of receptor for Activated C Kinase (LACK) and thiol specific antioxidant (TSA) as immuno-dominant antigens of Leishmania major are considered the most promising molecules for a DNA vaccine. We constructed a DNA cocktail, containing plasmids encoding LACK and TSA genes of Leishmania major and evaluated the immune response and survival rate in BALB/c mice. IgG and Interferon gamma values were noticeably increased in the immunized group with DNA cocktail vaccine, which were significantly higher than those in the single-gene vaccinated and control groups (p 0.05). The immunized mice with the cocktail DNA vaccine presented a considerable reduction in diameter of lesion compared to other groups and a significant difference was observed (p < 0.05) in this regard. The survival time of the immunized mice with the cocktail DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that in the other groups (p < 0.05) after their being challenged with Leishmania major. The findings of this study indicated that the cocktail DNA vaccine increased the cellular response and survival rate and induced protection against infection with Leishmania in the mice. © 2012 The Authors © 2012 APMIS.

  14. Severe bovine papillomatosis: detection of bovine papillomavirus in tumour tissue and efficacy of treatment using autogenous vaccine and parammunity inducer

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Nenad; Župančić, Željko; Starešina, Vilim; Kovač, Snježana; Babić, Tomislav; Kreszinger, Mario; Ćurić, Stipica; Barbić, Ljubo; Milas, Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Two cases of severe bovine papillomatosis occurred in northwest Croatia during 2000 are described. Diagnosis was based on presented clinical signs, histopathological findings, and detection of the papillomavirus by transmission electron microscopy. Animals successfully recovered following treatment with the autogenous (non-purified) vaccine and a parammunity inducer. For the first time in Croatia we report the detection of papillomavirus by electron microscopy.

  15. A multi-epitope vaccine based on Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein induces specific immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jianxin; Hou, Bailong; Wang, Bingbing; Lin, Xiaoyun; Gong, Wenci; Dong, Haiyan; Zhu, Shanli; Chen, Shao; Xue, Xiangyang; Zhao, Kong-Nan; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a candidate vaccine comprising the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) multi-epitope of Chlamydia trachomatis. A short gene of multi-epitope derived from MOMP containing multiple T- and B-cell epitopes was artificially synthesized. The recombinant plasmid pET32a(+) containing codon optimized MOMP multi-epitope gene was constructed. Expression of the fusion protein Trx-His-MOMP multi-epitope in Escherichia coli was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis. Balb/c mice were inoculated with the purified fusion protein subcutaneously three times with 2-week intervals. Results showed that the MOMP multi-epitope elicited not only strong humoral immune responses to C. trachomatis by generating significantly high levels of specific antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a), but also a cellular immune response by inducing robust cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in mice. Furthermore, the MOMP multi-epitope substantially primed secretion of IFN-γ, revealing that this vaccine could induce a strong Th1 response. Finally, the mice vaccinated with the MOMP multi-epitope displayed a reduction of C. trachomatis shedding upon a chlamydial challenge and an accelerated clearance of the infected C. trachomatis. In conclusion, the MOMP multi-epitope vaccine may have the potentiality for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against the C. trachomatis infection.

  16. Carbopol improves the early cellular immune responses induced by the modified-life vaccine Ingelvac PRRS® MLV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, K H; Koinig, H; Gerner, W; Höhne, A; Bretthauer, J; Kroll, J J; Roof, M B; Saalmüller, A; Stadler, K; Libanova, R

    2015-04-17

    Adjuvants enhance both the magnitude and duration of immune responses, therefore representing a central component of vaccines. The nature of the adjuvant can determine the particular type of immune response, which may be skewed toward cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, antibody responses, or particular classes of T helper (Th) responses and antibody isotypes. Traditionally, adjuvants have been added to intrinsically poor immunogenic vaccines, such as those using whole killed organisms or subunit vaccines. Here, we have compared cellular immune responses induced by the immunogenic modified life-attenuated vaccine Ingelvac PRRS® MLV when administered alone or in combination with carbopol, a widely used adjuvant in veterinary medicine. Using functional readouts (IFN-γ ELISpot and cell proliferation) and analyzing phenotypical hallmarks of CD4T cell differentiation, we show that carbopol improves cellular immunity by inducing early IFN-γ-producing cells and by preferentially driving T cell differentiation to effector phenotypes. Our data suggest that adjuvants may enhance and modulate life-attenuated--not only subunit/inactivated--vaccines. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  18. A chimeric Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein vaccine induces high titers of parasite growth inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaro, James R; Partridge, Andrea; Miura, Kazutoyo; Diouf, Ababacar; Lopez, Ana M; Angov, Evelina; Long, Carole A; Burns, James M

    2013-10-01

    The C-terminal 19-kDa domain of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (PfMSP119) is an established target of protective antibodies. However, clinical trials of PfMSP142, a leading blood-stage vaccine candidate which contains the protective epitopes of PfMSP119, revealed suboptimal immunogenicity and efficacy. Based on proof-of-concept studies in the Plasmodium yoelii murine model, we produced a chimeric vaccine antigen containing recombinant PfMSP119 (rPfMSP119) fused to the N terminus of P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 8 that lacked its low-complexity Asn/Asp-rich domain, rPfMSP8 (ΔAsn/Asp). Immunization of mice with the chimeric rPfMSP1/8 vaccine elicited strong T cell responses to conserved epitopes associated with the rPfMSP8 (ΔAsn/Asp) fusion partner. While specific for PfMSP8, this T cell response was adequate to provide help for the production of high titers of antibodies to both PfMSP119 and rPfMSP8 (ΔAsn/Asp) components. This occurred with formulations adjuvanted with either Quil A or with Montanide ISA 720 plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and was observed in both inbred and outbred strains of mice. PfMSP1/8-induced antibodies were highly reactive with two major alleles of PfMSP119 (FVO and 3D7). Of particular interest, immunization with PfMSP1/8 elicited higher titers of PfMSP119-specific antibodies than a combined formulation of rPfMSP142 and rPfMSP8 (ΔAsn/Asp). As a measure of functionality, PfMSP1/8-specific rabbit IgG was shown to potently inhibit the in vitro growth of blood-stage parasites of the FVO and 3D7 strains of P. falciparum. These data support the further testing and evaluation of this chimeric PfMSP1/8 antigen as a component of a multivalent vaccine for P. falciparum malaria.

  19. Virus-like particle vaccines containing F or F and G proteins confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus without pulmonary inflammation in cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Youri; Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Park, SooJin; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kwon, Young-Man; Moore, Martin L; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2017-05-04

    Vaccine-enhanced disease has been a major obstacle in developing a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study demonstrates the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines containing RSV F (F VLP), G (G VLP), or F and G proteins (FG VLP) in cotton rats. RSV specific antibodies were effectively induced by vaccination of cotton rats with F VLP or FG VLP vaccines. After challenge, lung RSV clearance was observed with RSV F, G, FG VLP, and formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccines. Upon RSV infection, cotton rats with RSV VLP vaccines were protected against airway hyper-responsiveness and weight loss, which are different from FI-RSV vaccination exhibiting vaccine-enhanced disease of airway obstruction, weight loss, and severe histopathology with eosinophilia and mucus production. FG VLP and F VLP vaccines did not cause pulmonary inflammation whereas G VLP induced moderate lung inflammation with eosinophilia and mucus production. In particular, F VLP and FG VLP vaccines were found to be effective in inducing antibody secreting cell responses in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as avoiding the induction of T helper type 2 cytokines. These results provide further evidence to develop a safe RSV vaccine based on VLP platforms.

  20. A highly conserved epitope-vaccine candidate against varicella-zoster virus induces neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Liu, Jian; Chen, Chunye; Ye, Xiangzhong; Xu, Longfa; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-03-18

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly infectious agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ). Vaccination is by far the most effective way to prevent these diseases. More safe, stable and efficient vaccines, such as epitope-based vaccines, now have been increasingly investigated by many researchers. However, only a few VZV neutralizing epitopes have been identified to date. We have previously identified a linear epitope between amino acid residues 121 and 135 of gE. In this study, we validated that this epitope is highly conserved amongst different VZV strains that covered five existing phylogenetic clades with an identity of 100%. We evaluated the immunogenicity of the recombinant hepatitis B virus core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) which included amino acids (121-135). VZV-gE-specific antibodies were detected in immunized mouse serum using ELISA. The anti-peptide antiserum positively detected VZV via Western blot and immunofluorescent staining assays. More importantly, these peptides could neutralize VZV, indicating that these peptides represented neutralizing epitopes. These findings have important implications for the development of epitope-based protective VZV vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Valentina; Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines.

  2. Intracutaneous DNA Vaccination with the E8 Gene of Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Induces Protective Immunity against Virus Challenge in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiafen; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D.

    2002-01-01

    The cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model has been used in several studies for testing prophylactic and therapeutic papillomavirus vaccines. Earlier observations had shown that the CRPV nonstructural genes E1, E2, and E6 induced strong to partial protective immunity against CRPV infection. In this study, we found that CRPV E8 immunization eliminated virus-induced papillomas in EIII/JC inbred rabbits (100%) and provided partial protection (55%) against virus challenge in outbred...

  3. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of...

  4. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Løve Aaes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  5. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads Andreas Bay; Kongsgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should...... these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response......, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both...

  6. Comparative analysis of the immune responses induced by native versus recombinant versions of the ASP-based vaccine against the bovine intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Ana; Borloo, Jimmy; Peelaers, Iris; Casaert, Stijn; Leclercq, Georges; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The protective capacities of a native double-domain activation-associated secreted protein (ndd-ASP)-based vaccine against the cattle intestinal nematode Cooperia oncophora has previously been demonstrated. However, protection analysis upon vaccination with a recombinantly produced antigen has never been performed. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to test the protective potential of a Pichia-produced double-domain ASP (pdd-ASP)-based vaccine against C. oncophora. Additionally, we aimed to compare the cellular and humoral mechanisms underlying the vaccine-induced responses by the native (ndd-ASP) and recombinant vaccines. Immunisation of cattle with the native C. oncophora vaccine conferred significant levels of protection after an experimental challenge infection, whereas the recombinant vaccine did not. Moreover, vaccination with ndd-ASP resulted in a higher proliferation of CD4-T cells both systemically and in the small intestinal mucosa when compared with animals vaccinated with the recombinant antigen. In terms of humoral response, although both native and recombinant vaccines induced similar levels of antibodies, animals vaccinated with the native vaccine were able to raise antibodies with greater specificity towards ndd-ASP in comparison with antibodies raised by vaccination with the recombinant vaccine, suggesting a differential immune recognition towards the ndd-ASP and pdd-ASP. Finally, the observation that animals displaying antibodies with higher percentages of recognition towards ndd-ASP also exhibited the lowest egg counts suggests a potential relationship between antibody specificity and protection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. PO and ID BCG vaccination in humans induce distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses and CD4+T cell transcriptomal molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, D F; Xia, M; Zhang, G L; Blazevic, A; Tennant, J; Kaplan, C; Matuschak, G; Dube, T J; Hill, H; Schlesinger, L S; Andersen, P L; Brusic, V

    2017-08-30

    Protective efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) may be affected by the methods and routes of vaccine administration. We have studied the safety and immunogenicity of oral (PO) and/or intradermal (ID) administration of BCG in healthy human subjects. No major safety concerns were detected in the 68 healthy adults vaccinated with PO and/or ID BCG. Although both PO and ID BCG could induce systemic Th1 responses capable of IFN-γ production, ID BCG more strongly induced systemic Th1 responses. In contrast, stronger mucosal responses (TB-specific secretory IgA and bronchoalveolar lavage T cells) were induced by PO BCG vaccination. To generate preliminary data comparing the early gene signatures induced by mucosal and systemic BCG vaccination, CD4 + memory T cells were isolated from subsets of BCG vaccinated subjects pre- (Day 0) and post-vaccination (Days 7 and 56), rested or stimulated with BCG infected dendritic cells, and then studied by Illumina BeadArray transcriptomal analysis. Notably, distinct gene expression profiles were identified both on Day 7 and Day 56 comparing the PO and ID BCG vaccinated groups by GSEA analysis. Future correlation analyses between specific gene expression patterns and distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses induced will be highly informative for TB vaccine development.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 30 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.67.

  8. Curcumin combined with FAP?c vaccine elicits effective antitumor response by targeting indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase and inhibiting EMT induced by TNF-? in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Guan-Min; Xie, Wan-Ying; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Du, Jun; Wu, Bai-Ping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hui-Fang; XIAO, PING; LIU, ZHI-GANG; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Yin, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Gui; Liang, Jian-Ping; Huang, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein ? (FAP?) is a potential target for cancer therapy. However, elimination of FAP?+ fibroblasts activates secretion of IFN-? and TNF-?. IFN-? can in turn induce expression indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), thereby contributing to immunosuppression, while TNF-? can induce EMT. These two reactive effects would limit the efficacy of a tumor vaccine. We found that curcumin can inhibit IDO expression and TNF-?-induced EMT. Moreover, FAP?c vaccine and CpG combined with cu...

  9. The effects of CpG-ODNs and Chitosan adjuvants on the elicitation of immune responses induced by the HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samira; Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2017-03-01

    HIV1-Tat-based vaccines could elicit broad, durable and neutralizing immune responses and are considered as potential AIDS vaccines. The present study aims to formulate CpG-ODNs adjuvant and Chitosan with Tat protein to enhance the immunogenicity of HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines and to investigate their efficacies in mice. To this end, we added CpG-ODNs, Chitosan and Alum as adjuvants to the Tat-based candidate vaccine formulations. Then, we compared frequency and magnitude of both humoral and cellular immune responses from mice immunized with the adjuvant-formulated Tat candidate vaccines against those obtained from mice immunized with recombinant Tat protein alone. Mice were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with the candidate vaccines. Measurements of anti-Tat immune responses showed that all vaccinated groups had a good immunity compared to the control groups and developed high levels of both humoral and cellular responses. However, immunized mice with CpG-ODNs, and Chitosan-adjuvanted Tat vaccines elicited stronger T-cell responses (both humoral and cellular immunity) compared to the others. These data suggest that co-administration of recombinant Tat protein with CpG-ODNs and Chitosan may serve as a potential formulation for enhancing of the Tat vaccine-induced immunity and might have effects on shaping Th polarization induced by HIV1-Tat protein vaccines. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: A protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.D. de Kleijn (Ester); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.B. van Gageldonk-Lafeber (Rianne); J. Labadie (J.); C.J.P. van Limpt (C. J P); J. Visser (John); G.A. Berbers; L. van Alphen (Loek); H. Rümke (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with

  11. A DNA Vaccine Encoding Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase of Brucella abortus Induces Protective Immunity in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Angel A.; Céspedes, Sandra; Cabrera, Alex; Rivers, Rodolfo; González, Andrés; Muñoz, Carola; Folch, Hugo; Andrews, Edilia

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA carrying the SOD gene (pcDNA-SOD) into BALB/c mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. Animals injected with pcDNA-SOD developed SOD-specific antibodies which exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the DNA vaccine elicited a T-cell-proliferative response and also induced the production of gamma interferon, but not interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, upon restimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in mice. The pcDNA-SOD (but not the control vector) induced a strong, significant level of protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308; the level of protection was similar to the one induced by B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Altogether, these data suggest that pcDNA-SOD is a good candidate for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis. PMID:12933826

  12. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can mediate vaccine-induced protection against Coccidioides immitis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierer, Joshua; Waters, Crystal; Walls, Lorraine

    2006-05-01

    To determine which lymphocytes are required for vaccine-induced immunity to coccidioidomycosis, we used a temperature-sensitive mutant of Coccidioides immitis to immunize mice lacking subsets of lymphocytes or specific cytokines and infected the mice 4 weeks later with virulent C. immitis. After 2 weeks, we determined the number of fungi in their lungs and spleens. Vaccine-induced immunity required alpha beta T lymphocytes. beta -2 microglobulin knockout (KO) mice were protected by immunization, and we transferred protection using CD4+ T cells from immunized mice. However, vaccination also protected CD4+ KO mice, which suggests that CD8+ T cells played a role in vaccine-induced immunity, even though they were not required. We adaptively transferred protection using spleen cells from immunized CD4+ KO mice to nonimmune B6 mice, but CD8+ -depleted spleen cells did not protect against infection. Recipients of spleen cells from immunized CD4+ KO mice had 6 times more tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha mRNA in their lungs than did mice that received nonimmune spleen cells, and TNF receptor-1 KO mice were not fully protected by immunization. These results show that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can protect against coccidioidomycosis and that TNF- alpha is a necessary component of the acquired immune response.

  13. The Breadth of Synthetic Long Peptide Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T Cell Responses Determines the Efficacy against Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Panagioti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an ultimate need for efficacious vaccines against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, which causes severe morbidity and mortality among neonates and immunocompromised individuals. In this study we explored synthetic long peptide (SLP vaccination as a platform modality to protect against mouse CMV (MCMV infection in preclinical mouse models. In both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mouse strains, prime-booster vaccination with SLPs containing MHC class I restricted epitopes of MCMV resulted in the induction of strong and polyfunctional (i.e., IFN-γ+, TNF+, IL-2+ CD8+ T cell responses, equivalent in magnitude to those induced by the virus itself. SLP vaccination initially led to the formation of effector CD8+ T cells (KLRG1hi, CD44hi, CD127lo, CD62Llo, which eventually converted to a mixed central and effector-memory T cell phenotype. Markedly, the magnitude of the SLP vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response was unrelated to the T cell functional avidity but correlated to the naive CD8+ T cell precursor frequency of each epitope. Vaccination with single SLPs displayed various levels of long-term protection against acute MCMV infection, but superior protection occurred after vaccination with a combination of SLPs. This finding underlines the importance of the breadth of the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Thus, SLP-based vaccines could be a potential strategy to prevent CMV-associated disease.

  14. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce...... been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly...

  15. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Vaccine-induced rabies in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes): isolation of vaccine virus in brain tissue and salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostnik, Peter; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Rihtarič, Danijela; Toplak, Ivan; Cliquet, Florence

    2014-04-01

    Oral vaccination campaigns to eliminate fox rabies were initiated in Slovenia in 1995. In May 2012, a young fox (Vulpes vulpes) with typical rabies signs was captured. Its brain and salivary gland tissues were found to contain vaccine strain SAD B19. The Basic Logical Alignment Search Tool alignment of 589 nucleotides determined from the N gene of the virus isolated from the brain and salivary glands of the affected fox was 100% identical to the GenBank reference SAD B19 strain. Sequence analysis of the N and M genes (4,351 nucleotides) showed two nucleotide modifications at position 1335 (N gene) and 3114 (M gene) in the KC522613 isolate identified in the fox compared to SAD B19.

  17. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ(+) CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin

    2016-01-01

    animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1......Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig...... trachomatis SvD bacteria (UV-SvD/CAF01) or CAF01. The Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine induced a strong CMI response against the vaccine antigens and high titers of antibodies, particularly against the VD4 region of MOMP. Sera from Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 immunized pigs neutralized C. trachomatis SvD and SvF infectivity...

  18. Studies on genetic and vaccination-induced resistance of chickens to lymphoid tumor transplants 2. Transmissible lymphoid tumor of Olson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J L; Gavora, J S; Grunder, A A; Robertson, A; Speckmann, G W

    1976-01-01

    Transmissible lymphoid tumor (TLT) was inoculated in wing webs of five-week-old chickens of 6 strains. About half of the chickens of each strain had been vaccinated with turkey herpesvirus (HVT) one week before challenge in the wing web with TLT. Tumors which developed at the site of inoculation usually reached maximum size within 2 weeks and then regressed. In some chickens, however, tumors developed in visceral organs and caused death in the 2nd through 5th weeks postinoculation. Comparisons among strains of chickens in Expt. 1 revealed no differences in mortality. Vaccination with HVT reduced mortality and also the incidence of wing-web tumors (WWT) in all strains of chickens. A lymphoid leukosis virus and a Marek's disease (MD) virus of low virulence were detected in preparations of TLT, and it is suggested that the immunity induced by vaccination may have been directed against tumor antigens associated with MD virus.

  19. Effect of the vaccination scheme on PregSure® BVD induced alloreactivity and the incidence of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasonta, Rahel; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Holsteg, Mark; Duchow, Karin; Cussler, Klaus; Bastian, Max

    2012-10-19

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a new neonate-maternal incompatibility phenomenon caused by vaccine-induced, maternal alloantibodies. The syndrome affects newborn calves at the approximate age of ten days and is characterized by spontaneous bleeding, severe anemia with an almost complete destruction of the red bone marrow. During the past two years the causal role of bioprocess impurities in PregSure(®)BVD, a strongly adjuvanted, inactivated vaccine against Bovine Virus Diarrhoea (BVD), in the induction of BNP causing alloantibodies has clearly been established. Despite intensive research efforts that have elucidated the basic principles of the BNP immunopathology still a number of questions remain open. In the current manuscript we address the puzzling observation that BNP incidences vary widely between different regions: as an example we compare the BNP incidences in the German Federal States of Bavaria and Lower Saxony. In Bavaria the BNP-incidence reaches 100 cases per 100,000 doses PregSure(®)BVD, while in Lower Saxony the incidence is as low as 6 cases per 100,000 doses. In Bavaria the vaccine has always been used according to the instructions for use. By contrast, in Lower Saxony BVD-immunization was performed according to a two-step vaccination protocol including a first immunization with an inactivated BVD-vaccine followed by booster immunizations with a live-attenuated BVD-vaccine. As a consequence, those cattle that received PregSure(®)BVD received in general more than two doses in Bavaria, while in Lower Saxony cows received at maximum one dose. By experimental immunization we can show that the two-step regimen including PregSure(®)BVD as a priming vaccine results in significantly lower alloantibody titers as compared to repetitive immunizations with the inactivated vaccine. The lower alloantibody titer after two-step vaccination explains the lower BNP-incidence in Lower Saxony and - generally speaking - indicates that variations in the

  20. The Recombinant BCG ΔureC::hly Vaccine Targets the AIM2 Inflammasome to Induce Autophagy and Inflammation.

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    Saiga, Hiroyuki; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Gengenbacher, Martin; Koehler, Anne-Britta; Schuerer, Stefanie; Moura-Alves, Pedro; Wagner, Ina; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Dorhoi, Anca; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2015-06-01

    The recombinant BCG ΔureC::hly (rBCG) vaccine candidate induces improved protection against tuberculosis over parental BCG (pBCG) in preclinical studies and has successfully completed a phase 2a clinical trial. However, the mechanisms responsible for the superior vaccine efficacy of rBCG are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the underlying biological mechanisms elicited by the rBCG vaccine candidate relevant to its protective efficacy. THP-1 macrophages were infected with pBCG or rBCG, and inflammasome activation and autophagy were evaluated. In addition, mice were vaccinated with pBCG or rBCG, and gene expression in the draining lymph nodes was analyzed by microarray at day 1 after vaccination. BCG-derived DNA was detected in the cytosol of rBCG-infected macrophages. rBCG infection was associated with enhanced absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome activation, increased activation of caspases and production of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, as well as induction of AIM2-dependent and stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent autophagy. Similarly, mice vaccinated with rBCG showed early increased expression of Il-1β, Il-18, and Tmem173 (transmembrane protein 173; also known as STING). rBCG stimulates AIM2 inflammasome activation and autophagy, suggesting that these cell-autonomous functions should be exploited for improved vaccine design. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Immunopathogenesis associated with formaldehyde-inactivated RSV vaccine in preclinical and clinical studies.

