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Sample records for universal interaction device

  1. Usability Testing of a Collaborative and Interactive University on a Mobile Device

    Gavin McArdle

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The use of mobile devices for delivering learning tools is an attractive concept. Termed mobile learning (m-learning, this new technology allows people to participate in learning activities without being tied to a fixed location and provides users with convenient and flexible access to learning resources anytime and anywhere. While many m-learning applications have been developed to date, most provide tools to help students’ with specific learning tasks rather than a general interface to online courses. Few sup-port online learning communities or allow users to download multimedia learning content. These features would engage mobile users and enable them to interact with one another, thus allowing them to participate in group learning activities despite their changing location. In this article, we describe an m-learning system which we have developed which aims to incorporate these facilities. This system provides access to multimedia learning resources and supports mobile users in an interactive synchronous learning environment with their desktop peers. Details of the evaluation techniques which we utilised to appraise the system are provided and the results are presented. Feedback suggests that the features offered by our system are beneficial for collaborative m-learning.

  2. Interaction university and school

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  3. Documentation of Appliances & Interaction Devices

    2004-01-01

    The interaction devices and appliances explored in the WorkSPACE project, address spatial computing in the context of work. We have developed and explored a range of appliances and interaction devices. The scope has been to develop tools for support of collaboration by mixing digital and physical...

  4. Exploring the Early Universe on Mobile Devices

    Kocevski, Dale; McGrath, E. J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The widespread adoption of smart phones and tablet computers has the potential to revolutionize the way in which educational material is shared with the general public. As part of the outreach effort for the CANDELS survey, we have developed a free interactive astronomy education application named Hubble Universe for iPad and iPhone devices. The application focuses on extragalactic science topics related to the CANDELS legacy survey, which is documenting galaxy evolution in the early universe. I will provide an overview of the application, which contains a wide range of interactive content, including 3D models of astrophysical phenomenon, informative diagrams and computer simulations. I will discuss how the application can be used to enhance classroom learning both by providing a database of interactive media and by encouraging students to explore astronomical topics away from traditional settings like the classroom or the desktop computer.

  5. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  6. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Harnik, R

    2006-01-01

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe

  7. A universe without weak interactions

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-01-01

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''weakless universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting standard model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the weakless universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multiparameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe

  8. Poster: Virtual reality interaction using mobile devices

    Aseeri, Sahar A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we aim to implement and evaluate alternative approaches for interacting with virtual environments on mobile devices for navigation, object selection and manipulation. Interaction with objects in virtual worlds using traditional input such as current state-of-the-art devices is often difficult and could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. We have developed new methods to perform different kinds of interactions using a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone) both as input device, performing selection and manipulation of objects, and as output device, utilizing the screen as an extra view (virtual camera or information display). Our hypothesis is that interaction via mobile devices facilitates simple tasks like the ones described within immersive virtual reality systems. We present here our initial implementation and result. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Virtual Reality Interaction Using Mobile Devices

    Aseeri, Sahar A.

    2013-07-01

    With the use of an immersive display system such as CAVE system, the user is able to realize a 3D immersive virtual environment realistically. However, interacting with virtual worlds in CAVE systems using traditional input devices to perform easy operations such as manipulation, object selection, and navigation is often difficult. This difficulty could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. Our research aims to implement and evaluate alternative approaches of interaction with immersive virtual environments on mobile devices for manipulation and object selection tasks. As many researchers have noted, using a mobile device as an interaction device has a number of advantages, including built-in display, built-in control, and touch screen facility. These advantages facilitate simple tasks within immersive virtual environments. This research proposes new methods using mobile devices like Smart-phones to perform di↵erent kinds of interactions both as an input device, (e.g. performing selection and manipulation of objects) and as an output device (e.g. utilizing the screen as an extra view for a virtual camera or information display). Moreover, we developed a prototype system to demonstrate and informally evaluate these methods. The research conclusion suggests using mobile devices as a 3D-controller. This will be a more intuitive approach to interact within the virtual environment.

  10. Poster: Virtual reality interaction using mobile devices

    Aseeri, Sahar A.; Acevedo-Feliz, Daniel; Schulze, Jü rgen P.

