WorldWideScience

Sample records for universities hbcus excluded

  1. Dynamics of a Successful Planned Giving Program Utilizing Shared Leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Baldwin, Robin Lynn Brunty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of a successful planned giving program utilizing shared leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This information will assist the leadership in determining if and how a successful planned giving program can be established for HBCUs. It is possible for planned gifts…

  2. 32 CFR 22.325 - Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority institutions (MIs).

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority institutions (MIs). 22.325 Section 22.325 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Competition § 22.325...

  3. The Male Initiative on Leadership and Excellence (MILE) and Its Impact on Retention and Persistence of Black Men at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.; Dancy, T. Elon

    2013-01-01

    A strong body of research has documented the supportive environments of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and their impact on facilitating student success. Notwithstanding the consistency of these findings, recent reports and empirical research have highlighted the problems that HBCUs are experiencing with Black male enrollment,…

  4. University engagement with socially excluded communities

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Benneworth, P.

    2012-01-01

    There appears to be an almost overwhelming consensus that an increasingly important element of the role of universities in contemporary society is to provide useful knowledge and contribute to emerging societal problems. However, the scale of the academic analysis to date has been surprising in its

  5. Cultural Diversity in Introductory Psychology Textbook Selection: The Case for Historically Black Colleges/Universities (HBCUs)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Clay, William A. L.; Broussard, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes a culturally relevant approach to introductory psychology textbook selection for students attending a historically Black college/university (HBCU). The following multistage procedure was used: (1) a survey of HBCU psychology departments was conducted to ascertain how they selected their introductory psychology…

  6. University Benefits Survey. Part 1 (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1983 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy,…

  7. HBCUs and Chemical Engineering: Analysis of Baccalaureate Programs

    Reeves, Sheena; Thompson, Audie

    2018-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) provide significant STEM degrees to African Americans. Initiatives toward increasing diversity in STEM fields have been implemented by government and industry leaders. HBCUs annually award over 20% of all African American baccalaureate chemical engineering degrees. This speaks volume to the…

  8. An Analysis of White Student Engagement at Public HBCUs

    Carter, Joelle Davis; Fountaine, Tiffany Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The steady increase of White undergraduates attending public Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) compels educators to better understand White students' collegiate experiences at HBCUs. One lens to assess these experiences is through examining their engagement on campus. Student engagement is defined as the amount of time and…

  9. HBCUs Gear Up to Produce Hospitality Managers.

    Murray, Chris

    1994-01-01

    Increasingly, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are developing professional programs in hotel and restaurant management and travel and tourism. One objective is to train African Americans to become owners and operators of their own enterprises. An obstacle is the perception that hospitality careers involve menial labor. (MSE)

  10. HBCUs as Sites of Resistance: The Malignity of Materialism, Western Masculinity, and Spiritual Malefaction

    Douglas, Ty-Ron M. O.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the author challenges stakeholders (i.e., administrators, educators, students) of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to examine how HBCUs can continue to serve as sites of resistance against the prevailing cultural norms of materialism, Western masculinity, and spiritual malefaction. The author traces his…

  11. Glenn's Strategic Partnerships With HBCUs and OMUs

    Kankam, M. David

    2003-01-01

    NASA senior management has identified the need to develop a strategy for increased contracting with the historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority universities (OMUs). The benefits to the institutions, by partnering with NASA, include developing their industrial base via NASA-industry partnerships, strong competitive advantage in technology-based research opportunities, and improved research capabilities. NASA gains increased contributed value to the Agency missions and programs as well as potential future recruits from technology-trained students who also constitute a pool for the nation s workforce. This report documents synergistic links between Glenn Research Center research and technology programs and faculty expertise at HBCUs and OMUs. The links are derived, based on Glenn technologies in the various directorates, program offices, and project offices. Such links readily identify universities with faculty members who are knowledgeable or have backgrounds in the listed technologies for possible collaboration. Recommendations are made to use the links as opportunities for Glenn and NASA, as well as industry collaborators, to cultivate stronger partnerships with the universities. It is concluded that Glenn and its partners and collaborators can expect to mutually benefit from leveraging NASA s cutting-edge and challenging research and technologies; industry's high technology development, research and development facilities, system design capabilities and market awareness; and academia s expertise in basic research and relatively low overhead cost. Reduced cost, accelerated technology development, technology transfer, and infrastructure development constitute some of the derived benefits.

  12. Educating Our Own: The Historical Legacy of HBCUs and Their Relevance for Educating a New Generation of Leaders

    Albritton, Travis J.

    2012-01-01

    Providing a brief history of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)--including how and why they were founded, funding sources and needs over time, and an examination of mission statements--the author considers the relevance of HBCUs in the current twenty-first century context. He makes an argument that the educational opportunities…

  13. HBCUs inform students and the community about cervical cancer.

    Green, Julian S; Williams, Deloris G; Scott, Dolores B; Madison, Shirley B; Comer, Kimberly D; Haynes, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    In summary, HBCUs can no longer remain reactive, but must spearhead efforts to increase both the health of the student body, as well as the community at large. HBCUs should collaboratively initiate a "Call to Action", whereby policies and programs could be created to aid in the prevention of HPV and other STIs. To support this action, HBCUs could more actively pursue funding sources that support both universities and the communities in which they exist. Student orientation could be redefined to include short courses in STI awareness and prevention, and be communicated in a manner that is professional, yet engaging to students. Moreover, university departments which have an interest in the health of communities should supervise these efforts. The knowledge of university faculty members within departments of Nursing, Social Work, Public Health, Rehabilitation Counseling and Physical Education should extend beyond the classroom and into the community. Clark commented, "Perhaps course content across departments could be revised to encompass an increased focus on practice skills which support awareness and prevention efforts". Through employment, volunteerism and student internships, each of these disciplines have established relationships with the surrounding community and understand the associated critical needs. Such relationships provide the best environment for both the creation and implementation of services, and provide students with a model of how to "give back" to the community by utilizing their education. Campus health centers should be more prevention-driven beyond the distribution of condoms and pamphlets, to collaborate with local area high schools and community-based organizations to create an information network accessible to students and community residents. Additionally, health centers should promote the availability of HPV vaccination, which depending on state of residence and age, may be free or available at a discounted cost. According to Bynum

  14. Doctoral Study Programs in Social Work at HBCUs: Origin and Program Development

    Aubrey, Hal; Jordan, Tina; Stevenson, Andre P.; Boss-Victoria, Rena; Haynes, James; Estreet, Anthony; Smith, Jahmaine; Cameron, Elijah; Williams, Quotasze

    2016-01-01

    Fisk University began the genesis of HBCU graduate programs in 1880. During the next fifty years, several other HBCUs established graduate programs. That group included Lincoln, Howard, and Morgan State. However, only Lincoln University established a PhD program. The primary goal of this paper is to provide a historical perspective regarding the…

  15. Factors affecting retention in science-based curriculums at HBCUs

    Pelham, J.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive study of the retention of minority students enrolled in college-level engineering was conducted. The majority of prior work in this area focused on institutional retention factors for students in non-specified majors and considered students dropouts'' whenever there was a break in enrollment. This study looked only at students whose beginning major was engineering, enrolled primarily at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including a comparison sample from a predominantly white institution (PWI). Science persisters were defined as those students who continuously enrolled in post-secondary institutions full- and part-time -- whether or not they transferred between institutions. The critical factor was their continued enrollment in engineering. Study participants provided four types of information: (1) a measure of academic motivation, (2) an objective measure of science interest, (3) a measure of nine aspects of normal personality functioning, and (4) an assessment of selected demographic variables. 64 refs.

  16. Factors affecting retention in science-based curriculums at HBCUs

    Pelham, J.

    1991-12-31

    A systematic and comprehensive study of the retention of minority students enrolled in college-level engineering was conducted. The majority of prior work in this area focused on institutional retention factors for students in non-specified majors and considered students ``dropouts`` whenever there was a break in enrollment. This study looked only at students whose beginning major was engineering, enrolled primarily at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including a comparison sample from a predominantly white institution (PWI). Science persisters were defined as those students who continuously enrolled in post-secondary institutions full- and part-time -- whether or not they transferred between institutions. The critical factor was their continued enrollment in engineering. Study participants provided four types of information: (1) a measure of academic motivation, (2) an objective measure of science interest, (3) a measure of nine aspects of normal personality functioning, and (4) an assessment of selected demographic variables. 64 refs.

  17. Shifting the Talk: Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Feminism at HBCUs

    Spencer-Maor, Faye; Randolph, Robert E., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article begins by asking readers to make a modest supposition: HBCUs are, perhaps, one of the last frontiers for sustained feminist praxis-administratively and pedagogically. The authors write that they struggle with the situation, and find it both lamentable and paradoxical, since many HBCUs were originally founded and/or administered by…

  18. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1990-91: Part I, Benefits Excluding Pensions.

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    The report details, in tabular form, non-pension benefits offered by each of 17 Ontario universities. These include: supplementary health insurance; long term disability; sick leave entitlement; sick leave-benefits continuance; long term disability-benefits continuance; life insurance; survivor benefit; dental plan; post-retirement benefits;…

  19. Forgotten, excluded or included? Students with disabilities: A case study at the University of Mauritius.

    Pudaruth, Sameerchand; Gunputh, Rajendra P; Singh, Upasana G

    2017-01-01

    Students with disabilities in the tertiary education sector are more than a just a phenomenon, they are a reality. In general, little attention is devoted to their needs despite the fact that they need more care and attention. This paper, through a case study at the University of Mauritius, sought to answer some pertinent questions regarding students with disabilities. Does the University of Mauritius have sufficient facilities to support these students? Are students aware of existing facilities? What additional structures need to be put in place so that students with any form of disability are neither victimised, nor their education undermined? Are there any local laws about students with disabilities in higher education? To answer these questions and others, an online questionnaire was sent to 500 students and the responses were then analysed and discussed. The response rate was 24.4% which showed that students were not reticent to participate in this study. Our survey revealed that most students were not aware of existing facilities and were often neglected in terms of supporting structures and resources. ICT facilities were found to be the best support that is provided at the University of Mauritius. The right legal framework for tertiary education was also missing. Ideally, students with disabilities should have access to special facilities to facilitate their learning experiences at tertiary institutions. Awareness about existing facilities must also be raised in order to offer equal opportunities to them and to enable a seamless inclusion.

  20. The politics of particularism: HBCUs, Spelman College, and the struggle to educate Black women in science, 1950--1997

    Scriven, Olivia A.

    Since the close of World War II, higher education has been central to the growth of U.S. science, but the role of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) has been under-explored within this narrative. The nation's 105 HBCUs constitute less than one percent of the U.S. higher education community, but consistently have served as a major conduit for the production of African Americans in the sciences, technology, mathematics and engineering. National Science Foundation data reflect an average 29 percent share for the period 1994-2001. The output is even more striking when examined by degrees awarded in disciplinary clusters---50 percent in the agricultural sciences, 45 percent in the physical sciences and mathematics, and 42 percent in the biological sciences. This research explores the role of HBCUs in educating African Americans in science from the boosterism period shortly following World War II, through affirmative action legislation of the 1960s and 1970s, and concluding with current federal policies. A particular analysis is undertaken of Spelman College, a private liberal arts college founded by New England missionaries in the South during the late 19th century as a seminary for former slave women and girls. Spelman presents a unique case to analyze the particularistic characteristics of race, gender and institutional setting within the context of a so-called normative structure of science. Over a 25-year period, Spelman was able to rise beyond the structural limitations of its position as a Black college, a women's college, and a southern college to become one of the single most productive undergraduate institution for African American women earning the baccalaureate degree in science. What new perspectives might the Spelman story specifically and the history of HBCUs generally offer about the history of U.S. science, the notion that careers be open to talent, and current public policy discourse regarding efforts to increase the participation of

  1. The Role of HBCUs in Addressing the Unique Needs of LGBT Students

    Mobley, Steve D., Jr.; Johnson, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights some of the extant literature on LGBT students at HBCUs and discusses some of the challenges they encounter at these institutions. Furthermore, it offers recommendations to help HBCUs be more intentional about creating a more affirming and inclusive campus environment for LGBT students.

  2. Colorism within the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Gasman, Marybeth; Abiola, Ufuoma

    2016-01-01

    Complexion privilege and color bias have long acted in concert with racism to foster intraracial forms of stratification among African Americans such as the tendency for educational levels and other measureable outcomes (e.g., income) to correspond with skin tone. In this article, we examine the salience of color prejudice at Historically Black…

  3. Increasing Diversity and Gender Parity by working with Professional Organizations and HBCUs

    Wims, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    Context/Purpose: This abstract proposes tactics for recruiting diverse applicants and addressing gender parity in the geoscience workforce. Methods: The geoscience community should continue to develop and expand a pipeline of qualified potential employees and managers at all levels. Recruitment from professional organizations, which are minority based, such as the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) provides senior and midlevel scientists, engineers, program managers, and corporate managers/administrators with proven track records of success. Geoscience organizations should consider increasing hiring from the 100+ Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) which have a proven track records of producing high quality graduates with math, science, computer science, and engineering backgrounds. HBCU alumni have been working in all levels of government and corporate organizations for more than 50 years. Results: Professional organizations, like NSBE, have members with one to 40 years of applicable work experience, who are prime candidates for employment in the geoscience community at all levels. NSBE, also operates pipeline programs to graduate 10,000 bachelor degree minority candidates per year by 2025, up from the current 3,620/year. HBCUs have established educational programs and several pipelines for attracting undergraduate students into the engineering and science fields. Since many HBCUs enroll more women than men, they are also addressing gender parity. Both professional organizations and HBCU's have pipeline programs that reach children in high school. Interpretation: Qualified and capable minority and women candidates are available in the United States. Pipelines for employing senior, mid-level, and junior skill sets are in place, but underutilized by some geoscience companies and organizations.

  4. Is There a Doctorate in the House? With Such a Significant Shortfall of African Americans with PH.D.s in Science, Engineering and Technology, More HBCUs Are Taking on the Challenge of Offering the Terminal Degree

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2004-01-01

    In the battle to increase the numbers of African American Ph.D.s in science, technology and engineering, the nation may just have a secret weapon: historically Black colleges and universities. The statement may sound improbable. After all, only a handful of the nation's HBCUs offer doctoral programs. And education has long been the field of choice…

  5. Racial Microaggressions among Asian American and Latino/a Students at a Historically Black University

    Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2015-01-01

    Research illustrates that the enrollments of Asian American and Latino/a students are increasing at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Nevertheless, research on how these students experience the institutional climates of HBCUs is nonexistent; hence, we sought to explore the college-choice process and perceptions of campus…

  6. A Delineation of Asian American and Latino/a Students' Experiences with Faculty at a Historically Black College and University

    Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that the enrollment of Asian American and Latino/a students are increasing at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Nevertheless, research on how these students experience the institutional climate of HBCUs is nonexistent. Hence, this study sought to explore the college choice process and perceptions of campus…

  7. Alumni Giving: A Case Study of the Factors That Influence Philanthropic Behavior of Alumni Donors of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Roy-Rasheed, Lupita D.

    2012-01-01

    This research project was a study of the philanthropic behavior of local alumni donors at two historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the South Central Region. Specifically, the research explored HBCUs' local alumni donors' experiences, perceptions, triggers, and motivations and how these factors influence alumni giving. This…

  8. Is It a Different World? Providing a Holistic Understanding of the Experiences and Perceptions of Non-Black Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Arroyo, Andrew T.; Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study contributes an original holistic understanding of the perceptions and experiences of non-Black students (e.g., Asian American, Latino, and White) as they matriculate into historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), persist to graduation, and reflect on their experiences as graduates at HBCUs. Findings from this…

  9. Institutional Retention Strategies at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Their Effects on Cohort Default Rates: 1987-1995. Monograph Series.

    Galloway, Fred J.; Swail, Watson Scott

    This study analyzed institutional factors that significantly affect cohort default rates at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and assessed the potential for reducing these rates. It has been hypothesized that the HBCUs most successful in lowering student cohort default rates are those that have also succeeded in increasing…

  10. Senior Level Administrators and HBCUs: The Role of Support for Black Women’s Success in STEM

    Amanda Washington Lockett

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While it is important for college and university senior administrators to embrace the traditional roles of their administrative positions, senior administrators’ interactions with students also shape institutional culture, students’ engagement, and ultimately play a role in students’ motivation to succeed. This engagement is especially evident in the Historically Black College and University (HBCU context as senior administrators’ engagement with students can directly or indirectly affect how students perceive themselves and their ability to succeed. This article aims to illuminate the role that HBCU senior level administrators play in students’ motivation toward success. We also highlight the notion that senior level administrators’ role in organizational culture ultimately led historically-disempowered Black women students toward success in even the most historically inaccessible pathways in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM fields. The study used semi-structured interviews with 71 Black women STEM students across 10 HBCUs and asked questions to better understand how events in their lives and on their campuses shaped their choice to pursue and persist through a STEM degree program. The study found that the women were highly motivated by their HBCUs’ family-like community of support. Integral to this article, this support was not confined to professors and peers, but extended to senior administrators. We conclude that Black women STEM students’ perception of their ability to succeed and their motivation is influenced by the institutions’ senior administration.

  11. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Summary of activities, 1985-1986

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1985 to 1986 activities of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Radioactive Waste Management Research Program sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The first set of three awards was made in September,1984. In September, 1985, two of these projects were renewed and a new proposal was funded. The program has been enthusiastically received by the community of HBCUs and the program sponsor

  12. Being Included and Excluded

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  13. GLOBE Atmosphere and AMS Diversity Program Content to Foster Weather and Climate Science Awareness at HBCUs: A Curriculum Enhancement Model

    Padgett, D.

    2017-12-01

    Tennessee State University (TSU) is a member of the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Mission Earth" project. The World Regional Geography (GEOG 1010/1020) courses are required for Education majors. Pre-service teachers must complete several exercises to be certified in the GLOBE Atmosphere Protocols. The pre-service teachers are required to develop GLOBE-based lessons to high school students. The exercise theme is "Exploring the Impacts of Urban Heat Islands (UHI) using Geospatial Technology." Surface temperature, ambient air temperature, and cloud cover data are collected. Sample point locations are logged using Garmin GPS receivers and then mapped using ArcGIS Online (http://arcg.is/1oiD379). The service learning outreach associated with this experience requires collegians to thoroughly understand the physical, social, and health science content associated with UHIs and then impart the information to younger learners. The precollegiate students are motivated due to their closeness in age and social context to the college students. All of the students have the advantage of engaging in hands-on problem-based learning of complex meteorology, climate science, and geospatial technology concepts. The optimal result is to have pre-service teachers enroll in the Weather and Climate (GEOG 3500) course, which is supported by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Weather and Climate Studies Curriculum. Tennessee State University faculty have completed training to deliver the curriculum through the AMS Diversity Program. The AMS Weather Studies and Climate Studies programs have been institutionalized at Tennessee State University (TSU) since fall 2005. Approximately 250 undergraduate students have been exposed to the interactive AMS learning materials over the past 10-plus years. Non-STEM, and education majors are stimulated by the real-time course content and are encouraged to think critically about atmospheric systems science, and

  14. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Improving Operations through an Enterprise Resource Planning System

    Hardee, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    There are a variety of challenges facing colleges and universities today. With shrinking public funding, many colleges and universities must rethink their operations to ensure that they are operating efficiently. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have an even more daunting task in a downturned economy because they are often…

  15. Leadership, Governance, and Sustainability of Black Colleges and Universities

    Ezzell, Jack L., Jr.; Schexnider, Alvin J.

    2010-01-01

    A topic of continuing interest in American higher education and society is the future of historically black colleges and universities, commonly referred to as HBCUs. The nation's public and private black institutions of higher education have proved their mettle, and yet they face persistent challenges to survive. A huge part of the challenge black…

  16. Selection of Universities by Students in Journalism and Mass Communication Courses: Do Criteria Differ between Caucasian and Minority Students?

    Biswas, Masudul; Perkins, Lyle; Izard, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    This study measures the significance of factors used by minority students in their selection of universities/colleges. This web survey was conducted mainly on 778 students enrolled in journalism/mass communication courses representing five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and twelve other universities. Differences were found…

  17. The Black Lives Matter Movement and Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Gasman, Marybeth

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the Black Lives Matter Movement and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) continue to play an important role in society. However, what the Black Lives Matter movement shows consistently is that predominantly White institutions need to change, to step up and embrace…

  18. Sharecropping in Higher Education: Case Study of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University-Florida State University Joint College of Engineering

    Darnell, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities have historically been given less funding than White institutions, a known discrepancy partially rectified by the Civil Rights era desegregation lawsuits. The court-ordered funding, however, came with race-based restrictions for public HBCUs, and many lost academic programs to traditionally White…

  19. Exploring Perspectives of Transitional Leadership Styles at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Case Study

    Mosley, Melvin L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) continue to strive for academic relevance in spite of the national problem of the misalignment of mission and values among their institutional leadership. The national problem was important to both the HBCU institutions and the entire academic community to establish global relevancy. The…

  20. The Relationship between Fundraising Practice and Job Satisfaction at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Tindall, Natalie T. J.; Waters, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Fundraising, as studied from a communications/public relations perspective, is an understudied function. This research examines fundraising at public and private historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), specifically exploring how these fundraisers incorporate various fundraising strategies into their communication outreach programs…

  1. Consequences of Conservatism: Black Male Undergraduates and the Politics of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Harper, Shaun R.; Gasman, Marybeth

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has highlighted numerous ways in which historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) offer more supportive educational environments for Black students than do predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Notwithstanding the consistency of these findings, persistence and graduation rates remain low for undergraduates,…

  2. Fewer Resources, More Debt: Loan Debt Burdens Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Saunders, Katherine M.; Williams, Krystal L.; Smith, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Student loans have become an increasingly important way for students and their families to pay for college, but for students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), student loan debt is a substantial burden. Students who attend these institutions--many of whom are low-income and first-generation--must borrow at higher rates and,…

  3. Making Bricks without Straw: The Kresge HBCU Initiative and Fundraising at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Leak, Halima N.

    2018-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have a history of "doing more with less" and this is often reflected in their effectiveness in securing financial resources from private donors. The purpose of this study is to probe and explore how the Kresge Foundation's HBCU Initiative strengthened HBCU fundraising capacity from…

  4. Perceived Norms and Marijuana Use at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Lewis, Todd F.; Wahesh, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the extent of marijuana use and related risk-taking behavior by college students on historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Undergraduate students (N = 212) from an HBCU in the southern region of the United States completed anonymous questionnaires that assessed their marijuana-related behaviors and…

  5. Racial and Athletic Identity of African American Football Players at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Reed, Courtney; Steinfeldt, M. Clint

    2010-01-01

    This study examined racial and athletic identity among African American football players at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Negotiating the dualism of racial and athletic identities can be problematic because both roles are subject to prejudice and discrimination, particularly for…

  6. Reimagining the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Environment: Exposing Race Secrets and the Binding Chains of Respectability and Othermothering

    Njoku, Nadrea; Butler, Malika; Beatty, Cameron C.

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how the intersections of gender, race, policy, and student differences at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) can impact student experience. Such an environment can displace and penalize those who do not adhere to the uniformity of heteronormative gender roles or respectability politics. Using…

  7. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7 Section... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. [52 FR 4581, Feb. 12...

  8. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    2010-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.49 Excluded services. (a... individual's dialysis, are excluded from coverage under the Medicare home health benefit. (f) Prosthetic... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 409.49 Section 409.49 Public...

  9. An Analysis of Stereotype Threat in African American Engineering Students at Predominantly White, Ethnically Diverse, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Sparks, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to distinguish the similarities and differences in coping strategies of African American engineering students by analyzing their perceptions of stereotype threat at three academic institution types, Predominantly White Institutions (PWI), ethnically diverse, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).…

  10. A Link to the Future: A Pilot Study Look at How Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Journalism and Mass Communications Units Use the Internet in Recruiting

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2012-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have had the ability to recruit African-American students since the 1860s by stressing a sense of inclusion and family through their mission statements and community outreach. There was little to no competition for African-American students from predominantly white institutions until integration…

  11. Journalism and Mass Communication Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions: Saying Goodbye to the Digital Divide

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2013-01-01

    The digital divide has been described as the distance or gap in access to information based on race, ethnicity, income, education and geographical location. This study examined how freshmen and first-semester journalism and mass communications students at five Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs] have been able to bridge the…

  12. Second-Class, Cash Strapped, Antiquated Institutions: Unbalanced Media Depictions of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the "Chronicle of Higher Education"

    Waymer, Damion; Street, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine "The Chronicle of Higher Education", a leading site for higher education news and politics, and its representation of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Design/methodology/approach: Frames are strong discursive tools that can help social actors achieve the following:…

  13. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per ml...

  14. Excluded Volume Effects in Gene Stretching

    Lam, Pui-Man

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects excluded volume on the stretching of a single DNA in solution. We find that for small force F, the extension h is not linear in F but proportion to F^{\\chi}, with \\chi=(1-\

  15. The Impact and Influence of HBCUs on the Social Work Profession

    Bowles, Dorcas D.; Hopps, June Gary; Clayton, Obie

    2016-01-01

    Faculties at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) have demonstrated stellar contributions to social work, which include early thought and epistemology related to strengths, empowerment, and social justice perspectives; religious orientation; inclusive learning environment, and community-based research. W. E. B. DuBois was the most…

  16. What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants?

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers...... the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend to result either in fairly strong cases for open borders or in denials that considerations of justice apply...... to immigration at all, which results in state discretion positions. This state of debate is both theoretically unsatisfactory and normatively implausible. The paper therefore explores an alternative approach to the right to exclude immigrants from the perspective of recent debates about the territorial rights...

  17. Our grandmothers, excluded from history, preservers and ...

    Our grandmothers, excluded from history, preservers and transmitters of indegenous values: ecomaternalistic approach. ... Journal of Religion and Human Relations ... It further calls for the retrieval of the said hidden histories of women which would hopefully be a lesson for the contemporary and future women.

  18. 21 CFR 1310.08 - Excluded transactions.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded transactions. 1310.08 Section 1310.08 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED...) Colombia (6) Ecuador (7) French Guiana (8) Guyana (9) Panama (10) Paraguay (11) Peru (12) Suriname (13...

  19. 42 CFR 403.768 - Excluded services.

    2010-10-01

    ... a RNHCI. (c) A nurse who is not providing RNHCI home nursing services under arrangement with a RNHCI... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 403.768 Section 403.768 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  20. Excluding joint probabilities from quantum theory

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Danageozian, Arshag

    2018-03-01

    Quantum theory does not provide a unique definition for the joint probability of two noncommuting observables, which is the next important question after the Born's probability for a single observable. Instead, various definitions were suggested, e.g., via quasiprobabilities or via hidden-variable theories. After reviewing open issues of the joint probability, we relate it to quantum imprecise probabilities, which are noncontextual and are consistent with all constraints expected from a quantum probability. We study two noncommuting observables in a two-dimensional Hilbert space and show that there is no precise joint probability that applies for any quantum state and is consistent with imprecise probabilities. This contrasts with theorems by Bell and Kochen-Specker that exclude joint probabilities for more than two noncommuting observables, in Hilbert space with dimension larger than two. If measurement contexts are included into the definition, joint probabilities are not excluded anymore, but they are still constrained by imprecise probabilities.

  1. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Extended Excluded Volume: Its Origin and Consequences

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Rouha, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2013), s. 201-210 ISSN 0033-4545. [International Conference on Solution Chemistry (ICSC-32) /32./. La Grande Motte, 28.08.2011-02.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720802 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : excluded volume * partial molar volume * primitive models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2013

  3. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-183 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states.

  4. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    Page, Don N.

    2014-01-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states

  5. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  6. 31 CFR 19.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 19.950 Section 19.950 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1012 - Work excluded from employment.

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work excluded from employment. 404.1012... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1012 Work excluded from employment. Certain kinds of work performed by an...

  8. 29 CFR 778.225 - Talent fees excludable under regulations.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Talent fees excludable under regulations. 778.225 Section... Payments That May Be Excluded From the âRegular Rateâ Talent Fees in the Radio and Television Industry § 778.225 Talent fees excludable under regulations. Section 7(e)(3) provides for the exclusion from the...

  9. Shared sanitation: to include or to exclude?

    Mara, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    Just over 600 million people used shared sanitation in 2015, but this form of sanitation is not considered 'improved sanitation' or, in the current terminology, 'basic sanitation' by WHO/UNICEF, principally because they are typically unhygienic. Recent research has shown that neighbour-shared toilets perform much better than large communal toilets. The successful development of community-designed, built and managed sanitation-and-water blocks in very poor urban areas in India should be adapted and adopted throughout urban slums in developing countries, with a caretaker employed to keep the facilities clean. Such shared sanitation should be classified as 'basic', sometimes as 'safely-managed', sanitation, so contributing to the achievement of the sanitation target of the Sustainable Development Goals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. An Arithmetical Hierarchy of the Law of Excluded Middle and Related Principles

    Akama, Yohji; Berardi, Stefano; Hayashi, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    's Lemma, Post's Theorem, Excluded Middle for simply Existential and simply Universal statements, and many others.Our motivations are rooted in the experience of one of the authors with an extended program extraction and of another author with bound extraction from classical proofs....

  11. Acting on social exclusion: neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of excluders.

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A; Güroğlu, Berna

    2015-02-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of initiators of social exclusion (i.e. 'excluders'). Participants divided money in a modified Dictator Game between themselves and people who previously either included or excluded them during a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Participants selectively punished the excluders by decreasing their outcomes; even when this required participants to give up monetary rewards. Punishment of excluders was associated with increased activation in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and bilateral anterior insula. Costly punishment was accompanied by higher activity in the pre-SMA compared with punishment that resulted in gains or was non-costly. Refraining from punishment (i.e. forgiveness) was associated with self-reported perspective-taking and increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junction, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings show that social exclusion can result in punishment as well as forgiveness of excluders and that separable neural networks implicated in social cognition and cognitive control are recruited when people choose either to punish or to forgive those who excluded them. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. 48 CFR 733.103-73 - Protests excluded from consideration.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protests excluded from consideration. 733.103-73 Section 733.103-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... excluded from consideration. (a) Contract administration. Disputes between a contractor and USAID are...

  13. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens...

  14. The Value of the Right to Exclude: An Empirical Assessment

    J.M. Klick (Jonathan); G. Parchomovsky (Gideon)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractProperty theorists have long deemed the right to exclude fundamental and essential for the efficient use and allocation of property. Recently, however, proponents of the progressive property movement have called into question the centrality of the right to exclude, suggesting that it

  15. An analysis of stereotype threat in African American engineering students at predominantly White, ethnically diverse, and historically Black colleges and universities

    Sparks, David M.

    The purpose of this research was to distinguish the similarities and differences in coping strategies of African American engineering students by analyzing their perceptions of stereotype threat at three academic institution types, Predominantly White Institutions (PWI), ethnically diverse, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The researcher collected demographic and survey data using the Stereotype Vulnerability Scale (SVS). The study was offered to the entire population of African American engineering students at each college using an online survey. Results were analyzed using MANOVA and Pearson's correlational statistical analyses to test the hypotheses. Findings revealed that little differences exist between students' scores on an assessment of stereotype vulnerability, with a few areas showing that HBCUs and ethnically diverse universities are doing a similar job in addressing perceptions of their African American engineering students. Finding also revealed that the percentage of African American students at a university did not correlate with the scores on the SVS accept on questions related to the personal feelings students have about their race. The strongest findings related to the differences in male and female students across the universities. African American female engineering students appeared to perceive more stereotype threat than did their male counterparts; although, this fining was not statistically significant. Overall, no statistically significant differences were found between students' perceptions of stereotype threat at the three types of universities. Future research should expand the number of survey participants at the current universities, add more HBCUs to the study population, run similar experiments in different parts of the country, compare stereotype threat in private and elite universities, use ethnically diverse universities as models for minority student development, and use new or improved survey instruments

  16. The State of Black Education: The Politics of Educating African American Students at Colleges and Universities

    Earnest N. Bracey, Ph.D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In terms of higher education for African American students, the “school-to-prison pipeline” or Prison Industrial Complex must be totally dismantled in order to focus entirely on academic performance at colleges and universities and HBCUs. Additionally, mentors should be identified to tutor and guide and help black youngsters overcome their fear of learning and going to school, so that our whole society can benefit and improve academically. Finally, in this respect, we-the-people can move our nation forward by graduating people of color at higher institutions of learning, while providing them with a more productive life, and social advancement.

  17. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using

  18. Office of Inspector General List of Excluded Individuals and Entities

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The objective is to ensure that providers who bill Federal health care programs do not submit claims for services furnished, ordered or prescribed by an excluded...