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    Muralidharan, Abenaya; Li, Changgui; Wang, Lisheng; Li, Xuguang

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is responsible for one-third of deaths of acute lower respiratory infection in children less than one-year-old. The formaldehyde-inactivated RSV vaccine trial conducted in the 1960s predisposed the vaccinees to more serious RSV infection instead of protection. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism is of critical importance for better designing of safe and effective RSV vaccines. Areas covered: PubMed was searched to review immunopathology induced by RSV vaccines. We intend to dissect the differences in clinical and pathological manifestations of enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) in different animal models in comparison with humans. Formaldehyde-inactivated RSV vaccine causes ERD in both humans and animals, while RSV vaccine without formaldehyde treatment could also induce similar disease in animals, suggesting multiple pathways may be involved. Expert commentary: Identification of biomarkers pertinent to clinical evaluation should be further explored for safety assessment of RSV vaccines in human trials.

  2. Systematic review of mucosal immunity induced by oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines against virus shedding following oral poliovirus challenge.

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    Thomas R Hird

    Full Text Available Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV may be used in mass vaccination campaigns during the final stages of polio eradication. It is also likely to be adopted by many countries following the coordinated global cessation of vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV after eradication. The success of IPV in the control of poliomyelitis outbreaks will depend on the degree of nasopharyngeal and intestinal mucosal immunity induced against poliovirus infection. We performed a systematic review of studies published through May 2011 that recorded the prevalence of poliovirus shedding in stool samples or nasopharyngeal secretions collected 5-30 days after a "challenge" dose of OPV. Studies were combined in a meta-analysis of the odds of shedding among children vaccinated according to IPV, OPV, and combination schedules. We identified 31 studies of shedding in stool and four in nasopharyngeal samples that met the inclusion criteria. Individuals vaccinated with OPV were protected against infection and shedding of poliovirus in stool samples collected after challenge compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary odds ratio [OR] for shedding 0.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.24. In contrast, IPV provided no protection against shedding compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.59-1.11] or when given in addition to OPV, compared with individuals given OPV alone (summary OR 1.14 [95% CI 0.82-1.58]. There were insufficient studies of nasopharyngeal shedding to draw a conclusion. IPV does not induce sufficient intestinal mucosal immunity to reduce the prevalence of fecal poliovirus shedding after challenge, although there was some evidence that it can reduce the quantity of virus shed. The impact of IPV on poliovirus transmission in countries where fecal-oral spread is common is unknown but is likely to be limited compared with OPV.

  3. Vaccination of dogs with canine parvovirus type 2b (CPV-2b) induces neutralising antibody responses to CPV-2a and CPV-2c.

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    Wilson, Stephen; Illambas, Joanna; Siedek, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; Plevová, Edita; Sture, Gordon; Salt, Jeremy

    2014-09-22

    Since the identification of canine parvovirus type 2, three variants have subsequently been observed differing from the historical CPV-2 and each other by 1-2 amino acids only. As a result there has been considerable research into differential diagnostics, with some researchers indicating there is a need for new vaccines containing different strains of CPV-2. In this study we investigated whether vaccination with a CPV-2b containing vaccine would induce cross-reactive antibody responses to the other CPV-2 variants. Two studies where dogs were vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine, subsequently challenged with CPV-2b and sera samples analysed are presented. Six week old pups with defined serological status were vaccinated twice, three weeks apart and challenged either 5 weeks (MDA override study) or one year after vaccination (duration of immunity study). Sera samples were collected before each vaccination and at periods throughout each study. In each study the antibody profiles were very similar; serological responses against CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c were higher than those for CPV-2. Nevertheless, responses against CPV-2 were well above levels considered clinically protective. In each study dogs also showed a rapid increase in antibody titres following vaccination, reached a plateau following second vaccination with a slight decline to challenge after which rapid anamnestic responses were seen. Evaluation of the serological responses suggests vaccination with CPV-2b would cross-protect against CPV-2a and CPV-2c, as well as against CPV-2 which is now extinct in the field. In conclusion we have demonstrated that vaccination of minimum aged dogs with a multivalent vaccine containing the CPV-2b variant strain will induce serological responses which are cross-reactive against all currently circulating field strains, CPV-2a and CPV-2c, and the now extinct field strain CPV-2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccination with the Mycoplasma suis recombinant adhesion protein MSG1 elicits a strong immune response but fails to induce protection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzle, Katharina; Doser, Susanne; Ritzmann, Mathias; Heinritzi, Karl; Palzer, Andreas; Elicker, Sabine; Kramer, Manuela; Felder, Kathrin M; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2009-08-27

    Mycoplasma suis is the unculturable pathogen of porcine infectious anemia. The study was aimed to determine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of MSG1, an immunodominant adhesin of M. suis as the first vaccine candidate against M. suis. The results demonstrated that recombinant MSG1 and Escherichia coli transformants expressing MSG1 (E. coli_MSG1) induced a strong humoral and cellular immunity against M. suis. The induced antibodies were found to be functionally active as confirmed by an in vitro adhesion inhibition assay. Both, IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were induced, but E. coli_MSG1 immune response was characterized by a significantly higher IgG1 antibody production. Both vaccine candidates failed to protect against M. suis challenge. However, E. coli_MSG1 vaccination has a considerable effect on the severity of the disease as shown by higher post-challenge hemoglobin and hematocrit values in comparison to control groups. This indicated that a high IgG1 antibody titer is negatively connected with severity of M. suis-induced anemia. Furthermore, the induction of monospecific anti-MSG1 antibodies by both vaccine candidates clearly allows for the differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA principle). Overall, the importance of MSG1 as potential vaccine candidate remains to be established. Future studies will evaluate the conditions (i.e. adjuvant, vaccination scheme, and application route) to optimize the effects of E. coli_MSG1 vaccines.

  5. DNA-MVA-protein vaccination of rhesus macaques induces HIV-specific immunity in mucosal-associated lymph nodes and functional antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chege, Gerald K; Burgers, Wendy A; Müller, Tracey L; Gray, Clive M; Shephard, Enid G; Barnett, Susan W; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-02-07

    Successful future HIV vaccines are expected to generate an effective cellular and humoral response against the virus in both the peripheral blood and mucosal compartments. We previously reported the development of DNA-C and MVA-C vaccines based on HIV-1 subtype C and demonstrated their immunogenicity when given in a DNA prime-MVA boost combination in a nonhuman primate model. In the current study, rhesus macaques previously vaccinated with a DNA-C and MVA-C vaccine regimen were re-vaccinated 3.5years later with MVA-C followed by a protein vaccine based on HIV-1 subtype C envelope formulated with MF59 adjuvant (gp140Env/MF59), and finally a concurrent boost with both vaccines. A single MVA-C re-vaccination elicited T cell responses in all animals similar to previous peak responses, with 4/7 demonstrating responses >1000 SFU/10 6 PBMC. In contrast to an Env/MF59-only vaccine, concurrent boosting with MVA-C and Env/MF59 induced HIV-specific cellular responses in multiple mucosal associated lymph nodes in 6/7 animals, with high magnitude responses in some animals. Both vaccine regimens induced high titer Env-specific antibodies with ADCC activity, as well as neutralization of Tier 1 viruses and modest Tier 2 neutralization. These data demonstrate the feasibility of inducing HIV-specific immunity in the blood and mucosal sites of viral entry by means of DNA and poxvirus-vectored vaccines, in combination with a HIV envelope-based protein vaccine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Mucosal vaccination of conserved sM2, HA2 and cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) fusion protein with poly gamma-glutamate/chitosan nanoparticles (PC NPs) induces protection against divergent influenza subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Uddin, Md Bashir; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Hewawaduge, C Y; Ferdowshi, Zannatul; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine that broad cross protection against seasonal or emerging influenza A viruses, we generated a mucosal influenza vaccine system combining the highly conserved matrix protein-2 (sM2), fusion peptide of hemagglutinin (HA 2 ), the well-known mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) and poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA)-chitosan nanoparticles (PC NPs), which are safe, natural materials that are able to target the mucosal membrane as a mucosal adjuvant. The mucosal administration of sM2HA2CTA1/PC NPs could induce a high degree of systemic immunity (IgG and IgA) at the site of inoculation as well as at remote locations and also significantly increase the levels of sM2- or HA2-specific cell-mediated immune response. In challenge tests in BALB/c mice with 10 MLD 50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005 (H7N3) or A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant sM2HA2CTA1/PC NPs provided cross protection against divergent lethal influenza subtypes and also the protection was maintained up to six months after vaccination. Thus, sM2HA2CTA1/PC NPs could be a promising strategy for a universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cationic micelle based vaccine induced potent humoral immune response through enhancing antigen uptake and formation of germinal center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zichao; Shi, Shuai; Jin, Ling; Xu, Lu; Yu, Jing; Chen, Hao; Li, Xingyi

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles have been proven to be an effective vaccine delivery system that can boost immune responses to subunit vaccines. Herein, we developed and characterized a cationic polymeric polyethylene glycol2000-poly ϵ-caprolactone2000-polyethylenimine2000 (mPEG2000-PCL2000-g-PEI2000) micelle as a potent vaccine delivery system to boost the immune response in vivo. The micelles that we developed exhibited great antigen-loading capability and minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Meanwhile, micelles facilitated OVA antigen uptake by dendritic cells both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, a micelle-formulated OVA vaccine could significantly promote anti-OVA antibody production by 190-fold and potently enhance T cell proliferation and the secretion of IL-5 and IFN-γ. We attributed these effects to its ability to promote antigen uptake, antigen deposition, and germinal center formation. In conclusion, the mPEG2000-PCL2000-PEI2000 micelle that we developed has potential as potent vaccine delivery system to induce Th2 immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A cancer vaccine induces expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific regulatory T cells in patients with advanced melanoma.

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    Lisa M Ebert

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines are designed to expand tumor antigen-specific T cells with effector function. However, they may also inadvertently expand regulatory T cells (Treg, which could seriously hamper clinical efficacy. To address this possibility, we developed a novel assay to detect antigen-specific Treg based on down-regulation of surface CD3 following TCR engagement, and used this approach to screen for Treg specific to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen in melanoma patients treated with the NY-ESO-1/ISCOMATRIX™ cancer vaccine. All patients tested had Treg (CD25(bright FoxP3(+ CD127(neg specific for at least one NY-ESO-1 epitope in the blood. Strikingly, comparison with pre-treatment samples revealed that many of these responses were induced or boosted by vaccination. The most frequently detected response was toward the HLA-DP4-restricted NY-ESO-1(157-170 epitope, which is also recognized by effector T cells. Notably, functional Treg specific for an HLA-DR-restricted epitope within the NY-ESO-1(115-132 peptide were also identified at high frequency in tumor tissue, suggesting that NY-ESO-1-specific Treg may suppress local anti-tumor immune responses. Together, our data provide compelling evidence for the ability of a cancer vaccine to expand tumor antigen-specific Treg in the setting of advanced cancer, a finding which should be given serious consideration in the design of future cancer vaccine clinical trials.

  9. A Cancer Vaccine Induces Expansion of NY-ESO-1-Specific Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Advanced Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Lisa M.; MacRaild, Sarah E.; Zanker, Damien; Davis, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to expand tumor antigen-specific T cells with effector function. However, they may also inadvertently expand regulatory T cells (Treg), which could seriously hamper clinical efficacy. To address this possibility, we developed a novel assay to detect antigen-specific Treg based on down-regulation of surface CD3 following TCR engagement, and used this approach to screen for Treg specific to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen in melanoma patients treated with the NY-ESO-1/ISCOMATRIXTM cancer vaccine. All patients tested had Treg (CD25bright FoxP3+ CD127neg) specific for at least one NY-ESO-1 epitope in the blood. Strikingly, comparison with pre-treatment samples revealed that many of these responses were induced or boosted by vaccination. The most frequently detected response was toward the HLA-DP4-restricted NY-ESO-1157–170 epitope, which is also recognized by effector T cells. Notably, functional Treg specific for an HLA-DR-restricted epitope within the NY-ESO-1115–132 peptide were also identified at high frequency in tumor tissue, suggesting that NY-ESO-1-specific Treg may suppress local anti-tumor immune responses. Together, our data provide compelling evidence for the ability of a cancer vaccine to expand tumor antigen-specific Treg in the setting of advanced cancer, a finding which should be given serious consideration in the design of future cancer vaccine clinical trials. PMID:23110239

  10. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  11. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schnee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS. In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G encoding messenger RNA (mRNA to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  12. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

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    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection.The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant.The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection was associated with cell-mediated immunity to AMA1, with CSP

  13. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Erlinda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on

  15. A pilot study on using rapamycin-carrying synthetic vaccine particles (SVP in conjunction with enzyme replacement therapy to induce immune tolerance in Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Hyuk Lim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A major obstacle to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with recombinant human acid-α-glucosidase (rhGAA for Pompe disease is the development of high titers of anti-rhGAA antibodies in a subset of patients, which often leads to a loss of treatment efficacy. In an effort to induce sustained immune tolerance to rhGAA, we supplemented the rhGAA therapy with a weekly intravenous injection of synthetic vaccine particles carrying rapamycin (SVP-Rapa during the first 3 weeks of a 12-week course of ERT in GAA-KO mice, and compared this with three intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (MTX per week for the first 3 weeks. Empty nanoparticles (NP were used as negative control for SVP-Rapa. Co-administration of SVP-Rapa with rhGAA resulted in more durable inhibition of anti-rhGAA antibody responses, higher efficacy in glycogen clearance in skeletal muscles, and greater improvement of motor function than mice treated with empty NP or MTX. Body weight loss was observed during the MTX-treatment but not SVP-Rapa-treatment. Our data suggest that co-administration of SVP-Rapa may be an innovative and safe strategy to induce durable immune tolerance to rhGAA during the ERT in patients with Pompe disease, leading to improved clinical outcomes.

  16. Direct Lymph Node Vaccination of Lentivector/Prostate-Specific Antigen is Safe and Generates Tissue-Specific Responses in Rhesus Macaques

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    Bryan C. Au

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer immunotherapy is emerging from a nadir and demonstrating tangible benefits to patients. A variety of approaches are now employed. We are invoking antigen (Ag-specific responses through direct injections of recombinant lentivectors (LVs that encode sequences for tumor-associated antigens into multiple lymph nodes to optimize immune presentation/stimulation. Here we first demonstrate the effectiveness and antigen-specificity of this approach in mice challenged with prostate-specific antigen (PSA-expressing tumor cells. Next we tested the safety and efficacy of this approach in two cohorts of rhesus macaques as a prelude to a clinical trial application. Our vector encodes the cDNA for rhesus macaque PSA and a rhesus macaque cell surface marker to facilitate vector titering and tracking. We utilized two independent injection schemas demarcated by the timing of LV administration. In both cohorts we observed marked tissue-specific responses as measured by clinical evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate gland. Tissue-specific responses were sustained for up to six months—the end-point of the study. Control animals immunized against an irrelevant Ag were unaffected. We did not observe vector spread in test or control animals or perturbations of systemic immune parameters. This approach thus offers an “off-the-shelf” anti-cancer vaccine that could be made at large scale and injected into patients—even on an out-patient basis.

  17. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2014-01-01

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all- or a part of the conserved nonstructural proteins (nsPs) of HCV. We demonstrated that an rSFV vector was able to encode a transgene as large as 6.1 kb without affecting its vaccine immunogenicity. Prime-boost immunizations of mice with rSFV expressing all nsPs induced strong and long-lasting NS3-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. The strength and functional heterogeneity of the T-cell response was similar to that induced with rSFV expressing only NS3/4A. Furthermore this leads to a significant growth delay and negative selection of HCV-expressing EL4 tumors in an in vivo mouse model. In general, as broad-spectrum T-cell responses are only seen in patients with resolved HCV infection, this rSFV-based vector, which expresses all nsPs, inducing robust T-cell activity has a potential for the treatment of HCV infections. PMID:24370701

  18. A Single Dose of Any of Four Different Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccines Is Safe and Immunogenic in Flavivirus-naive Adults: A Randomized, Double-blind Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P.; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Pierce, Kristen K.; Elwood, Daniel; Larsson, Catherine J.; Lindow, Janet C.; Tibery, Cecilia; Sabundayo, Beulah P.; Shaffer, Donna; Talaat, Kawsar R.; Hynes, Noreen A.; Wanionek, Kimberli; Carmolli, Marya P.; Luke, Catherine J.; Murphy, Brian R.; Subbarao, Kanta; Whitehead, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dengue virus (DENV) causes hundreds of millions of infections annually. Four dengue serotypes exist, and previous infection with one serotype increases the likelihood of severe disease with a second, heterotypic DENV infection. Methods. In a randomized, placebo-controlled study, the safety and immunogenicity of 4 different admixtures of a live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccine were evaluated in 113 flavivirus-naive adults. Serum neutralizing antibody levels to all 4 dengue viruses were measured on days 0, 28, 42, and 180. Results. A single dose of each LATV admixture induced a trivalent or better neutralizing antibody response in 75%–90% of vaccinees. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse events between vaccinees and placebo-recipients other than rash. A trivalent or better response correlated with rash and with non-black race (P < .0001). Black race was significantly associated with a reduced incidence of vaccine viremia. Conclusions. TV003 induced a trivalent or greater antibody response in 90% of flavivirus-naive vaccinees and is a promising candidate for the prevention of dengue. Race was identified as a factor influencing the infectivity of the LATV viruses, reflecting observations of the effect of race on disease severity in natural dengue infection. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01072786. PMID:23329850

  19. Safe sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K

    1994-01-01

    The main objectives of health care for people with AIDS are to help them adjust to changing sexual status and to provide them with information on safe sex. Sections consider the risks of various types of sexual activity and safe sex education. With regard to the risk of transmitting or contracting HIV, sexual activities may be high risk, medium risk, low risk, or no risk. High-risk activities include unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, oral-anal sexual contact, sharing sex toys, and traumatic sexual activity. Medium-risk activities include anal and vaginal intercourse using a latex condom with or without spermicide, and sex using a vaginal diaphragm or contraceptive vaginal sponge. Oral sex on a woman or oral sex on a man without ejaculation into the mouth are low-risk activities. Mutual masturbation, erotic touching, caressing and massage, kissing and non-genital licking pose no risk of infection. All general practitioners and family physicians should teach about safe sex. Prevention messages may be conveyed through individual and social counseling as well as with printed media and other forms of mass media. Messages should definitely reach prostitutes and brothel owners, as well as pre-pubertal children and older youths.

  20. HI responses induced by seasonal influenza vaccination are associated with clinical protection and with seroprotection against non-homologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luytjes, Willem; Enouf, Vincent; Schipper, Maarten; Gijzen, Karlijn; Liu, Wai Ming; van der Lubben, Mariken; Meijer, Adam; van der Werf, Sylvie; Soethout, Ernst C

    2012-07-27

    Vaccination against influenza induces homologous as well as cross-specific hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses. Induction of cross-specific HI responses may be essential when the influenza strain does not match the vaccine strain, or even to confer a basic immune response against a pandemic influenza virus. We carried out a clinical study to evaluate the immunological responses after seasonal vaccination in healthy adults 18-60 years of age, receiving the yearly voluntary vaccination during the influenza season 2006/2007. Vaccinees of different age groups were followed for laboratory confirmed influenza (LCI) and homologous HI responses as well as cross-specific HI responses against the seasonal H1N1 strain of 2008 and pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (H1N1pdm09) were determined. Homologous HI titers that are generally associated with protection (i.e. seroprotective HI titers ≥40) were found in more than 70% of vaccinees. In contrast, low HI titers before and after vaccination were significantly associated with seasonal LCI. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against drifted seasonal H1N1 were found in 69% of vaccinees. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were also significantly induced, especially in the youngest age group. More specifically, cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were inversely correlated with age. We did not find a correlation between the subtype of influenza which was circulating at the age of birth of the vaccinees and cross-specific HI response against H1N1pdm09. These data indicate that the HI titers before and after vaccination determine the vaccination efficacy. In addition, in healthy adults between 18 and 60 years of age, young adults appear to be best able to mount a cross-protective HI response against H1N1pdm09 or drifted seasonal influenza after seasonal vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis virus vaccines: present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    During the past decade there has been extraordinary progress toward the development of vaccines for the prevention of type A and type B hepatitis. The successful propagation of hepatitis A virus in cell culture in 1979 was followed by the preparation of experimental live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines that have been shown to induce antibody in marmosets and chimpanzees and protect immunized marmosets against challenge with hepatitis A virus. The first human immunization trials will begin in mid-1982. An inactivated hepatitis B vaccine that was licensed in the United States in November 1981 has been shown to be safe, immunogenic, and effective. When this vaccine becomes available for use in July 1982, it will be recommended for persons who are considered to be at increased risk of contracting hepatitis B infection. Future generations of hepatitis B vaccines may be prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen derived from DNA recombinant technology or by in vitro synthesis of HBs Ag determinants by chemical means. PMID:6295013

  2. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  3. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of innate immune mechanisms to enhance vaccine induced immunity: Role of co-inhibitory molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivas eGannavaram; Parna eBhattacharya; Nevien eIsmail; Amit eKaul; Rakesh eSingh; Hira eNakhasi

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several anti-leishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models including genetically modified live attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells i.e., dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (M). Further, Leishmania parasi...

  5. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania ...

  6. Vaccine-induced cross-genotype reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Gottwein, Judith M; Houghton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We detected cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chimpanzees vaccinated with HCV-1 (genotype 1a) recombinant E1/E2 envelope glycoproteins. Five vaccinated chimpanzees, protected following HCV-1 challenge, were initially studied using the heterologous H77......a, with limited reactivity against 2a and 3a. Our study provides encouragement for the development of a recombinant envelope-based vaccine against hepatitis C....

  7. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... effector functions, accumulated in the spleen. These findings indicate that the localization of the adenoviral inoculum and not the total Ag load determines the quality of the CD8(+) T cell response induced with adenoviral vaccines....