    2013-01-01

    such as current state-of-the-art devices is often difficult and could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. We have developed new methods to perform different kinds of interactions using a mobile device (e.g. a

  11. Mobile devices, interaction, and distraction

    Aagaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    at stake in such impaired social interaction include delayed responses, mechanical intonation, a motionless body, and a lack of eye contact. Appropriating developmental psychologist Daniel Stern’s terminology, it is suggested that this mismatch between the vitality of a person and his or her absently...

  12. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L.

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak

  13. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  14. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Antonio A Lagana

    Full Text Available We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  15. Building blocks for protein interaction devices

    Grünberg, Raik; Ferrar, Tony S.; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Constante, Marco; Serrano, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here, we propose a framework for the design of synthetic protein networks from modular protein–protein or protein–peptide interactions and provide a starter toolkit of protein building blocks. Our proof of concept experiments outline a general work flow for part–based protein systems engineering. We streamlined the iterative BioBrick cloning protocol and assembled 25 synthetic multidomain proteins each from seven standardized DNA fragments. A systematic screen revealed two main factors controlling protein expression in Escherichia coli: obstruction of translation initiation by mRNA secondary structure or toxicity of individual domains. Eventually, 13 proteins were purified for further characterization. Starting from well-established biotechnological tools, two general–purpose interaction input and two readout devices were built and characterized in vitro. Constitutive interaction input was achieved with a pair of synthetic leucine zippers. The second interaction was drug-controlled utilizing the rapamycin-induced binding of FRB(T2098L) to FKBP12. The interaction kinetics of both devices were analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. Readout was based on Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins and was quantified for various combinations of input and output devices. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of parts-based protein synthetic biology. Additionally, we identify future challenges and limitations of modular design along with approaches to address them. PMID:20215443

  16. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  17. Optical Near-field Interactions and Forces for Optoelectronic Devices

    Kohoutek, John Michael

    Throughout history, as a particle view of the universe began to take shape, scientists began to realize that these particles were attracted to each other and hence came up with theories, both analytical and empirical in nature, to explain their interaction. The interaction pair potential (empirical) and electromagnetics (analytical) theories, both help to explain not only the interaction between the basic constituents of matter, such as atoms and molecules, but also between macroscopic objects, such as two surfaces in close proximity. The electrostatic force, optical force, and Casimir force can be categorized as such forces. A surface plasmon (SP) is a collective motion of electrons generated by light at the interface between two mediums of opposite signs of dielectric susceptibility (e.g. metal and dielectric). Recently, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been exploited in many areas through the use of tiny antennas that work on similar principles as radio frequency (RF) antennas in optoelectronic devices. These antennas can produce a very high gradient in the electric field thereby leading to an optical force, similar in concept to the surface forces discussed above. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was introduced in the 1980s at IBM. Here we report on its uses in measuring these aforementioned forces and fields, as well as actively modulating and manipulating multiple optoelectronic devices. We have shown that it is possible to change the far field radiation pattern of an optical antenna-integrated device through modification of the near-field of the device. This modification is possible through change of the local refractive index or reflectivity of the "hot spot" of the device, either mechanically or optically. Finally, we have shown how a mechanically active device can be used to detect light with high gain and low noise at room temperature. It is the aim of several of these integrated and future devices to be used for applications in molecular sensing

  18. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  19. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Alonso-Serrano, A.; Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Robles-Pérez, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts

  20. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Alonso-Serrano, A. [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Bastos, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Robles-Pérez, S., E-mail: salvarp@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Física Teórica, Universidad del País Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-02-12

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts.

  1. Torsion based universal MEMS logic device

    Ilyas, Saad; Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Bayes, Ernesto; Foulds, Ian G.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate torsion based complementary MEMS logic device, which is capable, of performing INVERTER, AND, NAND, NOR, and OR gates using one physical structure within an operating range of 0-10 volts. It can also perform XOR and XNOR with one access inverter using the same structure with different electrical interconnects. The paper presents modeling, fabrication and experimental calculations of various performance features of the device including lifetime, power consumption and resonance frequency. The fabricated device is 535 μm by 150 μm with a gap of 1.92 μm and a resonant frequency of 6.51 kHz. The device is capable of performing the switching operation with a frequency of 1 kHz.