  19. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1992--1993

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The HBCU/MI Consortium was formed (1) to respond to national R and D, policy formulation and minority manpower needs in environmental technology, hazardous, solid and mixed waste materials management, environmental restoration, and environmental health; and (2) to address limited minority participation in the public, private and non-profit environmental industries; limited environmental awareness among minorities; minimal interaction between HBCUs/MIs and majority universities, industry and interest groups; limited institutional development in environmental education and research; and lack of minority technical businesses in the environmental industry. This report gives progress made for the 92--93 period.

  20. GUILT OF PERSONS WITH MENTAL DISORDERS ARE NOT EXCLUDING RESPONSIBILITIES

    Ekaterina Valerievna Yurchak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of law as a key cross-sectoral and multi-disciplinary institutions is the Institute of guilt. At the present stage of development of the law, in a convergence of many of its branches, it is important to investigate exhaustively the institution with the general legal position, both in general and in particular - the situation of the guilt of persons with mental disorder, not excluding sanity.The purpose of this study - to investigate the situation of the fault of persons with a mental disorder, not excluding sanity in different areas of law, and address the question of whether this interdisciplinary institute.Scientific, theoretical and practical significance of the work lies in the fact that the study of this topic will summarize the knowledge about the fault of persons with a mental disorder, not excluding sanity, to analyze the content of this institution in various areas of law, and to conclude that the cross-sectoral character.The author uses formal-legal, comparative, hermeneutical, mathematical methods, as well as general methods of scientific research.The author analyzes the provisions of the Russian legislation on the fault of persons with a mental disorder, not excluding sanity, concluding that the criminal law of guilt people with a mental disorder, not excluding sanity, the most developed and taken into account as a circumstance affecting the punishment. In other areas of the law said institution worked shallow.The results of this study are scientific and practical value, because they can be useful for teaching students - in the industrial discipline "Criminal Law" and the general theoretical discipline "Theory of State and Law"; in science - by picking up information about the features of the Institute of guilt, and in practice - said the work can be useful to practitioners of judicial and investigative bodies, in order to understand the meaning and importance of the category of guilt, including - the guilt of persons

  1. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-03

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle distribution function, with excluded-volume effects enhancing the overall collective diffusion rate. An expression for the effective (collective) diffusion coefficient is obtained. Stochastic simulations of the full particle system are shown to compare well with the solution of this equation for two examples. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. 20 CFR 404.1013 - Included-excluded rule.

    2010-04-01

    ... least one-half of your time in the pay period is in covered work. If you spend most of your time in a... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Included-excluded rule. 404.1013 Section 404.1013 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY...

  3. 21 CFR 1404.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded Parties List System 1404.950 Section 1404.950 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION... other information about persons who are ineligible. The EPLS system includes the printed version...

  4. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fingerprinting of excluded aliens. 1240.38 Section 1240.38 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of...

  5. The Education Act and Excluded Children. Policy Review.

    Hodgkin, Rachel

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the negative assumptions and outcomes of provisions in Britain's Education Act of 1997 dealing with expulsion of students. Presents some statistics on excluded children; discusses likely outcomes such as increased delinquency, parent-school acrimony, and disparity in schools. Describes the role of teachers' unions in drafting the bill…

  6. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    2010-10-01

    ... arts in public affairs or public administration. The Foundation may at its discretion, upon request of... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP...

  7. 48 CFR 52.247-7 - Freight Excluded.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Freight Excluded. 52.247-7... AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-7 Freight... contracts for transportation or for transportation-related services when any commodities or types of...

  8. Empowering the digitally excluded: learning initiatives for (invisible groups

    Jane Seale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that some digitally excluded groups of learners are receiving more attention than others. Discussions regarding why some digitally excluded learners are more visible than others and therefore worthy of more committed digital inclusion interventions raises important questions about how we define and conceptualise digital inclusion and digital inclusion practice; particularly in relation to empowerment. In this article, we draw on a range of research, practice and policy literature to examine two important questions: what is empowerment and in whose hands does empowerment lie? We argue that empowerment involves making informed choices about technology use, but that learners often require support- human intervention- to make these choices. However, current digital inclusion research has failed to produce a detailed critique of what constitutes empowering support from educational institutions and their staff. A lack of open and reflexive accounts of practice means that we are no closer to identifying and understanding the kinds of empowering practices that are required to challenge the kinds of prejudices, stereotypes, risk-aversiveness and low aspirations associated with the most invisible of digitally excluded learners.

  9. Technique for determining cesium-137 in milk excluding ashing

    Antonova, V.A.; Prokof'ev, O.N.

    1984-01-01

    For the purpose of simplification of the method of milk sample preparation for the radiochemical analysis for 137 Cs in laboratory sanitary and higienic investigations rapid analysis technique excluding sample ashing is developed. The technique comprises sample mixing with silica gel during an hour, 137 Cs desorption from silica gel into the 1N solution of hydrochloric acid, radiochemical analysis of hydrochloric solution for determining 137 Cs. The comparison of the results obtained by the above method and that with ashing provides perfect agreement. For taking into account the incompleteness of 137 Cs adsorption by silica gel a correction factor is applied in calculation formulae

  10. GUILT OF PERSONS WITH MENTAL DISORDERS ARE NOT EXCLUDING RESPONSIBILITIES

    Ekaterina Valerievna Yurchak

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of law as a key cross-sectoral and multi-disciplinary institutions is the Institute of guilt. At the present stage of development of the law, in a convergence of many of its branches, it is important to investigate exhaustively the institution with the general legal position, both in general and in particular - the situation of the guilt of persons with mental disorder, not excluding sanity.The purpose of this study - to investigate the situation of the fault of persons with a m...

  11. Verification of Carbon Sink Assessment. Can We Exclude Natural Sinks?

    Alexandrov, G.; Yamagata, Y

    2004-01-01

    Any human-induced terrestrial sink is susceptible to the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, climate variability and other natural or indirect human-induced factors. It has been suggested in climate negotiations that the effects of these factors should be excluded from estimates of carbon sequestration used to meet the emission reduction commitments under the Kyoto Protocol. This paper focuses on the methodologies for factoring out the effects of atmospheric and climate variability/change. We estimate the relative magnitude of the non-human induced effects by using two biosphere models and discuss possibilities for narrowing estimate uncertainty

  12. Academic Degree Conferment in the U.K. and Japan, Excluding Universities.

    Turner, D. A.; Baba, M.; Shimada, K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines similarities and differences in the institutions that authorize postsecondary technical education in the United Kingdom and Japan, focusing on the mechanisms for awarding degrees (quality evaluation vs. credit accumulation), structural differences, depth and scope of operation, legislative and policy-making approach, adaptation to system…

  13. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing Brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diffusion coefficient that are often confounded, namely collective diffusion and self-diffusion. Simulations of the discrete system show good agreement with the analytic results. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  14. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  15. Only MR can safely exclude patients from arthroscopy

    Vincken, Patrice W.J.; Braak, Bert P.M. ter; Erkel, Arian R. van; Bloem, Johan L.; Bloem, Rolf M.; Luijt, Peter A. van; Coene, L.N.J.E.M.; Lange, Sam de

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine in patients with subacute knee complaints and normal standardized physical examination the fraction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies showing arthroscopically treatable intra-articular pathology. There were 290 consecutive patients (between 16 and 45 years) with at least 4 weeks of knee complaints and low clinical suspicion of intra-articular pathology based on physical exam. Two hundred seventy-four patients were included. Sixteen patients with prior knee surgery, rheumatic arthritis, or severe osteoarthritis were excluded. MRI was used to assign patients to group 1 (treatable abnormalities) or group 2 (normal or no treatable findings), depending on whether MR demonstrated treatable pathology. Arthroscopy was performed in group 1 patients. If symptoms persisted for 3 months in group 2 patients, cross over to arthroscopy was allowed. MR showed treatable pathology in 73 patients (26.6%). Arthroscopy was performed in 64 patients of 73 patients (group 1). In 52 patients (81.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 71.4-91.1%), arthroscopy was therapeutic. Of the 13 arthroscopies (6.5%) in group 2, four were therapeutic (30.8%, 95% CI 1.7-59.8). The highest fraction of MR studies showing treatable pathology was found in males, aged over 30 years, with a history of effusion (54.5%, six of 11 patients). Authors believe that the negative predictive value of clinical assessment in patients with subacute knee complaints is too low to exclude these patients from MR. MR should at least be considered in male patients aged 30 years and over with a history of effusion. (orig.)

  16. Only MR can safely exclude patients from arthroscopy

    Vincken, Patrice W.J.; Braak, Bert P.M. ter; Erkel, Arian R. van; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Bloem, Rolf M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Leiden (Netherlands); Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Delft (Netherlands); Luijt, Peter A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Traumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Coene, L.N.J.E.M. [HAGA Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands); Lange, Sam de [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine in patients with subacute knee complaints and normal standardized physical examination the fraction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies showing arthroscopically treatable intra-articular pathology. There were 290 consecutive patients (between 16 and 45 years) with at least 4 weeks of knee complaints and low clinical suspicion of intra-articular pathology based on physical exam. Two hundred seventy-four patients were included. Sixteen patients with prior knee surgery, rheumatic arthritis, or severe osteoarthritis were excluded. MRI was used to assign patients to group 1 (treatable abnormalities) or group 2 (normal or no treatable findings), depending on whether MR demonstrated treatable pathology. Arthroscopy was performed in group 1 patients. If symptoms persisted for 3 months in group 2 patients, cross over to arthroscopy was allowed. MR showed treatable pathology in 73 patients (26.6%). Arthroscopy was performed in 64 patients of 73 patients (group 1). In 52 patients (81.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 71.4-91.1%), arthroscopy was therapeutic. Of the 13 arthroscopies (6.5%) in group 2, four were therapeutic (30.8%, 95% CI 1.7-59.8). The highest fraction of MR studies showing treatable pathology was found in males, aged over 30 years, with a history of effusion (54.5%, six of 11 patients). Authors believe that the negative predictive value of clinical assessment in patients with subacute knee complaints is too low to exclude these patients from MR. MR should at least be considered in male patients aged 30 years and over with a history of effusion. (orig.)

  17. 76 FR 30323 - President's Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    2011-05-25

    ... philanthropic, business, government, military, homeland- security, and education communities in a national..., technology, engineering, and mathematics) policies affecting HBCUs and possible strategies to enable the...

  18. An Investigation of How Black STEM Faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities Approach the National Science Foundation Merit Review Process

    Rankins, Falcon

    This qualitative inquiry explored the ways in which US-born, Black faculty member participants in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) interact with the National Science Foundation (NSF). Eight Black HBCU STEM faculty members with a range of involvement in NSF-related activities were individually interviewed. Topics of discussion with participants included their prior experiences with NSF, their understanding of the merit review process, and their understanding of their personal and institutional relationships with NSF and the STEM community. Two broad findings emerged from the conversations. The first was that issues of communities and social identity were important to the participants' work as research scientists. Participants prioritized advancing people and communities over advancing the knowledge of ambiguous, disembodied scientific disciplines, and some participants were motivated by interests in social justice. However, participants maintained strong identities as scientists and the discussions provided no evidence that other social factors influenced their application of the scientific method. The second major finding dealt with the role participants perceived their institutions playing in their involvement with NSF. All participants described challenges associated with pursuing research in HBCU environments and, in some cases, the institutional challenges served as the motivation for participants' projects, with varying consequences. The participants' discussions about their institutions also raised important questions about how well-aligned participants' visions are with the visions of their institutional leadership, regarding how research should be incorporated into the HBCU mission. Finally, this study developed and refined a theoretical framework for explaining the underrepresentation of HBCUs in NSF funding streams. In developing this framework, a brief history of

  19. Higher Education: How Freshmen and First-Year Journalism and Mass Communication Students at HBCUs and PWUs Used the Internet in Their Decision

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to explore how the Internet was used by Journalism and Mass Communications Program students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominately White Universities in their college choice and if these institutions were able to provide the information the respondents were looking for in their search. The study found…

  20. Transference to the analyst as an excluded observer.

    Steiner, John

    2008-02-01

    In this paper I briefly review some significant points in the development of ideas on transference which owe so much to the discoveries of Freud. I then discuss some of the subsequent developments which were based on Freud 's work and which have personally impressed me. In particular I mention Melanie Klein's elaboration of an internal world peopled by internal object and her description of the mechanisms of splitting and projective identification, both of which profoundly affect our understanding of transference. Using some clinical material I try to illustrate an important transference situation which I do not think has been sufficiently emphasized although it is part of the 'total situation' outlined by Klein. In this kind of transference the analyst finds himself in an observing position and is no longer the primary object to whom love and hate are directed. Instead he is put in a position of an excluded figure who can easily enact rather than understand the role he has been put in. In this situation he may try to regain the position as the patient's primary object in the transference or avoid the transference altogether and make extra-transference interpretations and in this way enact the role of a judgemental and critical super-ego. If he can tolerate the loss of a central role and understand the transference position he has been put in, the analyst can sometimes reduce enactments and release feelings to do with mourning and loss in both himself and his patient.

  1. Determinants of Prosocial Behavior in Included Versus Excluded Contexts.

    Cuadrado, Esther; Tabernero, Carmen; Steinel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Prosocial behavior (PSB) is increasingly becoming necessary as more and more individuals experience exclusion. In this context it is important to understand the motivational determinants of PSB. Here we report two experiments which analyzed the influence of dispositional (prosocialness; rejection sensitivity) and motivational variables (prosocial self-efficacy; prosocial collective efficacy; trust; anger; social affiliation motivation) on PSB under neutral contexts (Study 1), and once under inclusion or exclusion conditions (Study 2). Both studies provided evidence for the predicted mediation of PSB. Results in both neutral and inclusion and exclusion conditions supported our predictive model of PSB. In the model dispositional variables predicted motivational variables, which in turn predicted PSB. We showed that the investigated variables predicted PSB; this suggests that to promote PSB one could (1) foster prosocialness, prosocial self and collective efficacy, trust in others and affiliation motivation and (2) try to reduce negative feelings and the tendency to dread rejection in an attempt to reduce the negative impact that these variables have on PSB. Moreover, the few differences that emerged in the model between the inclusion and exclusion contexts suggested that in interventions with excluded individuals special care emphasis should be placed on addressing rejection sensitivity and lack of trust.

  2. One negative polysomnogram does not exclude obstructive sleep apnea.

    Meyer, T J; Eveloff, S E; Kline, L R; Millman, R P

    1993-03-01

    Night-to-night variability of apneas on overnight polymnography exists in patients with documented obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In this study, we evaluated the possibility that this variability may be severe enough to miss the diagnosis of OSA in patients clinically at risk for the disease. We prospectively studied 11 patients who were deemed on clinical grounds to have probable OSA, but had a negative result on overnight polysomnography. Six of the 11 patients were found to have a positive second study with a significant rise in the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) from 3.1 +/- 1.0 to 19.8 +/- 4.7 (mean +/- SEM, p cause of the negative first study in these patients is unclear, but it does not seem related to risk factor pattern, sleep architecture, or test interval. The change in AHI was not found to be rapid eye movement (REM)-dependent. This study demonstrates that a negative first-night study is insufficient to exclude OSA in patients with one or more clinical markers of the disease.

  3. Determinants of prosocial behavior in included versus excluded contexts

    Esther eCuadrado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosocial behavior is increasingly becoming necessary as more and more individuals experience exclusion. In this context it is important to understand the motivational determinants of prosocial behavior. Here we report two experiments which analyzed the influence of dispositional (prosocialness; rejection sensitivity and motivational variables (prosocial self-efficacy; prosocial collective efficacy; trust; anger; social affiliation motivation on prosocial behavior under neutral contexts (Study 1, and once under inclusion or exclusion conditions (Study 2. Both studies provided evidence for the predicted mediation of prosocial behavior. Results in both neutral and inclusion and exclusion conditions supported our predictive model of prosocial behavior. In the model dispositional variables predicted motivational variables, which in turn predicted prosocial behavior. We showed that the investigated variables predicted prosocial behavior; this suggests that to promote prosocial behavior one could (1 foster prosocialness, prosocial self and collective efficacy, trust in others and affiliation motivation and (2 try to reduce negative feelings and the tendency to dread rejection in an attempt to reduce the negative impact that these variables have on prosocial behavior. Moreover, the few differences that emerged in the model between the inclusion and exclusion contexts suggested that in interventions with excluded individuals special care emphasis should be placed on addressing rejection sensitivity and lack of trust.

  4. The politics of corruption, inequality, and the socially excluded.

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the production of knowledge in the context of socially excluded people exposed to inequality, oppression, and exploitation is problematized. The analysis follows Enrique Dussel's philosophical exegesis of the politics of power and corruption and his vision of a critical transformation of the social political order. The argument is also informed by the work of critical educator Paulo Freire, who elucidates the conditions of oppression and marginalization and highlights the importance of conscientization to develop a critical awareness of these conditions. Hannah Arendt's work on the politics of understanding totalitarianism also assists in the elucidation of the machinery that operates behind oppression to sustain power and inequality. The article emphasizes the need to recognize the inequality of conditions that exists between the producer of knowledge and those who live through inequality and oppression in their lived corporality. A critical transformation of the process of production of knowledge is needed to both acknowledge the conditions that sustain this endeavour in the first place and avoid the corruption of knowledge. A work of conscientization is also necessary among knowledge producers to undertake a critical analysis of inequality that exposes the corruption of power. This analysis needs to examine and unmask the hidden mechanisms that perpetuate inequality and oppression and serve only the interests of a few. The abysmal gaps between the wealthy and the poor within and among countries bespeak a degree of human indifference that reflects a most serious and complex phenomenon that perverts something profoundly human in our societies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Building a more diverse biomedical engineering workforce: Biomedical engineering at the university of the district of Columbia, a historically black college & university.

    Thompson, Lara A; Adebayo, A Segun; Nian Zhang; Haghani, Sasan; Dowell, Kathleen; Shetty, Devdas

    2016-08-01

    Biomedical Engineering (BME) is a new, multidisciplinary, and rapidly growing field, however, the BME Workforce suffers from limited ethnic and gender diversity. Despite the demand and growth of this new field due to its public health importance, only 4 out of the 107 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) nationwide offers a Bachelor's of Science (B.S.) in Bio-Engineering related fields. In order to contribute to a growing BME Workforce, HBCUs need to react and offer more degree-programs relevant to BME. At the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), an HBCU and the District's only public institution for higher learning, we have recently established a new, degree program: Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (B.S. in BME) full-board approved in Fall 2014, with program activities initiated in Fall 2015. The educational goal of this program is to enhance the quality and diversity of the BME Workforce via student professional development, new and relevant BME courses, and BME scholarly activities (e.g., guest lectures and journal club sessions), ultimately to increase the number of ethnic minorities pursuing careers and degrees in BME. Through our program activities, we are aiming to meet the nation's demand to contribute to a diverse BME workforce, directed towards solving problems in human health. A secondary, but related goal, is to increase the diversity of STEM-related fields. This paper summarizes our initial, but encouraging, BME activity-related findings. However, this study will be longitudinal (on a multiple year time period) to observe the true outcomes of our initiative.

  6. Casino Self- and Forced Excluders' Gambling Behavior Before and After Exclusion.

    Kotter, Roxana; Kräplin, Anja; Bühringer, Gerhard

    2018-06-01

    Casino exclusion programs are intended to prevent or limit gambling-related harm. Although previous research showed that self-exclusion is associated with reduced gambling, it remains unknown whether self- and forced excluded subjects show different patterns of gambling behavior and if exclusion from casino gambling affects all gambling activities. The present study retrospectively investigated (1) the role of voluntariness of exclusion for the first time, and (2) general gambling behavior of excluded individuals before and after exclusion. A total of N = 215 casino excluders (self-excluders: n = 187, forced excluders: n = 28) completed an online survey or a face-to-face interview up to 8 years after enrollment. Self- and forced excluders showed similar rates of abstinence (self-excluders: 19.3%, forced excluders: 28.6%) and reduction (self-excluders: 67.4%, forced excluders: 60.7%), even though forced excluders reported a significantly greater initial gambling intensity compared to self-excluders (e.g., pre-exclusion gambling time; self-excluders: 3.2 days/week, forced excluders: 4.3 days/week). Overall, results indicated that 20.5% of excluders stopped all gambling activities and another 66.5% reduced their gambling. Those who continued gambling significantly reduced this behavior in every segment, except for gambling halls. Findings indicate that self- and forced exclusion are associated with similarly reduced gambling behavior, even in non-excluded segments. However, unchanged gambling in gambling halls emphasizes the importance to implement consistent exclusion programs over all gambling segments.

  7. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are expressly...

  8. Technical Assistance and Program Support: DoD Historical Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions Program

    Andrews, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    ... (His), the United Negro College Fund Special Programs developed and implemented a comprehensive technical assistance and infrastructure program This program has provided HBCUs, HSIs, TCUs, and MIs...

  9. Should Controls With Respiratory Symptoms Be Excluded From Case-Control Studies of Pneumonia Etiology? Reflections From the PERCH Study.

    Higdon, Melissa M; Hammitt, Laura L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Driscoll, Amanda J; Karron, Ruth A; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    Many pneumonia etiology case-control studies exclude controls with respiratory illness from enrollment or analyses. Herein we argue that selecting controls regardless of respiratory symptoms provides the least biased estimates of pneumonia etiology. We review 3 reasons investigators may choose to exclude controls with respiratory symptoms in light of epidemiologic principles of control selection and present data from the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study where relevant to assess their validity. We conclude that exclusion of controls with respiratory symptoms will result in biased estimates of etiology. Randomly selected community controls, with or without respiratory symptoms, as long as they do not meet the criteria for case-defining pneumonia, are most representative of the general population from which cases arose and the least subject to selection bias. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Computer network access to scientific information systems for minority universities

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Wakim, Nagi T.

    1993-08-01

    The evolution of computer networking technology has lead to the establishment of a massive networking infrastructure which interconnects various types of computing resources at many government, academic, and corporate institutions. A large segment of this infrastructure has been developed to facilitate information exchange and resource sharing within the scientific community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports both the development and the application of computer networks which provide its community with access to many valuable multi-disciplinary scientific information systems and on-line databases. Recognizing the need to extend the benefits of this advanced networking technology to the under-represented community, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in the Space Data and Computing Division at the Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program: a major networking and education initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Universities (MUs). In this paper, we will briefly explain the various components of the MU-SPIN Program while highlighting how, by providing access to scientific information systems and on-line data, it promotes a higher level of collaboration among faculty and students and NASA scientists.

  11. Type specimens of Hymenoptera deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (excluding Aculeata

    Helena C. Onody

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper lists the type specimens of Hymenoptera, excluding Aculeata, deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. We record all labels contents and also additional information from MZSP registers, published material, and other available sources. High resolution photographs of holotypes, lectotypes and syntypes are available through links to Specimage - the image database of The Ohio State University, where they are archived. The collection comprises a total of 332 type-specimens (32 holotypes, 266 paratypes, 12 syntypes, 20 paralectotypes and two lectotypes of eight superfamilies, 18 families, 31 subfamilies, 43 genera and 83 species.

  12. Consciousness in the Universe

    Khalil Chamcham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available So far we can identify at least three concepts within modern cosmology that bring into debate the question of consciousness in the universe: 1 Fine Tuning; 2 The Anthropic Principle and 3 The Multiverse. This does not exclude the question of the role of observer (i.e. consciousness in cosmology as developed within Quantum Physics: we observe the universe through quanta and any breakthrough in understanding the origin and nature of the universe will come only through a quantum theory of gravity […

  13. Pilot Design and Implementation of an Innovative Mental Health and Wellness Clinic at a Historically Black College/University.

    Moore, Jessica R; Pollio, David E; Hong, Barry A; Valencia, Celeste; Sorrell, Michael; North, Carol S

    2018-05-01

    A pilot mental health and wellness clinic was developed and implemented on the campus of Paul Quinn College, a small Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Dallas, TX, to address mental health disparities in an African-American student population. Additionally, a series of student engagement activities was developed and implemented to address stigma and enhance linkage to the clinic. The student engagement activities were well attended. In all, 14 students requested a total of 97 appointments during the spring 2016 semester, but attended only 41 appointments. Students sought treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders, most commonly major depressive disorder and adjustment disorder. A model based on this program could conceivably be extended to serve students more broadly in other HBCUs as well as in community colleges.

  14. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  15. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS General Records and Reports § 761.187 Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to... generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761.187 Protection of Environment...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3402(e)-1 - Included and excluded wages.

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Included and excluded wages. 31.3402(e)-1... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(e)-1 Included and excluded wages. (a) If a portion of... not more than 31 consecutive days constitutes wages, and the remainder does not constitute wages, all...

  17. 31 CFR 19.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? 19.500 Section 19.500 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System...

  18. 17 CFR 37.4 - Election to trade excluded and exempt commodities.

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election to trade excluded and exempt commodities. 37.4 Section 37.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES TRANSACTION EXECUTION FACILITIES § 37.4 Election to trade excluded and exempt...

  19. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings Commenced...

  20. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of visa...

  1. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Requirements § 1.362 What records are excluded from this subpart? The establishment and maintenance of records...

  2. Psychiatric Disorder or Impairing Psychology in Children Who Have Been Excluded from School: A Systematic Review

    Whear, Rebecca; Marlow, Ruth; Boddy, Kate; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Parker, Claire; Ford, Tamsin; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Stein, Ken

    2014-01-01

    When children with special educational needs are excluded from school, it should raise the concern that these children are not receiving adequate help and support. This systematic review aims to identify the prevalence of psychiatric disorder or impairing psychopathology among children who are excluded from school compared to children who are not…

  3. Equitable access to health insurance for socially excluded children? The case of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana.

    Williams, Gemma A; Parmar, Divya; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Asante, Felix; Arhinful, Daniel; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2017-08-01

    To help reduce child mortality and reach universal health coverage, Ghana extended free membership of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to children (under-18s) in 2008. However, despite the introduction of premium waivers, a substantial proportion of children remain uninsured. Thus far, few studies have explored why enrolment of children in NHIS may remain low, despite the absence of significant financial barriers to membership. In this paper we therefore look beyond economic explanations of access to health insurance to explore additional wider determinants of enrolment in the NHIS. In particular, we investigate whether social exclusion, as measured through a sociocultural, political and economic lens, can explain poor enrolment rates of children. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 4050 representative households conducted in Ghana in 2012. Household indices were created to measure sociocultural, political and economic exclusion, and logistic regressions were conducted to study determinants of enrolment at the individual and household levels. Our results indicate that socioculturally, economically and politically excluded children are less likely to enrol in the NHIS. Furthermore, households excluded in all dimensions were more likely to be non-enrolled or partially-enrolled (i.e. not all children enrolled within the household) than fully-enrolled. These results suggest that equity in access for socially excluded children has not yet been achieved. Efforts should be taken to improve coverage by removing the remaining small, annually renewable registration fee, implementing and publicising the new clause that de-links premium waivers from parental membership, establishing additional scheme administrative offices in remote areas, holding regular registration sessions in schools and conducting outreach sessions and providing registration support to female guardians of children. Ensuring equitable access to NHIS will contribute substantially

  4. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 25 March 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Hunting for the Higgs with D0 at the Tevatron Prof. Gustaaf Brooijmans / Columbia University The search for the Higgs boson is one of the most important endeavors in current experimental particle physics. At the eve of the LHC start, the Tevatron is delivering record luminosity allowing both CDF and D0 to explore a new region of possible Higgs masses. In this seminar, the techniques used to search for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron will be explained, limiting factors will be examined, and the sensitivity in the various channels will be reviewed. The newly excluded values of the standard model Higgs mass will be presented. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : J.-S. Graulich

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable...

  6. 75 FR 49528 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (“NMG”) Excluding the Multimedia...

    2010-08-13

    ... services for chips used in networking and multimedia products. The company reports that workers leased from... Multimedia Applications Division, including on-site workers of Synergy Services, Craftcorp, Directions..., Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG'') Excluding the Multimedia Applications Division...

  7. 7 CFR 1794.21 - Categorically excluded proposals without an ER.

    2010-01-01

    ... UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES... or the substitution of one fuel combustion technology with another is excluded from this... providing service to customers or facilities such as stock tanks and irrigation pumps. (26) New bulk...

  8. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  9. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-03-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain.

  10. Oxytocin biases men but not women to restore social connections with individuals who socially exclude them

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yao, Shuxia; Xu, Lei; Geng, Yayuan; Zhao, Weihua; Ma, Xiaole; Kou, Juan; Luo, Ruixue; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2017-01-01

    We normally react to individuals who exclude us socially by either avoiding them or increasing our attempts to interact with them. The neuropeptide oxytocin can promote social bonds and reduce social conflict and we therefore investigated whether it facilitates more positive social responses towards individuals who exclude or include us. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subject design 77 healthy Chinese male and female participants received intranasal oxytocin (40 IU) or placebo...

  11. Excluded segmental duct bile leakage: the case for bilio-enteric anastomosis.

    Patrono, Damiano; Tandoi, Francesco; Romagnoli, Renato; Salizzoni, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Excluded segmental duct bile leak is the rarest type of post-hepatectomy bile leak and presents unique diagnostic and management features. Classical management strategies invariably entail a significant loss of functioning hepatic parenchyma. The aim of this study is to report a new liver-sparing technique to handle excluded segmental duct bile leakage. Two cases of excluded segmental duct bile leak occurring after major hepatic resection were managed by a Roux-en-Y hepatico-jejunostomy on the excluded segmental duct, avoiding the sacrifice of the liver parenchyma origin of the fistula. In both cases, classical management strategies would have led to the functional loss of roughly 50 % of the liver remnant. Diagnostic and management implications are thoroughly discussed. Both cases had an uneventful postoperative course. The timing of repair was associated with a different outcome: the patient who underwent surgical repair in the acute phase developed no long-term complications, whereas the patient who underwent delayed repair developed a late stenosis requiring percutaneous dilatation. Roux-en-Y hepatico-jejunostomy on the excluded bile duct is a valuable technique in selected cases of excluded segmental duct bile leakage.

  12. And the Survey Says…

    White, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant clustering of African-American physics faculty members at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Almost half (47%) of African-American physics faculty members are employed by physics departments at HBCUs. Physics departments at 30 HBCUs award degrees in physics; this accounts for about 4% (30 out of 746) of…

  13. Oxytocin biases men but not women to restore social connections with individuals who socially exclude them.

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yao, Shuxia; Xu, Lei; Geng, Yayuan; Zhao, Weihua; Ma, Xiaole; Kou, Juan; Luo, Ruixue; Kendrick, Keith M

    2017-01-12

    We normally react to individuals who exclude us socially by either avoiding them or increasing our attempts to interact with them. The neuropeptide oxytocin can promote social bonds and reduce social conflict and we therefore investigated whether it facilitates more positive social responses towards individuals who exclude or include us. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subject design 77 healthy Chinese male and female participants received intranasal oxytocin (40 IU) or placebo before playing a modified virtual ball-tossing game with three fictitious partners who either showed exclusion, inclusion or neutral behavioral interactions with them. Results showed that both male and female subjects threw the ball more often to individuals who excluded rather than included them, although oxytocin did not alter this or awareness/feelings of exclusion or inclusion. However, when subjects returned a week later males, but not females, in the oxytocin group exhibited an increased liking for, and preference for playing again with, players who had previously excluded them. This oxytocin effect was positively associated with independent traits. Our findings suggest that in a collectivist culture oxytocin may promote the desire of males, but not females, with a stronger independent orientation to rebuild social connections with individuals who have previously excluded them.

  14. How excluding some benefits from value assessment of new drugs impacts innovation.

    Cook, Joseph P; Golec, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Payers often assess the benefits of new drugs relative to costs for reimbursement purposes, but they frequently exclude some drugs' option-related benefits, reducing their reimbursement chances, and making them less attractive R&D investments. We develop and test a real options model of R&D investment that shows that excluding option-related benefits heightens drug developers' incentives to avoid high-risk (volatile) R&D investments and instead encourages them to focus on "safer" (positively skewed) investments. Our model and empirical results could partly explain the decline in the number of risky new molecular entities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    2010-04-01

    ... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA grantees must document in their Two Year Plan that a system is in place to afford all members of the eligible population...

  16. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. 725.910 Section 725.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... designated significant new uses, or (2) That the recipient has knowledge of the specific section in subpart M...

  17. Notes on the Ebenaceae. VI. Four species to be excluded from the family

    Ng, F.S.P.