  8. Effects of interferon-γ knockdown on vaccine-induced immunity against Marek’s disease in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Kamran; Wootton, Sarah K.; Barjesteh, Neda; Golovan, Serguei; Bendall, Andrew; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ has been shown to be associated with immunity to Marek’s disease virus (MDV). The overall objective of this study was to investigate the causal relationship between IFN-γ and vaccine-conferred immunity against MDV in chickens. To this end, 3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting chicken IFN-γ, which had previously been shown to reduce IFN-γ expression in vitro, and a control siRNA were selected to generate recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV) expressing short-hairpin small interfering RNAs (shRNAs). An MDV challenge trial was then conducted: chickens were vaccinated with herpesvirus of turkey (HVT), administered the rAAAV expressing shRNA, and then challenged with MDV. Tumors were observed in 4 out of 10 birds that were vaccinated with HVT and challenged but did not receive any rAAAV, 5 out of 9 birds that were administered the rAAAV containing IFN-γ shRNA, and 2 out of 10 birds that were administered a control enhanced green fluorescent protein siRNA. There was no significant difference in MDV genome load in the feather follicle epithelium of the birds that were cotreated with the vaccine and the rAAAV compared with the vaccinated MDV-infected birds. These results suggest that AAAV-based vectors can be used for the delivery of shRNA into chicken cells. However, administration of the rAAAV expressing shRNA targeting chicken IFN-γ did not seem to fully abrogate vaccine-induced protection. PMID:25673902

  9. Development of a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) particle vaccine to protect against house dust mite induced allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijaya B; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Jing, Xuefang; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Thorne, Peter S; Salem, Aliasger K

    2014-09-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles carrying antigen and adjuvant is a promising vaccine system which has been shown to stimulate systemic antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we investigated the relationship of (i) the sizes of PLGA particle and (ii) the presence of cytosine-phosphate-guanine motifs (CpG), with the extent and type of immune response stimulated against Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus-2 (Der p2) antigen. Different sizes of PLGA particles encapsulating CpG were prepared using a double emulsion solvent evaporation method. Mice were vaccinated with Der p2 and different sizes of empty or CpG-loaded PLGA particles. Vaccinated mice were exposed to daily intranasal instillation of Der p2 for 10 days followed by euthanization to estimate leukocyte accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids, antibody profiles, and airway hyperresponsiveness. PLGA particles showed a size-dependent decrease in the proportion of eosinophils found in BAL fluids. Mice vaccinated with the Der p2 coated on 9-μm-sized empty PLGA particles showed increased levels of IgE and IgG1 antibodies as well as increased airway hyperresponsiveness. All sizes of PLGA particles encapsulating CpG prevented airway hyperresponsiveness after Der p2 exposures. Inflammatory responses to Der p2 exposure were significantly reduced when smaller PLGA particles were used for vaccination. In addition, encapsulating CpG in PLGA particles increased IgG2a secretion. This study shows that the size of PLGA particles used for vaccination plays a major role in the prevention of house dust mite-induced allergy and that incorporation of CpG into the PLGA particles preferentially develops a Th1-type immune response.

  10. Evaluation of a modified live-virus vaccine for the prevention of porcine parvovirus-induced reproductive disease in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P S; Mengeling, W L

    1980-12-01

    Each of 5 gilts was vaccinated IM with modified live-virus (MLV) vaccine for porcine parvovirus (PPV), and 5 gilts were used as nonvaccinated controls. Vaccinated gilts developed hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies to PPV (titer of 320 to 1,280) by 2 weeks after vaccination. All gilts wee bred, and at about 40 days of gestation their immunity was challenged by intranasal and oral administration of a virulent strain of PPV. Gilts were killed at about 84 days of gestation and their litters were examined. Litters from vaccinated gilts comprised 59 live and 2 dead fetuses. Neither the virus nor antibodies to the virus were detected in any of the fetuses. In contrast, litters from nonvaccinated gilts comprised 25 live and 29 dead fetuses, and PPV was isolated from all dead and 9 live fetuses. Viral antigen was detected by direct immunofluorescence in the lungs of all PPV-infected fetuses, and 7 of the live infected fetuses had HI antibodies. Modified live virus did not cause transplacental fetal infection in 3 seronegative gilts inoculated at about 40 days of gestation. All 3 gilts had antibodies to PPV (80 to 640) when killed at about 84 days of gestation, and neither HI antibodies nor PPV were detected in any of the 20 live and 1 dead fetuses from these gilts. Modified live virus replicated in the tissues of fetuses of 2 gilts inoculated in utero. Seven of 8 fetuses inoculated with MLV died and were infected. These results demonstrated the efficacy of MLV vaccine for the prevention of PPV-induced reproductive disease in swine. Although MLV did not cross the placental barrier in pregnant animals, its pathogenicity for porcine fetuses after direct in utero inoculation indicates that its use should be limited to nonpregnant animals.

  11. DNA-based HIV vaccines do not induce generalized activation in mucosal tissue T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Morgan A; Yuan, Sally; Marx, Preston A; Kutzler, Michele A; Weiner, David B; Betts, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    HIV preferentially infects activated T cells, and activated mucosal CD4+ T cells are the primary sites of viral replication. One potential explanation for increased HIV acquisition rates in the STEP study is that vaccination with adenoviral (Ad) vectors increased CD4+ T cell activation levels at the site of infection, a concept that others and we continue to explore. Whether vaccination with HIV vaccine platforms increases the activation state of CD4+ T cells within peripheral tissues, such as the gastro-intestinal (GI) mucosa, is exceptionally important to determine as a vaccine safety measure, given the susceptibility of activated CD4+ T cells to HIV infection. In this study we examined whether vaccination with DNA plasmids and chemokine adjuvants alter the activation state of T cells within the GI mucosa, inguinal LN, and peripheral blood. T cell activation state was measured by expression of CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR over the course of the prime/boost study. DNA plasmid vaccination did not increase expression of any of these markers in the 3 tissues studied. Addition of the gut-homing chemokine TECK during DNA plasmid vaccination did not alter activation levels of CD4+ T cells at any of these sites. These findings indicate that DNA vaccines do not elicit generalized mucosal T cell activation. Thus, DNA platforms may be especially suitable for HIV vaccine development, where bystander activation could promote increased HIV transmission.

  12. Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Bajic, Goran; Ferdman, Jack; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Settembre, Ethan C.; Moody, M. Anthony; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Duke-MED); (CH-Boston); (Seqirus)

    2017-12-18

    Antigenic variation requires frequent revision of annual influenza vaccines. Next-generation vaccine design strategies aim to elicit a broader immunity by directing the human immune response toward conserved sites on the principal viral surface protein, the hemagglutinin (HA). We describe a group of antibodies that recognize a hitherto unappreciated, conserved site on the HA of H1 subtype influenza viruses. Mutations in that site, which required a change in the H1 component of the 2017 vaccine, had not previously “taken over” among circulating H1 viruses. Our results encourage vaccine design strategies that resurface a protein to focus the immune response on a specific region.

  13. AIDS vaccine: Present status and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of a preventive vaccine for HIV is the best hope of controlling the AIDS pandemic. HIV has, however, proved a difficult pathogen to vaccinate against because of its very high mutation rate and capability to escape immune responses. Neutralizing antibodies that can neutralize diverse field strains have so far proved difficult to induce. Adjuvanting these vaccines with cytokine plasmids and a "prime-boost," approach is being evaluated in an effort to induce both CTL and antibody responses and thereby have immune responses active against both infected cells and free viral particles, thereby necessitating fewer doses of recombinant protein to reach maximum antibodies titers. Although obstacles exist in evaluation of candidate HIV vaccines, evidence from natural history studies, new molecular tools in virology and immunology, new adjuvants, new gene expression systems, new antigen delivery systems, recent discoveries in HIV entry and pathogenesis, and promising studies of candidate vaccines in animal models have provided reasons to hope that developing a safe and effective AIDS vaccine is possible and within reach.

  14. Generation and characterization of a human iPSC cell line expressing inducible Cas9 in the “safe harbor” AAVS1 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Castaño

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the generation-characterization of a fetal liver (FL B-cell progenitor (BCP-derived human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC line CRISPR/Cas9-edited to carry/express a single copy of doxycycline-inducible Cas9 gene in the “safe locus” AAVS1 (iCas9-FL-BCP-hiPSC. Gene-edited iPSCs remained pluripotent after CRISPR/Cas9 genome-edition. Correct genomic integration of a unique copy of Cas9 was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot. Cas9 was robustly and specifically expressed on doxycycline exposure. T7-endonuclease assay demonstrated that iCas9 induces robust gene-edition when gRNAs against hematopoietic transcription factors were tested. This iCas9-FL-BCP-hiPSC will facilitate gene-editing approaches for studies on developmental biology, drug screening and disease modeling.

  15. DNA Vaccination Prevents and/or Delays Carcinoma Development of Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Papillomas on Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Reed, Cynthia A.; Peng, Xuwen; Budgeon, Lynn R; Pickel, Martin; Christensen, Neil D.

    2000-01-01

    Malignant progression is a life-threatening consequence of human papillomavirus-associated lesions. In this study, we tested the efficacy of papillomavirus early-gene-based vaccines for prevention of carcinoma development of papillomavirus-induced skin papillomas on rabbits. Rabbit skin papillomas were initiated by infection with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV). The papillomas were allowed to grow for 3 months without any treatment intervention. Rabbits were then immunized by gene gun...

  16. TriVax: an improved peptide-based therapeutic vaccination strategy against Human Papillomavirus-induced cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Kelly; Celis, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccines for cancer are an attractive alternative to conventional therapies, since the later result in serious adverse effects and in most cases are not effective against advanced disease. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for several malignancies such as cervical carcinoma. Vaccines targeting oncogenic viral proteins like HPV16-E6 and -E7 are ideal candidates to elicit strong immune responses without generating autoimmunity because: i) these products are not expressed in normal cells; and ii) their expression is required to maintain the malignant phenotype. Our group has developed peptide vaccination strategy called TriVax, which is effective in generating vast numbers of antigen-specific T cells in mice capable of persisting for long time periods. Materials and methods We have used two HPV-induced mouse cancer models (TC-1 and C3.43) to evaluate the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of TriVax prepared with the immunodominant CD8 T cell epitope HPV16-E749–57, mixed with poly-IC adjuvant and costimulatory anti-CD40 antibodies. Results TriVax using HPV16-E749–57 induced large and persistent T cell responses that were therapeutically effective against established HPV16-E7 expressing tumors. In most cases, TriVax was successful in attaining complete rejections of 6–11 day established tumors. In addition, TriVax induced long-term immunological memory, which prevented tumor recurrences. The antitumor effects of TriVax were independent of NK and CD4 T cells and surprisingly, did not rely to a great extent on type-I or type-II interferon. Conclusions These findings indicate that the TriVax strategy is an appealing immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of established viral-induced tumors. We believe that these studies may help to launch more effective and less invasive therapeutic vaccines for HPV-mediated malignancies. PMID:22527249

  17. TriVax-HPV: an improved peptide-based therapeutic vaccination strategy against human papillomavirus-induced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Kelly; Celis, Esteban

    2012-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for cancer are an attractive alternative to conventional therapies, since the later result in serious adverse effects and in most cases are not effective against advanced disease. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for several malignancies such as cervical carcinoma. Vaccines targeting oncogenic viral proteins like HPV16-E6 and HPV16-E7 are ideal candidates to elicit strong immune responses without generating autoimmunity because: (1) these products are not expressed in normal cells and (2) their expression is required to maintain the malignant phenotype. Our group has developed peptide vaccination strategy called TriVax, which is effective in generating vast numbers of antigen-specific T cells in mice capable of persisting for long time periods. We have used two HPV-induced mouse cancer models (TC-1 and C3.43) to evaluate the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of TriVax prepared with the immunodominant CD8 T-cell epitope HPV16-E7(49-57), mixed with poly-IC adjuvant and costimulatory anti-CD40 antibodies. TriVax using HPV16-E7(49-57) induced large and persistent T-cell responses that were therapeutically effective against established HPV16-E7 expressing tumors. In most cases, TriVax was successful in attaining complete rejections of 6-11-day established tumors. In addition, TriVax induced long-term immunological memory, which prevented tumor recurrences. The anti-tumor effects of TriVax were independent of NK and CD4 T cells and, surprisingly, did not rely to a great extent on type-I or type-II interferon. These findings indicate that the TriVax strategy is an appealing immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of established viral-induced tumors. We believe that these studies may help to launch more effective and less invasive therapeutic vaccines for HPV-mediated malignancies.

  18. Primary and booster vaccination with DTPw-HB/Hib pentavalent vaccine in Costa Rican children who had received a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idis Faingezicht

    2002-10-01

    protective/seropositive titers for Hib, HB, and tetanus and about 50% for diphtheria and Bordetella pertussis. At 15 months of age, virtually all the toddlers responded with a strong boost response to all the vaccine antigens, whether they received the DTPw-HB/Hib pentavalent vaccine or the DTPw/Hib vaccine as a booster. Both booster regimens were equally well tolerated, indicating that up to five doses of the HB vaccine can be given without impact on safety. Conclusions. Our study confirms that the DTPw-HB/Hib pentavalent vaccine is highly immunogenic as a primary vaccination in children who received an HB vaccine at birth, with the pentavalent combination inducing both persisting immunity and boostable memory. The pentavalent vaccine was safe both for primary and booster vaccinations. Thus, this study in Costa Rican infants supports the routine use of the pentavalent DTPw-HB/Hib vaccine as part of childhood vaccination programs in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  19. A single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cellular response similar to that induced by a natural infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Morgado, Lucas Nóbrega; Santiago, Marta Almeida; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Hasselmann, Bárbara; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca

    2015-07-31

    Based on current studies on the effects of single dose vaccines on antibody production, Latin American countries have adopted a single dose vaccine program. However, no data are available on the activation of cellular response to a single dose of hepatitis A. Our study investigated the functional reactivity of the memory cell phenotype after hepatitis A virus (HAV) stimulation through administration of the first or second dose of HAV vaccine and compared the response to that of a baseline group to an initial natural infection. Proliferation assays showed that the first vaccine dose induced HAV-specific cellular response; this response was similar to that induced by a second dose or an initial natural infection. Thus, from the first dose to the second dose, increase in the frequencies of classical memory B cells, TCD8 cells, and central memory TCD4 and TCD8 cells were observed. Regarding cytokine production, increased IL-6, IL-10, TNF, and IFNγ levels were observed after vaccination. Our findings suggest that a single dose of HAV vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cell response similar to that induced by a natural infection. The HAV-specific T cell immunity induced by primary vaccination persisted independently of the protective plasma antibody level. In addition, our results suggest that a single dose immunization system could serve as an alternative strategy for the prevention of hepatitis A in developing countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities.

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination for the prevention of HPV 16/18 induced cervical cancer and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Essential precondition for the development of cervical cancer is a persistent human papillomavirus (HPV infection. The majority - approximately 70% - of cervical carcinomas is caused by two high-risk HPV types (16 and 18. Recently, two vaccines have been approved to the German market with the potential to induce protection against HPV 16 and HPV 18 among additional low-risk virus types. Objectives: To analyse whether HPV vaccination is effective with regard to the reduction of cervical cancer and precursors of cervical carcinoma (CIN, respectively? Does HPV vaccination represent a cost-effective alternative or supplement to present screening practice? Are there any differences concerning cost-effectiveness between the two available vaccines? Should HPV vaccination be recommended from a health economic point of view? If so, which recommendations can be conveyed with respect to a (reorganization of the German vaccination strategy? Which ethical, social and legal implications have to be considered? Methods: Based on a systematic literature review, randomized controlled trials (RCT looking at the effectiveness of HPV vaccination for the prevention of cervical carcinoma and its precursors - cervical intraepithelial neoplasia - have been identified. In addition, health economic models were identified to address the health economic research questions. Quality assessment of medical and economic literature was assured by application of general assessment standards for the systematic and critical appraisal of scientific studies. Results: Vaccine efficacy in prevention of CIN 2 or higher lesions in HPV 16 or HPV 18 negative women, who received all vaccination doses, ranges between 98% and 100%. Side effects of the vaccination are mainly associated with injection site reactions (redness, turgor, pain. No significant differences concerning serious complications between the vaccination- and the placebo-groups were reported. Results of base case

  2. Remote glucosyltransferase-microparticle vaccine delivery induces protective immunity in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Lam, A; Barnes, L A; King, W F; Peacock, Z; Wise, D L; Trantolo, D J; Taubman, M A

    2003-08-01

    Intranasally administered dental caries vaccines show significant promise for human application. Alternate mucosal routes may be required, however, to induce caries-protective salivary IgA antibody in children with respiratory diseases. Since rectal mucosa contains inductive lymphoid tissue, we hypothesized that the rectal route could be used to induce salivary immunity to mutans streptococcal glucosyltransferase (GTF), resulting in protective immunity to experimental dental caries. We first explored the ability of glucosyltransferase, incorporated into polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles (MP), and administered rectally together with mucosal adjuvant, to induce a salivary IgA antibody response. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (6/group) were immunized rectally on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 with a) GTF-MP alone, b) GTF-MP with cholera toxin, c) GTF-MP with detoxified mutant Escherichia coli toxin (dLT), or d) sham immunized with PLGA and cholera toxin. An additional group was immunized intranasally with GTF-MP alone. Saliva and nasal washes of all intranasally immunized rats contained IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase on day 28. Salivary IgA antibody was also detected in 7/12 rats rectally immunized with GTF-MP and cholera toxin or dLT, although responses were lower than those obtained by intranasal immunization. Most fecal extracts from rectally delivered GTF-MP plus cholera toxin or dLT rats contained IgA antibody to GTF-MP. Low levels of fecal IgA antibody were detected in 3/6 intranasally immunized rats and 2/6 rats rectally immunized with GTF-MP alone. We then examined the extent to which salivary IgA antibody induced by the rectal route could be protective. At 25, 31 and 38 days of age, two groups of female Sprague-Dawley rats (13/group) were rectally immunized with GTF-MP and cholera toxin or with empty microparticles and cholera toxin (sham group). A third group was intranasally immunized with GTF-MP alone. After demonstrating salivary IgA responses to

  3. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benkirane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3 and B (n=3 consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10 consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12 composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 x 109 colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels.

  4. How Safe Is Measles Immunization Of Sick Children? | Ogbonna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study to ascertain how safe is maeales immunization of sick children was carried out in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Family Health Centre. Out of 125 children who were vaccinated against measles 17(16%) were sick at the time of vaccination. Two (12%) of the sick children had post vaccination reaction.

  5. Evaluation of vaccine competition using HVT vector vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkey herpesvirus (HVT) has been widely used as a vaccine for Marek’s disease (MD) since the 1970s. Because HVT is a safe vaccine that is poorly sensitive to interference from maternally derived antibodies, it has seen rising use as a vector for vaccines developed for protection against other comm...

  6. Non-invasive assessment of the reproductive cycle in free-ranging female African elephants (Loxodonta africana treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH vaccine for inducing anoestrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benavides Valades Gabriela

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In southern Africa, various options to manage elephant populations are being considered. Immunocontraception is considered to be the most ethically acceptable and logistically feasible method for control of smaller and confined populations. In this regard, the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH vaccine has not been investigated in female elephants, although it has been reported to be safe and effective in several domestic and wildlife species. The aims of this study were to monitor the oestrous cycles of free-ranging African elephant cows using faecal progestagen metabolites and to evaluate the efficacy of a GnRH vaccine to induce anoestrus in treated cows. Methods Between May 2009 - June 2010, luteal activity of 12 elephant cows was monitored non-invasively using an enzyme immunoassay detecting faecal 5alpha-reduced pregnanes (faecal progestagen metabolites, FPM on a private game reserve in South Africa. No bulls of breeding age were present on the reserve prior to and for the duration of the study. After a 3-month control period, 8 randomly-selected females were treated twice with 600 micrograms of GnRH vaccine (Improvac®, Pfizer Animal Health, Sandton, South Africa 5-7 weeks apart. Four of these females had been treated previously with the porcine zona pellucida (pZP vaccine for four years (2004-2007. Results All 12 monitored females (8 treated and 4 controls showed signs of luteal activity as evidenced by FPM concentrations exceeding individual baseline values more than once. A total of 16 oestrous cycles could be identified in 8 cows with four of these within the 13 to 17 weeks range previously reported for captive African elephants. According to the FPM concentrations the GnRH vaccine was unable to induce anoestrus in the treated cows. Overall FPM levels in samples collected during the wet season (mean 4.03 micrograms/gram dry faeces were significantly higher (P Conclusions The GnRH vaccination protocol failed

  7. Co-immunization with virus-like particle and DNA vaccines induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection and bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Jong Seok; Yoo, Si-Eun; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Ji-Yun; Li, Jian-Dong; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates that immunization with non-replicating virus-like particle (FFG VLP) containing RSV F and G glycoproteins together with RSV F DNA induced T helper type 1 antibody responses to RSV F similar to live RSV infection. Upon RSV challenge 21weeks after immunization, FFG VLP vaccination induced protection against RSV infection as shown by clearance of lung viral loads, and the absence of eosinophil infiltrates, and did not cause lung pathology. In contrast, formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccination showed significant pulmonary eosinophilia, severe mucus production, and extensive histopathology resulting in a hallmark of pulmonary pathology. Substantial lung pathology was also observed in mice with RSV re-infections. High levels of systemic and local inflammatory cytokine-secreting cells were induced in mice with FI-RSV but not with FFG VLP immunization after RSV challenge. Therefore, the results provide evidence that recombinant RSV FFG VLP vaccine can confer long-term protection against RSV without causing lung pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel mucosal vaccine targeting Peyer's patch M cells induces protective antigen-specific IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hideaki; Watanabe, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinji; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Ohara, Osamu; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Mucosal vaccines can induce mucosal immunity, including antigen-specific secretory IgA production, to protect from invasion by pathogens and to neutralize toxins at mucosal surfaces. We established an effective antigen-delivering fusion protein, anti-GP2-SA, as a mucosal vaccine. The anti-GP2-SA consists of streptavidin (SA) fused to the antigen-binding fragment region from a mAb against glycoprotein 2 (GP2), an antigen-uptake receptor specifically expressed on M cells. Anti-GP2-SA targets antigen-sampling M cells in the follicle-associated epithelium covering Peyer's patches. Immunofluorescence showed that anti-GP2-SA specifically bound to M cells. Orally administered biotinylated ovalbumin peptide (bOVA) conjugated with anti-GP2-SA more efficiently induced OVA-specific fecal IgA secretion compared with bOVA alone or bOVA conjugated with SA. Furthermore, mice immunized by oral administration of the biotinylated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) lysate conjugated with anti-GP2-SA were significantly better protected from subsequent infection by virulent S. Typhimurium than mice treated with the bacterial lysate alone or conjugated with SA. These results suggest that anti-GP2-SA-based M-cell-targeting vaccines are a novel strategy for inducing efficient mucosal immunity. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Mumps-specific cross-neutralization by MMR vaccine-induced antibodies predicts protection against mumps virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Sigrid; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Schurink-van 't Klooster, Tessa M; de Melker, Hester E; Boland, Greet J; Kaaijk, Patricia; van Els, Cécile A C M; Koopmans, Marion P G; van Binnendijk, Rob S

    2016-07-29

    Similar to other recent mumps genotype G outbreaks worldwide, most mumps patients during the recent mumps genotype G outbreaks in the Netherlands had received 2 doses of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine during childhood. Here, we investigate the capacity of vaccine-induced antibodies to neutralize wild type mumps virus strains, including mumps virus genotype G. In this study, we tested 105 pre-outbreak serum samples from students who had received 2 MMR vaccine doses and who had no mumps virus infection (n=76), symptomatic mumps virus infection (n=10) or asymptomatic mumps virus infection (n=19) during the mumps outbreaks. In all samples, mumps-specific IgG concentrations were measured by multiplex immunoassay and neutralization titers were measured against the Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain and against wild type genotype G and genotype D mumps virus strains. The correlation between mumps-specific IgG concentrations and neutralization titers against Jeryl Lynn was poor, which suggests that IgG concentrations do not adequately represent immunological protection against mumps virus infection by antibody neutralization. Pre-outbreak neutralization titers in infected persons were significantly lower against genotype G than against the vaccine strain. Furthermore, antibody neutralization of wild type mumps virus genotype G and genotype D was significantly reduced in pre-outbreak samples from infected persons as compared with non-infected persons. No statistically significant difference was found for the vaccine strain. The sensitivity/specificity ratio was largest for neutralization of the genotype G strain as compared with the genotype D strain and the vaccine strain. The reduced neutralization of wild type mumps virus strains in MMR vaccinated persons prior to infection indicates that pre-outbreak mumps virus neutralization is partly strain-specific and that neutralization differs between infected and non-infected persons. Therefore, we recommend the use of wild

  10. T cell responses to viral infections - opportunities for peptide vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske eRosendahl Huber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An effective immune response against viral infections depends on the activation of cytotoxic T cells that can clear the infection by killing virus-infected cells. Proper activation of these T cells depends on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs. In this review, we will discuss the potential of peptide-based vaccines for prevention and treatment of viral diseases. We will describe features of an effective response against both acute and chronic infections, such as an appropriate magnitude, breadth and quality and discuss requirements for inducing such an effective antiviral immune response. We will address modifications that affect presentation of vaccine components by DCs, including choice of antigen, adjuvants, and formulation. Furthermore, we will describe differences in design between preventive and therapeutic peptide-based vaccines. The ultimate goal in the design of preventive vaccines, is to develop a universal vaccine that cross-protects against multiple strains of the virus. For therapeutic vaccines, cross-protection is of less importance, but enhancing existing T cell responses is essential. Although peptide vaccination is successful in inducing responses in Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infected patients, there are still several challenges such as choosing the right target epitopes, choosing safe adjuvants that improve immunogenicity of these epitopes, and steering the immune response in the desired direction. We will conclude with an overview of the current status of peptide vaccination, hurdles to overcome, and prospects for the future.