  2. Torsion based universal MEMS logic device

    Ilyas, Saad

    2015-10-28

    In this work we demonstrate torsion based complementary MEMS logic device, which is capable, of performing INVERTER, AND, NAND, NOR, and OR gates using one physical structure within an operating range of 0-10 volts. It can also perform XOR and XNOR with one access inverter using the same structure with different electrical interconnects. The paper presents modeling, fabrication and experimental calculations of various performance features of the device including lifetime, power consumption and resonance frequency. The fabricated device is 535 μm by 150 μm with a gap of 1.92 μm and a resonant frequency of 6.51 kHz. The device is capable of performing the switching operation with a frequency of 1 kHz.

  3. Microfluidic Devices for Studying Biomolecular Interactions

    Wilson, Wilbur W.; Garcia, Carlos d.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for monitoring biomolecular interactions have been invented. These devices are basically highly miniaturized liquid-chromatography columns. They are intended to be prototypes of miniature analytical devices of the laboratory on a chip type that could be fabricated rapidly and inexpensively and that, because of their small sizes, would yield analytical results from very small amounts of expensive analytes (typically, proteins). Other advantages to be gained by this scaling down of liquid-chromatography columns may include increases in resolution and speed, decreases in the consumption of reagents, and the possibility of performing multiple simultaneous and highly integrated analyses by use of multiple devices of this type, each possibly containing multiple parallel analytical microchannels. The principle of operation is the same as that of a macroscopic liquid-chromatography column: The column is a channel packed with particles, upon which are immobilized molecules of the protein of interest (or one of the proteins of interest if there are more than one). Starting at a known time, a solution or suspension containing molecules of the protein or other substance of interest is pumped into the channel at its inlet. The liquid emerging from the outlet of the channel is monitored to detect the molecules of the dissolved or suspended substance(s). The time that it takes these molecules to flow from the inlet to the outlet is a measure of the degree of interaction between the immobilized and the dissolved or suspended molecules. Depending on the precise natures of the molecules, this measure can be used for diverse purposes: examples include screening for solution conditions that favor crystallization of proteins, screening for interactions between drugs and proteins, and determining the functions of biomolecules.

  4. Plasma Surface interaction in Controlled fusion devices

    1990-05-01

    The subjects presented in the 9th conference on plasma surface interaction in controlled fusion devices were: the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the effects observed in ergodic divertor experiments in Tore-Supra; the diffuse connexion induced by the ergodic divertor and the topology of the heat load patterns on the plasma facing components in Tore-Supra; the study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

  5. Reprogammable universal logic device based on mems technology

    Hafiz, Md Adbdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    Various examples of reprogrammable universal logic devices are provided. In one example, the device can include a tunable AC input (206) to an oscillator/resonator; a first logic input and a second logic input to the oscillator/resonator, the first

  6. Some progress towards ''universal'' effective interactions

    Gomez, J.M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The approximation methods introduced to treat the nuclear many-body problem usually imply that the appropriate nuclear force is an effective interaction, different from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction. An effective interaction is thus intimately related to a given nuclear model and its scope is generally confined to the description of a limited number of nuclei or nuclear states. However, in recent years there has been some progress towards ''universal'' effective nucleon-nucleon interactions, in the sense that they may be reasonably suitable to describe bulk properties of nuclear ground states throughout the periodic table and also properties of excited states. The authors conclude that a finite-range density-dependent effective interaction of the Gogny's type is capable of describing a large number of static and dynamical nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, including open-shell nuclei. Hopefully it may provide clues for the definition of some ''universal'' effective force

  7. Universal programmable devices for unambiguous discrimination

    Zhang Chi; Ying Mingsheng; Qiao, Bo

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the problem of designing unambiguous programmable discriminators for any n unknown quantum states in an m-dimensional Hilbert space. The discriminator is a fixed measurement that has two kinds of input registers: the program registers and the data register. The quantum state in the data register is what users want to identify, which is confirmed to be among the n states in program registers. The task of the discriminator is to tell the users which state stored in the program registers is equivalent to that in the data register. First, we give a necessary and sufficient condition for judging an unambiguous programmable discriminator. Then, if m=n, we present an optimal unambiguous programmable discriminator for them, in the sense of maximizing the worst-case probability of success. Finally, we propose a universal unambiguous programmable discriminator for arbitrary n quantum states

