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Sample records for upper thoracic compression

  1. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Mollá, Enrique; Costa, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6 +/- 14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P < 0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated ( P = 0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together ( P < 0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms.

  2. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain

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    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Costa, Salvador [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Clinica Quiron, Avda Blasco Ibanez 14, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Department of Morphological Sciences, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6{+-}14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P<0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated (P=0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together (P<0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  3. Upper thoracic-spine disc degeneration in patients with cervical pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Costa, Salvador; Molla, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    To study the relationship of upper thoracic spine degenerative disc contour changes on MR imaging in patients with neck pain. The relation between upper thoracic and cervical spine degenerative disc disease is not well established. One hundred and fifty-six patients referred with cervical pain were studied. There were 73 women and 77 men with a mean age of 48.6±14.6 years (range, 19 to 83 years). All MR studies were performed with a large 23-cm FOV covering at least from the body of T4 to the clivus. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion/bulge or extrusion. Degenerative thoracic disc contour changes were observed in 13.4% of patients with cervical pain. T2-3 was the most commonly affected level of the upper thoracic spine, with 15 bulge/protrusions and one extrusion. Upper degenerative thoracic disc contour changes presented in older patients than the cervical levels (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P<0.001). Degenerative disc contour changes at the C7-T1, T1-2, T2-3 and T3-4 levels were significantly correlated (P=0.001), but unrelated to any other disc disease, patient's gender or age. Degenerative cervical disc disease was closely related together (P<0.001), but not with any thoracic disc. A statistically significant relation was found within the upper thoracic discs, reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation to cervical segments is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Secondary Chondrosarcoma of the Upper Thoracic Costovertebral Junction with Neural Foraminal Extension and Compressing the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, Sofiene; Bouhoula, Asma; Maatar, Nidhal; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-08-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Secondary chondrosarcoma arising from a benign solitary costal osteochondroma is extremely rare. Data show that the reported incidence of costal osteochondroma is very low and they are usually found in the anterior region at the costochondral junction. To our knowledge, however, there have been no previous reports, in English literature, describing osteochondroma malignant transformation located in the thoracic costovertebral junction. We report the case of a man with chondrosarcoma arising from the malignant degeneration of an osteochondroma at the right first thoracic costovertebral junction with neural foraminal extension and compressing the spinal cord. Although it is rare in solitary osteochondromas of rib, malignant transformation must always be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bilateral Upper Extremity DVT in a 43-Year-Old Man: Is It Thoracic Outlet Syndrome?!

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    Hadoun Jabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent deep venous thrombosis, involving bilateral upper extremities, is an extremely rare phenomenon. We are presenting a 43-year-old man who was diagnosed with left upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT and was treated with anticoagulation and surgical decompression in 2004. 9 years later, he presented with right arm swelling and was diagnosed with right UEDVT using US venous Doppler. Venogram showed compression of the subclavian vein by the first rib, diagnosing thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. He was treated with anticoagulation and local venolysis and later by surgical decompression of the subclavian vein. Bilateral UEDVT, as mentioned above, is an extremely rare condition that is uncommonly caused by TOS. To our knowledge, we are reporting the first case of bilateral UEDVT due to TOS. Diagnosis usually starts with US venous Doppler to detect the thrombosis, followed by the gold standard venogram to locate the area of obstruction and lyse the thrombus if needed. The ultimate treatment for TOS remains surgical decompression of the vascular bundle at the thoracic outlet.

  6. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Muthusami, Prakash; Towbin, Alexander J.; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  7. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

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    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Muthusami, Prakash [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Borschel, Gregory H. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  8. Upper cervical and upper thoracic thrust manipulation versus nonthrust mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James R; Cleland, Joshua A; Waldrop, Mark A; Arnot, Cathy F; Young, Ian A; Turner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Gisli

    2012-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the short-term effects of upper cervical and upper thoracic high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Although upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation and nonthrust mobilization are common interventions for the management of neck pain, no studies have directly compared the effects of both upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Patients completed the Neck Disability Index, the numeric pain rating scale, the flexion-rotation test for measurement of C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and the craniocervical flexion test for measurement of deep cervical flexor motor performance. Following the baseline evaluation, patients were randomized to receive either HVLA thrust manipulation or nonthrust mobilization to the upper cervical (C1-2) and upper thoracic (T1-2) spines. Patients were reexamined 48-hours after the initial examination and again completed the outcome measures. The effects of treatment on disability, pain, C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and motor performance of the deep cervical flexors were examined with a 2-by-2 mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA). One hundred seven patients satisfied the eligibility criteria, agreed to participate, and were randomized into the HVLA thrust manipulation (n = 56) and nonthrust mobilization (n = 51) groups. The 2-by-2 ANOVA demonstrated that patients with mechanical neck pain who received the combination of upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation experienced significantly (Ppain (58.5%) than those of the nonthrust mobilization group (12.8% and 12.6%, respectively) following treatment. In addition, the HVLA thrust manipulation group had significantly (Pcervical flexor muscles as compared to the group that received nonthrust mobilization. The number needed to treat to avoid an unsuccessful outcome

  9. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated....... INTERVENTION: Three types of palpation were performed: Sitting motion palpation and prone motion palpation for biomechanic dysfunction and paraspinal palpation for tenderness. Each dimension was rated as "absent" or "present" for each segment. All examinations were performed according to a standard written...

  10. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Ureter Metastatic to the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Spinal Cord Compression

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    J. O. Larkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a left nephroureterectomy for a gentleman with transitional cell carcinoma of the upper ureter. Histological analysis revealed it to be a T1 lesion, but to be highly mitotically active. The gentleman defaulted on adjuvant therapy and defaulted on follow-up. He represented with symptoms of acute spinal cord compression and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion at T6/7. Neurosurgical resection of the lesion showed it to be a metastatic deposit from the ureteric primary. Despite surgical debulking and subsequent radiotherapy to the lesion, the patient died secondary to metastatic complications. This case report is of interest to the surgeon as it demonstrates both the high metastatic potential of upper tract carcinomas and educates the surgeon on the presentation of acute spinal cord compression.

  11. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  12. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of thoracic outlet syndrome

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    Wojcik Gustaw

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The superior thoracic aperture is a place particularly vulnerable to the occurrence of tissue conflict and the development of a number of neurovascular changes carrying a risk of upper limb dysfunction. The triggering factor in this case is the pressure on the nerve vascular elements brought about by too large muscles of the chest and neck, clavicle fracture and dislocation of the upper ribs, anomalies in the form of ribs, in the neck, or by apex of the lung tumors. Each anatomical anomaly may be a cause of a number of lesions and lead to the development of the disease. Due to the nature of the oppressed structures, there are two basic groups: neurogenic and vascular. The most common variant giving clinical symptoms is neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. In this, the compression ratio, the brachial plexus, and for this reason, the vascular surface of the upper limb dysfunction is often overlooked. However, the vascular variant, and especially arterial sub-variant, is very dangerous because it can give complications even in the form of aneurysms, and even upper limb ischemia. The aim of the study is to present the most common changes in the thoracic outlet causing functional disorders of the upper limb.

  13. The Flail and Pulseless Upper Limb: an Extreme Case of Traumatic Scapulo-thoracic Dissociation

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    Maria SW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scapulo-thoracic dissociation is an infrequent injury resulting from high energy trauma which is often associated with severe neurological and vascular injuries which may be unrecognised at the time of presentation. A 24 year-old female presented with bilateral rib fractures, pneumothorax, liver and kidney injuries following a road traffic accident. She also sustained fractures of her right scapula, odontoid, right transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and a closed fracture of her right femur. Her right upper limb was later noted to be flail and pulseless, due to complete right brachial plexus injury, scapula-thoracic dissociation and subclavian artery avulsion. We managed the upper limb injuries non-operatively, and focused on resuscitation of the patient. Early exploration of the complete brachial plexus injury was not undertaken in spite of the possible associated poor functional outcome as there was no life-threatening indication.

  14. Approach to the irradiation of extensive cervical and upper thoracic spinal astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, E.

    1981-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are relatively rare, especially to the extent presented in this report. A 31-year-old woman had been diagnosed as having an inoperable astrocytoma, grade I-II, involving the entire cervical spinal cord and two upper thoracic segments. After decompressive laminectomy, she was referred for a radical course of radiation therapy. An irradiation technique was devised which allowed treatment of a single cylindrical volume of tissue encompassing the known tumor. Field fractionation with undesirable gaps and/or excessive dose to overlying normal structures was avoided. To the cervical spinal cord she received 5590 cGy in 29 fractions over 42 days. By this schedule she received at the same time 4820 cGy to the medulla oblongata and 4880 cGy to the upper thoracic cord. Partial neurological improvement occurred at the end of the treatment. The treatment approach is discussed in the background of the literature data. (orig.) [de

  15. Clinical accuracy of three-dimensional fluoroscopy (IsoC-3D)-assisted upper thoracic pedicle screw insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ito, Yasuo; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Shiozaki, Yasuyuki; Mazaki, Tetsuro; Tomioka, Masao; Tanaka, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Correct screw placement is especially difficult in the upper thoracic vertebrae. At the cervicothoracic junction (C7-T2), problems can arise because of the narrowness of the pedicle and the difficulty of using a lateral image intensifier there. Other upper thoracic vertebrae (T3-6) pose a problem for screw insertion also because of the narrower pedicle. We inserted 154 pedicle screws into 78 vertebrae (C7 to T6) in 38 patients. Screws were placed using intraoperative data acquisition by an isocentric C-arm fluoroscope (Siremobile Iso-C3D) and computer navigation. Out of 90 pedicle screws inserted into 45 vertebrae between C7 and T2, 87 of the 90 (96.7%) screws were classified as grade 1 (no perforation). Of 64 pedicle screws inserted into 33 vertebrae between T3 and T6, 61 of 64 (95.3%) screws were classified as grade 1. In this study, we reduced pedicle screw misplacement at the level of the C7 and upper thoracic (T1-6) vertebrae using the three-dimensional fluoroscopy navigation system. (author)

  16. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung; Bae, Won Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis

  17. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

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    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Seoul Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurismatic dilatation of the thoracic aorta and filling defect on the esophagogram

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    Naschitz, J.E.; Bassan, H.; Lazarov, N.; Grishkan, A.

    1982-06-01

    A patient is described with an aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, which has ruptured into the esophagus. An esophageal X-ray contrast study has revealed a filling defect at the contact site of the esophagus and the aortic aneurysm. The filling defect was due to a clot protruding from the aorta into the esophagus. This unique case calls attention to a diagnostic triad: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and filling defect in the esophagus at its site of contact with the enlarged aorta. This triad suggested aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) in the patient and could help in the diagnosis of atypical cases of AEF, where thoracic aortography has not been performed initially.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurismatic dilatation of the thoracic aorta and filling defect on the esophagogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naschitz, J.E.; Bassan, H.; Lazarov, N.; Grishkan, A.; Haifa Univ.; Haifa Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A patient is described with an aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, which has ruptured into the esophagus. An esophageal X-ray contrast study has revealed a filling defect at the contact site of the esophagus and the aortic aneurysm. The filling defect was due to a clot protruding from the aorta into the esophagus. This unique case calls attention to a diagnostic triad: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and filling defect in the esophagus at its site of contact with the enlarged aorta. This triad suggested aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) in the patient and could help in the diagnosis of atypical cases of AEF, where thoracic aortography has not been performed initially. (orig.) [de

  20. DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING PROVIDES BETTERMENT IN ALTERED PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN UPPER THORACIC SPINAL CORD INJURIES

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    Muruganandam Periyasamy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory problems are usual in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries when compared to Lower thoracic spinal cord injuries. Generally there are frequent respiratory complications in the individuals with spinal cord injuries. The complications of the respiratory system are severe and more prevalent source of morbidity and mortality after the spinal cord injury due to the inefficient breathing capacity including inspiratory and expiratory abilities. The present study represents the inspiratory muscle training especially in upper thoracic spinal cord injury patients to assess the improvement in the pulmonary functions. Methods: Twenty five patients with the age between 25 -40 years with the upper spinal cord injuries were selected in the present study in order to assess the efficacy of the training. Several types of exercises were practiced including diaphragmatic breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, active cycle of breathing technique and weight training. COPD Conditions, Chest wall deformities, Hypertensive patients, Cardio vascular problems were excluded in the study. Results: The results from the study showed that significant changes were found in the patients treated with all the above mentioned techniques. Axillary level, nipple level, Xiphisternum levels were analysed and the results found to be significant after the treatment. Incentive spirometry and peak flow meter observations were also found to be significant when compare to the pretreatment. Conclusion: The present study conclude that the combined effect of incentive spriometry, diaphragmatic breathing exercises, and active cycle of breathing technique is more effective in improving the pulmonary functions in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries than single method efficiency.

  1. Myocardial ischemia due to compression of an unruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

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    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Abe, Koichiro; Izumi, Satoshi

    2007-06-01

    We report a 33-year-old woman who had a 60-mm thoracic aneurysm of the ascending aorta with Marfan syndrome and effort angina due to compression of the right coronary artery (RCA) by the aneurysm. Surgery was performed using the Bentall procedure and a coronary artery bypass graft to the RCA. Postoperatively, coronary angiography showed that the coronary flow of the RCA was restored by removing the aneurysmal compression. The patient was discharged without angina on postoperative day 21.

  2. Evaluation of the value of ENI in radiotherapy for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mina; Zhao, Kuaile; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2014-10-25

    A retrospective study to compare the failure patterns and effects of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) or involved field irradiation (IFI) for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients. One hundred and sixty nine patients with the cervical and upper thoracic esophageal SCC were analyzed retrospectively; 99 patients (59%) underwent IFI and 70 patients (41%) received ENI. We defined "Out-PTVifi in-PTVeni metastasis" as lymph node metastasis occurring in the cervical prophylactic field of PTVeni thus out of PTVifi. Out-PTVifi in-PTVeni cervical node metastasis occurred in 8% of patients in the IFI group, all within 2 years after treatment. However, it occurred in 10% of patients in the ENI group, and these failures happened gradually since one year after treatments. No difference was found in OS and the incidences of Grade ≥ 3 treatment-related esophageal and lung toxicities between the two groups. ENI for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal SCC patients did not bring longer OS and better long-term control of cervical lymph nodes. Although ENI might delay cervical nodes progression in elective field; it could not decrease the incidence of these failures.

  3. Effect of different ways of intraoperative lymph node dissection on prognosis of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma

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    Zhi Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of different ways of intraoperative lymph node dissection on prognosis of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma. Methods: 106 cases of patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma were selected and according to different ways of lymph node dissection, divided into three-field group who received three-field lymph node dissection and two-field group who received two-field lymph node dissection, then serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA as well as soluble interleukin-2 receptor (SIL- 2R, keratinized protein fragment 19 (Cyfra21-1 and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC levels of two groups were compared, and postoperative follow-up was carried out to record disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate. Results: In three-field group, postoperative average serum LDH levels of patients with thoracic upper esophageal carcinoma and thoracic mid esophageal carcinoma were lower than LDH values of corresponding patients in two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative serum NO value of three-field group was higher than that of two-field group, and NOS, CEA and SIL-2R values were lower than those of two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative serum Cyfra21-1 and SCC values of three-field group were lower than those of two-field group (P<0.05; postoperative disease-free survival rate during the followup period of three-field group was higher than that of two-field group, and overall survival rate at corresponding points in time was also higher than that of two-field group (P<0.05. Conclusion: After patients with thoracic mid-upper esophageal carcinoma receive three-field lymph node dissection, levels of serum indexes with poor prognosis and tumor markers were optimized, long-term disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate are improved. It has positive clinical significance.

  4. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

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    Kim, Sungjun [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hanyang University, Kuri Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kuri City, Kyunggi-do (Korea); Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Seung Min [Yonsei University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University, Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-02-15

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  5. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungjun; Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah; Kim, Seung Min; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  6. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  7. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2014-01-01

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  8. Kyphoplasty via unilateral extrapedicular approach for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracic compression fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Feng; Yang Huilin; Gan Minfeng; Zou Jun; Jiang Weimin; Chen Liang; Tang Tiansi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and safety of kyphoplasty via unilateral extrapedicular approach for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracic compression fractures. Methods: A total of 16 patients with painful osteoporotic thoracci fractures were treated by kyphoplasty via unilateral extrapedicular approach. Pain was measured using the self-reporting visual analogue scale (VAS) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Disability was measured using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. The height of the compromised vertebral body, the kyphotic angle were measured preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Results: Operations were completed smoothly, with the exception of 1 patients with less cement leakage but there was no clinical symptom occurred. The other one had intercostal neuralgia. Relief of pain was achieved in 24 hours post-operation. The mean operation time was 31minutes and the mean fluoroscopic time was 19.1. And the mean VAS score of these patients decreased from 8.2 ± 1.1 pre-operatively to 2.6 ± 0.8 post-operatively (P<0.05), and it improved further to 2.8 ± 1.1 in the final follow-up. The ODI score varied from 69.2 ± 1.2 pre-operatively to 32.2 ± 1.1 post-operatively (P<0.05). Improvement was maintained in the final follow-up. Comparing the height of anterior vertebrae (Ha), the height of midline vertebrae (Hm) and the kyphotic angle between pre-and post-operation there was no statistical significant difference. Conclusion: Kyphoplasty via unilateral extrapedicular approach for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracic compression fractures is effective. It can help reducing the radiation exposure. (authors)

  9. Treatment of carcinoma of the upper thoracic segment of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarov, V.I.; Berezkin, D.P.; Trishkin, V.A.; Ekimov, V.I.; Filatov, V.N.; Shulepov, A.V.; Feliz, P.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 350 hospitalized cases of esophageal carcinoma in the upper thoracic segment, stage 3-4 tumors were identified in 82.8%. A retarded seeking of medical advice was chiefly responsidle for the advancement of tumors. Radical surgery was performed in 32 (9.1%) patients only. The percentage of radically-treated cases could have been greater, if there had been fewer refusals to operate and to be operated on both on the part of patiens and doctors who would object to surgery on the grounds of concomitant pathology or the patient's age. Radiotherapy, used in 197 (72.7%) patients as a sole method of treatment, was followed by remission in 68%

  10. Primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of thoracic spinal column causing cord compression: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Torabinejad, Simin; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar

    2004-09-02

    Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that rarely affects the spinal canal. Primary malignant hemangiopericytoma of the spinal column is extremely rare. We report on a case of primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of the thoracic spinal column that invaded vertebral bone and caused spinal cord compression in a 21-year-old man. The patient presented with progressive back pain over a four-month period that progressed to paraparesis, bilateral leg paresthesia and urinary incontinence. The surgical intervention involved laminectomy and subtotal resection of the tumor, with posterior vertebral fixation. Postoperative involved-field radiotherapy was administered. A marked neurological improvement was subsequently observed. We describe the clinical, radiological, and histological features of this tumor and review the literature.

  11. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Zeng, Q.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, General Coal Hospital, Beijing (China); Jinkins, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  12. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.; Zeng, Q.Y.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  13. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10 4 vs. 1.4*10 4 ). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS algorithm

  14. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  15. 3D printing-assisted preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for middle-upper thoracic trauma: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xuming; Ke, Tie; Cai, Hongru; Gao, Xiang

    2017-08-11

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of 3D printing in assisting preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for treating middle-upper thoracic trauma. A preoperative plan was implemented in seven patients suffering from middle-upper thoracic (T3-T7) trauma between March 2013 and February 2016. In the 3D printing models, entry points of 56 pedicle screws (Magerl method) and 4 important parameters of the pedicle screws were measured, including optimal diameter (ϕ, mm), length (L, mm), inclined angle (α), head-tilting angle (+β), and tail-tilting angle (-β). In the surgery, bare-hands fixation of pedicle screws was performed using 3D printing models and the measured parameters as guidance. A total of seven patients were enrolled, including five men and two women, with the age of 21-62 years (mean age of 37.7 years). The position of the pedicle screw was evaluated postoperatively using a computerized tomography scan. Totally, 56 pedicle screws were placed, including 33 pieces of level 0, 18 pieces of level 1, 4 pieces of level 2 (pierced lateral wall), and 1 piece of level 3 (pierced lateral wall, no adverse consequences), with a fine rate of 91.0%. 3D printing technique is an intuitive and effective assistive technology to pedicle screw fixation for treating middle-upper thoracic vertebrae, which improve the accuracy of bare-hands screw placement and reduce empirical errors. The trial was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Fujian Provincial Hospital. It was registered on March 1st, 2013, and the registration number was K2013-03-001.

  16. A study on the application of prone compression study for obese patients in upper gastrointestinal series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Soon Yong; Jung, Hong Ryang

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the application of prone compression study using compression paddle for obese patients in upper gastrointestinal series. Prone compression study using compression paddle was performed in fifty patients, who were not examined completely erect compression study for obesity. The radiographs of stomach were classified into the lower, middle, and high body, and then we gave five points included 'very poor', 'poor', 'suspicious', 'good', and 'complete' according to level of detection for area gastric and mucosal fold. Statistic analysis was performed using T-test and ANOVA, and confidence rate was fixed in 95%(P 0.05). As these results, the prone compression study in upper gastrointestinal series seem to be an useful study for obese patients, because it decreases pain and the feeling of uneasiness, and improve compression efficiency remarkably

  17. Primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of thoracic spinal column causing cord compression: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that rarely affects the spinal canal. Primary malignant hemangiopericytoma of the spinal column is extremely rare. CASE REPORT: We report on a case of primary epidural malignant hemangiopericytoma of the thoracic spinal column that invaded vertebral bone and caused spinal cord compression in a 21-year-old man. The patient presented with progressive back pain over a four-month period that progressed to paraparesis, bilateral leg paresthesia and urinary incontinence. The surgical intervention involved laminectomy and subtotal resection of the tumor, with posterior vertebral fixation. Postoperative involved-field radiotherapy was administered. A marked neurological improvement was subsequently observed. We describe the clinical, radiological, and histological features of this tumor and review the literature.

  18. Thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification in a fixed population; longitudinal radiological observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Minoru; Russell, W.J.; Kudo, Sho.

    1984-05-01

    All lateral chest radiographs of 34 persons with posterior longitudinal ligament ossification (PLLO) in the thoracic spine were reviewed for date of its onset and its progress. These observations spanned as long as 18 years. Upper mid-thoracic PLLO first appeared under the age of 40, then increased in extent in the vertical axis until the age of 50. Lower thoracic PLLO occurred later than upper mid-thoracic PLLO. In the lower thoracic and lumbar regions, degeneration of the vertebrae and discs apparently were focal factors which triggered the development of thoracic PLLO. PLLO apparently developed in a different way in the upper and mid-thoracic regions, where the vertebrae and discs were unremarkable at the time of its initial appearance, and degenerative abnormalities did not predispose to it. (author)

  19. Postoperative thoracic hemorrhage after right upper lobectomy with thoracic wall resection during rivaroxaban anticoagulant therapy for deep leg vein thrombosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Kuwata

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE is the one of the most important complications after thoracic surgery. This complicatin after the surgery is often treated by new anticoaglant drug, such as rivaroxaban, which dose not need to the monitoring of blood coaglation system. We experienced postoperative bleeding case during anticoaglant therapy using rivaroxaban. Presentation of case: The patient underwent a right upper lobectomy with lung and chest wall resection for lung cancer. On postoperative day (POD 10, we started to use rivaroxaban to treat the deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Four days after starting the rivaroxaban treatment, severe surgical site hemorrhage occurred, which led to the need for the infusion of concentrated red cells (CRC. After stopping the rivaroxaban, the thoracic bleeding ceased. Because the event occurred so long after the surgery, and because the bleeding stopped after withdrawal of treatment, we believe that rivaroxaban induced the thoracic bleeding. Conclusion: Some reports in the field of orthopedics (Turpie et al., 2009 have noted that rivarxaban is effective to prevent postoperative DVT. However, there were few reports that invied the attention to postoperative bleeding be induced by rivarxaban. Thus, we describe this case in order to alert clinicians to the potential bleeding risks associated with the admistration of rivaroxaban postoperatively. Keywords: Revaroxaban, Anticoagulant, Surgical site bleeding

  20. A Review of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and the Possible Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of This Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Travlos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS is a complex entity that is characterized by different neurovascular signs and symptoms involving the upper limb. TOS is defined as upper extremity symptoms due to compression of the neurovascular bundle in the area of the neck just above the first rib. Compression is thought to occur at one or more of the three anatomical compartments: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space and the retropectoralis minor spaces. The clinical presentation can include both neurogenic and vascular symptoms. TOS can be difficult to diagnose because there is no standardized objective test that can be used and the clinician must rely on history and several positive findings on physical exam. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction may be a sensitive way to detect pathology in the lower trunks of the brachial plexus which is promising for future research. Treatment options continue to be conservative and surgical. However, for those who have failed physical therapy there is research to suggest that botulinum toxin may help with symptom relief. However, given that there has been conflicting evidence, further research is required using randomized controlled trials.

  1. Radiation therapy for the cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1990-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 19 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus (Ce) and 36 of the upper thoracic esophagus (Iu) treated with radiotherapy between September 1977 and December 1987. Three-year survival rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 18% in Ce cancer and 7% in Iu cancer. Two-year local tumor control was obtained in 3 Ce and 4 Iu cancer. Concerning the treatment methods for the above 7 patients, 3 patients with carcinoma of the Ce were treated with double wedged technique and 4 of Iu were treated with box-technique (2 patients), rotation technique (1) and double wedge technique (1). There were no 2-year local tumor control in patients who received less than 60 Gy of the tumor dose or whose tumor exceeded more than 10 cm in length. Double wedge technique is suitable for radiotherapy of Ce cancer, while further investigation of dose and compensation is necessary for Iu cancer. (author)

  2. Ranking of conventional X-ray diagnosis and phlebography in the thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Beltz, L.

    1991-01-01

    The compression of the neurovascular bundle of the upper limb (thoracic outlet syndrome, TOS) can be caused by osseous, muscular, fibrous, tumorous and habitual abnormalities of the cervicothoracic junction. Osseous causes can be shown in a conventional x-ray of the cervi cothoracic junction. In about 40% of the cases there is a venous stenosis which can be proved by means of phlebography in a special patient position (provocation position). The type of stenosis and location provides information on the cause of it. We examined 34 patients. (orig.) [de

  3. Percutaneous vertebroplasty of the entire thoracic and lumbar vertebrate for vertebral compression fractures related to chronic glucocorticosteriod use: Case report and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Qing Hwa; Wu, Chun Gen; Xiao, Quan; Ping; He, Cheng Jian; Gu, Yi Feng; Wang, Tao; Li, Ming Hua [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-12-15

    Glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most frequent of all secondary types of osteoporosis, and can increase the risk of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). There are promising additions to current medical treatment for appropriately selected osteoporotic patients. Few studies have reported on the efficiency of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or kyphoplasty for whole thoracic and lumbar glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with intractable pain caused by successional VCFs treated by PVP.

  4. Dosimetric comparison between step-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Min; Li, Qilin; Ning, Zhonghua; Gu, Wendong; Huang, Jin; Mu, Jinming; Pei, Honglei, E-mail: hongleipei@126.com

    2016-07-01

    To compare and analyze the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs step-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sIMRT) for upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma. Single-arc VMAT (VMAT1), dual-arc VMAT (VMAT2), and 7-field sIMRT plans were designed for 30 patients with upper thoracic or cervical esophageal carcinoma. Planning target volume (PTV) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, and PTV1 was prescribed to 60 Gy in 28 fractions. The parameters evaluated included dose homogeneity and conformality, dose to organs at risk (OARs), and delivery efficiency. (1) In comparison to sIMRT, VMAT provided a systematic improvement in PTV1 coverage. The homogeneity index of VMAT1 was better than that of VMAT2. There were no significant differences among sIMRT, VMAT1, and VMAT2 in PTV coverage. (2) VMAT1 and VMAT2 reduced the maximum dose of spinal cord as compared with sIMRT (p < 0.05). The rest dose-volume characteristics of OARs were similar. (3) Monitor units of VMAT2 and VMAT1 were more than sIMRT. However, the treatment time of VMAT1, VMAT2, and sIMRT was (2.0 ± 0.2), (2.8 ± 0.3), and (9.8 ± 0.8) minutes, respectively. VMAT1 was the fastest, and the difference was statistically significant. In the treatment of upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma by the AXESSE linac, compared with 7-field sIMRT, VMAT showed better PTV1 coverage and superior spinal cord sparing. Single-arc VMAT had similar target volume coverage and the sparing of OAR to dual-arc VMAT, with shortest treatment time and highest treatment efficiency in the 3 kinds of plans.

  5. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yukiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Endo, Norio

    1985-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Successful Recovery and Transplantation of 11 Organs Including Face, Bilateral Upper Extremities, and Thoracic and Abdominal Organs From a Single Deceased Organ Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullius, Stefan G; Pomahac, Bohdan; Kim, Heung Bae; Carty, Matthew J; Talbot, Simon G; Nelson, Helen M; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-10-01

    We report on the to date largest recovery of 11 organs from a single deceased donor with the transplantation of face, bilateral upper extremities, heart, 1 lung, liver (split for 2 recipients), kidneys, pancreas, and intestine. Although logistically challenging, this case demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the recovery of multiple thoracic and abdominal organs with multiple vascular composite allotransplants and tissues. Our experience of 8 additional successful multiple vascular composite allotransplants, thoracic, and abdominal organ recoveries suggests that such procedures are readily accomplishable from the same deceased donor.

  7. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yuchuan; Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin; Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You; Gong, Youling

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V 5 , V 13 , V 20 , mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V 30 for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy with intensity

  8. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuchuan [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Gong, Youling, E-mail: gongyouling@hotmail.com [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V{sub 30} for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  9. The evaluation of upper body muscle activity during the performance of external chest compressions in simulated hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygiel, Rebecca G.; Waye, Abigail B.; Baptista, Rafael Reimann; Heidner, Gustavo Sandri; Rehnberg, Lucas; Russomano, Thais

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND: This original study evaluated the electromyograph (EMG) activity of four upper body muscles: triceps brachii, erector spinae, upper rectus abdominis, and pectoralis major, while external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed in simulated Martian hypogravity using a Body Suspension Device, counterweight system, and standard full body cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) mannequin. METHOD: 20 young, healthy male subjects were recruited. One hundred compressions divided into four sets, with roughly six seconds between each set to indicate 'ventilation', were performed within approximately a 1.5 minute protocol. Chest compression rate, depth and number were measured along with the subject's heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). RESULTS: All mean values were used in two-tailed t-tests using SPSS to compare +1 Gz values (control) versus simulated hypogravity values. The AHA (2005) compression standards were maintained in hypogravity. RPE and HR increased by 32% (p training regimes in case of a serious cardiac event in hypogravity.

  10. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Differential Diagnosis of Compressive Upper Abdominal Tumor

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    Clara Kimie Miyahira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST are rare mesenchymal tumor lesions located outside the gastrointestinal tract. A rare compressing tumor with difficult diagnosis is reported. Presentation of the Case. A male patient, 63 years old, was admitted in the emergency room complaining of stretching and continuous abdominal pain for one day. He took Hyoscine, with partial improvement of symptoms, but got worse due to hyporexia, and the abdominal pain persisted. The patient also reported early satiety and ten-pound weight loss over the last month. Discussion. EGIST could be assessed by CT-guided biopsy, leading to diagnosis and proper treatment with surgical resection or Imatinib. Conclusion. This case report highlights the importance of considering EGIST an important differential diagnosis of compressing upper abdominal tumors.

  11. [Relationship of motor deficits and imaging features in metastatic epidural spinal cord compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Bin; Liu, Yao-Sheng; Li, Ding-Feng; Fan, Hai-Tao; Huai, Jian-Ye; Guo, Jun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-Hao; Cao, Yun-Cen; Jiang, Ning; Sui, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Jiu

    2010-06-15

    To explore the relationship of motor deficits of the lower extremities with the imaging features of malignant spinal cord compression (MESCCs). From July 2006 through December 2008, 56 successive MESCC patients were treated at our department. All were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and were scored according to motor deficits Frankel grading on admission. Imaging assessment factors of main involved vertebrae were level of vertebral metastatic location, epidural space involvement, vertebral body involvement, lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, pedicle involvement, continuity of main involved vertebrae, fracture of anterior column, fracture of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction. Occurrence was the same between paralytic state of MESCCs and epidural space involvement of imaging features. Multiple regression equation showed that paralytic state had a linear regression relationship with imaging factors of lamina involvement (X1), posterior protrusion of posterior wall (X2), location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction (X7) of main involved vertebrae. The optimal regression equation of paralytic state (Y) and imaging feature (X) was Y = -0.009 +0.639X, + 0.149X, +0.282X. Lamina involvement of main involved vertebrae has a greatest influence upon paralytic state of MESCC patients. Imaging factors of lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction of main involved vertebrae can predict the paralytic state of MESCC patients. MESCC with lamina involvement is more easily encroached on epidural space.

  12. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention.

  13. Relevance of Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Images in Evaluating Epidural Hematoma After Thoracic Fixation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Choi, Il; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-11-01

    It is difficult to evaluate the significant findings of epidural hematoma in magnetic resonance images (MRIs) obtained immediately after thoracic posterior screw fixation (PSF). Prospectively, immediate postoperative MRI was performed in 10 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from April to December 2013. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed the MRIs from 3 patients before hematoma evacuation out of 260 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from January 2000 to March 2013. The MRI findings of 9 out of the 10 patients, consecutively collected after thoracic PSF, showed neurologic recovery with a well-preserved cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space and no prominent hemorrhage. Even though there were metal artifacts at the level of the pedicle screws, the preserved CSF space was observed. In contrast, the MRI of 1 patient with poor neurologic outcome demonstrated a typical hematoma and slight spinal cord compression and reduced CSF space. In the retrospective analysis of the 3 patients who showed definite motor weakness in the lower extremities after their first thoracic fusion surgery and underwent hematoma evacuation, the magnetic resonance images before hematoma evacuation also revealed hematoma compressing the spinal cord and diminished CSF space. This study shows that epidural hematomas can be detected on MRI performed immediately after thoracic fixation surgery, despite metal artifacts and findings such as hematoma causing spinal cord compression. Loss of CSF space should be considered to be associated with neurologic deficit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery: CITES or cVATS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouad, J; Fénane, H; Masmoudi, H; Giol, M; Karsenti, A; Gounant, V; Grunenwald, D

    2013-10-01

    Early pain and persistent parietal disorders remains a major unresolved problem in thoracic surgery. Thoracotomy and the use of multiple ports in most Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) procedures are the major cause of this persistent pain. For the last decade, a few publications describing the use of either single incision VATS and cervical thoracic approaches have been reported without significant results in comparison with current used techniques. Intercostals compression during surgery and early after by intercostals chest tube placement, are probably the major cause of postoperative pain. Flexible endoscope is currently used in several surgeries and will take more and more importance in our daily use in thoracic surgery. Instrument flexibility allows its use through minimally invasive approaches and offers a very interesting intra-thoracic navigation. We describe here the first use in France of a flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery through a single cervical incision to perform simultaneous exploration and biopsies of the mediastinum and right pleura using the original approach of Cervical Incision Thoracic Endoscopic Surgery (CITES). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Studies on improvement of diagnostic ability of computed tomography (CT) in the parenchymatous organs in the upper abdomen, 1. Study on the upper abdominal compression method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, Ryo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-07-01

    1) The upper abdominal compression method was easily applicable for CT examination in practically all the patients. It gave no harm and considerably improved CT diagnosis. 2) The materials used for compression were foamed polystyrene, the Mix-Dp and a water bag. When CT examination was performed to diagnose such lesions as a circumscribed tumor, compression with the Mix-Dp was most useful, and when it was performed for screening examination of upper abdominal diseases, compression with a water bag was most effective. 3) Improvement in contour-depicting ability of CT by the compression method was most marked at the body of the pancreas, followed by the head of the pancreas and the posterior surface of the left lobe of the liver. Slight improvement was seen also at the tail of the pancreas and the left adrenal gland. 4) Improvement in organ-depicting ability of CT by the compression method was estimated by a 4-category classification method. It was found that the improvement was most marked at the body and the head of the pancreas. Considerable improvement was observed also at the left lobe of the liver and the both adrenal glands. Little improvement was obtained at the spleen. When contrast enhancement was combined with the compression method, improvement at such organs which were liable to be enhanced, as the liver and the adrenal glands, was promoted, while the organ-depicting ability was decreased at the pancreas. 5) By comparing the CT image under compression with that without compression, continuous infiltrations of gastric cancer into the body and the tail of the pancreas in 2 cases and a retroperitoneal infiltration of pancreatic tumor in 1 case were diagnosed preoperatively.

  16. Comparison between cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie; Daniel, Rob; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    Cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations have been reported to be rare in dogs due to the presence of the intercapital ligament, however some studies have proposed they may not be uncommon in German Shepherd dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs (control group). Medical records at the Ontario Veterinary College were searched for German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs that had magnetic resonance imaging studies including the T1-T9 region. For each dog and each disc space from T1-T9, three variables (compression, disc degeneration, and herniation) were recorded and graded based on review of sagittal T2-weighted images. Twenty-three German Shepherd dogs and 47 other large breed dogs met inclusion criteria. The German Shepherd dog group had higher scores than the control group for compression (P = 0.0099) and herniation (P dog group, intervertebral discs T2-T3 and T4-T5 had an increased risk for compression and T3-T4 had an increased risk for compression and herniation. Findings from this study indicated that German Shepherd dogs may be more likely than other large breed dogs to have spinal cord compression due to cranial thoracic disc herniations. Imaging of the cranial thoracic spine, including T2-T3, is recommended for German Shepherd dogs with T3-L3 neurological signs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  17. Clinical, morphologic, and morphometric features of cranial thoracic spinal stenosis in large and giant breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philippa; De Risio, Luisa; Sparkes, Andrew; McConnell, Fraser; Holloway, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The clinical, morphologic, and morphometric features of cranial thoracic spinal stenosis were investigated in large and giant breed dogs. Seventy-nine magnetic resonance imaging studies of the cranial thoracic spine were assessed. Twenty-six were retrieved retrospectively and 53 were acquired prospectively using the same inclusion criteria. Images were evaluated using a modified compression scale as: no osseous stenosis (grade 0), osseous stenosis without spinal cord compression (grade 1), and osseous stenosis with spinal cord compression (grade 2). Morphometric analysis was performed and compared to the subjective grading system. Grades 1 and 2 cranial thoracic spinal stenosis were identified on 24 imaging studies in 23 dogs. Sixteen of 23 dogs had a conformation typified by Molosser breeds and 21/23 were male. The most common sites of stenosis were T2-3 and T3-4. The articular process joints were enlarged with abnormal oblique orientation. Stenosis was dorsolateral, lateralized, or dorsoventral. Concurrent osseous cervical spondylomyelopathy was recognized in six dogs and other neurologic disease in five dogs. Cranial thoracic spinal stenosis was the only finding in 12 dogs. In 9 of these 12 dogs (all grade 2) neurolocalization was to the T3-L3 spinal segment. The median age of these dogs was 9.5 months. In the remaining three dogs neurologic signs were not present. Stenosis ratios were of limited benefit in detecting stenotic sites. Grade 2 cranial thoracic spinal stenosis causing direct spinal cord compression may lead to neurologic signs, however milder stenosis (grade 1) is likely to be subclinical or incidental. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  18. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  19. CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennebicque, Anne-Sophie; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Moulahi, Hassen; Brauner, Michel W.; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Severe thoracic sarcoidosis includes manifestations with significant clinical and functional impairment and a risk of mortality. Severe thoracic sarcoidosis can take on various clinical presentations and is associated with increased morbidity. The purpose of this article was to describe the CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis and to explain some of their mechanisms. Subacute respiratory insufficiency is a rare and early complication due to a high profusion of pulmonary lesions. Chronic respiratory insufficiency due to pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent and late complication. Three main CT patterns are identified: bronchial distortion, honeycombing and linear opacities. CT can be helpful in diagnosing some mechanisms of central airway obstruction such as bronchial distortion due to pulmonary fibrosis or an extrinsic bronchial compression by enlarged lymph nodes. An intrinsic narrowing of the bronchial wall by endobronchial granulomatous lesions may be suggested by CT when it shows evidence of bronchial mural thickening. Pulmonary hypertension usually occurs in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease and is related to fibrotic destruction of the distal capillary bed and to the resultant chronic hypoxemia. Several other mechanisms may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension including extrinsic compression of major pulmonary arteries by enlarged lymph nodes and secondary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Aspergilloma colonization of a cavity is the main cause of hemoptysis in sarcoidosis. Other rare causes are bronchiesctasis, necrotizing bronchial aspergillosis, semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, erosion of a pulmonary artery due to a necrotic sarcoidosis lesion, necrosis of parenchymal sarcoidosis lesions and specific endobronchial macroscopic lesions. (orig.)

  20. EFFECT OF UPPER-LIMB AND THORACIC MUSCLE STRENGTH ON 6-MIN WALK DISTANCE IN COPD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Varalakshmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the only cause of death from chronic disease that will increase worldwide until 2020 and it represents a big burden for patients and society. Patients with COPD characteristically show poor exercise performance indicated by a marked reduction in both peak pulmonary 02 uptake and work rate at peak exercise. The sequelae of exercise intolerance include increased difficulty in performing daily tasks, etc. The objective of the study is to investigate the influence of thoracic and upper limb muscle function on 6-min walk distance (6MWD in patients with COPD. Method: Thirty eight COPD patients were included if they fulfilled the criteria for COPD according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines. Prospective, cross-sectional design with sample size of 38 patients. All patients performed 6MWD and 1RM exercises. Results: To study the correlation between variables, Pearson or Spearman coefficients of correlation were used with the level of statistical significance set at 5%.Results of this study suggested for the first time that thoracic muscle strength is a predictor of 6MWD in COPD patients. It also confirms the influence of respiratory muscle strength (Pimax, dyspnea, on the 6MWD of these patients. Conclusion: It is concluded that peripheral muscle strength, respiratory muscle strength, and the sensation of dyspnea all have an influence on the capacity of COPD patients to perform exercises.

  1. Cardiac pacemaker dysfunction in children after thoracic drainage catheter manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobdell, K W; Walters, H L; Hudson, C; Hakimi, M

    1997-05-01

    Two children underwent placement of permanent, epicardial-lead, dual-chamber, unipolar pacemaker systems for complete heart block. Postoperatively, both patients demonstrated subcutaneous emphysema-in the area of their pulse generators-temporally related to thoracic catheter manipulation. Acutely, each situation was managed with manual compression of the pulse generator, ascertaining appropriate pacemaker sensing and pacing. Maintenance of compression with pressure dressings, vigilant observation/monitoring, and education of the care givers resulted in satisfactory pacemaker function without invasive intervention.

  2. Thoracic Ganglioneuromas Resulting in Nonimmune Hydrops Fetalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Most often, ganglioneuromas affect older pediatric and adult patients. They are typically slow growing tumors that remain clinically silent until they become large enough to cause symptoms by compression of adjacent structures. Case - We report a case of a 22-year-old Hispanic gravida 2 para 1 female patient who was found to have massive hydrops fetalis at 20 completed gestational weeks. Fetal echocardiography revealed a narrowed distal ductal arch and proximal descending aorta. Cesarean delivery was undertaken at 29 completed gestational weeks for refractory labor and nonreassuring fetal status. The neonate expired at 47 minutes of life despite aggressive resuscitation. At autopsy, multiple thoracic masses were found adjacent to a compressed proximal descending aorta. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglioneuroma, a rare type of neural crest tumor. Discussion - A variety of intrathoracic masses have previously been reported to cause hydrops fetalis including teratomas, fibrosarcomas, and lymphangiomas. To our knowledge, this case is the first description of hydrops fetalis caused by ganglioneuromas. We propose that multiple thoracic ganglioneuromas led to biventricular distal outflow tract obstruction and hydrops fetalis.

  3. Pattern of relapse in surgical treated patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its possible impact on target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjie; Xin Peiling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Background data: The irradiation target volume is important for effective postoperative treatment of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: One hundred forty patients with recurrent or metastatic thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had been treated with radical surgery but not with postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The information of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis for these patients was analyzed. Results: The median time to progression in the 140 patients with recurrence or metastasis was 18.3 months (range 15.4-21.1 months). Anastomotic recurrence accounted for 13.6% of treatment failures. The supraclavicular and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes had high metastasis rates for esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in all locations. The order from highest to lowest metastasis rate for the station 3 and 4 lymph nodes was middle, upper and lower thoracic esophageal regions and the order for upper abdominal lymph nodes was lower, middle, and upper thoracic esophageal regions. Locoregional recurrence was the most common type of recurrence. Conclusions: For upper and middle thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the anastomosis, supraclavicular, and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume with upper abdominal lymph nodes excluded; for lower thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, anastomosis, supraclavicular, station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes and upper abdominal lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume.

  4. EFFECT OF SITTING POSTURE ON THORACIC CONFIGURATION AND CHANGES IN VOLUME OF HEMITHORACES

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    Shōbo A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor posture is detrimental to breathing. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of upright and hunchbacked sitting on thoracic configuration and changes in the volume of the thorax during quiet and volitional deep breathing. Methods: The participants were 11 healthy men with a mean age of 21.6 years, mean body mass of 59.8 kg, mean height of 169.7 cm and a body mass index of 20.7 kg/m2. Eighty-four reflective markers were placed on the trunk. Three-dimensional motion analysis measured the volume within the hemithoraces. To calculate upper and lower thoracic volumes, six imaginary hexahedra were visualized using four reflective markers for each on both aspects of the thorax. Each hexahedron was divided into three imaginary triangular pyramids to calculate positional vectors. Finally, the volume for the hexahedra and triangular pyramids was calculated. Upper thoracic volume encompassed a space from the sternal notch to a midpoint on the ventral aspect of the third rib and the lower thoracic volume from the xiphoid process to the midpoint on tenth rib’s dorsal aspect. Results: In hunchbacked sitting during quiet breathing the left lower hemithorax yielded a significantly larger volume (p=0.003, and both breathing patterns during inspiration and expiration yielded a significantly greater change in thoracic configuration (p=0.01, p=0.016. Conclusion: Findings suggested that, in a hunchbacked sitting, there was decreased thoracic asymmetry with re-establishment of thoracic vertebral alignment, consequently stabilizing the sitting position, but breathing was suppressed and tidal volume decreased. Physiotherapy should aim at ensuring correction of hunchbacked posture and maintenance of thoracic symmetry.