    1970-01-01

    In the course of a study on Indo-Malesian Ebenaceae currently being carried out in the Oxford Forest Herbarium, it has been discovered that four species previously accepted as Diospyros do not belong to that genus and must be excluded from the family. They are as follows. 1. Diospyros addita

  18. Grafted polymers with annealed excluded volume : a model for surfactant association in brushes

    Currie, E.P.K.; Fleer, G.J.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Borisov, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    We present an analytical self-consistent-field (SCF) theory for a neutral polymer brush (a layer of long polymer chains end-grafted to a surface) with annealed excluded volume interactions between the monomer units. This model mimics the reversible adsorption of solute molecules or aggregates, such

  19. Play It Again: Neural Responses to Reunion with Excluders Predicted by Attachment Patterns

    White, Lars O.; Wu, Jia; Borelli, Jessica L.; Mayes, Linda C.; Crowley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Reunion behavior following stressful separations from caregivers is often considered the single most sensitive clue to infant attachment patterns. Extending these ideas to middle childhood/early adolescence, we examined participants' neural responses to reunion with peers who had previously excluded them. We recorded event-related potentials…

  20. Who's in and who's out: Labour law and those excluded from its ...

    The alternative is to challenge the divisions by organising the workers who are excluded at present. Significant gains can be made, it suggests, by working in parallel with other organisations, including those mobilising in the informal economy. The starting point, however, is in the workplaces where their own members are ...

  1. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-14 - Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from section 197.

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of certain intangible property... for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(a)-14 Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from...) for rules relating to changes in method of accounting for property to which § 1.167(a)-14 applies...

  2. Excluded from School: Getting a Second Chance at a "Meaningful" Education

    McGregor, Glenda; Mills, Martin; te Riele, Kitty; Hayes, Debra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we draw upon the experiences of a group of young people who have been excluded from mainstream schools in two Australian states to provide an account of the ways in which they have found their way to education in educational sites that are variously referred to as "flexible learning centres", "second chance…

  3. Excluding Ethical Issues from U.S. History Textbooks: 911 and the War on Terror

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined nine secondary American history textbooks regarding their treatment of 9/11 and related events. The analysis centered on both the knowledge included and excluded from the discussion in each book. Particular attention was given to the moral and ethical issues relevant to 9/11. Findings show that textbooks vary in their…

  4. Revision of the subfamily Euphorinae (excluding the tribe Meteorini Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from China

    Chen, X.; Achterberg, van C.

    1997-01-01

    The subfamily Euphorinae (excluding the tribe Meteorini Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from China is revised. In total 150 species, belonging to 24 genera, are treated and keyed. One genus (Heia gen. nov.; type species: Heia robustipes spec. nov.) and 69 species are described as new to science.

  5. 29 CFR 794.110 - Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute.

    2010-07-01

    ... definition quoted in § 794.106. The definition distinguishes between the related activities performed through... fide independent contractor (for example, an independent accounting or auditing firm). The latter activities are expressly excluded from the “enterprise” as defined. In addition, the definition contains a...

  6. Addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from trial analysis: a guide for systematic reviewers.

    Elie A Akl

    Full Text Available Systematic reviewer authors intending to include all randomized participants in their meta-analyses need to make assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data.The objective of this paper is to provide systematic reviewer authors with a relatively simple guidance for addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials.This guide is based on a review of the Cochrane handbook and published methodological research. The guide deals with participants excluded from the analysis who were considered 'non-adherent to the protocol' but for whom data are available, and participants with missing data.Systematic reviewer authors should include data from 'non-adherent' participants excluded from the primary study authors' analysis but for whom data are available. For missing, unavailable participant data, authors may conduct a complete case analysis (excluding those with missing data as the primary analysis. Alternatively, they may conduct a primary analysis that makes plausible assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data. When the primary analysis suggests important benefit, sensitivity meta-analyses using relatively extreme assumptions that may vary in plausibility can inform the extent to which risk of bias impacts the confidence in the results of the primary analysis. The more plausible assumptions draw on the outcome event rates within the trial or in all trials included in the meta-analysis. The proposed guide does not take into account the uncertainty associated with assumed events.This guide proposes methods for handling participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials. These methods can help in establishing the extent to which risk of bias impacts meta-analysis results.

  7. TSH alone is not sufficient to exclude all patients with a functioning thyroid nodule from undergoing testing to exclude thyroid cancer

    Hurtado-Lopez, Luis-Mauricio; Monroy-Lozano, Blanca-Estela [General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Martinez-Duncker, Carlos [Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) alone avoids tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with functional thyroid nodules (FTN). Sixty-nine patients with FTN on {sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy, radioiodine uptake test (RIU), {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, TSH assay, T3, and T4 obtained within 48 h were retrospectively identified out of 2,356 thyroid scans performed from January 2000 to April 2007. FTNs were classified as causing total, partial, or no inhibition of the thyroid as group 1, 2, or 3, respectively. TSH was subnormal in 21 of 69 (30.43%) patients. In group 1 (N = 23, 33.3%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in eight, nine, and six patients; in group 2 (N = 17, 24.6%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in four, six, and seven patients, and in group 3 (N = 29, 42%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in 9, 13, and 7 patients, respectively. TSH was significantly lower in group 1. In T3, T4, {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, and RIU, there were no differences between the three groups. Only 30.43% of patients had subnormal TSH. TSH alone cannot avoid tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with FTN. FTN existence can only be accurately assessed by thyroid scintigraphy. The current incidence of FTN may be unknown because scintigraphy is not routinely performed in all patients with thyroid nodules. Thyroid scintigraphy of patients with high TSH can detect diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and identify patients with FTN in whom no further diagnostic procedures would be needed in patients with normal TSH levels with nondiagnostic fine-needle aspiration results. (orig.)

  8. Trust and cooperation in the public sphere: why Roma people should not be excluded?

    Dragoş DRAGOMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent political developments in Romania and other Central and East European countries, marked by rising populism and political extremism, shed light on the essential issue of building a free, tolerant and inclusive public sphere, which is willing to let arguments to be decisive instead of power, status, race or wealth. The current tendencies of socially excluding Roma, indiscriminately taken by populists for unjustified social burden and intolerable racial difference, are a warning for more radical political action that could undermine on the long-run the effort to set up a democratic public space. Excluding from start an entire minority would only encourage future exclusions based on ideology, ethnicity or religion, according to the narrow definition populists use to give to the concept of ‘people’.

  9. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  10. Liver stiffness plus platelet count can be used to exclude high-risk oesophageal varices.

    Ding, Nik S; Nguyen, Tin; Iser, David M; Hong, Thai; Flanagan, Emma; Wong, Avelyn; Luiz, Lauren; Tan, Jonathan Y C; Fulforth, James; Holmes, Jacinta; Ryan, Marno; Bell, Sally J; Desmond, Paul V; Roberts, Stuart K; Lubel, John; Kemp, William; Thompson, Alexander J

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic screening for high-risk gastro-oesophageal varices (GOV) is recommended for compensated cirrhotic patients with transient elastography identifying increasing numbers of patients with cirrhosis without portal hypertension. Using liver stiffness measurement (LSM) ± platelet count, the aim was to develop a simple clinical rule to exclude the presence of high-risk GOV in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. A retrospective analysis of 71 patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis diagnosed by transient elastography (LSM >13.6 kPa) who underwent screening gastroscopy was conducted. A predictive model using LSM ± platelet count was assessed to exclude the presence of high-risk GOV (diameter >5 mm and/or the presence of high-risk stigmata) and validated using a second cohort of 200 patients from two independent centres. High-risk GOV were present in 10 (15%) and 16 (8%) of the training and validation cohorts, respectively, which was associated with LSM and Pl count (P < 0.05). A combined model based on LSM and Pl count was more accurate for excluding the presence of high-risk GOV than either alone (training cohort AUROC: 0.87 [0.77-0.96] vs. 0.78 [0.65-0.92] for LSM and 0.71 [0.52-0.90] for platelets) with the combination of LSM ≤25 kPa and Pl ≥100 having a NPV of 100% in both the training and validation cohorts. A total of 107 (39%) patients meet this criterion. The combination of LSM ≤25 kPa and Pl ≥100 can be used in clinical practice to exclude the presence of high-risk GOV in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Influences of excluded volume of molecules on signaling processes on the biomembrane.

    Masashi Fujii

    Full Text Available We investigate the influences of the excluded volume of molecules on biochemical reaction processes on 2-dimensional surfaces using a model of signal transduction processes on biomembranes. We perform simulations of the 2-dimensional cell-based model, which describes the reactions and diffusion of the receptors, signaling proteins, target proteins, and crowders on the cell membrane. The signaling proteins are activated by receptors, and these activated signaling proteins activate target proteins that bind autonomously from the cytoplasm to the membrane, and unbind from the membrane if activated. If the target proteins bind frequently, the volume fraction of molecules on the membrane becomes so large that the excluded volume of the molecules for the reaction and diffusion dynamics cannot be negligible. We find that such excluded volume effects of the molecules induce non-trivial variations of the signal flow, defined as the activation frequency of target proteins, as follows. With an increase in the binding rate of target proteins, the signal flow varies by i monotonically increasing; ii increasing then decreasing in a bell-shaped curve; or iii increasing, decreasing, then increasing in an S-shaped curve. We further demonstrate that the excluded volume of molecules influences the hierarchical molecular distributions throughout the reaction processes. In particular, when the system exhibits a large signal flow, the signaling proteins tend to surround the receptors to form receptor-signaling protein clusters, and the target proteins tend to become distributed around such clusters. To explain these phenomena, we analyze the stochastic model of the local motions of molecules around the receptor.

  12. A discrete fibre dispersion method for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of fibrous tissues.

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2018-01-01

    Recently, micro-sphere-based methods derived from the angular integration approach have been used for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of soft biological tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that many of the widely used numerical integration schemes over the unit sphere are inaccurate for large deformation problems even without excluding fibres under compression. Thus, in this study, we propose a discrete fibre dispersion model based on a systematic method for discretizing a unit hemisphere into a finite number of elementary areas, such as spherical triangles. Over each elementary area, we define a representative fibre direction and a discrete fibre density. Then, the strain energy of all the fibres distributed over each elementary area is approximated based on the deformation of the representative fibre direction weighted by the corresponding discrete fibre density. A summation of fibre contributions over all elementary areas then yields the resultant fibre strain energy. This treatment allows us to exclude fibres under compression in a discrete manner by evaluating the tension-compression status of the representative fibre directions only. We have implemented this model in a finite-element programme and illustrate it with three representative examples, including simple tension and simple shear of a unit cube, and non-homogeneous uniaxial extension of a rectangular strip. The results of all three examples are consistent and accurate compared with the previously developed continuous fibre dispersion model, and that is achieved with a substantial reduction of computational cost. © 2018 The Author(s).

  13. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of 99m Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  14. Excluded-Mean-Variance Neural Decision Analyzer for Qualitative Group Decision Making

    Ki-Young Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many qualitative group decisions in professional fields such as law, engineering, economics, psychology, and medicine that appear to be crisp and certain are in reality shrouded in fuzziness as a result of uncertain environments and the nature of human cognition within which the group decisions are made. In this paper we introduce an innovative approach to group decision making in uncertain situations by using a mean-variance neural approach. The key idea of this proposed approach is to compute the excluded mean of individual evaluations and weight it by applying a variance influence function (VIF; this process of weighting the excluded mean by VIF provides an improved result in the group decision making. In this paper, a case study with the proposed excluded-mean-variance approach is also presented. The results of this case study indicate that this proposed approach can improve the effectiveness of qualitative decision making by providing the decision maker with a new cognitive tool to assist in the reasoning process.

  15. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined

  16. The universal Higgs fit

    Giardino, P. P.; Kannike, K.; Masina, I.

    2014-01-01

    We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite...... Higgs models, models with extra Higgs doublets, supersymmetry, extra particles in the loops, anomalous top couplings, and invisible Higgs decays into Dark Matter. Best fit regions lie around the Standard Model predictions and are well approximated by our 'universal' fit. Latest data exclude the dilaton...... as an alternative to the Higgs, and disfavour fits with negative Yukawa couplings. We derive for the first time the SM Higgs boson mass from the measured rates, rather than from the peak positions, obtaining M-h = 124.4 +/- 1.6 GeV....

  17. Can absence of pyuria exclude urinary tract infection in febrile infants? About 2011 AAP guidelines on UTI.

    Kim, Seong Heon; Lyu, Soo Young; Kim, Hye Young; Park, Su Eun; Kim, Su Young

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) without significant pyuria in young children aged 2-24 months. The subjects consisted of infants and young children with febrile UTI treated at Pusan National University Children's Hospital, Korea. Group A included 283 patients with definite UTI who fulfilled the revised American Academy of Pediatrics diagnostic criteria, and group B included 19 patients with presumed UTI who had significant culture of uropathogens without pyuria, bacteriuria or other focus of infection. Duration of fever before hospital visit in group B was significantly shorter than in group A (17.7 ± 14.0 vs 34.5 ± 30.7 h). Most patients in group B (17/19, 89.5%) came to the hospital within 24 h of onset of fever. Acute scintigraphic lesions were found in 47.8% of patients in group A and 50% in group B. Underlying urological abnormalities such as vesicoureteral reflux and obstructive uropathy were found in 24.5% of patients in group A and in 33.3% of patients in group B (P = 0.74). Clinicians cannot exclude UTI on the absence of pyuria in young children aged 2-24 months. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. The effect of excluding juveniles on apparent adult olive baboons (Papio anubis) social networks

    Fedurek, Piotr; Lehmann, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in investigating the social structure of group living animals using social network analysis. Many studies so far have focused on the social networks of adults, often excluding younger, immature group members. This potentially may lead to a biased view of group social structure as multiple recent studies have shown that younger group members can significantly contribute to group structure. As proof of the concept, we address this issue by investigating social network structure with and without juveniles in wild olive baboons (Papio anubis) at Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria. Two social networks including all independently moving individuals (i.e., excluding dependent juveniles) were created based on aggressive and grooming behaviour. We used knockout simulations based on the random removal of individuals from the network in order to investigate to what extent the exclusion of juveniles affects the resulting network structure and our interpretation of age-sex specific social roles. We found that juvenile social patterns differed from those of adults and that the exclusion of juveniles from the network significantly altered the resulting overall network structure. Moreover, the removal of juveniles from the network affected individuals in specific age-sex classes differently: for example, including juveniles in the grooming network increased network centrality of adult females while decreasing centrality of adult males. These results suggest that excluding juveniles from the analysis may not only result in a distorted picture of the overall social structure but also may mask some of the social roles of individuals belonging to different age-sex classes. PMID:28323851

  19. Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy

    Spick, Claudio; Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred; Reittner, Pia; Baltzer, Pascal A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases (NPV: 100%). • Malignancy rate in the BI-RADS 0 population is substantial with 13.5%. • Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast MRI if used as a problem-solving tool in BI-RADS 0 cases. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved, single-center study, 687 women underwent high-resolution-3D, dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2012 and December 2012. Of these, we analyzed 111 consecutive patients (mean age, 51 ± 12 years; range, 20–83 years) categorized as BI-RADS 0. Breast MRI findings were stratified by clinical presentations, conventional imaging findings, and breast density. MRI results were compared to the reference standard, defined as histopathology or an imaging follow-up of at least 1 year. Results: One hundred eleven patients with BI-RADS 0 conventional imaging findings revealed 30 (27%) mammographic masses, 57 (51.4%) mammographic architectural distortions, five (4.5%) mammographic microcalcifications, 17 (15.3%) ultrasound-only findings, and two palpable findings without imaging correlates. There were 15 true-positive, 85 true-negative, 11 false-positive, and zero false-negative breast MRI findings, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 100% (15/15), 88.5% (85/96), 57.7% (15/26), and 100% (85/85), respectively. Breast density and reasons for referral had no significant influence on the diagnostic performance of breast MRI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases resulting in a NPV of 100% (85/85) and a PPV of 57.7% (15/26)

  20. SPECKLE IMAGING EXCLUDES LOW-MASS COMPANIONS ORBITING THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR TRAPPIST-1

    Howell, Steve B.; Scott, Nicholas J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515 (United States); Winters, Jennifer G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Hirsch, Lea [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, 510 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Nusdeo, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5060, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We have obtained the highest-resolution images available of TRAPPIST-1 using the Gemini-South telescope and our speckle imaging camera. Observing at 692 and 883 nm, we reached the diffraction limit of the telescope providing a best resolution of 27 mas or, at the distance of TRAPPIST-1, a spatial resolution of 0.32 au. Our imaging of the star extends from 0.32 to 14.5 au. We show that to a high confidence level, we can exclude all possible stellar and brown dwarf companions, indicating that TRAPPIST-1 is a single star.

  1. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARACHNIDS IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO (EXCLUDING ARANAE AND ACARI)

    Hugo Delfin Gonzalez; Virginia Meléndez-Ramírez; Pablo C. Manrique-Saide; Abdiel Martin-Park; Carlos Arisqueta-Chablé

    2017-01-01

    The Chelicerata are the second group of arthropods with the highest diversity after insects and they can inhabit almost all types of environments. The most current classification recognizes 11 orders and estimates in the number of species vary from 52,000 to 100,000. We have made an extensive literature review on the diversity of arachnids in the Yucatan Peninsula (YP) (excluding spiders and ticks). In Mexico there are 834 known species which represent 6% of the worldwide diversity. In the YP...

  2. SPECKLE IMAGING EXCLUDES LOW-MASS COMPANIONS ORBITING THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR TRAPPIST-1

    Howell, Steve B.; Scott, Nicholas J.; Everett, Mark E.; Horch, Elliott P.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Hirsch, Lea; Nusdeo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained the highest-resolution images available of TRAPPIST-1 using the Gemini-South telescope and our speckle imaging camera. Observing at 692 and 883 nm, we reached the diffraction limit of the telescope providing a best resolution of 27 mas or, at the distance of TRAPPIST-1, a spatial resolution of 0.32 au. Our imaging of the star extends from 0.32 to 14.5 au. We show that to a high confidence level, we can exclude all possible stellar and brown dwarf companions, indicating that TRAPPIST-1 is a single star.

  3. A new method of liquid crystal thermometry excluding human color sensation

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Akino, Norio; Ueda, Masaharu.

    1987-01-01

    Some choresteric liquid crystals can be used as a thermometer because of their color changes with varying temperatures. However, it is impossible to employ human color sensation for precise quantitative evaluation of temperature from their color. Therefore, a new method of liquid crystal thermometry is developed using narrow band optical filters and an image processor to exclude the employment of human color sensation. Relations between filter wavelength and temperature were determined by calibration tests. Two dimensional temperature distributions on a heated plate were successfully measured by the present method. (author)

  4. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    Phelps, Tommy J [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in...

  6. 41 CFR 105-68.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? 105-68.325 Section 105-68.325 Public Contracts...-68.325 What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? If as a...

  7. 9 CFR 130.19 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL).

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL). (a) User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials available from NVSL (excluding FADDL...

  8. 9 CFR 130.16 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at...

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.16 Section 130.16 Animals... USER FEES § 130.16 User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding...

  9. 20 CFR 10.818 - How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her?

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? 10.818 Section 10.818 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? The Regional Director shall...

  10. 20 CFR 30.718 - How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her?

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? 30.718 Section 30.718 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? The Regional Director shall initiate the exclusion process by...

  11. Rhizosphere characteristics of indigenously growing nickel hyperaccumulator and excluder plants on serpentine soil

    Wenzel, W.W.; Bunkowski, M.; Puschenreiter, M.; Horak, O.

    2003-01-01

    Field study reinforces that root exudates may contribute to nickel hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense Halacsy. - The role of rhizosphere processes in metal hyperaccumulation is largely unexplored and a matter of debate, related field data are virtually not available. We conducted a field survey of rhizosphere characteristics beneath the Ni hyperaccumulator Thlaspi goesingense Halacsy and the metal-excluder species Silene vulgaris L. and Rumex acetosella L. growing natively on the same serpentine site. Relative to bulk soil and to the rhizosphere of the excluder species, we found significantly increased DOC and Ni concentrations in water extracts of T. goesingense rhizosphere, whereas exchangeable Ni was depleted due to excessive uptake of Ni. Chemical speciation analysis using the MINTEQA2 software package revealed that enhanced Ni solubility in Thlaspi rhizosphere is driven by the formation of Ni-organic complexes. Moreover, ligand-induced dissolution of Ni-bearing minerals is likely to contribute to enhanced Ni solubility. Increased Mg and Ca concentrations and pH in Thlaspi rhizosphere are consistent with ligand-induced dissolution of orthosilicates such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ). Our field data reinforce the hypothesis that exudation of organic ligands may contribute to enhanced solubility and replenishment of metals in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating species

  12. Surgery for pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding femoral head and neck fractures: resection vs. stabilisation.

    Zacherl, Max; Gruber, Gerald; Glehr, Mathias; Ofner-Kopeinig, Petra; Radl, Roman; Greitbauer, Manfred; Vecsei, Vilmos; Windhager, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Pathological femoral head and neck fractures are commonly treated by arthroplasty. Treatment options for the trochanteric region or below are not clearly defined. The purpose of this retrospective, comparative, double-centre study was to analyse survival and influences on outcome according to the surgical technique used to treat pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding fractures of the femoral head and neck. Fifty-nine patients with 64 fractures were operated up on between 1998 and 2004 in two tertiary referral centres and divided into two groups. One group (S, n = 33) consisted of patients who underwent intramedullary nailing alone, and the other group (R, n = 31) consisted of patients treated by metastatic tissue resection and reconstruction by means of different implants. Median survival was 12.6 months with no difference between groups. Surgical complications were higher in the R group (n = 7) vs. the S group (n = 3), with no statistically significant difference. Patients with surgery-related complications had a higher survival rate (p = 0.049), as did patients with mechanical implant failure (p = 0.01). Survival scoring systems did not correlate with actual survival. Resection of metastases in patients with pathological fractures of the proximal femur, excluding femoral head and neck fractures, has no influence on survival. Patients with long postoperative survival prognosis are at risk of implant-related complications.

  13. Linking probabilities of off-lattice self-avoiding polygons and the effects of excluded volume

    Hirayama, Naomi; Deguchi, Tetsuo; Tsurusaki, Kyoichi

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate numerically the probability of linking, i.e. the probability of a given pair of self-avoiding polygons (SAPs) being entangled and forming a nontrivial link type L. In the simulation we generate pairs of SAPs of N spherical segments of radius r d such that they have no overlaps among the segments and each of the SAPs has the trivial knot type. We evaluate the probability of a self-avoiding pair of SAPs forming a given link type L for various link types with fixed distance R between the centers of mass of the two SAPs. We define normalized distance r by r=R/R g,0 1 where R g,0 1 denotes the square root of the mean square radius of gyration of SAP of the trivial knot 0 1 . We introduce formulae expressing the linking probability as a function of normalized distance r, which gives good fitting curves with respect to χ 2 values. We also investigate the dependence of linking probabilities on the excluded-volume parameter r d and the number of segments, N. Quite interestingly, the graph of linking probability versus normalized distance r shows no N-dependence at a particular value of the excluded volume parameter, r d = 0.2

  14. Computer assisted strain-gauge plethysmography is a practical method of excluding deep venous thrombosis

    Goddard, A.J.P.; Chakraverty, S.; Wright, J.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a computed strain-gauge plethysmograph (CSGP) as a screening tool to exclude above knee deep venous thrombosis (DVT). METHODS: The first phase took place in the Radiology department. One hundred and forty-nine patients had both Doppler ultrasound and CSGP performed. Discordant results were resolved by venography where possible. The second phase took place in an acute medical admissions ward using a modified protocol. A further 173 patients had both studies performed. The results were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Phase 1. The predictive value of a negative CSGP study was 98%. There were two false-negative CSGP results (false-negative rate 5%), including one equivocal CSGP study which had deep venous thrombosis on ultrasound examination. Two patients thought to have thrombus on ultrasound proved not to have acute thrombus on venography. Phase 2. The negative predictive value of CSGP using a modified protocol was 97%. There were two definite and one possible false-negative studies (false-negative rate 4-7%). CONCLUSION: Computer strain-gauge plethysmograph can provide a simple, cheap and effective method of excluding lower limb DVT. However, its use should be rigorously assessed in each hospital in which it is used. Goddard, A.J.P., Chakraverty, S. and Wright, J. (2001)

  15. Assessment of potential soybean cadmium excluder cultivars at different concentrations of Cd in soils.

    Zhi, Yang; He, Kangxin; Sun, Ting; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-09-01

    The selection of cadmium-excluding cultivars has been used to minimize the transfer of cadmium into the human food chain. In this experiment, five Chinese soybean plants were grown in three soils with different concentrations of Cd (0.15, 0.75 and 1.12mg/kg). Variations in uptake, enrichment, and translocation of Cd among these soybean cultivars were studied. The results indicated that the concentration of Cd in seeds that grew at 1.12mg/kg Cd in soils exceeded the permitted maximum levels in soybeans. Therefore, our results indicated that even some soybean cultivars grown on soils with permitted levels of Cd might accumulate higher concentrations of Cd in seeds that are hazardous to human health. The seeds of these five cultivars were further assessed for interactions between Cd and other mineral nutrient elements such as Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn. High Cd concentration in soil was found to inhibit the uptake of Mn. Furthermore, Fe and Zn accumulations were found to be enhanced in the seeds of all of the five soybean cultivars in response to high Cd concentration. Cultivar Tiefeng 31 was found to fit the criteria for a Cd-excluding cultivar under different concentrations of Cd in soils. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Quark-nuclear hybrid star equation of state with excluded volume effects

    Kaltenborn, Mark Alexander Randolph; Bastian, Niels-Uwe Friedrich; Blaschke, David Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    A two-phase description of the quark-nuclear matter hybrid equation of state that takes into account the effect of excluded volume in both the hadronic and the quark-matter phases is introduced. The nuclear phase manifests a reduction of the available volume as density increases, leading to a stiffening of the matter. The quark-matter phase displays a reduction of the effective string tension in the confining density functional from available volume contributions. The nuclear equation of state is based upon the relativistic density-functional model DD2 with excluded volume. The quark-matter equation of state is based upon a quasiparticle model derived from a relativistic density-functional approach and will be discussed in greater detail. The interactions are decomposed into mean scalar and vector components. The scalar interaction is motivated by a string potential between quarks, whereas the vector interaction potential is motivated by higher-order interactions of quarks leading to an increased stiffening at high densities. As an application, we consider matter under compact star constraints of electric neutrality and β equilibrium. We obtain mass-radius relations for hybrid stars that form a third family, disconnected from the purely hadronic star branch, and fulfill the 2 M⊙ constraint.

  17. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  18. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Jameson, Katherine; Taylor, Corbin James; Anderson, Neil; Megson, Peter; Roberg-Clark, Gareth; Sheppard, Kyle; Uher, Tim; Hammer, Donna; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland's Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions, and community colleges, and uses seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, and is now in its third year. GRAD-MAP launched with a three-pronged approach: 1) Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Spring Symposium. This program allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or, worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be); it is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. Our poster describes the key elements of our program, and highlights successes and lessons learned; GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  19. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    Steele, Amy; Smith, Robyn; Wilkins, Ashlee; Jameson, Katie

    2018-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland’s Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and community colleges. We use seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, inclusion-minded graduate student mentors, and faculty versed in the experiences of students at MSIs and the need for changes in the fields of physics and astronomy. Now in its fifth year, GRAD-MAP remains a graduate-student-powered initiative with a three-pronged approach: 1) Fall Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Summer Scholars Program. This coherent set of programming allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be active in research). GRAD-MAP is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make substantial, sustainable efforts toward making the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. We will describe the key elements of our program, highlight successes and lessons learned, and describe future directions for program elements. GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  20. 26 CFR 31.3121(c)-1 - Included and excluded services.

    2010-04-01

    ...) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT... enrolled and is regularly attending classes at a university, to perform domestic service for the club and...

  1. Preoperative CT staging of colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region)

    Acunas, B.; Rozanes, I.; Acunas, G.; Sayi, I.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1990-01-01

    28 Patients with colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region) underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography (CT). The CT had a sensitivity of 60 and 67 per cent for detection of extramural invasion, 75 per cent sensitivity and specificity for lymph node metastases and a sensitivity of 87 per cent and specificity of 95 per cent for liver metastases. Compared with the modified Dukes classification, CT correctly staged 50 per cent of the patients with Dukes A lesions; 40 per cent with Dukes B, 75 per cent with Dukes C and 85 per cent with Dukes D lesions. The data presented in this study showed that CT has limitations in the sensitivity and accuracy of staging local colonic carcinoma. However, the authors recommend its use for patients who are clinically suspected of having extensive disease. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. A socially excluded space: restrictions on access to health care for older women in rural Bangladesh.

    Hossen, Abul; Westhues, Anne

    2010-09-01

    This study was an exploration of the experiences of 17 women, age 60 or more years, from Bangladesh. The women were asked about decision-making processes with respect to their access to health care and whether they perceived that there were differences based on age and sex in the way a household responds to an illness episode. The overall theme that characterized their experiences was "being in a socially excluded space." The themes that explained this perception of social exclusion included gender- and age-based social practices, gender- and class-based economic practices, religious beliefs that restricted the mobility of women, and social constructions of health and illness that led the women to avoid seeking health care. We conclude that the Bangladesh constitutional guarantee that disparities will be eliminated in access to health care between rich and poor, men and women, rural and urban residents, and younger and older citizens has not yet been realized.

  3. Unexpected Complication with the New C3 Excluder: Cause and Treatment

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Bracale, Umberto M.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G., E-mail: Eric.Verhoeven@klinikum-nuernberg.de [Klinikum Nuernberg Sued, Department of Vascular Surgery (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The new C3 Gore Excluder delivery system enables both up/downward and rotational repositioning of the device before complete deployment. This contributes to more precise proximal landing and permits facilitation of the contralateral gate cannulation. During separate deployment, the position of the ipsilateral limb can also be readjusted. We have used the modified C3 delivery system in more than 50 patients, and in most cases, we were able to utilize the repositioning options of the device to achieve optimal fixation and sealing. However, we present a case where our attempt to readjust the position of the ipsilateral limb led to upward migration of the main body with coverage of the left renal artery origin. The latter was secured with a bare stent implantation.

  4. Unexpected Complication with the New C3 Excluder: Cause and Treatment

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Bracale, Umberto M.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.

    2013-01-01

    The new C3 Gore Excluder delivery system enables both up/downward and rotational repositioning of the device before complete deployment. This contributes to more precise proximal landing and permits facilitation of the contralateral gate cannulation. During separate deployment, the position of the ipsilateral limb can also be readjusted. We have used the modified C3 delivery system in more than 50 patients, and in most cases, we were able to utilize the repositioning options of the device to achieve optimal fixation and sealing. However, we present a case where our attempt to readjust the position of the ipsilateral limb led to upward migration of the main body with coverage of the left renal artery origin. The latter was secured with a bare stent implantation.

  5. Excluded and behaving unethically: social exclusion, physiological responses, and unethical behavior.

    Kouchaki, Maryam; Wareham, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Across 2 studies, we investigated the ethical consequences of physiological responses to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants who were socially excluded were more likely to engage in unethical behavior to make money and the level of physiological arousal experienced during exclusion--measured using galvanic skin response--mediated the effects of exclusion on unethical behavior. Likewise, in Study 2, results from a sample of supervisor-subordinate dyads revealed a positive relationship between experience of workplace ostracism and unethical behaviors as rated by the immediate supervisors. This relationship was mediated by employees' reports of experienced physiological arousal. Together, the results of these studies demonstrate that physiological arousal accompanies social exclusion and provides an explanatory mechanism for the increased unethical behavior in both samples. Theoretical implications of these findings for research on ethical behavior and social exclusion in the workplace are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations.

    Luchenski, Serena; Maguire, Nick; Aldridge, Robert W; Hayward, Andrew; Story, Alistair; Perri, Patrick; Withers, James; Clint, Sharon; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Hewett, Nigel

    2017-11-10

    Inclusion health is a service, research, and policy agenda that aims to prevent and redress health and social inequities among the most vulnerable and excluded populations. We did an evidence synthesis of health and social interventions for inclusion health target populations, including people with experiences of homelessness, drug use, imprisonment, and sex work. These populations often have multiple overlapping risk factors and extreme levels of morbidity and mortality. We identified numerous interventions to improve physical and mental health, and substance use; however, evidence is scarce for structural interventions, including housing, employment, and legal support that can prevent exclusion and promote recovery. Dedicated resources and better collaboration with the affected populations are needed to realise the benefits of existing interventions. Research must inform the benefits of early intervention and implementation of policies to address the upstream causes of exclusion, such as adverse childhood experiences and poverty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dyslexic adults can learn from repeated stimulus presentation but have difficulties in excluding external noise.

    Rachel L Beattie

    Full Text Available We examined whether the characteristic impairments of dyslexia are due to a deficit in excluding external noise or a deficit in taking advantage of repeated stimulus presentation. We compared non-impaired adults and adults with poor reading performance on a visual letter detection task that varied two aspects: the presence or absence of background visual noise, and a small or large stimulus set. There was no interaction between group and stimulus set size, indicating that the poor readers took advantage of repeated stimulus presentation as well as the non-impaired readers. The poor readers had higher thresholds than non-impaired readers in the presence of high external noise, but not in the absence of external noise. The results support the hypothesis that an external noise exclusion deficit, not a perceptual anchoring deficit, impairs reading for adults.