  11. Vaccines to Prevent Cancers Not Caused by Viruses - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have vaccines against viruses that cause cancer, but what about vaccines for cancers not caused by viruses? Learn about NCI's development of safe and effective vaccines for cancers not caused by infectious agents.

  12. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

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    Lanying Du

    Full Text Available An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS, is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV. It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588 in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606 of MERS-CoV spike (S protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  13. Matrix-M (TM) adjuvation broadens protection induced by seasonal trivalent virosomal influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, Freek; Saeland, Eirikur; Baart, Matthijs; Koldijk, Martin; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Koudstaal, Wouter; Lövgren Bengtsson, Karin; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radošević, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and therefore it remains a high priority to develop more broadly protective vaccines. Adjuvation of current seasonal influenza vaccines has the potential to achieve this goal. Methods: To assess the immune

  14. Vaccination with the Secreted Glycoprotein G of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Induces Protective Immunity after Genital Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önnheim, Karin; Ekblad, Maria; Görander, Staffan; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2016-04-22

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infects the genital mucosa and establishes a life-long infection in sensory ganglia. After primary infection HSV-2 may reactivate causing recurrent genital ulcerations. HSV-2 infection is prevalent, and globally more than 400 million individuals are infected. As clinical trials have failed to show protection against HSV-2 infection, new vaccine candidates are warranted. The secreted glycoprotein G (sgG-2) of HSV-2 was evaluated as a prophylactic vaccine in mice using two different immunization and adjuvant protocols. The protocol with three intramuscular immunizations combining sgG-2 with cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs and alum induced almost complete protection from genital and systemic disease after intra-vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers were detected with no neutralization activity. Purified splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) when re-stimulated with the antigen in vitro. sgG-2 + adjuvant intra-muscularly immunized mice showed a significant reduction of infectious HSV-2 and increased IFN-γ levels in vaginal washes. The HSV-2 DNA copy numbers were significantly reduced in dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and in serum at day six or day 21 post challenge. We show that a sgG-2 based vaccine is highly effective and can be considered as a novel candidate in the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HSV-2 infection.

  15. A live Leishmania major vaccine containing CpG motifs induces the de novo generation of Th17 cells in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenhui; Huang, Lu; Mendez, Susana

    2010-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis produces open sores that lead to scarring and disfiguration. We have reported that vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with live Leishmania major plus CpG DNA (Lm/CpG) prevents lesion development and provides long-term immunity. Our current study aims to characterize the components of the adaptive immune response that are unique to Lm/CpG. We find that this vaccine enhances the proliferation of CD4(+) Th17 cells, which contrasts with the highly polarized Th1 response caused by L. major alone; the Th17 response is dependent upon release of vaccine-induced IL-6. Neutralization of IFN-gamma and, in particular, IL-17 caused increased parasite burdens in Lm/CpG-vaccinated mice. IL-17R-deficient Lm/CpG-vaccinated mice develop lesions, and display decreased IL-17 and IFN-gamma, despite normal IL-12, production. Neutrophil accumulation is also decreased in the IL-17R-deficient Lm/CpG-vaccinated mice but Treg numbers are augmented. Our data demonstrate that activation of immune cells through CpG DNA, in the presence of live L. major, causes the specific induction of Th17 cells, which enhances the development of a protective cellular immunity against the parasite. Our study also demonstrates that vaccines combining live pathogens with immunomodulatory molecules may strikingly modify the natural immune response to infection in an alternative manner to that induced by killed or subunit vaccines.

  16. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate.

  17. Antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralizes a heterologous wild-type mumps virus associated with a large outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Steven A; Qi, Li; Audet, Susette A; Sullivan, Bradley; Carbone, Kathryn M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A; Sirota, Lev; Beeler, Judy

    2008-08-15

    Recent mumps outbreaks in older vaccinated populations were caused primarily by genotype G viruses, which are phylogenetically distinct from the genotype A vaccine strains used in the countries affected by the outbreaks. This finding suggests that genotype A vaccine strains could have reduced efficacy against heterologous mumps viruses. The remote history of vaccination also suggests that waning immunity could have contributed to susceptibility. To examine these issues, we obtained consecutive serum samples from children at different intervals after vaccination and assayed the ability of these samples to neutralize the genotype A Jeryl Lynn mumps virus vaccine strain and a genotype G wild-type virus obtained during the mumps outbreak that occurred in the United States in 2006. Although the geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers against the genotype G virus were approximately one-half the titers measured against the vaccine strain, and although titers to both viruses decreased with time after vaccination, antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralized the outbreak-associated virus at all time points tested.

  18. Curcumin combined with FAPαc vaccine elicits effective antitumor response by targeting indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase and inhibiting EMT induced by TNF-α in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guan-Min; Xie, Wan-Ying; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Du, Jun; Wu, Bai-Ping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hui-Fang; Xiao, Ping; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Yin, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Gui; Liang, Jian-Ping; Huang, Hong-Jun

    2015-09-22

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a potential target for cancer therapy. However, elimination of FAPα+ fibroblasts activates secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α. IFN-γ can in turn induce expression indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), thereby contributing to immunosuppression, while TNF-α can induce EMT. These two reactive effects would limit the efficacy of a tumor vaccine. We found that curcumin can inhibit IDO expression and TNF-α-induced EMT. Moreover, FAPαc vaccine and CpG combined with curcumin lavage inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of mice implanted with melanoma cells. The combination of FAPαc vaccine, CpG and curcumin stimulated FAPα antibody production and CD8+ T cell-mediated killing of FAPα-expressing stromal cells without adverse reactive effects. We suggest a combination of curcumin and FAPαc vaccine for melanoma therapy.

  19.   A rationally designed tyrosine hydroxylase DNA vaccine induces specific antineuroblastoma immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebener, Nicole; Fest, Stefan; Strandsby, Anne Bystrup

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against tumor antigens without induction of autoimmunity remains a major challenge in cancer immunotherapy. Here, we show for the first time effective therapeutic vaccination followed by suppression of established spontaneous neuroblastoma metastases using a tyrosine...... hydroxylase (TH) DNA minigene vaccine. We identified three novel mouse TH (mTH3) derived peptides with high predicted binding affinity to MHC class I antigen H2-K(k) according to the prediction program SYFPEITHI and computer modeling of epitopes into the MHC class I antigen binding groove. Subsequently, a DNA...... minigene vaccine was generated based on the expression vector pCMV-F3Ub encoding mutated ubiquitin (Gly(76) to Ala(76)) and mTH3. Prophylactic and therapeutic efficacies of this vaccine were established following oral delivery with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207. Only mice immunized with mTH3...

  20. Intranasal vaccination with Chlamydia pneumoniae induces cross-species immunity against genital Chlamydia muridarum challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manam, Srikanth; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Evani, Shankar Jaikishan; Zafiratos, Mark T; Ramasubramanian, Anand K; Arulanandam, Bernard P; Murthy, Ashlesh K

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world and specifically in the United States, with the highest incidence in age-groups 14-19 years. In a subset of females, the C. trachomatis genital infection leads to serious pathological sequelae including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Chlamydia pneumoniae, another member of the same genus, is a common cause of community acquired respiratory infection with significant number of children aged 5-14 yr displaying sero-conversion. Since these bacteriae share several antigenic determinants, we evaluated whether intranasal immunization with live C. pneumoniae (1×10(6) inclusion forming units; IFU) in 5 week old female C57BL/6 mice would induce cross-species protection against subsequent intravaginal challenge with Chlamydia muridarum (5×10(4) IFU), which causes a similar genital infection and pathology in mice as C. trachomatis in humans. Mice vaccinated intranasally with live C. pneumoniae, but not mock (PBS) immunized animals, displayed high levels of splenic cellular antigen-specific IFN-γ production and serum antibody response against C. muridarum and C. trachomatis. Mice vaccinated with C. pneumoniae displayed a significant reduction in the vaginal C. muridarum shedding as early as day 12 after secondary i.vag. challenge compared to PBS (mock) immunized mice. At day 19 after C. muridarum challenge, 100% of C. pneumoniae vaccinated mice had cleared the infection compared to none (0%) of the mock immunized mice, which cleared the infection by day 27. At day 80 after C. muridarum challenge, C. pneumoniae vaccinated mice displayed a significant reduction in the incidence (50%) and degree of hydrosalpinx compared to mock immunized animals (100%). These results suggest that respiratory C. pneumoniae infection induces accelerated chlamydial clearance and reduction of oviduct pathology following genital C. muridarum challenge, and may have

  1. [Efficacy of immune responses induced by anti-caries DNA vaccine-loaded bacterial ghost in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gaoxia; Fan, Mingwen; Guo, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    To develop an anti-caries DNA vaccine-loaded Salmonella typhimurium (St) ghost and enhance the efficacy of immune responses induced by anti-caries DNA vaccine via mucosal route. Both pREP4 and PhiX gene E expression plasmids were transformed into StJ357 and then induced with isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The bacterial ghosts (BG) were collected after wash and loaded with anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJGLU/VAX. Mice were divided into four groups and immunized through the nasal route with pGJGLU/VAX-loaded BG (Group Ghost+pGJGLU/VAX), pVAX1-loaded BG (Group Ghost+pVAX1), pGJGLU/VAX-Bupivacaine complex (Group pGJGLU/VAX) and pVAX1-Bupivacaine complex (Group pVAX1), respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to evaluate the immune responses. ELISA results showed that group Ghost+pGJGLU/VAX had significantly higher level of specific anti-GLU SIgA antibody [(0.367 ± 0.086) A/µg] compared with group Ghost+pVAX1 [(0.122 ± 0.077) A/µg], Group pGJGLU/VAX[(0.068 ± 0.068) A/µg] or Group pVAX1[(0.089 ± 0.089) A/µg] (P = 0.028, 0.012 or 0.030, respectively). St ghost was developed successfully, which enhanced the efficacy of immune responses induced by anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJGLU/VAX via the nasal route.

  2. Protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis infection induced by a multi-epitope vaccine in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gu

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses throughout the world. Because infected pigs are the major source of human infections, and China is becoming the largest international producer of pork, the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine to prevent swine from being infected is urgently needed for trichinellosis control in China. Our previous studies have demonstrated that specific Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen could provide protective immunity against T. spiralis infection in immunized mice. Certain protective epitopes of Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen have been identified. To identify more Ts-Pmy protective epitopes, a new monoclonal antibody, termed 8F12, was produced against the N-terminus of Ts-Pmy. This antibody elicited significant protective immunity in mice against T. spiralis infection by passive transfer and was subsequently used to screen a random phage display peptide library to identify recognized epitopes. Seven distinct positive phage clones were identified and their displayed peptides were sequenced. Synthesized epitope peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were used to immunize mice, four of which exhibited larval reduction (from 18.7% to 26.3%, respectively in vaccinated mice in comparison to the KLH control. To increase more effective protection, the epitope 8F7 that was found to induce the highest protection in this study was combined with two other previously identified epitopes (YX1 from Ts-Pmy and M7 from Ts-87 to formulate a multi-epitope vaccine. Mice immunized with this multi-epitope vaccine experienced a 35.0% reduction in muscle larvae burden after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. This protection is significantly higher than that induced by individual-epitope peptides and is associated with high levels of subclasses IgG and IgG1. These results showed that a multi-epitope vaccine induced better protective immunity than an individual

  3. Protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis infection induced by a multi-epitope vaccine in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Wei, Junfei; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaodi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-01-01

    Trichinellosis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses throughout the world. Because infected pigs are the major source of human infections, and China is becoming the largest international producer of pork, the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine to prevent swine from being infected is urgently needed for trichinellosis control in China. Our previous studies have demonstrated that specific Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) and Ts-87 antigen could provide protective immunity against T. spiralis infection in immunized mice. Certain protective epitopes of Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen have been identified. To identify more Ts-Pmy protective epitopes, a new monoclonal antibody, termed 8F12, was produced against the N-terminus of Ts-Pmy. This antibody elicited significant protective immunity in mice against T. spiralis infection by passive transfer and was subsequently used to screen a random phage display peptide library to identify recognized epitopes. Seven distinct positive phage clones were identified and their displayed peptides were sequenced. Synthesized epitope peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were used to immunize mice, four of which exhibited larval reduction (from 18.7% to 26.3%, respectively) in vaccinated mice in comparison to the KLH control. To increase more effective protection, the epitope 8F7 that was found to induce the highest protection in this study was combined with two other previously identified epitopes (YX1 from Ts-Pmy and M7 from Ts-87) to formulate a multi-epitope vaccine. Mice immunized with this multi-epitope vaccine experienced a 35.0% reduction in muscle larvae burden after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. This protection is significantly higher than that induced by individual-epitope peptides and is associated with high levels of subclasses IgG and IgG1. These results showed that a multi-epitope vaccine induced better protective immunity than an individual epitope and provided a

  4. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  5. Novel Bivalent Viral-Vectored Vaccines Induce Potent Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Conferring Protection against Stringent Influenza A Virus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Claire M; Chinnakannan, Senthil; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ulaszewska, Marta; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lambe, Teresa

    2017-07-19

    Seasonal influenza viruses are a common cause of acute respiratory illness worldwide and generate a significant socioeconomic burden. Influenza viruses mutate rapidly, necessitating annual vaccine reformulation because traditional vaccines do not typically induce broad-spectrum immunity. In addition to seasonal infections, emerging pandemic influenza viruses present a continued threat to global public health. Pandemic influenza viruses have consistently higher attack rates and are typically associated with greater mortality compared with seasonal strains. Ongoing strategies to improve vaccine efficacy typically focus on providing broad-spectrum immunity; although B and T cells can mediate heterosubtypic responses, typical vaccine development will augment either humoral or cellular immunity. However, multipronged approaches that target several Ags may limit the generation of viral escape mutants. There are few vaccine platforms that can deliver multiple Ags and generate robust cellular and humoral immunity. In this article, we describe a novel vaccination strategy, tested preclinically in mice, for the delivery of novel bivalent viral-vectored vaccines. We show this strategy elicits potent T cell responses toward highly conserved internal Ags while simultaneously inducing high levels of Abs toward hemagglutinin. Importantly, these humoral responses generate long-lived plasma cells and generate Abs capable of neutralizing variant hemagglutinin-expressing pseudotyped lentiviruses. Significantly, these novel viral-vectored vaccines induce strong immune responses capable of conferring protection in a stringent influenza A virus challenge. Thus, this vaccination regimen induces lasting efficacy toward influenza. Importantly, the simultaneous delivery of dual Ags may alleviate the selective pressure that is thought to potentiate antigenic diversity in avian influenza viruses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Development of Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccines against Outbreaks of H5N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglei Yi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several global outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus have increased the urgency of developing effective and safe vaccines against H5N1. Compared with H5N1 inactivated vaccines used widely, H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs have advantages in vaccine efficacy, dose-saving formula, long-lasting effect, ease of administration and some cross-protective immunity. Furthermore, H5N1 LAIVs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, especially including improved IgA production at the mucosa. The current trend of H5N1 LAIVs development is toward cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive or replication-defective vaccines, and moreover, H5N1 LAIVs plus mucosal adjuvants are promising candidates. This review provides an update on the advantages and development of H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines.

  7. An interferon inducing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine candidate elicits protection against challenge with the heterologous virulent type 2 strain VR-2385 in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Eve; Ma, Zexu; Zhang, Yanjin; de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Shen, Huigang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2017-01-03

    Achieving consistent protection by vaccinating pigs against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) remains difficult. Recently, an interferon-inducing PRRSV vaccine candidate strain A2MC2 was demonstrated to be attenuated and induced neutralizing antibodies. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of passage 90 of A2MC2 (A2P90) to protect pigs against challenge with moderately virulent PRRSV strain VR-2385 (92.3% nucleic acid identity with A2MC2) and highly virulent atypical PRRSV MN184 (84.5% nucleic acid identity with A2MC2). Forty 3-week old pigs were randomly assigned to five groups including a NEG-CONTROL group (non-vaccinated, non-challenged), VAC-VR2385 (vaccinated, challenged with strain VR-2385), VR2385 (challenged with strain VR-2385), VAC-MN184 (vaccinated, challenged with strain MN184) and a MN184 group (challenged with MN184 virus). Vaccination was done at 3weeks of age followed by challenge at 8weeks of age. No viremia was detectable in any of the vaccinated pigs; however, by the time of challenge, 15/16 vaccinated pigs had seroconverted based on ELISA and had neutralizing antibodies against a homologous strain with titers ranging from 8 to 128. Infection with VR-2385 resulted in mild-to-moderate clinical disease and lesions. For VR-2385 infected pigs, vaccination significantly lowered PRRSV viremia and nasal shedding by 9days post challenge (dpc), significantly reduced macroscopic lung lesions, and significantly increased the average daily weight gain compared to the non-vaccinated pigs. Infection with MN184 resulted in moderate-to-severe clinical disease and lesions regardless of vaccination status; however, vaccinated pigs had significantly less nasal shedding by dpc 5 compared to non-vaccinated pigs. Under the study conditions, the A2P90 vaccine strain was attenuated without detectable shedding, improved weight gain, and offered protection to the pigs challenged with VR-2385 by reduction of virus load and

  8. Vaccine composition formulated with a novel TLR7-dependent adjuvant induces high and broad protection against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Fabio; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Fiaschi, Luigi; Cartocci, Elena; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Paolo; Nosari, Sarah; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Lofano, Giuseppe; Marchi, Sara; Galletti, Bruno; Mariotti, Paolo; Bacconi, Marta; Torre, Antonina; Maccari, Silvia; Scarselli, Maria; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Inoshima, Naoko; Savino, Silvana; Mori, Elena; Rossi-Paccani, Silvia; Baudner, Barbara; Pallaoro, Michele; Swennen, Erwin; Petracca, Roberto; Brettoni, Cecilia; Liberatori, Sabrina; Norais, Nathalie; Monaci, Elisabetta; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Schneewind, Olaf; O’Hagan, Derek T.; Valiante, Nicholas M.; Bensi, Giuliano; Bertholet, Sylvie; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Both active and passive immunization strategies against Staphylococcus aureus have thus far failed to show efficacy in humans. With the attempt to develop an effective S. aureus vaccine, we selected five conserved antigens known to have different roles in S. aureus pathogenesis. They include the secreted factors α-hemolysin (Hla), ess extracellular A (EsxA), and ess extracellular B (EsxB) and the two surface proteins ferric hydroxamate uptake D2 and conserved staphylococcal antigen 1A. The combined vaccine antigens formulated with aluminum hydroxide induced antibodies with opsonophagocytic and functional activities and provided consistent protection in four mouse models when challenged with a panel of epidemiologically relevant S. aureus strains. The importance of antibodies in protection was demonstrated by passive transfer experiments. Furthermore, when formulated with a toll-like receptor 7-dependent (TLR7) agonist recently designed and developed in our laboratories (SMIP.7–10) adsorbed to alum, the five antigens provided close to 100% protection against four different staphylococcal strains. The new formulation induced not only high antibody titers but also a Th1 skewed immune response as judged by antibody isotype and cytokine profiles. In addition, low frequencies of IL-17–secreting T cells were also observed. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the rational selection of mixtures of conserved antigens combined with Th1/Th17 adjuvants can lead to promising vaccine formulations against S. aureus. PMID:25775551

  9. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Toft; Sehr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence...... of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil......™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were vaccination but >10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil...