  5. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  6. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  7. [Segmental cut-off bridge and local floating technology for the treatment of ossification of ligamentum flavum in thoracic spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-dong; Zhang, Jian; Sheng, Wei-bin

    2013-10-08

    To explore the efficacy and safety of segmental cut-off bridge and local floating technology for the treatment of ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF) in thoracic spine. Retrospective study was performed in 98 patients with thoracic OLF who under went operation. There was 56 males and 42 females with an average age of 45.8 (35-73) years. The average duration of onset was 17 (3-51) months. The main clinical symptoms were numbness and paraesthesia (n = 90), lower limb weakness and walking trouble (n = 46), positive pyramidal tract signs (n = 33) and sphincter function obstacle (n = 9). OLF was screened and diagnosed by radiology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) or CT myelography (CTM). A total of 142 OLF nidus were spotted. The lesions involved single segment (n = 32), double segments (n = 56), three segments (n = 6) and ≥ four segments (n = 4). And the locations were at upper thoracic segment (T1-4) (n = 34), middle thoracic segment (T5-8) (n = 23) and lower thoracic segment (T9-12) (n = 42). The OLF nidus were removed by local floating technology oft windowing at cephalic and caudal ends and a cut-off bridge at both sides of involved segments. Pre- and post-operative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores and Epstein grades were recorded to evaluate the outcomes. The mean loss volume of blood was 320 ml and operative duration 155 min. All cases recovered independent activities. The mean follow-up period was 28 (13-48) months. The mean preoperative JOA score was 4.3 (1-8) points and the mean postoperative JOA score 9.7 (5-11) points. The recovery rate was 78.8%. According to Epstein grade, the excellent and good rate was 86.7%. As a common cause of thoracic spinal cord compression, OLF should be operated as early as possible. Based upon clinical and imaging findings, the application of segmental cut-off bridge and local floating technology is both safe and efficacious in the treatment of OLF in thoracic spine.

  8. Biomechanical properties of human thoracic spine disc segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B D Stemper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The objective was to determine the age-dependent compressive and tensile properties of female and male thoracic spine segments using postmortem human subjects (PMHS. Materials and Methods : Forty-eight thoracic disc segments at T4-5, T6-7, T8-9, and T10-11 levels from 12 PMHS T3-T11 spinal columns were divided into groups A and B based on specimen age and loaded in compression and tension. Stiffness and elastic modulus were computed. Stiffness was defined as the slope in the linear region of the force-displacement response. Elastic modulus was defined as the slope of the stress strain curve. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (P< 0.05 in the disc cross-sectional area, stiffness, and elastic modulus based on gender, spinal level, and group. Results : Specimen ages in group A (28 ± 8 years were significantly lower than in group B (70 ± 7 years. Male discs had significantly greater area (7.2 ± 2.0 sq cm than female discs (5.9 ± 1.8 sq cm. Tensile and compressive stiffness values were significantly different between the two age groups, but not between gender and level. Specimens in group A had greater tensile (486 ± 108 N/mm and compressive (3300 ± 642 N/mm stiffness values compared to group B specimens (tension: 397 ± 124 N/mm, compression: 2527 ± 734 N/mm. Tensile and compressive elastic modulus values depended upon age group and gender, but not on level. Group A specimens had significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.9 ± 0.8 MPa, 19.5 ± 4.1 MPa than group B specimens (1.7 ± 0.6 MPa, 10.6 ± 3.4 MPa. Female specimens showed significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.6 ± 1.0 MPa, 16.6 ± 6.4 MPa than male specimens (2.0 ± 0.7 MPa, 13.7 ± 5.0 MPa. Discussion: Using the two groups to represent "young" and "old" specimens, this study showed that the mechanical response decreases in older specimens, and the decrease is greater in compressive than distractive

  9. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  10. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  11. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension

    OpenAIRE

    Oudeman, Eline A.; Tewarie, Rishi D. S. Nandoe; J?bsis, G. Joost; Arts, Mark P.; Kruyt, Nyika D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Case Description: We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior...

  12. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  13. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  14. Operativ behandling af thoracic outlet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Stiasny, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    of the brachial plexus. At surgery, we found and severed a fibrous band that compressed the inferior trunk. Postoperatively, the pain subsided and fine hand movements improved. One patient had no cervical rib, however, in the two other cases we found rudimentary cervical ribs. Magnetic resonance imaging......We present three cases with longstanding true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. All patients had aching pain in the shoulder, arm and ulnar border of the hand. On examination, we found atrophy of the hand muscles. Electromyography revealed signs of compromised function of the inferior trunk...

  15. The thoracic paraspinal shadow: normal appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, H H; Kolbenstvedt, A

    1982-01-01

    The width of the right and left thoracic paraspinal shadows were measured at all levels in 200 presumably normal individuals. The paraspinal shadow could be identified in nearly all cases on the left side and in approximately one-third on the right. The range of variation was greater on the left side than one the right. The left paraspinal shadow was wider at the upper levels and in individuals above 40 years of age.

  16. Preoperative Duplex Scanning is a Helpful Diagnostic Tool in Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Megan S; Likes, Kendall C; Mirza, Serene; Cao, Yue; Cohen, Anne; Lum, Ying Wei; Freischlag, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic role of venous and arterial duplex scanning in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Retrospective review of patients who underwent duplex ultrasonography prior to first rib resection and scalenectomy (FRRS) for NTOS from 2005 to 2013. Abnormal scans included ipsilateral compression (IC) with abduction of the symptomatic extremity (>50% change in subclavian vessel flow), contralateral (asymptomatic side) compression (CC) or bilateral compression (BC). A total of 143 patients (76% female, average age 34, range 13-59) underwent bilateral preoperative duplex scanning. Ipsilateral compression was seen in 44 (31%), CC in 12 (8%), and BC in 14 (10%). Seventy-three (51%) patients demonstrated no compression. Patients with IC more often experienced intraoperative pneumothoraces (49% vs. 25%, P duplex ultrasonography can assist in NTOS diagnosis. Ipsilateral compression on abduction often correlates with Adson testing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Cranial thoracic vertebral canal stenosis in three juvenile large-breed brachycephalic dogs treated by unilateral hemilaminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Amanda; Marchevsky, Andrew

    2017-05-22

    To describe the surgical treatment and outcome for juvenile dogs with cranial thoracic vertebral canal stenosis treated by unilateral hemilaminectomy. Case series. Three large-breed brachycephalic dogs of various breeds (Dogue de Bordeaux, Australian Bulldog, Boerboel) with neurological signs consistent with a myelopathy of the third thoracic (T) to third lumbar (L) spinal cord segment. Information on clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging, surgical procedures, postoperative complications, recovery and outcome is described. Neurological signs were present and progressive for two to four weeks prior to surgery and ranged from mild ataxia to paralysis. Cranial thoracic vertebral canal stenosis was diagnosed with computed tomography imaging. Lateral and dorsolateral spinal cord compression was present at multiple sites between T2 and T6. Alternating left and right-sided compressions were common. Surgical treatment was by unilateral, continuous hemilaminectomy over three to six vertebral spaces. Postoperative morbidity was minimal and return of independent ambulation was rapid (median: 13.5 days, range: 2-29 days). Neurological status in one dog worsened four months after surgery due to reoccurrence of osseous compression; unilateral hemilaminectomy was repeated in this dog. Long-term follow-up ranged from six to 10 months; neurological signs had completely resolved in one dog and substantially improved in the other two dogs. Unilateral hemilaminectomy was associated with rapid return of independent ambulation and substantial improvement in neurological scores.

  18. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.)

  19. Thoracic solitary pedunculated osteochondroma in a child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wali Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zubair Wali,1 Khalid I Khoshhal21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, King Fahd Hospital, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: This case report describes the rare presentation of a thoracic pedunculated osteochondroma in a child, arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Clinical features: A 7-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a swelling in her back. The patient was suffering from atraumatic, progressive painless back swelling, of approximately 2 years duration. The physical examination showed a healthy child, with a well-defined mass, about 4 × 6 cm, located around the midline of the upper thoracic spine. No clinical signs of hereditary multiple exostoses were detected. Plain radiographs and computerized tomography were suggestive of a pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.Intervention and outcome: The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. The pathologist confirmed the diagnosis. Follow up for 2 years did not show any evidence of clinical or radiological recurrence.Conclusion: The current report describes a rare case and the management of a solitary pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra in a child below the age of 10 years.Keywords: benign tumors, hereditary multiple exostoses, spine column tumors, thoracic vertebra

  20. Symptomatic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case series and technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Wright, Neill M

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on the treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there are few data on clinical outcomes. In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomatology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially because of multiple sclerosis. Finally, compared with compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISCH led to rapid improvement despite a long duration of symptoms. Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair.

  1. Assessing Readmission After General, Vascular, and Thoracic Surgery Using ACS-NSQIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Donald J.; Haider, Adil; Haut, Elliot; Dodson, Rebecca; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ahuja, Nita; Sweeney, John; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2012, Medicare began cutting reimbursement for hospitals with high readmission rates. We sought to define the incidence and risk factors associated with readmission after surgery. Methods A total of 230,864 patients discharged after general, upper gastrointestinal (GI), small and large intestine, hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB), vascular, and thoracic surgery were identified using the 2011 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Readmission rates and patient characteristics were analyzed. A predictive model for readmission was developed among patients with length of stay (LOS) 10 days or fewer and then validated using separate samples. Results Median patient age was 56 years; 43% were male, and median American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class was 2 (general surgery: 2; upper GI: 3; small and large intestine: 2; HPB: 3; vascular: 3; thoracic: 3; P readmission was 7.8% (general surgery: 5.0%; upper GI: 6.9%; small and large intestine: 12.6%; HPB: 15.8%; vascular: 11.9%; thoracic: 11.1%; P readmission included ASA class, albumin less than 3.5, diabetes, inpatient complications, nonelective surgery, discharge to a facility, and the LOS (all P readmission. A simple integer-based score using ASA class and the LOS predicted risk of readmission (area under the receiver operator curve 0.702). Conclusions Readmission among patients with the LOS 10 days or fewer occurs at an incidence of at least 5% to 16% across surgical subspecialties. A scoring system on the basis of ASA class and the LOS may help stratify readmission risk to target interventions. PMID:24022435

  2. Nonoperative Treatment of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures : A Prospective Randomized Study of Different Treatment Options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadhouder, Agnita; Buskens, Erik; Vergroesen, Diederik A.; Fidler, Malcolm W.; de Nies, Frank; Oner, F. C.

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare nonoperative treatment methods for traumatic thoracic and lumbar compression fractures and burst fractures. Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial with long-term follow-up. Setting: Two general hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients/Participants: Patients

  3. Ligamentum flavum hematomas of the cervical and thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Florian; Tuettenberg, Jochen; Grau, Armin; Weis, Joachim; Krauss, Joachim K

    2014-01-01

    To report extremely rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Only six cases of thoracic ligamentum flavum hematomas and three cases of cervical ligamentum flavum hematomas have been reported so far. Two patients presented with tetraparesis and one patient presented with radicular pain and paresthesias in the T3 dermatome. MRI was performed in two patients, which showed a posterior intraspinal mass, continuous with the ligamentum flavum. The mass was moderately hypointense on T2-weighted images and hyperintense on T1-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. The third patient underwent cervical myelography because of a cardiac pacemaker. The myelography showed an intraspinal posterior mass with compression of the dural sac at C3/C4. All patients underwent a hemilaminectomy to resect the ligamentum flavum hematoma and recovered completely afterwords, and did not experience a recurrence during follow-up of at least 2 years. This case series shows rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Surgery achieved complete recovery of the preoperative symptoms in all patients within days. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  5. MRI findings in thoracic outlet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Sharifov, Rasul; Kilicarslan, Rukiye; Alkan, Alpay [Bezmialem Vakif University, Department of Radiology, Fatih/Istanbul (Turkey); Cevikol, Can; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku [Akdeniz University, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    We discuss MRI findings in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A total of 100 neurovascular bundles were evaluated in the interscalene triangle (IS), costoclavicular (CC), and retropectoralis minor (RPM) spaces. To exclude neurogenic abnormality, MRIs of the cervical spine and brachial plexus (BPL) were obtained in neutral. To exclude compression on neurovascular bundles, sagittal T1W images were obtained vertical to the longitudinal axis of BPL from spinal cord to the medial part of the humerus, in abduction and neutral. To exclude vascular TOS, MR angiography (MRA) and venography (MRV) of the subclavian artery (SA) and vein (SV) in abduction were obtained. If there is compression on the vessels, MRA and MRV of the subclavian vessels were repeated in neutral. Seventy-one neurovascular bundles were found to be abnormal: 16 arterial-venous-neurogenic, 20 neurogenic, 1 arterial, 15 venous, 8 arterial-venous, 3 arterial-neurogenic, and 8 venous-neurogenic TOS. Overall, neurogenic TOS was noted in 69%, venous TOS in 66%, and arterial TOS in 39%. The neurovascular bundle was most commonly compressed in the CC, mostly secondary to position, and very rarely compressed in the RPM. The cause of TOS was congenital bone variations in 36%, congenital fibromuscular anomalies in 11%, and position in 53%. In 5%, there was unilateral brachial plexitis in addition to compression of the neurovascular bundle. Severe cervical spondylosis was noted in 14%, contributing to TOS symptoms. For evaluation of patients with TOS, visualization of the brachial plexus and cervical spine and dynamic evaluation of neurovascular bundles in the cervicothoracobrachial region are mandatory. (orig.)

  6. The effect of short-term upper thoracic self-mobilization using a Kaltenborn wedge on pain and cervical dysfunction in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyung-Taek; Hwangbo, Gak

    2018-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short-term self-joint mobilization of the upper spine using a Kaltenborn wedge on the pain and cervical dysfunction of patients with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven patients with neck pain were divided into two groups; the self-mobilization group (SMG, n=13) and the self-stretching group (SSG, n=14). The SMG performed upper thoracic self-mobilization and the SSG performed self-stretching exercises as a short-term intervention for a week. To assess the degree of neck pain, the visual analog scale (VAS) was utilized, and to measure the joint range of motion at the flexion-extension, it was compared and analyzed by using the goniometer. [Results] Both SMG and SSG show a significant decrease in the visual analog scale and a significant increase in joint range of motion within the group. In the comparison of groups, there was no significant difference, but it indicated effects on improving the range of motion of extension in SMG. [Conclusion] Self-mobilization of the upper spine, using a Kaltenborn wedge, was useful in alleviating pain in and dysfunction of the cervical spine, and in particular, in improving cervical spine extension in this study.

  7. Radiologic-anatomic correlation of thoracic vertebrae and rib shadows in chest digital radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Isao; Itoh, Harumi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an introduction to parsing the radiologic appearance of thoracic vertebrae and ribs. In the study, the radiologic-anatomic correlation technique was applied to promote further understanding of normal chest radiographs. The thoracic vertebrae and ribs of chest radiographs were compared with each macroscopic radiologic and computed tomography (CT) image. The rib parsed the linear shadow of the body of the rib. The macroscopic and radiologic images of thoracic vertebrae and ribs were evaluated to explain their normal radiologic findings. The results of such correlation were summarized as follows: The lamina of the vertebral arch was visualized due to anterior rotation of the upper thoracic vertebrae. The density ratio of the thoracic-vertebrae shadow was almost the same in the vertebral body and vertebral arch. The linear shadow superimposed on the rib corresponded to the inferior margin of the rib. The radiologic-anatomic correlation technique was useful to evaluate normal radiologic findings, and the study was useful to radiological technologists. (author)

  8. Comparative study between ultrasound guided TAP block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M Elsayed Goda

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transverses abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transverses abdominis block.

  9. Thoracic surgery in solving enormous elevation of the left hemidiaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijanović Vlado

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acquired elevation of the diaphragm is mostly the result of phrenic nerve paralysis, some of thoracic and abdominal patological states, and also some of neuromuscular diseases. Surgical treatment is rarely performed and is indicated when lung compression produces disabilitating dyspnea, and includes plication of diaphragm. The goal of this case report has been to show completely documented diagnostic procedures and surgical treatment one of rare pathological condition. Case report. A 62-year-old patient was admitted to our clinic because of surgical treatment of the enormous elevation of the left hemidiaphragm. After thoracotomy and plication of the bulging diaphragm, lung compression did not exist any more and mediastinum went back in the normal position. Conclusion. Elevation of the diaphragm rarely demands surgical correction. When it is complicated with lung compression and disabilitating dyspnea, surgical treatment has extremely useful functional effect.

  10. A rare malformation of urinary system: Right ectopic thoracic kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Ilgi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An ectopic kidney is a common developmental anomaly of the urinary system. However, the thoracic kidney (TK is the rarest state form of an aberrant kidney. The aim of this case report is defining the symptoms in TK diagnosis and constructing a treatment model will promote the best outcomes. These patients come to the physician with the various symptoms, and they could be diagnosed incidentally. In our case, we describe 40 years female patient with severe respiratory problems and upper back pain. In the pulmonary clinic, suspected mass was diagnosed with chest X-ray, and computerized tomography detected nontraumatic nonhernia associated, a truly ectopic TK. Moreover, the thoracic surgeon and urologist team decided to exploration and reconstructed the right ectopic kidney. The 1st month of the control of patient symptoms was disappeared. Overall, TK should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of thoracic tumors. Surgical exploration and reconstruction should be thought in patients who have severe respiratory symptoms.

  11. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P. (Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China)), email: zqpddn1@gmail.com; Sun, H.H. (Dept. of Orthopaedic, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical Univ., Xian Shaanxi (China)); Jiang, Y.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  12. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P.; Sun, H.H.; Jiang, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  13. Involvement of upper torso stress amplification, tissue compression and distortion in the pathogenesis of keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Shamin; Madaree, Anil

    2012-03-01

    Keloids are benign tumours composed of fibrous tissue produced during excessive tissue repair triggered by minor injury, trauma or surgical incision. Although it is recognized that keloids have a propensity to form in the upper torso of the body, the predisposing factors responsible for this have not been investigated. It is crucial that the aetiopathoical factors implicated in keloid formation be established to provide guidelines for well-informed more successful treatment. We compared keloid-prone and keloid-protected skin, identified pertinent morphological differences and explored how inherent structural characteristics and intrinsic factors may promote keloid formation. It was determined that keloid prone areas were covered with high tension skin that had low stretch and a low elastic modulus when compared with skin in keloid protected areas where the skin was lax with a high elastic modulus and low pre-stress level. Factors contributing to elevated internal stress in keloid susceptible skin were the protrusion of hard connective tissue such as bony prominences or cartilage into the dermis of skin as well as inherent skin characteristics such as the bundled arrangement of collagen in the reticular dermis, the existent high tension, the low elastic modulus, low stretch ability, contractile forces exerted by wound healing fibroblastic cells and external forces. Stress promotes keloid formation by causing dermal distortion and compression which subsequently stimulate proliferation and enhanced protein synthesis in wound healing fibroblastic cells. The strain caused by stress also compresses and occludes microvessels causing ischaemic effects and reperfusion injury which stimulate growth when blood rich in growth factors returns to the tissue. The growth promoting effects of increased internal stress, primarily, and growth factors released by reperfusing blood, manifest in keloid formation. Other inherent skin characteristics promoting keloid growth during the

  14. Prediction and analysis of human thoracic impact responses and injuries in cadaver impacts using a full human body finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jesse; El-Jawahri, Raed; Chai, Li; Barbat, Saeed; Prasad, Priya

    2003-10-01

    Human thoracic dynamic responses and injuries associated with frontal impact, side impact, and belt loading were investigated and predicted using a complete human body finite element model for an average adult male. The human body model was developed to study the impact biomechanics of a vehicular occupant. Its geometry was based on the Visible Human Project (National Library of Medicine) and the topographies from human body anatomical texts. The data was then scaled to an average adult male according to available biomechanical data from the literature. The model includes details of the head, neck, ribcage, abdomen, thoracic and lumbar spine, internal organs of the chest and abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. The present study is focused on the dynamic response and injuries of the thorax. The model was validated at various impact speeds by comparing predicted responses with available experimental cadaver data in frontal and side pendulum impacts, as well as belt loading. Model responses were compared with similar individual cadaver tests instead of using cadaver corridors because the large differences between the upper and lower bounds of the corridors may confound the model validation. The validated model was then used to study thorax dynamic responses and injuries in various simulated impact conditions. Parameters that could induce injuries such as force, deflection, and stress were computed from model simulations and were compared with previously proposed thoracic injury criteria to assess injury potential for the thorax. It has been shown that the model exhibited speed sensitive impact characteristics, and the compressibility of the internal organs significantly influenced the overall impact response in the simulated impact conditions. This study demonstrates that the development of a validated FE human body model could be useful for injury assessment in various cadaveric impacts reported in the literature. Internal organ injuries, which are

  15. Symptomatic Thoracic Nerve Root Herniation into an Extradural Arachnoid Cyst : Case Report and Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Duyff, Ruurd F.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare and usually asymptomatic. They preferentially are situated in the thoracic extradural space and almost always dorsal. SEACs may present with back pain and/or cord compression symptoms. Needle aspiration, needle fenestration,

  16. Thoracic mobilisation and periscapular soft tissue manipulations in the management of chronic Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc (PIVD - An innovative manual therapy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kiran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common cause of CLBP is discogenic lower back pain. Researches haveshown that connective tissue remodelling occurs in CLBP and thoracic spinal mobility and thoracolumbar mobility have higher correlations with LBP. Aims To see the effect of upper back fascia and periscapular muscles stretching and thoracic mobilisation to reduce symptoms in subjects with CLBP due to lumbar disk herniation. Methods A total of 40 subjects with CLBP due to Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc (PIVD were recruited and randomly distributed in two groups. Group 1 was given stretching of upper back fascia and periscapular muscles and thoracic mobilization along with conventional exercises (Cyriax listing correction -I followed by repeated McKenzie back extension exercise and Core muscle strengthening. Group 2 received only conventional exercises. Outcome Measures: visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index and Modified Schober's Test. Measurements were taken before and after three weeks of treatment, for five days/week. Results Overall results of the study, both Group 1 and Group 2 showed improvement in pain, function and lumbar Range of Motion (ROM after three weeks of intervention. However, Group 1 improved significantly to a greater extent in pain, ROM and function than the Group 2. Conclusion Stretching of periscapular muscles and fascia of the upper back and mobilisation of upper thoracic spine is found to be effective for the management of chronic low back pain due to PIVD.

  17. The effect of starting point placement technique on thoracic transverse process strength: an ex vivo biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Douglas C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thoracic pedicle screws in spinal deformity, trauma, and tumor reconstruction is becoming more common. Unsuccessful screw placement may require salvage techniques utilizing transverse process hooks. The effect of different starting point placement techniques on the strength of the transverse process has not previously been reported. The purpose of this paper is to determine the biomechanical properties of the thoracic transverse process following various pedicle screw starting point placement techniques. Methods Forty-seven fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae from T2 to T9 were disarticulated and matched by bone mineral density (BMD and transverse process (TP cross-sectional area. Specimens were randomized to one of four groups: A, control, and three others based on thoracic pedicle screw placement technique; B, straightforward; C, funnel; and D, in-out-in. Initial cortical bone removal for pedicle screw placement was made using a burr at the location on the transverse process or transverse process-laminar junction as published in the original description of each technique. The transverse process was tested measuring load-to-failure simulating a hook in compression mode. Analysis of covariance and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the data. Results Technique was a significant predictor of load-to-failure (P = 0.0007. The least squares mean (LS mean load-to-failure of group A (control was 377 N, group B (straightforward 355 N, group C (funnel 229 N, and group D (in-out-in 301 N. Significant differences were noted between groups A and C, A and D, B and C, and C and D. BMD (0.925 g/cm2 [range, 0.624-1.301 g/cm2] was also a significant predictor of load-to-failure, for all specimens grouped together (P P 0.05. Level and side tested were not found to significantly correlate with load-to-failure. Conclusions The residual coronal plane compressive strength of the thoracic transverse process

  18. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  19. The Role at Rehabilitation in Treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hosseinian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Thoracic outlet syndrome is a complex disorder caused by neurovascular irritation in the region of the thoracic outlet. The syndrome have been said to be mainly due to anomalous structures in the thoracic outlet, treatment for thoracic outlet syndrome varies among different institutions, and there has not been any standard program. In general conservative and surgical treatment can be do if necessary. Materials & Methods: The rehabilitation program consists of exercise and physiotherapy and brace designed to hold the posture in which thoracic outlet is enlarged. Exercise program was designed simple enough to be performed in the daily living or during work after minimal training and isometric exercises of Serratus anterior, Levator Scapulae and Erector Spinae muscles to be performed in one posture: flexion and elevation of scapular girdle and correction position of upper-thoracic spine. During 7 years, 131 cases of (T.O.S. were evaluated that 26 cases (20% have operated and 84 cases (64% have treated with conservative treatment and 21 cases (16% have been candidate for surgery but they didn't accepted. Results: All of the cases have treated with conservative treatment for four months. 84 cases responded well and no further treatment was needed. 47 cases were not satisfied with. The outcome of their treatment, that 26 cases have operated and 21 cases have not accepted the operation and continued the conservative treatment, they have had pain and slightly disability. 23 cases of operated group responded well and they have resumed to work, one case has had neuropraxia for about one year. Conclusion: Most cases of thoracic outlet syndrome (T.O.S. can be treated conservatively. Surgically treatment is indicated only in cases severe enough to make them disable to work. It is better all the patients undergo conservative treatment for at least four months then will decided for surgical treatment.

  20. Least median of squares filtering of locally optimal point matches for compressible flow image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Castillo, Richard; White, Benjamin; Rojo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Compressible flow based image registration operates under the assumption that the mass of the imaged material is conserved from one image to the next. Depending on how the mass conservation assumption is modeled, the performance of existing compressible flow methods is limited by factors such as image quality, noise, large magnitude voxel displacements, and computational requirements. The Least Median of Squares Filtered Compressible Flow (LFC) method introduced here is based on a localized, nonlinear least squares, compressible flow model that describes the displacement of a single voxel that lends itself to a simple grid search (block matching) optimization strategy. Spatially inaccurate grid search point matches, corresponding to erroneous local minimizers of the nonlinear compressible flow model, are removed by a novel filtering approach based on least median of squares fitting and the forward search outlier detection method. The spatial accuracy of the method is measured using ten thoracic CT image sets and large samples of expert determined landmarks (available at www.dir-lab.com). The LFC method produces an average error within the intra-observer error on eight of the ten cases, indicating that the method is capable of achieving a high spatial accuracy for thoracic CT registration. (paper)

  1. Comparison of intraosseous pentobarbital administration and thoracic compression for euthanasia of anesthetized sparrows (Passer domesticus) and starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Murphy, Joanne R; Engilis, Andrew; Pascoe, Peter J; Williams, D Colette; Gustavsen, Kate A; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Keel, M Kevin; Polley, Tamsen M; Engilis, Irene E

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare intraosseous pentobarbital treatment (IPT) and thoracic compression (TC) on time to circulatory arrest and an isoelectric electroencephalogram (EEG) in anesthetized passerine birds. ANIMALS 30 wild-caught adult birds (17 house sparrows [Passer domesticus] and 13 European starlings [Sturnus vulgaris]). PROCEDURES Birds were assigned to receive IPT or TC (n = 6/species/group). Birds were anesthetized, and carotid arterial pulses were monitored by Doppler methodology. Five subdermal braided-wire electrodes were used for EEG. Anesthetic depth was adjusted until a continuous EEG pattern was maintained, then euthanasia was performed. Times from initiation of euthanasia to cessation of carotid pulse and irreversible isoelectric EEG (indicators of death) were measured. Data (medians and first to third quartiles) were summarized and compared between groups within species. Necropsies were performed for all birds included in experiments and for another 6 birds euthanized under anesthesia by TC (4 sparrows and 1 starling) or IPT (1 sparrow). RESULTS Median time to isoelectric EEG did not differ significantly between treatment groups for sparrows (19.0 and 6.0 seconds for TC and IPT, respectively) or starlings (88.5 and 77.5 seconds for TC and IPT, respectively). Median times to cessation of pulse were significantly shorter for TC than for IPT in sparrows (0.0 vs 18.5 seconds) and starlings (9.5 vs 151.0 seconds). On necropsy, most (14/17) birds that underwent TC had grossly visible coelomic, pericardial, or perihepatic hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that TC might be an efficient euthanasia method for small birds. Digital pressure directly over the heart during TC obstructed venous return, causing rapid circulatory arrest, with rupture of the atria or vena cava in several birds. The authors propose that cardiac compression is a more accurate description than TC for this procedure.

  2. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariya, Shuji; Nakatani, Miyuki; Yoshida, Rie; Ueno, Yutaka; Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  3. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  4. Management of an ingested fish bone in the lung using video-assist thoracic surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sichuang; Tan, Sipin; Peng, Muyun; Yu, Fenglei

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of lung abscess caused by an ingested fish bone that was successfully treated by minimally invasive surgery. Although cases of ingested foreign body abscess are well reported, lung abscess caused by ingested fish bone is extremely rare. To date, less than 10 similar cases have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, the case presented in this case report is the first report of this kind that was successfully treated by video-assist thoracic surgery (VATS). A 47-year-old man was admitted to department of thoracic surgery with the complaint of continues dry cough and fever. The patient accidentally swallowed a long sharp-blade-shaped fish bone 20 days before, which perforated the upper thoracic esophagus on the right and embedded in the right upper lobe.The diagnosis was verified by computed tomography scan and a video-assist thoracic surgery procedure was successfully performed to treat the patient. The patient survived the esophageal perforation fortunately without involvement of great vessel injury and probable mediastinitis. This report may provide additional experience on lung abscess caused by ingested fish bones. However, it is also important to educate the public of the risks of trying to force an ingested object down into the stomach.

  5. Trunk muscle activation in a person with clinically complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Carpenter, Mark G; Cresswell, Andrew G; Thorstensson, Alf

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if, and how, upper body muscles are activated in a person with high thoracic spinal cord injury, clinically classified as complete, during maximal voluntary contractions and in response to balance perturbations. Data from one person with spinal cord injury (T3 level) and one able-bodied person were recorded with electromyography from 4 abdominal muscles using indwelling fine-wire electrodes and from erector spinae and 3 upper trunk muscles with surface electrodes. Balance perturbations were carried out as forward or backward support surface translations. The person with spinal cord injury was able to activate all trunk muscles, even those below the injury level, both in voluntary efforts and in reaction to balance perturbations. Trunk movements were qualitatively similar in both participants, but the pattern and timing of muscle responses differed: upper trunk muscle involvement and occurrence of co-activation of ventral and dorsal muscles were more frequent in the person with spinal cord injury. These findings prompt further investigation into trunk muscle function in paraplegics, and highlight the importance of including motor tests for trunk muscles in persons with thoracic spinal cord injury, in relation to injury classification, prognosis and rehabilitation.

  6. Thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Kawakita, Eiji; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kono, Toshibumi; Murata, Tetsuya; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2008-01-15

    A case of thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria (ochronotic spondyloarthropathy) is presented. To present and review the first reported case of an alkaptonuric patient with concomitant thoracic myelopathy. Alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disease, is characterized by accumulation of homogentistic acid, ochronosis, and destruction of connective tissue resulting in degenerative spondylosis and arthritis. Despite the high incidence of intervertebral disc diseases among patients with alkaptonuria, neurologic symptoms caused by spinal disease are rare. Thoracic myelopathy in a patient with alkaptonuria has not been previously reported. The clinical course, radiologic features, pathology, and treatment outcome of an alkaptonuria patient with thoracic myelopathy was documented. Myelopathy of the patient was caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. The neurologic symptoms of the patient were markedly improved after surgery. We have reported for the first time, that an alkaptonuria patient showed thoracic myelopathy caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. Decompression followed by the instrumented fusion of the thoracic spine was effective for improving the neurologic symptoms.

  7. [Biomedicine in thoracic surgery: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, M; Steinke, M; Walles, T

    2013-06-01

    Biomedicine represents a new scientific field at the interface of human, molecular and cell biology and medicine. Comprising the diverse disciplines of stem cell research, tissue engineering and material sciences, biomedicine gives rise to new approaches in research and therapy for - to date - unmet medical issues. Biomedical research is currently conducted in many medical, especially surgical subspecialties, and a number of successful developments have already been brought to clinical application. Concerning thoracic surgery, biomedical approaches are pursued primarily for tissue and organ replacement of the upper airways, lung and thoracic wall. In spite of a comparatively small research foundation, five different concepts have been clinically implemented worldwide, due to a lack of established treatment options in the case of extensive disease of the greater airways. In this review, the clinical background and the tissue-specific basics of tracheobronchial biomedicine are presented. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  9. Anterolateral Approach for Central Thoracic Disc Prolapse-Surgical Strategies Used to Tackle Differing Operative Findings: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krunal; Budohoski, Karol P; Kenyon, Olivia R P; Barone, Damiano G; Santarius, Thomas; Kirollos, Ramez W; Mannion, Richard J; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2018-04-02

    Thoracic disc prolapses causing cord compression can be challenging. For compressive central disc protrusions, a posterior approach is not suitable due to an unacceptable level of cord manipulation. An anterolateral transthoracic approach provides direct access to the disc prolapse allowing for decompression without disturbing the spinal cord. In this video, we describe 2 cases of thoracic myelopathy from a compressive central thoracic disc prolapse. In both cases, informed consent was obtained. Despite similar radiological appearances of heavy calcification, intraoperatively significant differences can be encountered. We demonstrate different surgical strategies depending on the consistency of the disc and the adherence to the thecal sac. With adequate exposure and detachment from adjacent vertebral bodies, soft discs can be, in most instances, separated from the theca with minimal cord manipulation. On the other hand, largely calcified discs often present a significantly greater challenge and require thinning the disc capsule before removal. In cases with significant adherence to dura, in order to prevent cord injury or cerebrospinal fluid leak a thinned shell can be left, providing total detachment from adjacent vertebrae can be achieved. Postoperatively, the first patient, with a significantly calcified disc, developed a transient left leg weakness which recovered by 3-month follow-up. This video outlines the anatomical considerations and operative steps for a transthoracic approach to a central disc prolapse, whilst demonstrating that computed tomography appearances are not always indicative of potential operative difficulties.

  10. Diffuse arachnoid ossification and multiple arachnoid cysts presenting with progressive thoracic myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Kashima, Masahiro; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo [The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Biosciences, Tokushima (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    An ossified arachnoid membrane combined with cystic formation is rarely reported as a cause of spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with diffuse ossification of the arachnoid membrane (arachnoid ossification) and multiple cystic changes (arachnoid cyst) at the thoracic and lumbar spine. The lesions were surgically removed and progressive deterioration was prevented, although no marked improvement of neurological symptoms was attained. (orig.)

  11. Comparative study between ultrasound guided tap block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries. Randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M. Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transversus abdominis block.

  12. Repeated measures of recent headache, neck and upper back pain in Australian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, K; Nyland, L; Milanese, S

    2006-07-01

    The epidemiological and clinical literature identifies strong associations between adult headache, cervical and thoracic spine dysfunction and spinal posture. This paper reports on the prevalence and incidence of headache, neck and upper back pain which occurred in the previous week, in urban Australians aged 13-17 years. Commencing in 1999, we followed a cohort of South Australian students through 5 years of secondary schooling. Of our commencing cohort of students, 132 (30%) provided data on bodily pain every year. For both girls and boys, there was a significantly decreasing prevalence of headache over the study period, while neck pain and upper back pain increased. There was a significantly increasing trend over time for boys with upper back pain. Twenty percent of girls and boys consistently reported headache, neck pain or upper back pain over 5 years. The progression of early adolescent headaches to mid-adolescent neck and upper back pain potentially reflects the adolescents' biomechanical responses to intrinsic and extrinsic imposts. This requires further investigation to understand the causes of adolescent headache, neck and upper thoracic pain.

  13. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  14. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  15. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  16. Trial study on design of irradiated fields of radiotherapy in cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zeng Zhifan; Cui Nianji; He Zhichun; Huang Shaomin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare three kinds of irradiation treatment plans for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer, in order to arrived at proper decision for the patient. Methods: From February 2001 to June 2004, 43 such patients were studied with three different simulated treatment plans made including conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan for every one. All plans were evaluated with iso- dose curve and dose-volume histogram. Results: GTV on 95% isodose curve was 99.5%, 98.2% and 87.4% in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; PTV 1 and PTV 2 on 95% isodose with 97.8%, 97.2%, 94.8% and 95.8%, 86.6%, 73.7%. The volume of > 20 Gy dose of left lung accepted was 18.6%, 17.2% and 32.3%, in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; the right lung received 20.5% ,19.9% and 35.5%. Conclusions: Conformal plan is the best in radiotherapy, as it can provide ideal dose distribution of irradiated target with adequate protection of the normal tissues. Conventional four-field plan, being easy to carry, out, can replace the conformal plan in most situations. Conventional two-field has the most uneven dose distribution and largest lung volume irradiated. (authors)

  17. Surgical decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis in achondroplasia: indication and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen; Peul, Wilco

    2012-08-01

    The achondroplastic spinal canal is narrow due to short pedicles and a small interpedicular distance. Compression of neural structures passing through this canal is therefore regularly encountered but rarely described. Symptomatology, radiological evaluation, and treatment of 20 patients with achondroplasia who underwent decompression of the thoracic spinal cord are described and outcome is correlated with the size of the spinal canal and the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle. Scores from the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Nurick scale, European Myelopathy scale, Cooper myelopathy scale for lower extremities, and Odom criteria before and after surgery were compared. Magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated to determine the size of the spinal canal, spinal cord compression, and presence of myelomalacia. The thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was measured using fluoroscopy. Patient symptomatology included deterioration of walking pattern, pain, cramps, spasms, and incontinence. Magnetic resonance images of all patients demonstrated spinal cord compression due to degenerative changes. Surgery resulted in a slight improvement on all the ranking scales. Surgery at the wrong level occurred in 15% of cases, but no serious complications occurred. The mean thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was 20°, and no correlation was established between this angle and outcome after surgery. No postoperative increase in this angle was reported. There was also no correlation between size of the spinal canal and outcome. Decompressive surgery of the thoracic spinal cord in patients with achondroplasia can be performed safely if anatomical details are taken into consideration. Spondylodesis did not appear essential. Special attention should be given to the method of surgery, identification of the level of interest, and follow-up of the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle.

  18. Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzcr, J.; Kozlowski, K.

    2008-01-01

    Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia is the most frequent form of Small Thorax - Short Rib Syndromes. Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia in two patients with different clinical course is reported. Radiographic examination is the only method to diagnose Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia with certainty. The correct diagnosis is important for prognostication and genetic counseling. It also excludes the necessity of further, often expensive investigations. (author)

  19. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  20. Movement coordination and differential kinematics of the cervical and thoracic spines in people with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2013-07-01

    Research on the kinematics and inter-regional coordination of movements between the cervical and thoracic spines in motion adds to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and coordination of the cervical and thoracic spines during active movements of the neck. Three-dimensional spinal kinematics and movement coordination between the cervical, upper thoracic, and lower thoracic spines were examined by electromagnetic motion sensors in thirty-four individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty-four age- and gender-matched asymptomatic subjects. All subjects performed a set of free active neck movements in three anatomical planes in sitting position and at their own pace. Spinal kinematic variables (angular displacement, velocity, and acceleration) of the three defined regions, and movement coordination between regions were determined and compared between the two groups. Subjects with chronic neck pain exhibited significantly decreased cervical angular velocity and acceleration of neck movement. Cross-correlation analysis revealed consistently lower degrees of coordination between the cervical and upper thoracic spines in the neck pain group. The loss of coordination was most apparent in angular velocity and acceleration of the spine. Assessment of the range of motion of the neck is not sufficient to reveal movement dysfunctions in chronic neck pain subjects. Evaluation of angular velocity and acceleration and movement coordination should be included to help develop clinical intervention strategies to promote restoration of differential kinematics and movement coordination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The management of thoracic inlet syndrome associated with Hurler's syndrome: a novel surgical technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahsan, Rauf M

    2012-02-01

    A 21-year-old male developed significant swelling of his tongue after a respiratory arrest. The patient had a history of Hurler\\'s syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiogram delineated that the swelling was due to compression of his internal jugular veins at the level of the first rib, resulting in thoracic inlet obstruction. The standard surgical treatment of thoracic inlet obstruction was not suitable in this patient\\'s case due to his short thick neck and his characteristic Hurler\\'s syndrome body habitus. Therefore, a novel surgical strategy was used to decompress his head and neck vessels. The manubrium was widened using an iliac crest bone graft, stabilised using internal fixation plates and reconstructed with a pectoral muscle flap.

  2. Lumbar vertebral haemangioma causing pathological fracture, epidural haemorrhage, and cord compression: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, S; Khan, S K; Braybrooke, J R

    2011-01-01

    Vertebral haemangiomas are recognized to be one of the commonest benign tumours of the vertebral column, occurring mostly in the thoracic spine. The vast majority of these are asymptomatic. Infrequently, these can turn symptomatic and cause neurological deficit (cord compression) through any of four reported mechanisms: (1) epidural extension; (2) expansion of the involved vertebra(e) causing spinal canal stenosis; (3) spontaneous epidural haemorrhage; (4) pathological burst fracture. Thoracic haemangiomas have been reported to be more likely to produce cord compression than lumbar haemangiomas. A forty-nine year old male with acute onset spinal cord compression from a pathological fracture in a first lumbar vertebral haemangioma. An MRI delineated the haemangioma and extent of bleeding that caused the cord compression. These were confirmed during surgery and the haematoma was evacuated. The spine was instrumented from T12 to L2, and a cement vertebroplasty was performed intra-operatively. Written consent for publication was obtained from the patient. The junctional location of the first lumbar vertebra, and the structural weakness from normal bone being replaced by the haemangioma, probably caused it to fracture under axial loading. This pathological fracture caused bleeding from the vascularized bone, resulting in cord compression.

  3. COMPLEX TREATMENT OF PATIENT WITH MULTIPLE FRACTURES OF THE VERTEBRAE IN THE THORACIC SPINE

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    S. V. Vissarionov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented an example of a complex treatment of pediatric patient with multiple fractures of the vertebrae in the thoracic spine. The child was operated on the burst fracture of a Th5 vertebra. Due to the presence of vertebral compression fractures Th8 a course of conservative treatment by the orthosis in hyperextension brace. Follow-up was 15 months.

  4. Extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jincheng; Tao Hua; Zha Wenwu; Xu Kangxiong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Should the entire mediastinum (M), bilateral supraclavicular areas(S) and the left gastric area(L) be all included in the irradiation field. Methods The clinical data of 204 such patients treated from 1996 through 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. They were classified into four groups: group A, 26 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum M alone; group B, 139 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum and bilateral supraclavicular areas M + S; group C, 10 patients irradiation to the mediastinum plus left gastric area M + L; and group D, 29 patients irradiation to all these three areas ( M + S + L). The overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan- Meier method and comparison of these groups was done with the Logrank test. Prognostic variables were entered into a Cox regression model controlling the age, gender, length, site, pT, pN, and treatment received. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all 204 patients were 83.8%, 53.2%, 34.1% and 77.8%, 51.6%, 33.8% , respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rates for patients in group A, group B, group C, and group D were 36.3%, 30.7%, 40.0% and 43.6% (χ 2 = 3.05, P=0.385), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the pT and pN were independent risk factors for disease-free survival rate, whereas treatment arm gave no significant difference (χ 2 =2.77, P=0.096). None of the 43 patents without irradiation to the L had abdominal lymph node metastasis from lesions in the upper and upper-middle third (located middle third but invasion to the upper third) thoracic esophagus. The data of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis between patients with and without irradiation showed that S in lesion in the lower and middle-lower third (located middle third but invasion to the lower third) thoracic

  5. Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with isolated thoracic symptoms: a case report

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    Drescher Robert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts represent a rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Case presentation A 55-year-old man with a history of chronic pancreatitis was admitted with intermittent dyspnea, dysphagia and weight loss. Chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large paracardial pancreatic pseudocyst causing cardiac and esophageal compression. Conclusion Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts are a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. These pseudocysts may lead to isolated thoracic symptoms. For accurate diagnostic and therapy planning, a multimodal imaging approach is necessary.

  6. Thoracic CT in the ED: a study of thoracic computed tomography utilisation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the use of thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) in the Emergency Department of a Dublin Academic Teaching Hospital over a six month period. Data was retrieved using the hospital\\'s computerised information system. There were 202 referrals in total for thoracic CT from the Emergency Department during this time period. The most common indication for thoracic CT referral was for the investigation of pulmonary embolism with 127 (63%) referrals. There were 40 (25%) referrals for suspected malignancy and lung disease, whilst 8 (4%) of the referrals were for investigation of thoracic aortic dissection, 8 (4%) for infection, and 6 (3%) were for investigation of thoracic injury. Only 8 (4%) of all referrals were for investigation of injury as a result of chest trauma.