  8. PCOS remains a diagnosis of exclusion: a concise review of key endocrinopathies to exclude.

    Kyritsi, Eleni Magdalini; Dimitriadis, George K; Kyrou, Ioannis; Kaltsas, Gregory; Randeva, Harpal S

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenous disorder associated with clinical, endocrine and ultrasonographic features that can also be encountered in a number of other diseases. It has traditionally been suggested that prolactin excess, enzymatic steroidogenic abnormalities and thyroid disorders need to be excluded before a diagnosis of PCOS is made. However, there is paucity of data regarding the prevalence of PCOS phenotype in some of these disorders, whereas other endocrine diseases that exhibit PCOS-like features may elude diagnosis and proper management if not considered. This article reviews the data of currently included entities that exhibit a PCOS phenotype and those that potentially need to be looked for, and attempts to identify specific features that distinguish them from idiopathic PCOS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. North sea: a quarter of total's reserves (excluding the Middle East)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, for the fifth successive year, Total increased its proven reserves of hydrocarbons which reach 4.3 Gboe (+ 6% compared to 1993). Outside the Middle East, the reserves show a development of 9% and reach the threshold of 2 Gboe. In 1994, Total's production of hydrocarbons reached 633,000 boe/d (+ 4%), despite a fall of 3% in oil production in the Middle East. Excluding the Middle East, production was increased to 345,000 boe/d (+ 12%), including 212,000 boe/d for gas (+ 20%). Exploration/production investments were 5.8 GF in 1994 (excluding labour) and the development program for reserves and production for the coming years is based on yearly investments of some 6 GF. Total's production in Europe, essentially in the North Sea, was 154,000 boe/d in 1994 (+ 12%). This zone has potential for significant growth for the group which has undertaken exploration surveys in the Western Shetlands and in Haltenbanken. In the British zone, the Dunbar field and its neighbour Ellon were brought into production in December 1994. In the Norwegian zone, the Froy field, was brought into production last June. In the Lille-Frigg field, whose production started in May, initial reserves are estimated at 6,7 Bcm of gas. Total Norge AS also has interests in the producing fields of Ekofisk, Frigg, East-Frigg, Heimdal, Sleipner East, Veslefrikk, Oseberg, Brage, in those of Sleipner West and Huldra (start-up scheduled for 1997) and in Troll (phase 1) which should be producing in 1996. In the Dutch zone, the K4b and K5a blocks brought into production last November hold reserves estimated at 20 Bcm; their production could reach 2 Bcm/year as from 1995. (authors). 1 tab., 1 photo

  10. Accountability and the pressures to exclude: A cautionary tale from England.

    E. Rustique-Forrester

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have produced conflicting findings about whether test-based rewards and sanctions create incentives that improve student performance, or hurdles that increase dropout and pushout rates from schools. This article reports the findings from a study that examined the impact of England's accountability reforms and investigated whether the confluent pressures associated with increased testing, school ranking systems, and other sanctions contributed to higher levels of student exclusion (expulsion and suspension. The study found that England's high-stakes approach to accountability, combined with the dynamics of school choice and other curriculum and testing pressures led to a narrowing of the curriculum, the marginalization of low-performing students, and a climate perceived by teachers to be less tolerant of students with academic and behavioral difficulties. A comparison of higher- and lower-excluding schools, however, found that these effects were more pronounced in the higher-excluding schools, which lacked strong systems and internal structures for supporting staff communication, teacher collaboration, and students' individual needs. The study offers an international perspective on recent trends toward greater accountability in education, pointing to a complex inter-relationship between the pressures of national policies and the unintended consequences on schools' organizational and teachers' instructional capacities. The study's findings raise particular implications for the United States and show that in the design of accountability systems, attention must be paid to how the pressures from accountability will affect the capacity of schools and teachers to respond to students who are low-performing and struggling academically.

  11. Oral Challenge without Skin Testing Safely Excludes Clinically Significant Delayed-Onset Penicillin Hypersensitivity.

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Rosman, Yossi; Meir-Shafrir, Keren; Stauber, Tali; Lachover-Roth, Idit; Hershko, Alon; Goldberg, Arnon

    Penicillins are the drug family most commonly associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Current guidelines recommend negative skin tests (ST) before re-administering penicillins to patients with previous nonimmediate reactions (NIR). The objective of this study was to examine whether ST are necessary before re-administering penicillin to patients with NIR. Patients with NIR to penicillins starting longer than 1 hour after last dose administration or starting any time after the first treatment day or patients with vague recollection of their reaction underwent penicillin ST. Disregarding ST results, patients were challenged with the relevant penicillins. One-tenth of the therapeutic dose followed by the full dose was administered at 1-hour interval and patients continued taking the full dose for 5 days. A total of 710 patients with alleged BL allergy were evaluated. Patients with a history of immediate reaction (52, 7.3%) or cephalosporin allergy (16, 2.2%) were excluded. Of the remaining 642 patients, 62.3% had negative ST, 5.3% positive ST, and 32.4% equivocal ST. A total of 617 (96.1%) patients were challenged. Immediate reaction was observed in 9 patients (1.5%): 1-positive ST, 7-negative ST, and 1-equivocal ST (P = .7). Late reaction to the first-day challenge occurred in 24 patients (4%). An at-home challenge was continued by 491 patients. Complete 5-day and partial challenges were well tolerated by 417 (85%) and 44 patients (8.9%), respectively, disregarding ST results. Thirty patients (6.1%) developed mild reactions to the home challenge regardless of their ST results. A 5-day oral challenge without preceding ST is safe and sufficient to exclude penicillin allergy after NIR developing during penicillin treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling fibrous biological tissues with a general invariant that excludes compressed fibers

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2018-01-01

    Dispersed collagen fibers in fibrous soft biological tissues have a significant effect on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissues. Constitutive modeling of the detailed structure obtained by using advanced imaging modalities has been investigated extensively in the last decade. In particular, our group has previously proposed a fiber dispersion model based on a generalized structure tensor. However, the fiber tension-compression switch described in that study is unable to exclude compressed fibers within a dispersion and the model requires modification so as to avoid some unphysical effects. In a recent paper we have proposed a method which avoids such problems, but in this present study we introduce an alternative approach by using a new general invariant that only depends on the fibers under tension so that compressed fibers within a dispersion do not contribute to the strain-energy function. We then provide expressions for the associated Cauchy stress and elasticity tensors in a decoupled form. We have also implemented the proposed model in a finite element analysis program and illustrated the implementation with three representative examples: simple tension and compression, simple shear, and unconfined compression on articular cartilage. We have obtained very good agreement with the analytical solutions that are available for the first two examples. The third example shows the efficacy of the fibrous tissue model in a larger scale simulation. For comparison we also provide results for the three examples with the compressed fibers included, and the results are completely different. If the distribution of collagen fibers is such that it is appropriate to exclude compressed fibers then such a model should be adopted.

  13. Synovial Calprotectin: An Inexpensive Biomarker to Exclude a Chronic Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Ploegmakers, Joris J W; Ottink, Karsten; Kampinga, Greetje A; Wagenmakers-Huizenga, Lucie; Jutte, Paul C; Kobold, Anneke C M

    2018-04-01

    To diagnose or exclude a chronic prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be a clinical challenge. Therefore, sensitive and specific biomarkers are needed in the diagnostic work-up. Calprotectin is a protein with antimicrobial properties and is released by activated neutrophils, making it a specific marker for infection. Because of its low costs and ability to obtain a quantitative value as a point of care test, it is an attractive marker to use in clinical practice. In addition, the test is already used in routine care in most hospitals for other indications and therefore easy to implement. Between June 2015 and June 2017 we collected synovial fluid of all consecutive patients who underwent revision surgery of a prosthetic joint because of chronic pain with or without prosthetic loosening. Synovial calprotectin was measured using a lateral flow immunoassay. A PJI was defined by the diagnostic criteria described by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. Fifty-two patients with chronic pain were included. A PJI was diagnosed in 15 of 52 (29%) patients. The median calprotectin in the PJI group was 859 mg/L (interquartile range 86-1707) vs 7 mg/L (interquartile range 3-25) in the control group (P < .001). With a cut-off value of 50 mg/L, synovial calprotectin showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 86.7%, 91.7%, 81.3%, and 94.4%, respectively. Synovial calprotectin is a useful and cheap biomarker to use in the diagnostic work-up of patients with chronic pain, especially to exclude a PJI prior to revision surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 31 CFR 19.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 19.430 Section 19.430 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an agency...

  15. Collaborative, Early-undergraduate-focused REU Programs at Savannah State University have been Vital to Growing a Demographically Diverse Ocean Science Community

    Gilligan, M. R.; Cox, T. M.; Hintz, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Formal support for undergraduates to participate in marine/ocean science research at Savannah State University (SSU), a historically-Black unit of the University System of Georgia, began in 1989 with funding from the National Science Foundation for an unsolicited proposal (OCE-8919102, 34,935). Today SSU, which has offered B.S degrees since 1979 and M.S. degrees since 2001 in Marine Sciences, is making major contributions nationally to demographic diversity in ocean sciences. 33% of Master's degrees in marine/ocean sciences earned by African Americans in the U.S. from 2004-2007 were earned at SSU. 10% of African American Master's and Doctoral students in marine/ ocean sciences in 2007 were either enrolled in the Master's program at SSU or were former SSU students enrolled in Doctoral programs elsewhere. Collaborative REU programs that focus on early (freshman and sophomore) undergraduate students have been a consistent and vital part of that success. In the most recent iteration of our summer REU program we used six of the best practices outlined in the literature to increase success and retention of underrepresented minority students in STEM fields: early intervention, strong mentoring, research experience, career counseling, financial support, workshops and seminars. The early intervention with strong mentoring has proven successful in several metrics: retention in STEM majors (96%), progression to graduate school (50%), and continuation to later research experiences (75%). Research mentors include faculty at staff at SSU, the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary and Georgia Tech-Savannah. Formal collaborative and cooperative agreements, externally-funded grants, and contracts in support of student research training have proven to be critical in providing resources for growth and improvement marine science curricular options at the University. Since 1981 the program has had four formal partnerships and 36 funded grant awards

  16. The Equity Myth: Racialization and Indigeneity at Canadian Universities

    Henry, Frances; Dua, Enakshi; James, Carl E.; Kobayashi, Audrey; Li, Peter; Ramos, Howard; Smith, Malinda S.

    2017-01-01

    The university is often regarded as a bastion of liberal democracy where equity and diversity are promoted and racism does not exist. In reality, the university still excludes many people and is a site of racialization that is subtle, complex, and sophisticated. While some studies do point to the persistence of systemic barriers to equity and…

  17. Universe symmetries

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  18. Effects of excluding goat herbivory on Acacia tortilis woodland around pastoralist settlements in northwest Kenya

    Oba, Gufu

    1998-08-01

    Browsing by goats is considered to cause poor tree regeneration and reduced tree growth around settlements throughout the arid zones of sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated whether excluding goats from Acacia tortilis woodlands increased tree regeneration, current season's shoot growth rates and browse production over a period of 52 months between 1986 and 1990. The study also investigated the effects of climatic variability on tree growth and browse production. Excluding goat herbivory provided no advantage over continuous browsing for juvenile A. tortilis. Trees on the unbrowsed and on browsed transects increased by 22.2 (standard error [SE] ± 0.53) cm·yr -1 and 25.0 (SE ± 0.58) cm·yr -1, respectively. Fewer but longer shoots were produced by trees on the unbrowsed transects, while trees on the browsed transects invested more in shorter shoots. Net total browse production was lower on unbrowsed (1.73 [standard deviation (SD) ± 4.3] t·ha -1·yr -1) than on the browsed (3.03 [SD ± 3.6] t·ha -1 ·yr -1) transects. Biomass production on unbrowsed and browsed transects was closely correlated with rainfall and presumably soil moisture during wet seasons. Relative growth rates (RGR) of current season's shoots in the two treatments did not differ, implying goat herbivory at moderate stocking density (i.e. 13.0 tropical livestock units [TLU]·km -2) stimulated shoot growth. RGR remained positive except on the browsed transects during 1990, a dry year. Goat browsing pressure was moderate. Total biomass loss on unbrowsed transects was 15.5 %·yr -1 compared with 27.7 %·yr -1 on the browsed transects. These findings do not support the notion that goats always destroy young trees around settlements. Goat herbivory at moderate intensity stimulated shoot productivity. However, the results should not be used to generalize all conditions throughout sub-Saharan Africa, let alone the arid zones of northern Kenya. Rather, there is a need to emphasize individual case

  19. Should children with overweight or obesity be excluded from height references?

    Júlíusson, Pétur B; Brannsether, Bente; Kristiansen, Hege; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Bjerknes, Robert; Roelants, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Growth reference charts are usually based on measurements of children free from a medical condition that affects growth. However, samples collected during the past decades often contain a large proportion of overweight or obese children. Because obesity increases linear growth, the question arises to what extent the percentiles curves for length/height are affected by the presence of children with overweight or obesity. Data from two cross-sectional samples of 2-year-old to 18-year-old children were analysed: 12,252 Belgian children, measured in 2002-2004, and 6159 Norwegian children, measured in 2003-2006. The LMS method was used to estimate height-for-age curves with and without children considered overweight or obese according to the International Obesity Task Force thresholds. The prevalence of overweight (including obesity) and obesity was 13.0% and 2.8% in the Belgian and 13.8% and 2.3% in the Norwegian sample. Children were taller when overweight (+0.49 and 0.43 SD, in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively) or obese (+0.73 and 0.72 SD in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively). Effect sizes were smaller in younger and older children, which points to an advanced age of maturation as a possible cause. Excluding overweight and obese children had only a minor impact on the growth curves with largest difference in mean height SD scores -0.09 in the Belgian and -0.12 in the Norwegian sample with a corresponding increase of up to 0.5% and 1.2% in number of children >+2 SD. Current Belgian and Norwegian growth references for length/height were found to be largely unaffected by the current proportion of overweight and obese children. There is, therefore, no need for revised height charts that exclude overweight or obese children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region

    Lin, Muqing; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Wang, Xiaoyong; Su, Min-Ying; Chan, Siwa; Chen, Siping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Methods: Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. Results: The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1.03%. The

  1. Should breast cancer survivors be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes?

    Bucchi Lauro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of breast cancer in developed countries has steadily risen over recent decades. Immediate and long-term health needs of patients, including preventive care and screening services, are receiving increasing attention. A question still unresolved is whether breast cancer survivors should receive mammographic surveillance in the clinical or screening setting and, thus, whether they should be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes. The objective of this article is to discuss the many contradictory aspects of this matter. Discussion Problems with mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors include: weak evidence of a reduction in mortality; lack of evidence in favour of one setting or the other; lack of evidence-based guidelines for the frequency and duration of surveillance; disproportionate emphasis placed on the first few years post-treatment, probably dictated by surgical and oncological priorities; a variety of screening policies, as these women are permanently or temporarily or partially excluded from many - but not all - organised screening programmes worldwide; an even greater disparity in follow-up protocols used in the clinical setting; a paucity of data on compliance to mammographic surveillance in both settings; and a difficulty in coordinating the roles of health care providers. In the future, the use of mammography in breast cancer survivors will be influenced by the inclusion of women aged > 69 years in organised screening programmes and the implementation of multidisciplinary breast units, and will probably be investigated by research activities on individual risk assessment and risk-tailored screening. In the interim, current problems can be partially alleviated with some technical solutions in screening data recording, patient flows, and care coordination. Summary Mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors is situated at the crossroads of numerous

  2. Excluded from social security: rejections of disability pension applications in Norway 1998-2004.

    Galaasen, Anders Mølster; Bruusgaard, Dag; Claussen, Bjørgulf

    2012-03-01

    Admission to disability pension (DP) in Norway, like most other countries, requires a medical condition as the main cause of income reduction. Still, a widespread assumption is that much of the recruitment to the programme is rather due to non-medical, mainly labour market factors. In this article, we study the grey zones between acceptance and rejection of DP applications, in light of the concept of marginalisation. From the total Norwegian population, aged 18-66 in 1998, we included all first-time applications for DP between 1998 and 2004. Logistic regressions of both application and application outcome were then performed, controlling for a range of socioeconomic variables and medical diagnosis. Medical diagnosis had the strongest impact on application outcome, together with the applicant's age. High rejection risk was found among applicants with complex musculoskeletal diagnoses, and also for complex psychiatric diagnoses as compared to well-defined ones. Persons having previously received social assistance more often applied for a DP and more often were rejected. The same is true, though on a lesser scale, for people with a weak affiliation to the labour market. The DP programme in Norway is to a large degree medically oriented, not only judicially but also in practice. Nevertheless, non-medical factors have a bearing on both application rates and application outcome. The control system seems to work in a way that excludes the most marginalised applicants, thus possibly contributing to further marginalisation of already disadvantaged groups.

  3. My life as a pupil: The autobiographical memories of adolescents excluded from school.

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2017-02-01

    Narrative psychology is founded on the premise that substantial insight can be gained into individuals' self-understanding and behaviour by studying the content of their autobiographical memories. This article contributes to this field of inquiry by suggesting that our understanding of adolescents' exclusion from mainstream education can be enhanced by examining their recollections of school using a narrative dialogical approach. In a research project the autobiographical memories of fifteen female and twenty male students, aged 15-16 years, who had been excluded from secondary schools in London, England were collected and analysed. The aim was to examine how in their narrated depictions of the past, the adolescents explained and justified their position and behaviour at different times in their lives at school. The findings highlight how adolescents perceive themselves to have become positioned by the voices of significant others, schools as institutions and themselves at earlier or later stages in their lives. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Strategies to exclude subjects who conceal and fabricate information when enrolling in clinical trials

    Eric G. Devine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials within the US face an increasing challenge with the recruitment of quality candidates. One readily available group of subjects that have high rates of participation in clinical research are subjects who enroll in multiple trials for the purpose of generating income through study payments. Aside from issues of safety and generalizability, evidence suggests that these subjects employ methods of deception to qualify for the strict entrance criteria of some studies, including concealing information and fabricating information. Including these subjects in research poses a significant risk to the integrity of data quality and study designs. Strategies to limit enrollment of subjects whose motivation is generating income have not been systematically addressed in the literature. The present paper is intended to provide investigators with a range of strategies for developing and implementing a study protocol with protections to minimize the enrollment of subjects whose primary motivation for enrolling is to generate income. This multifaceted approach includes recommendations for advertising strategies, payment strategies, telephone screening strategies, and baseline screening strategies. The approach also includes recommendations for attending to inconsistent study data and subject motivation. Implementing these strategies may be more or less important depending upon the vulnerability of the study design to subject deception. Although these strategies may help researchers exclude subjects with a higher rate of deceptive practices, widespread adoption of subject registries would go a long way to decrease the chances of subjects enrolling in multiple studies or more than once in the same study.

  5. Strategies to exclude subjects who conceal and fabricate information when enrolling in clinical trials.

    Devine, Eric G; Peebles, Kristina R; Martini, Valeria

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials within the US face an increasing challenge with the recruitment of quality candidates. One readily available group of subjects that have high rates of participation in clinical research are subjects who enroll in multiple trials for the purpose of generating income through study payments. Aside from issues of safety and generalizability, evidence suggests that these subjects employ methods of deception to qualify for the strict entrance criteria of some studies, including concealing information and fabricating information. Including these subjects in research poses a significant risk to the integrity of data quality and study designs. Strategies to limit enrollment of subjects whose motivation is generating income have not been systematically addressed in the literature. The present paper is intended to provide investigators with a range of strategies for developing and implementing a study protocol with protections to minimize the enrollment of subjects whose primary motivation for enrolling is to generate income. This multifaceted approach includes recommendations for advertising strategies, payment strategies, telephone screening strategies, and baseline screening strategies. The approach also includes recommendations for attending to inconsistent study data and subject motivation. Implementing these strategies may be more or less important depending upon the vulnerability of the study design to subject deception. Although these strategies may help researchers exclude subjects with a higher rate of deceptive practices, widespread adoption of subject registries would go a long way to decrease the chances of subjects enrolling in multiple studies or more than once in the same study.

  6. Using BOX-PCR to exclude a clonal outbreak of melioidosis

    Ward Linda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although melioidosis in endemic regions is usually caused by a diverse range of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains, clonal outbreaks from contaminated potable water have been described. Furthermore B. pseudomallei is classified as a CDC Group B bioterrorism agent. Ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST have been used to identify genetically related B. pseudomallei isolates, but they are time consuming and technically challenging for many laboratories. Methods We have adapted repetitive sequence typing using a BOX A1R primer for typing B. pseudomallei and compared BOX-PCR fingerprinting results on a wide range of well-characterized B. pseudomallei isolates with MLST and PFGE performed on the same isolates. Results BOX-PCR typing compared favourably with MLST and PFGE performed on the same isolates, both discriminating between the majority of multilocus sequence types and showing relatedness between epidemiologically linked isolates from various outbreak clusters. Conclusion Our results suggest that BOX-PCR can be used to exclude a clonal outbreak of melioidosis within 10 hours of receiving the bacterial strains.

  7. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARACHNIDS IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO (EXCLUDING ARANAE AND ACARI

    Hugo Delfin Gonzalez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chelicerata are the second group of arthropods with the highest diversity after insects and they can inhabit almost all types of environments. The most current classification recognizes 11 orders and estimates in the number of species vary from 52,000 to 100,000. We have made an extensive literature review on the diversity of arachnids in the Yucatan Peninsula (YP (excluding spiders and ticks. In Mexico there are 834 known species which represent 6% of the worldwide diversity. In the YP 63 records were found (58 species and 5 genera of arachnids, which represent 6.8% of the Mexican species. According to our research, 28 of the 58 species (48% in the YP were also record in other parts of Mexico, the continent and the world. Undoubtedly, the state of Yucatan is the best represented of the YP. In order to have a better understanding of the diversity of arachnid species is important to promote biological compendiums and sampling programs, which will improve the representation of this group and probably increasing the number of local species.

  8. External Events Excluding Earthquakes in the Design of Nuclear Power Plants. Safety Guide

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on design for the protection of nuclear power plants from the effects of external events (excluding earthquakes), i.e. events that originate either off the site or within the boundaries of the site but from sources that are not directly involved in the operational states of the nuclear power plant units. In addition, it provides recommendations on engineering related matters in order to comply with the safety objectives and requirements established in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It is also applicable to the design and safety assessment of items important to the safety of land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Application of safety criteria to the design; 3. Design basis for external events; 4. Aircraft crash; 5. External fire; 6. Explosions; 7. Asphyxiant and toxic gases; 8. Corrosive and radioactive gases and liquids; 9. Electromagnetic interference; 10. Floods; 11. Extreme winds; 12. Extreme meteorological conditions; 13. Biological phenomena; 14. Volcanism; 15. Collisions of floating bodies with water intakes and UHS components; Annex I: Aircraft crashes; Annex II: Detonation and deflagration; Annex III: Toxicity limits.

  9. A 'simple anterior fish excluder' (SAFE for mitigating penaeid-trawl bycatch.

    Matthew J McHugh

    Full Text Available Various plastic strips and sheets (termed 'simple anterior fish excluders'-SAFEs were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels were compared against a control (no SAFE on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE ('continuous plastic' was subsequently tested (against a control on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity.

  10. Genome-wide association study of handedness excludes simple genetic models

    Armour, J AL; Davison, A; McManus, I C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness is a human behavioural phenotype that appears to be congenital, and is often assumed to be inherited, but for which the developmental origin and underlying causation(s) have been elusive. Models of the genetic basis of variation in handedness have been proposed that fit different features of the observed resemblance between relatives, but none has been decisively tested or a corresponding causative locus identified. In this study, we applied data from well-characterised individuals studied at the London Twin Research Unit. Analysis of genome-wide SNP data from 3940 twins failed to identify any locus associated with handedness at a genome-wide level of significance. The most straightforward interpretation of our analyses is that they exclude the simplest formulations of the ‘right-shift' model of Annett and the ‘dextral/chance' model of McManus, although more complex modifications of those models are still compatible with our observations. For polygenic effects, our study is inadequately powered to reliably detect alleles with effect sizes corresponding to an odds ratio of 1.2, but should have good power to detect effects at an odds ratio of 2 or more. PMID:24065183

  11. Innovation Chinese rice wine brewing technology by bi-acidification to exclude rice soaking process.

    Wei, Xiao Lu; Liu, Shuang Ping; Yu, Jian Shen; Yu, Yong Jian; Zhu, Sheng Hu; Zhou, Zhi Lei; Hu, Jian; Mao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    As a traditional fermented alcoholic beverage of China, Chinese rice wine (CRW) had a long history of more than 5000 years. Rice soaking process was the most crucial step during CRW brewing process, because rice soaking quality directly determined the quality of CRW. However, rice soaking water would cause the eutrophication of water bodies and waste of water. The longer time of rice soaking, the higher the content of biogenic amine, and it would have a huge impact on human health. An innovation brewing technology was carried out to exclude the rice soaking process and the Lactobacillus was added to make up for the total acid. Compared to the traditional brewing technology, the new technology saved water resources and reduced environmental pollution. The concentration of biogenic amine was also decreased by 27.16%, which improving the security of the CRW. The esters increased led to more soft-tasted CRW and less aging time; the quality of CRW would be improved with less alcohol. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Two-year-olds exclude novel objects as potential referents of novel words based on pragmatics.

    Grassmann, Susanne; Stracke, Marén; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Many studies have established that children tend to exclude objects for which they already have a name as potential referents of novel words. In the current study we asked whether this exclusion can be triggered by social-pragmatic context alone without pre-existing words as blockers. Two-year-old children watched an adult looking at a novel object while saying a novel word with excitement. In one condition the adult had not seen the object beforehand, and so the children interpreted the adult's utterance as referring to the gazed-at object. In another condition the adult and child had previously played jointly with the gazed-at object. In this case, children less often assumed that the adult was referring to the object but rather they searched for an alternative referent--presumably because they inferred that the gazed-at object was old news in their common ground with the adult and so not worthy of excited labeling. Since this inference based on exclusion is highly similar to that underlying the Principle of Contrast/Mutual Exclusivity, we propose that this principle is not purely lexical but rather is based on children's understanding of how and why people direct one another's attention to things either with or without language.

  13. A transwell assay that excludes exosomes for assessment of tunneling nanotube-mediated intercellular communication.

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; O'Hare, Patrick; Wong, Phillip; Zhao, Xianda; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya; Lou, Emil

    2017-11-13

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are naturally-occurring filamentous actin-based membranous extensions that form across a wide spectrum of mammalian cell types to facilitate long-range intercellular communication. Valid assays are needed to accurately assess the downstream effects of TNT-mediated transfer of cellular signals in vitro. We recently reported a modified transwell assay system designed to test the effects of intercellular transfer of a therapeutic oncolytic virus, and viral-activated drugs, between cells via TNTs. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate validation of this in vitro approach as a new method for effectively excluding diffusible forms of long- and close-range intercellular transfer of intracytoplasmic cargo, including exosomes/microvesicles and gap junctions in order to isolate TNT-selective cell communication. We designed several steps to effectively reduce or eliminate diffusion and long-range transfer via these extracellular vesicles, and used Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis to quantify exosomes following implementation of these steps. The experimental approach outlined here effectively reduced exosome trafficking by >95%; further use of heparin to block exosome uptake by putative recipient cells further impeded transfer of these extracellular vesicles. This validated assay incorporates several steps that can be taken to quantifiably control for extracellular vesicles in order to perform studies focused on TNT-selective communication.

  14. Tests of a system to exclude roots from buried radioactive waste in a warm, humid climate

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Corey, J.C.; Adriano, D.C.; Decker, O.D.; Griggs, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Vegetation is commonly used to stabilize the ground covering buried waste sites. However, constituents of buried waste can be brought to the surface if the waste is penetrated by plant roots. An ideal waste burial system would allow the use of vegetation to stabilize the soil above the buried waste but would exclude roots from the waste. One system that shows considerable promise is a slow release encapsulation of a root growth inhibitor (Trifluralin). Projected lifetimes of the capsule are in the order of 100 years. The capsule is bonded to a geotextile, which provides an easy means of distributing the capsule evenly over the area to be protected. Vegetation grown in the soil above the barrier has provided good ground cover, although some decrease in growth has been found in some species. Of the species tested the sensitivity to the biobarrier, as measured by the distance root growth stops near the barrier, is bamboo> bahia grass> bermuda grass> soybean. Potential uses for the biobarrier at the Savannah River Site (SRS) include the protection of clay caps over buried, low-level saltstone and protection of gravel drains and clay caps over decommissioned seepage basins. Trails of the biobarrier as part of waste site caps are scheduled to begin during the next 12 months

  15. Identification of cadmium-excluding Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) cultivars and their mechanisms of low cadmium accumulation.

    Li, Xuhui; Zhou, Qixing; Wei, Shuhe; Ren, Wenjie

    2012-06-01

    Screening out cadmium (Cd) excluding cultivars of a crop in agricultural production is an effective way to prohibit Cd entering into food chain. A judging criterion for Cd-excluding cultivars based on food safety was suggested and used in the identification of Cd-excluding welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) cultivars. A pot culture experiment was carried out to screen out Cd-excluding cultivars, of which the results were confirmed by plot experiments. The relevant factors of Cd accumulation in the pseudostem were analyzed and used in the correlation analysis aiming to study the low Cd accumulation mechanisms. The concentration of Cd in the pseudostem of welsh onions was 0.08-0.20, 0.18-0.41, and 0.26-0.61 mg/kg fresh weight (FW) under three treatments (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg), respectively. The significant (p onion cultivars, but Cd contamination in soil had little influence on biomass and the contents of soluble sugar, NO(3)(-)-N, and eight other elements in the tested welsh onion cultivars. Two cultivars were identified as Cd-excluding cultivars, mainly because the accumulation of Cd in their pseudostem was only 0.041 ± 0.003 and 0.046 ± 0.002 mg/kg FW, and 0.054 ± 0.001 and 0.066 ± 0.011 mg/kg FW, when growing in plots with Cd concentration of 0.49 and 0.99 mg/kg, respectively. Ribentiegancongwang and Wuyeqi could be identified as Cd-excluding cultivars. Low bioaccumulation factor of the roots was the main mechanism of Cd-excluding welsh onion cultivars.

  16. Our Universe

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  17. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region

    Lin, Muqing [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China); Chen, Jeon-Hor [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and Department of Radiology, E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Wang, Xiaoyong; Su, Min-Ying, E-mail: msu@uci.edu [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 (United States); Chan, Siwa [Department of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40407, Taiwan (China); Chen, Siping [National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Methods: Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. Results: The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1

  18. Oscillometric casual blood pressure normative standards for Swedish children using ABPM to exclude casual hypertension.

    Krmar, Rafael T; Holtbäck, Ulla; Bergh, Anita; Svensson, Eva; Wühl, Elke

    2015-04-01

    Casual blood pressure (CBP) is considered a reliable proxy for cardiovascular health. Although the auscultatory technique is the reference standard method for measuring CBP, oscillometric devices are increasingly being used in children. We sought to establish oscillometric CBP normative standards for Swedish children. Cross-sectional oscillometric CBP readings were obtained by the Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs 420 monitor and measured according to the International Guidelines' recommendations. Participants with elevated oscillometric CBP levels underwent verification by the auscultatory method. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to exclude casual hypertension. Data on 1,470 (772 males) apparently healthy Swedish schoolchildren aged 6-16 years were analyzed and sex-specific reference charts normalized to age or height were constructed. Systolic and diastolic CBP values were significantly higher with age, height, height standard deviation score (SDS), body mass index (BMI), and BMI SDS. Gender differences for systolic CBP were present starting from age of 15 years and revealed significantly higher values in boys than in girls, whereas for diastolic CBP, the differences were apparent at the age of 12 years, with higher values in girls. Increased BMI and BMI SDS were positively associated with CBP levels. Positive parental history of hypertension turned out to be a risk factor for higher systolic and diastolic CBP across all ages. Our normative standard for CBP can be used for blood pressure screening and control programs in Swedish children. The use of ABPM should be considered to confirm the diagnosis of casual hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cercosporoid fungi (Mycosphaerellaceae) 2. Species on monocots (Acoraceae to Xyridaceae, excluding Poaceae).