  10. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif

    2013-01-01

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both...... seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs...... intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA...

  11. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen....... There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte...

  12. Vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing multi-stage antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by the mucosal route induces higher systemic cellular and local mucosal immune responses than with other vaccination routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan, is a cause of congenital disease and abortion in humans and animals. Various vaccination strategies against toxoplasmosis in rodent models have been used in the past few decades; however, effective vaccines remain a challenge. A recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing ubiquitin-conjugated multi-stage antigen segments (Ad-UMAS derived from different life-cycle stages of T. gondii was constructed previously. Here, we compared the immune responses and protection effects in vaccination of mice with Ad-UMAS by five vaccination routes including intramuscular (i.m., intravenous (i.v., subcutaneous (s.c., intraoral (i.o., and intranasal (i.n.. Much higher levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in the sera of the intraoral and intranasal vaccination groups on day 49 compared with controls (p < 0.05. The percentages of CD8+ T-cells in mice immunized intranasally and intraorally were larger than in mice immunized intramuscularly (p < 0.05. The highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ was detected in the group with nasal immunization, and splenocyte proliferation activity was significantly enhanced in mice immunized via the oral and nasal routes. Furthermore, the higher survival rate (50% and lower cyst numbers observed in the intraoral and intranasal groups all indicate that Ad-UMAS is far more effective in protecting mice against T. gondii infection via the mucosal route. Ad-UMAS could be an effective and safe mucosal candidate vaccine to protect animals and humans against T. gondii infection.

  13. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  14. Immune Response of A Novel ATR-AP205-001 Conjugate Anti-hypertensive Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiajun; Deng, Yihuan; Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Yanzhao; Zhang, Hongrong; Wu, Hailang; Yang, Shijun; Chen, Fen; Zhou, Zihua; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zhihua; Liao, Yuhua

    2017-10-03

    We developed a virus-like particle (VLP)-based therapeutic vaccine against angiotensin II receptor type 1, ATR-AP205-001, which could significantly reduce the blood pressure and protect target organs of hypertensive animals. In this study, we focused on the immunological effect and safety of the VLP-based vaccine. By comparing to the depolymerized dimeric vaccine ATR-Dimer-001, we found that ATR-AP205-001 reached subcapsular sinus of lymph node shortly after administration, followed by accumulation on follicle dendritic cells via follicle B cell transportation, while ATR-Dimer-001 vaccine showed no association with FDCs. ATR-AP205-001 vaccine strongly activated dendritic cells, which promoted T cells differentiation to follicular helper T cells. ATR-AP205-001 vaccine induced powerful germinal center reaction, which was translated to a boost of specific antibody production and long-lasting B cell memory, far superior to ATR-Dimer-001 vaccine. Moreover, neither cytotoxic T cells, nor Th1/Th17 cell-mediated inflammation was observed in ATR-AP205-001 vaccine, similar to ATR-Dimer-001 vaccine. We concluded that ATR-AP205-001 vaccine quickly induced potent humoral immunity through collaboration of B cells, follicular dendritic cells and follicular helper T cells, providing an effective and safe intervention for hypertension in the future clinical application.

  15. Comparative Immunogenicity of the Tetanus Toxoid and Recombinant Tetanus Vaccines in Mice, Rats, and Cynomolgus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT and is one of the most dreaded diseases especially in the developing countries. The current vaccine against tetanus is based on an inactivated tetanus toxin, which is effective but has many drawbacks. In our previous study, we developed a recombinant tetanus vaccine based on protein TeNT-Hc, with clear advantages over the toxoid vaccine in terms of production, characterization, and homogeneity. In this study, the titers, growth extinction, and persistence of specific antibodies induced by the two types of vaccine in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were compared. The booster vaccination efficacy of the two types of vaccines at different time points and protection mechanism in animals were also compared. The recombinant tetanus vaccine induced persistent and better antibody titers and strengthened the immunity compared with the commercially available toxoid vaccine in animals. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective recombinant tetanus vaccine to enhance the immunity of adolescents and adults as a substitute for the current toxoid vaccine.

  16. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruziinfection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeliepimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies againstT. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative. PMID:27074257

  17. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  18. Report on the first WHO integrated meeting on development and clinical trials of influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses: Hong Kong SAR, China, 24-26 January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Marc P; Tam, John S; Pervikov, Yuri; Katz, Jacqueline M

    2013-08-20

    On January 24-26, 2013, the World Health Organization convened the first integrated meeting on "The development and clinical trials of vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses" to review the current status of development and clinical evaluation of novel influenza vaccines as well as strategies to produce and deliver vaccines in novel ways. Special attention was given to the development of possible universal influenza vaccines. Other topics that were addressed included an update on clinical trials of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines in high-risk groups and vaccine safety, as well as regulatory issues. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Safe cycling!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The HSE Unit will be running a cycling safety campaign at the entrances to CERN's restaurants on 14, 15 and 16 May. Pop along to see if they can persuade you to get back in the saddle!   With summer on its way, you might feel like getting your bike out of winter storage. Well, the HSE Unit has come up with some original ideas to remind you of some of the most basic safety rules. This year, the prevention campaign will be focussing on three themes: "Cyclists and their equipment", "The bicycle on the road", and "Other road users". This is an opportunity to think about the condition of your bike as well as how you ride it. From 14 to 16 May, representatives of the Swiss Office of Accident Prevention and the Touring Club Suisse will join members of the HSE Unit at the entrances to CERN's restaurants to give you advice on safe cycling (see box). They will also be organising three activity stands where you can test your knowle...

  20. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects.To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites.The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  1. Humoral response to 2 inactivated bluetongue virus serotype-8 vaccines in South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolari, P; Bruckner, L; Fricker, R; Kaufmann, C; Mudry, M; Griot, C; Meylan, M

    2010-01-01

    Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) has caused disease in domestic ruminants in several countries of northern Europe since 2006. In 2008 a mass-vaccination program was launched in most affected countries using whole virus inactivated vaccines. To evaluate 2 inactivated vaccines (Bovilis BTV 8; BTVPUR AlSap8) for immunogenicity and safety against BTV-8 in South American camelids (SAC) in a field trial. Forty-two SAC (25 Alpacas, 17 Llamas) aged between 1 and 16 years. The animals were vaccinated twice at intervals of 21 days. They were observed clinically for adverse local, systemic, or both reactions throughout the trial. Blood samples collected on days 0, 14, 21, 43, and 156 after vaccination were tested for the presence of BTV-8 virus by real time-polymerase chain reaction and of specific antibodies by competitive ELISA and a serum neutralization test. All vaccinated animals developed antibodies to BTV-8 after the 2nd administration of the vaccine. No adverse effects were observed except for moderate local swellings at the injection site, which disappeared within 21 days. Slightly increased body temperatures were only observed in the first 2 days after vaccination. The BTV was not detected in any of the samples analyzed. The administration of the 2 inactivated commercial vaccines was safe and induced seroconversion against BTV-8 in all vaccinated animals. The results of this study suggest that 2 doses injected 3 weeks apart is a suitable vaccination regimen for SAC.

  2. Vaccine protection against Zika virus from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Rafael A; Abbink, Peter; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Iampietro, M Justin; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Boyd, Michael; Ng'ang'a, David; Kirilova, Marinela; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Li, Zhenfeng; Moseley, Edward T; Bricault, Christine A; Borducchi, Erica N; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Neubauer, George; Nkolola, Joseph P; Maxfield, Lori F; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus that is responsible for the current epidemic in Brazil and the Americas. ZIKV has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction, and other birth defects in both humans and mice. The rapid development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is a global health priority, but very little is currently known about ZIKV immunology and mechanisms of immune protection. Here we show that a single immunization with a plasmid DNA vaccine or a purified inactivated virus vaccine provides complete protection in susceptible mice against challenge with a strain of ZIKV involved in the outbreak in northeast Brazil. This ZIKV strain has recently been shown to cross the placenta and to induce fetal microcephaly and other congenital malformations in mice. We produced DNA vaccines expressing ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prM-Env), as well as a series of deletion mutants. The prM-Env DNA vaccine, but not the deletion mutants, afforded complete protection against ZIKV, as measured by absence of detectable viraemia following challenge, and protective efficacy correlated with Env-specific antibody titers. Adoptive transfer of purified IgG from vaccinated mice conferred passive protection, and depletion of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes in vaccinated mice did not abrogate this protection. These data demonstrate that protection against ZIKV challenge can be achieved by single-shot subunit and inactivated virus vaccines in mice and that Env-specific antibody titers represent key immunologic correlates of protection. Our findings suggest that the development of a ZIKV vaccine for humans is likely to be achievable.

  3. Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Efficiently Induces Functional and Persistent CD8+ T Cell Responses in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella R. M. Negri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells are an essential component of an effective host immune response to tumors and viral infections. Genetic immunization is particularly suitable for inducing CTL responses, because the encoded proteins enter the MHC class I processing pathway through either transgene expression or cross-presentation. In order to compare the efficiency and persistence of immune response induced by genetic vaccines, BALB/c mice were immunized either twice intramuscularly with DNA plasmid expressing a codon-optimized HIV-1 gp120 Envelope sequence together with murine GM-CSF sequence or with a single immunization using an integrase defective lentiviral vector (IDLV expressing the same proteins. Results strongly indicated that the schedule based on IDLV vaccine was more efficient in inducing specific immune response, as evaluated three months after the last immunization by IFN ELISPOT in both splenocytes and bone marrow- (BM- derived cells, chromium release assay in splenocytes, and antibody detection in sera. In addition, IDLV immunization induced high frequency of polyfunctional CD8+ T cells able to simultaneously produce IFN, TNF, and IL2.

  4. Oral rice-based vaccine induces passive and active immunity against enterotoxigenic E. coli-mediated diarrhea in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Oroku, Kazuki; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Kodama, Toshiaki; Nagai, Shinya; Ueda, Susumu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-09-22

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes severe diarrhea in both neonatal and weaned pigs. Because the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has a high level of amino acid identity to the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) B-subunit (LTB), we selected MucoRice-CTB as a vaccine candidate against ETEC-induced pig diarrhea. When pregnant sows were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, increased amounts of antigen-specific IgG and IgA were produced in their sera. CTB-specific IgG was secreted in the colostrum and transferred passively to the sera of suckling piglets. IgA antibodies in the colostrum and milk remained high with a booster dose after farrowing. Additionally, when weaned minipigs were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, production of CTB-specific intestinal SIgA, as well as systemic IgG and IgA, was induced. To evaluate the cross-protective effect of MucoRice-CTB against ETEC diarrhea, intestinal loop assay with ETEC was conducted. The fluid volume accumulated in the loops of minipigs immunized with MucoRice-CTB was significantly lower than that in control minipigs, indicating that MucoRice-CTB-induced cross-reactive immunity could protect weaned pigs from diarrhea caused by ETEC. MucoRice-CTB could be a candidate oral vaccine for inducing both passive and active immunity to protect both suckling and weaned piglets from ETEC diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (pguinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Junqueira

    Full Text Available Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, lipopeptide (Pam3Cys, and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128 derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by CD4(+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception. The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Adjuvants Potentiate T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by a NY-ESO-1 Based Antitumor Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant. PMID:22567144

  8. Vaccine against human Papilloma Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Cesar Reina; Nubia Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    At present two prophylactic human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines are commercially available. The Tetravalent vaccine against infection with four VPH types (6, 11, 16, and 18) distributed in the national program in Colombia and the Bivalent vaccine against the VPH types 16 and 18, respectively.  The efficacy and safety of both vaccines has periodically been assessed and they have been declared efficacious and safe by the health authorities of several countries and the Global Advisory Committee...

  9. Vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells protect against respiratory syncytial virus strain A2-line19F-induced pathogenesis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Stokes, Kate L; Currier, Michael G; Sakamoto, Kaori; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Celis, Esteban; Moore, Martin L

    2012-12-01

    CD8(+) T cells may contribute to vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Compared to CD8(+) T cells responding to RSV infection, vaccine-elicited anti-RSV CD8(+) T cells are less well defined. We used a peptide vaccine to test the hypothesis that vaccine-elicited RSV-specific CD8(+) T cells are protective against RSV pathogenesis. BALB/c mice were treated with a mixture (previously termed TriVax) of an M2(82-90) peptide representing an immunodominant CD8 epitope, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly(I·C), and a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody. TriVax vaccination induced potent effector anti-RSV CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Mice were challenged with RSV strain A2-line19F, a model of RSV pathogenesis leading to airway mucin expression. Mice were protected against RSV infection and against RSV-induced airway mucin expression and cellular lung inflammation when challenged 6 days after vaccination. Compared to A2-line19F infection alone, TriVax vaccination followed by challenge resulted in effector CD8(+) T cells with greater cytokine expression and the more rapid appearance of RSV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the lung. When challenged 42 days after TriVax vaccination, memory CD8(+) T cells were elicited with RSV-specific tetramer responses equivalent to TriVax-induced effector CD8(+) T cells. These memory CD8(+) T cells had lower cytokine expression than effector CD8(+) T cells, and protection against A2-line19F was partial during the memory phase. We found that vaccine-elicited effector anti-RSV CD8(+) T cells protected mice against RSV infection and pathogenesis, and waning protection correlated with reduced CD8(+) T cell cytokine expression.

  10. Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Protect against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain A2-Line19F-Induced Pathogenesis in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Stokes, Kate L.; Currier, Michael G.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Celis, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cells may contribute to vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Compared to CD8+ T cells responding to RSV infection, vaccine-elicited anti-RSV CD8+ T cells are less well defined. We used a peptide vaccine to test the hypothesis that vaccine-elicited RSV-specific CD8+ T cells are protective against RSV pathogenesis. BALB/c mice were treated with a mixture (previously termed TriVax) of an M282-90 peptide representing an immunodominant CD8 epitope, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly(I·C), and a costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody. TriVax vaccination induced potent effector anti-RSV CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Mice were challenged with RSV strain A2-line19F, a model of RSV pathogenesis leading to airway mucin expression. Mice were protected against RSV infection and against RSV-induced airway mucin expression and cellular lung inflammation when challenged 6 days after vaccination. Compared to A2-line19F infection alone, TriVax vaccination followed by challenge resulted in effector CD8+ T cells with greater cytokine expression and the more rapid appearance of RSV-specific CD8+ T cells in the lung. When challenged 42 days after TriVax vaccination, memory CD8+ T cells were elicited with RSV-specific tetramer responses equivalent to TriVax-induced effector CD8+ T cells. These memory CD8+ T cells had lower cytokine expression than effector CD8+ T cells, and protection against A2-line19F was partial during the memory phase. We found that vaccine-elicited effector anti-RSV CD8+ T cells protected mice against RSV infection and pathogenesis, and waning protection correlated with reduced CD8+ T cell cytokine expression. PMID:23015695

  11. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  12. Potential Role of Specific Antibodies as Important Vaccine Induced Protective Mechanism against Aeromonas salmonicida in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer Villumsen, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Inger; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    . In this study we have examined the protection against infection with a Danish strain of A. salmonicida in both vaccinated and non-vaccinated rainbow trout. A commercial and an experimental auto-vaccine were tested. The protective effects of the vaccines were evaluated through an A. salmonicida challenge 18...... weeks post vaccination. Both vaccines resulted in a significantly increased survival in the vaccinated fish during a 28 day challenge period relative to non-vaccinated fish (P = 0.01 and P = 0.001 for the commercial and experimental vaccine, respectively). Throughout the entire experiment, the presence...

  13. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Radwanska

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+ marginal zone (IgM(+MZ B cell population characterized as B220(+IgM(HighIgD(Int CD21(HighCD23(LowCD1d(+CD138(-. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R, indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  14. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines.

  15. A Fasciola hepatica-derived fatty acid binding protein induces protection against schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma bovis using the adjuvant adaptation (ADAD) vaccination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Belén; López-Abán, Julio; Rojas-Caraballo, José; Pérez del Villar, Luis; Hillyer, George V; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Muro, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Several efforts have been made to identify anti-schistosomiasis vaccine candidates and new vaccination systems. The fatty acid binding protein (FAPB) has been shown to induce a high level of protection in trematode infection. The adjuvant adaptation (ADAD) vaccination system was used in this study, including recombinant FABP, a natural immunomodulator and saponins. Mice immunised with the ADAD system were able to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 and IL-6) and induce high IgG2a levels. Moreover, there was a significant reduction in worm burden, egg liver and hepatic lesion in vaccinated mice in two independent experiments involving Schistosoma bovis infected mice. The foregoing data shows that ADAD system using FABP provide a good alternative for triggering an effective immune response against animal schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the integrated immune response induced by an inactivated EV71 vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longding Liu

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71, a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD, causes outbreaks among children in the Asia-Pacific region. A vaccine is urgently needed. Based on successful pre-clinical work, phase I and II clinical trials of an inactivated EV71 vaccine, which included the participants of 288 and 660 respectively, have been conducted. In the present study, the immune response and the correlated modulation of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 30 infants (6 to 11 months immunized with this vaccine or placebo and consented to join this study in the phase II clinical trial were analyzed. The results showed significantly greater neutralizing antibody and specific T cell responses in vaccine group after two inoculations on days 0 and 28. Additionally, more than 600 functional genes that were up- or down-regulated in PBMCs were identified by the microarray assay, and these genes included 68 genes associated with the immune response in vaccine group. These results emphasize the gene expression profile of the immune system in response to an inactivated EV71 vaccine in humans and confirmed that such an immune response was generated as the result of the positive mobilization of the immune system. Furthermore, the immune response was not accompanied by the development of a remarkable inflammatory response.NCT01391494 and NCT01512706.

  17. Protective immunity induced by a recombinant BCG vaccine encoding the cyclophilin gene of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinlei; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gong, Pengtao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Guocai; Yang, Ju; Li, He; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Xichen

    2013-12-09

    The investigation of Toxoplasma gondii virulence factors can elucidate the immunopathology of T. gondii infection and identify potential candidates for effective human vaccines. The adjuvant is an important component of an effective vaccine. In this study, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis was used as a live vaccine vector with both antigen and adjuvant characteristics. Following amplification of the T. gondii cyclophilin gene, the shuttle expression plasmid pMV261-TgCyP and integrative expression plasmid pMV361-TgCyP were constructed, and their expression was stimulated after transfection into BCG. Both recombinant plasmids were highly immunogenic. Greater proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was observed in the rBCG-vaccinated groups compared to the control groups. The levels of Th1-type IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12 were significantly increased following immunisation with the rBCG vaccines via the i.v. or oral route, which indicated that catalytic activity against T. gondii infection was generated in the mice. rBCGpMV361-TgCyP i.v. inoculation resulted in a higher protection efficiency, as demonstrated by the increased survival time and survival rate (17%) of BALB/c mice. The present study demonstrates that a BCG vector expressing a target antigen, TgCyP, represent an alternative system for the production of effective vaccines to prevent toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Different arms of the adaptive immune system induced by a combination vaccine work in concert to provide enhanced clearance of influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbin, Joanna C A; Zeng, Weiguang; Jackson, David C; Brown, Lorena E

    2014-01-01

    Current split influenza virus vaccines that induce strain-specific neutralising antibodies provide some degree of protection against influenza infection but there is a clear need to improve their effectiveness. The constant antigenic drift of influenza viruses means that vaccines are often not an exact match to the circulating strain and so levels of relevant antibodies may not be sufficiently high to afford protection. In the situation where the emergent influenza virus is completely novel, as is the case with pandemic strains, existing vaccines may provide no benefit. In this study we tested the concept of a combination vaccine consisting of sub-optimal doses of split influenza virus vaccine mixed with a cross-protective T-cell inducing lipopeptide containing the TLR2 ligand Pam2Cys. Mice immunised with combination vaccines showed superior levels of lung viral clearance after challenge compared to either split virus or lipopeptide alone, mediated through activation of enhanced humoral and/or additional cellular responses. The mechanism of action of these vaccines was dependent on the route of administration, with intranasal administration being superior to subcutaneous and intramuscular routes, potentially through the induction of memory CD8+ T cells in the lungs. This immunisation strategy not only provides a mechanism for minimising the dose of split virus antigen but also, through the induction of cross-protective CD8+ T cells, proves a breadth of immunity to provide potential benefit upon encounter with serologically diverse influenza isolates.

  19. Cell culture (Vero) derived whole virus (H5N1) vaccine based on wild-type virus strain induces cross-protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Howard, M Keith; Spruth, Martin; Wodal, Walter; Brühl, Peter; Gerencer, Marijan; Crowe, Brian A; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Livey, Ian; Reiter, Manfred; Mayerhofer, Ines; Tauer, Christa; Grillberger, Leopold; Mundt, Wolfgang; Falkner, Falko G; Barrett, P Noel

    2007-08-10

    The rapid spread and the transmission to humans of avian influenza virus (H5N1) have induced world-wide fears of a new pandemic and raised concerns over the ability of standard influenza vaccine production methods to rapidly supply sufficient amounts of an effective vaccine. We report here on a robust and flexible strategy which uses wild-type virus grown in a continuous cell culture (Vero) system to produce an inactivated whole virus vaccine. Candidate vaccines based on clade 1 and clade 2 influenza H5N1 strains were developed and demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in animal models. The vaccines induce cross-neutralising antibodies, highly cross-reactive T-cell responses and are protective in a mouse challenge model not only against the homologous virus but also against other H5N1 strains, including those from another clade. These data indicate that cell culture-grown whole virus vaccines, based on the wild-type virus, allow the rapid high yield production of a candidate pandemic vaccine.

  20. Different arms of the adaptive immune system induced by a combination vaccine work in concert to provide enhanced clearance of influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C A Cobbin

    Full Text Available Current split influenza virus vaccines that induce strain-specific neutralising antibodies provide some degree of protection against influenza infection but there is a clear need to improve their effectiveness. The constant antigenic drift of influenza viruses means that vaccines are often not an exact match to the circulating strain and so levels of relevant antibodies may not be sufficiently high to afford protection. In the situation where the emergent influenza virus is completely novel, as is the case with pandemic strains, existing vaccines may provide no benefit. In this study we tested the concept of a combination vaccine consisting of sub-optimal doses of split influenza virus vaccine mixed with a cross-protective T-cell inducing lipopeptide containing the TLR2 ligand Pam2Cys. Mice immunised with combination vaccines showed superior levels of lung viral clearance after challenge compared to either split virus or lipopeptide alone, mediated through activation of enhanced humoral and/or additional cellular responses. The mechanism of action of these vaccines was dependent on the route of administration, with intranasal administration being superior to subcutaneous and intramuscular routes, potentially through the induction of memory CD8+ T cells in the lungs. This immunisation strategy not only provides a mechanism for minimising the dose of split virus antigen but also, through the induction of cross-protective CD8+ T cells, proves a breadth of immunity to provide potential benefit upon encounter with serologically diverse influenza isolates.