  7. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  8. Effect of cervical vs. thoracic spinal manipulation on peripheral neural features and grip strength in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Aguirre, Francisco; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto M; Boscá-Gandía, Juan J; Ricard, François; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás

    2017-06-01

    Cervical and thoracic spinal manipulative therapy has shown positive impact for relief of pain and improve function in non-specific mechanical neck pain. Several attempts have been made to compare their effectiveness although previous studies lacked a control group, assessed acute neck pain or combined thrust and non-thrust techniques. To compare the immediate effects of cervical and thoracic spinal thrust manipulations on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. Randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Private physiotherapy clinical consultancy. Eighty-eight subjects (32.09±6.05 years; 72.7% females) suffering neck pain (grades I or II) of at least 12 weeks of duration. Participants were distributed into three groups: 1) cervical group (N.=28); 2) thoracic group (N.=30); and 3) control group (N.=30). One treatment session consisting of applying a high-velocity low-amplitude spinal thrust technique over the lower cervical spine (C7) or the upper thoracic spine (T3) was performed, while the control group received a sham-manual contact. Measurements were taken at baseline and after intervention of the pressure pain threshold over the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Secondary measures included assessing free-pain grip strength with a hydraulic dynamometer. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing between-groups in any of the outcome measures (P>0.05). Those who received thrust techniques, regardless of the manipulated area, reported an immediate increase in mechanosensitivity over the radial (both sides) and left ulnar nerve trunks (Ppain perception over the radial nerve also improved (P≤0.025). Low-cervical and upper-thoracic thrust manipulation is no more effective than placebo to induce immediate changes on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. A single

  9. Press to compress contaminated wastes drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, J.

    1993-01-01

    This patent describes a press for contaminated wastes drums pressing. The press is made of a structure comprising a base and an upper stringer bind to the base by vertical bearers, a compression system comprising a main cylinder and a ram, connected to the upper stringer

  10. Evaluation of a new image compression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, P.R.; Kroon, H.M.; Noordveld, R.B.; DeValk, J.P.J.; Seeley, G.W.; Westerink, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of a new image compression technique, subband coding using vector quantization, on 44 CT examinations of the upper abdomen. Three independent radiologists reviewed the original images and compressed versions. The compression ratios used were 16:1 and 20:1. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed no difference in the diagnostic contents between originals and their compressed versions. Subjective visibility of anatomic structures was equal. Except for a few 20:1 compressed images, the observers could not distinguish compressed versions from original images. They conclude that subband coding using vector quantization is a valuable method for data compression in CT scans of the abdomen

  11. Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injury with an iron rod: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranpreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injuries are potentially life-threatening due to the associated haemorrhagic shock and visceral injury. The management of these injuries poses specific challenges in pre-hospital care, transport, and management strategies. We report a 35-year-old male having impalement injury of the left thorax and left upper arm with a metallic rod used for construction of the house after a fall from height. One rod penetrated thorax from left shoulder and exit point was present just above the iliac crest and second rod was seen piercing left upper arm. Patient was successfully managed without any intraoperative, post-operative surgical complications, neurological damage or permanent injuries.

  12. Patterns of failure after complete resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for postoperative radiation therapy volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wencheng; Wang Qifeng; Xiao Zefen; Yang Longhai; Liu Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze intrathoracic or extrathoracic recurrence pattern after surgical resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and its help for further modify and improvement on the target of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods: One hundred and ninety-five patients who had undergone resection of TESCC at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences enrolled from April 1999 to July 2007. Sites of failure on different primary location of esophageal cancer were documented. Results: Patients with upper or middle thoracic esophageal cancer had higher proportion of intrathoracic recurrence. Patients with lower thoracic esophageal cancer had more intrathoracic recurrence and abdominal lymph node metastatic recurrence. Histological lymph node status has nothing to do with intrathoracic recurrence, supraclavicular lymph node (SLN) metastasis or distant metastasis (χ 2 =1.58, 0.06, 0.04, P =0.134, 0.467, 0.489, respectively), whereas the chance of abdominal lymph node metastases in N positive patients was significantly higher than that in N 0 patients (28.7%: 10.6%, χ 2 =9.94, P =0.001), and so did in middle thoracic esophageal cancer (20.0%: 5.6%, χ 2 =5.67, P =0.015). Anatomic recurrence rate of patients with proximal resection margin no more than 3 cm was significantly higher compared to those more than 3 cm (25.0%: 11.3%, χ 2 =5.65, P=0.019). Conclusions: Mediastinum is the most common recurrence site.According to recurrence site, the following radiation targets are recommended: when tumor was located at the upper or middle thoracic esophagus with negative N status, the mediastinum, the tumor bed and the supraclavicular region should be included as postoperative RT target; when tumor was located at the middle thoracic esophagus with positive N or located at the lower thoracic esophagus, the abdominal lymph node should be added.If the proximal resection margin was no more than 3 cm, the anastomotic-stoma should be included

  13. Outcomes from the Delphi process of the Thoracic Robotic Curriculum Development Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Dorn, Patrick; Dunning, Joel; Cardillo, Giuseppe; Schmid, Ralph A; Collins, Justin; Baste, Jean-Marc; Limmer, Stefan; Shahin, Ghada M M; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Pardolesi, Alessandro; Meacci, Elisa; Stamenkovic, Sasha; Casali, Gianluca; Rueckert, Jens C; Taurchini, Mauro; Santelmo, Nicola; Melfi, Franca; Toker, Alper

    2018-06-01

    As the adoption of robotic procedures becomes more widespread, additional risk related to the learning curve can be expected. This article reports the results of a Delphi process to define procedures to optimize robotic training of thoracic surgeons and to promote safe performance of established robotic interventions as, for example, lung cancer and thymoma surgery. In June 2016, a working panel was spontaneously created by members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) with a specialist interest in robotic thoracic surgery and/or surgical training. An e-consensus-finding exercise using the Delphi methodology was applied requiring 80% agreement to reach consensus on each question. Repeated iterations of anonymous voting continued over 3 rounds. Agreement was reached on many points: a standardized robotic training curriculum for robotic thoracic surgery should be divided into clearly defined sections as a staged learning pathway; the basic robotic curriculum should include a baseline evaluation, an e-learning module, a simulation-based training (including virtual reality simulation, Dry lab and Wet lab) and a robotic theatre (bedside) observation. Advanced robotic training should include e-learning on index procedures (right upper lobe) with video demonstration, access to video library of robotic procedures, simulation training, modular console training to index procedure, transition to full-procedure training with a proctor and final evaluation of the submitted video to certified independent examiners. Agreement was reached on a large number of questions to optimize and standardize training and education of thoracic surgeons in robotic activity. The production of the content of the learning material is ongoing.

  14. An unusual renal accessory artery originating from the thoracic aorta and its potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Talović

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unsual anatomical vascular blood supply to the right kidney. In an analysis of kidneys, by dissection of 39 foetuses, additional renal arteries were found in 18 cases (46.15%. In only one case (2.5% was it noticed that the right kidney was supplied with blood by three renal arteries, one main and two additional arteries. One of the additional arteries, marked as the upper pole artery of aortic origin, separated from the thoracic aorta at the level of T11 (the eleventh thoracic rib, 1.5 cm above the truncus coeliacus. This artery, after passing through the diaphragm, entered the renal hilus at its upper part and served to vasculate that part of the kidney. Conclusion. The importance of this study is seen in the fact that anatomic knowledge of variations in the vascularization of the kidneys is of exceptional practical importance. Also, this information may concern transplant surgeons involved in living donor nephrectomies.

  15. UPPER THORACIC SPINE FRACTURE ASSOCIATED WITH FRACTURE OF THE STERNUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAQUÍN VALERO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: The objectives of this presentation are to analyze the kinematics that causes this association, describe the impact of the injury, and evaluate the treatment performed Methods: Three cases are analyzed by quantifying the displacement and angulation of the sternum, the characteristics of the spinal injury and deformity, treatment, and complications Results: The mechanism that causes the injury is flexion-distraction, the component of the vertebral body presented is type A, and the most affected region was T5. Two patients had neurological picture E. Sternum injury was caused by direct trauma Conclusion: The association of these was observed in patients who have suffered from high-energy trauma in a car accident. There was no relationship between the angulation of the sternum and its displacement to the degree of kyphosis and displacement of the thoracic spine. It is important to carry out good radiographic studies that include the sternum when there is suspicion of this relationship.

  16. Surgical treatment of double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with a rigid proximal thoracic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Ito, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    There is limited consensus on the optimal surgical strategy for double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Recent studies have reported that pedicle screw constructs to maximize scoliosis correction cause further thoracic spine lordosis. The objective of this study was to apply a new surgical technique for double thoracic AIS with rigid proximal thoracic (PT) curves and assess its clinical outcomes. Twenty one consecutive patients with Lenke 2 AIS and a rigid PT curve (Cobb angle ≥30º on side-bending radiographs, flexibility ≤30 %) treated with the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique (SDRRT) were included. In this technique, a temporary rod is placed at the concave side of the PT curve. Then, distraction force is applied to correct the PT curve, which reforms a sigmoid double thoracic curve into an approximate single thoracic curve. As a result, the PT curve is typically converted from an apex left to an apex right curve before applying the correction rod for PT and main thoracic curve. All patients were followed for at least 2 years (average 2.7 years). The average main thoracic and PT Cobb angle correction rate at the final follow-up was 74.7 and 58.0 %, respectively. The average preoperative T5-T12 thoracic kyphosis was 9.3°, which improved significantly to 19.0° (p corrected using SDRRT for Lenke 2 AIS with a rigid PT curve.

  17. Dual compression is not an uncommon type of iliac vein compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wan-Yin; Gu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-Jian; Lou, Wen-Sheng; He, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Typical iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) is characterized by compression of left common iliac vein (LCIV) by the overlying right common iliac artery (RCIA). We described an underestimated type of IVCS with dual compression by right and left common iliac arteries (LCIA) simultaneously. Thirty-one patients with IVCS were retrospectively included. All patients received trans-catheter venography and computed tomography (CT) examinations for diagnosing and evaluating IVCS. Late venography and reconstructed CT were used for evaluating the anatomical relationship among LCIV, RCIA and LCIA. Imaging manifestations as well as demographic data were collected and evaluated by two experienced radiologists. Sole and dual compression were found in 32.3% (n = 10) and 67.7% (n = 21) of 31 patients respectively. No statistical differences existed between them in terms of age, gender, LCIV diameter at the maximum compression point, pressure gradient across stenosis, and the percentage of compression level. On CT and venography, sole compression was commonly presented with a longitudinal compression at the orifice of LCIV while dual compression was usually presented as two types: one had a lengthy stenosis along the upper side of LCIV and the other was manifested by a longitudinal compression near to the orifice of external iliac vein. The presence of dual compression seemed significantly correlated with the tortuous LCIA (p = 0.006). Left common iliac vein can be presented by dual compression. This type of compression has typical manifestations on late venography and CT.

  18. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudeman, Eline A; Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi D S; Jöbsis, G Joost; Arts, Mark P; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior stenosis. The postoperative course was complicated by severe intracranial hypotension attributed to the erroneous placement of a low-pressure drain placed in the pleural cavity instead of a lumbar drain; this resulted in subdural hematoma's necessitating subsequent surgery. Severe neurological deterioration occurring after thoracic decompressive surgery may rarely be attributed to intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Patients should be treated with external lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for 3-5 days rather than a low-pressure pleural drain to avoid the onset of intracranial hypotension leading to symptomatic subdural hematomas.

  19. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Tai; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Wang, Chun-Li; Jian, Hung-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung

    2015-07-07

    Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method.

  20. Acute Paraparesis Caused by a Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chun Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign but locally aggressive skeletal neoplasm of young adults. GCT located in the spine is relatively rare and may need a combination of surgical and adjunctive therapies. Here we present a patient who had intermittent thoracic back pain for two weeks and experienced an acute episode of decreased muscle power of both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging examinations of the thoracic spine revealed that the patient had severe spinal canal compression caused by pathological fracture due to a tumor within the seventh thoracic vertebra. She underwent an emergent surgical intervention for total removal of the tumor and spinal reconstruction with autologous rib grafts and instruments. Postoperatively, the patient made an uneventful recovery of muscle power of bilateral lower limbs. She subsequently received adjuvant radiotherapy. In a follow-up period of 36 months, the patient had no clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence. Even though spinal location for GCT is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with osteolytic lesions or pathological fractures of the vertebra, especially in young female patients sustaining no trauma who had a clinical history of persistent low back pain.

  1. Characterization of particle deformation during compression measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H X; Heinämäki, J; Yliruusi, J

    1999-09-20

    Direct compression of riboflavin sodium phosphate tablets was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The technique is non-invasive and generates three-dimensional (3D) images. Tablets of 1% riboflavin sodium phosphate with two grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were individually compressed at compression forces of 1.0 and 26.8 kN. The behaviour and deformation of drug particles on the upper and lower surfaces of the tablets were studied under compression forces. Even at the lower compression force, distinct recrystallized areas in the riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were observed in both Avicel PH-101 and Avicel PH-102 tablets. At the higher compression force, the recrystallization of riboflavin sodium phosphate was more extensive on the upper surface of the Avicel PH-102 tablet than the Avicel PH-101 tablet. The plastic deformation properties of both MCC grades reduced the fragmentation of riboflavin sodium phosphate particles. When compressed with MCC, riboflavin sodium phosphate behaved as a plastic material. The riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were more tightly bound on the upper surface of the tablet than on the lower surface, and this could also be clearly distinguished by CLSM. Drug deformation could not be visualized by other techniques. Confocal laser scanning microscopy provides valuable information on the internal mechanisms of direct compression of tablets.

  2. Confounding compression: the effects of posture, sizing and garment type on measured interface pressure in sports compression clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Driller, Matthew William; Shing, Cecilia Mary; Fell, James William; Halson, Shona Leigh; Halson, Shona Louise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure the interface pressure exerted by lower body sports compression garments, in order to assess the effect of garment type, size and posture in athletes. Twelve national-level boxers were fitted with sports compression garments (tights and leggings), each in three different sizes (undersized, recommended size and oversized). Interface pressure was assessed across six landmarks on the lower limb (ranging from medial malleolus to upper thigh) as athletes assumed sitting, standing and supine postures. Sports compression leggings exerted a significantly higher mean pressure than sports compression tights (P sports compression garments is significantly affected by garment type, size and posture assumed by the wearer.

  3. One-stage sequential bilateral thoracic expansion for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthialu, Nagarajan; Mussa, Shafi; Owens, Catherine M; Bulstrode, Neil; Elliott, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) is a rare disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, reduced diameter of the thoracic cage and extrathoracic organ involvement. Fatal, early respiratory insufficiency may occur. Two-stage lateral thoracic expansion has been reported, addressing each side sequentially over 3-12 months. While staged repair theoretically provides less invasive surgery in a small child with respiratory distress, we utilized a single stage, bilateral procedure aiming to rapidly maximize lung development. Combined bilateral surgery also offered the chance of rapid recovery, and reduced hospital stay. We present our early experience of this modification of existing surgical treatment for an extremely rare condition, thought to be generally fatal in early childhood. Nine children (6 males, 3 females; median age 30 months [3.5-75]) underwent thoracic expansion for Jeune syndrome in our centre. All patients required preoperative respiratory support (5 with tracheostomy, 8 requiring positive pressure ventilation regularly within each day/night cycle). Two children underwent sequential unilateral (2-month interval between stages) and 7 children bilateral thoracic expansion by means of staggered osteotomies of third to eighth ribs and plate fixation of fourth to fifth rib and sixth to seventh rib, leaving the remaining ribs floating. There was no operative mortality. There were 2 deaths within 3 months of surgery, due to pulmonary hypertension (1 following two-stage and 1 following single-stage thoracic expansion). At the median follow-up of 11 months (1-15), 3 children have been discharged home from their referring unit and 2 have significantly reduced respiratory support. One child remains on non-invasive ventilation and another is still ventilated with a high oxygen requirement. Jeune syndrome is a difficult condition to manage, but bilateral thoracic expansion offers an effective reduction in ventilator requirements in these children

  4. Practical use of bone scan in patients with an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Deuk Soo; An, Byoung Keun; Yu, Chang Hun; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Paik, Je Won

    2015-02-01

    Rib fractures are one of main causes of chest or flank pain when related to an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF). The authors investigated the incidence and risk factors of rib fracture in 284 patients with OVCF using bone scans and evaluated the feasibility as to whether bone scans could be utilized as a useful screening tool. Hot uptake lesions on ribs were found in 122 cases (43.0%). The factors analyzed were age, sex, number and locations of fractured vertebrae, BMD, and compression rates as determined using initial radiography. However, no statistical significances were found. In 16 cases (5.6%), there were concurrent multiple fractures of both the thoracic and lumbar spines not detected by single site MRI. Sixty cases (21.1%) of OVCF with the a compression rate of less than 15% could not be identified definitely by initial plain radiography, but were confirmed by bone scans. It is concluded that a bone scan has outstanding ability for the screening of rib fractures associated with OVCF. Non-adjacent multiple fractures in both thoracic and lumbar spines and fractures not identified definitely by plain radiography were detected on bone scans, which provided a means for determining management strategies and predicting prognosis.

  5. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  6. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  7. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery

  8. Hybrid constructs for tridimensional correction of the thoracic spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a comparative analysis of universal clamps versus hooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Even, Julien; Lefevre, Yan; Fitoussi, Franck; Presedo, Ana; Penneçot, Georges-François; Mazda, Keyvan

    2010-02-01

    Retrospective study of prospectively collected data. Compare Universal Clamps (UCs) and hooks for the thoracic correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In scoliosis surgery, sagittal correction is as important as frontal correction due to the risk of junctional kyphosis. Compared to all-screw constructs, hybrid constructs with lumbar pedicle screws and thoracic hooks or sublaminar wires have been shown to achieve similar coronal correction while providing superior postoperative thoracic kyphosis. The authors used a novel sublaminar thoracic implant, the UC with improvements over sublaminar wires. Hybrid constructs using thoracic UCs were compared to those with thoracic hooks. This series involved 150 patients treated for AIS with hybrid constructs. A total of 75 consecutive patients operated from 2001 to 2003, who had thoracic hooks with in situ contouring, distraction, and compression (Group 1), were compared to 75 consecutive patients operated from 2004 to 2006, who had thoracic UCs with posteromedial translation (Group 2). All had intraoperative somatosensory/motor-evoked potential monitoring and at least 2-years follow-up. Except for follow-up (longer in Group 1), the 2 groups were similar before surgery. The UCs achieved better thoracic coronal correction (P motor-evoked potentials. UC reduced operative time by 20% (60 minutes; P < 0.001) and blood loss by 23% (250 mL; P < 0.001). Although both of these hybrid constructs efficaciously corrected the coronal and axial deformities in AIS, the results of the UC technique were superior to those achieved with hooks in all 3 planes, especially the sagittal plane. Moreover, the UC technique is straightforward and safe, reducing both operative duration and blood loss.

  9. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis: A rareness in a young adult with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Shehab; Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Kohla, Samah; Soliman, Dina; Khirfan, Diala; Tambuerello, Adriana; Talaat, Mohamed; Nashwan, Abdulqadir; Caparrotti, Palmira; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of a thalassemia major male patient with back pain associated to severe weakness in lower extremities resulting in the ability to ambulate only with assistance. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of  thoracic and lumbosacral spine was requested. A posterior intraspinal extradural mass lesion compressing the spinal cord at the level of thoracic T5-8 was present, suggesting an extramedullary hematopoietic centre, compressing the spinal cord. He was treated successfully with thalassemia major alone. The patient was treated with blood transfusion, dexamethasone, morphine and paracetamol, followed by radiotherapy in 10 fractions to the spine (daily fraction of 2Gy from T3 to T9, total dose 20 Gy). His pain and neurologic examination quickly improved. A new MRI of the spine, one week after radiotherapy, showed an improvement of the extramedullary hematopoietic mass compression. In conclusion, EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis and spinal cord symptoms. MRI is the most effective method of demonstrating EMH. The rapid recognition and treatment can dramatically alleviate symptoms. There is still considerable controversy regarding indications, benefits, and risks of each of modality of treatment due to the infrequency of this disorder.

  10. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Tai Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method.

  11. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  13. ROLE OF MRI IN EVALUATION OF COMPRESSIVE MYELOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raseshkumar Rasiklal Vyas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Aim of the study was to find out various causes of compressive myelopathy and to characterise them. MATERIALS AND METHODS Total of 48 cases were analysed over a period of January 2016 to January 2017 and were evaluated using MRI spine studies. RESULTS MRI, because of its exemplary tissue characterisation and high contrast resolution, excellently demonstrates the anatomical details and pathological process. Thus, is a superior modality in diagnosing Spinal cord lesions as well as associated soft tissue injuries, inter-vertebral discs and ligaments. In our study, traumatic injuries (43% were found to be the most common cause of Compressive myelopathy, other were Infections (23%, primary malignancies (17%, and Metastasis (17%. Thoracic spine was found to be the most frequent site in cases of Traumatic injuries. 40 out of total 48 cases had extradural, and the rest 8 had intra-dural compressive lesions. CONCLUSION The study concludes that patients with suspected Compressive myelopathies benefit from evaluation with MRI, which is highly accurate for characterising and identifying the underlying aetiology, as well as associated features. Thus, explicitly helps in stating the long-term prognosis of the patient.

  14. SU-E-T-125: Application of Jaw-Tracking Function in VMAT for Upper Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Chen, J; Zhai, T; Yan, L; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of the Jaw-tracking with RapidArc(JT-RapidArc) plans for upper thoracic esophageal cancer. Methods: Treatment planning was designed by using RapidArc and JT-RapidArc techniques for 11 consecutive patients. The dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk(OAR), conformity index(CI), heterogeneity index(HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(B-P) and monitor units(MUs) were compared between the different techniques. Results: JT-RapidArc plans provided the better coverage of PTV1(64) D98 and HI(P<0.05), lower MLD, D2 of PTV1(64) and PTV2(54), but no statistically difference in CI(P>0.05), which comparison with RapidArc plans. Plans with JT- RapidArc had lower Lung of V5, V10, V13, V20, V30, MLD(P<0.05); heart of V20, MLD(P<0.05); and B-P of V5, V10, V15, V20, V30(P<0.05); but no significantly different in Spinal cord and SC-PRV as compared with RapidArc plans. JT-RapidArc plans increaseed the MUs by 1%(P>0.05) as compared with RapidArc plans. Conclusion: All of the plans had met the requirements of clinical dosimetry. JT-RapidArc plans as compared with RapidArc plans, showing better part of target coverage, part of OARS(lung and heart) and heart and B-P sparing, which MUs was slightly increased. This work was sponsored by Shantou University Medical College Clinical Research Enhancement Initiative(NO.201424)

  15. A preliminary study comparing the use of cervical/upper thoracic mobilization and manipulation for individuals with mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, David; Learman, Ken; O'Halloran, Bryan; Cleland, Josh

    2015-05-01

    Neck pain is routinely managed using manual therapy (MT) to the cervical and thoracic spines. While both mobilizations and manipulations to these areas have been shown to reduce neck pain, increase cervical range of motion, and reduce disability, the most effective option remains elusive. The purpose of this preliminary trial was to compare the pragmatic use of cervical and thoracic mobilizations vs. manipulation for mechanical neck pain. This trial included 20 patients with mechanical neck pain. Each patient was randomized to receive either mobilization or manipulation to both the cervical and thoracic spines during their plan of care. Within-group analyses were made with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and between-group analyses were made with Mann-Whitney U. There were no between-group differences for any of the dependent variables including cervical active range of motion (CAROM) (P = 0.18), deep cervical flexion (DCF) endurance (P = 0.06), numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) (P = 0.26), the neck disability index (NDI, P = 0.33), patient-specific functional scale (PSFS, P = 0.20), or the global rating of change (GROC) scale (P = 0.94). Within-group results were significant for all outcome variables (Ppain.

  16. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  17. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  19. Two-Stage Surgical Management of Multilevel Symptomatic Thoracic Haemangioma Using Ethanol and Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Degulmadi, Devanand; Brahmajoshyula, Venkatramana; Mayi, Shivanand; Teegala, Suman

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a 56-year-old obese female who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in her lower limbs for three months. She was bed-ridden for one week before reporting to our hospital. Plain radiographs showed vertical striations in multiple vertebrae classical of haemangioma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spine revealed multiple thoracic and lumbar vertebral haemangiomas. Extra osseous extension of haemangioma at T12 was causing spinal cord compression. Two-stage surg...

  20. A reappraisal of pediatric thoracic surface anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nicholas J; Morreau, Jonty; Sugunesegran, Ramanen; Taghavi, Kiarash; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2017-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of surface anatomy is fundamental to safe clinical practice. A paucity of evidence in the literature regarding thoracic surface anatomy in children was identified. The associations between surface landmarks and internal structures were meticulously analyzed by reviewing high quality computed tomography (CT) images of 77 children aged from four days to 12 years. The results confirmed that the sternal angle is an accurate surface landmark for the azygos-superior vena cava junction in a plane through to the level of upper T4 from birth to age four, and to lower T4 in older children. The concavity of the aortic arch was slightly below this plane and the tracheal and pulmonary artery bifurcations were even lower. The cardiac apex was typically at the 5 th intercostal space (ICS) from birth to age four, at the 4 th ICS and 5 th rib in 4-12 year olds, and close to the midclavicular line at all ages. The lower border of the diaphragm was at the level of the 6 th or 7 th rib at the midclavicular line, the 7 th ICS and 8 th rib at the midaxillary line, and the 11 th thoracic vertebra posteriorly. The domes of the diaphragm were generally flatter and lower in children, typically only one rib level higher than its anterior level at the midclavicular line. Diaphragm apertures were most commonly around the level of T9, T10, and T11 for the IVC, esophagus and aorta, respectively. This is the first study to provide an evidence-base for thoracic surface anatomy in children. Clin. Anat. 30:788-794, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, J; Westerdahl, E

    2010-03-01

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) of thoracic vasculature in an animal model using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Strouse, P.J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor (United States); Londy, F.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wakefield, T.W. [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Vascular Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate a gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) imaging protocol for the assessment of thoracic vessels using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing. An animal model was used to simulate imaging in infants and young children. Material and methods. Six baboons (Papio anubis), mean weight 5.7 kg, were sedated and intubated. After the injection of double-dose Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) through a peripheral vein, a coronal spoiled 3D gradient-echo volume acquisition was obtained during quiet breathing. Two radiologists reviewed the images for visualization of aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, pulmonary arteries (central, upper lobe and descending branches), and pulmonary veins (upper and lower). Results. Visualization was excellent for the aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, and pulmonary arteries, including the hilar branches. Visualization was excellent for the lower and right upper pulmonary veins and fair for the left upper pulmonary vein. There was excellent agreement between radiologists. Conclusion. Imaging of thoracic vessels with Gd-MRA using double gadolinium during quiet breathing was effective in our animal model. The advantages of this technique include a short imaging time and depiction of vascular segments - branches of pulmonary arteries and intraparenchymal segments of pulmonary veins - not optimally visualized with other non-invasive imaging techniques. (orig.)

  3. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) of thoracic vasculature in an animal model using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Strouse, P.J.; Londy, F.J.; Wakefield, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate a gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) imaging protocol for the assessment of thoracic vessels using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing. An animal model was used to simulate imaging in infants and young children. Material and methods. Six baboons (Papio anubis), mean weight 5.7 kg, were sedated and intubated. After the injection of double-dose Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) through a peripheral vein, a coronal spoiled 3D gradient-echo volume acquisition was obtained during quiet breathing. Two radiologists reviewed the images for visualization of aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, pulmonary arteries (central, upper lobe and descending branches), and pulmonary veins (upper and lower). Results. Visualization was excellent for the aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, and pulmonary arteries, including the hilar branches. Visualization was excellent for the lower and right upper pulmonary veins and fair for the left upper pulmonary vein. There was excellent agreement between radiologists. Conclusion. Imaging of thoracic vessels with Gd-MRA using double gadolinium during quiet breathing was effective in our animal model. The advantages of this technique include a short imaging time and depiction of vascular segments - branches of pulmonary arteries and intraparenchymal segments of pulmonary veins - not optimally visualized with other non-invasive imaging techniques. (orig.)

  4. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis and Ormond's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacl, G.M.; Bino, M.; Salomon, F.; Risti, B.; Marincek, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two cases of thoracic periaortal fibrosis as a manifestation of retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease) are shown on CT and MRI. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis can result in an inflammatory aneurysmo with chronic dissection. Manifestation of thoracic periaortal fibrosis may typically occur intermittently over decades. (orig.) [de

  5. Trunk muscle activity is modified in osteoporotic vertebral fracture and thoracic kyphosis with potential consequences for vertebral health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Greig

    Full Text Available This study explored inter-relationships between vertebral fracture, thoracic kyphosis and trunk muscle control in elderly people with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are associated with increased risk of further vertebral fractures; but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Several factors may explain this association, including changes in postural alignment (thoracic kyphosis and altered trunk muscle contraction patterns. Both factors may increase risk of further fracture because of increased vertebral loading and impaired balance, which may increase falls risk. This study compared postural adjustments in 24 individuals with osteoporosis with and without vertebral fracture and with varying degrees of thoracic kyphosis. Trunk muscle electromyographic activity (EMG associated with voluntary arm movements was recorded and compared between individuals with and without vertebral fracture, and between those with low and high thoracic kyphosis. Overall, elderly participants in the study demonstrated co-contraction of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles during forwards arm movements, but those with vertebral fractures demonstrated a more pronounced co-contraction than those without fracture. Individuals with high thoracic kyphosis demonstrated more pronounced alternating flexor and extensor EMG bursts than those with less kyphosis. Co-contraction of trunk flexor and extensor muscles in older individuals contrasts the alternating bursts of antagonist muscle activity in previous studies of young individuals. This may have several consequences, including altered balance efficacy and the potential for increased compressive loads through the spine. Both of these outcomes may have consequences in a population with fragile vertebrae who are susceptible to fracture.

  6. Computed tomography of thoracic and lumbar spine fractures that have been treated with Harrington instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Engler, G.; Delman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty patients with fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine underwent computed tomography (CT) following Harrington distraction instrumentation and a spinal fusion. CT was done to search for a cause of persistent cord or nerve root compression in those patients who failed to improve and completely recover their partial neurologic deficit (14 cases). The most common abnormality was the presence of residual bone fragments originating in the burst fracture of a vertebral body displaced posteriorly, into the spinal canal. In patients with complications in the late recovery period, CT found exuberant callus indenting the canal or lack of fusion of the bone grafts placed in the anterolateral aspect of the vertebral bodies. This experience indicates that CT is the modality of choice for spinal canal evaluation in those patients who fail to have an optimal clinical course following fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated with Harrington rods

  7. Endoscopic Transforaminal Thoracic Foraminotomy and Discectomy for the Treatment of Thoracic Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6–41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

  8. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Jean; Pearson, F Griffith; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Canada's contributions toward the 21st century's practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  9. A method of automatic control of the process of compressing pyrogas in olefin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podval' niy, M.L.; Bobrovnikov, N.R.; Kotler, L.D.; Shib, L.M.; Tuchinskiy, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the known method of automatically controlling the process of compressing pyrogas in olefin production by regulating the supply of cooling agents to the interstage coolers of the compression unit depending on the flow of hydrocarbons to the compression unit, to raise performance by lowering deposition of polymers on the flow through surfaces of the equipment, the coolant supply is also regulated as a function of the flows of hydrocarbons from the upper and lower parts of the demethanizer and the bottoms of the stripping tower. The coolant supply is regulated proportional to the difference between the flow of stripping tower bottoms and the ratio of the hydrocarbon flow from the upper and lower parts of the demethanizer to the hydrocarbon flow in the compression unit. With an increase in the proportion of light hydrocarbons (sum of upper and lower demethanizer products) in the total flow of pyrogas going to compression, the flow of coolant to the compression unit is reduced. Condensation of the given fractions in the separators, their amount in condensate going through the piping to the stripping tower, is reduced. With the reduction in the proportion of light hydrocarbons in the pyrogas, the flow of coolant is increased, thus improving condensation of heavy hydrocarbons in the separators and removing them from the compression unit in the bottoms of the stripping tower.

  10. Use of thoracic spine thrust manipulation for neck pain and headache in a patient following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Renata; Rowe, Robert H; Osborne, Raine; Beneciuk, Jason M

    2014-06-01

    Case report. Thoracic spine thrust manipulation has been shown to be an effective intervention for individuals experiencing mechanical neck pain. The patient was a 46-year-old woman referred to outpatient physical therapy 2 months following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. At initial evaluation, primary symptoms consisted of frequent headaches, neck pain, intermittent referred right elbow pain, and muscle fatigue localized to the right cervical and upper thoracic spine regions. Initial examination findings included decreased passive joint mobility of the thoracic spine, limited cervical range of motion, and limited right shoulder strength. Outcome measures consisted of the numeric pain rating scale, the Neck Disability Index, and the global rating of change scale. Treatment consisted of a combination of manual therapy techniques aimed at the thoracic spine, therapeutic exercises for the upper quarter, and patient education, including a home exercise program, over a 6-week episode of care. Immediate reductions in cervical-region pain (mean ± SD, 2.0 ± 1.1) and headache (2.0 ± 1.3) intensity were reported every treatment session immediately following thoracic spine thrust manipulation. At discharge, the patient reported 0/10 cervical pain and headache symptoms during all work-related activities. From initial assessment to discharge, Neck Disability Index scores improved from 46% to 16%, with an associated global rating of change scale score of +7 ("a very great deal better"). This case report describes the immediate and short-term clinical outcomes for a patient presenting with symptoms of neck pain and headache following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgical intervention. Clinical rationale and patient preference aided the decision to incorporate thoracic spine thrust manipulation as a treatment for this patient. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J.; King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.)

  12. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vertical field MR imaging of upper thorax and spine in small children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockstedt, S.; Malmgren, N.; Malmgren, L.; Ivarsson, M.L.; Larsson, E.M.; Holtaas, S.; Staahlberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    To improve image quality in a vertical field MR imaging unit, operating at low field strength (0.3 T), we have designed a half-elliptical coil for use in the upper thoracic region of small children. Our intention was also to shorten the examination time, which until now has been long, because several scans with different coils have been necessary to cover the thoracic region. The experimental coil is designed so that a child's shoulders fit into the central region. The coil consists of 2 serially connected cable-loops, mounted on a foam rubber vest. The coil performance was tested in a phantom and improvements relative to standard coils were demonstrated in in vivo studies. The results indicate that by using the half-elliptical coil, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio can be improved by a factor of 2 to 3 in the thoracic region of a child. (orig.)

  14. Sternocleidomastoid muscle metastasis of breast cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettab, M; Barrascout, E; Lamuraglia, M

    2017-01-01

    The authors report a case of 84-year-old women, with dysphagia to liquids and solid foods, and with infiltration of right stemocleidomastoid muscle that compressed the upper third of the esophagus to the thoracic hull. The biopsy of sternocleidomastoid muscle permitted the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer relapse after 22 years.

  15. Society of Thoracic Surgeons Risk Score predicts hospital charges and resource use after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; George, Timothy J; Alejo, Diane E; Merlo, Christian A; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E; Shah, Ashish S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted mortality risk score on resource use has not been previously studied. We hypothesize that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement are associated with greater hospital charges. Clinical and financial data for patients undergoing aortic valve replacement at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 10-year period (January 2000 to December 2009) were reviewed. The current Society of Thoracic Surgeons formula (v2.61) for in-hospital mortality was used for all patients. After stratification into risk quartiles, index admission hospital charges were compared across risk strata with rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Linear regression and Spearman's coefficient assessed correlation and goodness of fit. Multivariable analysis assessed relative contributions of individual variables on overall charges. A total of 553 patients underwent aortic valve replacement during the study period. Average predicted mortality was 2.9% (±3.4) and actual mortality was 3.4% for aortic valve replacement. Median charges were greater in the upper quartile of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (quartiles 1-3, $39,949 [interquartile range, 32,708-51,323] vs quartile 4, $62,301 [interquartile range, 45,952-97,103], P < .01]. On univariate linear regression, there was a positive correlation between Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and log-transformed charges (coefficient, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.07; P < .01). Spearman's correlation R-value was 0.51. This positive correlation persisted in risk-adjusted multivariable linear regression. Each 1% increase in Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score was associated with an added $3000 in hospital charges. This is the first study to show that increasing Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicts greater charges after aortic valve replacement. As competing therapies, such as percutaneous valve replacement, emerge to

  16. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants Emergency patients treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Luebeck, Germany. Main outcome measures Co-morbidities, mortality, risk factors and hospital length of stay. Results A total of 124 thoracic procedures were performed on 114 patients. There were 79 men and 36 women (average age 72.5 ±6.4 years, range 65–94). The overall operative mortality was 25.4%. The most frequent indication was thoracic/mediastinal infection, followed by peri- or postoperative thoracic complications. Risk factors for hospital mortality were a high ASA score, pre-existing diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency. Conclusions Our study documents a perioperative mortality rate of 25% in patients over 65 who required emergency thoracic surgery. The main indication for a surgical intervention was sepsis with a thoracic/mediastinal focus. Co-morbidities and the resulting perioperative complications were found to have a significant effect on both inpatient length of stay and outcome. Long-term systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus are difficult to equalize with respect to certain organ dysfunctions and significantly increase mortality. PMID:21369531

  17. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate, with or without laminectomy, for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability caused by congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Takeshi; Kanazono, Shinichi; Yoshigae, Yuki; Sharp, Nicholas J H; Muñana, Karen R

    2007-07-01

    To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in dogs with thoracic spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomalies. Retrospective clinical study. Dogs (n=9) with thoracic spinal canal stenosis. Medical records (1995-1996; 2000-2006) of 9 dogs with a myelographic diagnosis of spinal canal stenosis and/or vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly that were surgically managed by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy were reviewed. Data on pre- and postoperative neurologic status, diagnostic findings, surgical techniques, and outcomes were retrieved. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 2, and 6 months. Long-term outcome was assessed by means of clinical examination or owner telephone interviews. Spinal cord compression was confirmed by myelography, and in 2 dogs, dynamic compression by stress myelography. Eight dogs regained the ability to ambulate postoperatively. One dog with a partial recovery regained voluntary movement but did not become ambulatory. Spinal cord injury secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly may have a good outcome when treated by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy. Adequate stabilization of the vertebrae and improved neurologic outcome were achieved in most dogs. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate with or without laminectomy is an effective treatment for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

  18. Evaluations of Factors Predicting the Need for an Extra-Cervical Approach for Intra-Thoracic Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra-thoracic goiter refers to the extension of enlarged thyroid tissue into the thoracic inlet. This condition can produce symptoms of compression on adjacent organs and can sometimes be accompanied by malignant transformation. Therefore surgical treatment is almost always necessary. In order to remove the pathology with the fewest post-operative complications, selection of the appropriate surgical approach is essential. In this study we aimed to detect the criteria which help us select the best therapeutic approach.   Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 82 patients with intra-thoracic goiter were investigated. Their data were extracted from medical records and analyzed using SPSS software.   Results: Overall 82 patients, 18 (21% males and 64 (78% females with mean age of 56.38 years were studied. The most common clinical symptoms were mass (95% and dyspnea (73%. In most patients, the surgical approach was cervical (90.2%, while 9.8% of patients required an extra-cervical approach. Post-operation complications were observed in 17.1% of patients; the most common being transient recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (4.9%. Malignancy was reported in the histopathology of seven patients (8.5%. The most common malignant histopathology was papillary thyroid carcinoma (7.3%. Extension of the thyroid tissue below the uppermost level of the aortic arch was significantly correlated with the need for an extra-cervical approach to surgery (P

  19. File compression and encryption based on LLS and arithmetic coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changzhi; Li, Hengjian; Wang, Xiyu

    2018-03-01

    e propose a file compression model based on arithmetic coding. Firstly, the original symbols, to be encoded, are input to the encoder one by one, we produce a set of chaotic sequences by using the Logistic and sine chaos system(LLS), and the values of this chaotic sequences are randomly modified the Upper and lower limits of current symbols probability. In order to achieve the purpose of encryption, we modify the upper and lower limits of all character probabilities when encoding each symbols. Experimental results show that the proposed model can achieve the purpose of data encryption while achieving almost the same compression efficiency as the arithmetic coding.

  20. Does the quality of chest compressions deteriorate when the chest compression rate is above 120/min?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Taeyun; Kang, Changwoo; Park, Chanjong; Kim, Joonghee; Jo, You Hwan; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2014-08-01

    The quality of chest compressions along with defibrillation is the cornerstone of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which is known to improve the outcome of cardiac arrest. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the compression rate and other CPR quality parameters including compression depth and recoil. A conventional CPR training for lay rescuers was performed 2 weeks before the 'CPR contest'. CPR anytime training kits were distributed to respective participants for self-training on their own in their own time. The participants were tested for two-person CPR in pairs. The quantitative and qualitative data regarding the quality of CPR were collected from a standardised check list and SkillReporter, and compared by the compression rate. A total of 161 teams consisting of 322 students, which includes 116 men and 206 women, participated in the CPR contest. The mean depth and rate for chest compression were 49.0±8.2 mm and 110.2±10.2/min. Significantly deeper chest compression depths were noted at rates over 120/min than those at any other rates (47.0±7.4, 48.8±8.4, 52.3±6.7, p=0.008). Chest compression depth was proportional to chest compression rate (r=0.206, pcompression including chest compression depth and chest recoil by chest compression rate. Further evaluation regarding the upper limit of the chest compression rate is needed to ensure complete full chest wall recoil while maintaining an adequate chest compression depth. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Analysis of Deformation and Equivalent Stress during Biomass Material Compression Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guiying; Wei, Hetao; Zhang, Zhien; Yu, Shaohui; Wang, Congzhe; Huang, Guowen

    2018-02-01

    Ansys is adopted to analyze mold deformation and stress field distribution rule during the process of compressing biomass under pressure of 20Mpa. By means of unit selection, material property setting, mesh partition, contact pair establishment, load and constraint applying, and solver setting, the stress and strain of overall mold are analyzed. Deformation and equivalent Stress of compression structure, base, mold, and compression bar were analyzed. We can have conclusions: The distribution of stress forced on compressor is not completely uniform, where the stress at base is slightly decreased; the stress and strain of compression bar is the largest, and stress concentration my occur at top of compression bar, which goes against compression bar service life; the overall deformation of main mold is smaller; although there is slight difference between upper and lower part, the overall variation is not obvious, but the stress difference between upper and lower part of main mold is extremely large so that reaches to 10 times; the stress and strain in base decrease in circular shape, but there is still stress concentration in ledge, which goes against service life; contact stress does not distribute uniformly, there is increasing or decreasing trend in adjacent parts, which is very large in some parts. in constructing both.

  2. On Compression of a Heavy Compressible Layer of an Elastoplastic or Elastoviscoplastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtanyuk, L. V.; Panchenko, G. L.

    2017-11-01

    The problem of deformation of a horizontal plane layer of a compressible material is solved in the framework of the theory of small strains. The upper boundary of the layer is under the action of shear and compressing loads, and the no-slip condition is satisfied on the lower boundary of the layer. The loads increase in absolute value with time, then become constant, and then decrease to zero.Various plasticity conditions are consideredwith regard to the material compressibility, namely, the Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition, the von Mises-Schleicher plasticity condition, and the same conditions with the viscous properties of the material taken into account. To solve the system of partial differential equations for the components of irreversible strains, a finite-difference scheme is developed for a spatial domain increasing with time. The laws of motion of elastoplastic boundaries are presented, the stresses, strains, rates of strain, and displacements are calculated, and the residual stresses and strains are found.

  3. Upper digestive stenosis due to a hydatid cyst of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mohamed Salah; Ben Hadj Khalifa, Mohamed Habib; Toumi, Radhouane; Ghrissi, Rafik; Elghali, Mohamed Amine; Khenissi, Abdelmajid; Hamila, Fehmi; Letaief, Rached

    2015-03-01

    The complications of the hydatid cyst of the liver are dominated by infection and rupture. The compression of adjacent organs (mainly the inferior vena cava, the portal vein and the bile ducts) can be seen, when the cyst is located in the dome, in the hilum or within the hepatic parenchyma. Upper digestive stenosis by compression of the duodenum by the hydatid cyst is an exceptional complication. A 63 year-old patient had, for two months, upper digestive stenosis associated with a sensation of weight in the right hypochondrium. Digestive endoscopy showed an extrinsic compression of the second portion of the duodenum. Biopsies were negative. Abdominal CT showed up a hydatid cyst in the segment VI of the liver, adhering to the duodenum, with an exo-vesiculation compressing it. The patient was operated on: There was a hydatid cyst of the right lateral sector compressing the duodenum. A partial intralamellar pericystectomy was performed. Hydatid cyst of the liver, a parasitic disease described as benign, may give mechanical complications related to compression of adjacent organs (especially the bile ducts and veins). Compression of the digestive tract is exceptional. This is due to the proximity of the cyst to the duodenum and the thickness of the cyst wall.

  4. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  5. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in a patient with myelofibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Ando, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Tomonori; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Sobue, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Development and growth of hematopoietic tissue outside of the bone marrow is termed extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). It occurs in patients with hematological diseases such as myelofibrosis and thalassemia. Liver and spleen are the usual sites of EMH. However, spinal cord compression caused by EMH is a rare complication. A 65-year-old man with myelofibrosis was admitted to our hospital with progressive paraparesis. Thoracic spine MRI revealed epidural masses causing cord compression. Histological examination of the epidural mass showed evidence of EMH consisting of megakaryocytic and erythroid hyperplasia. After surgical decompression and radiotherapy, lower limb weakness and sensory disturbance were significantly improved. MRI showed disappearance of the spinal cord compression. With this therapy, he had no recurrence until he died of myelofibrosis. Spinal EMH should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with hematological diseases presenting with paraparesis. Surgical decompression and radiotherapy are effective approaches for the treatment of paraparesis due to EMH.