    Braun, Uwe; Crous, Pedro W; Nakashima, Chiharu

    2014-12-01

    Cercosporoid fungi (formerly Cercospora s. lat.) represent one of the largest groups of hyphomycetes belonging to the Mycosphaerellaceae (Ascomycota). They include asexual morphs, asexual holomorphs, or species with mycosphaerella-like sexual morphs. Most of them are leaf-spotting plant pathogens with special phytopathological relevance. In the first part of a new monographic work, cercosporoid hyphomycetes occurring on other fungi (fungicolous species), on ferns (pteridophytes) and gymnosperms were treated. This second part deals with cercosporoid fungi on monocots (Liliopsida; Equisetopsida, Magnoliidae, Lilianae), which covers species occurring on host plants belonging to families arranged in alphabetical order from Acoraceae to Xyridaceae, excluding Poaceae (cereals and grasses) which requires a separate treatment. The species are described and illustrated in alphabetical order under the particular cercosporoid genera, supplemented by keys to the species concerned. A detailed introduction, a survey of currently recognised cercosporoid genera, a key to the genera concerned, and a discussion of taxonomically relevant characters were published in the first part of this series. Neopseudocercospora, an additional recently introduced cercosporoid genus, is briefly discussed. The following taxonomic novelties are introduced: Cercospora alpiniigena sp. nov., C. neomaricae sp. nov., Corynespora palmicola comb. nov., Exosporium miyakei comb. nov., E. petersii comb. nov., Neopseudocercospora zambiensis comb. nov., Passalora caladiicola comb. nov., P. streptopi comb. nov., P. togashiana comb. nov., P. tranzschelii var. chinensis var. nov., Pseudocercospora beaucarneae comb. nov., P. constrictoflexuosa comb. et stat. nov., P. curcumicola sp. nov., P. dispori comb. nov., P. smilacicola sp. nov., P. urariigena nom. nov., Zasmidium agavicola comb. nov., Z. cercestidis-afzelii comb. nov., Z. citri-griseum comb. nov., Z. cyrtopodii comb. nov., Z. gahnae comb. nov., Z. indicum

  20. Beyond the sticker price: including and excluding time in comparing food prices.

    Yang, Yanliang; Davis, George C; Muth, Mary K

    2015-07-01

    An ongoing debate in the literature is how to measure the price of food. Most analyses have not considered the value of time in measuring the price of food. Whether or not the value of time is included in measuring the price of a food may have important implications for classifying foods based on their relative cost. The purpose of this article is to compare prices that exclude time (time-exclusive price) with prices that include time (time-inclusive price) for 2 types of home foods: home foods using basic ingredients (home recipes) vs. home foods using more processed ingredients (processed recipes). The time-inclusive and time-exclusive prices are compared to determine whether the time-exclusive prices in isolation may mislead in drawing inferences regarding the relative prices of foods. We calculated the time-exclusive price and time-inclusive price of 100 home recipes and 143 processed recipes and then categorized them into 5 standard food groups: grains, proteins, vegetables, fruit, and dairy. We then examined the relation between the time-exclusive prices and the time-inclusive prices and dietary recommendations. For any food group, the processed food time-inclusive price was always less than the home recipe time-inclusive price, even if the processed food's time-exclusive price was more expensive. Time-inclusive prices for home recipes were especially higher for the more time-intensive food groups, such as grains, vegetables, and fruit, which are generally underconsumed relative to the guidelines. Focusing only on the sticker price of a food and ignoring the time cost may lead to different conclusions about relative prices and policy recommendations than when the time cost is included. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Olfactory Disorder Pattern In Patients With Neurological Diseases Excluding Psychiatric And Traumatic Aetiologies.

    de Haro-Licer, Josep; González-Fernández, Adela; Planas-Comes, Albert; González-Ares, Josep Antón

    2018-03-23

    The most common cause of olfactory ENT disorders are colds and flu, chronic sinusitis, allergies and traumatic brain injury. Rarer aetiologies include certain neurological, psychiatric and metabolic injuries. The aim of this paper was to check the sort of olfactory disorders found in people who have suffered a brain injury, excluding: cranial traumas, psychiatric diseases, epilepsy, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, and synaesthesia. A descriptive study based on 61 patients with diagnoses of various neurological injuries, which were tested by BAST-24 olfactometer. The results were compared with those of a control group (n= 120). The results show major impairment in these patients' olfactory sense. The neurological injury patients were able to detect from 60-77% of the odours, while the control group were able to detect between 98-100%. The neurological patients were able, at best, to identify, 11-32% of the odours correctly, while the control group were able to correctly detect between 59 -75%. The differences between odour detection and correct identification were statistically significant (p<.05). We concluded: a) Neurological injury, not caused by traumatic brain injury, psychiatric disorders or ENT diseases, ranged from 68-89% of the olfactory failures. b) We must bear in mind that these sorts of injuries can cause olfactory disorders. c) ENT and Neurologists should collaborate in the treatment of these disorders. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Why are people with mental illness excluded from the rational suicide debate?

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The topic of rational suicide is often approached with some trepidation by mental health professionals. Suicide prevention strategies are more likely to be seen as the domain of psychiatry and a wealth of psychiatric literature is devoted to identifying and managing suicide risk. Whether or not suicide can be deemed permissible is ostensibly linked to discussions of autonomy and mental capacity, and UK legislation directs that a patient's wishes must be respected with regard to treatment refusal where decisional capacity is intact. In the context of the care and treatment of those with physical disorders, extreme and untreatable physical suffering is likely to be accepted as rational grounds for suicide, where the person possesses cognitive coherence and an ability to realistically appreciate the consequences of his or her actions. In the case of those with serious mental disorder, the grounds for accepting that suicide is rational are however less clear-cut. Serious mental illness is typically conceived of as a coercive pressure which prevents rational deliberation and as such, the suicides of those with serious mental illness are considered to be substantially non-voluntary acts arising from constitutive irrationality. Therefore, where an appropriate clinician judges that a person with serious mental disorder is non-autonomous, suicide prevention is likely to be thought legally and morally justified. There are arguably, two questionable assumptions in the position that psychiatry adopts: Firstly, that psychogenic pain is in some way less real than physical pain and secondly, that mental illness invariably means that a desire to die is irrational and inauthentic. If it can be shown that some people with serious mental illness can be rational with regard to suicide and that psychological pain is of equal significance as physical suffering, then it may be possible to conclude that some persons with serious mental illness should not by definition be excluded from the

  3. Patients with computed tomography-proven acute diverticulitis require follow-up to exclude colorectal cancer

    Shafquat Zaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Traditionally, patients with acute diverticulitis undergo follow-up endoscopy to exclude colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its usefulness has been debated in this era of high-resolution computed tomography (CT diagnosis. We assessed the frequency and outcome of endoscopic follow-up for patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, according to the confidence in the CT diagnosis.Methods: Records of patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis between October 2007 and March 2014 at Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust were retrieved. The National Cancer Registry confirmed the cases of CRC. Endoscopy quality indicators were compared between these patients and other patients undergoing the same endoscopic examination over the same period.Results: We identified 235 patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, of which, 187 were managed conservatively. The CT report was confident of the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in 75% cases. Five of the 235 patients were subsequently diagnosed with CRC (2.1%. Three cases of CRC were detected in the 187 patients managed conservatively (1.6%. Forty-eight percent of the conservatively managed patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; one case of CRC was identified. Endoscopies were often incomplete and caused more discomfort for patients with diverticulitis compared with controls.Conclusions: CRC was diagnosed in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis at a higher rate than in screened asymptomatic populations, necessitating follow-up. CT reports contained statements regarding diagnostic uncertainty in 25% cases, associated with an increased risk of CRC. Follow-up endoscopy in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis is associated with increased discomfort and high rates of incompletion. The use of other follow-up modalities should be considered.

  4. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Limb muscle sound speed estimation by ultrasound computed tomography excluding receivers in bone shadow

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Takeuchi, Hideki; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Sarcopenia is the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle ability associated with aging. One reason is the increasing of adipose ratio of muscle, which can be estimated by the speed of sound (SOS), since SOSs of muscle and adipose are different (about 7%). For SOS imaging, the conventional bent-ray method iteratively finds ray paths and corrects SOS along them by travel-time. However, the iteration is difficult to converge for soft tissue with bone inside, because of large speed variation. In this study, the bent-ray method is modified to produce SOS images for limb muscle with bone inside. The modified method includes three steps. First, travel-time is picked up by a proposed Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) with energy term (AICE) method. The energy term is employed for detecting and abandoning the transmissive wave through bone (low energy wave). It results in failed reconstruction for bone, but makes iteration convergence and gives correct SOS for skeletal muscle. Second, ray paths are traced using Fermat's principle. Finally, simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) is employed to correct SOS along ray paths, but excluding paths with low energy wave which may pass through bone. The simulation evaluation was implemented by k-wave toolbox using a model of upper arm. As the result, SOS of muscle was 1572.0+/-7.3 m/s, closing to 1567.0 m/s in the model. For vivo evaluation, a ring transducer prototype was employed to scan the cross sections of lower arm and leg of a healthy volunteer. And the skeletal muscle SOSs were 1564.0+/-14.8 m/s and 1564.1±18.0 m/s, respectively.

  6. National review of use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as respiratory support in thoracic surgery excluding lung transplantation.

    Rinieri, Philippe; Peillon, Christophe; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Veber, Benoît; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Melki, Jean; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support is increasingly used in intensive care units (ICU), but rarely during thoracic surgical procedures outside the transplantation setting. ECMO can be an alternative to cardiopulmonary bypass for major trachea-bronchial surgery and single-lung procedures without in-field ventilation. Our aim was to evaluate the intraoperative use of ECMO as respiratory support in thoracic surgery: benefits, indications and complications. This was a multicentre retrospective study (questionnaire) of use of ECMO as respiratory support during the thoracic surgical procedure. Lung transplantation and lung resection for tumour invading the great vessels and/or the left atrium were excluded, because they concern respiratory and circulatory support. From March 2009 to September 2012, 17 of the 34 centres in France applied ECMO within veno-venous (VV) (n=20) or veno-arterial (VA) (n=16) indications in 36 patients. Ten VA ECMO were performed with peripheral cannulation and 6 with central cannulation; all VV ECMO were achieved through peripheral cannulation. Group 1 (total respiratory support) was composed of 28 patients without mechanical ventilation, involving 23 tracheo-bronchial and 5 single-lung procedures. Group 2 (partial respiratory support) was made up of 5 patients with respiratory insufficiency. Group 3 was made up of 3 patients who underwent thoracic surgery in a setting of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with preoperative ECMO. Mortality at 30 days in Groups 1, 2 and 3 was 7, 40 and 67%, respectively (P<0.05). In Group 1, ECMO was weaned intraoperatively or within 24 h in 75% of patients. In Group 2, ECMO was weaned in ICU over several days. In Group 1, 2 patients with VA support were converted to VV support for chronic respiratory indications. Bleeding was the major complication with 17% of patients requiring return to theatre for haemostasis. There were two cannulation-related complications (6%). VV or

  7. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  8. Intelligent Universe

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  9. USAID University

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  10. Runaway universe

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  11. Rhodes University

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  12. Undulant Universe

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  13. Excluded from school: Autistic students’ experiences of school exclusion and subsequent re-integration into school

    Janina Brede

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims All children have the right to receive an education and to be included in school. Yet young people on the autism spectrum, who are already vulnerable to poor health and social outcomes, are at increased risk of school exclusion. The current study sought to understand the key factors surrounding the school exclusion experiences of a group of autistic students with particularly complex needs, and their subsequent re-integration into education. Method We interviewed nine intellectually able students (eight male, one female; M age = 13.3 years, all with a diagnosis of autism and the majority with a history of demand avoidant behaviour. We also interviewed their parents and teaching staff about the students’ past and current school experiences. All students were currently being educated within an ‘Inclusive Learning Hub’, specially designed to re-integrate excluded, autistic students back into school, which was situated within a larger autism special school. Results Young people and their parents gave overwhelmingly negative accounts of the students’ previous school experiences. Children’s perceived unmet needs, as well as inappropriate approaches by previous school staff in dealing with children’s difficulties, were felt to cause decline in children’s mental health and behaviour and, ultimately, led to their exclusion from school. Four key factors for successful reintegration into school were identified, including (i making substantial adjustments to the physical environment, (ii promoting strong staff–student relationships, (iii understanding students’ specific needs, and (iv targeted efforts towards improving students’ wellbeing. Conclusion The culmination – and escalation – of challenges students experienced in the students’ previous placements could suggest that the educational journey to exclusion from school is an inevitable consequence for at least some autistic children, including those with

  14. Plasma universe

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  15. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    2010-04-01

    ... products to all other buyers. (4) A “retail food establishment” includes grocery stores, convenience stores... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart? 1.327 Section 1.327 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. 7 CFR 3017.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-01-01

    ... knowingly do business with an excluded person, we may disallow costs, annul or terminate the transaction... in a covered transaction? 3017.325 Section 3017.325 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Responsibilities of Participants Regarding Transactions § 3017.325...

  17. 2 CFR 180.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-01-01

    ... person, the Federal agency responsible for your transaction may disallow costs, annul or terminate the... excluded person in a covered transaction? 180.325 Section 180.325 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF... Regarding Transactions Doing Business With Other Persons § 180.325 What happens if I do business with an...

  18. 29 CFR 98.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-07-01

    ... transaction? If as a participant you knowingly do business with an excluded person, we may disallow costs... covered transaction? 98.325 Section 98.325 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Responsibilities of Participants Regarding Transactions Doing Business...

  19. 29 CFR 1471.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-07-01

    ... business with an excluded person, we may disallow costs, annul or terminate the transaction, issue a stop... covered transaction? 1471.325 Section 1471.325 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... of Participants Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 1471.325 What happens if I...

  20. 21 CFR 1404.135 - May the Office of National Drug Control Policy exclude a person who is not currently...

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the Office of National Drug Control Policy exclude a person who is not currently participating in a nonprocurement transaction? 1404.135 Section 1404.135 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1404.135 May the...

  1. 5 CFR 919.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What happens if I do business with an... Persons § 919.325 What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? If as a... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND...

  2. 31 CFR 19.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? 19.325 Section 19.325 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Participants Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 19.325 What happens if I do business...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 5 to Part 223 - Net Diagram for the Excluder Panel of the Parker Soft TED

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net Diagram for the Excluder Panel of the Parker Soft TED 5 Figure 5 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  4. 9 CFR 130.18 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding...

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding FADDL). 130.18 Section 130.18 Animals and... § 130.18 User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site...

  5. 9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... FEES USER FEES § 130.17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed at the...

  6. 29 CFR 1471.135 - May the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service exclude a person who is not currently...

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service exclude....135 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1471.135 May the Federal Mediation and...

  7. Baby universes

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  8. CP violations in the Universe

    Auriemma, Giulio

    2003-12-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter that is evident in our part of the Universe is one of the open questions in cosmology, because the CPT symmetry between matter and antimatter seems to be absolutely conserved at microscopic level. We repeat here the classical proofs which exclude the viability of a Universe baryon symmetric on the average, or the observed asymmetry as an initial conditions. The current understanding is that the asymmetry should have been dynamically generated before nucleosynthesis, by B, C, and CP violating processes, acting out of thermodynamical equilibrium, as suggested by Sakharov in the 70's. The physical realizations of these conditions would be possible, in principle, also in the framework of the Standard Model of elementary particles, but the present limits on the mass of the higgs particle exclude this possibility. Finally we present the model of baryogenesis through leptogenesis, which is allowed by a minimal extension of the Standard Model, which has the appeal of being testable in future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  9. Clarifying the use of aggregated exposures in multilevel models: self-included vs. self-excluded measures.

    Etsuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available Multilevel analyses are ideally suited to assess the effects of ecological (higher level and individual (lower level exposure variables simultaneously. In applying such analyses to measures of ecologies in epidemiological studies, individual variables are usually aggregated into the higher level unit. Typically, the aggregated measure includes responses of every individual belonging to that group (i.e. it constitutes a self-included measure. More recently, researchers have developed an aggregate measure which excludes the response of the individual to whom the aggregate measure is linked (i.e. a self-excluded measure. In this study, we clarify the substantive and technical properties of these two measures when they are used as exposures in multilevel models.Although the differences between the two aggregated measures are mathematically subtle, distinguishing between them is important in terms of the specific scientific questions to be addressed. We then show how these measures can be used in two distinct types of multilevel models-self-included model and self-excluded model-and interpret the parameters in each model by imposing hypothetical interventions. The concept is tested on empirical data of workplace social capital and employees' systolic blood pressure.Researchers assume group-level interventions when using a self-included model, and individual-level interventions when using a self-excluded model. Analytical re-parameterizations of these two models highlight their differences in parameter interpretation. Cluster-mean centered self-included models enable researchers to decompose the collective effect into its within- and between-group components. The benefit of cluster-mean centering procedure is further discussed in terms of hypothetical interventions.When investigating the potential roles of aggregated variables, researchers should carefully explore which type of model-self-included or self-excluded-is suitable for a given situation

  10. Stiegler's University

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  11. Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome.

    Greally, John M

    2002-01-08

    To test whether regions undergoing genomic imprinting have unique genomic characteristics, imprinted and nonimprinted human loci were compared for nucleotide and retroelement composition. Maternally and paternally expressed subgroups of imprinted genes were found to differ in terms of guanine and cytosine, CpG, and retroelement content, indicating a segregation into distinct genomic compartments. Imprinted regions have been normally permissive to L1 long interspersed transposable element retroposition during mammalian evolution but universally and significantly lack short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs). The primate-specific Alu SINEs, as well as the more ancient mammalian-wide interspersed repeat SINEs, are found at significantly low densities in imprinted regions. The latter paleogenomic signature indicates that the sequence characteristics of currently imprinted regions existed before the mammalian radiation. Transitions from imprinted to nonimprinted genomic regions in cis are characterized by a sharp inflection in SINE content, demonstrating that this genomic characteristic can help predict the presence and extent of regions undergoing imprinting. During primate evolution, SINE accumulation in imprinted regions occurred at a decreased rate compared with control loci. The constraint on SINE accumulation in imprinted regions may be mediated by an active selection process. This selection could be because of SINEs attracting and spreading methylation, as has been found at other loci. Methylation-induced silencing could lead to deleterious consequences at imprinted loci, where inactivation of one allele is already established, and expression is often essential for embryonic growth and survival.

  12. Excluding parental grief: A critical discourse analysis of bereavement accommodation in Canadian labour standards.

    Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Kennedy, Kimberly; Moll, Sandra; Pineda, Carolina; Mitchell, Lisa M; Stephenson, Peter H; Cadell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Grief following child loss is profoundly destabilizing with serious long-term repercussions for bereaved parents. Employed parents may need time away from work to deal with this loss. The purpose of this study was to reflect upon the ways labour policies and practices respond to parental bereavement. Critical discourse analysis was used to examine labour policies and practices related to employment leave for bereaved parents in Canada. Results were compared to international labour standards. Universally, employment policies provide only for the practical issues of bereavement. Commonly, leave is three days, unpaid, and meant to enable ceremonial obligations. Policies do not acknowledge the long-term suffering caused by grief or the variable intensity of different kinds of loss. Managerial, moral, normative and neoliberal values embedded in these policies efface the intensely personal experience of grief, thereby leaving employees at risk for serious health and workplace safety issues. Bereavement leave currently understands grief as a generic, time-limited state with instrumental tasks and ceremonial obligations. In contrast, research characterizes responses to child loss as intense, highly personal experiences for which healing and recovery can take years. This disconnect is especially problematic when viewed through the lens of employee wellbeing, reintegration and workplace productivity.

  13. CT findings of the mediastinal tumors -excluding mediastinal granuloma and primary carcinoma-

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Im, Chung Kie; Han, Man Chung

    1985-01-01

    Computerized Tomography can make accurate diagnosis in most of the mediastinal tumors and cysts by assessing their location, shape and internal architecture. Authors analysed and present CT findings of 89 surgically proven mediastinal tumors and cysts that were studied and treated in Seoul National University Hospital during recent 5 years. The results are as follows; 1. The most common tumor was teratoma (25 cases). Neurogenic tumor (20 cases), thymic tumor or cyst (16 cases), lymphoma (7 cases), bronchogenic cyst (6 cases), intrathoracic goiter (6 cases), pericardial cyst (3 cases) and cystic hygroma (2 cases) were next in order of frequency. 2. The most constant findings of teratoma was thick walled cystic area (100%), while pathognomonic fat and calcified density were seen only in 52% and 48% of cases, respectively. 22 cases were located in anterior mediastinum, 2 cases were in posterior mediastinum and a case is in middle mediastinum. 3. There were 20 cases of neurogenic tumor consisting of 6 neurilemmomas, 7 ganglioneuromas, 4 neurofibromas, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 1 neuroblastoma and 1 malignant schwannoma. Most of them were located in posterior mediastinum with exception of 2 neurilemmomas arising from left vagus nerve and left recurrent laryngeal nerve in middle mediastinum. Cystic change was seen in 2 cases of neurilemmoma and in a case of ganglioneuroma. Calcification was seen in 3 cases, of neuroblastoma, a neurilemmoma, and a ganglioneuroma. 4. There were 11 cases of thymoma showing homogeneous solid mass with speckeld calcification in 4 cases and irregular cystic change in 3 cases. 2 cases were invasive thymoma and myasthenia gravis was present in 4 cases. A cases of thymolipoma and a case of thymic cyst were included. 5. Lymphoma (2 Hodgkin's and 4 non-Hodgkin's) appeared as lobulated, matted mass in anterior mediastinum especially in prevascular area expanding bilaterally

  14. CT findings of the mediastinal tumors -excluding mediastinal granuloma and primary carcinoma-

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Im, Chung Kie; Han, Man Chung [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-06-15

    Computerized Tomography can make accurate diagnosis in most of the mediastinal tumors and cysts by assessing their location, shape and internal architecture. Authors analysed and present CT findings of 89 surgically proven mediastinal tumors and cysts that were studied and treated in Seoul National University Hospital during recent 5 years. The results are as follows; 1. The most common tumor was teratoma (25 cases). Neurogenic tumor (20 cases), thymic tumor or cyst (16 cases), lymphoma (7 cases), bronchogenic cyst (6 cases), intrathoracic goiter (6 cases), pericardial cyst (3 cases) and cystic hygroma (2 cases) were next in order of frequency. 2. The most constant findings of teratoma was thick walled cystic area (100%), while pathognomonic fat and calcified density were seen only in 52% and 48% of cases, respectively. 22 cases were located in anterior mediastinum, 2 cases were in posterior mediastinum and a case is in middle mediastinum. 3. There were 20 cases of neurogenic tumor consisting of 6 neurilemmomas, 7 ganglioneuromas, 4 neurofibromas, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 1 neuroblastoma and 1 malignant schwannoma. Most of them were located in posterior mediastinum with exception of 2 neurilemmomas arising from left vagus nerve and left recurrent laryngeal nerve in middle mediastinum. Cystic change was seen in 2 cases of neurilemmoma and in a case of ganglioneuroma. Calcification was seen in 3 cases, of neuroblastoma, a neurilemmoma, and a ganglioneuroma. 4. There were 11 cases of thymoma showing homogeneous solid mass with speckeld calcification in 4 cases and irregular cystic change in 3 cases. 2 cases were invasive thymoma and myasthenia gravis was present in 4 cases. A cases of thymolipoma and a case of thymic cyst were included. 5. Lymphoma (2 Hodgkin's and 4 non-Hodgkin's) appeared as lobulated, matted mass in anterior mediastinum especially in prevascular area expanding bilaterally.

  15. University writing

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  16. Universe unfolding

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  17. University physics

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  18. Human universe

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  19. Size, flexibility, and scattering functions of semiflexible polyelectrolytes with excluded volume effects: Monte Carlo simulations and neutron scattering experiments

    Cannavacciuolo, L.; Sommer, C.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    outlined in the Odijk-Skolnick-Fixman theory, in which the behavior of charged polymers is described only in terms of increasing local rigidity and excluded volume effects. Moreover, the Monte Carlo data are found to be in very good agreement with experimental scattering measurements with equilibrium......We present a systematic Monte Carlo study of the scattering function S(q) of semiflexible polyelectrolytes at infinite dilution, in solutions with different concentrations of added salt. In the spirit of a theoretical description of polyelectrolytes in terms of the equivalent parameters, namely......, persistence length and excluded volume interactions, we used a modified wormlike chain model, in which the monomers are represented by charged hard spheres placed at distance a. The electrostatic interactions are approximated by a Debye-Huckel potential. We show that the scattering function is quantitatively...

  20. Exploratory Inquiry: Fundraising at Historically Black Colleges and Universities to Reduce Resource Dependence

    Mills Campbell, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Resource dependence has been evidenced among private HBCUs that obtain as much as 90% of operating revenue from tuition and fees. Without alternative funding strategies in place, small declines in enrollment can lead to a major budget crisis. The basic premise of this exploratory inquiry was that fundraising represents an opportunity that has been…

  1. 75 FR 56459 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2010

    2010-09-15

    ... (HBCUs) have been valued resources for our country since their inception before the Civil War... achieve our goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020. This year, I... tenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United...

  2. Estimating the common trend rate of inflation for consumer prices and consumer prices excluding food and energy prices

    Michael T. Kiley

    2008-01-01

    I examine the common trend in inflation for consumer prices and consumer prices excluding prices of food and energy. Both the personal consumption expenditure (PCE) indexes and the consumer price indexes (CPI) are examined. The statistical model employed is a bivariate integrated moving average process; this model extends a univariate model that fits the data on inflation very well. The bivariate model forecasts as well as the univariate models. The results suggest that the relationship betwe...

  3. If patient-reported outcome measures are considered key health-care quality indicators, who is excluded from participation?

    Kroll, Thilo; Wyke, Sally; Jahagirdar, Deepa; Ritchie, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures have received increasing attention with regard to ensuring quality improvement across the health service. However, there is a risk that people with disabilities and low literacy are systematically excluded from the development of these measures as well as their application in clinical practice. This editorial highlights some of these risks and the potential consequences of exclusion for these groups. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Constraining the supersaturation density equation of state from core-collapse supernova simulations? Excluded volume extension of the baryons

    Fischer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article the role of the supersaturation density equation of state (EOS) is explored in simulations of failed core-collapse supernova explosions. Therefore the nuclear EOS is extended via a one-parameter excluded-volume description for baryons, taking into account their finite and increasing volume with increasing density in excess of saturation density. Parameters are selected such that the resulting supernova EOS represent extreme cases, with high pressure variations at supersaturation density which feature extreme stiff and soft EOS variants of the reference case, i.e. without excluded-volume corrections. Unlike in the interior of neutron stars with central densities in excess of several times saturation density, central densities of core-collapse supernovae reach only slightly above saturation density. Hence, the impact of the supersaturation density EOS on the supernova dynamics as well as the neutrino signal is found to be negligible. It is mainly determined from the low- and intermediate-density domain, which is left unmodified within this generalized excluded volume approach. (orig.)

  5. Sustainable Universities

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    Declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education (SHE) can be viewed as a piece of international regulation. Over the past 30 years research at universities has produced convincing data to warn about deterioration of the environment, resource scarcity and the need for sustainability. This in turn....... Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...

  6. Open University

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  7. 2008 update of standards, options: recommendations for management of patients with salivary gland malignant tumours (excluding lymphoma, sarcoma and melanoma), summary report

    Bensadoun, R.J.; Dassonville, O.; Rousmans, S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: An update of the S.O.R.-C.P.G. for management of patients with salivary gland malignant tumours has been initiated by the French National Federation of Cancer Centres (F.N.C.L.C.C.) in collaboration with French league against cancer, specialists from university or general hospitals and private clinics, and with the French National Cancer Institute. This work performed is based on the methodology developed and used in the 'Standards, Options: Recommendations' program (S.O.R.). Objectives. To update the S.O.R. guideline for the management of patients with salivary gland malignant tumors (excluding lymphoma, sarcoma and melanoma) previously validated in 1997 and 2003. Method: The guideline development process is based on literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts. The methodological approach combines systematic review with expert judgement. Recommendations take into account the effectiveness and toxicity of the different therapeutic alternatives and the levels of evidence. Following their development and prior to publication, S.O.R.-guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. Results: This paper is a summary version of the full clinical practice guideline presenting the updated recommendations. Recommendations on radiotherapy have been updated to underline new Options on more and more accessible emerging techniques including 'intensity-modulated radiotherapy', '3-D conformational radiotherapy', 'Cyber-knife', 'Tomotherapy', 'Proton therapy' and 'particle accelerators producing carbon ions' (e.g. last generation hadron therapy). Therapeutical modalities have also been specified. (authors)

  8. Discourse versus practice: are traditional practices and beliefs in pregnancy and childbirth included or excluded in the Ecuadorian health care system?

    Gallegos, Carlos Andres; Waters, William F; Kuhlmann, Anne Sebert

    2017-03-01

    Traditional beliefs, knowledge and practices are formally integrated into the Ecuadorian health system. We sought to understand whether they are integrated in practice. Qualitative data were collected in two rural parishes in the central highlands of Ecuador through four focus group discussions (30 participants), eight key informant interviews, three participatory exercises (24 participants), structured observations of health facilities and analysis of official documents. We found different levels of integration, coexistence, tolerance, and intolerance of traditional health beliefs and practices in health facilities. One parish has undergone dramatic social and cultural transformation, and the role of traditional birth attendants is limited. In the other parish, traditional indigenous norms and values persist, and traditional birth attendants are sought during pregnancy and childbirth. The degree to which traditional birth attendants, indigenous women and their families are included or excluded from public health services depends largely on decisions taken by local health professionals. Formal policies in Ecuador stipulate that health care should be intercultural, but the role of traditional birth attendants is not necessarily incorporated in practice. The integration of culturally-informed beliefs and practices is critical for providing appropriate health services to members of vulnerable populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 9 March 2009 COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Are We Descended From Heavy Neutrinos? Prof. Boris Kayser / Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Center, Geneva, Illinois, USA) Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe. The discovery that they have nonzero masses has raised a number of very interesting questions about them, and about their connections to other areas of physics and to cosmology. After briefly reviewing what has been learned about the neutrinos so far, we will identify the major open questions, explain why they are interesting, and discuss ideas and plans for answering them through future experiments. We will highlight a particularly intriguing question: Are neutrinos the key to understanding why the universe contains matter but almost no antimatter, making it s...

  10. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  11. Erasmus Language Students in a British University: A Case Study

    Bogain, Ariane

    2012-01-01

    Students' assessment of their academic experience is actively sought by higher education institutions, as evidenced in the UK's National Student Survey, introduced in 2005. Erasmus students, despite their growing numbers, tend to be excluded from these satisfaction surveys, even though they, too, are primary customers of a university. This study…

  12. The Jewish Ethical Tradition in the Modern University.

    Novak, David

    1998-01-01

    Proposes an interpretation of pluralism and multiculturalism that separates these concepts from the notions of relativism. Asserts that the inclusion of formerly excluded cultural traditions such as Judaism in North American universities has been a give-and-take enterprise. (SLD)

  13. Geneva University

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  14. Geneva University

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  15. Geneva University

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 28 April 2008 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravity : an Emergent Perspective by Prof. Thanu Padmanabhan, Pune University Dean, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India I will motivate and describe a novel perspective in which gravity arises as an emergent phenomenon, somewhat like elasticity. This perspective throws light on several issues which are somewhat of a mystery in the conventional approach. Moreover it provides new insights on the dark energy problem. In fact, I will show that it is necessary to have such an alternative perspective in order to solve the cosmological constant problem.Information: http://theory.physics.unige.ch/~fiteo/seminars/COL/collist.html

  16. Universal Alienation

    David Harvey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a debate between David Harvey, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri. It takes Marx’s bicentenary as occasion for an update of his concept of alienation. The paper asks: how are we to interpret universal alienation and from whence does it come? Marx radically reformulated the concept of alienation in the Grundrisse. The humanism of the early Marx can be re-rooted and reconceptualised in the scientific mode proposed in the Grundrisse. In the Grundrisse, the universality of alienation is specific to capitalism’s historical evolution. Today, alienation exists almost everywhere. It exists at work in production, at home in consumption, and it dominates much of politics and daily life. Such trends intensify through the application of information technologies and artificial intelligence. Widespread alienation has resulted in Occupy movements as well as right-wing populism and bigoted nationalist and racist movements. Donald Trump is the President of alienation. The circulation of capital as totality consists of the three key moments of production, circulation and distribution. A lot of contemporary economic struggles are now occurring at the point of realisation rather than at the point of production. Protests are therefore today often expressions of broad-based discontent. Our future is dictated by the need to redeem our debts. Under such conditions democracy becomes a sham. The big question is what forms of social movement can help us get out of the state-finance nexus. The theory of objective alienation along with an understanding of its subjective consequences is one vital key to unlock the door of a progressive politics for the future.