  1. Intradermally Administered Yellow Fever Vaccine at Reduced Dose Induces a Protective Immune Response: A Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Roukens (Guy); A.C.Th.M. Vossen (Ann); P.J. Bredenbeek (Peter); J.T. van Dissel (Jaap); L.G. Visser (Leo)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Implementation of yellow fever vaccination is currently hampered by limited supply of vaccine. An alternative route of administration with reduced amounts of vaccine but without loss of vaccine efficacy would boost vaccination programmes.Methods and Findings:A randomized,

  2. Heavy-chain isotype patterns of human antibody-secreting cells induced by Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in relation to age and preimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Juul, Lars; Gyhrs, A

    1994-01-01

    The influence of preexisting immunity on the heavy-chain isotypes of circulating antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) induced by vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and by vaccination with TT or DT...... of natural HibCP antibodies (r = 0.59; P = 0.00002). A possible role of natural exposure for Hib or cross-reactive bacteria on the mucosal surfaces in the shaping of the isotype response to HibCP conjugate vaccines is discussed....

  3. DNA fusion vaccine designs to induce tumor-lytic CD8+ T-cell attack via the immunodominant cysteine-containing epitope of NY-ESO 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Perez, Juan; Rice, Jason; Escors, David; Collins, Mary; Paterson, Alex; Savelyeva, Natalia; Stevenson, Freda K

    2013-09-15

    The cancer/testis antigen NY-ESO-1 contains an immunodominant HLA-A2-binding peptide (SLLMWITQC), designated S9C, an attractive target for vaccination against several human cancers. As cysteine contains a reactive -SH, the oxidation status of exogenous synthetic peptide is uncertain. We have designed tolerance-breaking DNA fusion vaccines incorporating a domain of tetanus toxin fused to tumor-derived peptide sequences (p.DOM-peptide), placed at the C-terminus for optimal immunogenicity. In a "humanized" HLA-A2 preclinical model, p.DOM-S9C primed S9C-specific CD8+ T cells more effectively than adjuvanted synthetic peptide. A DNA vaccine encoding the full NY-ESO-1 sequence alone induced only weak S9C-specific responses, amplified by addition of DOM sequence. The analog peptide (SLLMWITQL) also primed peptide-specific CD8+ T cells, again increased by DNA delivery. Importantly, T cells induced by S9C-encoding DNA vaccines killed tumor cells expressing endogenous NY-ESO-1. Only a fraction of T cells induced by the S9L-encoding DNA vaccines was able to recognize S9C and kill tumor cells. These data indicate that DNA vaccines mimic posttranslational modifications of -SH-containing peptides expressed by tumor cells. Instability of synthetic peptides and the potential dangers of analog peptides contrast with the ability of DNA vaccines to induce high levels of tumor-lytic peptide-specific CD8+ T cells. These findings encourage clinical exploration of this vaccine strategy to target NY-ESO-1. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  4. Why LiFePO4 is a safe battery electrode: Coulomb repulsion induced electron-state reshuffling upon lithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yung Jui; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Hafiz, Hasnain; Basak, Susmita; Liu, Jun; Richardson, Thomas; Shu, Guojiun; Chou, Fangcheng; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Moritz, Brian; Devereaux, Thomas P; Qiao, Ruimin; Chuang, Yi-De; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli

    2015-10-21

    LiFePO4 is a battery cathode material with high safety standards due to its unique electronic structure. We performed systematic experimental and theoretical studies based on soft X-ray emission, absorption, and hard X-ray Raman spectroscopy of LixFePO4 nanoparticles and single crystals. The results clearly show a non-rigid electron-state reconfiguration of both the occupied and unoccupied Fe-3d and O-2p states during the (de)lithiation process. We focus on the energy configurations of the occupied states of LiFePO4 and the unoccupied states of FePO4, which are the critical states where electrons are removed and injected during the charge and discharge process, respectively. In LiFePO4, the soft X-ray emission spectroscopy shows that, due to the Coulomb repulsion effect, the occupied Fe-3d states with the minority spin sit close to the Fermi level. In FePO4, the soft X-ray absorption and hard X-ray Raman spectroscopy show that the unoccupied Fe-3d states again sit close to the Fermi level. These critical 3d electron state configurations are consistent with the calculations based on modified Becke and Johnson potentials GGA+U (MBJGGA+U) framework, which improves the overall lineshape prediction compared with the conventionally used GGA+U method. The combined experimental and theoretical studies show that the non-rigid electron state reshuffling guarantees the stability of oxygen during the redox reaction throughout the charge and discharge process of LiFePO4 electrodes, leading to the intrinsic safe performance of the electrodes.

  5. Rotavirus vaccines: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Penelope H

    2005-02-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide and has a major global impact on childhood morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is the only control measure likely to have a significant impact on the incidence of severe dehydrating rotavirus disease. Rotavirus disease prevention efforts suffered a great setback in 1999 with the withdrawal of the RRV-TV vaccine less than a year after its introduction. Several new rotavirus vaccine candidates have now been developed and are undergoing clinical trials. New safe and effective rotavirus vaccines offer the best hope of reducing the toll of acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in both developed and developing countries.

  6. Improved influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine induces robust B and T-cell responses and protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailybayeva, Aigerim; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Sansyzbay, Abylai; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Tabynov, Kaissar

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a potent candidate vaccine against bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus using the influenza viral vector expressing Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins (Flu-BA). Our success in the Flu-BA vaccine trial in cattle and results of a pilot study in non-pregnant small ruminants prompted us in the current study to test its efficacy against B. melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats. In this study, we improved the Flu-BA vaccine formulation and immunization method to achieve maximum efficacy and safety. The Flu-BA vaccine formulation had two additional proteins Omp19 and SOD, and administered thrice with 20% Montanide Gel01 adjuvant, simultaneously by both subcutaneous and conjunctival routes at 21 days intervals in pregnant sheep and goats. At 42 days post-vaccination (DPV) we detected antigen-specific IgG antibodies predominantly of IgG2a isotype but also IgG1, and also detected a strong lymphocyte recall response with IFN-γ production. Importantly, our candidate vaccine prevented abortion in 66.7% and 77.8% of pregnant sheep and goats, respectively. Furthermore, complete protection (absence of live B. melitensis 16M) was observed in 55.6% and 66.7% of challenged sheep and goats, and 72.7% and 90.0% of their fetuses (lambs/yeanlings), respectively. The severity of B. melitensis 16M infection in vaccinated sheep and goats and their fetuses (index of infection and rates of Brucella colonization in tissues) was significantly lower than in control groups. None of the protection parameters after vaccination with Flu-BA vaccine were statistically inferior to protection seen with the commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine (protection against abortion and vaccination efficacy, alpha = 0.18-0.34, infection index, P = 0.37-0.77, Brucella colonization, P = 0.16 to P > 0.99). In conclusion, our improved Flu-BA vaccine formulation and delivery method were found safe and effective in protecting pregnant sheep and goats against adverse

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine administered concomitantly with routine vaccines starting at 2 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry M; Nissen, Michael D; Naz, Aftab; Shepard, Julie; Bedell, Lisa; Hohenboken, Matthew; Odrljin, Tatjana; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Infants are at the highest risk for meningococcal disease and a broadly protective and safe vaccine is an unmet need in this youngest population. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a 4-dose infant/toddler regimen of MenACWY-CRM given at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age concomitantly with pentavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-Hemophilus influenzae type b-inactivated poliovirus-combination vaccine (DTaP-IPV/Hib), hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), 7- or 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV), and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). Four doses of MenACWY-CRM induced hSBA titers ≥8 in 89%, 95%, 97%, and 96% of participants against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y, respectively. hSBA titers ≥8 were present in 76-98% of participants after the first 3 doses. A categorical linear analysis incorporating vaccine group and study center showed responses to routine vaccines administered with MenACWY-CRM were non-inferior to routine vaccines alone, except for seroresponse to the pertussis antigen fimbriae. The reactogenicity profile was not affected when MenACWY-CRM was administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. MenACWY-CRM administered with routine concomitant vaccinations in young infants was well tolerated and induced highly immunogenic responses against each of the serogroups without significant interference with the immune responses to routine infant vaccinations. Healthy 2 month old infants were randomized to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines (n = 258) or routine vaccines alone (n = 271). Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA). Medically attended adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and AEs leading to study withdrawal were collected throughout the study period.

  8. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Immunogenicity of next-generation HPV vaccines in non-human primates: Measles-vectored HPV vaccine versus Pichia pastoris recombinant protein vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Giannino, Viviana; Rishi, Narayan; Glueck, Reinhard

    2016-09-07

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. HPVs are oncogenic small double-stranded DNA viruses that are the primary causal agent of cervical cancer and other types of cancers, including in the anus, oropharynx, vagina, vulva, and penis. Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an attractive strategy for preventing cervical cancer and some other types of cancers. However, there are few safe and effective vaccines against HPV infections. Current first-generation commercial HPV vaccines are expensive to produce and deliver. The goal of this study was to develop an alternate potent HPV recombinant L1-based vaccines by producing HPV virus-like particles into a vaccine that is currently used worldwide. Live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have a well-established safety and efficacy record, and recombinant MV (rMV) produced by reverse genetics may be useful for generating candidate HPV vaccines to meet the needs of the developing world. We studied in non-human primate rMV-vectored HPV vaccine in parallel with a classical alum adjuvant recombinant HPV16L1 and 18L1 protein vaccine produced in Pichia pastoris. A combined prime-boost approach using both vaccines was evaluated, as well as immune interference due to pre-existing immunity against the MV. The humoral immune response induced by the MV, Pichia-expressed vaccine, and their combination as priming and boosting approaches was found to elicit HPV16L1 and 18L1 specific total IgG and neutralizing antibody titres. Pre-existing antibodies against measles did not prevent the immune response against HPV16L1 and 18L1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leishmaniasis: focus on the design of nanoparticulate vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroud, Delaram; Rafati, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Although mass vaccination of the entire population of an endemic area would be the most cost-effective tool to diminish Leishmania burden, an effective vaccine is not yet commercially available. Practically, vaccines have failed to achieve the required level of protection, possibly owing to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant and/or delivery system. Therefore, there is still an imperative demand for an improved, safe and efficient delivery system to enhance the immunogenicity of available vaccine candidates. Nanoparticles are proficient in boosting the quality and magnitude of immune responses in a predictable fashion. Herein, we discuss how nanoparticulate vaccine delivery systems can be used to induce appropriate immune responses against leishmaniasis by controlling physicochemical properties of the vaccine. Stability, production reproducibility, low cost per dose and low risk-benefit ratios are desirable characteristics of an ideal vaccine formulation and solid lipid nanoparticles may serve as one of the most promising practical strategies to help to achieve such a leishmanial vaccine, at least in canine species in the developing world.

  11. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Induces HPV-Specific Antibodies in the Oral Cavity: Results From the Mid-Adult Male Vaccine Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Kemp, Troy J.; Torres, B. Nelson; Isaacs-Soriano, Kimberly; Ingles, Donna; Abrahamsen, Martha; Pan, Yuanji; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmeron, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus virus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 cause a large proportion of oropharyngeal cancers, which are increasing in incidence among males, and vaccine efficacy against oral HPV infections in men has not been previously evaluated. Methods. Sera and saliva collected in mouthwash and Merocel sponges at day 1 and month 7 were obtained from 150 men aged 27–45 years from Tampa, Florida, and Cuernavaca, Mexico, who received Gardasil at day 1 and months 2 and 6. Specimens were tested for anti–HPV-16 and anti–HPV-18 immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels by an L1 virus-like particle–based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. All participants developed detectable serum anti–HPV-16 and anti–HPV-18 antibodies, and most had detectable antibodies in both oral specimen types at month 7 (HPV-16 was detected in 93.2% of mouthwash specimens and 95.7% of sponge specimens; HPV-18 was detected in 72.1% and 65.5%, respectively). Antibody concentrations in saliva were approximately 3 logs lower than in serum. HPV-16– and HPV-18–specific antibody levels, normalized to total IgG levels, in both oral specimen types at month 7 were significantly correlated with serum levels (for HPV-16, ρ was 0.90 for mouthwash specimens and 0.92 for sponge specimens; for HPV-18, ρ was 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). Conclusions. This is the first study demonstrating that vaccination of males with Gardasil induces HPV antibody levels at the oral cavity that correlate with circulating levels. PMID:27511896

  13. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Induces HPV-Specific Antibodies in the Oral Cavity: Results From the Mid-Adult Male Vaccine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ligia A; Kemp, Troy J; Torres, B Nelson; Isaacs-Soriano, Kimberly; Ingles, Donna; Abrahamsen, Martha; Pan, Yuanji; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmeron, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-15

    Human papillomavirus virus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 cause a large proportion of oropharyngeal cancers, which are increasing in incidence among males, and vaccine efficacy against oral HPV infections in men has not been previously evaluated. Sera and saliva collected in mouthwash and Merocel sponges at day 1 and month 7 were obtained from 150 men aged 27-45 years from Tampa, Florida, and Cuernavaca, Mexico, who received Gardasil at day 1 and months 2 and 6. Specimens were tested for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels by an L1 virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All participants developed detectable serum anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 antibodies, and most had detectable antibodies in both oral specimen types at month 7 (HPV-16 was detected in 93.2% of mouthwash specimens and 95.7% of sponge specimens; HPV-18 was detected in 72.1% and 65.5%, respectively). Antibody concentrations in saliva were approximately 3 logs lower than in serum. HPV-16- and HPV-18-specific antibody levels, normalized to total IgG levels, in both oral specimen types at month 7 were significantly correlated with serum levels (for HPV-16, ρ was 0.90 for mouthwash specimens and 0.92 for sponge specimens; for HPV-18, ρ was 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This is the first study demonstrating that vaccination of males with Gardasil induces HPV antibody levels at the oral cavity that correlate with circulating levels. © 2016 World Health Organization; licensee Oxford Journals.

  14. Efficacy of an inactivated virus vaccine for prevention of porcine parvovirus-induced reproductive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengeling, W L; Brown, T T; Paul, P S; Gutekunst, D E

    1979-02-01

    Gilts vaccinated IM either once (4 gilts) or twice (2 gilts) with an acetylethyleneimine-inactivated porcine parvovirus (PPV) vaccine before they were bred were subsequently exposed intranasally and orally to virulent PPV at about the 40th day of gestation (from 37 to 43 days). At 2 weeks after vaccination, all had hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) titers for PPV (from 20 to 80) which decreased by the time the immunity was challenged with virulent virus (from 10 to 40), but increased thereafter (from 160 to 1,280). Titers of singly and doubly vaccinated gilts were similar throughout the experiment. The gilts were killed at about the 84th day of gestation (from 80 to 87 days), and their litters were examined. Litters were comprised of 68 live fetuses and 1 dead fetus (7 to 14 fetuses/litter). Neither viral antigen, PPV, nor homologous HI antibody was found in any of the fetuses. In addition, 4 gilts were kept in contact with the vaccinated gilts and were treated similarly except for vaccination. These 4 gilts remained free of HI antibody until after they were exposed to virulent PPV during gestation. At the time the gilts were killed the titers were 1,280 to 2,560. Their litters were comprised of 11 live fetuses and 26 dead fetuses (8 to 11 fetuses/litter). Virus was isolated from fetuses of all litters. Viral antigen was found in 24 of the dead fetuses and 10 of the live fetuses. All infected live fetuses also had HI antibody for PPV. The 2 boars used to breed vaccinated and nonvaccinated gilts (usually each gilt was bred to each of the 2 boars), but not exposed to virulent PPV, remained free of HI antibody for PPV.

  15. 9 CFR 113.308 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Venezuelan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Venezuelan... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.308 Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Venezuelan. Encephalomyelitis Vaccine...

  16. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). 113.317... Virus Vaccines § 113.317 Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine recommended for use in dogs...

  17. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine...

  18. 9 CFR 113.315 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.315 Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine. Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine shall... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine...

  19. 9 CFR 113.310 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.310 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine. Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine shall... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine...

  20. Orally administered recombinant Lactobacillus casei vector vaccine expressing β-toxoid of Clostridium perfringens that induced protective immunity responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Ezatkhah, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens types B and C cause enteritis and enterotoxemia in animals. The conventional vaccine production systems need time-consuming detoxification and difficult quality control steps. In this study, a modified β-toxoid gene was synthesized, cloned into the pT1NX vector, and electroporated into Lactobacillus casei competent cells to yield L. casei-β recombinant strain. Surface expression of the recombinant β-toxoid was evaluated by ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Vaccinated BALB/c mice with L. casei-β induced potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses that were protective against lethal challenges with 100 MLD/mL of the β-toxin. Safety and efficacy of the recombinant clone was evaluated and the presumptive toxicity of L. casei-β was studied by toxicity test and histopathological findings, which were the same as negative controls. Our results support the use of L. casei as a live oral vector vaccine, and that the recombinant L. casei-β is a potential candidate for being used in the control of enterotoxemia diseases caused by C. perfringens types B and C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mycobacterium indicus pranii as a booster vaccine enhances BCG induced immunity and confers higher protection in animal models of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Mohd; Khatri, Rahul; Singh, Bindu; Gupta, Ananya; Kumar, Arvind; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2016-12-01

    BCG, the only approved vaccine protects against severe form of childhood tuberculosis but its protective efficacy wanes in adolescence. BCG has reduced the incidence of infant TB considerably in endemic areas; therefore prime-boost strategy is the most realistic measure for control of tuberculosis in near future. Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) shares significant antigenic repertoire with Mtb and BCG and has been shown to impart significant protection in animal models of tuberculosis. In this study, MIP was given as a booster to BCG vaccine which enhanced the BCG mediated immune response, resulting in higher protection. MIP booster via aerosol route was found to be more effective in protection than subcutaneous route of booster immunization. Pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-17 were induced at higher level in infected lungs of 'BCG-MIP' group both at mRNA expression level and in secretory form when compared with 'only BCG' group. BCG-MIP groups had increased frequency of multifunctional T cells with high MFI for IFN-γ and TNF-α in Mtb infected mice. Our data demonstrate for the first time, potential application of MIP as a booster to BCG vaccine for efficient protection against tuberculosis. This could be very cost effective strategy for efficient control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2882c Protein Induces Activation of Macrophages through TLR4 and Exhibits Vaccine Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Gyu Choi

    Full Text Available Macrophages constitute the first line of defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are critical in linking innate and adaptive immunity. Therefore, the identification and characterization of mycobacterial proteins that modulate macrophage function are essential for understanding tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we identified the novel macrophage-activating protein, Rv2882c, from M. tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins. Recombinant Rv2882c protein activated macrophages to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and express co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules via Toll-like receptor 4, myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88, and Toll/IL-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta. Mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in Rv2882c-induced macrophage activation. Further, Rv2882c-treated macrophages induced expansion of the effector/memory T cell population and Th1 immune responses. In addition, boosting Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination with Rv2882c improved protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis in our model system. These results suggest that Rv2882c is an antigen that could be used for tuberculosis vaccine development.

  3. Lutein modulates transcription dysregulation of adhesion molecules and spermatogenesis transcription factors induced by testicular ischemia reperfusion injury: it could be SAFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maghrebi, May; Renno, Waleed M; Al-Somali, Hoda F; Botras, Marina S; Qadhi, Iman N

    2016-05-01

    Testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (tIRI) is considered as the underlying mechanism of testicular torsion, which can cause male infertility. tIRI-induced damage was investigated by assessing the gene expression of spermatogenesis master transcription factors (TFs) and that of major adhesion molecules of the blood-testis barrier. The effect of lutein, a hydroxyl carotenoid, in alleviating tIRI-induced damage was also studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, unilateral tIRI, and tIRI + lutein (0.2 mg/kg). tIRI was induced by occlusion of the testicular artery for 1 h, followed by 4 h of reperfusion. Lutein was injected 15 min after the start of ischemia. Histological analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed significant decreases in tissue biopsy scores, reduced seminiferous tubule diameters, and downregulated the mRNA expression of the TFs cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), TATA box-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2), and regulatory factor X 2 (RFX2) compared with the sham group. Lutein treatment reversed these effects. The mRNA expression of the adhesion molecules N-cadherin, nectin-2, claudin-11, occludin, and connexin-43 was significantly downregulated during tIRI, but this change was prevented by lutein treatment. In addition, lutein normalized the tIRI-induced increase in total antioxidant capacity, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, augmented number of TdT-mediated dUTP-X nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive nuclei, and activated caspase-8 pathway. The components of survivor activating factor enhancement (SAFE) were also activated during tIRI. Increased tissue expression of TNF-α and its receptor, TNFR1, was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) and STAT3, which was prevented by lutein treatment. Our findings suggested that tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage may involve modulation of the SAFE pathway and could benefit from lutein treatment.

  4. Intraspleen Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Coding for Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) of Brucella abortus Induces SOD-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Andrews, Edilia; Rivers, Rodolfo; González-Smith, Andrés; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Folch, Hugo; Céspedes, Sandra; Oñate, Angel A.

    2004-01-01

    In the development of vaccines capable of providing immunity against brucellosis, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been demonstrated to be one of the protective immunogens of Brucella abortus. In an earlier study, we provided strong evidence that intramuscular injection with a plasmid DNA carrying the SOD gene (pcDNA-SOD) was able to induce a protective immune response. The present study was designed to characterize T-cell immune responses after an intraspleen (i.s.) vaccination of BALB/c mice with pcDNA-SOD. Animals vaccinated with pcDNA-SOD did not develop SOD-specific antibodies, at least until week 4 after immunization (the end of the experiment), and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with either recombinant Cu-Zn SOD or crude Brucella protein induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin-4, and elicited the induction of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity. Upon analyzing the SOD-specific T-cell responses, the pcDNA-SOD vaccination was found to be stimulating both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell populations. However, only the CD4+ population was able to produce IFN-γ and only the CD8+ population was able to induce cytotoxic activity. Nevertheless, although i.s. route vaccination induces a significant level of protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with the virulent B. abortus strain 2308, vaccination by the intramuscular route with a similar amount of plasmid DNA does not protect. Based on these results, we conclude that i.s. immunization with pcDNA-SOD vaccine efficiently induced a Th1 type of immune response and a protective response that could be related to IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity against infected cells by SOD-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. PMID:15039330

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 - a MSP3-GLURP fusion protein malaria vaccine candidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esen, Meral; Kremsner, Peter G; Schleucher, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In highly endemic regions infants, children and pregnant women are mostly affected. An effective malaria vaccine would complement existing malaria control strategies because it can be integrated in existing immunization programs easily....... Here we present the results of the first phase Ia clinical trial of GMZ2 adjuvanted in aluminium hydroxide. GMZ2 is a malaria vaccine candidate, designed upon the rationale to induce immune responses against asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum similar to those encountered in semi...... is a safe and immunogenic malaria vaccine candidate suitable for further clinical development....