  7. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  8. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of dose distribution between 3DCRT and IMRT in middle thoracic and under thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dingjie; Liu Hailong; Mao Ronghu; Liu Ru; Guo Xiaoqi; Lei Hongchang; Wang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in treating esophageal carcinoma (middle thoracic section and under thoracic section) and to select reasonable treatment methods for esophagus cancer. Methods: Ten cases with cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section esophagus were chosen for a retrospective treatment-planning study. 3DCRT and IMRT plans were created for each patient: Some critical indicators were evolved in evaluating the treatment plans of IMRT (5B and 7B) and 3DCRT (3B), such as, PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures. Evaluation indicators: prescription of 50 Gy. total lung volume (V5, V10, V20), mean lung dose (MLD), spinal cord (Dmax), heart (V40) and conformality index (CI). Each plan was evaluated with respect to dose distribution,dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and additional dosimetric endpoints described below. Results: There is no significance of CRT and IMRT technique in protection of total lung volume,mean lung dose, spinal cord (Dmax), target, CI and heart. Conclusion: As To radiotherapy of esophagus cancer of the middle thoracic section and under thoracic section, IMRT has no advantage compared with 3DCRT, the selection of plan should be adapted to the situations of every patient. (authors)

  10. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, Salil; Rosenfeld, David L; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Drachtman, Richard A; Cohler, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 16 year-old male with ß thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions a...

  11. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  12. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female, yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients, repetitive throwing (5 patients, deep massage (2 patients, repetitive overhead movement (1 patient, direct trauma (1 patient, motor bike accident (1 patient, and idiopathic causes (9 patients. Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN. Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98% of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%. At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86% cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered

  13. Initial thoracic involvement in lymphoma. CT assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, A.; Corredoira, J.; Ferreiros, J.; Cabeza, B.; Jorquera, M.; Pedrosa, I.; Martinez, R.; Fernandez, C.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the initial thoracic involvement by CT in a consecutive series of patients with lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was made of thoracic CT studies made at the time of diagnosis of 259 patients with lymphoma. Mediastinal pulmonary, pleural, pericardial and chest wall involvement was assessed by CT. Of 259 patients (129 men y 130 women), 56 had Hodgkin's disease (HD) and 203 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Forty-two percent (42.5%, 110/259) of the patients had chest involvement on CT: 33 of 56 patients with HD (58.9%) and 77 of 203 patients with NHL (37.9%). All the patients with thoracic HD) and 71.4% of patients with thoracic NHL, had mediastinal lymph node involvement. of the patients with thoracic involvement 12.1% (4/33) of the patient with HD and 23.3% (18/77) of the patients with NHL had pulmonary involvement. Thoracic involvement on CT was more frequent in HD. Mediastinal lymph node involvement was the most common finding fundamentally in HD. Pulmonary disease always occurred in the presence of mediastinal lymph node involvement in HD but could occur as an isolated finding in NHL. (Author) 24 refs

  14. Computed tomographic myelography characteristics of spinal cord atrophy in juvenile muscular atrophy of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabuki, Norio; Mitomo, Masanori; Miura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Kawai, Ryuji; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-01-01

    Although atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord in juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity has been reported, the atrophic patterns of the cord, especially in the transverse section, have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study is to clarify the atrophic patterns of the cord by CT myelography (CTM) and to discuss the pathogenesis of cord atrophy. Sixteen patients with juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity were examined by CTM. Atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord, consistent with the segmental weakness, was seen in all patients. Flattening of the ventral convexity was a characteristic atrophic pattern of the cord. Bilateral cord atrophy was commonly observed; 8/12 patients with unilateral clinical form and all 4 patients with bilateral form showed bilateral cord atrophy with dominance on the clinical side. There was no correlation between the degree of cord atrophy and duration of symptoms. Flattening of the ventral convexity, associated with purely motor disturbances, reflects selective atrophy of the anterior horns in the cord, which is attributable to chronic ischemia. Cord atrophy proved to precede clinical manifestations. The characteristic atrophy of the cord provides useful information to confirm the diagnosis without long-term observation. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. A comparison of oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block versus thoracic paravertebral block for postoperative analgesia after open cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Kamhawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major challenge in the postoperative period is pain management which, if not adequately controlled, may contribute to patient discomfort and decreased patient satisfaction, and possibly increased morbidity and mortality. Both Thoracic paravertebral block and oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can be used as analgesic techniques for abdominal surgeries. Our aim in this research was comparison of cumulative 24-h post-operative morphine consumption between ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block and ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in patients who underwent an open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Patients and methods: This study was performed on 46 patients who underwent open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. All patients were randomly allocated alternatively to one of two equal groups to either undergo ultrasound-guided unilateral oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block Group (I or to undergo ultrasound-guided unilateral thoracic paravertebral block Group (II. Both groups were subjected to a similar analgesic regimen in the immediate post-operative period that involved intravenous patient-controlled morphine analgesia which was used in both groups. Results: The total morphine consumption in the first postoperative 24 h was lower in thoracic paravertebral block Group (II (9.9 mg in thoracic paravertebral block group vs. 15.4 mg in oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block Group (I with p < 0.001. The mean time of first request of analgesia in Group (I was 248.7 min compared to 432.1 for Group (II with p < 0.001. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plain block and single injection ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block are effective analgesic techniques for upper abdominal surgeries and reduces postoperative opioid requirements. However, thoracic paravertebral block is more

  16. Thoracic chordoma: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Hyo Sun; Han, Heon

    1993-01-01

    Chordoma arising from the notochordal remnants is a rare primary bone tumor in the cervicosacral region and is even more unusual in the thoracic region. The authors experienced a case of thoracic chordoma and reports its CT and MR findings

  17. Ortner's Syndrome: Secondary Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by a Great Thoracic Aorta Aneurysm

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    Zangirolami, Ana Claudia Alves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by cardiovascular disease is a rare condition, and often it is the only prominent sign of an imminent break of an aortic artery aneurysm. Objective To report left laryngeal paralysis caused by a great aortic arch aneurysm and to highlight the importance of an otorhinolaryngologic evaluation along with a thoracic radiologic study. Resumed Report A 42-year-old man complained of thickness of his voice and dysphagia for 3 months, but no thoracic pain or other relevant complaints. Video laryngoscopy revealed immobility of his left vocal fold in the paramedian position. Imaging was obtained for investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of his thorax, which showed a fusiform aneurysm in the aortic arch, leading to recurrent compression of the left laryngeal nerve. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular repair of the aneurysm. At 2-month follow-up, there was still no recovery of the laryngeal mobility. Conclusion An aortic artery aneurysm can suddenly break, requiring emergency heart surgery, and the results can be fatal in many cases. We suggest routine exam of the vocal folds in all patients with a heart condition, and we review the literature and suggest the use of imaging to reduce the number of emergency procedures.

  18. Ortner's Syndrome: Secondary Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by a Great Thoracic Aorta Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangirolami, Ana Claudia Alves; Oliveira, Frederico Vieira de; Tepedino, Miguel Soares

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by cardiovascular disease is a rare condition, and often it is the only prominent sign of an imminent break of an aortic artery aneurysm. Objective To report left laryngeal paralysis caused by a great aortic arch aneurysm and to highlight the importance of an otorhinolaryngologic evaluation along with a thoracic radiologic study. Resumed Report A 42-year-old man complained of thickness of his voice and dysphagia for 3 months, but no thoracic pain or other relevant complaints. Video laryngoscopy revealed immobility of his left vocal fold in the paramedian position. Imaging was obtained for investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of his thorax, which showed a fusiform aneurysm in the aortic arch, leading to recurrent compression of the left laryngeal nerve. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular repair of the aneurysm. At 2-month follow-up, there was still no recovery of the laryngeal mobility. Conclusion An aortic artery aneurysm can suddenly break, requiring emergency heart surgery, and the results can be fatal in many cases. We suggest routine exam of the vocal folds in all patients with a heart condition, and we review the literature and suggest the use of imaging to reduce the number of emergency procedures.

  19. Failures and complications of thoracic drainage

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    Đorđević Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thoracic drainage is a surgical procedure for introducing a drain into the pleural space to drain its contents. Using this method, the pleura is discharged and set to the physiological state which enables the reexpansion of the lungs. The aim of the study was to prove that the use of modern principles and protocols of thoracic drainage significantly reduces the occurrence of failures and complications, rendering the treatment more efficient. Methods. The study included 967 patients treated by thoracic drainage within the period from January 1, 1989 to June 1, 2000. The studied patients were divided into 2 groups: group A of 463 patients treated in the period from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1994 in whom 386 pleural drainage (83.36% were performed, and group B of 602 patients treated form January 1, 1995 to June 1, 2000 in whom 581 pleural drainage (96.51% were performed. The patients of the group A were drained using the classical standards of thoracic drainage by the general surgeons. The patients of the group B, however, were drained using the modern standards of thoracic drainage by the thoracic surgeons, and the general surgeons trained for this kind of the surgery. Results. The study showed that better results were achieved in the treatment of the patients from the group B. The total incidence of the failures and complications of thoracic drainage decreased from 36.52% (group A to 12.73% (group B. The mean length of hospitalization of the patients without complications in the group A was 19.5 days versus 10 days in the group B. The mean length of the treatment of the patients with failures and complications of the drainage in the group A was 33.5 days versus 17.5 days in the group B. Conclusion. The shorter length of hospitalization and the lower morbidity of the studied patients were considered to be the result of the correct treatment using modern principles of thoracic drainage, a suitable surgical technique, and a

  20. Magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography. Imaging aid for thoracic surgery and thoracic duct depiction based on embryological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Itsuko; Udagawa, Harushi; Takahashi, Junji; Yamase, Hiromi; Kohno, Tadasu; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    We describe the optimal protocol of magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography (MRTD) and provide examples of thoracic ducts (TD) and various anomalies. The anatomical pathway of the TD was analyzed based on embryological considerations. A total of 78 subjects, consisting of noncancer adults and patients with esophageal cancer and lung cancer, were enrolled. The MRTD protocol included a long echo time and was based on emphasizing signals from the liquid fraction and suppressing other signals, based on the principle that lymph flow through the TD appears hyperintense on T2-weighted images. The TD configuration was classified into nine types based on location [right and/or left side(s) of the descending aorta] and outflow [right and/or left venous angle(s)]. MRTD was conducted in 78 patients, and the three-dimensional reconstruction was considered to provide excellent view of the TD in 69 patients, segmentalization of TD in 4, and a poor view of the TD in 5. MRTD achieved a visualization rate of 94%. Most of the patients had a right-side TD that flowed into the left venous angle. Major configuration variations were noted in 14% of cases. Minor anomalies, such as divergence and meandering, were frequently seen. MRTD allows noninvasive evaluation of TD and can be used to identify TD configuration. Thus, this technique is considered to contribute positively to safer performance of thoracic surgery. (author)

  1. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  2. Thoracic trauma: analysis of 100 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Benito Scapolan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze thoracic trauma assisted by the EmergencyService of Hospital da Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia deSão Paulo. Methods: One hundred patients with thoracic trauma wereassisted throughout six months in 2006. Data from their records werecollected and a protocol of thoracic trauma was fulfilled. The RevisedTrauma Score was used to evaluate gravity of injury and to calculatethe survival index. Results: Prevalence of trauma injury in male from20 to 29 years old was observed. Out of all patients, 44 had blunttrauma and 56 penetrating trauma (78.6% presented stab woundsand 21.4% gun shots. Up to the settings of injuries, 23% were in thethoracoabdominal transition, 7% in the precordium and 70% in theremainder thoracic area. In those with the thoracoabdominal transitioninjury, 22.7% were hemodynamically unstable and 77.3% stable.Thoracoabdominal injury patients presented 40.9% of diaphragmwound and all were stable. Of those with precordium wound, 37.5%presented cardiac injury. In cardiac onset, 66.7% presented stableand 33.3% unstable. Thoracic drainage was the most accomplishedsurgical procedure (71%. Conclusions: The thoracic trauma patientis most prevalently young male with stab wound penetrating injury,without associated injuries, hemodynamically stable, presentinghemothorax, with high probability of survival.

  3. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabshin, Nogah; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Carrino, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  4. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabshin, Nogah (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel)), e-mail: shabshin@gmail.com; Schweitzer, Mark E. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital and Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)); Carrino, John A. (Dept. of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  5. Left atrium and pulmonary artery compression due to aortic aneurysm causing heart failure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Antonio José Lagoeiro; Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Moutinho, Victor M; Rezende, Juliano M; Alves, Patricia Y; Villacorta, Humberto; Silveira, Pedro F; Couto, Antonio A

    2018-05-09

    Patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) are mostly asymptomatic and TAA is rarely related to heart failure (HF). We report the case of an 80-year-old female patient, with type A TAA without dissection, with right pulmonary artery and left atrium compression, who presented with HF, preserved ejection fraction and acute pulmonary edema. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  7. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  8. Thoracic CT findings at hypovolemic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; Catalano, O.; Grassi, R.; Scialpi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the thoracic CT features of hypovolemic shock. Material and Methods: From a group of 18 patients with signs of hypovolemia on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, 11 were selected for our study as having also undergone a complete chest examination. Pulse rate, blood pressure, trauma score value, Glasgow coma scale value, surgical result, and final outcome were retrospectively evaluated. The CT features analyzed were: decreased cardiac volume, reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta, aortic branches and caval venous system, increased enhancement of the aorta, and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions. Results: All 11 subjects presented severe injuries and hemodynamic instability; 7 were stable enough to undergo surgery; only 1 of the 11 survived. Two patients showed none of the features of thoracic hypovolemia. All the other patients presented at least two signs: reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta in 7 cases; decreased volume of the cardiac chambers and increased aortic enhancement in 6; decreased caliber of the aortic vessels in 4; decreased caliber of the caval veins in 3; and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions in 3. Conclusions: In patients with hypovolemia, CT may show several thoracic findings in addition to abdominal ones. Knowledge of these features is important for distinguishing them from traumatic injuries. (orig.)

  9. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  10. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  11. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  12. A "conservative" method of thoracic wall dissection: a proposal for teaching human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberini, Fabrizio; Brunone, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    The common methods of dissection exposing the thoracic organs include crossing of the wall together with wide resection of its muscular planes. In order to preserve these structures, a little demolishing technique of the thoracic wall is proposed, entering the thoracic cavity without extensive resection of the pectoral muscles. This method is based on the fact that these muscles rise up from the wall, like a bridge connecting the costal plane with the upper limb, and that the pectoralis major shows a segmental constitution. SUPERIOR LIMIT: Resect the sternal manubrium transversely between the 1st and the 2nd rib. The incision is prolonged along the 1st intercostal space, separating the first sterno-costal segment of the pectoralis major from the second one, and involving the intercostal muscles as far as the medial margin of the pectoralis minor. This muscle must be raised up, and the transverse resection continued below its medial margin latero-medially along the 1st intercostal space, to rejoin the cut performed before. Then, the incision of the 1st intercostal space is prolonged below the lateral margin of the pectoralis minor, which must be kept raised up, medio-laterally as far as the anterior axillary line. INFERIOR LIMIT: It corresponds to the inferior border of the thoracic cage, resected from the xiphoid process to the anterior axillary line, together with the sterno-costal insertions of the diaphragm. Then, an incision of the sterno-pericardial ligaments and a median sternotomy from the xiphoid process to the transverse resection of the manubrium should be performed. LATERAL LIMIT: From the point of crossing of the anterior axillary line with the inferior limit, resect the ribs from the 10th to the 2nd one. The lateral part of the pectoralis major must be raised up, so that the costal resection may be continued below it. Then, at the lateral extremity of the superior incision, the first and the second sternocostal segment of the pectoralis major must be

  13. Rule of lymph node metastasis and proper target of postoperative radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zefen; Zhou Zongmei; Lv Jima; Liang Jun; Ou Guangfei; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Zhang Shiping; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the rule of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal carcinoma, and to study the proper radiation target. Methods: From September 1986 to December 1997,549 patients with esophageal carcinoma who had undergone radical resection were divided into surgery alone group (S,275 patients) or surgery plus radiotherapy group(S + R,274 patients). Radiotherapy was begun 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The radiation target included both supra-clavicular areas and the entire mediastinum. The total dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for the supra-clavicular areas and 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks for the entire mediastinum. Results: The 5-year overall survival of patients with lymph node metastasis in one anatomic site and two anatomic sites was 31.5% and 13.9% (P=0.013), respectively. For patients with > 2 positive nodes metastasis receiving surgery alone, the corresponding 5-year survival was 24.8% and 4.9% (P=0.046), respectively. The median number of dissected lymph nodes of the upper-, middle-and lower-segment esophageal carcinoma was 13, 17 and 20, respectively. The rate of metastatic lymph node in the para-esophagus region was the highest(61.5%-64.9%), which was not different among the different primary sites (P=0.922). The anastomotic stoma recurrence rate of the upper-segment esophageal carcinoma was higher than that of the middle- or lower-segment carcinomas (16.7%, 3.1%, and 7.7%, χ 2 =9.02,P<0.05). Conclusions: For the thoracic esophageal carcinoma, the number of anatomic sites of lymph node metastasis is an important factor affecting the survival. The lower rate of lymph node metastasis of the upper segment esophageal carcinoma may be corrected with the less lymph node dissected. The rate of lymph node metastasis in para-esophageal region is not related with the lesion segment. The anastomotic stoma is an important radiotherapy target for upper segment esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  14. One-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection of T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Seijiro; Goto, Tatsuya; Koike, Terumoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy of one-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection for T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine is described. A 56-year-old man with locally advanced lung cancer infiltrating the aortic wall and spine underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation, followed by en bloc resection of the aortic wall and spine with thoracic endovascular grafting. He developed postoperative chylothorax, but there were no stent graft-relat...

  15. POLYCOMP: Efficient and configurable compression of astronomical timelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of polycomp, a open-sourced, publicly available program for compressing one-dimensional data series in tabular format. The program is particularly suited for compressing smooth, noiseless streams of data like pointing information, as one of the algorithms it implements applies a combination of least squares polynomial fitting and discrete Chebyshev transforms that is able to achieve a compression ratio Cr up to ≈ 40 in the examples discussed in this work. This performance comes at the expense of a loss of information, whose upper bound is configured by the user. I show two areas in which the usage of polycomp is interesting. In the first example, I compress the ephemeris table of an astronomical object (Ganymede), obtaining Cr ≈ 20, with a compression error on the x , y , z coordinates smaller than 1 m. In the second example, I compress the publicly available timelines recorded by the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), an array of microwave radiometers onboard the ESA Planck spacecraft. The compression reduces the needed storage from ∼ 6.5 TB to ≈ 0.75 TB (Cr ≈ 9), thus making them small enough to be kept in a portable hard drive.

  16. Accidental fatal lung injury by compressed air: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayamane, Anand Parashuram; Pradeepkumar, M V

    2015-03-01

    Compressed air is being used extensively as a source of energy at industries and in daily life. A variety of fatal injuries are caused by improper and ignorant use of compressed air equipments. Many types of injuries due to compressed air are reported in the literature such as colorectal injury, orbital injury, surgical emphysema, and so on. Most of these injuries are accidental in nature. It is documented that 40 pounds per square inch pressure causes fatal injuries to the ear, eyes, lungs, stomach, and intestine. Openings of body are vulnerable to injuries by compressed air. Death due to compressed air injuries is rarely reported. Many cases are treated successfully by conservative or surgical management. Extensive survey of literature revealed no reports of fatal injury to the upper respiratory tract and lungs caused by compressed air. Here, we are reporting a fatal event of accidental death after insertion of compressed air pipe into the mouth. The postmortem findings are corroborated with the history and discussed in detail.

  17. Automated extraction of pleural effusion in three-dimensional thoracic CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Shoji; Tsunomori, Akinori

    2009-02-01

    It is important for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases to measure volume of accumulating pleural effusion in threedimensional thoracic CT images quantitatively. However, automated extraction of pulmonary effusion correctly is difficult. Conventional extraction algorithm using a gray-level based threshold can not extract pleural effusion from thoracic wall or mediastinum correctly, because density of pleural effusion in CT images is similar to those of thoracic wall or mediastinum. So, we have developed an automated extraction method of pulmonary effusion by use of extracting lung area with pleural effusion. Our method used a template of lung obtained from a normal lung for segmentation of lungs with pleural effusions. Registration process consisted of two steps. First step was a global matching processing between normal and abnormal lungs of organs such as bronchi, bones (ribs, sternum and vertebrae) and upper surfaces of livers which were extracted using a region-growing algorithm. Second step was a local matching processing between normal and abnormal lungs which were deformed by the parameter obtained from the global matching processing. Finally, we segmented a lung with pleural effusion by use of the template which was deformed by two parameters obtained from the global matching processing and the local matching processing. We compared our method with a conventional extraction method using a gray-level based threshold and two published methods. The extraction rates of pleural effusions obtained from our method were much higher than those obtained from other methods. Automated extraction method of pulmonary effusion by use of extracting lung area with pleural effusion is promising for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases by providing quantitative volume of accumulating pleural effusion.

  18. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  19. Mechanics of the Compression Wood Response: II. On the Location, Action, and Distribution of Compression Wood Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, R R; Wilson, B F

    1973-04-01

    A new method for simulation of cross-sectional growth provided detailed information on the location of normal wood and compression wood increments in two tilted white pine (Pinus strobus L.) leaders. These data were combined with data on stiffness, slope, and curvature changes over a 16-week period to make the mechanical analysis. The location of compression wood changed from the under side to a flank side and then to the upper side of the leader as the geotropic stimulus decreased, owing to compression wood action. Its location shifted back to a flank side when the direction of movement of the leader reversed. A model for this action, based on elongation strains, was developed and predicted the observed curvature changes with elongation strains of 0.3 to 0.5%, or a maximal compressive stress of 60 to 300 kilograms per square centimeter. After tilting, new wood formation was distributed so as to maintain consistent strain levels along the leaders in bending under gravitational loads. The computed effective elastic moduli were about the same for the two leaders throughout the season.

  20. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  1. Real-time direct measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression: relationship between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuichiro; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Hino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2007-08-15

    An in vivo study to measure rat spinal cord blood flow in real-time at the site of compression using a newly developed device. To evaluate the change in thoracic spinal cord blood flow by compression force and to clarify the association between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency after a spinal cord compression injury. Until now, no real-time measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression has been conducted. In addition, it has not been clearly determined whether blood flow recovery is related to motor function after a spinal cord injury. Our blood flow measurement system was a combination of a noncontact type laser Doppler system and a spinal cord compression device. The rat thoracic spinal cord was exposed at the 11th vertebra and spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression was continuously measured before, during, and after the compression. The functioning of the animal's hind-limbs was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scoring scale and the frequency of voluntary standing. Histologic changes such as permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier, microglia proliferation, and apoptotic cell death were examined in compressed spinal cord tissue. The spinal blood flow decreased on each increase in the compression force. After applying a 5-g weight, the blood flow decreased to compression), while no significant difference was observed between the 20-minute ischemia group and the sham group. In the 20-minute ischemia group, the rats whose spinal cord blood flow recovery was incomplete showed significant motor function loss compared with rats that completely recovered blood flow. Extensive breakdown of blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and the following microglia proliferation and apoptotic cell death were detected in the 40-minute complete ischemia group. Duration of ischemia/compression and blood flow recovery of the spinal cord are important factors in the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury.

  2. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  3. [Animal experiment study of anastomosis healing after partial resection of the pre-irradiated thoracic esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, C; Nilles-Schendera, A; Frommhold, H

    2000-01-01

    Multimodal therapeutic concepts in cases of neoplasms of the intestinal tract entail the risk of undesirable complications with respect to healing of wounds and anastomoses. The separate steps of a combined treatment consisting radiation therapy and partial resection of the thoracic esophagus were performed in animal experiments to study the effect of radiation therapy on the healing of anastomoses. Adult non-purebred dogs were irradiated in a defined thoracic field with a Betatron (42 MeV) and subsequently underwent esophagectomy. After resection of a 2 cm segment of the esophagus end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Different methods of irradiation and postoperative observation times resulted in a total of 8 groups of 3 animals each. Fractionated irradiation was definitely better tolerated than irradiation with a high single doses. The temporary delay of the anastomotic healing was documented histologically. Only one case of anastomotic leakage occurred, and impaired wound healing was observed in only one animal. The mode of irradiation must be regarded as important for the clinical course. Fractionated preoperative irradiation in the area of the thoracic esophagus does not lead to any relevant disturbance of wound and anastomotic healing with meticulous surgical technique and adequate intensive postoperative care. The basic feasibility of surgical therapy combined with preoperative radiotherapy in tumors of the upper digestive tract was confirmed by our experimental work.

  4. A randomized clinical trial to compare the immediate effects of seated thoracic manipulation and targeted supine thoracic manipulation on cervical spine flexion range of motion and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Steve; Olson Hunt, Megan J

    2014-05-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To determine the effectiveness of seated thoracic manipulation versus targeted supine thoracic manipulation on cervical spine pain and flexion range of motion (ROM). There is evidence that thoracic spine manipulation is an effective treatment for patients with cervical spine pain. This evidence includes a variety of techniques to manipulate the thoracic spine. Although each of them is effective, no research has compared techniques to determine which produces the best outcomes. A total of 39 patients with cervical spine pain were randomly assigned to either a seated thoracic manipulation or targeted supine thoracic manipulation group. Pain and flexion ROM measures were taken before and after the intervention. Pain reduction (post-treatment-pre-treatment) was significantly greater in those patients receiving the targeted supine thoracic manipulation compared to the seated thoracic manipulation (Pmanipulation group. The results of this study indicate that a targeted supine thoracic manipulation may be more effective in reducing cervical spine pain and improving cervical flexion ROM than a seated thoracic manipulation. Future studies should include a variety of patients and physical therapists (PTs) to validate our findings.

  5. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  6. Post traumatic intra thoracic spleen presenting with upper GI bleed! – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinra Sonali

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated splenic vein thrombosis with left sided portal hypertension is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed. Diagnosis is difficult and requires a high index of suspicion, especially in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleed in the presence of splenomegaly and normal liver function tests. Case presentation A 64 year old male presented with haematemesis and melaena. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of antral erosions in the stomach and fundal varices. A computerised tomography scan of abdomen confirmed the presence of a diaphragmatic tear and the spleen to be lying in the left hemi thorax. The appearances of the splenic vein on the scan were consistent with thrombosis. Conclusion Left sided portal hypertension as a result of isolated splenic vein thrombosis secondary to trauma is rare. The unusual presentation of our case, splenic herniation into the left hemithorax, causing fundal varices leading to upper gastrointestinal bleed 28 years after the penetrating injury, makes this case most interesting. We believe that this has not been reported in literature before.

  7. Left main bronchus compression as a result of tuberculous lymphnode compression of the right-sided airways with right lung volume loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, S; Van Wyk, M J; Goussard, P; Gie, R P

    2014-03-01

    The superior mediastinal space is confined by the sterno-manubrium anteriorly and the vertebral column posterior. An abnormal relationship between the superior mediastinal structures may result in compression of the left main bronchus. In patients with right-sided pneumonectomy an exaggerated compensatory response may lead to stretching and compression of the remainder of the intra-thoracic airway. Lymphobronchial TB mimics pneumonectomy when it causes compression of the bronchus intermedius, between nodal lymphnode groups with resultant volume loss in the right lung and displacement of the mediastinum to the right. The left main bronchus may be at risk of compression due to rotation and displacement of the major vessels. To report pediatric cases of right-sided lymphobronchial TB with volume loss, demonstrate the use of angle measurements to quantify mediastinal dynamics and support a pathogenetic theory for left main bronchus compression. CT scans in children with TB and right lung volume loss, were compared retrospectively with controls using angle measurements based on descriptions of the aorta-carinal syndrome and the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare groups. The "Pulmonary bifurcation angle" between the main pulmonary arteries reached statistical significance (P = 0.025). The "Pulmonary outflow tract rotation" angle (pulmonary trunk with the mid sagittal plane) approached statistical significance (P = 0.078). The left main bronchus ranged from complete obliteration in two patients to 0.7 cm. In 16 of 30 patients the size was reduced to less than 75% of expected. In children with right lung volume loss from TB, the compression of the contralateral bronchus is due to narrowing of the pulmonary artery bifurcation angle as the main trunk rotates towards the midline. This is comparable to the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  10. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR in thoracic disc herniations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizel, P.M.; Rodesch, G.; Baleriaux, D.; Segebarth, C.; Zegers de Beyl, D.; Haens, J. d'; Noterman, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance findings in two patients with herniated thoracic intervertebral discs are reported. The first patient was a 56-year-old woman with a small subligamentous T6-7 disc herniation, slightly lateralized to the right. The second patient was a 51-year-old man with a central and right posterolateral disc herniation, including a large calcified fragment, at the T8-9 level. The nonenhanced MR examination revealed the presence of an extradural mass lesion in both patients, impinging upon the dural sac and compressing and displacing the spinal cord posteriorly. The lesion was slightly hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted spin echo sequences. Following intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA in a dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, enhancement of the posterior longitudinal ligament was noted and triangular areas of contrast uptake were seen to occur in the epidural space above and below the herniated disc. At surgery, they were found to correspond to dilated and congested epidural veins. (orig.)

  11. Vertebral Body Compression Fractures and Bone Density: Automated Detection and Classification on CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph E; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To create and validate a computer system with which to detect, localize, and classify compression fractures and measure bone density of thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies on computed tomographic (CT) images. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived in this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. A CT study set of 150 patients (mean age, 73 years; age range, 55-96 years; 92 women, 58 men) with (n = 75) and without (n = 75) compression fractures was assembled. All case patients were age and sex matched with control subjects. A total of 210 thoracic and lumbar vertebrae showed compression fractures and were electronically marked and classified by a radiologist. Prototype fully automated spinal segmentation and fracture detection software were then used to analyze the study set. System performance was evaluated with free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Sensitivity for detection or localization of compression fractures was 95.7% (201 of 210; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 87.0%, 98.9%), with a false-positive rate of 0.29 per patient. Additionally, sensitivity was 98.7% and specificity was 77.3% at case-based receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Accuracy for classification by Genant type (anterior, middle, or posterior height loss) was 0.95 (107 of 113; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.98), with weighted κ of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.99). Accuracy for categorization by Genant height loss grade was 0.68 (77 of 113; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.76), with a weighted κ of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.47, 0.71). The average bone attenuation for T12-L4 vertebrae was 146 HU ± 29 (standard deviation) in case patients and 173 HU ± 42 in control patients; this difference was statistically significant (P high sensitivity and with a low false-positive rate, as well as to calculate vertebral bone density, on CT images. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Radiographic evaluation of obesity-caused oppression of the thoracic cavity in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, T.; Niiyama, M.; Kougo, A.; Soya, M.; Nunome, K.

    2004-01-01

    Thoracic radiographs of fifteen beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity revealed that oppression of the thoracic cavity increased with increasing degree of obesity. Oppression of the thoracic cavity was evaluated based on the length, depth, width and area of the thoracic cavity. To obtain thoracic radiographs at the terminal inspiration and expiration phases, thoracic fluororadiographs were recorded with a digital video camera. Bodyweight and the depth of the back fat layer at the seventh lumbar vertebra (DB, measured by ultrasonography) were used as indicators of the degree of obesity. The length of the thoracic cavity tended to become shorter and the depth and width of the thoracic cavity tended to increase as bodyweight increased and as DB increased. On the other hand, the area of the thoracic cavity was not clearly related to bodyweight or DB. These results suggest that oppression of the thoracic cavity due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm is compensated for by increases in the depth and width of the thoracic cavity in beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity

  13. Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwyk, Brad; Lyerly, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery present potential advantages for patients as well as new challenges for the anesthesia and surgery teams. This article describes the major aspects of the surgical approach for the most commonly performed robotic-assisted thoracic surgical procedures as well as the pertinent preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthetic concerns. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Low-cycle compression fatigue of reinforced concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.

    2010-01-01

    Paper reports on experiments performed in the low-cycle compression fatigue domain, considering two relatively high upper load levels and several lower ones. Two frequency levels were emphasized, i.e. 17.5 Hz and 0.175 Hz. An overview is given of characteristics of mechanical behaviour and of the

  15. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since...... exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...

  16. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  17. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Details of recurrence sites after elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma--a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Okuma, Kae; Wakui, Reiko; Kobayashi-Shibata, Shino; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2011-02-01

    To describe patterns of recurrence of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy. One hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients with stages I-IVB thoracic esophageal SqCC newly diagnosed between June 2000 and July 2009 and treated with 3D-CRT in our institution were recruited from our database. Definitive CRT consisted of two cycles of nedaplatin/5FU repeated every 4 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy of 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Until completion, radiotherapy was delivered to the N1 and M1a lymph nodes as ENI in addition to gross tumor volume. All 126 patients were included in this analysis, and their tumors were staged as follows: T1/T2/T3/T4, 28/18/54/26; N0/N1, 50/76; M0/M1a/M1b, 91/5/30. The mean follow-up period for the 63 surviving patients was 28.3 (±22.8) months. Eighty-seven patients (69%) achieved complete response (CR) without any residual tumor at least once after completion of CRT. After achieving CR, each of 40 patients experienced failures (local=20 and distant=20) and no patient experienced elective nodal failure without having any other site of recurrence. The upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma showed significantly more (34%) relapses at the local site than the middle (9%) or lower thoracic (11%) carcinomas. The 2-year and 3-year overall survival was 56% and 43%, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year and 3-year disease-free survival was 46%, 38% and 33%, respectively. In CRT for esophageal SqCC, ENI was effective for preventing regional nodal failure. The upper thoracic esophageal carcinomas had significantly more local recurrences than the middle or lower thoracic sites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Graft-Sparing Strategy for Thoracic Prosthetic Graft Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Gaku; Yoshida, Takeshi; Kakii, Bunpachi; Furui, Masato

    2018-04-01

    Thoracic prosthetic graft infection is a rare but serious complication with no standard management. We reported our surgical experience on graft-sparing strategy for thoracic prosthetic graft infection.  This study included patients who underwent graft-sparing surgery for thoracic prosthetic graft infection at Matsubara Tokushukai Hospital in Japan from January 2000 to October 2017.  There were 17 patients included in the analyses, with a mean age at surgery of 71.0 ± 10.5 years; 11 were men. In-hospital mortality was observed in five patients (29.4%).  Graft-sparing surgery for thoracic prosthetic graft infection is an alternative option particularly for early graft infection after hemiarch replacement. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Transitioning from video-assisted thoracic surgical lobectomy to robotics for lung cancer: are there outcomes advantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin E; Korst, Robert J; Kletsman, Elaine; Rutledge, John R

    2014-02-01

    To determine if there are advantages to transitioning to robotics by a surgeon who is already proficient in performing video-assisted thoracic surgical (VATS) lobectomy. A single surgeon proficient in VATS lobectomy initiated a robotic lobectomy program, and a retrospective review was conducted of his patients undergoing minimally invasive lobectomy (robotics or VATS) for lung cancer between 2011 and 2012. Data collected included patient/tumor characteristics, morbidity, mortality, operative times, and length of hospital stay. Over a 24-month period, a total of 69 patients underwent minimally invasive lobectomy (35 robotic, 34 VATS). Patients in each group were similar in age and clinical stage. Robotic upper lobectomy operative times were longer than VATS (172 vs 134 minutes; P = .001), with no significant difference in lower lobectomies noted (140 vs 123 minutes; P = .1). Median length of stay was 3 days in both groups, and the median number of lymph nodes harvested was 18 (robotic) versus 16 (VATS; P = .42). Morbidity and mortality for robotic versus VATS were 11% versus 18% (P = .46) and 0% versus 3% (P = .49), respectively. There does not seem to be a significant advantage for an established VATS lobectomy surgeon to transition to robotics based on clinical outcomes. The learning curve for robotic upper lobectomies seems to be more significant than that for lower lobectomies. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The voluntary driven exoskeleton Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for postoperative training of thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kengo; Abe, Tetsuya; Kubota, Shigeki; Marushima, Aiki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akira; Nakai, Kei; Saotome, Kosaku; Kadone, Hideki; Endo, Ayumu; Haginoya, Ayumu; Hada, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-05-01

    The hybrid assistive limb (HAL) is a wearable robot suit that assists in voluntary control of knee and hip joint motion by detecting bioelectric signals on the surface of the skin with high sensitivity. HAL has been reported to be effective for functional recovery in motor impairments. However, few reports have revealed the utility of HAL for patients who have undergone surgery for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (thoracic OPLL). Herein, we present a postoperative thoracic OPLL patient who showed remarkable functional recovery after training with HAL. A 63-year-old woman, who could not walk due to muscle weakness before surgery, underwent posterior decompression and fusion. Paralysis was re-aggravated after the initial postoperative rising. We diagnosed that paralysis was due to residual compression from the anterior lesion and microinstability after posterior fixation, and prescribed bed rest for a further 3 weeks. The incomplete paralysis gradually recovered, and walking training with HAL was started on postoperative day 44 in addition to standard physical therapy. The patient underwent 10 sessions of HAL training until discharge on postoperative day 73. Results of a 10-m walk test were assessed after every session, and the patient's speed and cadence markedly improved. At discharge, the patient could walk with 2 crutches and no assistance. Furthermore, no adverse events associated with HAL training occurred. HAL training for postoperative thoracic OPLL patients may enhance improvement in walking ability, even if severe impairment of ambulation and muscle weakness exist preoperatively.

  2. Frequency and significance of thoracic injuries detected on abdominal trauma CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareli, G.S.; Rhea, J.T.; Novelline, R.A.; Lawrason, N.; Sacknoff, R.; Oser, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have noted that in multiple trauma patients chest injuries inapparent on initial chest radiographs may be detected at abdominal CT. In an ongoing series of 112 patients to date, 50 chest injuries were detected in 33 patients (29%). The injuries included 15 bilateral hemothoraces, seven unilateral hemothoraces, seven posttraumatic atrelectasis, seven lung contusions, five pneumothoraces, four rib factures, two thoracic spine fractures, two chest wall emphysema, and one mediastinal emphysema. In 24 of the 33 patients (72%) the injury was not seen on the initial chest radiographs; in seven patients treatment of the chest injury was required. The authors have included screening cuts of the middle and upper chest as part of their abdominal CT protocol

  3. Paravertebral and Brachial plexus block for Abdominal flap to cover the upper limb wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report where thoracic paravertebral block and brachial plexus block were used in a sick elderly patient with poor cardiopulmonary reserve, to cover a post traumatic raw area of the upper limb by raising flap from lateral abdominal wall. The residual raw area of abdomen was then covered with the split skin graft taken from thigh.

  4. An epidural neuroblastoma causing spinal cord compression in a 67-year-old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Taub

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of disseminated neuroblastoma (NB causing epidural spinal cord compression in a 67-year-old woman. Because NB is primarily a tumor of infancy and childhood, less is known about its clinical course and optimal treatment in adults. This patient was treated with a thoracic laminectomy and tumor resection; polychemotherapy with one cycle of vindesine, cisplatin, and etoposide; one cycle of vincristine, dacarbazine, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin; and radiotherapy to the spine. She remained able to walk but died 8.5 months later of diffuse systemic tumor progression.

  5. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database to Social Security data to examine the accuracy of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Badhwar, Vinay; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sanchez, Juan A; Morales, David L; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Haan, Constance K; George, Kristopher M; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Han, Jane M; Bongiorno, Phillip A; Yohe, Courtney; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Grover, Frederick L

    2013-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database has been linked to the Social Security Death Master File to verify "life status" and evaluate long-term surgical outcomes. The objective of this study is explore practical applications of the linkage of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database to Social Securtiy Death Master File, including the use of the Social Securtiy Death Master File to examine the accuracy of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons 30-day mortality data. On January 1, 2008, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database began collecting Social Security numbers in its new version 2.61. This study includes all Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database records for operations with nonmissing Social Security numbers between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, inclusive. To match records between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and the Social Security Death Master File, we used a combined probabilistic and deterministic matching rule with reported high sensitivity and nearly perfect specificity. Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database collected data for 870,406 operations. Social Security numbers were available for 541,953 operations and unavailable for 328,453 operations. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the 30-day mortality rate was 17,757/541,953 = 3.3%. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File identified 16,565 cases of suspected 30-day deaths (3.1%). Of these, 14,983 were recorded as 30-day deaths in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database (relative sensitivity = 90.4%). Relative sensitivity was 98.8% (12,863/13,014) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring before discharge and 59.7% (2120/3551) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring after discharge. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File confirms the accuracy of

  6. Pleural puncture with thoracic epidural: A rare complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Wadhwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Freedom from pain has almost developed to be a fundamental human right. Providing pain relief via epidural catheters in thoracic and upper abdominal surgeries is widely accepted. Pain relief through this technique not only provides continuous analgesia but also reduces post-operative pulmonary complications and also hastens recovery. But being a blind procedure it is accompanied by certain complications. Hypotension, dura puncture, high epidural, total spinal, epidural haematoma, spinal cord injury and infection are some of the documented side effects of epidural block. There are case reports eliciting neurological complications, catheter site infections, paresthesias, radicular symptoms and worsening of previous neurological conditions. Few technical problems related to breakage of epidural catheter are also mentioned in the literature. The patient had no sequelae on long term follow up even when a portion of catheter was retained. We present a case report where epidural catheter punctured pleura in a patient undergoing thoracotomy for carcinoma oesophagus.

  7. Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J

    2012-09-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing "overshoot" effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression.

  8. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A second lymphography revealed a collateral thoracic duct that was not detected during the first lymphography. The collateral duct was ligated and chylothorax was resolved after the second surgery. The lymphography applied in this study was minimally-invasive and easily provided images of the thoracic duct in a dog with ...

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  10. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  11. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy; Metastases do segmento toracico e lombar da coluna vertebral: estudo prospectivo comparativo entre o tratamento cirurgico e radioterapico com a imobilizacao externa e radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: asdrubal@doctor.com; Righesso Neto, Orlando [Faculdade Federal de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  12. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apply for Membership Membership Directory Pay Your Dues Industry Mailing List License & eBlast Communications Programs Advertise on ... Hotel Discount Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. ...

  13. The History of the Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery at Rush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, L Penfield; Liptay, Michael J; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The Rush Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery received certification by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS) to train thoracic surgical residents in 1962. The outstanding clinical faculty, with nationally recognized technical expertise, was eager to provide resident education. The hallmark of the program has been clinical excellence, dedication to patient care, and outstanding results in complex cardiac, vascular, and general thoracic surgical procedures. A strong commitment to resident education has been carried to the present time. Development of the sternotomy incision, thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, along with valve replacement, have been the hallmark of the section of cardiovascular surgery. Innovation in bronchoplastic lung resection, aggressive approach to thoracic malignancy, and segmental resection for lung cancer identify the section of general thoracic surgery. A total of 131 thoracic residents have been trained by the Rush Thoracic Surgery program, and many achieved their vascular certificate, as well. Their training has been vigorous and, at times, difficult. They carry the Rush thoracic surgical commitment of excellence in clinical surgery and patient care throughout the country, both in practice groups and academic centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance in prenatal diagnosis of thoracic anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrani, M.; Elias, D.; Wojakowski, A.; Fataljaef, V.; Carcano, M.; Otano, L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to communicate the experience in the evaluation of fetal anomalies thoracic by means of magnetic resonance. Between January, 2001 - March, 2007 16 fetus were evaluated by means of magnetic resonance with echographic diagnosis of thoracic anomalies. An equipment of 1.5 TESLA was used. The thoracic anatomy was valued in general. At the presence of discovering pulmonary mass, their size, volume and intensity of sign were determined. The echographic and magnetic resonance findings were checked against the perinatal results [es

  15. Solitary Osteochondroma of the Thoracic Spine with Compressive Myelopathy; A Rare Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrian, Payam; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Kahkuee, Shahram; Bakhshayeshkaram, Mehrdad; Ghasemikhah, Reza

    2013-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of back pain radiating to the lower extremities and paresthesis of the toes during the last year. Plain X-ray revealed a large cauliflower shaped exophytic mass at the level of T8, T9 and T10 vertebrae. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal bony mass arising from the posterior arch of T9 with protrusion to the spinal canal and marked cord compression. The cortex and medulla of the lesion had continuity with those of the T9 vertebra. Surgical en bloc resection was performed and the patient’s symptoms resolved. The histopathologic diagnosis was osteochondroma. In patients with symptoms of myelopathy, in addition to more common etiologies, one should also be aware of rare entities such as osteochondroma

  16. A History of Thoracic Aortic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Paul Michael; Wiggins, Luke M; Boys, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    Ancient historical texts describe the presence of aortic pathology conditions, although the surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease remained insurmountable until the 19th century. Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease then progressed along with advances in surgical technique, conduit production, cardiopulmonary bypass, and endovascular technology. Despite radical advances in aortic surgery, principles established by surgical pioneers of the 19th century hold firm to this day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaesthetic and critical care management of thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, J A; Mellor, A J

    2010-09-01

    Thoracic wounding has been a relatively common presentation of military wounds throughout modern conflict. When civilian casualties are included the incidence has remained constant at around 10%, although the frequency and severity of wounds to combatants has been altered by modern body armour. Whilst thoracic injury has a high initial mortality on the battlefield, those surviving to reach hospital frequently have injuries that only require simple management. In addition to penetrating ballistic injury, blunt chest trauma frequently occurs on operations as a result of road traffic collisions or tertiary blast injury. The physiological impact of thoracic wounds, however, is often great and survivors often require intensive care management and, where available, complex strategies to ensure oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal. This review examines the incidence and patterns of thoracic trauma and looks at therapeutic options for managing these complex cases.