  17. Exploring the Perceptions of HBCU Student Affairs Practitioners toward the Racial Diversification of Black Colleges

    Palmer, Robert T.; Arroyo, Andrew T.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2018-01-01

    While research has shown that the racial diversity of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) is increasing, literature suggests that some stakeholders at HBCUs feel the diversification of Black colleges could change their culture, which some see as vital for promoting the success of Black students. Given this, the following study…

  18. Black, White, and Biracial Students' Engagement at Differing Institutional Types

    Harris, Jessica C.; BrckaLorenz, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Within this study, the authors are interested in engagement practices for Black students, White students, and the mixed-race college student population at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and non-HBCUs. The authors asked the following research questions: How does engagement compare for Black, White, and biracial students with…

  19. "This Has Been Quite a Year for Heads Falling": Institutional Autonomy in the Civil Rights Era

    Williamson, Joy Ann

    2004-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their students played a pivotal part in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and early 1960s. Private HBCUs, in particular, provided foot soldiers, intellectual leadership, and safe places to meet and plan civil disobedience. Their economic and political autonomy from the state enabled the…

  20. Detecting in situ copepod diet diversity using molecular technique: development of a copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-inclusive PCR protocol.

    Hu, Simin; Guo, Zhiling; Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey

  1. 21 CFR 1404.445 - What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or...

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or disqualified person? 1404.445 Section 1404.445 Food... § 1404.445 What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded...

  2. 7 CFR 3017.310 - What must I do if a Federal agency excludes a person with whom I am already doing business in a...

    2010-01-01

    ... with whom I am already doing business in a covered transaction? 3017.310 Section 3017.310 Agriculture... already doing business in a covered transaction? (a) You as a participant may continue covered transactions with an excluded person if the transactions were in existence when the agency excluded the person...

  3. 24 CFR 203.18c - One-time or up-front mortgage insurance premium excluded from limitations on maximum mortgage...

    2010-04-01

    ... insurance premium excluded from limitations on maximum mortgage amounts. 203.18c Section 203.18c Housing and...-front mortgage insurance premium excluded from limitations on maximum mortgage amounts. After... LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE...

  4. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  5. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 6 avril 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR àt 17:00 – Auditoire Stückelberg Hospital superbugs, nanomechanics and statistical physics Prof. Dr G. Aeppli / University College London The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report silicon cantilever based studies of self-assembled monolayers of mucopeptides which model drug-sensitive and resistant bacterial walls. The underlying concepts needed to understand the measurements will simplify the design of cantilevers and coatings for biosensing and could even impact our understanding of drug action on bacteria themselves. (Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.) Organizer : Prof. Markus Büttiker ...

  6. Geneva University

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  7. Geneva University

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  8. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. 022 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 October 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Long-lived particle searches at colliders Dr. Philippe Mermod / Oxford University The discovery of exotic long-lived particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This talk will focus on searches for long-lived charged massive particles, where "charged" refers to the magnetic, electric or colour charge. Previous searches at the LEP and Tevatron Colliders allowed to put mass and cross section limits on various kinds of long-lived particles, such as Magnetic Monopoles and metastable leptons and up-type quarks. The new energy regime made available at the LHC will probe physics regions well beyond these limits. F...

  9. Universal algebra

    Grätzer, George

    1979-01-01

    Universal Algebra, heralded as ". . . the standard reference in a field notorious for the lack of standardization . . .," has become the most authoritative, consistently relied on text in a field with applications in other branches of algebra and other fields such as combinatorics, geometry, and computer science. Each chapter is followed by an extensive list of exercises and problems. The "state of the art" account also includes new appendices (with contributions from B. Jónsson, R. Quackenbush, W. Taylor, and G. Wenzel) and a well-selected additional bibliography of over 1250 papers and books which makes this a fine work for students, instructors, and researchers in the field. "This book will certainly be, in the years to come, the basic reference to the subject." --- The American Mathematical Monthly (First Edition) "In this reviewer's opinion [the author] has more than succeeded in his aim. The problems at the end of each chapter are well-chosen; there are more than 650 of them. The book is especially sui...

  10. Geneva University

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 April 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Search for spin-1 excited bosons at the LHC Mihail V. Chizhov (Physics Department, Sofia University, Bulgaria) I will discuss the resonance production of new type spin-1 excited bosons, Z*, at hadron colliders. They can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the invariant dilepton mass distribution in the same way as the well-known hypothetical gauge bosons, Z�. This makes them very interesting objects for early searches with the LHC first data. Moreover, they have unique signatures in transverse momentum and angular distributions, which allow to distinguish them from other resonances. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  11. 20 CFR 404.1028 - Student working for a school, college, or university.

    2010-04-01

    ... university. 404.1028 Section 404.1028 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1028 Student working for a school, college, or university. (a) For...

  12. Excluding scalar gluons

    Koller, K.; Krasemann, H.

    1979-08-01

    We investigate the Dalitz plot population and thrust angular distribution for the Orthoquarkonium decay Q anti Q → 3 scalar gluons. The Dalitz plot for scalar gluons is populated in corners where events are 2 jet like and this disagrees with existing Upsilon data. The scalar gluon thrust angular distribution is also in striking disagreement with the UPSILON data and so scalar gluons are completely ruled out. (orig.)

  13. Excluding the typical patient

    Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Weinhandl, Eric; Mancebo, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, clinical trials have resulted in several successful pharmacotherapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet patients in clinical settings often report inadequate response. This study compares clinical characteristics of treatment-seeking OCD patients to the inclusion...

  14. Radiographic signs of radiolesions of the pelvis (excluding the femur) after irradiation for epithelioma of the cervix uteri

    Zenny, J.C.; Bergiron, C.; Chassagne, D.; Couanet, D.; Ibrahim, E.; Masselot, J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiolesions of the pelvic bones (excluding the femur) were observed in 29 patients after irradiation therapy for cervix uteri cancer. Three regions can be affected corresponding to the areas irradiated: the sacrum and internal part of the iliac wings, the pubis, and the cotyles. In most cases the lesions appeared after 1 to 4 years. Their radiological appearances are characteristic, the principal sign being irregular bone condensation in a demineralized bone, without true cavitation. The only lytic lesions observed were in the pubis. Calcification of soft tissues may occur and fractures are frequent. There is a slow progression of the lesions over long periods. Clinical, radiological, and progression signs differentiate radiolesions from other affections: metastases, invasion by contiguity, infections, and radio-induced sarcoma [fr

  15. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is enhanced by adding oesophageal histology and excluding epigastric pain.

    Vakil, N; Vieth, M; Wernersson, B; Wissmar, J; Dent, J

    2017-05-01

    The diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in clinical practice is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of symptoms and diagnostic testing. To determine if adding histology as a criterion and excluding patients with epigastric pain enhances the diagnosis for GERD. Patients with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms who had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months and who had evaluable distal oesophageal biopsies were included (Diamond study: NCT00291746). Epithelial hyperplasia was identified when total epithelial thickness was at least 430 μm. Investigation-based GERD criteria were: presence of erosive oesophagitis, pathological oesophageal acid exposure and/or positive symptom-acid association probability. Symptoms were assessed using the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and a pre-specified checklist. Overall, 127 (55%) of the 231 included patients met investigation-based GERD criteria and 195 (84%) met symptom-based criteria. Epithelial hyperplasia was present in 89 individuals, of whom 61 (69%) met investigation-based criteria and 83 (93%) met symptom-based criteria. Adding epithelial hyperplasia as a criterion increased the number of patients diagnosed with GERD on investigation by 28 [12%; number needed to diagnose (NND): 8], to 155 (67%). The proportion of patients with a symptom-based GERD diagnosis who met investigation-based criteria including epithelial hyperplasia was significantly greater when concomitant epigastric pain was absent than when it was present (P < 0.05; NND: 8). Histology increases diagnosis of GERD and should be performed when clinical suspicion is high and endoscopy is negative. Excluding patients with epigastric pain enhances sensitivity for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ion-ion correlation, solvent excluded volume and pH effects on physicochemical properties of spherical oxide nanoparticles.

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Aljzmi, Amal; Almusaynid, Manal; Khan, Asrar; Valderrama, Esteban; Nash, Kelly L; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-15

    One major source of complexity in the implementation of nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes arises from the strong influence that biological environments has on their physicochemical properties. A key parameter for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles is the formation of the surface charge density. In this article, we present an efficient and accurate approach that combines a recently introduced classical solvation density functional theory for spherical electrical double layers with a surface complexation model to account for ion-ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical nanoparticles. We apply the proposed computational approach to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms on the surface chemistry of spherical silica (SiO2) nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, as well as pH level and electrolyte concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge density and Zeta potential. We validate our predictions for 580Å and 200Å nanoparticles immersed in acid, neutral and alkaline mono-valent aqueous electrolyte solutions against experimental data. Our results on mono-valent electrolyte show that the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations contribute significantly to the surface charge density and Zeta potential of the nanoparticle at high electrolyte concentration and pH levels, where the solvent crowding effects and electrostatic screening have shown a profound influence on the protonation/deprotonation reactions at the liquid/solute interface. The success of this approach in describing physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles supports its broader application to study other spherical metal oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Compendium of shock wave data. Section C. Organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons. Section D. Mixtures. Section E. Mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Compendium index

    van Thiel, M.; shaner, J.; Salinas, E.

    1977-06-01

    This volume lists thermodynamic data for organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons, mixtures, and mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Alloys and some minerals are included among the mixtures. This volume also contains the index for the three-volume compendium

  18. 23 CFR Appendix D to Part 658 - Devices That Are Excluded From Measurement of the Length or Width of a Commercial Motor Vehicle

    2010-04-01

    ...; (v) Tarp basket; (w) Tire carrier; and (x) Uppercoupler. 2. Devices excluded from length measurement... measurement are side rails running the length of the vehicle and rear doors, provided the only function of the...

  19. The Learning University.

    Patterson, Glenys

    1999-01-01

    As universities make cross-sectoral alliances, various models for integrating postsecondary education into universities arise: contract, brokerage, collaborative, validation, joint program, dual-sector institution, tertiary university, metaphoric, and federal. The integrated, comprehensive university is the learning university of the 21st century.…

  20. Opening a Side-Gate: Engaging the Excluded in Chilean Higher Education through Test-Blind Admission

    Koljatic, Mladen; Silva, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The article describes a test-blind admission initiative in a Chilean research university aimed at expanding the inclusion of talented, albeit educationally and socially disadvantaged, students. The outcomes of the test-blind admission cohort were compared with those of students admitted via the regular admission procedure to the same academic…

  1. Measurement problem in PROGRAM UNIVERSE

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.

    1984-12-01

    We present a discrete theory that meets the measurement problem in a new way. We generate a growing universe of bit strings, labeled by 2 127 + 136 strings organized by some representation of the closed, four level, combinatorial hierarchy, of bit-length N 139 greater than or equal to 139. The rest of the strings for each label, which grow in both length and number, are called addresses. The generating algorithm, called PROGRAM UNIVERSE, starts from a random choice between the two symbols ''0'' and ''1'' and grows (a) by discriminating between two randomly chosen strings and adjoining a novel result to the universe, or when the string so generated is not novel, by (b) adjoining a randomly chosen bit at the growing end of each string. We obtain, by appropriate definitions and interpretations, stable ''particles'' which satisfy the usual relativistic kinematics and quantized angular momentum without being localizable in a continuum space-time. The labeling scheme is congruent with the ''standard model'' of quarks and leptons with three generations, but for the problem at hand, the implementation of this aspect of the theory is unimportant. What matters most is that (a) these complicated ''particles'' have the periodicities familiar from relativistic ''deBroglie waves'' and resolve in a discrete way the ''wave-particle dualism'' and (b) can be ''touched'' by our discrete equivalent of ''soft photons'' in such a way as to follow, macroscopically, the usual Rutherford scattering trajectories with the associated bound states. Thus our theory could provide a discrete description of ''measurement'' in a way that allows no conceptual barrier between the ''micro'' and the ''macro'' worlds, if we are willing to base our physics on counting and exclude the ambiguities associated with the unobservable ''continuum''. 27 refs

  2. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    Cogollo, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S. [Department of Physics and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Teles, P. Rebello, E-mail: diegocogollo@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu, E-mail: fdasilva@ucsc.edu, E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  3. World wide web-based cytological analysis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesions.

    Washiya, Kiyotada; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Yukie; Himeji, Yukari; Kobayashi, Takako; Iwai, Muneo; Watanabe, Jun

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that the low level of consistency of diagnosis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H) in uterine cervical cancer screening using the Bethesda System, indicating the necessity of a large-scale survey. We presented cases cytologically judged as ASC-H on our website and invited our members to give their opinions regarding the diagnosis by voting online. The Web voting results were analyzed and ASC-H was cytologically investigated. Virtual slides of atypical cells in cytology preparations of 53 cases were prepared and presented on a website. ASC-H cases were divided into 42 cases sampled by brush scraping and 11 cases sampled by cotton swab scraping. Fifty-three cases cytologically judged as ASC-H were classified into benign and CIN2/3, and their patterns of arrangement of atypical cells and 8 cytological parameters were morphologically investigated. The frequency of ASC-H diagnosis in the Web votes was low: 29.2% for brush-scraped and 26.2% for cotton swab-scraped cases. Three-dimensionality, coarse chromatin and irregular nuclei were significantly different between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. Web-based surveys showed the difference of cytological findings between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. To increase interobserver consistency, it may be useful to share information online, which avoids geographical and temporal limitations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. “Not Designed for Us”: How Science Museums and Science Centers Socially Exclude Low-Income, Minority Ethnic Groups

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how people from low-income, minority ethnic groups perceive and experience exclusion from informal science education (ISE) institutions, such as museums and science centers. Drawing on qualitative data from four focus groups, 32 interviews, four accompanied visits to ISE institutions, and field notes, this paper presents an analysis of exclusion from science learning opportunities during visits alongside participants’ attitudes, expectations, and conclusions about participation in ISE. Participants came from four community groups in central London: a Sierra Leonean group (n = 21), a Latin American group (n = 18), a Somali group (n = 6), and an Asian group (n = 13). Using a theoretical framework based on the work of Bourdieu, the analysis suggests ISE practices were grounded in expectations about visitors’ scientific knowledge, language skills, and finances in ways that were problematic for participants and excluded them from science learning opportunities. It is argued that ISE practices reinforced participants preexisting sense that museums and science centers were “not for us.” The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings in relation to previous research on participation in ISE and the potential for developing more inclusive informal science learning opportunities. PMID:25574059

  5. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello

    2014-01-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z ' boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings

  6. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    Kaballo, Babikir G.; Khogali, Mohamed S.; Khalifa, Eman H.; Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M.; Abu-Aisha, H.

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  7. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    Kaballo, Babikir G; Khogali, Mohamed S [Nephrology Unit, Military Hospital, Omdurman (Sudan); Khalifa, Eman H [Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Univ. of Khartoum (Sudan); Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M [Institute of Endemic Diseases, Univ. of Khartoum (Sudan); Abu-Aisha, H [The National Ribat Univ., Khartoum (Sudan)

    2007-07-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  8. Efficacy of PET/CT to exclude leiomyoma in patients with lesions suspicious for uterine sarcoma on MRI.

    Kusunoki, Soshi; Terao, Yasuhisa; Ujihira, Takafumi; Fujino, Kazunari; Kaneda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Miki; Ota, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Satoru

    2017-08-01

    To analyze the efficacy of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the diagnosis of uterine sarcoma. Thirty-four patients evaluated between January 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. All patients in whom uterine sarcoma was suspected based on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (heterogeneous, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and/or high intensity on T1-weighted images) underwent PET/CT for further assessment. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on postoperative pathological findings: uterine sarcoma (n = 15) and leiomyoma (n = 19). The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all lesions was measured using PET/CT; we calculated the optimal cutoff value for diagnosing sarcoma. The median SUVmax for uterine sarcoma and leiomyoma was 12 and 4.1, respectively; these values were significantly different. An SUVmax of greater than 7.5 was able to exclude leiomyoma with 80.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity (area under the curve, 95.3%). A cutoff SUVmax of 7.5 yields 100% specificity, and a cutoff SUVmax of 4.4 yields a 100% negative predictive value (NPV). The combination of PET/CT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels had a sensitivity of 86.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and an NPV of 90.4%. No relation between histopathology or International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake value on PET/CT was seen. The surgical outcome trended toward a correlation with the SUVmax, although this was not statistically significant. In patients with MRI findings consistent with either uterine sarcoma or leiomyoma, PET/CT can decrease the false-positive rate by setting an optimal cutoff SUVmax of 7.5. Using this cutoff can avoid unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Transarterial chemoembolization in very early and early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients excluded from curative treatment: A prospective cohort study

    Bargellini, Irene; Sacco, Rodolfo; Bozzi, Elena; Bertini, Marco; Ginanni, Barbara; Romano, Antonio; Cicorelli, Antonio; Tumino, Emanuele; Federici, Graziana; Cioni, Roberto; Metrangolo, Salvatore; Bertoni, Michele; Bresci, Giampaolo; Parisi, Giuseppe; Altomare, Emanuele; Capria, Alfonso; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess clinical outcome of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in a series of patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), within Milan criteria, but clinically unfit for liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: From January 2006 to May 2009, 67 patients (43 males, mean age 70 ± 7.6 years) with very early or early-stage unresectable HCC, within Milan selection criteria but clinically unfit for OLT, underwent TACE. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were: safety, liver toxicity, 1-month tumour response according to the amended RECIST criteria, time to local and distant intrahepatic tumour recurrence and time to radiological progression. Results: Two major periprocedural complications occurred (3%), consisting of liver failure. Periprocedural mortality rate was 1.5% (1 patient). A significant increase in ALT and bilirubin levels 24 h after treatment was reported, with progressive decrease at discharge. At 1-month follow-up, complete and partial tumour response rates were 67.2% and 29.8%, respectively, with two cases of progressive disease. Mean follow-up was 37.3 ± 15 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 90.9%, 86.1%, and 80.5%, respectively. Median expected time to local tumour recurrence and intrahepatic tumour recurrence were 7.9 and 13.8 months, respectively. Radiological disease progression was observed in 12 patients (17.9%) with a mean expected time of 26.5 months. Conclusion: In patients with early-stage HCC, clinically excluded from OLT and unfit for surgery or percutaneous ablation, TACE is a safe and effective option, with favourable long-term survival.

  10. The accuracy of Gram stain of respiratory specimens in excluding Staphylococcus aureus in ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Gottesman, Tamar; Yossepowitch, Orit; Lerner, Evgenia; Schwartz-Harari, Orna; Soroksky, Arie; Yekutieli, Daniel; Dan, Michael

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the Gram stain of deep tracheal aspirate as a tool to direct empiric antibiotic therapy, and more specifically as a tool to exclude the need for empiric antibiotic coverage against Staphylococcus aureus in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A prospective, single-center, observational, cohort study. All wards at a community hospital. Adult patients requiring mechanical ventilation, identified as having VAP in a 54-month prospective surveillance database. Sampling of lower airway secretions by deep endotracheal aspiration was taken from each patient who developed VAP. Samples were sent immediately for Gram stain and qualitative bacterial cultures. Demographic and relevant clinical data were collected; Gram stain, culture, and antibiotic susceptibility results were documented; and outcome was followed prospectively. The analysis included 114 consecutive patients with 115 episodes of VAP from June 2007 to January 2012. Sensitivity of Gram stain compared with culture was 90.47% for gram-positive cocci, 69.6% for gram-negative rods, and 50% for sterile cultures. Specificity was 82.5%, 77.8%, and 79%, respectively. Negative predictive value was high for gram-positive cocci (97%) and sterile cultures (96%) but low for gram-negative rods (20%). Acinetobacter baumanii (45%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38 %) were the prevailing isolates. S aureus was found in 18.3% of the patients. Most isolates were multiresistant. Absence of gram-positive bacteria on Gram stain had a high negative predictive value. These data can be used to narrow the initial empiric antibiotic regimen and to avoid unnecessary exposure of patients to vancomycin and other antistaphyloccocal agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternative preparation of inclusion bodies excludes interfering non-protein contaminants and improves the yield of recombinant proinsulin.

    Mackin, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The goal of simple, high-yield expression and purification of recombinant human proinsulin has proven to be a considerable challenge. First, proinsulin forms inclusion bodies during bacterial expression. While this phenomenon can be exploited as a capture step, conventionally prepared inclusion bodies contain significant amounts of non-protein contaminants that interfere with subsequent chromatographic purification. Second, the proinsulin molecules within the inclusion bodies are incorrectly folded, and likely cross-linked to one another, making it difficult to quantify the amount of expressed proinsulin. Third, proinsulin is an intermediate between the initial product of ribosomal translation (preproinsulin) and the final product secreted by pancreatic beta cells (insulin). Therefore, to be efficiently produced in bacteria, it must be produced as an N-terminally extended fusion protein, which has to be converted to authentic proinsulin during the purification scheme. To address all three of these problems, while simultaneously streamlining the procedure and increasing the yield of recombinant proinsulin, we have made three substantive modifications to our previous method for producing proinsulin:.•Conditions for the preparation of inclusion bodies have been altered so contaminants that interfere with semi-preparative reversed-phase chromatography are excluded while the proinsulin fusion protein is retained at high yield.•Aliquots are taken following important steps in the procedure and the quantity of proinsulin-related polypeptide in the sample is compared to the amount present prior to that step.•Final purification is performed using a silica-based reversed-phase matrix in place of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based matrix.

  12. Aspects concerning the lengths of the excluded shareholder’s liability towards third parties in the case of limited liability companies in Romania

    Andreea Stoican

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of reinventing the trading company law, at the end of a lengthy and extremely difficult economic crisis, when every participant in the economic life tried to find their own way to adapt and make their activity survive the new social and commercial realities, not few were the cases when some of the Shareholders were excluded and their liability was drawn onto the legal person itself. Nevertheless, there is a type of legal liability of the former Shareholders, excluded from the Company, that still is quite deficiently regulated and, despite the sound argumentation and comprehensive regulation of Law no. 31/1990, it fails to provide a clear and detailed explanation of the consequences, namely, of the consequences the exclusion of a Shareholder has over the Third Parties of good-faith that the legal person (the Company had or continues to have legal relations with. This paper thus aims at analysing one of the main effects of excluding Shareholders from the company, namely the extent of their liability towards the Third Parties, and it is structured in five parts, as follows: 1 Introduction, 2 About the Shareholders’ exclusion, 3 The effects of excluding a Shareholder from the Limited Liability Company, 4 The excluded Shareholder’s liability towards the Third Parties and 5 Conclusions.

  13. The Global University Press

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  14. Enlistment Propensities of University Students

    Moskos, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Enlistment propensities of undergraduates were assessed through surveys conducted at Northwestern University, University of Arizona, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Illinois-Chicago...

  15. Endovascular repair of posttraumatic multiple femoral-femoral and popliteal-popliteal arteriovenous fistula with Viabahn and excluder stent graft

    Šarac Momir

    2011-01-01

    . Also, numerous metallic balls - grains of shotgun were present. After the preoperative preparation under local infiltrative anesthesia, transfemoral endovascular reconstruction was done of the surface femoral and popliteal artery by the use of stent grafts Viabahn 6 × 50 mm and excluder PXL 161 007. Within the immediate postoperative course a significant reduction of the leg edema and disappearance of thrill occurred, and, latter, healing of ulceration, and disappearance of signs of the foot ischemia. Also, patient's both cardiac and breathing functions became normal. Conclusion. In patients with chronic traumatic AV fistulas in the femoropopliteal region, especially with multiple fistulas, the gold standard is their endovascular reconstruction which, although being minimally traumatic and invasive, offers a complete reconstruction besides keeping integrity of both distal and proximal circulation in the leg.

  16. Mapping the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon using parasitological, serological, and clinical evidence to exclude other causes of lymphedema.

    Kebede Deribe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Podoconiosis is a non-filarial elephantiasis, which causes massive swelling of the lower legs. It was identified as a neglected tropical disease by WHO in 2011. Understanding of the geographical distribution of the disease is incomplete. As part of a global mapping of podoconiosis, this study was conducted in Cameroon to map the distribution of the disease. This mapping work will help to generate data on the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon and contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis.We used a multi-stage sampling design with stratification of the country by environmental risk of podoconiosis. We sampled 76 villages from 40 health districts from the ten Regions of Cameroon. All individuals of 15-years old or older in the village were surveyed house-to-house and screened for lymphedema. A clinical algorithm was used to reliably diagnose podoconiosis, excluding filarial-associated lymphedema. Individuals with lymphoedema were tested for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen and specific IgG4 using the Alere Filariasis Test Strips (FTS test and the Standard Diagnostics (SD BIOLINE lymphatic filariasis IgG4 test (Wb123 respectively, in addition to thick blood films. Presence of DNA specific to W. bancrofti was checked on night blood using a qPCR technique.Overall, 10,178 individuals from 4,603 households participated in the study. In total, 83 individuals with lymphedema were identified. Of the 83 individuals with lymphedema, two were found to be FTS positive and all were negative using the Wb123 test. No microfilaria of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with clinical lymphedema. None were found to be positive for W. bancrofti using qPCR. Of the two FTS positive cases, one was positive for Mansonella perstans DNA, while the other harbored Loa loa microfilaria. Overall, 52 people with podoconiosis were identified after applying the clinical algorithm. The overall prevalence of podoconiosis was

  17. NIKEI: a new inexpensive and non-invasive scoring system to exclude advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

    Münevver Demir

    Full Text Available AIMS: To develop, validate and compare a non-invasive fibrosis scoring system for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD derived from routinely obtained clinical and biochemical parameters. METHODS: 267 consecutive patients with biopsy proven fatty liver or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were randomly assigned to the estimation (2/3 or validation (1/3 group to develop a model for the prediction of advanced fibrosis. Univariate statistics were performed to compare patients with and without advanced fibrosis, and following a multivariate logistic regression analysis a new scoring system was constructed. This non-invasive Koeln-Essen-index (NIKEI was validated and compared to the FIB-4 index by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. We evaluated a stepwise combination of both scoring systems for the precise prediction of advanced fibrosis. To set in contrast, we additionally tested the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio, BARD score and the NAFLD fibrosis score in our cohort. RESULTS: Age, AST, AST/ALT ratio, and total bilirubin were identified as significant predictors of advanced fibrosis and used to construct the NIKEI with an AUC of 0.968 [0.937; 0.998] compared to 0.929 [0.869; 0.989] for the FIB-4 index. The absence of advanced fibrosis could be confirmed with excellent accuracy (99-100%. The positive predictive value of the FIB-4 index was higher (100% vs. 60%, however, the false negative rate was also high (33%. With a stepwise combination of both indices 82%-84% of biopsies would have been avoidable without a single misclassification. The AUROC for AST/ALT ratio, the NAFLD fibrosis score, and the BARD score were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.90, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-0.99, and 0.67 (95% CI 0.55-0.78, respectively. CONCLUSION: The NIKEI can reliably exclude advanced fibrosis in subjects with NAFLD. In combination with the FIB-4 index misclassification with inadequate clinical management can be avoided while

  18. Gamma ray astronomy and search for antimatter in the universe

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy provides a powerful tool for searching antimatter in the universe; it probably provides the only means to determine, if the universe has baryon symmetry. Presently existing gamma-ray observations can be interpreted without postulating the existence of antimatter. However, the measurements are not precise enough to definitely exclude the possibility of its existence. The search for antimatter belongs to one of the main scientific objectives of the Gamma Ray Observatory GRO of NASA, which will be launched in 1990 by the Space Shuttle. (orig.)

  19. Ministerial Decree of 20 March 1979 excluding certain categories of nuclear substances from the scope of the Paris and Brussels Conventions on Nuclear Third Party Liability

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this Decree is to exclude certain categories of nuclear substances from the scope of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. Its publication enables implementation at the internal level of the corresponding Decision taken by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's Steering Committee on 27 October 1977. (NEA) [fr

  20. 41 CFR 105-68.310 - What must I do if a Federal agency excludes a person with whom I am already doing business in a...

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do if a Federal agency excludes a person with whom I am already doing business in a covered transaction? 105-68... Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 105-68.310 What must I do if a Federal agency...

  1. 2 CFR 180.440 - What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or...

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or disqualified person? 180.440 Section 180.440 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS...

  2. 41 CFR 105-68.445 - What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or...

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What action may I take if a primary tier participant knowingly does business with an excluded or disqualified person? 105-68.445 Section 105-68.445 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  3. 21 CFR 1404.310 - What must I do if a Federal agency excludes a person with whom I am already doing business in a...

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I do if a Federal agency excludes a person with whom I am already doing business in a covered transaction? 1404.310 Section 1404.310 Food and...) Responsibilities of Participants Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 1404.310 What must I do...

  4. Prognosis of patients excluded by the definition of septic shock based on their lactate levels after initial fluid resuscitation: a prospective multi-center observational study.

    Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Kyuseok; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Kang, Gu Hyun; Shin, Tae Gun; Jo, You Hwan; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Beom, Jin Ho; Kwon, Woon Yong; Han, Kap Su; Choi, Han Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Suh, Gil Joon; Lim, Tae Ho; Kim, Won Young

    2018-02-24

    Septic shock can be defined both by the presence of hyperlactatemia and need of vasopressors. Lactate levels should be measured after volume resuscitation (as per the Sepsis-3 definition). However, currently, no studies have evaluated patients who have been excluded by the new criteria for septic shock. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and prognosis of these patients, based on their lactate levels after initial fluid resuscitation. This observational study was performed using a prospective, multi-center registry of septic shock, with the participation of 10 hospitals in the Korean Shock Society, between October 2015 and February 2017. We compared the 28-day mortality between patients who were excluded from the new definition (defined as lactate level definition of septic shock. These patients, in whom perfusion was restored, demonstrated significantly lower age, platelet count, and initial and subsequent lactate levels (all p < 0.01). Similarly, significantly lower 28-day mortality was observed in these patients than in those who had not been excluded (8.2% vs 25.5%, p = 0.02). In-hospital mortality and the maximum SOFA score were also significantly lower in the excluded patients group (p = 0.03, both). It seems reasonable for septic shock to be defined by the lactate levels after volume resuscitation. However, owing to the small number of patients in whom lactate levels were improved, further study is warranted.

  5. 2 CFR 801.137 - Who in the Department of Veterans Affairs may grant an exception to allow an excluded person to...

    2010-01-01

    ... may grant an exception to allow an excluded person to participate in a covered transaction? 801.137 Section 801.137 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION General § 801.137 Who in the Department of...

  6. Whither the African University

    Sam

    reform. 1. Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, Addis Ababa University ..... reduce African universities to virtually vocational schools. The World ..... theories, established institutions, and widely held beliefs according to the cannons ...

  7. Origin (?) of the Universe

    cal models of the universe are based on the idea, which is supported by ... Only the continuous distribution was clearly ... displaced from their natural locations, their observed wave- .... universe? Mathematical Models: Basic Assumptions.

  8. The Alien University

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    - they are alien. The conditions of universities today is not one of crisis and upheaval, as with the postmodern universities, it is one of night travel and exile. The alien university leaves behind the epistemological skirmishes of the postmodern university with all its rhetoric and knowledge activism. Thinking...... in the alien university is a move into a whirlpool of nothingness, a “nocturnal space”, where “[d]arkness fills it like a content; it is full, but full of the nothingness of everything.” (Levinas, 2001, p.53). In the alien university thinking is not situated, and instead of rhizomes, and assemblages of thought......, there is merely an imposing and nightly “swarming of points.” (ibid.). There is no place for the alien university, and exactly this exile of thought makes possible the move beyond postmodernism and the mentality of political crisis. The alien university is not in the future as such, but it is not entirely...

  9. Gambling with the Universe

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  10. Inflation in the Universe

    Barrow, J.D.; California Univ., Berkeley; Turner, M.S.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1981-01-01

    The problems of explaining the observed isotropy, homogeneity, flatness and specific entropy of the Universe are discussed in the context of an inflationary Universe which has recently been suggested. It is shown that the isotropy cannot be ignored as a Universe with a large amount of anisotropy will not undergo the inflationary phase. A Universe with only moderate anistropy will undergo inflation and will be rapidly isotropized. (U.K.)