  6. Vaccination with Salmonella Typhi recombinant outer membrane protein 28 induces humoral but non-protective immune response in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani Saxena

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Typhoid is one of the most important food and water borne disease causing millions of deaths over the world. Presently, there is no cost effective vaccine available in India. The outer-membrane proteins (Omps of Salmonella have been exhibited as a potential candidate for development of subunit vaccine against typhoid. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of recombinant Omp 28 protein for immunization of rabbit to elucidate its protection against virulent Salmonella Typhi. Materials and Methods: Immune potential of recombinant Omp28 was tested in New Zealand Rabbits. Rabbits were divided into two groups, i.e., control and test group. Control group was injected with phosphate buffer saline with adjuvant while test group were injected with recombinant Omp28 along with adjuvant. Rabbits were bleed and serum was collected from each rabbit. Serum was tested by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for humoral response. Rabbits were challenged with virulent culture to test the protective immunity. Results: Humoral response was provoked at 15th day and maintained till 30th day. The mean ELISA titer at 15th day was 1 : 28000 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4472 and on the 30th day was 1 : 25866 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4127. Protective immune potential of Omp 28 was assessed by challenge studies in rabbits for which vaccinated and control rabbits were challenged with 109 cells of virulent culture of S. Typhi. In control group, out of six, no rabbit could survive after 48 days while in vaccinated group, three out of six rabbit were survived. Conclusion: Immunization of rabbit with recombinant Omp 28 induced a strong humoral response which was exhibited by high antibody titer in ELISA. Subsequently, intraperitoneal homologous challenge of the immunized New Zealand rabbit resulted in lack of significant protection. These findings indicate that Omp 28 though provoked the humoral immunity but could not provide the protective immunity in

  7. A booster vaccine expressing a latency-associated antigen augments BCG induced immunity and confers enhanced protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bappaditya Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of a consistent protection against tuberculosis (TB in children, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG fails to provide adequate protection against the disease in adults as well as against reactivation of latent infections or exogenous reinfections. It has been speculated that failure to generate adequate memory T cell response, elicitation of inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens and inability to impart long-term immunity against M. tuberculosis infections are some of the key factors responsible for the limited efficiency of BCG in controlling TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the ability of a DNA vaccine expressing α-crystallin--a key latency antigen of M. tuberculosis to boost the BCG induced immunity. 'BCG prime-DNA boost' regimen (B/D confers robust protection in guinea pigs along with a reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination (1.37 log(10 and 1.96 log(10 fewer bacilli in lungs and spleen, respectively; p<0.01. In addition, B/D regimen also confers enhanced protection in mice. Further, we show that B/D immunization in mice results in a heightened frequency of PPD and antigen specific multi-functional CD4 T cells (3(+ simultaneously producing interferon (IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of α-crystallin based B/D regimen over BCG. Our study, also demonstrates that protection against TB is predictable by an increased frequency of 3(+ Th1 cells with superior effector functions. We anticipate that this study would significantly contribute towards the development of superior booster vaccines for BCG vaccinated individuals. In addition, this regimen can also be expected to reduce the risk of developing active TB due to reactivation of latent infection.

  8. Comparing New-Generation Candidate Vaccines against Human Orthopoxvirus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyutov, R A; Yakubitskyi, S N; Kolosova, I V; Shchelkunov, S N

    2017-01-01

    The lack of immunity to the variola virus in the population, increasingly more frequent cases of human orthopoxvirus infection, and increased risk of the use of the variola virus (VARV) as a bioterrorism agent call for the development of modern, safe vaccines against orthopoxvirus infections. We previously developed a polyvalent DNA vaccine based on five VARV antigens and an attenuated variant of the vaccinia virus (VACV) with targeted deletion of six genes (VACΔ6). Independent experiments demonstrated that triple immunization with a DNA vaccine and double immunization with VACΔ6 provide protection to mice against a lethal dose (10 LD50) of the ectromelia virus (ECTV), which is highly pathogenic for mice. The present work was aimed at comparing the immunity to smallpox generated by various immunization protocols using the DNA vaccine and VACΔ6. It has been established that immunization of mice with a polyvalent DNA vaccine, followed by boosting with recombinant VACΔ6, as well as double immunization with VACΔ6, induces production of VACV-neutralizing antibodies and provides protection to mice against a 150 LD50 dose of ECTV. The proposed immunization protocols can be used to develop safe vaccination strategies against smallpox and other human orthopoxvirus infections.

  9. A vaccine encoding conserved promiscuous HIV CD4 epitopes induces broad T cell responses in mice transgenic to multiple common HLA class II molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Pereira Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Current HIV vaccine approaches are focused on immunogens encoding whole HIV antigenic proteins that mainly elicit cytotoxic CD8+ responses. Mounting evidence points toward a critical role for CD4+ T cells in the control of immunodeficiency virus replication, probably due to cognate help. Vaccine-induced CD4+ T cell responses might, therefore, have a protective effect in HIV replication. In addition, successful vaccines may have to elicit responses to multiple epitopes in a high proportion of vaccinees, to match the highly variable circulating strains of HIV. Using rational vaccine design, we developed a DNA vaccine encoding 18 algorithm-selected conserved, "promiscuous" (multiple HLA-DR-binding B-subtype HIV CD4 epitopes - previously found to be frequently recognized by HIV-infected patients. We assessed the ability of the vaccine to induce broad T cell responses in the context of multiple HLA class II molecules using different strains of HLA class II- transgenic mice (-DR2, -DR4, -DQ6 and -DQ8. Mice displayed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses of significant breadth and magnitude, and 16 out of the 18 encoded epitopes were recognized. By virtue of inducing broad responses against conserved CD4+ T cell epitopes that can be recognized in the context of widely diverse, common HLA class II alleles, this vaccine concept may cope both with HIV genetic variability and increased population coverage. The vaccine may thus be a source of cognate help for HIV-specific CD8+ T cells elicited by conventional immunogens, in a wide proportion of vaccinees.

  10. Implementing rotavirus vaccination in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosham, Mathuram; Nelson, E Anthony S; Bresee, Joseph S

    2007-11-01

    At the 2006 meeting of the Asian Pacific Pediatric Association (APPA), the Asia Pacific regional rotavirus community and international experts strongly recommended that rotavirus vaccines be used in National Immunization Programmes (NIP) in countries in Asia. Two rotavirus vaccine candidates are currently licensed and have been demonstrated to be safe, well tolerated and highly efficacious. Several additional vaccines are in the late stages of development. The conference participants agreed that decisions on the introduction of rotavirus vaccines may require additional disease burden data in some countries and that economic evaluations will help policymakers reach decisions on nationwide rotavirus vaccine implementation. Other potential issues that arise with vaccine implementation, for example, the concomitant use of rotavirus vaccines with other vaccines, were also discussed. Rotavirus vaccines have the potential to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from rotavirus disease and impact children's health in Asia.

  11. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Sun

    Full Text Available B cell activating factor (BAFF is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis. CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response.

  12. Intradermal vaccination for infants and children

    OpenAIRE

    Saitoh, Akihiko; Aizawa, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination induces a more potent immune response and requires lower vaccine doses as compared with standard vaccination routes. To deliver ID vaccines effectively and consistently, an ID delivery device has been developed and is commercially available for adults. The clinical application of ID vaccines for infants and children is much anticipated because children receive several vaccines, on multiple occasions, during infancy and childhood. However, experience with ID vaccin...

  13. Durability of Vaccine-Induced Immunity Against Tetanus and Diphtheria Toxins: A Cross-sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarlund, Erika; Thomas, Archana; Poore, Elizabeth A.; Amanna, Ian J.; Rynko, Abby E.; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Slifka, Mark K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many adult immunization schedules recommend that tetanus and diphtheria vaccination be performed every 10 years. In light of current epidemiological trends of disease incidence and rates of vaccine-associated adverse events, the 10-year revaccination schedule has come into question. Methods. We performed cross-sectional analysis of serum antibody titers in 546 adult subjects stratified by age or sex. All serological results were converted to international units after calibration with international serum standards. Results. Approximately 97% of the population was seropositive to tetanus and diphtheria as defined by a protective serum antibody titer of ≥0.01 IU/mL. Mean antibody titers were 3.6 and 0.35 IU/mL against tetanus and diphtheria, respectively. Antibody responses to tetanus declined with an estimated half-life of 14 years (95% confidence interval, 11–17 years), whereas antibody responses to diphtheria were more long-lived and declined with an estimated half-life of 27 years (18–51 years). Mathematical models combining antibody magnitude and duration predict that 95% of the population will remain protected against tetanus and diphtheria for ≥30 years without requiring further booster vaccination. Conclusions. These studies demonstrate that durable levels of protective antitoxin immunity exist in the majority of vaccinated individuals. Together, this suggests that it may no longer be necessary to administer booster vaccinations every 10 years and that the current adult vaccination schedule for tetanus and diphtheria should be revisited. PMID:27060790

  14. Surgical management of BCG vaccine-induced regional axillary lymphadenitis in HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzi, J T; Sidler, D; Moore, S W

    2008-05-01

    There are as yet no clear surgical guidelines for the management of BCG vaccine-induced regional axillary lymphadenopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of the condition and to suggest possible management strategies. A retrospective study was undertaken of 23 cases of suspected ipsilateral BCG adenitis following neonatal BCG inoculation (2001 - 2004). Diagnosis of a BCG infection was confirmed by culture and/or gastric washout. The age of the patient and mode of presentation, imaging findings, and results of tuberculin skin testing (Mantoux test) were documented. Because of a change in management policy the first group of patients treated by primary surgery were compared with those treated by fine-needle aspiration (FNA). The influence of HIV status on outcome was assessed. Surgical complications and outcome were analysed. Twenty-three children under 13 years of age (mean age 8.8 months, male/female ratio 1.9:1) were evaluated. Eighteen patients tested positive for HIV and 5 were HIV-negative. A positive culture for BCG bacillus was identified in 19 cases (83%) - by FNA (N=13, 68%), on pus swab (N=3, 16%), at surgery (N=1, 5%), and by gastric washing (N=2, 11%). Three HIV-negative children had granulomas on histological examination without a positive culture. Forty-five per cent of the 11 patients treated early in the study period by primary surgery (drainage/biopsy) had complications, which included a difficult anaesthetic induction and technical surgical difficulties. The postoperative incidence of wound dehiscence/infection was extremely high in this group and 18.2% developed postoperative cutaneous sinuses. Following a change in management policy, the following 12 patients, with a comparable HIV incidence, treated by initial conservative management, had a much lower incidence of post-procedural complications. This study confirms a high perioperative complication rate associated with the primary surgical treatment of BCG lymphadenitis in

  15. Non-invasive assessment of the reproductive cycle in free-ranging female African elephants (Loxodonta africana) treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine for inducing anoestrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides Valades, Gabriela; Ganswindt, Andre; Annandale, Henry; Schulman, Martin L; Bertschinger, Henk J

    2012-08-25

    In southern Africa, various options to manage elephant populations are being considered. Immunocontraception is considered to be the most ethically acceptable and logistically feasible method for control of smaller and confined populations. In this regard, the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine has not been investigated in female elephants, although it has been reported to be safe and effective in several domestic and wildlife species. The aims of this study were to monitor the oestrous cycles of free-ranging African elephant cows using faecal progestagen metabolites and to evaluate the efficacy of a GnRH vaccine to induce anoestrus in treated cows. Between May 2009-June 2010, luteal activity of 12 elephant cows was monitored non-invasively using an enzyme immunoassay detecting faecal 5alpha-reduced pregnanes (faecal progestagen metabolites, FPM) on a private game reserve in South Africa. No bulls of breeding age were present on the reserve prior to and for the duration of the study. After a 3-month control period, 8 randomly-selected females were treated twice with 600 micrograms of GnRH vaccine (Improvac®, Pfizer Animal Health, Sandton, South Africa) 5-7 weeks apart. Four of these females had been treated previously with the porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccine for four years (2004-2007). All 12 monitored females (8 treated and 4 controls) showed signs of luteal activity as evidenced by FPM concentrations exceeding individual baseline values more than once. A total of 16 oestrous cycles could be identified in 8 cows with four of these within the 13 to 17 weeks range previously reported for captive African elephants. According to the FPM concentrations the GnRH vaccine was unable to induce anoestrus in the treated cows. Overall FPM levels in samples collected during the wet season (mean 4.03 micrograms/gram dry faeces) were significantly higher (Pelephants. These results indicate that irregular oestrous cycles occur amongst free

  16. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Fukasaka

    Full Text Available A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic and IgA (mucosal antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens.

  17. Novel HIV IL-4R antagonist vaccine strategy can induce both high avidity CD8 T and B cell immunity with greater protective efficacy.

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    Jackson, Ronald J; Worley, Matthew; Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-09-29

    We have established that the efficacy of a heterologous poxvirus vectored HIV vaccine, fowlpox virus (FPV)-HIV gag/pol prime followed by attenuated vaccinia virus (VV)-HIV gag/pol booster immunisation, is strongly influenced by the cytokine milieu at the priming vaccination site, with endogenous IL-13 detrimental to the quality of the HIV specific CD8+ T cell response induced. We have now developed a novel HIV vaccine that co-expresses a C-terminal deletion mutant of the mouse IL-4, deleted for the essential tyrosine (Y119) required for signalling. In our vaccine system, the mutant IL-4C118 can bind to IL-4 type I and II receptors with high affinity, and transiently prevent the signalling of both IL-4 and IL-13 at the vaccination site. When this IL-4C118 adjuvanted vaccine was used in an intranasal rFPV/intramuscular rVV prime-boost immunisation strategy, greatly enhanced mucosal/systemic HIV specific CD8+ T cells with higher functional avidity, expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and greater protective efficacy were detected. Surprisingly, the IL-4C118 adjuvanted vaccines also induced robust long-lived HIV gag-specific serum antibody responses, specifically IgG1 and IgG2a. The p55-gag IgG2a responses induced were of a higher magnitude relative to the IL-13Rα2 adjuvant vaccine. More interestingly, our recently tested IL-13Rα2 adjuvanted vaccine which only inhibited IL-13 activity, even though induced excellent high avidity HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, had a detrimental impact on the induction of gag-specific IgG2a antibody immunity. Our observations suggest that (i) IL-4 cell-signalling in the absence of IL-13 retarded gag-specific antibody isotype class switching, or (ii) IL-13Rα2 signalling was involved in inducing good gag-specific B cell immunity. Thus, we believe our novel IL-4R antagonist adjuvant strategy offers great promise not only for HIV-1 vaccines, but also against a range of chronic infections where sustained high quality mucosal and systemic T and B

  18. The role of Toll-like receptor-4 in pertussis vaccine-induced immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Mooi Frits R; Dormans Jan AMA; Stenger Rachel M; Gremmer Eric R; Banus Sander; Kimman Tjeerd G; Vandebriel Rob J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis is an important causative agent of pertussis, an infectious disease of the respiratory tract. After introduction of whole-cell vaccines (wP) in the 1950's, pertussis incidence has decreased significantly. Because wP were found to be reactogenic, in most developed countries they have been replaced by acellular vaccines (aP). We have previously shown a role for Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) in pertussis-infected mice and the per...

  19. Comparison between immune responses and resistance induced in BALB/c mice vaccinated with RB51 and Rev. 1 vaccines and challenged with Brucella melitensis bv. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, M E R; El-Gibaly, S M; Montasser, A M

    2002-08-02

    BALB/c mice were immunized with live rough Brucella abortus RB51 or smooth Brucella melitensis Rev. 1 vaccines and challenged with a B. melitensis field strain. Protection was assessed by a variety of serological tests and recovery of vaccinal and challenge strains by culture. Mice vaccinated with RB51 gave negative results in the conventional serological tests prior to challenge, namely; standard tube agglutination test (SAT), Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT), buffered acidified plate antigen test (BAPAT), and mercaptoethanol test (MET). Sero-conversion took place to a whole-cell bacterial buffered RB51 antigen after vaccination and persisted for 7 weeks post-vaccination. Mice challenged with B. melitensis were assessed for bacterial load and immune response for 12 weeks after challenge. Protection units were showed that Rev. 1 vaccine was superior to RB51 vaccine in protection of mice against B. melitensis. However, RB51 vaccine has the advantage that it would not elicit antibodies to standard serological tests based on the LPS O antigen. RB51 vaccine could therefore be used for control of B. melitensis infection and avoid confusion in the use of standard sero-diagnostic tests.

  20. Malaria vaccine R&D in the Decade of Vaccines: breakthroughs, challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Ashley J; Moorthy, Vasee S; Loucq, Christian; Chitnis, Chetan E; Kaslow, David C

    2013-04-18

    While recent progress has been made in reducing malaria mortality with other interventions, vaccines are still urgently needed to further reduce the incidence of clinical disease, including during pregnancy, and to provide "herd protection" by blocking parasite transmission. The most clinically advanced candidate, RTS,S, is presently undergoing Phase 3 evaluation in young African children across 13 clinical sites in eight African countries. In the 12-month period following vaccination, RTS,S conferred approximately 50% protection from clinical Plasmodium falciparum disease in children aged 5-17 months, and approximately 30% protection in children aged 6-12 weeks when administered in conjunction with Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) vaccines. The development of more highly efficacious vaccines to prevent clinical disease caused by both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, as well as vaccines to support elimination efforts by inducing immunity that blocks malaria parasite transmission, are priorities. Some key barriers to malaria vaccine development include: a paucity of well-characterized target immunogens and an absence of clear correlates of protection to enable vaccine development targeting all stages of the P. falciparum and P. vivax lifecycles; a limited number of safe and effective delivery systems, including adjuvants, that induce potent, long-lived protective immunity, be it by antibody, CD4+, and/or CD8+ T cell responses; and, for vaccines designed to provide "herd protection" by targeting sexual stage and/or mosquito antigens, the lack of a clear clinical and regulatory pathway to licensure using non-traditional endpoints. Recommendations to overcome these, and other key challenges, are suggested in this document. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies.

  2. Vaccination and public trust: A model for the dissemination of vaccination behaviour with external intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorso, Claudio O.; Medus, Andrés; Balenzuela, Pablo

    2017-09-01

    Vaccination is widely recognized as the most effective way of immunization against many infectious diseases. However, unfounded claims about supposed side effects of some vaccines have contributed to spread concern and fear among people, thus inducing vaccination refusal. MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine coverage has undergone an important decrease in a large part of Europe and US as a consequence of erroneously alleged side effects, leading to recent measles outbreaks. There is evidence that clusterization of unvaccinated individuals may lead to epidemics way larger that the ones that might appear in the case that unvaccinated agents are distributed at random in the population. In this work we explore the emergence of those clusters as a consequence of the social interaction driven mainly by homophily, where vaccination behaviour is part of a process of cultural dissemination in the spirit of Axelrod's model. The ingredients of this calculation encompass: (i) interacting agents which are to decide if they vaccinate or not their children, (ii) their interaction with a small subset of stubborn agents who believe that the MMR vaccine is not safe and (iii) government sponsored propaganda trying to convince people of the benefits of vaccination. We find that these clusters, which emerge as a dynamical outcome of the model, are the responsible of the increasing probability of the occurrence of measles outbreaks, even in scenarios where the WHO (World Health Organization) recommendation of 95% vaccine coverage is fulfilled. However, we also illustrate that the mitigating effect of a public health campaign, could effectively reduce the impact and size of outbreaks.

  3. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M; Mollers, Madelief; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA) for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (pHPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  4. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Scherpenisse

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. METHODS: Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. RESULTS: Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (p<0.0001. IgG1 and IgG3 were found to be the predominant subclasses observed after HPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. CONCLUSION: Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  5. Administration of Poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and Avian Beta Defensin as Adjuvants in Inactivated Inclusion Body Hepatitis Virus and its Hexon Protein-Based Experimental Vaccine Formulations in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Arshud; Tipu, Masroor; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andy; Gerdts, Volker; Tikoo, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is one of the major infectious diseases adversely affecting the poultry industry of the United States and Canada. Currently, no effective and safe vaccine is available for the control of IBH virus (IBHV) infection in chickens. However, based on the excellent safety and immunogenic profiles of experimental veterinary vaccines developed with the use of new generation adjuvants, we hypothesized that characterization of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV or its capsid protein hexon as antigens, along with poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and avian beta defensin 2 (ABD2) as vaccine adjuvants, will be helpful in development of an effective and safe vaccine formulation for IBH. Our data demonstrated that experimental administration of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV and a mixture of PCEP with or without ABD2 as an adjuvant induced significantly higher antibody responses compared with other vaccine formulations, while hexon protein-based vaccine formulations showed relatively lower levels of antibody responses. Thus, a vaccine formulation containing inactivated IBHV with PCEP or a mixture of PCEP and ABD2 (with a reduced dosage of PCEP) as an adjuvant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate. However, in order to overcome the risks associated with whole virus inactivated vaccines, characterization of additional viral capsid proteins, including fiber protein and penton of IBHV along with hexon protein in combination with more new generation adjuvants, will be helpful in further improvements of vaccines against IBHV infection.

  6. Anti-caries DNA vaccine-induced secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies inhibit formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Xu, Qing-an; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ming-wen; Li, Yu-hong

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effects of anti-caries DNA vaccine-induced salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adherence and biofilms formation in vitro. Adult female Wistar rats were intranasally immunized with the anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX. Their saliva samples were collected at different times after the immunization, and S-IgA antibody level in the saliva and its inhibition on S. mutans adherence were examined. The effects of S-IgA in the saliva with the strongest inhibitory effects were examined at 3 different stages, ie acquired pellicles, biofilm formation and production of mature biofilms. The number of viable bacteria and depth of the biofilm at 16 h in each stage were determined using counting colony forming units and using a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The participation of S-IgA in acquired pellicles and its aggregation with S. mutans were also observed under CLSM. The S-IgA titer in saliva reached its peak and exhibited the strongest inhibition on S. mutans adhesion at 10 weeks after the immunization. The colonies and depth of the biofilm in the saliva-pretreated group were 41.79% and 41.02%, respectively, less than the control group. The colonies and depth of the biofilm in the co-culture group were 27.4% and 22.81% less than the control group. The assembly of S. mutans and S-IgA was observed under CLSM after co-cultivation. In the mature-stage biofilm, no differences were observed between the different groups. These results demonstrate that the anti-caries DNA vaccine induces the production of specific S-IgA antibodies that may prevent dental caries by inhibiting the initial adherence of S. mutans onto tooth surfaces, thereby reducing the accumulation of S. mutans on the acquired pellicles.