  18. Thoracic aortic stent-graft placement combined with left subclavian artery 'chimney operation': therapeutic analysis of 15 cases with insufficient proximal anchor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiayi; Huang Lianjun; Fan Zhanming; Zhang Zhaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the strategies for the management of insufficient proximal anchoring area during the performance of transluminal stent-graft placement (TSGP), and to evaluate the feasibility of intentional coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA) together with left subclavian artery stent-graft placement by using 'chimney operation' technique. Methods: A total of 15 patients with thoracic aortic diseases complicated by insufficient proximal anchoring area, who were encountered in authors' hospital during the period from Dec. 2009 to April 2011, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The thoracic aortic diseases included aortic dissection (n=6), aortic pseudoaneurysm (n=1), aortic aneurysm (n=4) and penetrating ulcer (n=4). Of the 15 patients, the distance between the lesion and LSA anchoring site 15 mm in 2. TSGP was carried out. The ostium of LSA was intentionally and completely covered by thoracic aortic stent-graft and left subclavian artery stent-graft placement was subsequently performed. The patients were kept under observation for symptoms of cerebral and upper limb ischemia. The postoperative complications such as endoleak and the patency of LSA were assessed with angiography. Results: Thoracic aortic stent-graft placement was successfully carried out in all 15 patients. In addition, one 'chimney' stent was properly implanted in LSA in each patient. After the procedure, no complications of nervous system or severe ischemia of upper extremity occurred. Follow-up examinations performed between 5 days to 3 months after the treatment revealed that the aortic stent-graft remained in stable condition and no type Ⅰ endoleak occurred, meanwhile the blood flow in 'chimney' stent was unobstructed. Conclusion: Intentional LSA coverage with 'chimney operation' can expand the applicability of TSGP with high tolerability. It is especially useful for patients with left vertebral artery blood supply dominance or with

  19. Entrapment Neuropathies in the Upper and Lower Limbs: Anatomy and MRI Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Q.; Jacobson, J.A.; Jamadar, D.A.; Gandikota, G.; Brandon, C.; Morag, Y.; Fessell, D.P.; Kim, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and non compressive, involving the supra scapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb

  20. Enhanced Recovery in Thoracic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna D. Dinic

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of enhanced recovery program after thoracic surgery is to minimize stress response, reduce postoperative pulmonary complications, and improve patient outcome, which will in addition decrease hospital stay and reduce hospital costs. As minimally invasive technique, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery represents an important element of enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Anesthetic management during preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative period is essential for the enhanced recovery. In the era of enhanced recovery protocols, non-intubated thoracoscopic procedures present a step forward. This article focuses on the key elements of the enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Having reviewed recent literature, the authors highlight potential procedures and techniques that might be incorporated into the program.

  1. Robert R. Shaw, MD: thoracic surgical hero, Afghanistan medical pioneer, champion for the patient, never a surgical society president.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urschel, Harold C; Urschel, Betsey Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Dr Robert R. Shaw arrived in Dallas to practice Thoracic Surgery in 1937, as John Alexander's 7th Thoracic Surgical Resident from Michigan University Medical Center. Dr Shaw's modus operandi was, "You can accomplish almost anything, if you don't care who gets the credit." He was a remarkable individual who cared the most about the patient and very little about getting credit for himself. From 1937 to 1970, Dr Shaw established one of the largest lung cancer surgical centers in the world in Dallas, Texas. It was larger than M.D. Anderson and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospitals put together regarding the surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. To accomplish this, he had the help of Dr Donald L. Paulson, who trained at the Mayo Clinic and served as Chief of Thoracic Surgery at Brook Army Hospital during the Second World War. Following the War, because of his love for Texas, he ended up as a partner of Dr Shaw in Dallas. Together, they pursued the development of this very large surgical lung cancer center. Dr Shaw and his wife Ruth went to Afghanistan with Medico multiple times to teach men modern cardiac and thoracic surgery. They also served as consultants on Medico's Ship of Hope in Africa. Dr Shaw initiated multiple new operations including: 1) resection of Pancoast's cancer of the lung after preoperative irradiation; 2) upper lobe of the lung bronchoplasty, reattaching (and saving) the lower lobe to prevent the "disabling" pneumonectomy; and 3) resections of pulmonary mucoid impaction of the lung in asthmatics. Because of his humility and giving "the credit to others," Dr Shaw was never President of a major medical or surgical association. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunctions: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Paolo; Buzzatti, Luca; Cattrysse, Erik; Scafoglieri, Aldo

    2018-02-01

    Manual treatments targeting different regions (shoulder, cervical spine, thoracic spine, ribs) have been studied to deal with patients complaining of shoulder pain. Thoracic manual treatments seem able to produce beneficial effects on this group of patients. However, it is not clear whether the patient improvement is a consequence of thoracic manual therapy or a placebo effect. To compare the efficacy of thoracic manual therapy and placebo thoracic manual treatment for patients with shoulder dysfunction. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PEDro, CINAHL, WoS, EMBASE, ERIC) were searched through November 2016. Randomized Controlled Trials assessing pain, mobility and function were selected. The Cochrane bias estimation tool was applied. Outcome results were either extracted or computed from raw data. Meta-analysis was performed for outcomes with low heterogeneity. Four studies were included in the review. The methodology of the included studies was generally good except for one study that was rated as high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed no significant effect for "pain at present" (SMD -0.02; 95% CI: -0.35, 0.32) and "pain during movement" (SMD -0.12; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.21). There is very low to low quality of evidence that a single session of thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than a single session of placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunction at immediate post-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Salil; Rosenfeld, David L; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Drachtman, Richard A; Cohler, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 16 year-old male with β thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions and near complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. While EMH causing cord compression in adolescents is rare in the current era of bone marrow transplantation or chronic transfusions, it should be considered when thalassemia major patients present with neurological deficits. The well defined imaging features of EMH can play a central role in its diagnosis and management, especially because surgical and / or radiotherapeutic intervention are often considered in cases of failed medical treatment. PMID:22470615

  4. Experimental human-like model to assess the part of viable Legionella reaching the thoracic region after nebulization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Pourchez

    Full Text Available The incidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD in European countries and the USA has been constantly increasing since 1998. Infection of humans occurs through aerosol inhalation. To bridge the existing gap between the concentration of Legionella in a water network and the deposition of bacteria within the thoracic region (assessment of the number of viable Legionella, we validated a model mimicking realistic exposure through the use of (i recent technology for aerosol generation and (ii a 3D replicate of the human upper respiratory tract. The model's sensitivity was determined by monitoring the deposition of (i aerosolized water and Tc99m radio-aerosol as controls, and (ii bioaerosols generated from both Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila sg 1 suspensions. The numbers of viable Legionella prior to and after nebulization were provided by culture, flow cytometry and qPCR. This study was designed to obtain more realistic data on aerosol inhalation (vs. animal experimentation and deposition at the thoracic region in the context of LD. Upon nebulization, 40% and 48% of the initial Legionella inoculum was made of cultivable and non-cultivable cells, respectively; 0.7% of both populations reached the filter holder mimicking the thoracic region in this setup. These results are in agreement with experimental data based on quantitative microbial risk assessment methods and bring new methods that may be useful for preventing LD.

  5. Visualization of the thoracic duct by lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.L.; Itti, R.; Tours Univ., 37

    1987-01-01

    Imaging of the thoracic duct is usually performed by radiological lymphography. However, this procedure, which uses an oil based dye injected directly into the lymph channels, has some adverse effects. In this paper we note that lymphoscintigraphy, a physiological and non invasive method, may visualize thoracic duct abnormalities, and might be particularly usefull when radiological lymphography is contraindicated. (orig.)

  6. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery course in Mexico-first experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes-Meneses, Erick; Echavarri-Arana, José Manuel; Tort-Martínez, Alejandro; Guzmán-de Alba, Enrique; das Neves-Pereira, Joao Carlos; González-Rivas, Diego

    2016-01-01

    "The First Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Uniportal Course" in Mexico was held from July 13 th to 15 th in Mexico City, at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER). Thoracic surgeons from around Mexico assisted the course. The special guests were the Spanish doctor Diego González-Rivas and the Brasilian doctor Joao Carlos das Neves-Pereira. The course included live surgery and wet lab. Demonstration of the uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) technique was done. The course was a success and Mexican thoracic surgeons were ready to adopt this technique.

  7. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The thoracic aortography by Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. Assessment of thoracic aortic dilatation in aging and in patients with hypertension and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiyoshi; Saito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Nobutada; Haiyama, Toru

    1995-01-01

    To assess the morphology of thoracic aorta, we had a trial of Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging on the thoracic aorta. This method was provided with high quality thoracic aortogram during 15-20 seconds. In patients without hypertension and aortic valve disease, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly correlated with aging. In patients with hypertension, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly dilated. In patients with aortic valve disease, thoracic aorta was diffusely enlarged, especially in ascending aorta. Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafact cine MR imaging was useful to assess the thoracic aortic anatomy and diseases. (author)

  9. MRI-based anatomical landmarks for the identification of thoracic vertebral levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Shah, A.; Latifoltojar, H.; Lung, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To identify soft-tissue and bony anatomical landmarks on dedicated thoracic spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess their detectability, reproducibility, and accuracy in predicting specific thoracic vertebral levels. Materials and methods: One hundred dedicated thoracic MRI studies were retrospectively analysed by two radiologists independently. Ten bone and soft-tissue landmarks were localized to the adjacent vertebral level. The true numerical thoracic vertebral level was subsequently determined and recorded by cross referencing with a sagittal cervico-thoracic “counting scan”. Results: Six landmarks were defined in ≥98% cases; however, there was a low interobserver percentage agreement for the defined vertebral levels (>70% for only one landmark). The most useful landmark for defining a specific vertebral level was the most superior rib (98% detection, 95% interobserver agreement, 98% at a single vertebral level, 0.07 SD). Eight landmarks localized to a specific thoracic segment in only 16–44% of cases, with a standard deviation of >0.5 vertebral levels and with a range which was greater than four vertebral levels. Conclusion: The C2 vertebra must be identified and cross referenced to the dedicated thoracic spine MRI, as other MRI-based anatomical landmarks are unreliable in determining the correct thoracic vertebral level

  10. Thoracic splenosis as a differential diagnosis of juxtapleural nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic splenosis is rare and consists of ectopic implantation of splenic tissue into the chest after concomitant thoracic and abdominal trauma with diaphragm injury. It occurs in about 18% of cases of splenic ruptures. In almost all cases, diagnosis is given incidentally once patients are usually asymptomatic. Thoracic splenosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in all patients with history of trauma presenting with juxtapleural nodules in chest computed tomography. However, malignant conditions should be ruled out firstly. Biopsy is not essential for the diagnosis once nuclear medicine can confirm splenosis in patients with pertinent history of trauma and suggestive tomographic image. We present a typical case of thoracic splenosis whose diagnosis was made by nuclear medicine and no invasive procedures were required.

  11. Vertebral metastases with high risk of symptomatic malignant spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Senba, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    To find vertebral metastases with high risk of symptomatic malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC), features of vertebral metastases caused motor deficits of the lower extremities were examined. From 2004 through 2006, 78 patients with metastases of the thoracic and/or the cervical spine were treated with radiation therapy (RT). Of these, 86 irradiated lesions in 73 patients were evaluable by magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography at the initiation of RT and were reviewed retrospectively in this study. Twenty-eight patients (38%) had motor deficits at the initiation of RT. Assessed factors were age, sex, primary disease (lung, breast, digestive system and other cancer), lamina involvement, main level of tumor location and vertebral-body involvement. Incidence of motor deficits at the initiation of RT was 55% for lesions with lamina involvement and 5% for lesions without lamina involvement (P 0.9999, P=0.7798, P=0.1702 and P=0.366, respectively). Vertebral metastases with lamina involvement tended to cause symptomatic MSCC. Latent development of MSCC occurred more frequently in the MTS compared with other levels of the thoracic and the cervical spine. (author)

  12. Internal Thoracic Artery Encircled by an Unusual Phrenic Nerve Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fu-Chean Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an anatomic variation of the phrenic nerve. During a routine gross anatomical dissection course at our medical university, we found an unusual loop of the left phrenic nerve around the internal thoracic artery, about 1 cm from the take-off of the left subclavian artery. The phrenic nerve is close to the internal thoracic artery and is easily injured when dissecting the internal thoracic artery for coronary artery bypass conduit. Therefore, we suggest that the anatomic relationship of the phrenic nerve and internal thoracic artery is important in preventing incidental injury of the phrenic nerve.

  13. October 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 10/24/2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, pathology, and radiology communities. An announcement was made that the Colorado Thoracic Society has accepted an invitation to partner with the Arizona and New Mexico Thoracic Societies in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Discussions continue to be held regarding a combined Arizona Thoracic Society meeting with Tucson either in Casa Grande or electronically. Six cases were presented: Dr. Tim Kuberski, chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, presented a 48 year old female who had been ill for 2 weeks. A CT of the chest revealed a left lower lobe nodule and a CT of the abdomen showed hydronephrosis and a pelvic mass. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was elevated. All turned out to be coccidioidomycosis on biopsy. CEA decreased …

  14. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  15. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, H.; Darby, M.; Edey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  16. SU-E-J-18: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Compression Methods in SBRT for Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y; Tolekids, G; Yao, R; Templeton, A; Sensakovic, W; Chu, J

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of compression in immobilizing tumor during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Published data have demonstrated bigger respiratory motion in lower lobe than in upper lobe during normal breathing. We hypothesize that 4DCT-based patient selection and abdominal compression would immobilize lung tumor volumes effectively, regardless of their location. We retrospectively reviewed 12 SBRT lung cases treated with Trilogy® (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA). Either compression plate or Vac-LokTM was used as abdomen compression of the SBRT immobilization system (Body Pro-LokTM, CIVCO) to restrict patients' breathing during CT simulation and treatment delivery. These cases are grouped into 2 categories: lower and upper lobe tumor, each with 6 cases. Records for 33 treatments were studied. On each treatment day, the patient was set up to the bony anatomy using kV-kV-match. A CBCT was performed to further set up the patient to the tumor based on the soft tissue information. The shifts from CBCT-setup were analyzed as displacement vectors demonstrating the magnitude of the tumor motion relative to the bony anatomy. The mean magnitude of displacement vectors for upper lobe and lower lobe were 3.7±2.7 and 4.2±6.3, [1S.D.] mm, respectively. The Wilcoxon rank sum test indicates that the difference in the displacement vector between the two groups is not statistically significant (p-value = 0.33). The magnitude of shifts from CBCT were small with mean value <5mm in SBRT lung treatments. No statistically significant difference were observed in the displacement of tumor between lower and upper lobes. With limited sample size, this suggests that our current 4DCT screening/abdominal compression approach is effective in restricting the respiration-induced tumor motion despite its location within the lung. We plan to confirm this Result in additional patients. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Thoracic computer tomography for the evaluation of the thymus gland in cases of myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druschky, K.F.; Stadler, H.W.; Daun, H.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    1981-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thymus gland is observed in 65% of all patients with myasthenia gravis, while the incidence of thymus tumor is reported to be 8.5-28%. Conventional radiological techniques provide little information in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Even a clearly developed thymus tumor can escape clinical detection. Since March 1978 thoracic computer tomography has been performed in addition to X-rays of the chest in a series of 19 patients with myasthenia ravis, 10 women and 9 men ranging in age from 15-71 years and in 3 patients with suspected thymomas but without myasthenia gravis. These examinations were carried out with a Somatom II (Siemens) since September 1979. On the average 15-20 scans were made at the level of the upper two-third of the sternum. The chest X-rays in 2 planes revealed signs of a thymus tumor in 3 female patients. Thoracic computer tomography showed definite signs of a space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum in 11 cases. At thymectomy 6 patients were found to have hyperplasia of the thymus, 2 patients had a benign thymoma and 3 patients a malignant thymoma. In 6 cases computer tomography showed only slight changes and in 5 patients no pathological findings could be demonstrated in the thymus gland. Thoracic computer tomography is a relatively harmless diagnostic measure without any risk for the patient. It has a high resolution and great accuracy in the evaluation of the thymus gland and is therefore the method of choice for the diagnosis of patients with myasthenia gravis. (orig.) [de

  18. Thoracic computer tomography for the evaluation of the thymus gland in cases of myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druschky, K.F.; Stadler, H.W.; Daun, H.

    1981-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thymus gland is observed in 65% of all patients with myasthenia gravis, while the incidence of thymus tumor is reported to be 8.5-28%. Conventional radiological techniques provide little information in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Even a clearly developed thymus tumor can escape clinical detection. Since March 1978 thoracic computer tomography has been performed in addition to X-rays of the chest in a series of 19 patients with myasthenia ravis, 10 women and 9 men ranging in age from 15-71 years and in 3 patients with suspected thymomas but without myasthenia gravis. These examinations were carried out with a Somatom II (Siemens) since September 1979. On the average 15-20 scans were made at the level of the upper two-third of the sternum. The chest X-rays in 2 planes revealed signs of a thymus tumor in 3 female patients. Thoracic computer tomography showed definite signs of a space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum in 11 cases. At thymectomy 6 patients were found to have hyperplasia of the thymus, 2 patients had a benign thymoma and 3 patients a malignant thymoma. In 6 cases computer tomography showed only slight changes and in 5 patients no pathological findings could be demonstrated in the thymus gland. Thoracic computer tomography is a relatively harmless diagnostic measure without any risk for the patient. It has a high resolution and great accuracy in the evaluation of the thymus gland and is therefore the method of choice for the diagnosis of patients with myasthenia gravis.

  19. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  20. A RARE CASE OF THORACIC ACTINOMYCOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PRESENTATION OF CASE Actinomycetes are branching gram-positive anaerobic bacteria belonging to Actinomycetaceae family and are commensals in human oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract and female genitalia. Thoracic or pulmonary actinomycosis is an uncommon bacterial infection. The diagnosis of pulmonary or thoracic actinomycosis is often confounding because of its shared clinical features with malignant lung diseases and chronic suppurative lung diseases. However, chest physicians should be aware of actinomycosis being a differential diagnosis in persistent shadows in lung as early diagnosis leads to good prognosis. 1

  1. Correlation analysis between change in thoracic kyphosis and multilevel facetectomy and screw density in main thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Kokabu, Terufumi; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Yoichi M; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on deformity correction, especially thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on sagittal plane correction in patients with main thoracic (MT) AIS curve. A retrospective correlation and comparative analysis of prospectively collected, consecutive, non-randomized series of patients at a single institution was undertaken. Sixty-four consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 AIS treated with posterior correction and fusion surgery using simultaneous double-rod rotation technique were included. Patient demographics and preoperative and 2-year postoperative radiographic measurements were the outcome measures for this study. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was conducted between change in TK (T5-T12) and the following factors: age at surgery, Risser sign, number of facetectomy level, screw density, preoperative main thoracic curve, flexibility in main thoracic curve, coronal correction rate, preoperative TK, and preoperative lumbar lordosis. Patients were classified into two groups: TKcorrect hypokyphosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest x-ray as a screening tool for blunt thoracic trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchar, Natalie L; Woo, Kenneth; Brennan, Maureen; Palmer, Cameron S; Zs Ee, Michael; Sweeney, Brian; Crameri, Joe

    2013-10-01

    With the increasing use of thoracic computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt thoracic trauma (BTT), we determined whether chest x-ray (CXR) and other clinical and epidemiologic variables could be used to predict significant thoracic injuries, to inform the selective use of CT in pediatric BTT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain a thoracic CT. This retrospective cohort study included cases of BTT from three Level I pediatric trauma centers between April 1999 and March 2008. Pre-CT epidemiologic, clinical, and radiologic variables associated with CT findings of any thoracic injury or a significant thoracic injury as well as the decision to obtain a thoracic CT were determined using logistic regression. Of 425 patients, 40% patients had a significant thoracic injury, 49% had nonsignificant thoracic injury, and 11% had no thoracic injury at all. Presence of hydrothorax and/or pneumothorax on CXR significantly increased the likelihood of significant chest injury visualized by CT (adjusted odds ratio 10.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-18), as did the presence of isolated subcutaneous emphysema (adjusted odds ratio, 19.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-168). Although a normal CXR finding was not statistically associated with a reduced risk of significant thoracic injury, 8 of the 9 cases with normal CXR findings and significant injuries involved occult pneumothoraces or hemothoraces not requiring intervention. Converse to features suggesting increased risk of significant injury, the decision to obtain a thoracic CT was only associated with later period in the study and obtaining a CT scan of another body region. CXR can be used to screen for significant thoracic injuries and direct the selective use of thoracic CT in pediatric BTT. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings and develop guidelines that include CXR to define indications for thoracic CT in pediatric BTT

  3. The reduction of image noise and streak artifact in the thoracic inlet during low dose and ultra-low dose thoracic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, N S; Prezelj, E; Burey, P; Menezes, R J; Blobel, J; Ursani, A; Kashani, H; Siewerdsen, J H

    2010-01-01

    Increased pixel noise and streak artifact reduce CT image quality and limit the potential for radiation dose reduction during CT of the thoracic inlet. We propose to quantify the pixel noise of mediastinal structures in the thoracic inlet, during low-dose (LDCT) and ultralow-dose (uLDCT) thoracic CT, and assess the utility of new software (quantum denoising system and BOOST3D) in addressing these limitations. Twelve patients had LDCT (120 kV, 25 mAs) and uLDCT (120 kV, 10 mAs) images reconstructed initially using standard mediastinal and lung filters followed by the quantum denoising system (QDS) to reduce pixel noise and BOOST3D (B3D) software to correct photon starvation noise as follows: group 1 no QDS, no B3D; group 2 B3D alone; group 3 QDS alone and group 4 both QDS and B3D. Nine regions of interest (ROIs) were replicated on mediastinal anatomy in the thoracic inlet, for each patient resulting in 3456 data points to calculate pixel noise and attenuation. QDS reduced pixel noise by 18.4% (lung images) and 15.8% (mediastinal images) at 25 mAs. B3D reduced pixel noise by ∼8% in the posterior thorax and in combination there was a 35.5% reduction in effective radiation dose (E) for LDCT (1.63-1.05 mSv) in lung images and 32.2% (1.55-1.05 mSv) in mediastinal images. The same combination produced 20.7% reduction (0.53-0.42 mSv) in E for uLDCT, for lung images and 17.3% (0.51-0.42) for mediastinal images. This quantitative analysis of image quality confirms the utility of dedicated processing software in targeting image noise and streak artifact in thoracic LDCT and uLDCT images taken in the thoracic inlet. This processing software potentiates substantial reductions in radiation dose during thoracic LDCT and uLDCT.

  4. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  5. Computed tomography (CT) findings in 88 neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) patients: Prevalence rates and correlations of thoracic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Ken; Honda, Osamu; Satoh, Yukihisa; Kawai, Misa; Gyobu, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Shojiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Various thoracic CT findings, including cysts, mediastinal masses, etc. were found. • Cysts show upper and peripheral dominant distribution. • The number, size, and distribution of the pulmonary cysts in NF-1 revealed significant correlation. • It is suspected that thoracic CT findings in NF-1 occur independently. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence rates and the correlations of thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) in 88 patients. Materials and methods: Chest CT images of 88 NF1 patients were independently reviewed by three observers, and the CT findings were evaluated. If abnormal findings were present, their number, size, and distribution were recorded. The prevalence rate of each CT finding was calculated, and the correlations between CT findings were analyzed. Results: Of the 88 cases, 13 were positive for cysts, 16 for emphysema, 8 for nodules, 8 for GGNs (ground glass nodules), 13 for mediastinal masses, 20 for scoliosis, 44 for subcutaneous nodules, and 34 for skin nodules. Cysts showed upper and peripheral dominant distributions. Regarding 13 mediastinal masses, 2 were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), 1 was diagnosed as primary lung cancer, 2 were diagnosed as lateral meningocele, 3 were diagnosed as neurofibromas, and the remaining 7 were considered neurofibromas. There was a significant correlation between the prevalence of subcutaneous nodules and that of skin nodules. Significant positive correlations were also seen between size and number, size and rate of central distribution, and number and rate of central distribution of cysts. Conclusion: Various CT findings were found in NF-1 patients, and the prevalence rates of subcutaneous and skin nodules were higher than other findings. Though the prevalence rates of subcutaneous nodules and skin nodules were significantly correlated, the other CT findings in NF-1 occurred independently. The number, size, and

  6. Computed tomography (CT) findings in 88 neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) patients: Prevalence rates and correlations of thoracic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Ken, E-mail: k-ueda@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Honda, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Satoh, Yukihisa [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (Japan); Kawai, Misa; Gyobu, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Shojiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Sumikawa, Hiromitsu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Osaka Rosai Hospital (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Various thoracic CT findings, including cysts, mediastinal masses, etc. were found. • Cysts show upper and peripheral dominant distribution. • The number, size, and distribution of the pulmonary cysts in NF-1 revealed significant correlation. • It is suspected that thoracic CT findings in NF-1 occur independently. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence rates and the correlations of thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) in 88 patients. Materials and methods: Chest CT images of 88 NF1 patients were independently reviewed by three observers, and the CT findings were evaluated. If abnormal findings were present, their number, size, and distribution were recorded. The prevalence rate of each CT finding was calculated, and the correlations between CT findings were analyzed. Results: Of the 88 cases, 13 were positive for cysts, 16 for emphysema, 8 for nodules, 8 for GGNs (ground glass nodules), 13 for mediastinal masses, 20 for scoliosis, 44 for subcutaneous nodules, and 34 for skin nodules. Cysts showed upper and peripheral dominant distributions. Regarding 13 mediastinal masses, 2 were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), 1 was diagnosed as primary lung cancer, 2 were diagnosed as lateral meningocele, 3 were diagnosed as neurofibromas, and the remaining 7 were considered neurofibromas. There was a significant correlation between the prevalence of subcutaneous nodules and that of skin nodules. Significant positive correlations were also seen between size and number, size and rate of central distribution, and number and rate of central distribution of cysts. Conclusion: Various CT findings were found in NF-1 patients, and the prevalence rates of subcutaneous and skin nodules were higher than other findings. Though the prevalence rates of subcutaneous nodules and skin nodules were significantly correlated, the other CT findings in NF-1 occurred independently. The number, size, and

  7. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  8. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan COHLER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 16 year-old male with ß thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH. After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions and near complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. While EMH causing cord compression in adolescents is rare in the current era of bone marrow transplantation or chronic transfusions, it should be considered when thalassemia major patients present with neurological deficits. The well defined imaging features of EMH can play a central role in its diagnosis and management, especially because surgical and / or radiotherapeutic intervention are often considered in cases of failed medical treatment.

  9. Preoperative diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Reiki; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Ueno, Keiko; Murata, Yoko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    From 1994 to 1995, to evaluate the utility of preoperative CT, EUS (endoscopic ultrasonography) and US in the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer, 94 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy were studied clinicopathologically. The sensitivity of EUS diagnosis of upper mediastinal lymph node metastasis (85%), left-sided paragastrin lymph node metastasis (73-77%), and especially lower paraesophageal lymph node metastasis (100%) were good. But due to their low-grade specificity in EUS diagnosis, their overall accuracy was not very good. On the other hand, the overall accuracy of the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was fine. However, sensitivity, the most important clinical factor in the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was considerably inferior to EUS. The assessment of the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis around the tracheal bifurcation and the pulmonary hilum and the left para-cardial lesion by CT or EUS was poor. It was concluded that lymph node metastasis of these area must be the pitfall in preoperative diagnosis. The average diameter of the lymph nodes and the proportion of cancerous tissue in the lymph nodes diagnosed as metastatic lymph nodes by CT was larger than that of the false negative lymph nodes. However, the lymph nodes diagnosed as true positives by EUS showed no such tendency. This must be the reason the sensitivity of the EUS diagnosis and specificity of the CT diagnosis were favorable, but the specificity of the EUS diagnosis and especially the sensitivity of the CT diagnosis were not as good. (author)

  10. Preoperative diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Reiki; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Ueno, Keiko; Murata, Yoko

    1996-01-01

    From 1994 to 1995, to evaluate the utility of preoperative CT, EUS (endoscopic ultrasonography) and US in the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer, 94 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy were studied clinicopathologically. The sensitivity of EUS diagnosis of upper mediastinal lymph node metastasis (85%), left-sided paragastrin lymph node metastasis (73-77%), and especially lower paraesophageal lymph node metastasis (100%) were good. But due to their low-grade specificity in EUS diagnosis, their overall accuracy was not very good. On the other hand, the overall accuracy of the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was fine. However, sensitivity, the most important clinical factor in the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was considerably inferior to EUS. The assessment of the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis around the tracheal bifurcation and the pulmonary hilum and the left para-cardial lesion by CT or EUS was poor. It was concluded that lymph node metastasis of these area must be the pitfall in preoperative diagnosis. The average diameter of the lymph nodes and the proportion of cancerous tissue in the lymph nodes diagnosed as metastatic lymph nodes by CT was larger than that of the false negative lymph nodes. However, the lymph nodes diagnosed as true positives by EUS showed no such tendency. This must be the reason the sensitivity of the EUS diagnosis and specificity of the CT diagnosis were favorable, but the specificity of the EUS diagnosis and especially the sensitivity of the CT diagnosis were not as good. (author)

  11. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTIVENESS OF THORACIC FACET JOINT INTERVENTIONS IN CHRONIC THORACIC PAIN%X光引导胸椎小关节注射治疗胸背痛的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓宏; 李世杰; 黄翔; 富沛勇; 杨承祥

    2013-01-01

    目的:评价小关节注射治疗胸背部疼痛的临床疗效及安全性.方法:60例经保守治疗无效的慢性胸背痛患者,随机分为超激光治疗组(S组,n=30)和介入治疗组(Ⅰ组,n=30).S组患者取俯卧位,超激光照射病变关节部位,每天1次,每次15 rain,共14次;Ⅰ组患者取俯卧位,在X光引导下确定病变小关节平面,穿刺针经皮正确无误到达胸椎后关节突关节间隙,到位后注射消炎镇痛液.对治疗后第1周、2周、1个月、3个月的VAS进行评分、生活质量改善情况及安全性进行评估.结果:与S组比较,Ⅰ组治疗患者术后3个月的VAS评分较治疗前有显著性降低(P<0.05),且未发现有严重并发症.结论:小关节注射治疗胸背痛是一项操作简便、安全,疗效确切、可靠的微创介入治疗方法.%Objective:To determine the clinical effectiveness of zygapophysial joint injections with fluoroscopy in managing chronic mid back or upper back pain of facet joint origin.Methods:A total of 60 patients were randomized divided into two groups,with 30 patients in each of the super laser and facet joint interventions groups.All of the patients met the diagnostic criteria of thoracic facet joint pain by means of the inclusion criteria.Group S patients received thoracic facet joint with super laser,whereas Group Ⅰ patients received thoracic facet joint intervention with bupivacaine and non-particulate betamethasone.The clinical efficacy were assessed by patients with visual analogue scale(VAS).All outcomes were assessed at baseline,1 week,2 weeks,1 month,and 3 months after treatment.Results:In Group S,compared with baseline,patients showed significant pain relief and functional improvement at 1 week (P < 0.05) But there were no significant pain relief after 2 weeks.In Group Ⅰ,patients showed significant pain relief and functional improvement after facet joint injection,a significant change 3 months after treatment from baseline (P < 0

  12. Thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thoracic disease.1,2,4 The chronic progressive suppurative infection ... venous Penicillin G for 4 - 6 weeks being the treatment of ... pathology was demonstrated in the liver. (Figs 7a and b ). .... ulceration (may resemble Crohn's disease).3. 2.

  13. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. RADIOGRAPHIC THORACIC ANATOMY OF THE RED PANDA (AILURUS FULGENS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-09-01

    The red panda ( Ailurus fulgens ) is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. The natural distribution of the red panda is in the Himalayas and southern China. Thoracic diseases such as dirofilariasis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, tracheal obstruction, lung worm infestation, and pneumonia have been reported in the red panda. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of captive red pandas as a species-specific reference for routine health examinations and clinical cases. Right lateral (RL) and dorsoventral (DV) inspiratory phase views of the thorax were obtained in 11 adult captive red pandas. Measurements were made and ratios calculated to establish reference ranges for the mean vertebral heart score on the RL (8.34 ± 0.25) and DV (8.78 ± 0.34) views and the mean ratios of the caudal vena cava diameter to the vertebral body length above tracheal bifurcation (0.67 ± 0.05) and tracheal diameter to the width of the third rib (2.75 ± 0.24). The majority of animals (10/11) had 14 thoracic vertebrae, except for one animal that had 15 thoracic vertebrae. Rudimentary clavicles were seen in 3/11 animals. The ovoid, oblique cardiac silhouette was more horizontally positioned and elongated in older animals. A redundant aortic arch was seen in the oldest animal. The trachea was seen with mineralized cartilage rings in all animals. The carina was clearly seen in the majority of animals (10/11). Variations exist in the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of different species. Knowledge of the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of the red panda should prove useful for routine health examinations and in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases.

  15. Surgical Thoracic Transplant Training: Super Fellowship-Is It Super?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Tony; Caldeira, Christiano C; Wang, I-Wen

    2017-10-11

    The quality of training provided to thoracic transplant fellows is a critical step in the care of complex patients undergoing transplant. The training varies since it is not an accreditation council for graduate medical education accredited fellowship. A total of 104 heart or lung transplant program directors throughout the United States were sent a survey of 24 questions focusing on key aspects of training, fellowship training content and thoracic transplant job satisfaction. Out of the 104 programs surveyed 45 surveys (43%) were returned. In total, 26 programs offering a transplant fellowship were included in the survey. Among these programs 69% currently have fellows of which 56% are American Board of Thoracic Surgery board eligible. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) requirements, 46% of the programs do not meet the requirements to be qualified as a primary heart transplant surgeon. A total of 23% of lung transplant programs also perform less than the UNOS minimum requirements. Only 24% have extra-surgical curriculum. Out of the participating programs, only 38% of fellows secured a job in a hospital setting for performing transplants. An astounding 77% of replies site an unpredictable work schedule as the main reason that makes thoracic transplant a less than favorable profession among new graduates. Long hours were also a complaint of 69% of graduates who agreed that their personal life is affected by excessive work hours. Annually, almost half of all thoracic transplant programs perform fewer than the UNOS requirements to be a primary thoracic surgeon. This results in a majority of transplant fellows not finding a suitable transplant career. The current and future needs for highly qualified thoracic transplant surgeons will not be met through our existing training mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Severe upper extremity polyneuropathy due to inferior brachial plexus compression as a result of left subclavian artery pseudoaneurism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kosmadakis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old hemodialysis patient who was admitted with clinical features of neurological thoracic exit syndrome due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurism following the insertion of a dual lumen vascular internal jugular catheter (vascath with excellent outcome after endo-arterial stent placement.

  17. Comparison of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society reintroduction guidelines for anti-tuberculous therapy induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, B. F.; Alvi, H.; Zuberi, F. F.; Salahuddin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines for re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy after drug-induced liver injury, and to assess the ease of administration of each guideline on a scale of 1-10. Methods: The randomised prospective interventional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Pulmonology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2011 to November 2013. Patients with anti-tuberculous therapy drug-induced liver injury were selected. Hepatotoxic anti-tuberculous therapy was stopped and modified anti-tuberculous therapy was started. Patients were followed weekly till clinical and biochemical parameters got stabilised. After stabilisation, the patients were randomised to one of the two groups to receive re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy under the guidelines of British Thoracic Society (Group I) or those of American Thoracic Society (Group II). Means of the groups were analysed by Student's t test and proportions were compared by chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was done for age, body mass index and serum albumin for recurrence of drug-induced liver injury after the re-introduction. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Of the total 325 patients, 163(50.15%) were in Group I, while 162(49.84%) were in Group II. The frequency of recurrence of drug-induced liver injury in Group I was 16 (9.8%) and in Group II it was 18 (11.1%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.7). Age was positively related with drug-induced liver injury, while body mass index and serum albumin were negatively associated. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the two major guidelines though the American Thoracic Society guideline was easier to follow. (author)

  18. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  19. Surgical and Clinical Decision Making in Isolated Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Krauss, Emily M; Felder, John M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy results in scapular winging and destabilization. In this study, we review the surgical management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy and suggest a surgical technique and treatment algorithm to simplify management. In total, 19 patients who required surgery for an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative demographics, electromyography (EMG), and physical examinations were reviewed. Intraoperative nerve stimulation, surgical decision making, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. In total, 19 patients with an average age of 32 were included in the study. All patients had an isolated long thoracic nerve palsy caused by either an injury (58%), Parsonage-Turner syndrome (32%), or shoulder surgery (10%); 18 patients (95%) underwent preoperative EMG; 10 with evidence of denervation (56%); and 13 patients had motor unit potentials in the serratus anterior (72%). The preoperative EMG did not correlate with intraoperative nerve stimulation in 13 patients (72%) and did correlate in 5 patients (28%); 3 patients had a nerve transfer (3 thoracodorsal to long thoracic at lateral chest, 1 pec to long thoracic at supraclavicular incision). In the 3 patients who had a nerve transfer, there was return of full forward flexion of the shoulder at an average of 2.5 months. A treatment algorithm based on intraoperative nerve stimulation will help guide surgeons in their clinical decision making in patients with isolated long thoracic nerve palsy. Intraoperative nerve stimulation is the gold standard in the management of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy.

  20. Postpneumonectomy Compression of the Mitral Annulus: Rare Vascular Complication in Sportive Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeaumont, David; Bota, Susana; Baste, Jean-Marc; Bellefleur, Marie; Stepowski, Dimitri; Vincent, Florence; Bonnevie, Tristan; Gravier, Francis-Edouard; Netchitailo, Marie; Tardif, Catherine; Boutry, Alain; Muir, Jean-François; Coquart, Jérémy

    2016-01-01

    Numerous postpneumonectomy complications exist. We present a rare clinical case of postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea revealing compression of the mitral annulus by the descending aorta. The patient was 42-year-old former smoker with pulmonary emphysema. He has been operated on, in 2012 (i.e., right pneumonectomy). Before the surgery, the patient was a recreational runner. However, after some months, it was difficult for the patient to resume running. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing indicated moderate exercise intolerance with important oxygen desaturation. More interestingly, a decrease of low oxygen pulse was noticed from the first ventilatory threshold with no electrical modification on the electrocardiogram. This decrease was indicative of a decline in stroke volume. The thoracic scan revealed a right pneumonectomy pocket with a liquid abnormal content. Moreover, the mediastinum had shifted toward the pneumonectomy space and the left lung was distended and emphysematous. Echocardiography revealed a major change in the mediastinal anatomy. The mitral annulus was observed to be compressed by the rear wall of the descending aorta. The diagnosis of postpneumonectomy syndrome or platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome was ruled out in this patient. Mitral annular compression by the descending aorta is rare complication, which must be researched in patients with postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea.

  1. Postpneumonectomy Compression of the Mitral Annulus: Rare Vascular Complication in Sportive Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Debeaumont

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous postpneumonectomy complications exist. We present a rare clinical case of postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea revealing compression of the mitral annulus by the descending aorta. The patient was 42-year-old former smoker with pulmonary emphysema. He has been operated on, in 2012 (i.e., right pneumonectomy. Before the surgery, the patient was a recreational runner. However, after some months, it was difficult for the patient to resume running. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing indicated moderate exercise intolerance with important oxygen desaturation. More interestingly, a decrease of low oxygen pulse was noticed from the first ventilatory threshold with no electrical modification on the electrocardiogram. This decrease was indicative of a decline in stroke volume. The thoracic scan revealed a right pneumonectomy pocket with a liquid abnormal content. Moreover, the mediastinum had shifted toward the pneumonectomy space and the left lung was distended and emphysematous. Echocardiography revealed a major change in the mediastinal anatomy. The mitral annulus was observed to be compressed by the rear wall of the descending aorta. The diagnosis of postpneumonectomy syndrome or platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome was ruled out in this patient. Mitral annular compression by the descending aorta is rare complication, which must be researched in patients with postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea.

  2. CT morphometry of adult thoracic intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Justin G R; Stringer, Mark D; Briggs, Christopher A; Davies, Tilman M; Woodley, Stephanie J

    2015-10-01

    Despite being commonly affected by degenerative disorders, there are few data on normal thoracic intervertebral disc dimensions. A morphometric analysis of adult thoracic intervertebral discs was, therefore, undertaken. Archival computed tomography scans of 128 recently deceased individuals (70 males, 58 females, 20-79 years) with no known spinal pathology were analysed to determine thoracic disc morphometry and variations with disc level, sex and age. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights and axial dimensions were significantly greater in men (anterior disc height 4.0±1.4 vs 3.6±1.3 mm; posterior disc height 3.6±0.90 vs 3.4±0.93 mm; p<0.01). Disc heights and axial dimensions at T4-5 were similar or smaller than at T2-3, but thereafter increased caudally (mean anterior disc height T4-5 and T10-11, 2.7±0.7 and 5.4±1.2 mm, respectively, in men; 2.6±0.8 and 5.1±1.3 mm, respectively, in women; p<0.05). Except at T2-3, anterior disc height decreased with advancing age and anteroposterior and transverse disc dimensions increased; posterior and middle disc heights and indices of disc shape showed no consistent statistically significant changes. Most parameters showed substantial to almost perfect agreement for intra- and inter-rater reliability. Thoracic disc morphometry varies significantly and consistently with disc level, sex and age. This study provides unique reference data on adult thoracic intervertebral disc morphometry, which may be useful when interpreting pathological changes and for future biomechanical and functional studies.

  3. Thoracic fistulas of the pancreas and their complications in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, R; Schirg, E; Buerger, D

    1981-08-01

    The article reports on two thoracic fistulas of the pancreas in infants. Anamnesis revealed that recurring abdominal pain had occured in those children for years; at the time of their admission to hospital there was considerable dyspnoea with thoracic pain depending on the respiration. Fistulas of the pancreas with thoracic connection were identified as the cause. The article goes into the details of genesis, differential diagnosis and course of the disease.

  4. A rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chylothorax is an accumulation of chyle in the pleural cavity due to a disruption of the thoracic duct. Traumatic chylothoraces are usually a result of a penetrating trauma and disruption of the thoracic duct, but blunt traumatic chylothorax is a rare condition. The aim of this paper is to present a rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma. Case Outline. We present a case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma in a patient injured in a motor vehicle accident. The patient had a right-sided fracture of rib XI, hydropneumothorax, lung contusion, and signs of pneumomediastinum. We performed thoracic drainage, but a few days later, according to the increase of amount of the fluid daily drained, and the confirmation of laboratory findings of the analyzed fluid, we made a diagnosis of chylothorax and the patient underwent a thoracotomy, where we sutured the thoracic duct. Conclusion. Chylothorax should be considered in patients after chest trauma if they develop a milky pleural effusion. Analysis of pleural fluid and level of triglycerides is important for the diagnosis and treatment of chylothorax. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III41007

  5. Measurement of spinal canal narrowing, interpedicular widening, and vertebral compression in spinal burst fractures: plain radiographs versus multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensch, Frank V.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Kiuru, Martti J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the reliability of measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening in burst fractures in radiography compared with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Patients who had confirmed acute vertebral burst fractures over an interval of 34 months underwent both MDCT and radiography. Measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening from MDCT and radiography were compared. The 108 patients (30 female, 78 male, aged 16-79 years, mean 39 years) had 121 burst fractures. Eleven patients had multiple fractures, of which seven were not contiguous. Measurements showed a strong positive correlation between radiography and MDCT (Spearman's rank sum test: spinal canal narrowing k = 0.50-0.82, vertebral compression k = 0.55-0.72, and interpedicular widening k = 0.81-0.91, all P 0.25) and for interpedicular widening in the thoracic spine (k = 0.35, P = 0.115). The average difference in measurements between the modalities was 3 mm or fewer. Radiography demonstrates interpedicular widening, spinal canal narrowing and vertebral compression with acceptable precision, with the exception of those of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  6. State of the art thoracic ultrasound: intervention and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corcoran, John P.; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Maldonado, Fabien; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Annema, Jouke T.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.; St Noble, Victoria; Rahman, Najib M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound outside the radiology department and in everyday clinical practice is becoming increasingly common, having been incorporated into standards of care for many specialties. For the majority of practitioners, their experience of, and exposure to, thoracic ultrasound will

  7. Is there a link between the structural impact of thoracic outlet and the development of central venous stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoda, Atsushi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sugase, Taro; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kusano, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (CVS) is a serious complication for chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Previous reports of CVS have focused on prior central venous catheterization, because of the higher prevalence and potential for prevention of such an event. However, recent studies have demonstrated that CVS may also develop without a history of central venous catheterization. Although information about the etiological backgrounds regarding the development of CVS without previous central venous catheterization have gradually accumulated, the clinical impact of the chronic compression of the central venous system by the surrounding structures, which may likely determine the central venous susceptibility to CVS, remains poorly understood. This study proposes the hypothesis that the combination of chronic venous compression at the level of thoracic outlet characterized by the natural physique and elevated venous flow induced by the creation of vascular access should be evaluated as a potential factor for the development of CVS, since they may accelerate the development of venous stenosis, presumably through the stimulation of intimal hyperplasia, and thereby the subclavian venous susceptibility to CVS should be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sampling Efficiency and Performance of Selected Thoracic Aerosol Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Boivin, Alexis; Bau, Sébastien

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of worker exposure to a thoracic health-related aerosol fraction is necessary in a number of occupational situations. This is the case of workplaces with atmospheres polluted by fibrous particles, such as cotton dust or asbestos, and by particles inducing irritation or bronchoconstriction such as acid mists or flour dust. Three personal and two static thoracic aerosol samplers were tested under laboratory conditions. Sampling efficiency with respect to particle aerodynamic diameter was measured in a horizontal low wind tunnel and in a vertical calm air chamber. Sampling performance was evaluated against conventional thoracic penetration. Three of the tested samplers performed well, when sampling the thoracic aerosol at nominal flow rate and two others performed well at optimized flow rate. The limit of flow rate optimization was found when using cyclone samplers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  9. Surgical outcome analysis of paediatric thoracic and cervical neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Dakshesh; Short, Melissa; Eshmawy, Mohamed; Brown, Rachel

    2012-03-01

    To identify factors determining the surgical outcome of primary cervical and thoracic neuroblastoma. Twenty-six children with primary thoracic neuroblastoma presented over the last 14 years were analysed for age, mode of presentation, tumour histopathology, biology and outcome. Primary thoracic neuroblastoma was presented in 16 boys and 10 girls at a median age of 2 years (range 6 weeks-15 years). The International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) classified these as Stage 1 (8), Stage 2 (5), Stage 3 (6) and Stage 4 (7). Computed tomography defined the tumour location at the thoracic inlet (11), cervical (2), cervico-thoracic (3), mid-thorax (9) and thoraco-abdominal (1). Twenty-two children underwent surgery that allowed an adequate exposure and resection. Surgical resection was achieved after initial biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy in 15 children, whereas primary resection was performed in 7 children. Four patients with Stage 4 disease underwent chemotherapy alone after initial biopsy; of which, two died despite chemotherapy. Favourable outcome after surgical resection and long-term survival was seen in 19 (86.4%) of the 22 children. Three had local recurrence (14 to 21 months postoperatively), all with unfavourable histology on initial biopsy. The prognostic factors that determined the outcome were age and INSS stage at presentation. In this series, all patients under 2 years of age are still alive, while mortality was seen in five older children. Thoracic neuroblastoma in children under 2 years of age irrespective of stage and histology of the tumour results in long-term survival.