  8. Interracial interactions at racially diverse university campuses.

    Cowan, Gloria

    2005-02-01

    The present research was an observational study of casual interracial and intraracial public-group interactions among African American, Asian American, Latino, and White students at 6 southern California State University campuses. Results indicated (a) that at these racially diverse public-university campuses, there was no difference between the percentages of interracial and intraracial groups; (b) specifically, that at the campus with the second largest percentage of non-White students, there were more interracial than intraracial interactions; and (c) that for each of the 4 ethnic groups, at the campuses with the largest percentages of the specific group, interactions were more likely to be intraracial than they were at campuses that had smaller percentages of the specific group. Despite reports of self-segregation, these findings suggest that when Whites are not the majority of students, interracial interactions are common.

  9. Investigating Daily Mobile Device Use Among University Students in Indonesia

    Pratama, Ahmad R.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates daily mobile device use among Indonesian university students by using survey data collected in the first quarter of 2016. The data show that 55.49% of the students spend more than five hours a day on their mobile devices. OLS regression analysis shows that female students, owners of the most expensive smartphone or tablet, and those who access social media apps and play mobile games frequently are more likely to spend more time on their mobile devices each day. Contrary to that, those who consider themselves as laggards are less likely to do so. The findings in this study help better understand how university students in Indonesia use their mobile device and lay a foundation as part of a larger research agenda about the relationship between mobile technology and education in Indonesia.

  10. Reprogammable universal logic device based on mems technology

    Hafiz, Md Adbdullah Al

    2017-06-15

    Various examples of reprogrammable universal logic devices are provided. In one example, the device can include a tunable AC input (206) to an oscillator/resonator; a first logic input and a second logic input to the oscillator/resonator, the first and second logic inputs provided by separate DC voltage sources (VA, VB), each of the first and second logic inputs including an on/off switch (A, B); and the oscillator/resonator including an output terminal (215). The tunable oscillator/resonator can be a MEMS/NEMS resonator. Switching of one or both of the first or second logic inputs on or off in association with the tuning of the AC input (206) can provide logic gate operation. The device can easily be extended to a 3-bit or n-bit device by providing additional logic inputs. Binary comparators and encoders can be implemented using a plurality of oscillators/resonators.

  11. Modelling dynamic human-device interaction in healthcare

    Niezen, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Errors are typically blamed on human factors, forgetting that the system should have been designed to take them into account and minimise these problems. In our research we are developing tools to design interactive medical devices using human-in-the-loop modelling. Manual control theory is used to describe and analyse the dynamic aspects of human-device interaction.

  12. Reading log: pedagogical device accompanying training university paths

    Marisa Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of the research on teacher training in Physical Education, developed in Bariloche Regional University Center of the National University of Comahue (CRUB-UNCo. Due to the steady increase in the number of students who drop out of course of study on the first two years, projects thatfollow this line of investigation are seeking to question university teaching practices in this field, unravel their particular ways of production and to analyse their impact on the constitution of the formative stages of the students. In the research we have found evidence of a systematic teaching work to improve the learning and teaching conditions and have identified pedagogical devices, both at institutional and classroom levels, as resources for scaffolding student paths and different modes of reception of the students doing the introductory course. Here, we describe and analyse one of these devices, called "reading log" generated in Subject Pedagogy for the 1st year of the School of Physical Education of abovementioned University. This instrument is part of a series of pedagogical practices deliberately planned in connection with the entrance, continuity and graduation stages of undergraduate students; it aims to promote better contexts for the development of the educational processes. This device, created as a way of scaffolding the reading practices of the students, is thought to contribute to the promotion of democratic formative paths and attempts to provide new explanations, which would anchor the transformation and construction of new knowledge and would achieve better pedagogical interventions.

  13. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    Dommenget, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 2000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system and solve some puzzles. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  14. Universal Shapes formed by Interacting Cracks

    Fender, Melissa; Lechenault, Frederic; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated curvature and stress geometries, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths known in the geologic literature as en passant cracks. While the fragmentation of solids via many interacting cracks has seen wide investigation, less attention has been paid to the details of individual crack-crack interactions. We investigate the origins of this widely observed crack pattern using a rectangular elastic plate which is notched on each long side and then subjected to quasistatic uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until the pass each other, after which they curve and release a lenticular fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, the shape of this fragment has an aspect ratio of 2:1, with the length scale set by the initial cracks offset s and the time scale set by the ratio of s to the pulling velocity. The cracks have a universal square root shape, which we understand by using a simple geometric model and the crack-crack interaction.