  7. Anti-caries DNA vaccine-induced secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies inhibit formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Xu, Qing-an; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ming-wen; Li, Yu-hong

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of anti-caries DNA vaccine-induced salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adherence and biofilms formation in vitro. Methods: Adult female Wistar rats were intranasally immunized with the anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX. Their saliva samples were collected at different times after the immunization, and S-IgA antibody level in the saliva and its inhibition on S. mutans adherence were examined. The effects of S-IgA in the saliva with the strongest inhibitory effects were examined at 3 different stages, ie acquired pellicles, biofilm formation and production of mature biofilms. The number of viable bacteria and depth of the biofilm at 16 h in each stage were determined using counting colony forming units and using a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The participation of S-IgA in acquired pellicles and its aggregation with S. mutans were also observed under CLSM. Results: The S-IgA titer in saliva reached its peak and exhibited the strongest inhibition on S. mutans adhesion at 10 weeks after the immunization. The colonies and depth of the biofilm in the saliva-pretreated group were 41.79% and 41.02%, respectively, less than the control group. The colonies and depth of the biofilm in the co-culture group were 27.4% and 22.81% less than the control group. The assembly of S. mutans and S-IgA was observed under CLSM after co-cultivation. In the mature-stage biofilm, no differences were observed between the different groups. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the anti-caries DNA vaccine induces the production of specific S-IgA antibodies that may prevent dental caries by inhibiting the initial adherence of S. mutans onto tooth surfaces, thereby reducing the accumulation of S. mutans on the acquired pellicles. PMID:23274411

  8. A tetravalent virus-like particle vaccine designed to display domain III of dengue envelope proteins induces multi-serotype neutralizing antibodies in mice and macaques which confer protection against antibody dependent enhancement in AG129 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Ramasamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the fastest spreading vector-borne diseases, caused by four antigenically distinct dengue viruses (DENVs. Antibodies against DENVs are responsible for both protection as well as pathogenesis. A vaccine that is safe for and efficacious in all people irrespective of their age and domicile is still an unmet need. It is becoming increasingly apparent that vaccine design must eliminate epitopes implicated in the induction of infection-enhancing antibodies.We report a Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue immunogen, DSV4, based on DENV envelope protein domain III (EDIII, which contains well-characterized serotype-specific and cross-reactive epitopes. In natural infection, <10% of the total neutralizing antibody response is EDIII-directed. Yet, this is a functionally relevant domain which interacts with the host cell surface receptor. DSV4 was designed by in-frame fusion of EDIII of all four DENV serotypes and hepatitis B surface (S antigen and co-expressed with unfused S antigen to form mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs. These VLPs displayed EDIIIs of all four DENV serotypes based on probing with a battery of serotype-specific anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies. The DSV4 VLPs were highly immunogenic, inducing potent and durable neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes encompassing multiple genotypes, in mice and macaques. DSV4-induced murine antibodies suppressed viremia in AG129 mice and conferred protection against lethal DENV-4 virus challenge. Further, neither murine nor macaque anti-DSV4 antibodies promoted mortality or inflammatory cytokine production when passively transferred and tested in an in vivo dengue disease enhancement model of AG129 mice.Directing the immune response to a non-immunodominant but functionally relevant serotype-specific dengue epitope of the four DENV serotypes, displayed on a VLP platform, can help minimize the risk of inducing disease-enhancing antibodies while eliciting effective tetravalent

  9. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

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    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  10. Cold-induced aqueous acetonitrile phase separation: A salt-free way to begin quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Gang; Agar, Jeffrey; Giese, Roger W

    2017-07-14

    Cooling a 1:1 (v/v) solution of acetonitrile and water at -16° C is known to result in two clear phases. We will refer to this event as "cold-induced aqueous acetonitrile phase separation (CIPS)". On a molar basis, acetonitrile is 71.7% and 13.6% in the upper and lower phases, respectively, in our study. The phase separation proceeds as a descending cloud of microdroplets. At the convenient temperature (typical freezer) employed here the lower phase is rather resistant to solidification, although it emerges from the freezer as a solid if various insoluble matter is present at the outset. In a preliminary way, we replaced the initial (salting-out) step of a representative QuEChERS procedure with CIPS, applying this modified procedure ("CIPS-QuEChERS") to a homogenate of salmon (and partly to beef). Three phases resulted, where only the upper, acetonitrile-rich phase is a liquid (that is completely clear). The middle phase comprises ice and precipitated lipids, while the lower phase is the residual matrix of undissolved salmon or meat. Treating the upper phase from salmon, after isolation, with anhydrous MgSO4 and C18-Si (typical QuEChERS dispersive solid phase extraction sorbents), and injecting into a GC-MS in a nontargeted mode, gives two-fold more preliminary hits for chemicals, and also number of spiked pesticides recovered, relative to that from a comparable QuEChERS method. In part, this is because of much higher background signals in the latter case. Further study of CIPS-QuEChERS is encouraged, including taking advantage of other QuERChERS conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Prostate cancer cell vaccine transfected with 4-1BBL induces anti-tumor immunity in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, You-lin; Weng, Xiao-dong; Liu, Xiu-heng; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Zhu, Heng-cheng; Jiang, Bo-tao

    2010-09-01

    To explore the anti-tumor immunity in vitro induced by prostate cancer cell vaccine transfected with recombinant adenovirus encoding 4-1BBL in mice. The replication-deficient adenovirus AdEasy-1 system was used to construct recombinant adenovirus Ad-m4-1BBL and Ad-eGFP. The prostate cancer cell RM-1 of mice was transfected with Ad-m4-1BBL and Ad-eGFP, and treated with mitomycin (MMC) to produce TCV, TCV-Ad-eGFP and TCV-Ad-m4-1BBL, followed by co-culture with syngeneic murine spleen cells. Then the cytotoxic activity of the lymphocytes against RM-1 cells was analyzed with CCK-8 solution, and IL-2 and INF-gamma were detected by ELISA. The 4-1BBL protein was highly expressed in the TCV-Ad-m4-1BBL of the 4-1BBL-transfected mice. TCV-Ad-m4-1BBL significantly increased the expressions of IL-2 ([180.24 +/- 2.22] pg/ml) and INF-gamma ([1512.46 +/- 23.64] pg/ml) as compared with TCV and TCV-Ad-eGFP (P m4-1BBL-expressing prostate cancer cell vaccine can effectively induce anti-tumor immune responses.

  12. Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work in small animal laboratory models of tuberculosis have shown that vaccination strategies based on heterologous prime-boost protocols using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to prime and Modified Vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA85A) or recombinant attenuated adenoviruses (Ad8...

  13. Sublingual immunization with M2-based vaccine induces broad protective immunity against influenza

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choi, Young Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Lee, Eu-Gene; Jeon, Yoon Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Cheon, In Su; Joo, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Chung Hwan; Song, Min-Suk; Seo, Sang-Uk; Byun, Young-Ho; Park, Hae-Jung; Poo, Haryoung; Seong, Baik Lin; Kim, Jae Ouk; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Stadler, Konrad; Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Kee-Jong; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Song, Man Ki

    2011-01-01

    The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza A virus is a rationale target antigen candidate for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza as M2e undergoes little sequence variation amongst human influenza A strains...

  14. CBPP T 1 44/T 1 SR vaccine induced immune response in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Gambia experienced a sudden epidemic outbreak of Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in cattle in August 2012 after its last reported cases in 1971. The objective of this study was to monitor the immunological response in terms of antibody detection in vaccinated cattle against CBPP using freeze-dried live ...

  15. Genomic analysis of chimeric human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates derived from strains Towne and Toledo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Nicolás M; Lau, Betty; Kemble, George M; Lee, Ronzo; Mocarski, Edward S; Wilkinson, Gavin W G; Adler, Stuart P; McVoy, Michael A; Davison, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients and a major cause of congenital birth defects when acquired in utero. In the 1990s, four chimeric viruses were constructed by replacing genome segments of the high passage Towne strain with segments of the low passage Toledo strain, with the goal of obtaining live attenuated vaccine candidates that remained safe but were more immunogenic than the overly attenuated Towne vaccine. The chimeras were found to be safe when administered to HCMV-seronegative human volunteers, but to differ significantly in their ability to induce seroconversion. This suggests that chimera-specific genetic differences impacted the ability to replicate or persist in vivo and the consequent ability to induce an antibody response. To identify specific genomic breakpoints between Towne and Toledo sequences and establish whether spontaneous mutations or rearrangements had occurred during construction of the chimeras, complete genome sequences were determined. No major deletions or rearrangements were observed, although a number of unanticipated mutations were identified. However, no clear association emerged between the genetic content of the chimeras and the reported levels of vaccine-induced HCMV-specific humoral or cellular immune responses, suggesting that multiple genetic determinants are likely to impact immunogenicity. In addition to revealing the genome organization of the four vaccine candidates, this study provided an opportunity to probe the genetics of HCMV attenuation in humans. The results may be valuable in the future design of safe live or replication-defective vaccines that optimize immunogenicity and efficacy.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Repertoire-Scale Immunoglobulin Properties in Vaccine-Induced B-Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja V. Khavrutskii

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the next-generation sequencing of B-cell receptors (BCRs enable the characterization of humoral responses at a repertoire-wide scale and provide the capability for identifying unique features of immune repertoires in response to disease, vaccination, or infection. Immunosequencing now readily generates 103–105 sequences per sample; however, statistical analysis of these repertoires is challenging because of the high genetic diversity of BCRs and the elaborate clonal relationships among them. To date, most immunosequencing analyses have focused on reporting qualitative trends in immunoglobulin (Ig properties, such as usage or somatic hypermutation (SHM percentage of the Ig heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segment family, and on reducing complex Ig property distributions to simple summary statistics. However, because Ig properties are typically not normally distributed, any approach that fails to assess the distribution as a whole may be inadequate in (1 properly assessing the statistical significance of repertoire differences, (2 identifying how two repertoires differ, and (3 determining appropriate confidence intervals for assessing the size of the differences and their potential biological relevance. To address these issues, we have developed a technique that uses Wilcox’ robust statistics toolbox to identify statistically significant vaccine-specific differences between Ig repertoire properties. The advantage of this technique is that it can determine not only whether but also where the distributions differ, even when the Ig repertoire properties are non-normally distributed. We used this technique to characterize murine germinal center (GC B-cell repertoires in response to a complex Ebola virus-like particle (eVLP vaccine candidate with known protective efficacy. The eVLP-mediated GC B-cell responses were highly diverse, consisting of thousands of clonotypes. Despite this staggering diversity, we identified statistically

  17. STAT3-blocked whole-cell hepatoma vaccine induces cellular and humoral immune response against HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuju Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-cell tumor vaccines have shown much promise; however, only limited success has been achieved for the goal of eliciting robust tumor-specific T-cell responses. Methods Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells, H22 and Hepa1–6, were modified by blocking the STAT3 signaling pathway with a STAT3 decoy oligodeoxynucleotide, and the immunogenicity and possibility of using these cell lysates as a vaccine were evaluated. Results STAT3-blocked whole HCC cell lysates inhibited tumor growth and tumorigenesis, and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. In addition, STAT3-blocked whole HCC cell lysates stimulated the activation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells, and enhanced the infiltration of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the tumor tissues. In addition, the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs was enhanced, which promoted the generation of immunological memory against HCC. Furthermore, secondary immune responses could be primed as soon as these immunized mice were challenged with HCC cells, accompanied by T cell and NK cell activation and infiltration. Additionally, immunization with this vaccine decreased the generation of Tregs and the production of TGF-β and IL-10. Importantly, STAT3-blocked whole HCC cell lysates prevented HCC-mediated exhaustion of T cells and NK cells, showing low expression of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1 and TIGIT on T cells and NK cells in the immunized mice. Conclusions The newly generated STAT3-blocked whole-cell HCC vaccine has potential for cancer cell vaccination.

  18. Antibody induced by one-dose varicella vaccine soon became weak in children: evidence from a cross-sectional seroepidemiological survey in Beijing, PRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Luodan; Lu, Li; Chen, Meng; Pang, Xinghuo

    2015-11-10

    Numerous post-licensure studies, mostly from field epidemiological evidences such as outbreak surveys, have demonstrated the effectivenesss and insufficiency of one-dose varicella vaccine in outbreak control. Serological evidence of immunization failure is, however, relatively less reported in contrast. A cross-sectional seroepidemiological survey of Beijing residents was performed in 2012 in the People's Republic of China, after the one-dose varicella vaccine had been widely used for several years. Multistage stratified random sampling method was designed to recruit 2 144 subjects. The ELISA method was used to test the present blood samples collected and the reserve samples collected in 2008 to assess the trends of anti-VZV seroprevalence in the past 5 years and to determine the risk factors for varicella infection. The age- and sex- adjusted overall anti-VZV seropositivity of Beijing residents in 2012 was 84.5%. Two groups' adjusted overall anti-VZV seroprevalence in 2012 showed obvious growth compared with 2008 (groups, respectively. Of subjects who had received the one-dose vaccine, 36% (216/603) showed negative anti-VZV concentrations (anti-VZV concentrations were in the lowest positive concentration group (110-299 mIU/mL). Seropositivity in permanent residents of 1-9 yr old with verified vaccination was merely 61.8%. Various age groups (1-3 yr, 4-6 yr, and 7-9 yr) all showed seropositivity that gradually decreased with increasing of the interval between vaccination and blood sampling. Mass varicella vaccination significantly improved the immunity of younger Beijing residents. However, vaccine-induced anti-VZV antibody soon became weak in children with high coverage (approximately 80%) after vaccination for several years which is significantly higher than reported in pre-licensure studies. A government-funded 2-dose immunization program with mandatory vaccination schedule for Beijing residents may need consideration in the near future.

  19. Human CD4+ T Cell Responses to an Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Parallel Those Induced by Natural Infection in Magnitude, HLA Restriction, and Antigen Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Michael A.; Grifoni, Alba; O'Rourke, Patrick H.; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; de Silva, Aruna D.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Diehl, Sean A.; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Durbin, Anna P.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for growing numbers of infections worldwide and has proven to be a significant challenge for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a dengue live attenuated virus (DLAV) vaccine resemble those observed after natural infection. In this study, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors vaccinated with a tetravalent DLAV vaccine (TV005) with pools of dengue virus-derived predicted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding peptides. The definition of CD4+ T cell responses after live vaccination is important because CD4+ T cells are known contributors to host immunity, including cytokine production, help for CD8+ T and B cells, and direct cytotoxicity against infected cells. While responses to all antigens were observed, DENV-specific CD4+ T cells were focused predominantly on the capsid and nonstructural NS3 and NS5 antigens. Importantly, CD4+ T cell responses in vaccinees were similar in magnitude and breadth to those after natural infection, recognized the same antigen hierarchy, and had similar profiles of HLA restriction. We conclude that TV005 vaccination has the capacity to elicit CD4+ cell responses closely mirroring those observed in a population associated with natural immunity. IMPORTANCE The development of effective vaccination strategies against dengue virus infection is of high global public health interest. Here we study the CD4 T cell responses elicited by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine and show that they resemble responses seen in humans naturally exposed to dengue virus. This is an important issue, since it is likely that optimal immunity induced by a vaccine requires induction of CD4+ responses against the same antigens as those recognized as dominant in natural infection. Detailed knowledge of the T cell response may further contribute to the identification of robust correlates of protection against dengue

  20. Human CD4+T Cell Responses to an Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Parallel Those Induced by Natural Infection in Magnitude, HLA Restriction, and Antigen Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Michael A; Grifoni, Alba; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; de Silva, Aruna D; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Diehl, Sean A; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for growing numbers of infections worldwide and has proven to be a significant challenge for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that CD8 + T cell responses elicited by a dengue live attenuated virus (DLAV) vaccine resemble those observed after natural infection. In this study, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors vaccinated with a tetravalent DLAV vaccine (TV005) with pools of dengue virus-derived predicted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding peptides. The definition of CD4 + T cell responses after live vaccination is important because CD4 + T cells are known contributors to host immunity, including cytokine production, help for CD8 + T and B cells, and direct cytotoxicity against infected cells. While responses to all antigens were observed, DENV-specific CD4 + T cells were focused predominantly on the capsid and nonstructural NS3 and NS5 antigens. Importantly, CD4 + T cell responses in vaccinees were similar in magnitude and breadth to those after natural infection, recognized the same antigen hierarchy, and had similar profiles of HLA restriction. We conclude that TV005 vaccination has the capacity to elicit CD4 + cell responses closely mirroring those observed in a population associated with natural immunity. IMPORTANCE The development of effective vaccination strategies against dengue virus infection is of high global public health interest. Here we study the CD4 T cell responses elicited by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine and show that they resemble responses seen in humans naturally exposed to dengue virus. This is an important issue, since it is likely that optimal immunity induced by a vaccine requires induction of CD4 + responses against the same antigens as those recognized as dominant in natural infection. Detailed knowledge of the T cell response may further contribute to the identification of robust correlates of protection against dengue

  1. Immunization of humans with polysaccharide vaccines induces systemic, predominantly polymeric IgA2-subclass antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, A; Lue, C; Moldoveanu, Z; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J

    1990-05-15

    Ig class- and IgA subclass-specific immune responses to protein and polysaccharide Ag were studied in serum, external secretions, and at the single cell level in peripheral blood of systemically immunized adults. Immunization with tetanus toxoid induced predominantly IgG antibody responses in serum and in the PBMC. The IgA antibody response was low, and was mostly of the IgA1 subclass. In contrast, immunization with polysaccharide Ag (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A, C, Y, W-135, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides) elicited a major IgA response predominantly of the IgA2 isotype. Analysis of the molecular forms of secreted IgA antibodies indicated that polymers were produced early after immunization, irrespective of the nature of the Ag. When compared with serum antibody and to PBMC cell responses, systemic immunization with polysaccharides induced a minor salivary response dominated by IgG and IgM antibodies. In contrast, the presence of antipolysaccharide antibodies in bile, irrespective of their isotype, paralleled the serum response 14 days after the immunization with polysaccharide Ag. These results suggest that biliary Ig were mostly derived from serum. Different patterns of the expression of MHC class II Ag on T cells, B cells, and monocytes during the course of immunization with protein or polysaccharide Ag were observed: whereas protein Ag induced a high frequency of HLA-DP- and HLA-DR-expressing cells early in the course of immunization, polysaccharide vaccines elicited low and protracted increases of HLA-DP+ T cells. Polysaccharide vaccine covalently coupled to a protein carrier induced a higher frequency of antipolysaccharide antibody-secreting cells in peripheral blood and increased the IgG to IgA ratio among polysaccharide-specific antibody-secreting cells.

  2. Live attenuated influenza vaccine provides superior protection from heterologous infection in pigs with maternal antibodies without inducing vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the US is hindered since inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants co-circulating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be further limited when administered to young pigs that possess maternally deriv...

  3. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  4. The patterns of in vitro cell-death and inflammatory cytokines induced by distinct BCG vaccine strains are differentially induced in human mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, C; Hacker, M; Moraes, M; Castello-Branco, L; Silva, F; Antas, P

    2018-01-02

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains among the world's leading cause of mortality. For its control, studies of TB vaccines are needed. Since live-attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only TB vaccine currently in use, studies on the protective role of BCG are required. In this study, we analyzed host cells purified directly from whole blood of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative volunteers, comprising adult healthy donors (HD) and neonates (umbilical cord bloods, UCB), with the aim to directly compare in vitro immune responses with distinct BCG strains in human mononuclear cells. The Moreau, Pasteur, and Danish BCG strains were used to infect mononuclear cells in vitro for 48 h; bacilli viability and cell-death were subsequently detected by flow cytometry. In addition, cell culture supernatants were used in cytokine detection assays. Overall, the Moreau BCG strain induced higher levels of apoptosis than the Pasteur and Danish BCG strains in both the HD and UCB groups (p-value BCG infection. The Moreau BCG strain, exclusively, induced Th1 cytokines at the highest levels in cells from adults (p-value BCG strains, whereas TGF-β1 levels were reduced significantly (p-value BCG vaccine. As expected, eight out of 22 pro-inflammatory cytokines were secreted at significant levels (p-value BCG-infected cell cultures, in the HD group only. When analyzing these results, we excluded confounding factors related to storage and viability of the BCG strains used. These findings suggest that Moreau BCG is a more potent immunostimulating agent than the Pasteur and Danish BCG strains. Clinical trials will be needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril; Thomsen, Joakim S.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13-23. Background Alternative influenza vaccines...... in the vaccine formulations. Objective In this study, we compared the ability of pandemic influenza DNA vaccines to induce immunity against distantly related strains within a subtype with the immunity induced by conventional trivalent protein vaccines against homologous virus challenge. Methods Ferrets were...... immunised by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were...

  6. A synthetic adjuvant to enhance and expand immune responses to influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, Rhea N; Baldwin, Susan L; Shaverdian, Narek; Bertholet, Sylvie; Reed, Steven J; Raman, Vanitha S; Lu, Xiuhua; DeVos, Joshua; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Vedvick, Thomas S; Duthie, Malcolm S; Clegg, Christopher H; Van Hoeven, Neal; Reed, Steven G

    2010-10-27

    Safe, effective adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency, including induction of neutralizing Abs against a broad range of variant strains, is an important strategy for the development of seasonal influenza vaccines which can provide optimal protection, even during seasons when available vaccines are not well matched to circulating viruses. We investigated the safety and ability of Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE), a synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 agonist formulation, to adjuvant Fluzone® in mice and non-human primates. The GLA-SE adjuvanted Fluzone vaccine caused no adverse reactions, increased the induction of T helper type 1 (T(H)1)-biased cytokines such as IFNγ, TNF and IL-2, and broadened serological responses against drifted A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza variants. These results suggest that synthetic TLR4 adjuvants can enhance the magnitude and quality of protective immunity induced by influenza vaccines.

  7. A synthetic adjuvant to enhance and expand immune responses to influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea N Coler

    Full Text Available Safe, effective adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency, including induction of neutralizing Abs against a broad range of variant strains, is an important strategy for the development of seasonal influenza vaccines which can provide optimal protection, even during seasons when available vaccines are not well matched to circulating viruses. We investigated the safety and ability of Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE, a synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR4 agonist formulation, to adjuvant Fluzone® in mice and non-human primates. The GLA-SE adjuvanted Fluzone vaccine caused no adverse reactions, increased the induction of T helper type 1 (T(H1-biased cytokines such as IFNγ, TNF and IL-2, and broadened serological responses against drifted A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza variants. These results suggest that synthetic TLR4 adjuvants can enhance the magnitude and quality of protective immunity induced by influenza vaccines.

  8. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Karen A; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A; Tindle, Robert W

    2004-02-20

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses.

  9. Mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system