  10. Compressive Strength of Cometary Surfaces Derived from Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShafie, A.; Heggy, E.

    2014-12-01

    Landing on a comet nucleus and probing it, mechanically using harpoons, penetrometers and drills, and electromagnetically using low frequency radar waves is a complex task that will be tackled by the Rosetta mission for Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The mechanical properties (i.e. density, porosity and compressive strength) and the electrical properties (i.e. the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant) of the comet nucleus, constrain both the mechanical and electromagnetic probing capabilities of Rosetta, as well as the choice of landing site, the safety of the landing, and subsurface data interpretation. During landing, the sounding radar data that will be collected by Rosetta's CONSERT experiment can be used to probe the comet's upper regolith layer by assessing its dielectric properties, which are then inverted to retrieve the surface mechanical properties. These observations can help characterize the mechanical properties of the landing site, which will optimize the operation of the anchor system. In this effort, we correlate the mechanical and electrical properties of cometary analogs to each other, and derive an empirical model that can be used to retrieve density, porosity and compressive strength from the dielectric properties of the upper regolith inverted from CONSERT observations during the landing phase. In our approach we consider snow as a viable cometary material analog due to its low density and its porous nature. Therefore, we used the compressive strength and dielectric constant measurements conducted on snow at a temperature of 250 K and a density range of 0.4-0.9 g/cm3 in order to investigate the relation between compressive strength and dielectric constant under cometary-relevant density range. Our results suggest that compressive strength increases linearly as function of the dielectric constant over the observed density range mentioned above. The minimum and maximum compressive strength of 0.5 and 4.5 MPa corresponded to a

  11. [A Case of Locally Advanced Thoracic Esophageal Cancer with Larynx Preservation and Curative Resection via Combined Modality Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Mitsuru; Kimura, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Osamu; Kato, Hiroaki; Hiraki, Yoko; Tanaka, Yumiko; Yasuda, Atsushi; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Yasuda, Takushi

    2017-11-01

    Prognosis of locally advanced esophageal cancer is poor. The greatest prognostic factor of locally advanced esophageal cancer is a local control. We experienced a case of T4 locally advanced thoracic esophageal cancer who was successfully resected without any combined resection after multimodality therapy. A male in 75-year-old. was diagnosed with type 3 locally advanced upper thoracic esophageal cancer whose metastatic right recurrent laryngeal lymph node invaded into the trachea. Definitive chemoradiation therapy(CRT)was performed, leading to a significant shrinkage of the main tumor, but T4 lesion remained. Next, adding DCF therapy(docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU), a relief of T4 was finally obtained. Then, salvage surgery with subtotalesophagectomy and retrosternalesophagealreconstruction with gastric tube was performed, resulting in R0 resection without any combined resection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been alive without recurrence for 1 year after surgery. In locally advanced cancer, focusing on T4 downstaging, it is significantly important in terms of safety, curativity and organ preservation to perform surgery after a sure sign of T4 relief by multimodality therapy.

  12. Relationship between cement distribution pattern and new compression fracture after percutaneous vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Noboru; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Omura, Naoto; Sawada, Satoshi

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate relationships between cement distribution patterns and the occurrence rates of new compression fractures after percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed for osteoporotic compression fractures in 76 consecutive patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to the cement filling pattern shown on radiography and CT: cleft pattern group (group C, n = 34), compact and solid cement filling pattern in vertebrae; and trabecular pattern group (group T, n = 42), sponge-like filling pattern. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain severity, and anterior and lateral radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae were obtained 1-3 days and 1, 4, 10, 22, and 34 months after percutaneous vertebroplasty. Differences in treatment efficacy and the occurrence rates of new compression fractures were examined and compared for both groups using the Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. A significant difference was seen between groups with respect to the volume of cement injected per vertebra (mean volume: group C, 4.5 mL; group T, 3.7 mL; p = 0.01). VAS improvement did not differ significantly between group C (4.6) and group T (4.5). The mean follow-up period was 19.5 months, during which new compression fractures were significantly more frequent in group C (17 of 34 [50%]) than in group T (11 of 42 [26.2%]; p = 0.03). Although cement distribution patterns do not significantly affect initial clinical response, a higher incidence of new compression fractures is seen in patients with treated vertebrae exhibiting a cleft pattern.

  13. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  14. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  15. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, P.; Nicolas, A. I.; Vivas, I.; Damaso Aquerreta, J.; Martinez-Cuesta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  16. Auricular Acupuncture Analgesia in Thoracic Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S. Papadopoulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of thoracic trauma (rib fractures with pneumothorax and pulmonary contusions with severe chest pain leading to ineffective ventilation and oxygenation. The patient presented to our emergency department. The patient had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was completely unable to take deep breaths and clear secretions from his bronchial tree. After obtaining informed consent, we applied auricular acupuncture to ameliorate pain and hopefully improve his functional ability to cough and breathe deeply. Within a few minutes, his pain scores diminished considerably, and his ventilation and oxygenation indices improved to safe limits. Auricular acupuncture analgesia lasted for several hours. Parallel to pain reduction, hemodynamic disturbances and anxiety significantly resolved. A second treatment nearly a day later resulted in almost complete resolution of pain that lasted at least 5 days and permitted adequate ventilation, restored oxygenation, and some degree of mobilization (although restricted due to a compression fracture of a lumbar vertebra. Nonopioid and opioid analgesics were sparsely used in low doses during the entire hospitalization period. Hemodynamic alterations and anxiety also decreased, and the patient was soon ready to be discharged.

  17. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. METHODS: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second-third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. RESULTS: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents' experience (p < 0.001, 0.005. CONCLUSION: Body mass index and level of insertion site were significant on thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate. We think that residents' grade is not a significant factor in terms overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization, but it is important for outcome of these procedures.

  18. Visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mizukami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary visceral subpleural hematoma is rare. We report visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy. This very rare case was difficult to distinguish from thoracic abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with hypertension had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper division segmentectomy for suspected lung carcinoma. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg was identified and edoxaban, a so-called novel oral anticoagulant, was started on postoperative day 7. The chest drainage tube was removed on postoperative day 12 because of persistent air leakage, but fever appeared the same day. Computed tomography revealed a cavity with mixed air and fluid, so antibiotics were started on suspicion of abscess. Computed tomography-guided drainage was attempted, but proved unsuccessful. Fever continued and surgical investigation was therefore performed. Visceral subpleural hematoma was identified under the diaphragmatic surface of the left basal lung. We excised the pleura, then performed drainage and applied running sutures. The parenchyma and visceral pleura were covered with polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue. Edoxaban was restarted on postoperative day 12 of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and no recurrence of hematoma has been revealed. Conclusions Visceral subpleural hematoma after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Furthermore, correct diagnosis was difficult and surgery offered a good diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.

  19. Digital radiography of crush thoracic trauma in the Sichuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-Hui; Shao, Heng; Chen, Tian-Wu; Chu, Zhi-Gang; Deng, Wen; Tang, Si-Shi; Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Gang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the features of crush thoracic trauma in Sichuan earthquake victims using chest digital radiography (CDR). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 772 CDR of 417 females and 355 males who had suffered crush thoracic trauma in the Sichuan earthquake. Patient age ranged from 0.5 to 103 years. CDR was performed between May 12, 2008 and June 7, 2008. We looked for injury to the thoracic cage, pulmonary parenchyma and the pleura. RESULTS: Antero-posterior (AP) and lateral CDR were obtained in 349 patients, the remaining 423 patients underwent only AP CDR. Thoracic cage fractures, pulmonary contusion and pleural injuries were noted in 331 (42.9%; 95% CI: 39.4%-46.4%), 67 and 135 patients, respectively. Of the 256 patients with rib fractures, the mean number of fractured ribs per patient was 3. Rib fractures were mostly distributed from the 3rd through to the 8th ribs and the vast majority involved posterior and lateral locations along the rib. Rib fractures had a significant positive association with non-rib thoracic fractures, pulmonary contusion and pleural injuries (P < 0.001). The number of rib fractures and pulmonary contusions were significant factors associated with patient death. CONCLUSION: Earthquake-related crush thoracic trauma has the potential for multiple fractures. The high number of fractured ribs and pulmonary contusions were significant factors which needed appropriate medical treatment. PMID:22132298

  20. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  1. A clinical case study of long-term injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Zaretskov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Overestimation of the efficacy of conservative treatment of spine injuries children often leads to unsatisfactory long-term results. The effective correction of post-traumatic spinal column deformities occurs in patients who undergo the operation in the early post-traumatic period. While choosing treatment strategies for children, higher reparative opportunities, which provide early fracture consolidation, including those in faulty positions, should be considered. This study presents a case of surgical treatment for uncomplicated injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with long-term compression fragmental fracture of the L1 vertebra body in a 12-year-old child. Due to the long-standing character of the injury right thoraco-frenotomy was conducted with partial L1 vertebral body and resection of the adjacent discs, deformity correction of the thoracic and lumbar spine with a transpedicular system, and ventral spondylodesis with an autograft. This extensive intervention was justified by the peculiarities in the vertebral body damage and the post-traumatic segmental kyphotic deformity that resulted from delayed medical treatment. An anterior approach was chosen to achieve immobilization at the site of the damage before correction using the transpedicular system. Surgical correction of long-term spinal injuries in children, with the use of a combined approach, is usually laborious and traumatic. The prevention of rigid post-traumatic spine deformities with the help of timely diagnostics and appropriate treatment, including surgery, should be a priority to prevent such cases.

  2. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  3. Thoracic dysfunction in whiplash associated disorders: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard; Tyros, Isaak; Falla, Deborah; Rushton, Alison

    2018-01-01

    Background Research investigating Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) has largely focused on the cervical spine yet symptoms can be widespread. Thoracic spine pain prevalence is reported ~66%; perhaps unsurprising given the forceful stretch/eccentric loading of posterior structures of the spine, and the thoracic spine’s contribution to neck mobility/function. Approximately 50% WAD patients develop chronic pain and disability resulting in high levels of societal and healthcare costs. It is time to look beyond the cervical spine to fully understand anatomical dysfunction in WAD and provide new directions for clinical practice and research. Purpose To evaluate the scope and nature of dysfunction in the thoracic region in patients with WAD. Methods A systematic review and data synthesis was conducted according to a pre-defined, registered (PROSPERO, CRD42015026983) and published protocol. All forms of observational study were included. A sensitive topic-based search strategy was designed from inception to 1/06/16. Databases, grey literature and registers were searched using a study population terms and key words derived from scoping search. Two reviewers independently searched information sources, assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A third reviewer checked for consistency and clarity. Extracted data included summary data: sample size and characteristics, outcomes, and timescales to reflect disorder state. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Data were tabulated to allow enabling a semi-qualitative comparison and grouped by outcome across studies. Strength of the overall body of evidence was assessed using a modified GRADE. Results Thirty eight studies (n>50,000) which were conducted across a range of countries were included. Few authors responded to requests for further data (5 of 9 contacted). Results were reported in the context of overall quality and were presented for measures of pain or dysfunction and

  4. Lungs, pleura, thoracal wall. 7. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book describes the anatomy of the lungs, as well as X-ray, computerized tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and nuclear-medical imaging techniques. Following a discussion of the general symptomatology of pulmonary diseases verifiable by X-ray, the individual diseases including inhalation damage from inorganic dusts and gases are dealt with. Traumatic thoracal conditions, the image of the thorax after operations, alterations of the thoracal wall, as well as pleural diseases are also discussed. (MG) With 1776 figs., 52 tabs [de

  5. From Diagnosis to Treatment: Clinical Applications of Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digesu, Christopher S; Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field with potential as an adjunct to cancer therapy, particularly thoracic surgery. Therapy can be delivered to tumors in a more targeted fashion, with less systemic toxicity. Nanoparticles may aid in diagnosis, preoperative characterization, and intraoperative localization of thoracic tumors and their lymphatics. Focused research into nanotechnology's ability to deliver both diagnostics and therapeutics has led to the development of nanotheranostics, which promises to improve the treatment of thoracic malignancies through enhanced tumor targeting, controlled drug delivery, and therapeutic monitoring. This article reviews nanoplatforms, their unique properties, and the potential for clinical application in thoracic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabálek, L; Kalita, O; Langová, K

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of different surgical approaches to thoracic disc herniation, and to show the role of segmental fusion and selection of an appropriate microsurgical decompression technique for the successful outcome of surgery. A group of 27 patients, 10 men and 17 women, between 31 and 70 years (average age, 49.33 years) were included in this prospective study. They underwent surgery for thoracic degeneration disc disease in the period from June 1994 to August 2008. In all patients, the severity of myelopathy was assessed using the grading Frankel system and JOA score, axial and radicular pain intensity was evaluated with VAS and ODI rating systems. The diagnosis was established on the basis of thoracic spine radiography, thoracic spine MRI and a CT scan of the segment. A total of 30 thoracic segments, in the range of Th4/Th5 to Th12/L1, were indicated for surgery. Localisation of the hernia was medial at 19 segments, mediolateral at three and lateral at eight segments. Soft disc herniation was found in 17 cases and hard disc protrusion at the remaining 13 segments. Surgery for significant myelopathy was carried out in 23 patients and for pain in four patients. According to the surgical procedure used, the patients were allocated to two groups: group A comprised 10 patients treated without disc replacement through a laminectomy or a costotransversectomy exposure, and group B consisted of 17 patients undergo- ing intersomatic fusion via a thoracotomy. Clinical and radiographic examinations were made at regular intervals for at least 1 year of follow-up. The results of clinical assessment, including JOA scores, JOA Recovery Rate, VAS scores at rest and after exercise and ODI, were statistically analysed for each group and compared. There was a statistically significant difference in JOA evaluation of myelopathy between the groups in group A, the mean JOA score declined from 7.9 to 7.0, i.e., -0.9 point, while in group B it

  7. Overexpression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ in type I thoracic aortic dissections and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms: possible correlation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and apoptosis of aortic media cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Ming-fang; Tian, Lei; Zou, Si-li; Lu, Qing-sheng; Bao, Jun-min; Pei, Yi-fei; Jing, Zai-ping

    2011-07-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ and their possible roles in aortic dissections and aneurysms. Aortic specimens were obtained from patients with type I thoracic aortic dissection, ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms, and control organ donors. The expression of interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and signal transduction factors phospho-p38 and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (phospho-JNK) were detected by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to detect apoptosis of media cells. The correlation of these factors and apoptosis was also studied. Apoptosis in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms was dramatically higher than in the control group. The expression of interleukin-1β gradually increased from the control group, thoracic aortic dissection to ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p matrix metalloproteinase-9 was significantly increased in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms compared with the control group (p correlations between interleukin-1β versus matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β versus phospho-p38 in thoracic aortic dissection (p matrix metalloproteinase-9, interferon-γ versus phospho-JNK, interferon-γ versus apoptosis, and interleukin-1β versus apoptosis in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p = 0.02, 0.02, p matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the apoptosis of media cells in humans. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The humeral origin of the brachioradialis muscle: an unusual site of high radial nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchel, A; Zirak, C; De Mey, A

    2013-11-01

    Radial nerve compression is seldom encountered in the upper arm, and most commonly described compression syndromes have their anatomical cause in the forearm. The teres major, the triceps muscle, the intermuscular septum region and the space between the brachialis and brachioradialis muscles have all been identified as radial nerve compression sites above the elbow. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male patient who presented with dorso-lateral forearm pain and paraesthesias without neurological deficit. Surgical exploration revealed radial nerve compression at the humeral origin of the brachioradialis muscle. Liberation of the nerve at this site was successful at relieving the symptoms. To our knowledge, this compression site has not been described in the literature. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of cervical scar contracture using axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianjie; Li, Yang; Wang, Lu; Li, Weiyang; Dong, Liwei; Xia, Wei; Su, Yingjun

    2014-09-01

    Cervical scar contracture causes both physical and psychological distress for burn patients. Many pedicle flaps or skin grafting have been suggested for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture with variable results in the literature. The authors present the axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery (TBSA) for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture. Postburn scar contractures in anterior neck region of 66 patients had been reconstructed with the axial pattern thoracic flaps based on the TBSA, including 1 expanded and 10 nonexpanded pedicle flaps, and 9 expanded and 46 nonexpanded island pedicle flaps, during 1988 through 2012. After removing and releasing the cervical scar contracture, the flap was designed in the thoracic region. The axial artery of the flap is the TBSA bifurcating from the intersection point of sternocleidomastoid muscle and omohyoid muscle with several concomitant veins as the axial veins. The flap can be designed in a large area within the borders of the anterior border of the trapezius muscle superiorly, the middle part of the deltoid muscle laterally, the midsternal line medially, and the level 3 to 4 cm below nipples inferiorly. After incisions were made along the medial, inferior, and lateral border, dissection was performed toward the pedicle. Donor site was closed directly in expanded cases and with skin grafting in nonexpanded cases. Cervical scar contractures were repaired with good functional and cosmetic results in 64 cases among this cohort. Flap tip necrosis in other 2 cases, caused by postoperative hematoma, was repaired by skin grafting. The color and texture of all flaps were fitted with those of the surrounding skin. The donor sites all healed primarily. The flap sensation in the thoracic region regained in the early stage postoperatively and that in cervical area recovered completely after 6 months according to the report of the patients. With reliable blood supply based on the

  10. Robotics in general thoracic surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M Jawad; Park, Bernard J

    2017-01-01

    The use of robotic technology in general thoracic surgical practice continues to expand across various institutions and at this point many major common thoracic surgical procedures have been successfully performed by general thoracic surgeons using the robotic technology. These procedures include lung resections, excision of mediastinal masses, esophagectomy and reconstruction for malignant and benign esophageal pathologies. The success of robotic technology can be attributed to highly magnified 3-D visualization, dexterity afforded by 7 degrees of freedom that allow difficult dissections in narrow fields and the ease of reproducibility once the initial set up and instruments become familiar to the surgeon. As the application of robotic technology trickle downs from major academic centers to community hospitals, it becomes imperative that its role, limitations, learning curve and financial impact are understood by the novice robotic surgeon. In this article, we share our experience as it relates to the setup, common pitfalls and long term results for more commonly performed robotic assisted lung and thymic resections using the 4 arm da Vinci Xi robotic platform (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) to help guide those who are interested in adopting this technology.

  11. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed.

  12. The immediate effects of thoracic transverse mobilization in patients with the primary complaint of mechanical neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, CIndy; Boyles, Robert; Murahashi, Laura; Sena, Tanya; Yarnall, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Posterior-to-anterior (PA) vertebral mobilization to the thoracic spine has been studied as an intervention for neck pain. Our purpose was to explore effects of a different mobilization technique, transverse vertebral pressure, on cervical range of motion (ROM) and pain when applied to the thoracic spine among participants with neck pain. A single-blinded quasi-experimental study with a one-group pretest-posttest design. A transverse group consisted of 21 participants whose neck pain increased with active movements. A non-intervention group of 20 asymptomatic participants was included simply to ensure rater blinding. The treatment group received Grades IV to IV+ transverse mobilizations at T1 through T4 bilaterally. Measurements taken immediately after intervention included pre/post cervical ROM, distant pressure pain threshold (PPT), and a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Analysis utilized t-tests and ordinal counterparts. The transverse group demonstrated significant gains in extension and bilateral rotation (P≤0.005) but not flexion or side-bend. A total of 57% of mobilized participants reported clinically meaningful decreased pain (Ptransverse mobilization to the upper thoracic spine, significant gains in cervical extension and bilateral rotation, and decreased pain scores were found. There were no adverse effects. Unlike other mobilization studies, PPT changes at a remote site were statistically but not clinically meaningful. Findings suggest that transverse mobilization would be a productive topic for controlled clinical trials.

  13. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors that press on nerves, poor posture that causes nerve compression, pregnancy, and repetitive arm and shoulder movements and activity, ... tumors that press on nerves, poor posture that causes nerve compression, pregnancy, and repetitive arm and shoulder movements and activity, ...

  14. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  15. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  16. Transection of the inferior vena cava from blunt thoracic trauma: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzman, A B; Udekwu, A O; Pevec, W; Albrink, M

    1989-04-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a frequent cause of death in multiple trauma victims. Myocardial rupture may occur in up to 65% of patients who die with thoracic injuries. Two cases are presented with intrapericardial transection of the inferior vena cava, pericardial rupture, and myocardial rupture from blunt thoracic trauma. Both patients died.

  17. Involvement of the thoracic duct in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. Using MR lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboyama, Shin-ichi; Ishii, Kunihide; Koga, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography without contrast agent. In 7 healthy volunteers, the thoracic duct was clearly visualized as an intermittent or continuous straight line along the thoracic aorta (its mean diameter was 3.9 mm). In 20 liver cirrhosis without ascites, its mean diameter was 3.6 mm. In 6 liver cirrhosis with refractory ascites, the thoracic duct was visualized as straight or slightly tortuous and slender line (its mean diameter was 2.5 mm). On the other hand, 7 cases with ascites which respond well to the administration of diuretics showed tortuous and dilated thoracic duct (its mean diameter was 4.3 mm). In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. Thus, it was found that the morphological differences of the thoracic duct depend on the response to the diuretics in liver cirrhosis patients with ascites. To elucidate whether the morphological changes of the thoracic duct are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites, the thoracic duct was examined at magnetic resonance lymphography without contrast agent. In cases with refractory ascites, mean diameter of the thoracic duct was significantly reduced, compared with the cases without ascites and with ascites that respond well to the administration of diuretics. (author)

  18. Immediate and Short-Term Effects of Upper Thoracic Manipulation on Myoelectric Activity of Sternocleidomastoid Muscles in Young Women With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Paulo Fernandes; Packer, Amanda Carine; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immediate and short-term effects of upper thoracic spine manipulation on pain intensity and myoelectric activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles in young women with chronic neck pain. A randomized clinical trial was carried out involving 32 women with chronic neck pain (mean age, 24.8 ± 5.4 years) allocated to an experimental group and a placebo group. Three evaluations were carried out: baseline, immediate postintervention, and short-term postintervention (48-72 hours after intervention). Myoelectric activity of the right and left sternocleidomastoid muscles was assessed at rest and during isometric contractions for cervical flexion and elevation of the shoulder girdle. Neck pain intensity was assessed at rest using a visual analog scale. Comparisons of the data were performed using 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction. The level of significance was set at P 0.40). No statistically significant differences were found for any of the variables analyzed in the intergroup comparisons at the different evaluation times (P > .05). No statistically significant differences were found in the intragroup or intergroup analyses of the experimental and placebo groups regarding myoelectric activity of the cervical muscles or the intensity of neck pain at rest in the immediate or short-term postintervention evaluations. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem MRI for thoracic abnormalities in fetuses and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Thayyil, Sudhin; Addison, Shea; Olsen, Oystein E.; Wade, Angie; Jones, Rod; Norman, Wendy; Taylor, Andrew M.; Scott, Rosemary J.; Robertson, Nicola J.; Chitty, Lyn S.; Sebire, Neil J.; Owens, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) specifically for non-cardiac thoracic pathology in fetuses and children, compared with conventional autopsy. Institutional ethics approval and parental consent was obtained. A total of 400 unselected fetuses and children underwent PMMR before conventional autopsy, reported blinded to the other dataset. Of 400 non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities, 113 (28 %) were found at autopsy. Overall sensitivity and specificity (95 % confidence interval) of PMMR for any thoracic pathology was poor at 39.6 % (31.0, 48.9) and 85.5 % (80.7, 89.2) respectively, with positive predictive value (PPV) 53.7 % (42.9, 64.0) and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.0 % (71.8, 81.4). Overall agreement was 71.8 % (67.1, 76.2). PMMR was most sensitive at detecting anatomical abnormalities, including pleural effusions and lung or thoracic hypoplasia, but particularly poor at detecting infection. PMMR currently has relatively poor diagnostic detection rates for the commonest intra-thoracic pathologies identified at autopsy in fetuses and children, including respiratory tract infection and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. The reasonable NPV suggests that normal thoracic appearances at PMMR exclude the majority of important thoracic lesions at autopsy, and so could be useful in the context of minimally invasive autopsy for detecting non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem MRI for thoracic abnormalities in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Thayyil, Sudhin; Addison, Shea [Imperial College London, Perinatal Neurology and Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Olsen, Oystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Wade, Angie [UCL Institute of Child Health, Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Rod; Norman, Wendy; Taylor, Andrew M. [UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); Scott, Rosemary J. [University College London Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Robertson, Nicola J. [UCL Institute for Women' s Health, Academic Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); UCLH NHS Foundation Trusts, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); Collaboration: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Autopsy Study (MaRIAS) Collaborative Group

    2014-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) specifically for non-cardiac thoracic pathology in fetuses and children, compared with conventional autopsy. Institutional ethics approval and parental consent was obtained. A total of 400 unselected fetuses and children underwent PMMR before conventional autopsy, reported blinded to the other dataset. Of 400 non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities, 113 (28 %) were found at autopsy. Overall sensitivity and specificity (95 % confidence interval) of PMMR for any thoracic pathology was poor at 39.6 % (31.0, 48.9) and 85.5 % (80.7, 89.2) respectively, with positive predictive value (PPV) 53.7 % (42.9, 64.0) and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.0 % (71.8, 81.4). Overall agreement was 71.8 % (67.1, 76.2). PMMR was most sensitive at detecting anatomical abnormalities, including pleural effusions and lung or thoracic hypoplasia, but particularly poor at detecting infection. PMMR currently has relatively poor diagnostic detection rates for the commonest intra-thoracic pathologies identified at autopsy in fetuses and children, including respiratory tract infection and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. The reasonable NPV suggests that normal thoracic appearances at PMMR exclude the majority of important thoracic lesions at autopsy, and so could be useful in the context of minimally invasive autopsy for detecting non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities. (orig.)

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: A rare cause of elevated hemidiaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Ejazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve palsy causing hemidiaphragm paralysis is a very uncommon feature of thoracic aortic aneurysm. In one case, a 30 year male complained of chronic dull aching chest pain, and hoarseness of voice; posteroanterior view chest radiograph revealed large spherical radiopacity on the left upper lung zone with smooth lobulated margin with elevated left hemidiaphragm. On Colour Doppler sonography, lesion was anechoic on gray scale sonography but on Doppler analysis revealed intense internal vascularity within it with characteristic "Ying Yang" sign. The finding favor the vascular origin of the lesion and a diagnosis of an arterial aneurysm was made Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT of the thorax revealed a large well defined spherical lesion of 8 × 10 cm size with smooth well defined margin arising from the aortic arch and attenuation of impending rupture or dissection were lesion on immediate post contrast and delayed scan was similar to that of aorta. Left hemidiaphragm elevation was explained by the gross mass effect of the aneurysm causing right phrenic nerve palsy.

  2. Right main bronchial fracture resolution by digital thoracic drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Julián, Gildardo; Mier, José M; Iñiguez, Marco A; Guzmán de Alba, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    Tracheobronchial stenosis is common in the thoracic surgery service, and iatrogenic injury of the airway after manipulation is not infrequent. When a digital thoracic drainage system came onto the market, many advantages were evident. A 24-year-old woman with critical right main bronchial stenosis underwent airway dilation that was complicated by a tear with a massive air leak, resulting in a total right pneumothorax. We employed a pleural drain connected to a digital thoracic drainage system. The drain was removed 2 days after successful resolution of the air leak. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in thoracic inlet tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Eiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the detectability of tumor invasion to the thoracic inlet, MRI was performed in 57 patients with thoracic inlet tumor, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI was compared with that of CT concerning the utility for thoracic inlet lesions. And we assessed abnormal findings in comparison with surgical or autopsy findings. In the local extent of the tumor, the accuracy for tumor invasion to the vessels such as subclavian artery and vein was 94.9% for MRI, and 83.5% for CT, and to the brachial plexus was 95.0% for MRI, and 60.0% for CT. MRI was superior to CT, but MRI was equivalent to CT with regard to invasion to the base of the neck, lateral chest wall, ribs, and vertebral bodies. However on MRI, it is easier to understand the longitudinal tumor extent than on CT. CT has superior spatial resolusion but CT has also disadvantages, such as streak artifact caused by shoulder joints, resulting in image degradation. In contrast, MRI has inherent advantages, and multiple images which facilitate the relationship between tumor and normal structures. Coronal and sagittal MR images facilitated three-dimensional observation of tumor of invasion in the thoracic inlet. Furthermore to improve image quality of MRI for the thoracic inlet, we newly devised a high molecular polyester shell for fixing a surface coil. On the high resolution MR (HR-MR) imaging using our shell, normal lymph nodes, muscles, blood vessels and the branches of the branchial plexus were clearly visualized in detail. Our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation. In conclusion, MRI was very useful for detecting lesions of the thoracic inlet and in deciding surgical indication and the planning for radiotherapy. (author).

  4. Quality Aware Compression of Electrocardiogram Using Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) compression finds wide application in various patient monitoring purposes. Quality control in ECG compression ensures reconstruction quality and its clinical acceptance for diagnostic decision making. In this paper, a quality aware compression method of single lead ECG is described using principal component analysis (PCA). After pre-processing, beat extraction and PCA decomposition, two independent quality criteria, namely, bit rate control (BRC) or error control (EC) criteria were set to select optimal principal components, eigenvectors and their quantization level to achieve desired bit rate or error measure. The selected principal components and eigenvectors were finally compressed using a modified delta and Huffman encoder. The algorithms were validated with 32 sets of MIT Arrhythmia data and 60 normal and 30 sets of diagnostic ECG data from PTB Diagnostic ECG data ptbdb, all at 1 kHz sampling. For BRC with a CR threshold of 40, an average Compression Ratio (CR), percentage root mean squared difference normalized (PRDN) and maximum absolute error (MAE) of 50.74, 16.22 and 0.243 mV respectively were obtained. For EC with an upper limit of 5 % PRDN and 0.1 mV MAE, the average CR, PRDN and MAE of 9.48, 4.13 and 0.049 mV respectively were obtained. For mitdb data 117, the reconstruction quality could be preserved up to CR of 68.96 by extending the BRC threshold. The proposed method yields better results than recently published works on quality controlled ECG compression.

  5. Thoracic staging with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR in non-small cell lung cancer - does it change therapeutic decisions in comparison to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metzenmacher, Martin [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, Essen (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Gauler, Thomas [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Radiation and Tumour Clinic, Essen (Germany); Roesel, Christian [University Duisburg-Essen, Ruhrlandklinik, Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald; Buchbender, Christian [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate whether differences in thoracic tumour staging between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging lead to different therapeutic decisions in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Seventy-seven NSCLC patients that underwent whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT from the base of skull to the upper thighs and thoracic PET/MR were enrolled in this retrospective study. Thoracic PET/CT and PET/MR images were staged according to the 7th edition of the AJCC staging manual. Staging results of both modalities were discussed separately in a simulated interdisciplinary tumour board and therapeutic decisions based on both imaging modalities were recorded. Descriptive statistics were used to compare the results and reasons for changes in the therapeutic decision were investigated. Staging results differed in 35 % of patients (27 patients) between thoracic PET/CT and PET/MR. Differences were detected when assessing the T-stage in 18 % (n = 14), the N-stage in 23 % (n = 18), and the M-stage in 1 % (n = 1). However, patient therapy management was changed in only six patients (8 %). Despite the variability of thoracic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR in TNM-staging, both modalities lead to comparable therapeutic decisions in patients suffering from NSCLC. Hence, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR can be considered an possible alternative to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for clinical NSCLC staging. (orig.)

  6. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic and abdominal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woitek, R.; Asenbaum, U.; Furtner, J.; Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal thoracic and abdominal malformations. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cases of suspected pathologies based on fetal ultrasound MRI can be used for more detailed examinations and can be of assistance in the differential diagnostic process. Improved imaging of anatomical structures and of the composition of different tissues by the use of different MRI sequences. Fetal MRI has become a part of clinical routine in thoracic and abdominal malformations and is the basis for scientific research in this field. In cases of thoracic or abdominal malformations fetal MRI provides important information additional to ultrasound to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic evaluation and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  7. Electron core ionization in compressed alkali metal cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2018-01-01

    Elements of groups I and II in the periodic table have valence electrons of s-type and are usually considered as simple metals. Crystal structures of these elements at ambient pressure are close-packed and high-symmetry of bcc and fcc-types, defined by electrostatic (Madelung) energy. Diverse structures were found under high pressure with decrease of the coordination number, packing fraction and symmetry. Formation of complex structures can be understood within the model of Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interactions and supported by Hume-Rothery arguments. With the volume decrease there is a gain of band structure energy accompanied by a formation of many-faced Brillouin zone polyhedra. Under compression to less than a half of the initial volume the interatomic distances become close to or smaller than the ionic radius which should lead to the electron core ionization. At strong compression it is necessary to assume that for alkali metals the valence electron band overlaps with the upper core electrons, which increases the valence electron count under compression.

  8. Thoracic ROM measurement system with visual bio-feedback: system design and biofeedback evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujitani, Junko; Koike, Tomokazu; Fujimoto, Masashi; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need to improve their thorax mobility. Thoracic ROM is one of the simplest and most useful indexes to evaluate the respiratory function. In this paper, we have proposed the prototype of a simple thoracic ROM measurement system with real-time visual bio-feedback in the chest expansion test. In this system, the thoracic ROM is measured using a wire-type linear encoder whose wire is wrapped around the thorax. In this paper, firstly, the repeatability and reliability of measured thoracic ROM was confirmed as a first report of the developed prototype. Secondly, we analyzed the effect of the bio-feedback system on the respiratory function. The result of the experiment showed that it was easier to maintain a large and stable thoracic ROM during deep breathing by using the real-time visual biofeedback system of the thoracic ROM.

  9. Hydromagnetic stability of rotating stratified compressible fluid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, V; Kandaswamy, P [Dept. of Mathematics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India; Debnath, L [Dept. of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA

    1984-09-01

    The hydromagnetic stability of a radially stratified compressible fluid rotating between two coaxial cylinders is investigated. The stability with respect to axisymmetric disturbances is examined. The fluid system is found to be thoroughly stable to axisymmetric disturbances provided the fluid rotates very rapidly. The system is shown to be unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances, and the slow amplifying hydromagnetic wave modes propagate against the basic rotation. The lower and upper bounds of the azimuthal phase speeds of the amplifying waves are determined. A quadrant theorem on the slow waves characteristic of a rapidly rotating fluid is derived. Special attention is given to the effects of compressibility of the fluid. Some results concerning the stability of an incompressible fluid system are obtained as special cases of the present analysis.

  10. Anesthesia for thoracic surgery: A survey of middle eastern practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawlatly, Abdelazeem; Turkistani, Ahmed; Shelley, Ben; El-Tahan, Mohamed; Macfie, Alistair; Kinsella, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this survey is to describe the current practice of thoracic anesthesia in the Middle Eastern (ME) region. Methods: A prospective online survey. An invitation to participate was e-mailed to all members of the ME thoracic-anaesthesia group. A total of 58 members participated in the survey from 19 institutions in the Middle East. Questions concerned ventilation strategies during one-lung ventilation (OLV), anesthesia regimen, mode of postoperative analgesia, use of lung isolation techniques, and use of i.v. fluids. Results: Volume-controlled ventilation was favored over pressure-controlled ventilation (62% vs 38% of respondents, Panesthesia practice. Failure to pass a DLT and difficult airway are the most commonly cited indications for BB use. Regarding postoperative analgesia, the majority 61.8% favor thoracic epidural analgesia over other techniques (P<0.05). Conclusions: Our survey provides a contemporary snapshot of the ME thoracic anesthetic practice. PMID:23162388

  11. Uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery: summary of experience, mini-review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Marcello; Calvo, Damiano; Criscione, Alessandra; Borrata, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The uniportal-video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) technique comprises operations which can be performed with skin incisions ranging from 2 to 8 cm and the manifest result of the introduction of the uniportal lobectomy had made possible to increase rapidly the number of published papers on this subject. Many of the large ensuing literature report incomplete historical information on uniportal VATS, and doubts exist about the indication of uniportal VATS for some thoracic oncologic pathologies. Known limitations have been overcome. On the other hand, the modern thoracic surgical team includes one surgeon, one assistant and a scrub nurse, and it is clear that the new generation of thoracic surgeons need to use the "less" used hand. The new technology which permitted the introduction of the uniportal VATS could influence the future need of thoracic surgeons worldwide.

  12. Fast and predictable video compression in software design and implementation of an H.261 codec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Dagmar; Hess, Robert

    1998-09-01

    The use of software codecs for video compression becomes commonplace in several videoconferencing applications. In order to reduce conflicts with other applications used at the same time, mechanisms for resource reservation on endsystems need to determine an upper bound for computing time used by the codec. This leads to the demand for predictable execution times of compression/decompression. Since compression schemes as H.261 inherently depend on the motion contained in the video, an adaptive admission control is required. This paper presents a data driven approach based on dynamical reduction of the number of processed macroblocks in peak situations. Besides the absolute speed is a point of interest. The question, whether and how software compression of high quality video is feasible on today's desktop computers, is examined.

  13. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  14. Permanent interstitial implantation of 125Iodine seed for thoracic malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhongheng; Qian Yongyue; Wu Jinchang; Liu Zengli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe effect of 125 Iodine sed on interstitial brachytherapy of patient with thoracic malignant tumor. Methods: 125 Iodine seed were inserted into the target tissue and permanent left there for brachytherapy in 6 cases of thoracic malignant tumors, which including lung cancer, Pancoast's tumour, mediastinal malignant schwannoma. Results: All cases were rehabilitated shortly after operation. The implanted lesions remained controlled now and in dead patients. No radiation-related and 125 Iodine seed-related complications occurred. Conclusion: Brachytherapy by implantation of 125 Iodine seeds of remained tumor tissue in patients with thoracic malignant tumor after operation has a satisfactory outcome. This therapy can control local recurrent of thoracic malignant tumor. But the results in long term should be studied further

  15. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty in the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, J.P.; Guenther, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Venous thromboses of stenoses in the upper extremity are often the result of a compression syndrome of the shoulder girdle, the Paget-von Schroetter syndrome, vascular surgery, space-occupying lesions in the mediastinum or the result of catheterisation. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty were performed successfully in six patients. (orig.) [de

  16. Primary hyperparathyroidism: A rare cause of spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Fares H.; Malkawi, Omar M.; Sharbaji, Amer A.; Rihani, Hanan R.; Jbara, Ibrahim F.

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old postmenopausal hypertensive lady who was treated for osteoporosis with calcium and Vitamin D. She presented with progressive lower limb weakness and paresthesia with sensory level at T4. Investigations revealed high parathyroid hormone 1152 ng/dl, calcium 10.9 mg/dl, and low phosphorus of 2.4 mg/dl after stopping calcium supplement. Chest x-ray showed an expansile mass lesion of the right 6th rib confirmed by chest CT. Thoracic MRI showed a mass lesion extending from the T3 vertebral body and compressing the spinal cord. There were multiple lytic lesions of the scalp, ribs, femur, and pelvis suggesting metastatic lesions. A neck ultrasound and SESTA MIBI parathyroid scan confirmed a right lower parathyroid adenoma. Excision biopsy of the rib lesion confirmed a vascular lesion with features of brown tumor BT. Decompression surgery of the thoracic spine was performed, and the histopathology confirmed BT. Two weeks later the patient underwent right parathyroidectomy that proved to be a parathyroid adenoma. She showed a remarkable improvement in her clinical condition and there were some regression of the bony lesions observed 12 months post parathyroidectomy. This case should alert physicians to the association of multiple brown tumors in PHPT and that the presentation may be an aggressive one mimicking metastasis, patients with osteoporosis warrant at least calcium profile to rule out a secondary cause. (author)

  17. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  18. Preliminary study of the internal margin of the gross tumor volume in thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiancheng; Pan, Jianji; Wang, Linhua; Zhao, Yunhui; Liu, Di; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, He Ping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To measure the displacement of the tumor of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of thoracic esophageal cancer in the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration for determining the internal margin of the GTV (IGTV). Methods. - Twenty-two patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who were unable to undergo surgery were identified in our hospital. The patients received radiotherapy. By using 16-slice spiral computed tomography (CT), we acquired the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration. The displacement and volume changes in tumor target volume were measured, and the changes were analyzed to determine if these were associated with the tidal volume and the location and length of the target volume V. In the end, we analyzed the displacement of tumor target volume and calculated the internal margin of the GTV by empirical formula. Results. - The average tidal volume was 463.6 ml. The average GTV at end-inspiration was 33.3 ml and at end-expiration was 33.35 ml. Three was not any significant between two groups (T -0.034, P > 0.05). The IGTV (X-axis direction) was 3.09 mm for the right sector and 4.08 mm for the left border; the IGTV (Z-axis direction) was 3.96 mm for the anterior border and 2.83 mm for the posterior border; and the IGTV (Y-axis direction) was 7.31 mm for the upper boundary (head direction) and 10.16 mm for the lower boundary (feet direction). The motion of the GTV showed no significant correlation with the tidal volume of patients and the length of the tumor, but in relation to the tumor location, the displacement of the lower thoracic and the middle thoracic target volumes occurred in the direction of the anterior and right, which were not significantly different (T = 0.859, 0.229, P > 0.05) The significant differences were observed for the other directions (P < 0.05). Conclusions. - Because of respiratory and organ movements, the displacement of the tumor target volume was different in all directions. Therefore, we recommend that

  19. Physiological Striae Atrophicae of Adolescence with Involvement of the Upper Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K. C. Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 13-year-old boy with multiple purplish, atrophic, horizontal linear striae in the thoracic area. He reported a growth spurt in the preceding 12 months. His past health was unremarkable, and he took no medications. To our knowledge, physiological striae atrophicae of adolescence where idiopathic striae were restricted to the upper back have rarely been reported. Physiological striae atrophicae of adolescence may, on occasions, be mistaken for child abuse. It is important that child care professionals recognize this condition so that false accusations of child abuse will not be made.

  20. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [A case of medulla oblongata compression by tortuous vertebral arteries presenting with spastic quadriplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Takashi; Tateishi, Takahisa; Yamashita, Tamayo; Nagata, Shinji; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 58-year-old man showing spastic paraparesis due to medulla oblongata compression by tortuous vertebral arteries. He noticed weakness of both legs and gait disturbance at the age of 58 years and his symptoms progressively worsened during the following several months. General physical findings were normal. Blood pressure was normal and there were no signs of arteriosclerosis. Neurological examination on admission revealed lower-limb-dominant spasticity in all four extremities, lower-limb weakness, hyperreflexia in all extremities with positive Wartenberg's, Babinski's and Chaddock's signs, mild hypesthesia and hypopallesthesia in both lower limbs, and spastic gait. Cranial nerves were all normal. Serum was negative for antibodies against human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 antibody. Nerve conduction and needle electromyographic studies of all four limbs revealed normal findings. Cervical, thoracic and lumbo-sacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were all normal. Brain MRI and magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated bilateral tortuous vertebral arteries compressing the medulla oblongata. Neurovascular decompression of the right vertebral artery was performed because compression of the right side was more severe than that of the left side. Post-operative MRI revealed outward translocation of the right vertebral artery and relieved compression of the medulla oblongata on the right side. The patient's symptoms and neurological findings improved gradually after the operation. Bilateral pyramidal tract signs without cranial nerve dysfunction due to compression of the medulla oblongata by tortuous vertebral arteries are extremely rare and clinically indistinguishable from hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Although we did not perform a genetic test for HSP, we consider that the spastic paraparesis and mild lower-limb hypesthesia were caused by compression of the medulla oblongata by bilateral tortuous vertebral arteries based on the post

  2. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  3. Thoracic Duct Injury Following Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Pace, Jonathan R; Smith, Gabriel A; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Riew, K Daniel; Mroz, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series. To determine the rate of thoracic duct injury during cervical spine operations. A retrospective case series study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify instances of thoracic duct injury during anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data for each identified case into case report forms. All case report forms were collected by the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing, cleaning, and analysis. Of a total of 9591 patients reviewed that underwent cervical spine surgery, 2 (0.02%) incurred iatrogenic injury to the thoracic duct. Both patients underwent a left-sided anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The interruption of the thoracic duct was addressed intraoperatively in one patient with no residual postoperative effects. The second individual developed a chylous fluid collection approximately 2 months after the operation that required drainage via needle aspiration. Damage to the thoracic duct during cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Rapid identification of the disruption of this lymphatic vessel is critical to minimize deleterious effects of this complication.

  4. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thoracic Epidural Teratoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Quon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Spinal teratomas comprise a rare subset of spinal cord tumors, and here, we describe an even rarer childhood thoracic extradural-intracanalicular teratoma. The clinical presentation, management, and pathophysiology of these tumors are reviewed to promote recognition and guide treatment of these lesions. Methods We report the case of a 21-month-old boy who presented with marked spasticity, as well as failure to ambulate and meet motor milestones. Additionally, we provide a literature review of spinal teratomas, including their clinical presentation, work-up, pathophysiology, and underlying genetics. Results An MRI of the spine revealed a large dorsal epidural tumor extending from T3 to T10 with heterogeneous contrast enhancement and severe spinal cord compression. The tumor was resected revealing a cystic mass with tissue resembling hair, muscle, as well as cartilage; pathology confirmed the diagnosis of teratoma. Gross total resection was achieved, and the child eventually gained ambulatory function. Conclusions Given that spinal teratomas are rare entities that can present with significant neurologic compromise, they must remain on clinicians’ differentials. Unfortunately, the exact origin of these tumors remains inconclusive and requires further investigation.