  11. Following-up the efficiency of 131-Iodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (excluding medullary) - Moroccan situation

    Ben Rais Aouad, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Since 1985, the department of nuclear medicine of IBN SINA Hospital in the Rabat University hospital centre is the only centre in Morocco, where all patients of differentiated thyroid carcinoma after surgery are treated with 3.7 GBq of Iodine-131. The number of patients on follow-up is more than two thousands. The endemic zone represents the main origin of thyroid carcinoma. The sex ratio (F/M) is 3.5/1; the mean age is 42.5 years. The papillary carcinoma constitutes about 65.5% of the 26% of well-differentiated carcinoma and 12.5 of moderately differentiated carcinoma (MDC). The tumour size at diagnosis was more than 2 cm in 70% of cases. Prognosis factors are the age, the histology and tumour size. After the surgery, the patients receive 131-Iodine therapy (3.7 GBq) and a regular follow-up by clinical examination, neck ultrasonography and thyroglobulin (Tg) blood level. The aim is to obtain a negative whole body scan (WBS) and undetectable Tg. All the patients also receive a suppressive hormone therapy (thyroxin: 2.4 μg/kg/day). In the same patient, the Tg level is also compared with and without suppression therapy, but taking TSH levels into account. The efficiency of 131-Iodine treatment and the following up, depends on the type of patients: (a) Patients without metastasis: the success of Iodine-131 therapy depended on surgery and it was more than 92% (b) Patients with local metastasis to lymph nodes: the success of 131-Iodine therapy depended of nodal status and complete dissection is possible in 70% cases only. (c) Patients with distant metastasis: The efficiency of 131-Iodine therapy depended on the uptake, the homogeneity and the size of metastasis. In lung metastasis, the efficiency of 131-Iodine is about 40-42% (70%: miliary and micro nodules) and only 6.6% in bone metastasis. After treatment, the patients were regularly followed-up clinically till the next WBS and Tg estimation. In some cases, it was interesting to compare WBS and MIBI

  12. Entrepreneurship in Finnish Universities

    Nurmi, Piia; Paasio, Kaisu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of universities in fostering and promoting entrepreneurship in Finland. In particular it seeks to examine the university-entrepreneurship relationship: its nature and how universities are addressing the entrepreneurship agenda. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large…

  13. Our Particle Universe

    and “why is the universe the way it is?” Not long before ... to each other. The interactions of particles in the universe ... theory by Jean Perrin in 1908 convinced people that atoms and ..... ing the origin and evolution of our universe13. This is an ...

  14. Hybrid Universities in Malaysia

    Lee, Molly; Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi

    2017-01-01

    Are Asian universities different from those in Western countries? Premised on the hypothesis that Asian universities are different because of hybridization between Western academic models and local traditional cultures, this paper investigates the hybrid characteristics in Malaysian universities resulting from interaction between contemporary…

  15. Establishing a University Foundation.

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  16. The University Culture

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  17. Motivating University Researchers

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Alves de Sousa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said

  18. A Universal Reactive Machine

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  19. The early universe

    Steigman, G.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the physics of the early universe: the production and survival of relics from the big bang. The author comments on relic WIMPs as the dark matter in the universe. The remainder of this discussion is devoted to a review of the status of the only predictions from the early evolution of the universe that are accessible to astronomical observation: primordial nucleosynthesis

  20. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... such dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  1. Antimatter in the universe

    Stigman, G.

    1973-01-01

    The means of detecting the presence of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Both direct, annihilation processes, and indirect, cosmic ray particles, were analyzed. All results were negative and it was concluded that no antimatter exists, if the universe is in fact symmetric. If the universe is not symmetric then matter and antimatter are well separated from each other.

  2. Universities as Development Hubs

    Hansen, Jens Aage; Lindegaard, Klaus; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Capacity-building in environment and development has been implemented and tested over the last decade through university and university consortia networking. Universities from Africa (Botswana and South Africa), Asia (Malaysia and Thailand), Central America (Costa Rica, El Salvador and Nicaragua...

  3. The inflationary universe

    Guth, A.; Steinhardt, P.

    1993-01-01

    According to the inflationary model, the universe had a brief period of extraordinary rapid expansion, or inflation, during which its diameter increased by a factor at least 10 25 times larger (and perhaps much larger still) than had been previously thought. All the matter and energy in the universe could have been created from virtually nothing. Features of this article are: comparison of standard and inflationary modes, the horizon problem, the geometry of the universe, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism (energy density of the Higgs fields), the flatness problem, the new inflationary universe (new Higgs fields and false vacuum), conserved quantities in the universe. 12 figs., 11 refs

  4. The inflationary universe

    Linde, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the inflationary universe scenario the universe in the very early stages of its evolution was exponentially expanding in the unstable vacuum-like state. At the end of the exponential expansion the energy of the unstable vacuum transforms into the energy of hot dense matter. Recently it was realised that the exponential expansion of the universe naturally occurs in a wide class of realistic theories of elementary particles. The inflationary universe scenario makes it possible to obtain a simple solution to many longstanding cosmological problems and leads to a crucial modification of the standard point of view of the large-scale structure of the universe. (author)

  5. The expanding universe

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  6. The universe a biography

    Gribbin, John

    2008-01-01

    The Universe: A Biography makes cosmology accessible to everyone. John Gribbin navigates the latest frontiers of scientific discovery to tell us what we really know about the history of the universe. Along the way, he describes how the universe began; what the early universe looked like; how its structure developed; and what emerged to hold it all together. He describes where the elements came from; how stars and galaxies formed; and the story of how life emerged. He even looks to the future: is the history of the universe going to end with a Big Crunch or a Big Rip.

  7. A lightweight universe?

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Fan, Xiaohui

    1998-01-01

    How much matter is there in the universe? Does the universe have the critical density needed to stop its expansion, or is the universe underweight and destined to expand forever? We show that several independent measures, especially those utilizing the largest bound systems known—clusters of galaxies—all indicate that the mass-density of the universe is insufficient to halt the expansion. A promising new method, the evolution of the number density of clusters with time, provides the most powerful indication so far that the universe has a subcritical density. We show that different techniques reveal a consistent picture of a lightweight universe with only ∼20–30% of the critical density. Thus, the universe may expand forever. PMID:9600898

  8. Universities scale like cities.

    Anthony F J van Raan

    Full Text Available Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  9. Universities scale like cities.

    van Raan, Anthony F J

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  10. University of Maryland MRSEC - Collaborations

    . University of Maryland Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Home About Us Leadership , National Nanotechnology Lab, Neocera, NIST, Rowan University, Rutgers University, Seagate, Tokyo Tech

  11. A systematic search for linkage with nonsyndromic recessive deafness in two large Middle Eastern inbred kindreds excludes more than 30% of the genome

    Weiss, S.; Korostishevsky, M. [Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Frydman, M. [Haim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 35 loci may individually cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. The extreme genetic heterogeneity, limited clinical differentiation and phenotypic assortative mating in many western countries make many families unsuitable for genetic linkage studies. Recently the first of those loci was mapped (to 13q) in two consanguineous families from northern Tunisia. We are studying two large highly consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds (a total of 26 deaf in 98 sampled individuals). Examination in each family showed no evidence of clinical heterogeneity and indicated an uncomplicated profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have been able to exclude the 13q locus as the cause of deafness in each kindred and have also excluded such `candidate` loci as regions as those causing Usher`s syndrome type 1 (11q13)(11p), Usher`s syndrome type II (1q32-q41), Waardenburg syndrome type I (2q37), branchio-oto-renal syndrome (8q12-q13), Monge`s deafness (5q31), and Treacher Collins syndrome (5q31.3-q33.3). To date, no lod scores greater than 1 have been obtained in either kindred using 150 RFLT`s, VNTR`s and highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (CA repeats and tetranucleotides). By Morton`s criterion a minimum of 30% of the autosomal genome can be excluded for each kindred separately.

  12. Rectors of European universities

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Several rectors of European universities visited CERN recently while in Geneva for a conference on coordination between their institutions. The visit began with a welcome by Roger Cashmore, CERN Director of Collider Programmes,and continued with tours of CMS, ALICE and the LHC magnet assembly hall. Photos 01, 02: The visitors in the ALICE assembly hall: (left to right) Dr. Raymond Werlen, Deputy Secretary-General of the Conference of Rectors of Swiss Universities; visit guide Prof. Alain Blondel, Department of Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics, University of Geneva; Prof. Adriano Pimpão, Rector of the University of Algarve, President of the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities; Prof. Jean-Pierre Finance, Conference of University Presidents, France; Prof. Jean-Paul Lehners, Vice-President of the Centre Universitaire, Luxemburg.

  13. Universities as Research Partners

    Hall, Bronwyn; Link, Albert; Scott, John

    2010-01-01

    Universities are a key institution in the U.S. innovation system, and an important aspect of their involvement is the role they play in public-private partnerships. This note offers insights into the performance of industry-university research partnerships, using a survey of precommercial research projects funded by the Advanced Technology Program. Although results must be interpreted cautiously because of the small size of the sample, the study finds that projects with university involvement...

  14. Geometry of the Universe

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  15. University Advertising and Universality in Messaging

    Diel, Stan R.; Katsinas, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    University and college institutional advertisements, which typically are broadcast as public service announcements during the halftime of football games, were the subject of a quantitative analysis focused on commonality in messaging and employment of the semiotic theory of brand advertising. Findings indicate advertisements focus on students'…

  16. From Universal Access to Universal Proficiency.

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2003-01-01

    Panel of five education experts--Elliot Eisner, John Goodlad, Patricia Graham, Phillip Schlechty, and Warren Simons--answer questions related to recent school reform efforts, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, aimed at achieving universal educational proficiency. (PKP)

  17. Imagining the Future University

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Barnett, Ronald

    'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett.......'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett....

  18. Mathematics at University

    Winsløw, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics is studied in universities by a large number of students. At the same time it is a field of research for a (smaller) number of university teachers. What relations, if any, exist between university research and teaching of mathematics? Can research “support” teaching? What research...... and what teaching? In this presentation we propose a theoretical framework to study these questions more precisely, based on the anthropological theory of didactics. As a main application, the links between the practices of mathematical research and university mathematics teaching are examined...

  19. University of Washington

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  20. University Technology Transfer

    Mike Cox

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the experiences and general observations of the author at Heriot-Watt University and concerns the transfer of university technology for the purposes of commercialisation. Full commercial exploitation of a university invention generally requires transferring that technology into the industrial arena, usually either by formation of a new company or licensing into an existing company. Commercialisation activities need to be carried out in unison with the prime activities of the university of research and teaching. Responsibility for commercialising university inventions generally rests with a specific group within the university, typically referred to as the technology transfer group. Each technology transfer should be considered individually and appropriate arrangements made for that particular invention. In general, this transfer process involves four stages: identification, evaluation, protection and exploitation. Considerations under these general headings are outlined from a university viewpoint. A phased approach is generally preferred where possible for the evaluation, protection and exploitation of an invention to balance risk with potential reward. Evaluation of the potential opportunity for a university invention involves essentially the same considerations as for an industrial invention. However, there are a range of commercial exploitation routes and potential deals so that only general guidelines can be given. Naturally, the final deal achieved is that which can be negotiated. The potential rewards for the university and inventor are both financial (via licensing income and equity realisation and non-financial.

  1. The professionalization of the university students during the initial formation

    Elizabeth Darias Hernández

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At present time, the process of professionalization is considered as one of the highest goals in the university studies and it is the base of solutions of other big problems stated by the present university. However, there is a tendency from the hyperbole of this process as a phenomenon of post graduated education. This excludes and diminishes the value in the university formation, moment where the bases of identity as professionals are created. The article deals with role and placement as a whole and its harmonic relationship between initial and permanent formation, the content of this article constitutes the scientific problem of the research and it brings about the methodological bases to contribute to its solution.

  2. Universality in heterogeneous catalysis

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2002-01-01

    Based on an extensive set of density functional theory calculations it is shown that for a class of catalytic reactions there is a universal, reactant independent relation between the reaction activation energy and the stability of reaction intermediates. This leads directly to a universal relati...

  3. Regionalism in Scottish Universities

    Hutchison, Dougal

    1976-01-01

    It is well-known that Scottish universities are highly local institutions and that over two-fifth of Scottish university students live at home. Attempts to ascertain if this regionalism has relaxed over the past twenty years with student grant regulations, improvement in communications and the increasing affluence of today's society. (Author/RK)

  4. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl…

  5. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market"…

  6. Universe of constant

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  7. Knowledge and the University

    Barnett, Ronald; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    for the university and the university’s place in the world. However, that presupposition has taken a battering recently from many directions. With the incorporation of the university more fully into the world, knowledge is no longer seen as valuable in-itself but now is viewed only instrumentally, and has to have...

  8. The deep universe

    Sandage, AR; Longair, MS

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the concept of the deep universe from two conflicting theoretical viewpoints: firstly as a theory embracing the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present; and secondly through observations gleaned over the years on stars, galaxies and clusters.

  9. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  10. Talent Management for Universities

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  11. General Topology of the Universe

    Pandya, Aalok

    2002-01-01

    General topology of the universe is descibed. It is concluded that topology of the present universe is greater or stronger than the topology of the universe in the past and topology of the future universe will be stronger or greater than the present topology of the universe. Consequently, the universe remains unbounded.

  12. The university with conditions

    José María Ripalda Crespo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The model of the national university is being substituted by that of the global university. At the same time, new dogmas that appear with economic labels are being imposed. All this is accompanied by important cultural changes. The Spanish university was one of the instances that was taken care of by the post-Francoist regime. Now, this regime feels strong against it, and on the other hand this university – as the whole of the productive structure – requires a reform. It is not expected that this reform will go in the direction of the university having more social presence, but rather more presence of companies. It is neither expected that it will imply more internal democracy, but more discipline. All resistance or alternative has to take into account the new situation and join the still dispersed forces that still have, however, a constitutive capacity.

  13. The holographic universe

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  14. The rotating universe

    Ruben, G.; Treder, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    For a long time the question whether the universe rotates or not is discussed. Aspects of Huygens, Newton, Mach and other important historical scientists in this field are reported. The investigations of the mathematician Kurt Groedel in order to prove the rotation of the universe are illustrated. Kurt Groedel has shown that Einstein's gravitational equations of general relativity theory and the cosmological postulate of global homogeneity of cosmic matter (that is the Copernical principle) are not contradictionary to a rotating universe. Abberation measurements, position determination by means of radiointerferometry and methods for the determination of the rotation of the universe from the isotropy of the background radiation are presented. From these experiments it can be concluded that the universe seems not to rotate as already Einstein expected

  15. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  16. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Hyun, Su Jeong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  17. University Performance Management

    For the last two decades the Danish Universities have felt the impact of the international trend towards implementation of New Public Management. The results are seen in the implementation of new hierarchical governance structures and contractual governance system including market based quantitat......For the last two decades the Danish Universities have felt the impact of the international trend towards implementation of New Public Management. The results are seen in the implementation of new hierarchical governance structures and contractual governance system including market based...... quantitative measurement systems for resource allocation and performance evaluation. Compared to other countries the changes in performance measurements and governance of the Danish universities are radical and the Minister of Science heralded them as "the greatest change in university management since...... the founding of Copenhagen University in 1479". The changes took place with surprisingly little resistance from university scholars. The articles in this anthology investigate the origins and rationales for the silent managerial revolution at Danish Universities and the radical implications for the identity...

  18. Age of the universe

    Parker, B.

    1981-01-01

    The age of the universe is the time that has elapsed since the Big Bang. To calculate the age, the expansion rate of the universe and distance to the galaxies must be determined. Unfortunately, it appears that the expansion rate is not constant but is decelerating. In the 1920's and 30's, Edwin Hubble set out to estimate the age of universe based on the expansion rate and distance to the galaxies. His method is described along with its flaw. Since that time several others have estimated the age of the universe. Their methods as well as results vary. These are discussed in the article. The ages determined from the various methods range from 10 to 20 billion years. There are two independent ways to determine the age of the universe. What they actually do is determine the age of our galaxy which would give a lower limit to the age of the universe. The first method calculates age of globular clusters which yields as age range from 8 to 18 billion years. The second method involves observing the speed at which radioactive substances decay. This also yields and age greater than 10 billion years. It is clear that there is still a lot of work to do before the true age of the universe can be determied

  19. On universal partial words

    Chen, Herman Z. Q.; Kitaev, Sergey; Mütze, Torsten; Sun, Brian Y.

    2016-01-01

    A universal word for a finite alphabet $A$ and some integer $n\\geq 1$ is a word over $A$ such that every word in $A^n$ appears exactly once as a subword (cyclically or linearly). It is well-known and easy to prove that universal words exist for any $A$ and $n$. In this work we initiate the systematic study of universal partial words. These are words that in addition to the letters from $A$ may contain an arbitrary number of occurrences of a special `joker' symbol $\\Diamond\

  20. Possible physical universes

    Gordon McCabe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various types of physical universe which could exist according to modern mathematical physics. The paper begins with an introduction that approaches the question from the viewpoint of ontic structural realism. Section 2 takes the case of the 'multiverse' of spatially homogeneous universes, and analyses the famous Collins-Hawking argument, which purports to show that our own universe is a very special member of this collection. Section 3 considers the multiverse of all solutions to the Einstein field equations, and continues the discussion of whether the notions of special and typical can be defined within such a collection.

  1. Universal (Global Evolutionism

    Arkady Ursul

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article investigate a general scientific concept of a global (universal evolution, in which selforganization of the material systems acts as a common ground and a permanent process of progressive development in the visible Universe. The main problem of research of this type of evolution is seen as a superhighway trajectory of evolutionary processes in the Universe, in which there is a continuous selforganization of the material systems, ranging from the Big Bang and to the social level of evolution, which may have an indefinite continuation of society and nature

  2. Interaction university and school

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  3. The intelligent Universe

    Hoyle, F.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the 'primordial soup'); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe. (U.K.)

  4. ULTRA: Universal Grammar as a Universal Parser.

    Medeiros, David P

    2018-01-01

    A central concern of generative grammar is the relationship between hierarchy and word order, traditionally understood as two dimensions of a single syntactic representation. A related concern is directionality in the grammar. Traditional approaches posit process-neutral grammars, embodying knowledge of language, put to use with infinite facility both for production and comprehension. This has crystallized in the view of Merge as the central property of syntax, perhaps its only novel feature. A growing number of approaches explore grammars with different directionalities, often with more direct connections to performance mechanisms. This paper describes a novel model of universal grammar as a one-directional, universal parser. Mismatch between word order and interpretation order is pervasive in comprehension; in the present model, word order is language-particular and interpretation order (i.e., hierarchy) is universal. These orders are not two dimensions of a unified abstract object (e.g., precedence and dominance in a single tree); rather, both are temporal sequences, and UG is an invariant real-time procedure (based on Knuth's stack-sorting algorithm) transforming word order into hierarchical order. This shift in perspective has several desirable consequences. It collapses linearization, displacement, and composition into a single performance process. The architecture provides a novel source of brackets (labeled unambiguously and without search), which are understood not as part-whole constituency relations, but as storage and retrieval routines in parsing. It also explains why neutral word order within single syntactic cycles avoids 213-like permutations. The model identifies cycles as extended projections of lexical heads, grounding the notion of phase. This is achieved with a universal processor, dispensing with parameters. The empirical focus is word order in noun phrases. This domain provides some of the clearest evidence for 213-avoidance as a cross

  5. Risk management at university

    Ivanova, H.; Abramovich, S.

    2013-01-01

    This article observes the basic recommendations for the risk management system in higher education as an example Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno. Consider the risk-management standard that based in a process approach

  6. The hidden universe

    Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomer Disney has followed a somewhat different tack than that of most popular books on cosmology by concentrating on the notion of hidden (as in not directly observable by its own radiation) matter in the universe

  7. Is our Universe typical?

    Gurzadyan, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of typicalness of the Universe - as a dynamical system possessing both regular and chaotic regions of positive measure of phase space, is raised and discussed. Two dynamical systems are considered: 1) The observed Universe as a hierarchy of systems of N graviting bodies; 2) (3+1)-manifold with matter evolving to Wheeler-DeWitt equation in superspace with Hawking boundary condition of compact metrics. It is shown that the observed Universe is typical. There is no unambiguous answer for the second system yet. If it is typical too then the same present state of the Universe could have been originated from an infinite number of different initial conditions the restoration of which is practically impossible at present. 35 refs.; 2 refs

  8. The Universe and Life

    Eduard Kazantsev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some of the unsolved problems of modern cosmology, which lead to the need to consider the role of living matter in the evolution of the universe. The author proposes the hy- pothesis of the emergence, in the process of evolution of the universe, “biological vacuum” (physical antipode, which has a purpose of improving physical matter until the appearance of living matter. Substantiates the idea that the “biological vacuum” in the “live” dark matter with the participation of a living organism as an intermediary. The model of a stationary universe, as the local group of galaxies, placed in a halo of “live” dark matter. At the end of the article the author predicts the final evolution of the physical universe (after the collapse of the physical fields and particles as the begin- ning of a new stage of evolution of the “live” dark matter.

  9. Origin (?) of the Universe

    light nuclei and the microwave background. ... tested by more sophisticated observations. This is what we ... of the universe so long as the observational tests do not disprove it. ... Naturally, in the six and a half decades since Hubble's observa-.

  10. University Presidents: Academic Chameleons

    Buxton, Thomas H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Sampling the opinions of at least one college or university president in each state and at schools of all sizes, the authors measure the degree of job satisfaction experienced by presidents. (Editor/LBH)

  11. The accidental universe

    Davies, P.C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Is our universe an accident of nature. The mysterious coincidences underlying the structure and properties of the universe that we inhabit are examined. This is the first book for the non-specialist reader to present in depth the provocative hypothesis that the structure of the physical world is exceedingly contrived in its appearance. A survey is presented of the range of apparently miraculous accidents of nature that have enabled the universe to evolve its familiar structures: atoms, stars, galaxies, and life itself. This book concludes with an investigation of the so-called 'anthropic principle' which postulates that 'miraculous coincidences' are inevitable in any universe containing conscious observers. This thesis of a cosmic biological selection effect will both reassure and enrage readers, the very existence of whom may be related to fine tuning in the laws of physics. (author)

  12. The isotropic Universe

    Raine, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This introduction to contemporary ideas in cosmology differs from other books on the 'expanding Universe' in its emphasis on physical cosmology and on the physical basis of the general theory of relativity. It is considered that the remarkable degree of isotropy, rather than the expansion, can be regarded as the central observational feature of the Universe. The various theories and ideas in 'big-bang' cosmology are discussed, providing an insight into current problems. Chapter headings are: quality of matter; expanding Universe; quality of radiation; quantity of matter; general theory of relativity; cosmological models; cosmological tests; matter and radiation; limits of isotropy; why is the Universe isotropic; singularities; evolution of structure. (U.K.)

  13. University of Southern California

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  14. The universe strikes back

    Steigman, G.

    1983-01-01

    The approach to particle physics via cosmology may meet with an obstacle in a series of cosmological puzzles studied in this paper: the flatness-longevity puzzle, the horizon-homogenity puzzle, and the cosmological constant puzzle. An analysis of the geometry and dynamics of the universe leads to an understanding (but not solution) of the flatness-longevity puzzle: possible universes are distinguished by the value of the dimensionless quantity N, the coordinate density of ER particles, such that the longevity of the universe is fixed by N. Universes where nonrelativistic particles dominate are then studied. An inflationary scenario proposed as a solution to these puzzles is studied, but found to have some difficulties

  15. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  16. Performance Measurement at Universities

    Lueg, Klarissa

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes empirical approaches to testing the reliability, validity, and organizational effectiveness of student evaluations of teaching (SET) as a performance measurement instrument in knowledge management at the institutional level of universities. Departing from Weber’s concept...

  17. University related studies

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Over the years, opportunities for terrestrial ecology studies have attracted student researchers associated with Pacific Northwest colleges and universities. During the past year, four students have been involved with undergraduate or graduate thesis projects. Brief descriptions of these studies are included in this section. It is expected that university participation will be enhanced by designating parts of the Hanford Reservation as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP)

  18. Mapping the early Universe

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe

  19. The Bright Universe Cosmology

    Surdin, M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that viewed from the 'outside', our universe is a black hole. Hence the 'inside' cosmology considered is termed as the Bright Universe Cosmology. The model proposed avoids the singularities of cosmologies of the Big Bang variety, it gives a good account of the redshifts, the cosmic background radiation, the number counts; it also gives a satisfactory explanation of the 'large numbers coincidence' and of the variation in time of fundamental constants. (Auth.)

  20. The universal access handbook

    Stephanidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the field of Universal Access has made significant progress in consolidating theoretical approaches, scientific methods and technologies, as well as in exploring new application domains. Increasingly, professionals in this rapidly maturing area require a comprehensive and multidisciplinary resource that addresses current principles, methods, and tools. Written by leading international authorities from academic, research, and industrial organizations and nonmarket institutions, The Universal Access Handbook covers the unfolding scientific, methodological, technological, and pol

  1. Rotating universe models

    Tozini, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Universal computer interfaces

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  3. Mapping the early Universe

    Anon.

    1991-06-15

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe.

  4. Cultural universals: So what?

    M. Elaine Botha

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the elusive "cultural universal s” in a variety of academic disciplines has been motivated b y the spectre of relativism in its diverse guises. The problem of relativism has been thrust upon us inter alia by the inability of our epistemological models to account for social and cultural, moral and cognitive diversity and to provide us with criteria by means of which to judge aberrations like ideologies. Contrary to the general trend I would like to argue that it is not the spectre of relativism in its various guises which necessitates the search for cultural universals, nor is this the only motivation for a Christian to argue in favour of the recognition of cultural universals. Various authors have suggested that such universal structures do exist; that they condition human and societal behaviour and that it would in principle be possible to construct a theory of these structural universals or a "biogrammar" or "geography ” of the universal cultural acquisition device of humankind (cf. Harre,1976, 32; Johnson, 1987: xxxvii ; Tige r and Fox, 1974:17,30. Cross -cu ltural research in both psychology and anthropology has pointed to the existence of such traits, and in recent philosophical discussions Apel and others have pointed to the necessity of recognizing the existence of some sort of " transcendentalia" . These arguments emphasize elements that are common to diverse approaches to the problem of cultural universals. Christian scholars could accept most of these arguments as valid and yet argue in favour of a very specifically modified version of the notion of cultural universals. This essay attempts to develop such a position.

  5. Establishing and prioritizing research questions for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hair loss (excluding alopecia areata): the Hair Loss Priority Setting Partnership.

    Macbeth, A; Tomlinson, J; Messenger, A; Moore-Millar, K; Michaelides, C; Shipman, A; Kassim, J; Brockley, J; Szczecinska, W; Farrant, P; Robinson, R; Rodgers, J; Chambers, J; Upadhyaya, S; Harries, M

    2018-02-01

    Hair and scalp problems are common. Unfortunately, many uncertainties exist around the most effective management and treatment strategies for these disorders. To identify uncertainties in hair-loss management, prevention, diagnosis and treatment that are important to both people with hair loss and healthcare professionals. A Hair Loss Priority Setting Partnership was established between patients, their carers and relatives, and healthcare professionals to identify the most important uncertainties in hair loss. The methodology of the James Lind Alliance was followed to ensure a balanced, inclusive and transparent process. In total, 2747 treatment uncertainties were submitted by 912 participants; following exclusions 884 uncertainties relating to hair loss (excluding alopecia areata) were analysed. Questions were combined into 'indicative uncertainties' following a structured format. A series of ranking exercises further reduced this list to a top 25 that was taken to a final prioritization workshop where the top 10 priorities were agreed. We present the top 10 research priorities for hair loss (excluding alopecia areata) to guide researchers and funding bodies to support studies important to both patients and clinicians. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: one dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions.

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D

    2014-11-28

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a "mushroom" regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ(1/3) scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ(1/3). In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ(1/3). We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  7. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a “mushroom” regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ 1/3 scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ 1/3 . In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ 1/3 . We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results

  8. Inclusive Education and Training in South African Higher Education: Mapping the Experiences of a Student with Physical Disability at University

    Ntombela, Sithabile

    2013-01-01

    The South African Constitution upholds and entrenches the human right of all citizens. Similarly, the Higher Education Act of 1997 promotes equality of access for all, especially for those previously marginalised or excluded. The study reported in this article explored challenges experienced by students with disabilities at his university. Using…

  9. Survivors in a Male Preserve: A Study of British Women Academics' Experiences and Perceptions of Discrimination in a UK University.

    Bagilhole, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    A study of 43 British women university faculty suggested that, in general, women faculty are small minorities, feel isolated and excluded, feel their authority challenged by male students, and pressure themselves to perform better than men. Women faculty tend to have fewer support systems, role models or mentors, and have difficulty with work…

  10. Dialoguing, Cultural Capital, and Student Engagement: Toward a Hip Hop Pedagogy in the High School and University Classroom

    Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2009-01-01

    Hip hop culture is typically excluded from conventional educational spaces within the U.S. Drawing on the experiences of an educator who works with urban high school students and university level pre- and in-service educators, this article examines the role of hip hop culture for student engagement in two settings--an alternative high school…

  11. University contracts summary book

    None

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  12. Universal Majorana thermoelectric noise

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2018-04-01

    Thermoelectric phenomena resulting from an interplay between particle flows induced by electric fields and temperature inhomogeneities are extremely insightful as a tool providing substantial knowledge about the microscopic structure of a given system. By tuning, e.g., parameters of a nanoscopic system coupled via tunneling mechanisms to two contacts, one may achieve various situations where the electric current induced by an external bias voltage competes with the electric current excited by the temperature difference of the two contacts. Even more exciting physics emerges when the system's electronic degrees freedom split to form Majorana fermions which make the thermoelectric dynamics universal. Here, we propose revealing these unique universal signatures of Majorana fermions in strongly nonequilibrium quantum dots via noise of the thermoelectric transport beyond linear response. It is demonstrated that whereas mean thermoelectric quantities are only universal at large-bias voltages, the noise of the electric current excited by an external bias voltage and the temperature difference of the contacts is universal at any bias voltage. We provide truly universal, i.e., independent of the system's parameters, thermoelectric ratios between nonlinear response coefficients of the noise and mean current at large-bias voltages where experiments may easily be performed to uniquely detect these truly universal Majorana thermoelectric signatures.

  13. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  14. When apparent schizophrenia is excluded

    Subsequently, the MRI in May 2010 showed only nonspecific changes. Finally, in July ... Town to instruct the development of the predictive .... Cummings JL. ... World Health Organization, and Global Health Observatory Data Repository. Global ...

  15. Theory including future not excluded

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  16. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented

  17. Recipes for the Universe

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of conferences for the uninitiated. Each of the conferences will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The third conference in the series, "How to build a universe?", will take place on Tuesday 15 March 2005 and the speaker will be the CERN theoretical physicist, John Ellis. A tiny number of elementary particles are responsible for the very diverse universe that surrounds us. These basic building blocks of matter interact by exchanging photons and other similar particles. After summing up what we know about these fundamental building blocks, their role in the history of the universe will be discussed. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that ...

  18. CP-Violating solitons in the early universe

    Tornkvist, O.; Riotto, A.

    1997-07-01

    Solitons in extensions of the Standard Model can serve as localized sources of CP violation. Depending on their stability properties, they may serve either to create or to deplete the baryon asymmetry. The conditions for existence of a particular soliton candidate, the membrane solution of the two-Higgs model, are presented. In the generic case, investigated by Bachas and Tomaras, membranes exist and are metastable for a wide range of parameters. For the more viable supersymmetric case, it is shown that the present-day existence of CP-violating membranes is experimentally excluded, but preliminary studies suggest that they may have existed in the early universe soon after the electroweak phase transition, with important consequences for the baryon asymmetry of the universe

  19. Quantum and Universe

    Uiler, Dzh.

    1982-01-01

    General approach to the structure of the Universe is discussed. Two properties of physical laws: symmetry and changeability are considered from this view point. Each physical law permits simpler formulation in the notion of symmetry. But the simplicity of this description conceals interval mechanisms which make up the base of the physical law. The problem of physical law stability is analyzed. It is concluded that unrestricted changeability is the main property of physics. Primary attention is paid to the problem of ''quantum and Universe''. The effect of measuring process on the experimental results is the most difficult problem of quantum mechanisms. The quantum principle rejected an attempt to conceptually present the reality as it is pictured independently from its observation and it made the description of the Universe structure still more complicated and confused

  20. Armored glass university ceilings

    Ana Guil Bozal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The barriers that women face to occupy the highest professional positions are well studied, yet they persist. The employment situation of women has improved, but the positions of power are still predominantly in male hands, as if men continually seek new mechanisms to keep, like viruses that change every year to survive the way vaccines. Barriers persist, although in recent decades women have managed to overcome in quantity and quality to men among university students. Women are still unable to access the best academic positions. Among university faculty only reach 40% and full professor position remain masculinized, having managed to reach the women -after many efforts and some policies- measures only 20%, which is seen clearly insufficient given their greater training. Against this background, the future is difficult, unless the university decided to endorse the cause of equality, going to assume its role of reference for the new generations and to other organizations and society in general.

  1. Baby universe theory

    Nielsen, H.B.; Ninomiya, Masao

    1989-12-01

    We give an elementary review of the so called 'the theory of baby universes' which is a series of ideas or speculations about some effects in quantum gravity, viz. the effect of a certain type of wormholes, representing the exchange of small 3-space universes called baby universes. We consider this 'theory' as being physically and scientifically a very promising candidate for a theory of everything. It is, however, mathematically lacking any strong foundation at all. It solves several fine-tuning problems: First of all the cosmological constant problem, and also the strong CP-problem and the hierarchy problem. We also speculate that it might predict the possibility of influencing the probability distributions of the outcome of quantum mechanical measurements at one time by acts at a later time. (orig.)

  2. Phonology without universal grammar.

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  3. Electromagnetic Gowdy universe

    Charach, C.