  6. Apparent stress-strain relationships in experimental equipment where magnetorheological fluids operate under compression mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, S A; Ekreem, N B; Olabi, A G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of two different magnetorheological (MR) fluids, namely, water-based and hydrocarbon-based MR fluids in compression mode under various applied currents. Finite element method magnetics was used to predict the magnetic field distribution inside the MR fluids generated by a coil. A test rig was constructed where the MR fluid was sandwiched between two flat surfaces. During the compression, the upper surface was moved towards the lower surface in a vertical direction. Stress-strain relationships were obtained for arrangements of equipment where each type of fluid was involved, using compression test equipment. The apparent compressive stress was found to be increased with the increase in magnetic field strength. In addition, the apparent compressive stress of the water-based MR fluid showed a response to the compressive strain of greater magnitude. However, during the compression process, the hydrocarbon-based MR fluid appeared to show a unique behaviour where an abrupt pressure drop was discovered in a region where the apparent compressive stress would be expected to increase steadily. The conclusion is drawn that the apparent compressive stress of MR fluids is influenced strongly by the nature of the carrier fluid and by the magnitude of the applied current

  7. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes: lack of association with susceptibility to thoracic empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Catrin E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the innate immune protein mannose-binding lectin (MBL in host defence against severe respiratory infection remains controversial. Thoracic empyema is a suppurative lung infection that arises as a major complication of pneumonia and is associated with a significant mortality. Although the pathogenesis of thoracic empyema is poorly understood, genetic susceptibility loci for this condition have recently been identified. The possible role of MBL genotypic deficiency in susceptibility to thoracic empyema has not previously been reported. Methods To investigate this further we compared the frequencies of the six functional MBL polymorphisms in 170 European individuals with thoracic empyema and 225 healthy control individuals. Results No overall association was observed between MBL genotypic deficiency and susceptibility to thoracic empyema (2 × 2 Chi square = 0.02, P = 0.87. Furthermore, no association was seen between MBL deficiency and susceptibility to the Gram-positive or pneumococcal empyema subgroups. MBL genotypic deficiency did not associate with progression to death or requirement for surgery. Conclusions Our results suggest that MBL genotypic deficiency does not associate with susceptibility to thoracic empyema in humans.

  8. Extrapleural Inner Thoracic Wall Lesions: Multidetector CT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shik [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The extrapleural space is external to the parietal pleura in the thorax. The structures within and adjacent to this region include the fat pad, endothoracic fascia, intercostal muscles, connective tissue, nerves, vessels, and ribs. Further, the space is divided into the inner and outer thoracic wall by the innermost intercostal muscle. Extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall are classified as air-containing lesions, fat-containing lesions, and soft tissue-containing lesions according on their main component. Air-containing lesions include extrapleural air from direct chest trauma and extrapleural extension from pneumomediastinum. Prominent extrapleural fat is seen in decreased lung volume conditions, and can also be seen in normal individuals. Soft tissue-containing lesions include extrapleural extensions from a pleural or chest wall infection as well as tumors and extrapleural hematoma. We classify extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall and illustrate their imaging findings

  9. A new concept of the anatomy of the thoracic oesophagus: the meso-oesophagus. Observational study during thoracoscopic esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Miguel A; Weijs, Teus J; Bleys, Ronald L A W; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Ruurda, Jelle P; Straatman, Jennifer; Osugi, Harushi; van der Peet, Donald L

    2015-09-01

    During thoracoscopic oesophageal surgery, we observed not previously described fascia-like structures. Description of similar structures in rectal cancer surgery was of paramount importance in improving the quality of resection. Therefore, we aimed to describe a new comprehensive concept of the surgical anatomy of the thoracic oesophagus with definition of the meso-oesophagus. We retrospectively evaluated 35 consecutive unedited videos of thoracoscopic oesophageal resections for cancer, to determine the surgical anatomy of the oesophageal fascia's vessels and lymphatic drainage. The resulting concept was validated in a prospective study, including 20 patients at three different centres. Additional confirmation was sought by a histologic study of a cadaver's thorax. A thin layer of connective tissue around the infracarinal oesophagus, involving the lymph nodes at the level of the carina, was observed during thoracoscopic esophagectomy in 32 of the 35 patients included in the retrospective study and in 19 of the 20 patients included in the prospective study. A thick fascia-like structure from the upper thoracic aperture to the lower thoracic aperture was visualized in all patients. This fascia is encountered between the descending aorta and left aspect of the infracarinal oesophagus. Above the carina it expands on both sides of the oesophagus to lateral mediastinal structures. This fascia contains oesophageal vessels, lymph vessels and nodes and nerves. The histologic study confirmed these findings. Here we described the concept of the "meso-oesophagus". Applying the description of the meso-oesophagus will create a better understanding of the oesophageal anatomy, leading to more adequate and reproducible surgery.

  10. A Large Asymptomatic Thoracic Spine Schwannoma Detected Incidentally by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Seoul Sungae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [Catholic University Medical School Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Schwannoma is not a rare tumor occurring anywhere where sheathed nerve fibers present. However the spinal involvement has been noted to be uncommon. The use of PET in the diagnosis of spinal schwannomas seemed to have only sporadically been reported and standardized uptake values (SUV) measured in peripheral nerves schwannomas varied according to cellularity. Most reported spinal schwannoms were symptomatic and relatively hypometabolic but ours differed in that despite considerable compression of the spinal cord it did not produce clinical symptoms or signs and had a relatively high FDG uptake value. The spine was operated. On opening a 1.0x1.5 cm tumor was found to be encapsulated and located in the right posterolateral aspect of the intradural space at the 4th thoracic spine level. It was completely resected along with the rootlet from which the tumor seemed to have originated not damaging the cord or causing bleeding. The spinal medulla compressed by and adherent to the tumor was decompressed and released following arachnoid adhesiolysis. The hospital stay was uneventful. Patient was discharged and is well and fine without complication eight months after surgery.

  11. Idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare and often missed cause of thoracic myelopathy. The clinical presentation and radiological appearance is inconsistent and commonly confused with a dorsal arachnoid cyst and often is a misdiagnosed entity. While ventral spinal cord herniation through a dural defect has been previously described, intravertebral herniation is a distinct entity and extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year old man with idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation and discuss the clinico-radiological presentation, pathophysiology and operative management along with a review the literature of this unusual entity.

  12. On the implicit density based OpenFOAM solver for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Jiří

    The contribution deals with the development of coupled implicit density based solver for compressible flows in the framework of open source package OpenFOAM. However the standard distribution of OpenFOAM contains several ready-made segregated solvers for compressible flows, the performance of those solvers is rather week in the case of transonic flows. Therefore we extend the work of Shen [15] and we develop an implicit semi-coupled solver. The main flow field variables are updated using lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method (LU-SGS) whereas the turbulence model variables are updated using implicit Euler method.

  13. Statistical and data reporting guidelines for the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Dunning, Joel; Seifert, Burkhardt; Sodeck, Gottfried; Carr, Matthew J; Burger, Hans Ulrich; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    As part of the peer review process for the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EJCTS) and the Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery (ICVTS), a statistician reviews any manuscript that includes a statistical analysis. To facilitate authors considering submitting a manuscript and to make it clearer about the expectations of the statistical reviewers, we present up-to-date guidelines for authors on statistical and data reporting specifically in these journals. The number of statistical methods used in the cardiothoracic literature is vast, as are the ways in which data are presented. Therefore, we narrow the scope of these guidelines to cover the most common applications submitted to the EJCTS and ICVTS, focusing in particular on those that the statistical reviewers most frequently comment on. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  15. The Thoracic Lordosis Correction Improves Sacral Slope and Walking Ability in Neuromuscular Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Moon, Eun Su; Park, Jin Oh; Chong, Hyon Su; Lee, Hwan Mo; Moon, Seong Hwan; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hak Sun

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective study. To report on neuromuscular patients with preserved walking ability, but forward bending of the body due to thoracic lordosis, and to suggest thoracic lordosis correction as the surgical treatment. It is an established fact that lumbar lordosis or pelvic parameter is directly related to thoracic sagittal balance. However, the reverse relationship has not been fully defined yet. Loss of thoracic kyphosis results in positive sagittal balance, which causes walking difficulty. Neuromuscular patients with thoracic lordosis have not been reported yet, and there have been no reports on their surgical treatments. This study analyzed 8 patients treated with thoracic lordosis correction surgery. Every patient was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. In thoracic lordosis correction surgery, anterior release was performed in the first stage and posterior segmental instrumentation was performed in the second stage. Radiographic parameters were compared and walking ability was evaluated with gait analysis. All patients were classified according to the modified Rancho Los Amigos Hospital system preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively to evaluate functional ability. The average follow-up period was 2.9 years. Before surgery, the mean thoracic sagittal alignment was -2.1-degree lordosis, the mean Cobb angle and sacral slope increased to 36.3 and 56.6 degrees, respectively. The anterior pelvic tilt in gait analysis was 29.3 degrees. At last follow-up after surgery, the mean thoracic sagittal alignment changed to 12.6-degree kyphosis, and the Cobb angle and sacral slope decreased to 18.9 and 39.5 degrees, respectively. Lumbar lordosis and the sacral slope showed significant positive correlation (Plordosis showed a significant correlation to the preoperative flexibility of the major curve (P=0.028). The anterior pelvic tilt in gait analysis improved to 15.4 degrees. The functional ability improved in 2 (50%) of 4 patients in class 2 and maintained in remaining 6

  16. External validation of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Mitchell J; Wright, Cameron D; McDonald, Donna; Fernandez, Felix G; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2013-11-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD) reports outstanding results for lung and esophageal cancer resection. However, a major weakness of the GTSD has been the lack of validation of this voluntary registry. The purpose of this study was to perform an external, independent audit to assess the accuracy of the data collection process and the quality of the database. An independent firm was contracted to audit 5% of sites randomly selected from the GTDB in 2011. Audits were performed remotely to maximize the number of audits performed and reduce cost. Auditors compared lobectomy cases submitted to the GTSD with the hospital operative logs to evaluate completeness of the data. In addition, 20 lobectomy records from each site were audited in detail. Agreement rates were calculated for 32 individual data elements, 7 data categories pertaining to patient status or care delivery, and an overall agreement rate for each site. Six process variables were also evaluated to assess best practice for data collection and submission. Ten sites were audited from the 222 participants. Comparison of the 559 submitted lobectomy cases with operative logs from each site identified 28 omissions, a 94.6% agreement rate (discrepancies/site range, 2 to 27). Importantly, cases not submitted had no mortality or major morbidity, indicating a lack of purposeful omission. The aggregate agreement rates for all categories were greater than 90%. The overall data accuracy was 94.9%. External audits of the GTSD validate the accuracy and completeness of the data. Careful examination of unreported cases demonstrated no purposeful omission or gaming. Although these preliminary results are quite good, it is imperative that the audit process is refined and continues to expand along with the GTSD to insure reliability of the database. The audit results are currently being incorporated into educational and quality improvement processes to add further value. Copyright

  17. Video-assisted thoracic surgery mediastinal germ cell metastasis resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Marco; Jayakumar, Shruti; Migliore, Marcello; Dunning, Joel

    2017-07-01

    Thoracoscopy can be safely used for dissection of masses in the visceral mediastinum. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by metastatic germ cell tumour and successfully treated with a 3-port posterior approach video-assisted thoracic surgery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic injury rule out criteria and NEXUS chest in predicting the risk of traumatic intra-thoracic injuries: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Saeed; Radfar, Fatemeh; Baratloo, Alireza

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of NEXUS chest and Thoracic Injury Rule out criteria (TIRC) models in predicting the risk of intra-thoracic injuries following blunt multiple trauma. In this diagnostic accuracy study, using the 2 mentioned models, blunt multiple trauma patients over the age of 15 years presenting to emergency department were screened regarding the presence of intra-thoracic injuries that are detectable via chest x-ray and screening performance characteristics of the models were compared. In this study, 3118 patients with the mean (SD) age of 37.4 (16.9) years were studied (57.4% male). Based on TIRC and NEXUS chest, respectively, 1340 (43%) and 1417 (45.4%) patients were deemed in need of radiography performance. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of TIRC were 98.95%, 62.70%, 21.19% and 99.83%. These values were 98.61%, 59.94%, 19.97% and 99.76%, for NEXUS chest, respectively. Accuracy of TIRC and NEXUS chest models were 66.04 (95% CI: 64.34-67.70) and 63.50 (95% CI: 61.78-65.19), respectively. TIRC and NEXUS chest models have proper and similar sensitivity in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-thoracic injuries that are detectable via chest x-ray. However, TIRC had a significantly higher specificity in this regard. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Four-Dimensional Measurement of the Displacement of Internal Fiducial Markers During 320-Multislice Computed Tomography Scanning of Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Sakumi, Akira; Haga, Akihiro; Ito, Saori; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Okuma, Kae; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the three-dimensional movement of internal fiducial markers placed near esophageal cancers using 320-multislice CT. Methods and Materials: This study examined 22 metal markers in the esophageal wall near the primary tumors of 12 patients treated with external-beam photon radiotherapy. Motion assessment was analyzed in 41 respiratory phases during 20 s of cine CT in the radiotherapy position. Results: Motion in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction showed a strong correlation (R 2 > 0.4) with the respiratory curve in most markers (73%). The average absolute amplitude of the marker movement was 1.5 ± 1.6 mm, 1.6 ± 1.7 mm, and 3.3 ± 3.3 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and CC directions, respectively. The average marker displacements in the CC direction between peak exhalation and inhalation for the 22 clips were 1.1 mm (maximum, 5.5 mm), 3.0 mm (14.5 mm), and 5.1 mm (16.3 mm) for the upper, middle, and lower thoracic esophagus, respectively. Conclusions: Motion in primary esophagus tumor was evaluated with 320-multislice CT. According to this study, 4.3 mm CC, 1.5 mm AP, and 2.0 mm LR in the upper, 7.4 mm CC, 3.0 mm AP, and 2.4 mm LR in the middle, and 13.8 mm CC, 6.6 mm AP, and 6.8 mm LR in the lower thoracic esophagus provided coverage of tumor motion in 95% of the cases in our study population.

  20. Pulmonary function tests correlated with thoracic volumes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledonio, Charles Gerald T; Rosenstein, Benjamin E; Johnston, Charles E; Regelmann, Warren E; Nuckley, David J; Polly, David W

    2017-01-01

    Scoliosis deformity has been linked with deleterious changes in the thoracic cavity that affect pulmonary function. The causal relationship between spinal deformity and pulmonary function has yet to be fully defined. It has been hypothesized that deformity correction improves pulmonary function by restoring both respiratory muscle efficiency and increasing the space available to the lungs. This research aims to correlate pulmonary function and thoracic volume before and after scoliosis correction. Retrospective correlational analysis between thoracic volume modeling from plain x-rays and pulmonary function tests was conducted. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients enrolled in a multicenter database were sorted by pre-operative Total Lung Capacities (TLC) % predicted values from their Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT). Ten patients with the best and ten patients with the worst TLC values were included. Modeled thoracic volume and TLC values were compared before and 2 years after surgery. Scoliosis correction resulted in an increase in the thoracic volume for patients with the worst initial TLCs (11.7%) and those with the best initial TLCs (12.5%). The adolescents with the most severe pulmonary restriction prior to surgery strongly correlated with post-operative change in total lung capacity and thoracic volume (r 2  = 0.839; p volume in this group was 373.1 cm 3 (11.7%) which correlated with a 21.2% improvement in TLC. Scoliosis correction in adolescents was found to increase thoracic volume and is strongly correlated with improved TLC in cases with severe restrictive pulmonary function, but no correlation was found in cases with normal pulmonary function. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:175-182, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  2. Some noticeable problems in the radiological diagnosis of thoracic sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tieyi; Li Hui; Ji Jingling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the noticeable problems in the radiological diagnosis of thoracic sarcoidosis through retrospective analysis of misdiagnosis. Methods: Imaging examinations of 32 misdiagnosed cases with thoracic sarcoidosis including chest radiography, CT, and their clinical data were reviewed. The final diagnosis was made by pathology (9 cases) and clinical therapy (23 cases). Results: Enlarged thoracic lymph nodes were detected in all cases. 23 of them presented mediastinal lymph node enlargement associated with bilateral hilar lymph node enlargement, 5 of them had mediastinal lymph node enlargement and unilateral hilar lymph node enlargement, and 4 of them had mediastinal lymph node enlargement without hilar lymph node enlargement. In these cases, 24 had pulmonary abnormalities. 19 of them showed multiple pulmonary nodes, 4 of them had patchy pulmonary shadows, and another 1 had pulmonary fibrosis. Pleural lesions included 2 hydrothorax and 1 multiple pleural nodes, and all of pleural lesions were associated with multiple pulmonary nodes. Conclusion: When the radiological findings of thoracic sarcoidosis are atypical, the diagnosis is difficult and must combine with the clinical findings, or the outcome of the treatment

  3. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  4. Abdominal-thoracic gamma-graphy with colloids in the hepatic hydrothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostinho, C.; Sousa, C.; Pedroto, I.; Areias, J.; Pinho, C.; Amorim, I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The authors present two cases with refractory hydrothorax and the necessity of thoracentesis of repetition. In both cases, the study of the pleural liquid revealed to be a transudates, with mesothelial cells, macrophages, leukocytes and negative microbiologic examination. Abdomino-thoracic gammagraphy has been performed by injecting colloids labeled with Technetium-99m in the peritoneal cavity (left iliac fossa) under echography control, which confirmed the diagnostic hypothesis of hepatic hydrothorax for labeled activity in the thoracic cavity after 30 minutes. The importance of the confirmed diagnosis oriented the therapeutic program. The abdomino-thoracic gammagraphy using colloids labeled with Technetium-99m showed to be a simple and an important technique to diagnose the hepatic hydrothorax

  5. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  6. The dorsal thoracic fascia: anatomic significance with clinical applications in reconstructive microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P S; Gottlieb, J R; Harris, G D; Nagle, D J; Lewis, V L

    1987-01-01

    The anatomic distribution and potential arterial flow patterns of the circumflex scapular artery were investigated by Microfil injection. These studies demonstrated that the circumflex scapular artery lies within the dorsal thoracic fascia, which plays a significant role in the circulation of the overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. We conclude that scapular/parascapular flaps are fasciocutaneous flaps, the dorsal thoracic fascia can be transferred as a free flap without its overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue, and intercommunication exists between the myocutaneous perforators of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and the vascular plexus of the dorsal thoracic fascia. We present microvascular cases in which the vascular properties of the dorsal thoracic fascia facilitated wound closure with free fascia flaps or expanded cutaneous or myocutaneous flaps.

  7. Menstruation in an unusual place: A case of thoracic endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While pelvic endometriosis is relatively common, thoracic menstruation is rare. A report of what is believed to be the first case of thoracic endometriosis in Uganda is given. A 34 year old female was complaining of on and off chest pain mainly on the right side. Clinically she had signs of pleural effusion and 500 mls of altered ...

  8. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  9. Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Borchsenius, Julie I Helene; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer are well described. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors and thus an increasing number of patients with long-term side effects...... of their cancer treatments. This article describes the short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following thoracic radiotherapy and further, optimal cardiovascular assessments and diagnostic tools in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients....

  10. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  11. Thoracic epidural analgesia in a child with multiple traumatic rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keech, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with blunt thoracic trauma are significant and can be multisystem in nature. Of these, pulmonary complications, including ventilatory impairment secondary to pain, have been recognized to be the most consequential. Although several analgesic strategies have emerged, thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) has arguably demonstrated superior efficacy and is used frequently in adults. Unfortunately, TEA is rarely used in children after blunt thoracic trauma, but may be of considerable benefit. This low rate of use likely reflects one or more of several factors potentially encountered when considering the use of TEA in pediatric chest wall trauma. Among them are (1) uncertainty regarding safety and efficacy; (2) the technical challenges of pediatric thoracic epidural placement, including technique and equipment concerns; and (3) drug selection, dosing, and toxicity. The following case review describes the successful application of TEA in a 4-year-old boy after multiple traumatic rib fractures and associated pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Left-Sided Catamenial Pneumothorax with Thoracic Endometriosis and Bullae in the Alveolar Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka

    2017-04-20

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is generally caused by intraperitoneal air leaking from the uterus into the thoracic cavity via a defect in the endometrial tissue of the diaphragm and is usually detected in the right thorax. We report a case of left-sided CP caused by endometriosis in the visceral pleura and with no abnormal findings in the diaphragm. A 33-year-old female patient presented at the end of a course of low-dose contraceptive pills for pelvic endometriosis, with spontaneous pneumothorax in the left chest. Chest CT revealed a bulla in the left upper lung lobe. The patient underwent partial resection of the lung. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of endometrial stromal tissue in the visceral pleura and confirmed this as the cause of pneumothorax since there were no observable abnormalities in the diaphragm. This case suggests that immunohistochemical examination of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax can detect alternative endometrial lesions.

  13. Relationship between thoracic hypokyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Jean-Luc; Geoffray, Anne; Yagoubi, Fatima; Chau, Edouard; Solla, Federico; Oborocianu, Ioana; Rampal, Virginie

    2013-11-01

    Sagittal spine and pelvic alignment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is poorly described in the literature. It generally reports the sagittal alignment with regard to the type of curve and never correlated to the thoracic kyphosis. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic parameters in thoracic AIS. Spinal and pelvic sagittal parameters were evaluated on lateral radiographs of 86 patients with thoracic AIS; patients were separated into hypokyphosis group (n = 42) and normokyphosis group (n = 44). Results were statistically analyzed. The lumbar lordosis was lower in the hypokyphosis group, due to the low proximal lordosis. The thoracic kyphosis was not correlated with any pelvic parameters but with the proximal lordosis. The pelvic incidence was correlated with sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and highly correlated with distal lumbar lordosis in the two groups. There was a significant linear regression between thoracic kyphosis and proximal lordosis and between pelvic incidence and distal lordosis. We can consider that the proximal part of the lordosis depends on the thoracic kyphosis and the distal part depends on the pelvic incidence. The hypokyphosis in AIS is independent of the pelvic parameters and could be described as a structural parameter, characteristic of the scoliotic deformity.

  14. Comparison of fractional flow reserve of composite Y-grafts with saphenous vein or right internal thoracic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glineur, David; Boodhwani, Munir; Poncelet, Alain; De Kerchove, Laurent; Etienne, Pierre Yves; Noirhomme, Philippe; Deceuninck, Paul; Michel, Xavier; El Khoury, Gebrine; Hanet, Claude

    2010-09-01

    Composite Y-grafts, using the left internal thoracic artery as the inflow, allow a more efficient use of conduits without the need to touch a diseased ascending aorta. Among other conduits, the saphenous vein graft may be an alternative to the radial artery in elderly patients. We evaluated the hemodynamic characteristics of 17 composite Y-grafts made with the left internal thoracic artery anastomosed to the left anterior descending coronary artery in all cases and with either the free right internal thoracic artery (RITA group, n = 10) or a saphenous vein graft (SVG group, n = 7) implanted proximally to the left internal thoracic artery and distally to the circumflex territory 6 months after the operation. At baseline, the pressure gradient measured with a 0.014-inch pressure wire was minimal between the aorta and the internal thoracic artery stem (2 +/- 1 mm Hg), the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending (4 +/- 2 mm Hg), the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex (3 +/- 1 mm Hg), and the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex (2 +/- 2 mm Hg). During hyperemia induced by adenosine, the pressure gradient increased significantly to 6 +/- 2 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery stem, 9 +/- 4 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending artery, 9 +/- 3 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex, and 7 +/- 4 mm Hg in the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex. Fractional flow reserve was 0.94 +/- 0.02 in internal thoracic artery stem, 0.90 +/- 0.04 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left anterior descending, 0.91 +/- 0.03 mm Hg in the internal thoracic artery and left circumflex, and 0.92 +/- 0.06 mm Hg in the saphenous vein graft and left circumflex. No difference between the two types of composite Y-grafts was observed for pressure gradients or fractional flow reserve measured in internal thoracic artery stem or in distal branches. Composite Y-grafts with saphenous vein or right internal thoracic

  15. Two-Stage Surgical Management of Multilevel Symptomatic Thoracic Haemangioma Using Ethanol and Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmajoshyula, Venkatramana; Mayi, Shivanand; Teegala, Suman

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a 56-year-old obese female who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in her lower limbs for three months. She was bed-ridden for one week before reporting to our hospital. Plain radiographs showed vertical striations in multiple vertebrae classical of haemangioma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spine revealed multiple thoracic and lumbar vertebral haemangiomas. Extra osseous extension of haemangioma at T12 was causing spinal cord compression. Two-stage surgery was performed with absolute alcohol (ethanol) injection followed by pedicle screw fixation and decompression with tricortical iliac crest bone graft into the vertebral body. Postoperatively rapid neurological improvement was seen. After three weeks, she could walk independently. One year later, computed tomography showed complete incorporation of bone graft and maintained vertebral body height. MRI showed complete resolution of the cord edema at T12. These findings indicated diminished vascularity of the tumor. PMID:25187869

  16. Morphology study of thoracic transverse processes and its significance in pedicle-rib unit screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin-gang; Cai, Jin-fang; Sun, Jian-min; Jiang, Zhen-song

    2015-03-01

    Thoracic transverse process is an important anatomic structure of the spine. Several anatomic studies have investigated the adjacent structures of the thoracic transverse process. But there is still a blank on the morphology of the thoracic transverse processes. The purpose of the cadaveric study is to investigate the morphology of thoracic transverse processes and to provide morphology basis for the pedicle-rib unit (extrapedicular) screw fixation method. Forty-five adult dehydrated skeletons (T1-T10) were included in this study. The length, width, thickness, and the tilt angle (upward and backward) of the thoracic transverse process were measured. The data were then analyzed statistically. On the basis of the morphometric study, 5 fresh cadavers were used to place screws from transverse processes to the vertebral body in the thoracic spine, and then observed by the naked eye and on computed tomography scans. The lengths of thoracic transverse processes were between 16.63±1.59 and 18.10±1.95 mm; the longest was at T7, and the shortest was at T10. The widths of thoracic transverse processes were between 11.68±0.80 and 12.87±1.48 mm; the widest was at T3, and the narrowest was at T7. The thicknesses of thoracic transverse processes were between 7.86±1.24 and 10.78±1.35 mm; the thickest was at T1, and the thinnest was at T7. The upward tilt angles of thoracic transverse processes were between 24.9±3.1 and 3.0±1.56 degrees; the maximal upward tilt angle was at T1, and the minimal upward tilt angle was at T7. The upward tilt angles of T1 and T2 were obviously different from the other thoracic transverse processes (Ptransverse processes gradually increased from 24.5±2.91 degrees at T1 to 64.5±5.12 degrees at T10. The backward tilt angles were significantly different between each other, except between T5 and T6. In the validation study, screws were all placed successfully from transverse processes to the vertebrae of thoracic spine. The length, width, and

  17. Comparative data compression techniques and multi-compression results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M R; Ibrahimy, M I; Motakabber, S M A; Ferdaus, M M; Khan, M N H

    2013-01-01

    Data compression is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some compression techniques for lossless text type data compression and comparative result of multiple and single compression, that will help to find out better compression output and to develop compression algorithms

  18. Effect of Thoracic Surgeons on Lung Cancer Patients’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning LI

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgeons are the direct decision-makers and performers in the surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Whether the differences among doctors affect the survival of patients is unclear. This study analyzed the five-year survival rates of different thoracic surgeries in patients undergoing surgery to assess the physician's impact and impact. Methods A retrospective analysis of five years between 2002-2007 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, for surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. According to different surgeons grouping doctors to compare the basic information of patients, surgical methods, short-term results and long-term survival differences. Results A total of 712 patients treated by 11 experienced thoracic surgeons were included in this study. The patients have nosignificant difference with gender, age, smoking, pathological type between groups. There were significant differences in clinical staging, surgery type, operation time, blood transfusion rate, number of lymph node dissection, palliative resection rate, postoperative complications and perioperative mortality. There was a significant difference in five-year survival rates among patients treated by different doctors. This difference can be seen in all clinical stage analyzes with consistency. In the multivariate analysis, it was suggested that surgeon was an independent factor influencing the prognosis of patients. Conclusion Thoracic surgeon has a significant effect on the therapeutic effect of lung cancer patients.

  19. Catamenial pneumothorax caused by thoracic endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Maniglio, MD

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis of thoracic endometriosis is challenging. The first line of treatment is medical, whereas the surgical treatment is performed secondly. Moreover, surgical treatment can lead to a significant rate of recurrence, often reduced by a coadjutant medical treatment.

  20. Gamification in thoracic surgical education: Using competition to fuel performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokadam, Nahush A; Lee, Richard; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Walker, Jennifer D; Cerfolio, Robert J; Hermsen, Joshua L; Baker, Craig J; Mark, Rebecca; Aloia, Lauren; Enter, Dan H; Carpenter, Andrea J; Moon, Marc R; Verrier, Edward D; Fann, James I

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to stimulate residents and trainers to increase their use of simulation training and the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum, a gamification strategy was developed in a friendly but competitive environment. "Top Gun." Low-fidelity simulators distributed annually were used for the technical competition. Baseline and final video assessments were performed, and 5 finalists were invited to compete in a live setting from 2013 to 2015. "Jeopardy." A screening examination was devised to test knowledge contained in the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum. The top 6 2-member teams were invited to compete in a live setting structured around the popular game show Jeopardy. "Top Gun." Over 3 years, there were 43 baseline and 34 final submissions. In all areas of assessment, there was demonstrable improvement. There was increasing evidence of simulation as seen by practice and ritualistic behavior. "Jeopardy." Sixty-eight individuals completed the screening examination, and 30 teams were formed. The largest representation came from the second-year residents in traditional programs. Contestants reported an average in-training examination percentile of 72.9. Finalists reported increased use of the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum by an average of 10 hours per week in preparation. The live competition was friendly, engaging, and spirited. This gamification approach focused on technical and cognitive skills, has been successfully implemented, and has encouraged the use of simulators and the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum. This framework may capitalize on the competitive nature of our trainees and can provide recognition of their achievements. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2...

  2. Airway obstruction due to tracheomalacia caused by innominate artery compression and a kyphotic cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Hong-Hau; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Chian, Chih-Feng; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Tracheomalacia can cause variable degrees of intrathoracic airway obstruction and is an easily overlooked cause of respiratory distress in adults. Here, we report a case of acute respiratory failure in which subglottic stenosis was accidentally identified during endotracheal intubation. Subsequent bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the thorax and neck revealed tracheal compression with tracheomalacia caused by a tortuous innominate artery and a kyphotic cervical spine. The patient underwent rigid bronchoscopy with metal stent implantation, and her symptoms were alleviated. These findings outline the importance of precise diagnosis and interventions for preventing recurrent life-threatening respiratory failure in such cases. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies on improvement of diagnostic ability of computed tomography (CT) in the parenchymatous organs in the upper abdomen, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Ryo

    1982-01-01

    1) The upper abdominal compression method was easily applicable for CT examination in practically all the patients. It gave no harm and considerably improved CT diagnosis. 2) The materials used for compression were foamed polystyrene, the Mix-Dp and a water bag. When CT examination was performed to diagnose such lesions as a circumscribed tumor, compression with the Mix-Dp was most useful, and when it was performed for screening examination of upper abdominal diseases, compression with a water bag was most effective. 3) Improvement in contour-depicting ability of CT by the compression method was most marked at the body of the pancreas, followed by the head of the pancreas and the posterior surface of the left lobe of the liver. Slight improvement was seen also at the tail of the pancreas and the left adrenal gland. 4) Improvement in organ-depicting ability of CT by the compression method was estimated by a 4-category classification method. It was found that the improvement was most marked at the body and the head of the pancreas. Considerable improvement was observed also at the left lobe of the liver and the both adrenal glands. Little improvement was obtained at the spleen. When contrast enhancement was combined with the compression method, improvement at such organs which were liable to be enhanced, as the liver and the adrenal glands, was promoted, while the organ-depicting ability was decreased at the pancreas. 5) By comparing the CT image under compression with that without compression, continuous infiltrations of gastric cancer into the body and the tail of the pancreas in 2 cases and a retroperitoneal infiltration of pancreatic tumor in 1 case were diagnosed preoperatively. (J.P.N.)

  4. Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallas, J.; Olesen, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and radiologic findings in a case of sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis are reported and compared with the findings in the 23 Caucasian and about 300 Japanese cases reported in the literature. The main complaints are pain in the upper anterior chest wall and sometimes limited mobility of the shoulders. Radiologically, the clavicles, the sternum and the first ribs are grossly enlarged with complete fusion between them. As reported in previous cases, our patient had conspicuous congestion of the external jugular veins, but no other signs of compression in the thoracic inlet. There was asymptomatic compression of both subclavian veins, but none of the previously reported skin manifestations and no complaints from other parts of the locomotive system. The patient was HLA-B27 negative. (orig.)

  5. Endolymphatic Thoracic Duct Stent-Graft Reconstruction for Chylothorax: Approach, Technical Success, Safety, and Short-term Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Rajiv N; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Hage, Anthony N; Gemmete, Joseph J; Murrey, Douglas C; Srinivasa, Ravi N

    2018-04-01

    To report approach, technical success, safety, and short-term outcomes of thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction for the treatment of chylothorax. Two patients, 1 (50%) male and 1 (50%) female, with mean age of 38 years (range: 16-59 years) underwent endolymphatic thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction between September 2016 and July 2017. Patients had radiographic left-sided chylothoraces (n = 2) from idiopathic causes (n = 1) and heart transplantation (n = 1). In both (100%) patients, antegrade lymphatic access was used to opacify the thoracic duct after which retrograde access was used for thoracic duct stent-graft placement. Pelvic lymphangiography technical success, antegrade cisterna chyli cannulation technical success, thoracic duct opacification technical success, retrograde thoracic duct access technical success, thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction technical success, ethiodized oil volume, contrast volume, estimated blood loss, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, clinical success, complications, deaths, and follow-up were recorded. Pelvic lymphangiography, antegrade cisterna chyli cannulation, thoracic duct opacification, retrograde thoracic duct access, and thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction were technically successful in both (100%) patients. Mean ethiodized oil volume was 8 mL (range: 5-10 mL). Mean contrast volume was 13 mL (range: 5-20 mL). Mean estimated blood loss was 13 mL (range: 10-15 mL). Mean fluoroscopy time was 50.4 min (range: 31.2-69.7 min). Mean dose area product and reference air kerma were 954.4 μGmy 2 (range: 701-1,208 μGmy 2 ) and 83.5 mGy (range: 59-108 mGy), respectively. Chylothorax resolved in both (100%) patients. There were no minor or major complications directly related to the procedure. Thoracic duct stent-graft reconstruction may be a technically successful and safe alternative to thoracic duct embolization, disruption, and surgical ligation for the treatment of chylothorax

  6. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm due to brucellosis: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Qi; Liu, Han; Sun, Siqiao; Sun, Xiwei; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Cheng, Zhihua

    2017-06-02

    Arterial damage is a known complication of brucellosis, but the occurrence of a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis has not been previously reported. A 65-year-old Chinese man presented with a pseudoaneurysm in the descending segment of the thoracic aorta that caused symptoms of chest pain and intermittent fever. He was diagnosed with a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis based on a positive brucella serology test (standard-tube agglutination test) and imaging examination (computed tomography angiography). Anti-brucellosis treatment and covered stent graft implantation were attempted to eliminate the brucellosis and pseudoaneurysm, respectively, and were ultimately successful, with no symptoms after 6 months of follow-up. Endovascular repair may be effective and safe for treating a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm resulting from brucellosis.

  7. THORACIC COMPLICATIONS OF OESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA- A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CT APPEARANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Joshi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oesophageal cancer is a common gastrointestinal tract malignancy and Computed Tomography (CT is generally used for its initial evaluation and staging. Due to the anatomical relationships of the oesophagus, malignancies afflicting it can also give rise to various pulmonary and thoracic complications. The staging CT can also be used to detect and evaluate these complications. Detection of concurrent thoracic complications in addition to the primary malignancy is imperative to institute appropriate management. The aim of the study is to analyse and discuss the various thoracic complications in cases of oesophageal carcinoma detected on Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS MDCT images of 27 cases of histopathologically-proven carcinoma oesophagus who had thoracic complications in addition to features of malignancy and metastases were retrospectively analysed. The various pulmonary and thoracic complications in addition to the primary lesions were assessed and evaluated. RESULTS There were 27 cases of oesophageal carcinoma with complications, of which there were 20 patients who had pulmonary consolidation/pneumonitis, 5 had oesophago-respiratory fistulae, 1 had a lung abscess, 2 had pericardial effusions, 3 had pleural effusions, 2 cases of airway compromise with atelectasis and 2 cases with Pulmonary Thromboembolism (PTE. CONCLUSION The routine chest CT for evaluation and staging of the primary tumour in cases of oesophageal carcinoma can also reveal thoracic complications directly or indirectly related the cancer some of which may alter management. The most common of these are pneumonia and oesophago-respiratory fistulas. Others like pulmonary thromboembolism may require immediate intervention. An awareness of the spectrum of imaging appearances of these complications and due vigilance while interpreting chest CT studies will aid decision making and institution of appropriate management.

  8. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  9. From Diagnosis to Treatment: Clinical Applications of Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digesu, Christopher S.; Hofferberth, Sophie C.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Nanotechnology is an emerging field of medicine with significant potential to become a powerful adjunct to cancer therapy, and in particular, thoracic surgery. Using the unique properties of several different nanometer-sized platforms, therapy can be delivered to tumors in a more targeted fashion, with less of the systemic toxicity associated with traditional chemotherapeutics. In addition to the packaged delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, nanoparticles show potential to aid in the diagnosis, pre-operative characterization, and intraoperative localization of thoracic tumors and their lymphatics. With increasing interest in their clinical application, there is a rapid expansion of in vitro and in vivo studies being conducted that provide a better understanding of potential toxicities and hopes of broader clinical translation. Focused research into nanotechnology’s ability to deliver both diagnostics and therapeutics has led to the development of a field known as nanotheranostics which promises to improve the treatment of thoracic malignancies through enhanced tumor targeting, controlled drug delivery, and therapeutic monitoring. This article reviews the various types of nanoplatforms, their unique properties, and the potential for clinical application in thoracic surgery. PMID:27112260

  10. Repair of extensive radionecrosis of the thoracic wall using soft tissues from the paralyzed upper limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delacroix, R; Wallaert, C; Soulier, A; Delepoulle, E; Francois, C; Grignet, J P

    1975-04-01

    The authors report one case of extensive radionecrosis after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer, with overt pyothorax, deep axillary ulceration, and brachial paralysis. The plastic use of the musculo-aponeutrotic tissues of the paralysed upper limb resulted in spectacular success, complicated only by empyema of the hemithoracic cavity, for which treatment with neomycin is recommended.

  11. The role of wet lab in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedetti, Benedetta; Schnorr, Philipp; Schmidt, Joachim; Scarci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    During the last three decades, minimally invasive surgery has become common practice in all kinds of surgical disciplines and, in Thoracic Surgery, the minimally invasive approach is recommended as the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Nevertheless, all over the world a large number of lobectomies is still performed by conventional open thoracotomy and not as video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which shows the need of a proper training for this technique. Development and improvement of surgical skills are not only challenging and time-consuming components of the training curriculum for resident or fellow surgeons, but also for more experienced consultants learning new techniques. The rapid evolution of medical technologies like VATS or robotic surgery requires an evolution of the existing educational models to improve cognitive and procedural skills before reaching the operating room in order to increase patient safety. Nowadays, in the Thoracic Surgery field, there is a wide range of simulation-based training methods for surgeons starting or wanting to improve their learning curve in VATS. Aim is to overcome the learning curve required to successfully master this new technique in a brief time. In general, the basic difference between the various learning techniques is the distinction between "dry" and "wet" lab modules, which mainly reflects the use of synthetic or animal-model-based materials. Wet lab trainings can be further sub-divided into in vivo modules, where living anaesthetized animals are used, and ex vivo modules, where only animal tissues serve as basis of the simulation-based training method. In the literature, the role of wet lab in Thoracic Surgery is still debated.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped with...

  13. Increased interleukin-11 levels in thoracic aorta and plasma from patients with acute thoracic aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Ye, Jing; Wang, Menglong; Wang, Yuan; Ji, Qingwei; Huang, Ying; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Di; Jiang, Huimin; Liu, Jianfang; Lin, Yingzhong; Wan, Jun

    2018-06-01

    Interleukin (IL) 11 is closely related to tumor and hematological system diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that IL-11 also participates in cardiovascular diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion mediated heart injury and acute myocardial infarction. This study aimed to investigate whether IL-11 is involved in acute thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). Aortic tissue samples from normal donors and acute TAD patients were collected, and the expression of IL-11 in all aortic tissue was analyzed. In addition, blood samples from patients with chest pain were collected and divided into a non-AD (NAD) group and a TAD group according to the results of computed tomography angiography of the thoracic aorta. The plasma IL-11, IL-17 and interferon (IFN) γ in all blood samples were measured. Compared with aortic tissue of normal controls, IL-11 was significantly increased in aortic tissue of acute TAD patients, especially in the torn section. The IL-11 was derived from aorta macrophages in TAD. In addition, the plasma IL-11, IL-17 and IFN-γ were significantly higher in acute TAD patients than in NAD patients, and the correlation analysis showed that IL-11 levels were positively correlated with levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, glucose, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, white blood cells, C-reactive proteins and D-dimers. Binary logistic regression analyses showed that elevated IL11 in patients who may have diagnostic value of TAD, but less that D-dimer. IL-11 was increased in thoracic aorta and plasma of TAD patients and may be a promising biomarker for diagnosis in patients with TAD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Workability of coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W; Fels, M; Soltysik, K

    1978-04-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation on workability of coal seams of stratigraphic groups from 100 to 700 in the: Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Analyzed are 2900 petrographic logs taken in the longwall workings and in narrow openings as well as about 9000 individual samples. Workability of coal seams, floors and partings is determined. Workability is described by the indicator f, (according to the Protodyakonov shatter method) and the indicator U, (compression strength of the unshaped test samples). The mean percentage content of indivi dual petrographic groups of coal as well as the mean workability indicator, f, of coals in the stratigraphic groups of coal seams in Upper Silesia are also determined.

  15. Clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of spinal injuries in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokovikov V.A.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Spine injuries in children are of great social significance. Currently, the incidence of spinal cord injuries in children has increased; this is due to the use of modern imaging devices (digital X-ray examination, CT, MRI at the prehospital and hospital stages. For children, compression fractures of the vertebral body, which are associated with serious injuries to the musculoskeletal system, are more characteristic. Compression fractures of vertebral bodies (1–2 % with improper treatment can lead to aseptic necrosis of the vertebra, kyphoscoliosis and other pathological conditions, which often results in disability. When X-ray diagnosis of fractures of transverse and spinous processes, one should consider additional ossification points, which can be mistaken for fractures. Also, differential diagnosis should take into account congenital wedge vertebrae and other abnormalities of vertebral development, which can be mistaken for fractures. The publication presents the results of a comprehensive examination and treatment of 85 children with spine trauma. The age of the examined was from 3 months to 16 years. In 20 cases, we detected compression fractures of the spine at different levels (cervical – 1, upper-thoracic – 4, medium-thoracic – 10, lower-thoracic – 2, lumbar – 3. In 25 cases, a rotational subluxation of the C I vertebra was diagnosed, in 3 – a traumatic rupture of the intervertebral disc, in 29 – a fracture of the coccyx. Complicated injuries of the spine accompanied by lesions of the spinal cord and roots were noted in 7 patients. Given the anatomical and physiological features of spine injuries in children, conservative methods of treatment were predominantly used.

  16. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-03-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess.

  17. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-01-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess

  18. Effect of lower limb compression on blood flow and performance in elite wheelchair rugby athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, Joanna; Stefanovic, Brad; Askew, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of compression socks worn during exercise on performance and physiological responses in elite wheelchair rugby athletes. In a non-blinded randomized crossover design, participants completed two exercise trials (4 × 8 min bouts of submaximal exercise, each finishing with a timed maximal sprint) separated by 24 hr, with or without compression socks. National Sports Training Centre, Queensland, Australia. Ten national representative male wheelchair rugby athletes with cervical spinal cord injuries volunteered to participate. Participants wore medical grade compression socks on both legs during the exercise task (COMP), and during the control trial no compression was worn (CON). The efficacy of the compression socks was determined by assessments of limb blood flow, core body temperature, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion, perceived thermal strain, and physical performance. While no significant differences between conditions were observed for maximal sprint time, average lap time was better maintained in COMP compared to CON (Pbenefit may be associated with an augmentation of upper limb blood flow.

  19. [Thoracic surgery for patients with bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, A; Satoh, Y

    2012-07-01

    Thoracic surgery poses a risk for complications in the respiratory system. In particular, for patients with bronchial asthma, we need to care for perioperative complications because it is well known that these patients frequently have respiratory complications after surgery, and they may have bronchial spasms during surgery. If we can get good control of their bronchial asthma, we can usually perform surgery for these patients without limitations. For safe postoperative care, it is desirable that these patients have stable asthma conditions that are well-controlled before surgery, as thoracic surgery requires intrabronchial intubation for anesthesia and sometimes bronchial resection. These stimulations to the bronchus do not provide for good conditions because of the risk of bronchial spasm. Therefore, we should use the same agents that are used to control bronchial asthma if it is already well controlled. If it is not, we have to administer a β₂ stimulator, aminophylline, or steroidal agents for good control. Isoflurane or sevoflurane are effective for the safe control of anesthesia during surgery, and we should use a β₂ stimulator, with or without inhalation, or steroidal agents after surgery. It is important to understand that we can perform thoracic surgery for asthma patients if we can provide perioperative control of bronchial asthma, although these patients still have severe risks.

  20. Density and adiabatic compressibility of the immiscible molten AgBr+LiCl mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Victor P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry; Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kulik, Nina P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2017-07-01

    The adiabatic compressibility, β, of the immiscible liquid mixture 0.52 LiCl+0.48 AgBr (the top of the miscibility gap) was experimentally investigated in the temperature range from the melting point to the critical mixing temperature using the sound velocity values, u, measured by the pulse method, and the density quantities, ρ, which were determined using the hydrostatic weight procedure based on the relationship β = u{sup -2}ρ{sup -1}. It is shown that the coefficients of the temperature dependencies for the compressibility and density of the upper and lower equilibrium phases have opposite signs because of the superposition of the intensity of the thermal motion of the ions and the change in the composition of the phases. The differences, Δβ and Δρ, in the magnitudes of the compressibility and density for the equilibrium phases decrease with temperature elevation. The temperature dependencies of the compressibility and density difference are described using the empirical equations Δβ ∼ (T{sub c}-T){sup 0.438} and Δρ ∼ (T{sub c}-T){sup 0.439}.

  1. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  2. Haemothorax and Thoracic Spine Fractures in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Masteller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both osteoporotic fractures and pleural effusions are frequently observed in medicine. However, rarely does one associate a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a thoracic spinal fracture when the patient has not sustained massive trauma. In this paper, we discuss two cases where seemingly insignificant low-energy trauma precipitated massive haemothoraces in elderly patients with underlying osteoporosis, ultimately resulting in their immediate causes of death. This paper serves to remind health care professionals of the importance of using caution when moving elderly patients as well as to consider thoracic spinal fracture as a potential explanation for a hemorrhagic pleural effusion of undetermined etiology.

  3. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  4. X-ray examination of the thoracic organs in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil'shtinskij, A.Ya.; Efimenko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors presented a combined clinicoroentgenological study of the thoracic organs in 12 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It revealed specific involvement of the thoracic organs supported by clinicomorphological findings and assessment of therapeutic results in 66 patients (55.0 ± 3.2 %). It also played an important role in the recognition of disease starting with changes in the bone marrow, in the differential diagnosis of specific and nonspecific changes in the thoracic organs, and in the assessment of a degree of remission

  5. Thoracic cavity segmentation algorithm using multiorgan extraction and surface fitting in volumetric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, JangPyo [Interdisciplinary Program, Bioengineering Major, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug, E-mail: namkugkim@gmail.com; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Chan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a semiautomatic segmentation method for thoracic cavity volumetry and mediastinum fat quantification of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The thoracic cavity region was separated by segmenting multiorgans, namely, the rib, lung, heart, and diaphragm. To encompass various lung disease-induced variations, the inner thoracic wall and diaphragm were modeled by using a three-dimensional surface-fitting method. To improve the accuracy of the diaphragm surface model, the heart and its surrounding tissue were segmented by a two-stage level set method using a shape prior. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the algorithm results of 50 patients were compared to the manual segmentation results of two experts with more than 5 years of experience (these manual results were confirmed by an expert thoracic radiologist). The proposed method was also compared to three state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy were volumetric overlap ratio (VOR), false positive ratio on VOR (FPRV), false negative ratio on VOR (FNRV), average symmetric absolute surface distance (ASASD), average symmetric squared surface distance (ASSSD), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD). Results: In terms of thoracic cavity volumetry, the mean ± SD VOR, FPRV, and FNRV of the proposed method were (98.17 ± 0.84)%, (0.49 ± 0.23)%, and (1.34 ± 0.83)%, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the thoracic wall were 0.28 ± 0.12, 1.28 ± 0.53, and 23.91 ± 7.64 mm, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the diaphragm surface were 1.73 ± 0.91, 3.92 ± 1.68, and 27.80 ± 10.63 mm, respectively. The proposed method performed significantly better than the other three methods in terms of VOR, ASASD, and ASSSD. Conclusions: The proposed semiautomatic thoracic cavity segmentation method, which extracts multiple organs (namely, the rib, thoracic wall, diaphragm, and heart

  6. Comparative short-term effects of two thoracic spinal manipulation techniques in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Méndez, Amaloha; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Gogorza-Arroitaonandia, Kristobal; Almazán-Campos, Ginés

    2014-08-01

    Spinal Manipulation (SM) has been purported to decrease pain and improve function in subjects with non-specific neck pain. Previous research has investigated which individuals with non-specific neck pain will be more likely to benefit from SM. It has not yet been proven whether or not the effectiveness of thoracic SM depends on the specific technique being used. This double-blind randomized trial has compared the short-term effects of two thoracic SM maneuvers in subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sixty participants were distributed randomly into two groups. One group received the Dog technique (n = 30), with the subject in supine position, and the other group underwent the Toggle-Recoil technique (n = 30), with the participant lying prone, T4 being the targeted area in both cases. Evaluations were made of self-reported neck pain (Visual Analogue Scale); neck mobility (Cervical Range of Motion); and pressure pain threshold at the cervical and thoracic levels (C4 and T4 spinous process) and over the site described for location of tense bands of the upper trapezius muscle. Measurements were taken before intervention, immediately afterward, and 20 min later. Both maneuvers improved neck mobility and mechanosensitivity and reduced pain in the short term. No major or clinical differences were found between the groups. In the between-groups comparison slightly better results were observed in the Toggle-Recoil group only for cervical extension (p = 0.009), right lateral flexion (p = 0.004) and left rotation (p < 0.05). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between preterm birth and thoracic musculoskeletal static alterations in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessey M. B. Garcia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare thoracic musculoskeletal static alterations in adolescents born prematurely with those born at term and investigate neonatal and post-neonatal variables associated with thoracic alterations. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study with 57 adolescents aged 10-15 years born prematurely and 57 adolescents born at term paired by gender and age. Photographs of the head and thorax in the front, back, and right side views were studied using a computer program. The two groups were compared in regards to: elevation of clavicles, elevation of shoulders, protrusion of the head, and anteroposterior and mediolateral thoracic length. Factor associated with thoracic disorders were evaluated by linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The Preterm group had mean gestational age of 32.0±2.8 weeks and the birth weight was 1462±338 and 3342±430 g for the Preterm and Term adolescents, respectively. Preterm adolescents had higher elevation of the left shoulder (22.7±5.4o vs. 20.6±5.3o;sim, p=0.038 and the right shoulder (22.2±4.4o vs. 18.5±5.7o; p5 days (p=0.009. CONCLUSION: Adolescents born prematurely presented greater thoracic musculoskeletal static alterations compared to those born at term. Factors associated with these alterations were: very low birth weight and longer duration of mechanical ventilation in the neonatal unit.

  8. Fatal outcome after insufficient spine fixation for pyogenic thoracic spondylodiscitis: an imperative for 360° fusion of the infected spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Ernest E

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyogenic spondylodiscitis represents a potentially life-threatening condition. Due to the low incidence, evidence-based surgical recommendations in the literature are equivocal, and the treatment modalities remain controversial. Case presentation A 59 year-old patient presented with a history of thoracic spondylodiscitis resistant to antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks, progressive severe back pain, and a new onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness. Clinically, the patient showed a deteriorating spastic paraparesis of her lower extremities. An emergent MRI revealed a kyphotic wedge compression fracture at T7/T8 with significant spinal cord compression, paravertebral and epidural abscess, and signs of myelopathy. The patient underwent surgical debridement with stabilization of the anterior column from T6–T9 using an expandable titanium cage, autologous bone graft, and an anterolateral locking plate. The patient recovered well under adjunctive antibiotic treatment. She presented again to the emergency department 6 months later, secondary to a repeat fall, with acute paraplegia of the lower extremities and radiographic evidence of failure of fixation of the anterior T-spine. She underwent antero-posterior revision fixation with hardware removal, correction of kyphotic malunion, evacuation of a recurrent epidural abscess, decompression of the spinal canal, and 360° fusion from T2–T11. Despite the successful salvage procedure, the patient deteriorated in the postoperative phase, when she developed multiple complications including pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, bacterial meningitis, abdominal compartment syndrome, followed by septic shock with multiple organ failure and a lethal outcome within two weeks after revision surgery. Conclusion This catastrophic example of a lethal outcome secondary to failure of anterior column fixation for pyogenic thoracic spondylodiscitis underlines the notion that surgical

  9. Financial validation of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score predicting prolonged air leak after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Pompili, Cecilia; Dinesh, Padma; Bassi, Vinod; Imperatori, Andrea

    2018-04-27

    The objective of this study was to verify whether the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons prolonged air leak risk score for video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy was associated with incremental postoperative costs. We retrospectively analyzed 353 patients subjected to video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy or segmentectomy (April 2014 to March 2016). Postoperative costs were obtained from the hospital Finance Department. Patients were grouped in different classes of risk according to their prolonged air leak risk score. To verify the independent association of the prolonged air leak risk score with postoperative costs, we performed a stepwise multivariable regression analysis in which the dependent variable was postoperative cost. Prolonged air leak developed in 56 patients (15.9%). Their length of stay was 3 days longer compared with those without prolonged air leak (8.3 vs 5.4, P validated the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons prolonged air leak risk score for video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomies, which appears useful in selecting those patients in whom the application of additional intraoperative interventions to avoid prolonged air leak may be more cost-effective. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thoracic Pneumorrhachis in Patient with Lumbar Fractures; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ghafarzad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Pneumorrhachis as a relatively rare condition may be an indication of substantial intra-spinal column injury. Here we report a 39-year-old man was admitted because of low back pain and dyspenea after locating between motor vehicle and wall three days before admission. On arrival, physical exams and vital signs were normal. Computed tomography (CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusion, fracture of ribs number 8, 9 and 10 in lower left side of thorax, fracture of vertebra in L2-L4, and air bubbles in upper thoracic spinal canal.  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial;}

  11. Thoracic manifestations of Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Baptista, Maria Ines Garcia; Cardenas, Gloria Pamela; Costa Praxedes, Marcia da; Boechat, Lucia de Fatima; Quaresma, Patricia Souto Maior

    1995-01-01

    The radiological findings of 189 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma occurring in patients with AIDS were studied. There was also made pathological correlations in these patients. Interstitial reticular infiltrations were frequently detected on thoracic examination showing paracardiac confluent areas. There was also lymphadenopathy, gross nodules and pleural fluid accumulation. Although there was no detection of any pathognomonic aspect, the interstitial reticular infiltration finding together with the paracardiac confluent areas and associated with gross nodules, is highly indicative to thoracic involvement by the disease. (author). 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Pulmonary sequestrations of the upper lobe in children: Three presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffel, J.C.; Bernard, C.; Didier, F.; Bretagne, M.C.; Gautry, P.; Olive, D.; Prevot, J.; Pernot, C.; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestrations are congenital abnormalities where nonfunctioning lung tissue receives its vascular supply from the systemic circulation (thoracic or abdominal aorta). It is necessary to establish the diagnosis in childhood when the lesions are uncomplicated. The authors present three cases of sequestration of the apex (2 extralobar and 1 atypical) with the main clinical and radiological features. Sequestrations in the upper lobe are rare, and the usual site is the left lower lobe. Plain X-rays show a dense opacity, sometimes with an air-fluid level: angiography is currently the best mean for definitive diagnosis; however, computed tomography will probably be very useful in the future. Differential diagnosis includes tumours of the superior mediastinum (neurogenic tumours, digestive duplication, bronchogenic cysts, pheochromocytoma and hydatid cysts). (orig.) [de

  13. Evolution of Thoracic Surgery in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Deslauriers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another.

  14. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: Current concept in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thoracic endometriosis is a rare pathology. The diagnosis is often delayed or missed, however recently, there has been significant advances in the knowledge of this condition and hence, an improvement in the diagnosis and treatment. Objective: To review the current concepts in the pathophysiology and ...

  15. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  16. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  17. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Rousset-Jablonski, C.; Alifano, M.; Mansuet-Lupo, A.; Buy, J.-N.; Revel, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is considered to be rare, but is the most frequent form of extra-abdominopelvic endometriosis. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome affects women of reproductive age. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical findings, which can include catamenial pneumothorax and haemothorax, non-catamenial endometriosis-related pneumothorax, catamenial haemoptysis, lung nodules, and isolated catamenial chest pain. Symptoms are typically cyclical and recurrent, with a right-sided predominance. Computed tomography (CT) is the first-line imaging method, but is poorly specific; therefore, its main role is to rule out other pulmonary diseases. However, in women with a typical clinical history, some key CT findings may help to confirm this often under-diagnosed syndrome. MRI can also assist with the diagnosis, by showing signal changes typical of haemorrhage within diaphragmatic or pleural lesions

  18. Colon Targeted Guar Gum Compression Coated Tablets of Flurbiprofen: Formulation, Development, and Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sateesh Kumar Vemula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rationale of the present study is to formulate flurbiprofen colon targeted compression coated tablets using guar gum to improve the therapeutic efficacy by increasing drug levels in colon, and also to reduce the side effects in upper gastrointestinal tract. Direct compression method was used to prepare flurbiprofen core tablets, and they were compression coated with guar gum. Then the tablets were optimized with the support of in vitro dissolution studies, and further it was proved by pharmacokinetic studies. The optimized formulation (F4 showed almost complete drug release in the colon (99.86% within 24 h without drug loss in the initial lag period of 5 h (only 6.84% drug release was observed during this period. The pharmacokinetic estimations proved the capability of guar gum compression coated tablets to achieve colon targeting. The Cmax of colon targeted tablets was 11956.15 ng/mL at Tmax of 10 h whereas it was 15677.52 ng/mL at 3 h in case of immediate release tablets. The area under the curve for the immediate release and compression coated tablets was 40385.78 and 78214.50 ng-h/mL and the mean resident time was 3.49 and 10.78 h, respectively. In conclusion, formulation of guar gum compression coated tablets was appropriate for colon targeting of flurbiprofen.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease; Correlation with clinical findings, radiography, ultrasonography, CT and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J. (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Medicine Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.).

  20. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a child due to cystic medial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Watabe, Tsuneya; Ohtaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Shoya; Ogawa, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    The valuable role of computed tomography (CT) was stressed in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 12-year-old child. She initially presented mediastinal mass on plain chest film. A saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm was highly suspected from the CT findings, and it was confirmed on angiography. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed cystic medial necrosis. (author)

  1. Technical strategies and anatomic considerations for parapedicular access to thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, Douglas P.; Martin, Hal D.; Stapp, Annette M.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Stechison, M.T.; Braswell, John J.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate and illustrate a variation on the traditional percutaneous access to the vertebral body via a parapedicular approach. An effective parapedicular access technique that could safely and reliably guide the needle tip into the center of the vertebral body was developed from cadaver dissection observations for the purpose of clinical use. A total of 102 vertebral compression fractures from T-4 to L-5 were treated via the parapedicular access at our institution between July 2005 and March 2006. There were 72 patients between the ages of 17 and 96 years (mean age: 68.2 years) who underwent treatment. The cadaver dissection revealed a relatively avascular and aneural portion of the vertebral body along the superior margin of the vertebral body-pedicle junction. A total 102 vertebral fractures were treated using the parapedicular access technique without any recognized clinical complications from the needle access or the instrumentation. The thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies may be safely, reliably, and reproducibly accessed using a percutaneous parapedicular access technique. The technique presented represents a relatively avascular and aneural approach to vertebral body. (orig.)

  2. New imaging characteristics for predicting postoperative neurologic status in patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. A retrospective analysis of 81 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingxing; Liu, Shubin; Yang, Shaoxing; Liu, Yaosheng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Hongjun

    2017-06-01

    dependent on the location of spine lesions and the CASCC. Patients with upper thoracic or cervicothoracic junction spine metastases or CASCC over 180° were at higher risk of relatively poor postoperative neurologic outcome. Timely, adequate surgical decompression is urgently warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of size-dependent aerosol deposition in a realistic model of the upper human airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederix, E.M.A.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Nordlund, Markus; Belka, M.; Lizal, F.; Elcner, J.; Jicha, M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    An Eulerian internally mixed aerosol model is used for predictions of deposition inside a realistic cast of the human upper airways. The model, formulated in the multi-species and compressible framework, is solved using the sectional discretization of the droplet size distribution function to

  4. Preoperative thoracic radiographic findings in dogs presenting for gastric dilatation-volvulus (2000-2010): 101 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jaime L; Cimino Brown, Dorothy; Agnello, Kimberly A

    2012-10-01

    To identify the incidence of clinically significant findings on preoperative thoracic radiographs in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and to determine if those findings are associated with survival. Retrospective study from 2000 to 2010. Urban university small animal teaching hospital. One hundred and one dogs diagnosed with GDV that had thoracic radiographs obtained preoperatively, and medical records available with the following information available: signalment, time of presentation, respiratory status, plasma lactate, presence of cardiac arrhythmias, reason for thoracic radiographs, radiographic findings, and outcome. None. Findings on preoperative thoracic radiographs included small vena cava (40%), esophageal dilation (39%), microcardia (34%), aspiration pneumonia (14%), cardiomegaly (5%), pulmonary nodule (4%), pulmonary edema (2%), sternal lymphadenopathy (1%), and pulmonary bullae (1%). Eighty-four percent of dogs (85 out of 101) survived to discharge. Dogs without cardiomegaly on presenting thoracic radiographs had a 10.2 greater odds of surviving to discharge. The most common findings on preoperative thoracic radiographs include esophageal dilation, microcardia, and a small vena cava while the incidence of pulmonary nodules was low. A negative association between survival and presence of cardiomegaly on preoperative thoracic radiographs in dogs with GDV supports the need to obtain these images for prognostic information in spite of the emergency surgical nature of the GDV. The main limitations of this study include the possibilities of type I and type II errors, the retrospective nature of the study, and the lack of well-defined criteria for obtaining thoracic radiographs. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  5. The 100 most-cited papers in general thoracic surgery: A bibliography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongdou; Song, Xiao; Chen, Linsong; Zheng, Xinlin; Jiang, Gening

    2018-05-01

    The status of citations can reflect the impact of a paper and its contribution to surgical practice. The aim of our study was to identify and review the 100 most-cited papers in general thoracic surgery. Relevant papers on general thoracic surgery were searched through Thomson Reuters Web of Science in the last week of November 2017. Results were returned in descending order of total citations. Their titles and abstracts were reviewed to identify whether they met our inclusion criteria by two thoracic surgeons independently. Characteristics of the first 100 papers, including title, journal name, country, first author, year of publication, total citations, citations in latest 5 years and average citation per year (ACY) were extracted and analyzed. Of the 100 papers, the mean number of citations was 322 with a range from 184 to 921. 19 journals published the papers from 1956 to 2012. Annals of Surgery had the largest number (29), followed by Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (22) and Annals of Thoracic Surgery (21). The majority of the papers were published in 2000s (48) and originated from United States of America (62). There were 65 retrospective studies, 13 RCTs and 11 prospective studies. Orringer MB and Grillo HC contributed 4 first-author articles respectively. There were 53 papers on esophagus, 36 on lung, 6 on pleura and 5 on trachea. Our study identified the most-cited papers in the past several decades and offered insights into the development and advances of general thoracic surgery. It can help us understand the evidential basis of clinical decision-making today in the area. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Acquired intrathoracic kidney in thoracic kyphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Kawashima, Akira; Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Russell, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    Two cases of acquired intrathoracic kidney associated with thoracic kyphosis are reported, with emphasis on the radiographic manifestations. A search of the scientific literature disclosed that the acquired type of this abnormality is rare. The importance of recognizing this entity from a differential diagnostic standpoint is underscored. (author)

  7. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  8. Rib fractures in blunt chest trauma - associated thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Dimitrov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze the patterns of associated thoracic injuries in patients underwent blunt chest trauma and rib fractures. METHODS. The study included 212 patients with rib fractures due to blunt thoracic trauma. The mechanism of trauma, the type of rib fracture and the type of associated injuries were analyzed. RESULTS. The patients were divided in two groups according to the number of fractured ribs-group I included the patients with up to two fractured ribs (72 patients-33,9%, and group II – with ≥3 fractured ribs (140 patients-66,1%. Associated chest injuries were present in 36 of the patients from group I (50%, and in 133 patients from group II (95%. Pulmonary contusion was the most common intrathoracicinjurie-65,6% of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 8, 7 days. The lethality rate was 16,9% -all of them due to the associated chest injuries. CONCLUSIONS. The mortality related to rib fractures is affected by the associated thoracic injuries, the advanced age, and the number of fractured ribs.

  9. Repair of pectus excavatum in a toddler with Prune Belly syndrome and left bronchus compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn T. Liechty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy with prune-belly syndrome and severe pectus excavatum experienced recurrent pulmonary infections. A CT scan of the chest demonstrated compression of the left mainstem bronchus and leftward shift of the heart. The bronchial compression resulted in left upper lobe collapse and left lower lobe air-trapping requiring two hospitalizations for respiratory distress and pneumonia. The child underwent minimally invasive repair of his pectus excavatum and has not experienced any further pulmonary events. The pectus bar was removed 3 years post-operatively and at seven years following surgery he has a sustained repair.

  10. SeqCompress: an algorithm for biological sequence compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence compression algorithm SeqCompress that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data compression and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to compress DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized compression tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better compression gain as compared to other existing algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanyang; Fu Xiaolong; Xia Bing; Fan Min; Yang Huanjun; Ren Jun; Xu Zhiyong; Jiang Guoliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms. Methods: 224 kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (KVCBCT) scans from 20 thoracic tumor patients were evaluated retrospectively. All these patients were involved in the research of 'Evaluation of the residual set-up error for online kilovoltage cone-beam CT guided thoracic tumor radiation'. Rotational set-up errors, including pitch, roll and yaw, were calculated by 'aligning the KVCBCT with the planning CT, using the semi-automatic alignment method. Results: The average rotational set-up errors were -0.28 degree ±1.52 degree, 0.21 degree ± 0.91 degree and 0.27 degree ± 0.78 degree in the left-fight, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior axis, respectively. The maximal rotational errors of pitch, roll and yaw were 3.5 degree, 2.7 degree and 2.2 degree, respectively. After correction for translational set-up errors, no statistically significant changes in rotational error were observed. Conclusions: The rotational set-up errors in patients with thoracic neoplasms were all small in magnitude. Rotational errors may not change after the correction for translational set-up errors alone, which should be evaluated in a larger sample future. (authors)

  12. Maximizing Use of Robot-Arm No. 3 in Da Vinci–Assisted Thoracic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Naohiro; Maeda, Junichi; Yoshida, Koichi; Kato, Yasufumi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Ohira, Tatsuo; Kawate, Norihiko; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported on the importance of appropriate robot-arm settings and replacement of instrument ports in robot-assisted thoracic surgery, because the thoracic cavity requires a large space to access all lesions in various areas of the thoracic cavity from the apex to the diaphragm and mediastinum and the chest wall.1–3 Moreover, it can be difficult to manipulate the da Vinci Surgical System using only arms No. 1 and No. 2 depending on the tumor location. However, arm No. 3 is usually positioned on the same side as arm No. 2, and sometimes it is only used as an assisting-arm to avoid conflict with other arms (Fig. 1). In this report, we show how robot-arm No. 3 can be used with maximum effectiveness in da Vinci-assisted thoracic surgery. PMID:26011219

  13. Periosteal chondroma with spinal cord compression in the thoracic spinal canal: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Hyeok; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Sim, Hong Bo; Kim, Misung

    2016-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a very unusual cartilaginous neoplasm of the spinal canal. We herein report a case of periosteal chondroma in a 41-year-old male who presented with gait disturbance and paresthesia of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed an extradural mass which caused compression of the spinal cord at the T5/6 level. The mass showed iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and nodular and peripheral rim enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Computed tomography (CT) images showed a mass with punctate calcifications and extension into the left T5/6 neural foramen. MR and CT images showed extrinsic cortical bone erosion of the posterior inferior body of T5 and superior pedicle of T6, bone remodeling with overhanging margins, and sclerosis adjacent to the tumor. The patient underwent a complete excision of the mass by left T5/6 hemi-laminectomy and exhibited complete resolution of his symptoms. Histopathologic examination revealed periosteal chondroma. Tumor recurrence was not recorded during the 18-month follow-up period. (orig.)

  14. Photogrammetry: an accurate and reliable tool to detect thoracic musculoskeletal abnormalities in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Josy; dos Santos, Amelia Miyashiro N; Garcia, Kessey Maria B; Yi, Liu C; João, Priscila C; Miyoshi, Milton H; Goulart, Ana Lucia

    2012-09-01

    To analyse the accuracy and reproducibility of photogrammetry in detecting thoracic abnormalities in infants born prematurely. Cross-sectional study. The Premature Clinic at the Federal University of São Paolo. Fifty-eight infants born prematurely in their first year of life. Measurement of the manubrium/acromion/trapezius angle (degrees) and the deepest thoracic retraction (cm). Digitised photographs were analysed by two blinded physiotherapists using a computer program (SAPO; http://SAPO.incubadora.fapesp.br) to detect shoulder elevation and thoracic retraction. Physical examinations performed independently by two physiotherapists were used to assess the accuracy of the new tool. Thoracic alterations were detected in 39 (67%) and in 40 (69%) infants by Physiotherapists 1 and 2, respectively (kappa coefficient=0.80). Using a receiver operating characteristic curve, measurement of the manubrium/acromion/trapezius angle and the deepest thoracic retraction indicated accuracy of 0.79 and 0.91, respectively. For measurement of the manubrium/acromion/trapezius angle, the Bland and Altman limits of agreement were -6.22 to 7.22° [mean difference (d)=0.5] for repeated measures by one physiotherapist, and -5.29 to 5.79° (d=0.75) between two physiotherapists. For thoracic retraction, the intra-rater limits of agreement were -0.14 to 0.18cm (d=0.02) and the inter-rater limits of agreement were -0.20 to -0.17cm (d=0.02). SAPO provided an accurate and reliable tool for the detection of thoracic abnormalities in preterm infants. Copyright © 2011 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome by anatomically adapted tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastora, I.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Remy, J.; Suess, C.; Scherf, C.; Guillot, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of the thoracic outlet by on-line tube-current control. Prospectively, 114 patients undergoing spiral CT angiography of the subclavian artery for thoracic outlet arterial syndromes were evaluated with and without tube-current modulation at the same session (scanning parameters for the two successive angiograms, one in the neutral position and one after the postural maneuver): 140 kV; 206 mA; scan time 0.75 s; collimation 3 mm; pitch = (1). The dose reduction system was applied in the neutral position in the first 92 consecutive patients and after postural maneuver in the remaining 22 consecutive patients. Dose reduction and image quality were analyzed in the overall study group (group 1; n = 114). The influence of the arm position was assessed in 44 of the 114 patients (group 2), matched by the transverse diameter of the upper thorax. The mean dose reduction was 33 % in group 1 (range 22-40 %) and 34 % in group 2 (range 26-40 %). In group 2 the only difference in image quality was a significantly higher frequency of graininess on low-dose scans compared with reference scans whatever the patient's arm position, graded as minimal in 38 of the 44 patients (86 %). When the low-dose technique was applied after postural maneuver in group 2: (a) the mean dose reduction was significantly higher (35 vs 32 % in the neutral position; p = 0.006); (b) graininess was less frequent (82 vs 91 % in the neutral position); and (c) the percentage of graininess graded as minimal was significantly higher (83 vs 70 % in the neutral position; p = 0.2027). On-line tube-current modulation enables dose reduction on high-quality, diagnostic spiral CT angiograms of the thoracic outlet and should be applied during data acquisition in the neutral position and after postural maneuver for optimal use. (orig.)

  16. Dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome by anatomically adapted tube current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastora, I.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Remy, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Medical Research Group, Lille (France); Suess, C.; Scherf, C. [Siemens Medical Systems, Forcheim (Germany); Guillot, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of the thoracic outlet by on-line tube-current control. Prospectively, 114 patients undergoing spiral CT angiography of the subclavian artery for thoracic outlet arterial syndromes were evaluated with and without tube-current modulation at the same session (scanning parameters for the two successive angiograms, one in the neutral position and one after the postural maneuver): 140 kV; 206 mA; scan time 0.75 s; collimation 3 mm; pitch = (1). The dose reduction system was applied in the neutral position in the first 92 consecutive patients and after postural maneuver in the remaining 22 consecutive patients. Dose reduction and image quality were analyzed in the overall study group (group 1; n = 114). The influence of the arm position was assessed in 44 of the 114 patients (group 2), matched by the transverse diameter of the upper thorax. The mean dose reduction was 33 % in group 1 (range 22-40 %) and 34 % in group 2 (range 26-40 %). In group 2 the only difference in image quality was a significantly higher frequency of graininess on low-dose scans compared with reference scans whatever the patient's arm position, graded as minimal in 38 of the 44 patients (86 %). When the low-dose technique was applied after postural maneuver in group 2: (a) the mean dose reduction was significantly higher (35 vs 32 % in the neutral position; p = 0.006); (b) graininess was less frequent (82 vs 91 % in the neutral position); and (c) the percentage of graininess graded as minimal was significantly higher (83 vs 70 % in the neutral position; p = 0.2027). On-line tube-current modulation enables dose reduction on high-quality, diagnostic spiral CT angiograms of the thoracic outlet and should be applied during data acquisition in the neutral position and after postural maneuver for optimal use. (orig.)

  17. Radiofrequency Denervation Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Thoracic Zygapophyseal Joint Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambraeus, Johan; Hambraeus, Kjerstin S; Persson, Jan

    2018-05-01

    To describe a practical approach for the diagnosis and treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain and to present preliminary clinical data on the effects of this treatment approach on health-related quality of life. An observational study. Specialist outpatient pain clinic in northern Sweden. Patients with long-term thoracic pain. We describe a method of radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints. We compared health-related quality of life between patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints and patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. Treatment according to the Spine Intervention Society Guidelines was performed on the lumbar region in 178 patients and in the cervical region in 55 patients. Another 82 patients were treated in the thoracic region with our proposed technique. A survival plot of improvements in health-related quality of life revealed that all three treatments were effective in 65% or more of patients. The improvement in health-related quality of life was maintained for 12 or more months after treatment in 47% to 51% of patients. Our results suggest that radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain is as effective as radiofrequency denervation, the standard treatment, for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. If these results can be confirmed by other centers, radiofrequency denervation is likely to become more widely available for the treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain.

  18. Compression Stockings and Pressure Ulcers: Case Series of a Neglected Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq A; Ahmad, Faria; Khan, Omer J

    2017-10-10

    Pressure ulcers develop in patients who endure long periods of immobilization, often caused by conditions such as musculoskeletal and neurological diseases. Pressure ulcers adversely affect the patient and increase caregiver burden and healthcare costs. Typical sites for these ulcers include the sacrum, trochanters, and heels; they also occur on the nape of the neck, penis, nostrils, helix of the ear, and upper back. Compression stockings are commonly used to prevent and stop the progression of venous disorders, including deep vein thrombosis, but their role in the development of pressure ulcers is not well known. We describe three case reports of pressure ulcer development due to prolonged application of compression stockings. In each case, the nursing staff who were primarily responsible for the prevention of pressure ulcers applied the stockings continuously without any intermittent relief. Moreover, the stockings did not include manufacturer instructions, such as recommended exposure times and applications. We recommend that nursing staff be trained in pressure relief and prevention of pressure ulcers, including rare occurrences, and that manufacturers give detailed guidance regarding the safe use of compression stockings.

  19. Radiographic measures of thoracic kyphosis in osteoporosis: Cobb and vertebral centroid angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, A.M.; Greig, A.M.; Wrigley, T.V.; Tully, E.A.; Adams, P.E.; Bennell, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Several measures can quantify thoracic kyphosis from radiographs, yet their suitability for people with osteoporosis remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the vertebral centroid and Cobb angles in people with osteoporosis. Lateral radiographs of the thoracic spine were captured in 31 elderly women with osteoporosis. Thoracic kyphosis was measured globally (T1-T12) and regionally (T4-T9) using Cobb and vertebral centroid angles. Multisegmental curvature was also measured by fitting polynomial functions to the thoracic curvature profile. Canonical and Pearson correlations were used to examine correspondence; agreement between measures was examined with linear regression. Moderate to high intra- and inter-rater reliability was achieved (SEM = 0.9-4.0 ). Concurrent validity of the simple measures was established against multisegmental curvature (r = 0.88-0.98). Strong association was observed between the Cobb and centroid angles globally (r = 0.84) and regionally (r 0.83). Correspondence between measures was moderate for the Cobb method (r 0.72), yet stronger for the centroid method (r = 0.80). The Cobb angle was 20% greater for regional measures due to the influence of endplate tilt. Regional Cobb and centroid angles are valid and reliable measures of thoracic kyphosis in people with osteoporosis. However, the Cobb angle is biased by endplate tilt, suggesting that the centroid angle is more appropriate for this population. (orig.)

  20. Radiographic measures of thoracic kyphosis in osteoporosis: Cobb and vertebral centroid angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, A.M.; Greig, A.M. [University of Melbourne, Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Wrigley, T.V.; Tully, E.A.; Adams, P.E.; Bennell, K.L. [University of Melbourne, Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, Victoria (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    Several measures can quantify thoracic kyphosis from radiographs, yet their suitability for people with osteoporosis remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the vertebral centroid and Cobb angles in people with osteoporosis. Lateral radiographs of the thoracic spine were captured in 31 elderly women with osteoporosis. Thoracic kyphosis was measured globally (T1-T12) and regionally (T4-T9) using Cobb and vertebral centroid angles. Multisegmental curvature was also measured by fitting polynomial functions to the thoracic curvature profile. Canonical and Pearson correlations were used to examine correspondence; agreement between measures was examined with linear regression. Moderate to high intra- and inter-rater reliability was achieved (SEM = 0.9-4.0 ). Concurrent validity of the simple measures was established against multisegmental curvature (r = 0.88-0.98). Strong association was observed between the Cobb and centroid angles globally (r = 0.84) and regionally (r = 0.83). Correspondence between measures was moderate for the Cobb method (r = 0.72), yet stronger for the centroid method (r = 0.80). The Cobb angle was 20% greater for regional measures due to the influence of endplate tilt. Regional Cobb and centroid angles are valid and reliable measures of thoracic kyphosis in people with osteoporosis. However, the Cobb angle is biased by endplate tilt, suggesting that the centroid angle is more appropriate for this population. (orig.)

  1. Chondrosarcoma of a thoracic vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Casden, A.M.; Klein, M.J.; Spollman, A.

    1991-01-01

    Central chondrosarcoma is an uncommon primary malignancy of the axial skeleton which usually affects the posterior elements or the posterior part of a vertebral body. The authors present an unusual case of chondrosarcoma involving the anterior part of a thoracic vertebra with massive extravertebral extension into the posterior mediastinum. The roles of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this pathology are emphasized

  2. Ultrasonographyin diagnosis of thoracic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Stević Ruža; Jaković Radoslav; Mašulović Dragan; Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila; Mujović Nataša; Jovanović Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Chest sonography was used until recently mainly for diagnosis of pleural diseases. High resolution ultrasound machines enable ultrasound application not only in pleural diseases detection, but in diagnosing peripheral lung and mediastinal lesions. Ultrasonography can define the origin and structure of the lesion of thoracic wall, pleural and peripheral lung lesions and mediastinal lesions. Pleural lesions. Ultrasonography is very useful in diagnosing pleural effusion and disting...

  3. Thoracic spine disc-related abnormalities: longitudinal MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Charles J.; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Morrison, William B.; Parellada, Joan A. [TJUH Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carrino, J.A. [Department of Radiology ASB-1, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, L1, Room 002B, 75 Francis Street, MA 02115, Boston (United States)

    2004-04-01

    To describe and characterize the temporal changes in disc-related disorders of the thoracic spine using MR imaging. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was carried out of 40 patients with two sequential thoracic spine MR images at variable intervals. The images were assessed for baseline presence of, new incidence of and changes in disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, endplate marrow signal alteration and Schmorl nodes. The range of follow-up was 4-149 weeks. Baseline presence was: disc herniation, 10% (49/480); degenerative disc disease, 14% (66/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 2.3% (11/480); Schmorl nodes 9.6% (46/480). Most pre-existing lesions tended to remain unchanged. Herniations showed the most change, tending to improve in 27%. New incidence was: disc herniation, 1.5% (7/480), degenerative disc disease, 2% (10/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 1.6% (8/480); Schmorl nodes, 2.1% (10/480). Disc degeneration was first visible at an 11-week interval and once established almost never changed over many weeks to months. Endplate signal alterations (Modic changes) were uncommon. Schmorl nodes show no change from baseline for up to 2 1/2 years. All findings predominated in the lower intervertebral levels from T6 to T10. The most prevalent thoracic spine disc-related findings are degeneration and herniation. Disc herniations predominate in the lower segments and are a dynamic phenomenon. Disc degeneration can be rapidly evolving but tends to remain unchanged after occurrence. Endplate marrow signal changes were an uncommon manifestation of thoracic disc disease. Schmorl nodes showed the least change over time. (orig.)

  4. Diameter of the thoracic and abdominal aorta in healthy Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Wakako

    1989-01-01

    In 300 cases, diameter of thoracic and abdominal aorta in healthy Japanese is measured by computed tomography (CT) and the values are analyzed in relation to the age, sex and the level of the aorta on CT scan. Aorta becomes dilated with age. In female diameter of the aorta is correlated with age, on the other hand, diameter of those is not correlated with age in male. Diameter in male is larger than in female. Aorta tapers off and the ratio of tapering of the thoracic aorta is more prominent than that of the abdominal aorta. Therefore the calculations of the landmarks of tapering of the aorta and the ratio of diameter of the aorta to transverse diameter of the vertebral body at the levels of 10th thoracic and 3rd lumber vertebrae on CT scan are useful for judgement of normal range of diameter of the aorta. Calcifications of the wall of the aorta are seen initially at the age of 5th decade in the abdominal aorta and 6th decade in the thoracic aorta in healthy Japanese. They are noted in almost of the persons after the age of seventy years old. The presence of calcification is not correlated with diameter of the aorta at the same level on CT scan. (author)

  5. The numerical study of the compressible rising of nuclear fireball at low altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lin; Zheng Yi; Cheng Xianyou

    2010-01-01

    To study the evolution of nuclear fireball during the phase of compressible rising, the pressure and density were computed with numerical method. It can be concluded that the distribution of parameters of fireball changed during its rising the pressure in the upper part of fireball increased while the one of lower part decreased. the dilute area lied in the middle of fireball initially moved upward, on the other hand, the gradient of density in the upper and side part increased and is contrary to the changing of density beneath the fireball. The computational results of density agreed with experimental shadow graphs very well. (authors)

  6. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  7. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Keall, Paul J; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and

  8. Profile of thoracic injury at College of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Thoracic injury is a challenge to the thoracic surgeon practicing in developing countries. This prospective study was conducted to see the mode of injury, injury types and overall outcome of thoracic injury in our settings. Materials and methods: This prospective study was conducted in 100 thoracic injury patients between December 2011 to June 2012. The demographic features, type of the trauma, radiological assessment, associated organ injuries, management of the injury, surgical interventions, morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay were analysed. Results: In this study the ages ranged from 7 to 84 years. There were 73 (73% males and 27 (27% females. The majority of patients (83% were injured during the evening and night time. The majority of patients 92(92% sustained blunt chest injuries. The mechanism of injury was not significantly associated with length of hospital stay (P > 0.05 and mortality (P > 0.05.Road traffic accident was the most common cause of injuries affecting 68(68% of patients followed by fall injury of 19(19%. Rib fractures, haemothorax, pneumothorax and lung contusion were the most common type of injuries accounting for 83.0%, 57%,34% and 33% respectively. Associated extra-thoracic injuries were noted in 64.0% of patients. 45(45% of the cases of haemothorax, pneumotharax and haemopneumothorax were treated by tube thoracotomy. Four patients (04% had undergone thoracotomy. There were 09(09% patients of flail chest and treated conservatively. Fourty six patients (46% were admitted in the ICU. Eleven (11% patients were treated with ventilator support. Seventeen (17% patients had complication. The overall length of hospital stay ranged from 0 to 25 days. Conclusion: Road traffic accidents and fall from height are the major public health problems. Preventive measures at reducing road traffic accidents and timely management with closed tube thoracotomy are the main factors to be considered in the thoracic

  9. “Clavicular Duplication Causing Thoracic Outlet Obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and left shoulder pain radiating to hand, and associated with paresthesia and .... results in fracture instead of acromioclavicular joint sprain and a “new” clavicle ... such as anomalous cervical ribs, hypoplastic first thoracic rib, exostoses of the ...

  10. Diagnosis of celiac trunk compression stenosis in ischemic gastric and duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potashov, L.V.; Morozov, V.P.; Chekhuta, S.M.; Rodionov, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    Chronic gastric and duodenal ulcers may result from ischemia determined by celiac trunk compression stenosis (CTCS). In such cases angiography is necessary to specify diagnosis, to bring to light the causes of ulceration and to define therapeutic tactics. An analysis of angiograms of 75 patients with gastric and duodenal mucosa ulcers in CTCS and its characteristics have presented. The opening and proximal part of the celiac trunk are more frequently subjected to compression. The length of a narrow part of the celiac trunk is on an average of 6.62±0.31 mm. Enlargement in the diameter of the gastroduodenal artery was noted. Simultaneous narrowing of the celaic trunk and the upper mesenteric artery was found in 18 patients

  11. Radiation dose-reduction strategies in thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, J B; Sheard, S L; Edyvean, S; Vlahos, I

    2017-05-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) machines have the capability to perform thoracic CT for a range of clinical indications at increasingly low radiation doses. This article reviews several factors, both technical and patient-related, that can affect radiation dose and discusses current dose-reduction methods relevant to thoracic imaging through a review of current techniques in CT acquisition and image reconstruction. The fine balance between low radiation dose and high image quality is considered throughout, with an emphasis on obtaining diagnostic quality imaging at the lowest achievable radiation dose. The risks of excessive radiation dose reduction are also considered. Inappropriately low dose may result in suboptimal or non-diagnostic imaging that may reduce diagnostic confidence, impair diagnosis, or result in repeat examinations incurring incremental ionising radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  13. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A. [Departamento de Morfofisiologia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Silva, C.A. da [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Defino, H.L.A. [Departamento de Orthopedia e Traumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bel, E.A.Del [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-12

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury.

  14. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A.; Silva, C.A. da; Defino, H.L.A.; Bel, E.A.Del

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury

  15. The Effect of Al on the Compressibility of Silicate Perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M. J.; Kubo, A.; Yoshino, T.; Koga, K. T.; Ohishi, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Experimental data on compressibility of aluminous silicate perovskite show widely disparate results. Several studies show that Al causes a dramatic increase in compressibility1-3, while another study indicates a mild decrease in compressibility4. Here we report new results for the effect of Al on the room-temperature compressibility of perovskite using in situ X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell from 30 to 100 GPa. We studied compressibility of perovskite in the system MgSiO3-Al2O3 in compositions with 0 to 25 mol% Al. Perovskite was synthesized from starting glasses using laser-heating in the DAC, with KBr as a pressure medium. Diffraction patterns were obtained using monochromatic radiation and an imaging plate detector at beamline BL10XU, SPring8, Japan. Addition of Al into the perovskite structure causes systematic increases in orthorhombic distortion and unit cell volume at ambient conditions (V0). Compression of the perovskite unit cell is anisotropic, with the a axis about 25% and 3% more compressive than the b and c axes, respectively. The magnitude of orthorhombic distortion increases with pressure, but aluminous perovskite remains stable to at least 100 GPa. Our results show that Al causes only a mild increase in compressibility, with the bulk modulus (K0) decreasing at a rate of 0.7 GPa/0.01 XAl. This increase in compressibility is consistent with recent ab initio calculations if Al mixes into both the 6- and 8-coordinated sites by coupled substitution5, where 2 Al3+ = Mg2+ + Si4+. Our results together with those of [4] indicate that this substitution mechanism predominates throughout the lower mantle. Previous mineralogic models indicating the upper and lower mantle are compositionally similar in terms of major elements remain effectively unchanged because solution of 5 mol% Al into perovskite has a minor effect on density. 1. Zhang & Weidner (1999). Science 284, 782-784. 2. Kubo et al. (2000) Proc. Jap. Acad. 76B, 103-107. 3. Daniel et al

  16. Left Sided Trans-thoracic Esophagectomy for Resectable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Background: Surgery is the main stay of treatment for Esophageal Cancer but there is no .... patients and a nasogastric tube positioned in the gastric tube in all. .... infection, thorough drainage of the thoracic cavity, maintenance of nutrition and ...

  17. Plenary presentations and public citations from The American Association for Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Mohamed; Terasaki, Yusuke; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Stiles, Brendon M

    2016-01-01

    We examined the impact of work presented in the plenary sessions at the meeting of The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS), by determining how frequently the published papers corresponding to the session presentations during the past 20 years, were cited; those that were most cited were identified. We reviewed the AATS meeting programs from the 20-year period from 1994 to 2014 and identified the corresponding publications in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (JTCVS) from all abstracts presented at the plenary sessions. Papers were categorized as cardiac, thoracic, or congenital. References were evaluated for subsequent citation in the Web of Science (WoS), and Google Scholar (GS). We determined both the median number of citations overall, and per year. For comparison, we evaluated numbers of citations in WoS from current JTCVS papers in issues containing the 3 most-cited plenary session papers. Among 195 published plenary papers, the median number of citations in WoS and GS was 49 and 76, respectively. The median total number of citations in WoS was as follows: 51 for cardiac-category papers (n = 105); 61 for thoracic (n = 55), and 41 for congenital (n = 35). These values were higher than the median total number of citations for contemporary nonplenary JTCVS papers: cardiac (22, n = 55; P papers published in JTCVS. The median number of citations per year since publication for plenary publications was 5.9 (cardiac), 6 (thoracic), and 3.7 (congenital), respectively. Publications corresponding to the plenary sessions of the AATS are highly cited and include some of the seminal studies in our field in the past 20 years. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mural Thrombus in the Normal-Appearing Descending Thoracic Aorta of a Chronic Smoker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Habib; Hsu, Judy; Winchell, Patricia Jo; Daoko, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Thrombus formation in an atherosclerotic or aneurysmal desc