    1979-01-01

    Following Gowdy and Berger we construct an inhomogeneous closed electromagnetic universe with three-torus topology. This model is obtained as a result of the homogeneity breaking in the electromagnetic Bianchi type-I universe and contains interacting gravitational and electromagnetic waves. This cosmological solution provides an exactly solvable model for the study of the nonlinear fully relativistic regime of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational fields in the early universe. The asymptotic behavior is considered (i) in the vicinity of the initial singularity and (ii) in the high-frequency limit. It is shown that the effects of coupling between electromagnetic and gravitational waves cause an evolution which is significantly different from that of the vacuum model. The influence of the primordial homogeneous electromagnetic field on the dynamics of the model is also discussed

  4. The anamorphic universe

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  5. The anamorphic universe

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase

  6. The anamorphic universe

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J., E-mail: aijjas@princeton.edu, E-mail: steinh@princeton.edu [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  7. Southern Universities Nuclear Institute

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Southern Universities Nuclear Institute was created in 1961 to provide postgraduate research and teaching facilities for the universities of Cape Town and Stellenbosch. The main research tool is the 6,0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator installed in 1964. Developments and improvements over the years have maintained the Institute's research effectiveness. The work of local research groups has led to a large number of M Sc and doctorate degrees and numerous publications in international journals. Research at the Institute includes front-line studies of basic nuclear and atomic physics, the development and application of nuclear analytical techniques and the application of radioisotope tracers to problems in science, industry and medicine. The Institute receives financial support from the two southern universities, the Department of National Education, the CSIR and the Atomic Energy Board

  8. An eternal universe

    Novello, M.; Heintzmann, H.

    1983-01-01

    A new generalized solution of Maxwell-Einstein equations (which are non-minimally coupled) which leads to some fascinating aspects of the Universe is presented. The Cosmos has no singularity due to the coupling of longitudinal electromagnetism with space-time. It contains the Milne-Schucking cosmos as a limiting case. This model contains a free parameter (the longitudinal electromagnetic field) which allows one to fix the density of highest compression of the Cosmos. Alternativelly the parameter allows one to adjust our cosmos to the presently observed Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter. The model seems to be a viable candidate for our real cosmos as it allows one to extend the time scale of the Universe to arbitrarily large values i.e., it is able to provide the necessary time scale for the origin of life. It is speculated that the entropy is finite but intelligence in the Universe may be infinite. (Author) [pt

  9. The Worldhood university

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    Universities and higher education today are sites for entanglement of multiple forms of agency and lifeworlds. Enhanced focus is given to higher education strategies and frameworks that integrate more traditional forms of higher education curriculum with moral and political awareness, social agency...... the mode 2 university, where the university is ‘for sale’ (Shumar, 1997) and where higher education curricula are being defined and shaped by the needs and current drivers of the job market and the shifting neoliberalist company strategies. As Ronald Barnett underlines “the contemporary vocabulary...... politically, socially, ethically, and philosophically. It requires, among other things, new conceptions of academic citizenship, belonging in higher education, and what we have called ‘placeful universities’ where “academic citizenship emerges through dialogical integration and ‘Mitsein’ in the critically...

  10. Supercomplexity and the university

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    Ronald Barnett’s modern classic Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity (published December 1999), has had a crucial impact internationally on the field of Higher Education research and develop- ment since the book was published now nearly 20 years ago. Bridging an academic oeuvre...... across almost 30 years with close to 30 published volumes, Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity plays an important role in the development and transformation of Barnett’s social theory of Higher Education into a social philosophy of Higher Education. In the book Barnett performs...... and vision that fully embraces the future of Higher Education. This way, Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity has not only paved the way for Barnett’s own devel- opment of a social philosophy of Higher Education, but also contributed invaluably to the rise and maturing of philosophy...

  11. A unified universe

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2018-01-01

    We present a unified evolution of the universe from very early times until the present epoch by including both the leading local correction R2 and the leading non-local term R1□2R to the classical gravitational action. We find that the inflationary phase driven by R2 term gracefully exits...... in a transitory regime characterized by coherent oscillations of the Hubble parameter. The universe then naturally enters into a radiation dominated epoch followed by a matter dominated era. At sufficiently late times after radiation–matter equality, the non-local term starts to dominate inducing an accelerated...... expansion of the universe at the present epoch. We further exhibit the fact that both the leading local and non-local terms can be obtained within the covariant effective field theory of gravity. This scenario thus provides a unified picture of inflation and dark energy in a single framework by means...

  12. Comparison of the thermal stabilization of proteins by oligosaccharides and monosaccharide mixtures: Measurement and analysis in the context of excluded volume theory.

    Beg, Ilyas; Minton, Allen P; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2018-06-01

    The thermal stability of apo α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and lysozyme was measured in the presence of mixtures of glucose, fructose, and galactose. Mixtures of these monosaccharides in the appropriate stoichiometric ratio were found to have a greater stabilizing effect on each of the two proteins than equal weight/volume concentrations of di- tri- and tetrasaccharides with identical subunit composition (sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, and stachyose). The excluded volume model for the effect of a single saccharide on the stability of a protein previously proposed by Beg et al. [Biochemistry 54 (2015) 3594] was extended to treat the case of saccharide mixtures. The extended model predicts quantitatively the stabilizing effect of all monosaccharide mixtures on α-LA and lysozyme reported here, as well as previously published results obtained for ribonuclease A [Biophys. Chem. 138 (2008) 120] to within experimental uncertainty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Einstein Universe Revisited and End of Dark ERA

    Nurgaliev, Ildus S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the earliest general relativistic cosmological solution was received by Einstein himself as homogenous, isotropic one. In accordance with European cosmology it was expected static. The Eternal Universe as scientific model is conflicting with the existed theological model of the Universe created by God, therefore, of the limited age. Christianity, younger Islam, older Judaism are based on creationism. Much older oriental traditions such us Hinduism and Buddhism are based on conceptions of eternal and cyclic Universe which are closer to scientific worldview. To have static universe Einstein needed a factor to counteract gravity and postulated cosmological term and considered it as a disadvantage of the theory. This aesthetic dissatisfaction was amplified by interpretation distance-redshift relationship as a cosmological expansion effect. Emerged scientific cosmological community (excluding Hubble himself - almost always) endorsed the concept of expanding Universe. At the same time, as it is shown in this report, a natural well known factors do exist to counteract gravity. They are inertial centrifugal and Coriolis forces finding their geometrical presentation in the relativity theory.

  14. Radioprotection in Brazilian universities

    Caballero, K.C.; Borges, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a broad knowledge of the circumstances under which activities involving ionizing radiations are held at brazilian academic institutions. Around 90 institutions (universities and isolated schools of both public and private sectors) were invited, by mail, to answer an inquiry with questions from technical to legal aspects of their activities with radiations. Information received from 2/3 of institutions contacted, permitted conclusions as: there is a wide ignorance about radioprotection procedures and legislation, although few universities maintain some efficient radioprotection staff; there is a need for the establishment of a standard radioprotection text dedicated to those specific activities of the sector. (author)

  15. Universal Lyndon Words

    Carpi, Arturo; Fici, Gabriele; Holub, Stepan; Oprsal, Jakub; Sciortino, Marinella

    2014-01-01

    A word $w$ over an alphabet $\\Sigma$ is a Lyndon word if there exists an order defined on $\\Sigma$ for which $w$ is lexicographically smaller than all of its conjugates (other than itself). We introduce and study \\emph{universal Lyndon words}, which are words over an $n$-letter alphabet that have length $n!$ and such that all the conjugates are Lyndon words. We show that universal Lyndon words exist for every $n$ and exhibit combinatorial and structural properties of these words. We then defi...

  16. Building the universe

    Sutton, Christine

    1985-01-01

    The book 'In Building the Universe' contains a collection of articles from the magazine 'New Scientist', compiled and edited to provide an overview of the field of particle physics. A picture of the basic constituents of matter (quarks and leptons) is given, together with the four fundamental forces that hold them together. The operation of these forces in the first instance of the hot young Universe is described. Also, the development of the accelerators and detectors used in elementary particle physics, is discussed. (UK)

  17. The 4-percent universe

    Panek, Richard

    2012-01-01

    It is one of the most disturbing aspects of our universe: only four per cent of it consists of the matter that makes up every star, planet, and every book. The rest is completely unknown. Acclaimed science writer Richard Panek tells the story of the handful of scientists who have spent the past few decades on a quest to unlock the secrets of “dark matter" and the even stranger substance called “dark energy". These are perhaps the greatest mysteries in science,and solving them will reshape our understanding of the universe and our place in it. The stakes could not be higher. Panek's fast-paced

  18. The missing universe

    Springel, V.; Taillet, R.; Deffayet, C.

    2014-01-01

    According to the Big Bang model, ordinary matter would play a second role in the universe compared to 2 mysterious components: dark matter and dark energy. Although the nature of both components is unknown, observational hints for their existence pile up but the direct detection of both has been unsuccessful so far. New ways have been explored to do without the concepts of dark matter and dark energy. This document that is divided into 3 parts presents the observational data that back the idea of dark matter and dark energy, the experimental effort made worldwide to detect dark matter particles, and the other ways to explain universe expansion

  19. Models of the universe

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Most models of the universe are dependent on the assumption of a uniform distribution of matter, and thus are rather crude, due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's field equations. Here, a model is proposed which avoids this smoothing-out process. A metric is obtained which is consistent with the assumption that the matter of the universe is concentrated mainly in stars, moving with the velocity of recession implied by Hubble's law. The solution obtained gives results comparable to those obtainable by Schwarzchild metric, suitably adjusted to agree with the Einstein-DeSitter model at large distances

  20. Exponential Cardassian universe

    Liu Daojun; Sun Changbo; Li Xinzhou

    2006-01-01

    The expectation of explaining cosmological observations without requiring new energy sources is forsooth worthy of investigation. In this Letter, a new kind of Cardassian models, called exponential Cardassian models, for the late-time universe are investigated in the context of the spatially flat FRW universe scenario. We fit the exponential Cardassian models to current type Ia supernovae data and find they are consistent with the observations. Furthermore, we point out that the equation-of-state parameter for the effective dark fluid component in exponential Cardassian models can naturally cross the cosmological constant divide w=-1 that observations favor mildly without introducing exotic material that destroy the weak energy condition

  1. Fundamentals of university mathematics

    McGregor, C M; Stothers, W W

    2010-01-01

    The third edition of this popular and effective textbook provides in one volume a unified treatment of topics essential for first year university students studying for degrees in mathematics. Students of computer science, physics and statistics will also find this book a helpful guide to all the basic mathematics they require. It clearly and comprehensively covers much of the material that other textbooks tend to assume, assisting students in the transition to university-level mathematics.Expertly revised and updated, the chapters cover topics such as number systems, set and functions, differe

  2. Bootstrap, universality and horizons

    Chang, Chi-Ming [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics,University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States); Lin, Ying-Hsuan [Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We present a closed form expression for the semiclassical OPE coefficients that are universal for all 2D CFTs with a “weak” light spectrum, by taking the semiclassical limit of the fusion kernel. We match this with a properly regularized and normalized bulk action evaluated on a geometry with three conical defects, analytically continued in the deficit angles beyond the range for which a metric with positive signature exists. The analytically continued geometry has a codimension-one coordinate singularity surrounding the heaviest conical defect. This singularity becomes a horizon after Wick rotating to Lorentzian signature, suggesting a connection between universality and the existence of a horizon.

  3. The plasma universe

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1989-12-01

    The term 'Plasma Universe', coined by Hannes Alfven, emphasices the fact that plasma phenomena discovered in the laboratory and in accessible regions of space. must be important also in the rest of the universe, which consists almost entirely of matter in the plasma state. Relevant aspect of this concept will be discussed. They include the response of the plasma to electric currents, the support of magnetic-field aligned electric fields, violation of the frozen-field condition, rapid release of magnetically stored energy, acceleration of charged particles, chemical separation, and filamentary and cellular structures. (authors)

  4. Prevalence of Eligibility Criteria for the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial in US Adults Among Excluded Groups: Age Diabetes Mellitus, or a History of Stroke.

    Bress, Adam P; Tanner, Rikki M; Hess, Rachel; Gidding, Samuel S; Colantonio, Lisandro D; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Adults diabetes mellitus, or a history of stroke were not enrolled in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). Estimating the size and characteristics of these excluded groups who meet the other SPRINT eligibility criteria may provide information on the potential impact of providers extending the SPRINT findings to these populations. We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2012 (n=25 076) to estimate the percentage and characteristics of US adults ≥20 years in 3 populations (age diabetes mellitus, or history of stroke) excluded from SPRINT who otherwise meet the trial eligibility criteria: age ≥50 years, systolic blood pressure (SBP) 130-180 mm Hg, high cardiovascular disease risk, and not having trial exclusion criteria. Overall, 1.0% (95% CI 0.8-1.3) of US adults age diabetes mellitus, and 19.0% (95% CI 16.0-22.4) with history of stroke met the other SPRINT eligibility criteria. Among US adults with SBP ≥130 mm Hg, other SPRINT eligibility criteria were met by 7.5% (95% CI 6.1-9.2) of those age diabetes mellitus, and 23.0% (95% CI 19.4-27.0) with history of stroke. Among US adults meeting the other SPRINT eligibility criteria, antihypertensive medication was being taken by 31.0% (95% CI 23.9-41.3) of those diabetes mellitus, and 68.9% (95% CI 59.4-77.1) with a history of stroke. A substantial percentage of US adults with diabetes mellitus or history of stroke and a small percentage <50 years old meet the other SPRINT eligibility criteria. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. The pathophysiology of the aqueduct stroke volume in normal pressure hydrocephalus: can co-morbidity with other forms of dementia be excluded?

    Bateman, Grant A. [John Hunter Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Newcastle (Australia); Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C. [Hunter Medical Research Institute, Clinical Neurosciences Program, Newcastle (Australia); Schofield, Peter [James Fletcher Hospital, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Newcastle (Australia)

    2005-10-01

    Variable results are obtained from the treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) by shunt insertion. There is a high correlation between NPH and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on brain biopsy. There is an overlap between AD and vascular dementia (VaD), suggesting that a correlation exists between NPH and other forms of dementia. This study seeks to (1) understand the physiological factors behind, and (2) define the ability of, the aqueduct stroke volume to exclude dementia co-morbidity. Twenty-four patients from a dementia clinic were classified as having either early AD or VaD on the basis of clinical features, Hachinski score and neuropsychological testing. They were compared with 16 subjects with classical clinical findings of NPH and 12 aged-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects. MRI flow quantification was used to measure aqueduct stroke volume and arterial pulse volume. An arterio-cerebral compliance ratio was calculated from the two volumes in each patient. The aqueduct stroke volume was elevated in all three forms of dementia, with no significant difference noted between the groups. The arterial pulse volume was elevated by 24% in VaD and reduced by 35% in NPH, compared to normal (P=0.05 and P=0.002, respectively), and was normal in AD. There was a spectrum of relative compliance with normal compliance in VaD and reduced compliance in AD and NPH. The aqueduct stroke volume depends on the arterial pulse volume and the relative compliance between the arterial tree and brain. The aqueduct stroke volume cannot exclude significant co-morbidity in NPH. (orig.)

  6. The pathophysiology of the aqueduct stroke volume in normal pressure hydrocephalus: can co-morbidity with other forms of dementia be excluded?

    Bateman, Grant A.; Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C.; Schofield, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Variable results are obtained from the treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) by shunt insertion. There is a high correlation between NPH and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on brain biopsy. There is an overlap between AD and vascular dementia (VaD), suggesting that a correlation exists between NPH and other forms of dementia. This study seeks to (1) understand the physiological factors behind, and (2) define the ability of, the aqueduct stroke volume to exclude dementia co-morbidity. Twenty-four patients from a dementia clinic were classified as having either early AD or VaD on the basis of clinical features, Hachinski score and neuropsychological testing. They were compared with 16 subjects with classical clinical findings of NPH and 12 aged-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects. MRI flow quantification was used to measure aqueduct stroke volume and arterial pulse volume. An arterio-cerebral compliance ratio was calculated from the two volumes in each patient. The aqueduct stroke volume was elevated in all three forms of dementia, with no significant difference noted between the groups. The arterial pulse volume was elevated by 24% in VaD and reduced by 35% in NPH, compared to normal (P=0.05 and P=0.002, respectively), and was normal in AD. There was a spectrum of relative compliance with normal compliance in VaD and reduced compliance in AD and NPH. The aqueduct stroke volume depends on the arterial pulse volume and the relative compliance between the arterial tree and brain. The aqueduct stroke volume cannot exclude significant co-morbidity in NPH. (orig.)

  7. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  8. Study of university students' attitudes toward office space at universities

    S.M. Eteadifard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Office space is the space where students first experience the university. In this paper, the attitude of students toward office space in the public sphere of university is discussed. This article is the result of the research conducted for the “Institute for Social and Cultural Studies” by the author. The main issues in this paper are: university students' attitudes towards quality office space at the universities and mental basis of common issues among students at the universities. Data were collected through individual and group interviews. More than eighty interviews with activists and students of University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Sharif University of Technology and Kharazmi University were done. The main indicators of office space in this study include: students’ satisfaction of office space, students’ welfare affairs and students’ feedback about this space. Problems and obstacles relating to the office space and their solutions were also studied in this paper.

  9. Universal Precautions: A Review

    DATONYE ALASIA

    and hazards could cause devastating effects on. 2 health and ... (splash of blood or other body fluids into the eyes, nose or ... nurses, laboratory staff and aides who work in .... electric hand dryers are available which is ideal. ... self, patient and co-workers from infection. All ... with universal precautions include the absence of ...

  10. Ranganathan : A Universal Librarian

    Abulfazale M. Fazle Kabir

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In formulating Five Laws of Library Science Ranganathan has made a lasting and fundamental contribution to the philosophy of library patron service. His Colon Classification has provided a scheme for hierarchical design of faceted subject classification. For such valuable contribution to the profession he has been acclaimed as a universal librarian.

  11. Universal and Relative Rationality

    Nathaniel Goldberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I illustrate how a basic kind of universal rationality can be profitably combined with undeniable instances of relativism. I do so by engaging Michael Friedman’s recent response to a challenge from Thomas Kuhn.

  12. Entrepreneurship and University Licensing

    Brouwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Outside invention has gained in importance as universities are actively seeking commercialization of their inventions since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act. The paper analyzes the incentives to invent for outside and inside inventors. It is shown that outside inventors have greater incentives to

  13. Explore Your Universe

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This warm-up lab is intended to get students familiar with the large numbers encountered in astronomy (e.g. distances, times, numbers of stars and galaxies in the universe). Students will measure the dimensions of the classroom and/or the distance between objects in the classroom, and report their findings in units of millimeters, micrometers and nanometers.

  14. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Origin (?) of the Universe The Big Bang. Jayant V Narlikar. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 6-12. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/03/0006-0012 ...

  15. Discrete bipolar universal integrals

    Greco, S.; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 1 (2014), s. 55-65 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/11/0378 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : bipolar integral * universal integral * Choquet integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.986, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/mesiar-0432224.pdf

  16. Universal decoherence in solids.

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M

    2004-03-26

    Symmetry implications for the decoherence of quantum oscillations of a two-state system in a solid are studied. When the oscillation frequency is small compared to the Debye frequency, the universal lower bound on the decoherence due to the atomic environment is derived in terms of the macroscopic parameters of the solid, with no unknown interaction constants.

  17. Origin(?) of the Universe

    weaknesses of the big bang cosmology, conceptual as well as observational. ... They argue that this event marks the origin of the ... a change of the lowest energy state of matter, normally designated as ... Rapid expansion of this kind produces some lasting effects in the universe. .... This attitude coupled with attempted ...

  18. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  19. Telecommunications and Universal Service

    The book is intended to provide valuable input to the Universal Service Agency .... Figure 1 is not, of course, drawn to scale for South Africa. .... Such uneconomic customers and areas are mainly found in rural, peripheral, and less favoured regions. ... The United Kingdom is a good example of the enduring nature of this task.

  20. Universities in Transition

    The use in this publication of trade names, trademarks, service marks, and similar .... 13 Germany: The Role of Universities in the Learning Economy ... and that there exist good opportunities for learning from each other's experiences. ...... to sell on credit, and/or provide access to markets, introducing the firms to customers.

  1. The Classification of Universes

    Bjorken, J

    2004-01-01

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific

  2. Earth and Universe

    Kosygin, Yu A

    1986-12-01

    Rocks, the age of which according to certain data exceeds considerably the recognized age of the Earth and approximates the age of the Universe, have been detected on the Earth. There is a necessity to coordinate the geological data with cosmological structures.

  3. Organizing University Marketing.

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  4. Romanians decipher the Universe

    Balan, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    We are at the European Nuclear Research Center, the greatest partcile accelerator in the world. Approximately 50 people work here. Thanks to them, Romania can be proud of taking part in the greatest experiment in the world that tries to find an explanation for the ofrmation of the Universe. (1,5 page)

  5. Towards Universal Semantic Tagging

    Abzianidze, Lasha; Bos, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes the task of universal semantic tagging---tagging word tokens with language-neutral, semantically informative tags. We argue that the task, with its independent nature, contributes to better semantic analysis for wide-coverage multilingual text. We present the initial version of

  6. Parallel universes beguile science

    2007-01-01

    A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too. We may not be able -- as least not yet -- to prove they exist, many serious scientists say, but there are plenty of reasons to think that parallel dimensions are more than figments of eggheaded imagination.

  7. Universities and National Laboratories

    knowledge, etc. in the curriculum of the Institute of Technology at Kharagpur. The. University of ... Nothing can be farther from reality. If the powers that can ... have moved and mixed and have had my being in the student community. I claim that.

  8. The Classification of Universes

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  9. PBL at Aalborg university

    From the preface: "All the articles in this book have been presented at the International Conference PBL 2006 ABP, that was held in Lima, Peru, July 19th-21th 2006. This conference is part of a series of Pan-American conferences. It is the first time that Aalborg University has participated...

  10. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  11. Universal Cable Brackets

    Vanvalkenburgh, C.

    1985-01-01

    Concept allows routing easily changed. No custom hardware required in concept. Instead, standard brackets cut to length and installed at selected locations along cable route. If cable route is changed, brackets simply moved to new locations. Concept for "universal" cable brackets make it easy to route electrical cable around and through virtually any structure.

  12. A Universe of Questions.

    Zeldovich, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    Reprinted from the original Russian manuscript of Yakov Zeldovich, this article chronicles his studies of the universe and his attempts to construct a theory of its evolution. He provides the high school student with compelling cosmological discussions about uniformity, galactic clusters, radiation, evolution, the big bang, and gravitational…

  13. Universe opacity and EBL

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 2 (2017), s. 1532-1542 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : cosmic background radiation * dust, extinction * early Universe * galaxies: high redshift * galaxies: ISM * intergalactic medium Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  14. University of Maryland MRSEC

    operation. This site remains as a history of the center, but will not be actively maintained. University of . Crystals are made up of layers, or "planes" of atoms, perfectly stacked in an ordered pattern . Because this surface has been cut at a slight angle to the crystal planes, it appears "stepped"

  15. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity o...

  16. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  17. Chaotic universe model.

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2018-01-15

    In this study, we consider nonlinear interactions between components such as dark energy, dark matter, matter and radiation in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker space-time and propose a simple interaction model based on the time evolution of the densities of these components. By using this model we show that these interactions can be given by Lotka-Volterra type equations. We numerically solve these coupling equations and show that interaction dynamics between dark energy-dark matter-matter or dark energy-dark matter-matter-radiation has a strange attractor for 0 > w de  >-1, w dm  ≥ 0, w m  ≥ 0 and w r  ≥ 0 values. These strange attractors with the positive Lyapunov exponent clearly show that chaotic dynamics appears in the time evolution of the densities. These results provide that the time evolution of the universe is chaotic. The present model may have potential to solve some of the cosmological problems such as the singularity, cosmic coincidence, big crunch, big rip, horizon, oscillation, the emergence of the galaxies, matter distribution and large-scale organization of the universe. The model also connects between dynamics of the competing species in biological systems and dynamics of the time evolution of the universe and offers a new perspective and a new different scenario for the universe evolution.

  18. 9. Universality and Incomputability

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Algorithms - Universality and Incomputability. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  19. Type II universal spacetimes

    Hervik, S.; Málek, Tomáš; Pravda, Vojtěch; Pravdová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 24 (2015), s. 245012 ISSN 0264-9381 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10042S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : einstein spacetimes * generalized gravities * universal spacetimes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.837, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0264-9381/32/24/245012

  20. The Universe's First Fireworks

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2 This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light. Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state. Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics. A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer and the

  1. Exploring the relationship between university internationalization and university autonomy

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    This paper explores a research gap at the intersection of university internationalization and university autonomy. A process model of university internationalization is put forward whereby the process of university internationalization is mediated by university internationalization capacity...... and moderated by target country institutional autonomy and globalization; and entry modes, timing and pace, as well as product mix of internationalization define university’s internationalization pattern. A systematic review is conducted to identify empirical studies at this intersection. One of the questions...

  2. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  3. Universe or Multiverse?

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  4. Life at a Teaching University

    Marineau, Josiah F.

    2018-01-01

    Many new political science faculty at teaching universities are recent PhD recipients, and are coming to these institutions from research-oriented universities. There are considerable differences between the training for graduate students received at research universities and the expectations for faculty at teaching universities. This essay…

  5. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  6. The future of the universe

    Meadows, AJ

    2007-01-01

    Many books have described how the universe became the way it is today. But what about the future of the universe? How long might the universe as we recognize it survive? The Future of the Universe takes the reader on a journey through space and time, beginning with a long look at the Earth and solar system, voyaging to the outermost galaxies, and finishing with speculations about the life and fate of the entire universe.

  7. Universal behaviour in the stock market: Time dynamics of the electronic orderbook

    Kızılersü, Ayşe; Kreer, Markus; Thomas, Anthony W.; Feindt, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A consequence of the digital revolution is that share trading at the stock exchange takes place via electronic order books which are accessed by traders and investors via the internet. Our empirical findings of the London Stock Exchange demonstrate that once ultra-high frequency manipulation on time scales less than around ten milliseconds is excluded, all relevant changes in the order book happen with time differences that are randomly distributed and well described by a left-truncated Weibull distribution with universal shape parameter (independent of time and same for all stocks). The universal shape parameter corresponds to maximum entropy of the distribution.

  8. Universality of accelerating change

    Eliazar, Iddo; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2018-03-01

    On large time scales the progress of human technology follows an exponential growth trend that is termed accelerating change. The exponential growth trend is commonly considered to be the amalgamated effect of consecutive technology revolutions - where the progress carried in by each technology revolution follows an S-curve, and where the aging of each technology revolution drives humanity to push for the next technology revolution. Thus, as a collective, mankind is the 'intelligent designer' of accelerating change. In this paper we establish that the exponential growth trend - and only this trend - emerges universally, on large time scales, from systems that combine together two elements: randomness and amalgamation. Hence, the universal generation of accelerating change can be attained by systems with no 'intelligent designer'.

  9. Pythagorean Philolaus’ Pyrocentric Universe

    Maniatis, Yiorgo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, first, I reexamine the pyrocentric universe of the Pythagorean, Philolaus, who emphatically propounded that the center of the cosmos is neither the earth nor the sun, but a central fiery hearth that stands in the middle of the spherical universe. Second, I attempt to demonstrate the value and significance of this pyrocentric cosmic model by elaborating its novel revolutionary elements and its contribution to astronomy. Third, by underlining the diachroneity and timeliness of this cosmic model, I try to establish as to how the model served as a precursor to not only the ancient and modern heliocentric models, as widely believed, but also as much to the contemporary cosmic models and theories of astrophysics.

  10. Universality for quintessence

    Cicciarella, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Pieroni, M., E-mail: f.cicciarella1@gmail.com, E-mail: mauro.pieroni@apc.in2p3.fr [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2017-08-01

    Several recent works suggested the possibility of describing inflation by means of a renormalization group equation. In this paper we discuss the application of these methods to models of quintessence. In this framework a period of exponential expansion corresponds to the slow evolution of the scalar field in the neighborhood of a fixed point. A minimal set of universality classes for models of quintessence is defined and the transition from a matter dominated to quintessence dominated universe is studied. Models in which quintessence is non-minimally coupled with gravity are also discussed. We show that the formalism proves to be extremely convenient to describe quintessence and moreover we find that in most of the models discussed in this work quintessence naturally takes over ordinary matter.

  11. Improving University Research Value

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  12. Atoms against the universe

    Senovilla, J.; Raul Vera, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Woody Allen's masterpiece Annie Hall the main character is worried about the expansion of the universe. Indeed, during a childhood visit to his psychiatrist, his mother admonishes him: ''You're here in Brooklyn! Brooklyn is not expanding!''. But is that really true? Relativists have attacked this naive question many times and have arrived at different answers. New light has now been thrown on the subject by William Bonnor from Queen Mary and Westfield College in London by considering the influence of the expanding universe on the size of the hydrogen atom (Class. Quantum Grav. 1999 16 1313). According to Bonner's calculations we can conclude that the cosmic expansion does not affect human-scale objects like laboratories and our bodies. In this article the authors explain the reasoning behind this research and its thought provoking consequences. (UK)

  13. Universal quantum interfaces

    Lloyd, Seth; Landahl, Andrew J.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    2004-01-01

    To observe or control a quantum system, one must interact with it via an interface. This article exhibits simple universal quantum interfaces--quantum input/output ports consisting of a single two-state system or quantum bit that interacts with the system to be observed or controlled. It is shown that under very general conditions the ability to observe and control the quantum bit on its own implies the ability to observe and control the system itself. The interface can also be used as a quantum communication channel, and multiple quantum systems can be connected by interfaces to become an efficient universal quantum computer. Experimental realizations are proposed, and implications for controllability, observability, and quantum information processing are explored

  14. Universal Test Facility

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  15. Mapping the universe.

    Geller, M J; Huchra, J P

    1989-11-17

    Maps of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe reveal large coherent structures. The extent of the largest features is limited only by the size of the survey. Voids with a density typically 20 percent of the mean and with diameters of 5000 km s(-1) are present in every survey large enough to contain them. Many galaxies lie in thin sheet-like structures. The largest sheet detected so far is the "Great Wall" with a minimum extent of 60 h(-1) Mpc x 170 h(-1) Mpc, where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The frequent occurrence of these structures is one of several serious challenges to our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe.

  16. Life in the Universe

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  17. University Reactor Sharing Program

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  18. Median and ulnar neuropathies in university guitarists.

    Kennedy, Rachel H; Hutcherson, Kimberly J; Kain, Jennifer B; Phillips, Alicia L; Halle, John S; Greathouse, David G

    2006-02-01

    Descriptive study. To determine the presence of median and ulnar neuropathies in both upper extremities of university guitarists. Peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes of the upper extremities are well documented in musicians. Guitarists and plucked-string musicians are at risk for entrapment neuropathies in the upper extremities and are prone to mild neurologic deficits. Twenty-four volunteer male and female guitarists (age range, 18-26 years) were recruited from the Belmont University School of Music and the Vanderbilt University Blair School of Music. Individuals were excluded if they were pregnant or had a history of recent upper extremity or neck injury. Subjects completed a history form, were interviewed, and underwent a physical examination. Nerve conduction status of the median and ulnar nerves of both upper extremities was obtained by performing motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) nerve conduction studies. Descriptive statistics of the nerve conduction study variables were computed using Microsoft Excel. Six subjects had positive findings on provocative testing of the median and ulnar nerves. Otherwise, these guitarists had normal upper extremity neural and musculoskeletal function based on the history and physical examinations. When comparing the subjects' nerve conduction study values with a chart of normal nerve conduction studies values, 2 subjects had prolonged distal motor latencies (DMLs) of the left median nerve of 4.3 and 4.7 milliseconds (normal, DMLs are compatible with median neuropathy at or distal to the wrist. Otherwise, all electrophysiological variables were within normal limits for motor, sensory, and F-wave (central) values. However, comparison studies of median and ulnar motor latencies in the same hand demonstrated prolonged differences of greater than 1.0 milliseconds that affected the median nerve in 2 additional subjects, and identified contralateral limb involvement in a subject with a prolonged distal latency. The other 20

  19. Geneva University - Cancelled

    Université de Genève

    2010-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 19 April 2010 17h00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Into the darkness: Simulating the distribution of dark matter in our Universe Prof. Volker Springel - Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies   THE COLLOQUIUM IS CANCELLED. Prof. Markus Büttiker

  20. Building baby universes

    Coles, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The thought of a scientist trying to design a laboratory experiment in which to create a whole new universe probably sounds like it belongs in the plot of a science-fiction B-movie. But as author Zeeya Merali explains in her new book A Big Bang in a Little Room, there are more than a few eminent physicists who think that this is theoretically possible.