  15. Scientists Interacting With University Science Educators

    Spector, B. S.

    2004-12-01

    Scientists with limited time to devote to educating the public about their work will get the greatest multiplier effect for their investment of time by successfully interacting with university science educators. These university professors are the smallest and least publicized group of professionals in the chain of people working to create science literate citizens. They connect to all aspects of formal and informal education, influencing everything from what and how youngsters and adults learn science to legislative rulings. They commonly teach methods of teaching science to undergraduates aspiring to teach in K-12 settings and experienced teachers. They serve as agents for change to improve science education inside schools and at the state level K-16, including what science content courses are acceptable for teacher licensure. University science educators are most often housed in a College of Education or Department of Education. Significant differences in culture exist in the world in which marine scientists function and that in which university science educators function, even when they are in the same university. Subsequently, communication and building relationships between the groups is often difficult. Barriers stem from not understanding each other's roles and responsibilities; and different reward systems, assumptions about teaching and learning, use of language, approaches to research, etc. This presentation will provide suggestions to mitigate the barriers and enable scientists to leverage the multiplier effect saving much time and energy while ensuring the authenticity of their message is maintained. Likelihood that a scientist's message will retain its authenticity stems from criteria for a university science education position. These professors have undergraduate degrees in a natural science (e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, geology), and usually a master's degree in one of the sciences, a combination of natural sciences, or a master's including

  16. Interactive topology optimization on hand-held devices

    Aage, Niels; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive topology optimization application designed for hand-held devices running iOS or Android. The TopOpt app solves the 2D minimum compliance problem with interactive control of load and support positions as well as volume fraction. Thus, it is possible to change......OS devices from the Apple App Store, at Google Play for the Android platform, and a web-version can be run from www.topopt.dtu.dk....

  17. Improving Interaction between NGO's, Science Shops and Universities

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the results from the INTERACTS research project: Improving Interaction between NGOs, Universities and Science Shops: Experiences and Expectations, running 2002-2004......An overview of the results from the INTERACTS research project: Improving Interaction between NGOs, Universities and Science Shops: Experiences and Expectations, running 2002-2004...

  18. From Eminent Men to Excellent Universities: University Rankings as Calculative Devices.

    Hammarfelt, Björn; de Rijcke, Sarah; Wouters, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Global university rankings have become increasingly important 'calculative devices' for assessing the 'quality' of higher education and research. Their ability to make characteristics of universities 'calculable' is here exemplified by the first proper university ranking ever, produced as early as 1910 by the American psychologist James McKeen Cattell. Our paper links the epistemological rationales behind the construction of this ranking to the sociopolitical context in which Cattell operated: an era in which psychology became institutionalized against the backdrop of the eugenics movement, and in which statistics of science became used to counter a perceived decline in 'great men.' Over time, however, the 'eminent man,' shaped foremost by heredity and upbringing, came to be replaced by the excellent university as the emblematic symbol of scientific and intellectual strength. We also show that Cattell's ranking was generative of new forms of the social, traces of which can still be found today in the enactment of 'excellence' in global university rankings.

  19. Large Display Interaction Using Mobile Devices

    Bauer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Large displays become more and more popular, due to dropping prices. Their size and high resolution leverages collaboration and they are capable of dis- playing even large datasets in one view. This becomes even more interesting as the number of big data applications increases. The increased screen size and other properties of large displays pose new challenges to the Human- Computer-Interaction with these screens. This includes issues such as limited scalability to the number of users, diver...

  20. Designing Gestural Interfaces Touchscreens and Interactive Devices

    Saffer, Dan

    2008-01-01

    If you want to get started in new era of interaction design, this is the reference you need. Packed with informative illustrations and photos, Designing Gestural Interfaces provides you with essential information about kinesiology, sensors, ergonomics, physical computing, touchscreen technology, and new interface patterns -- information you need to augment your existing skills in traditional" websites, software, or product development. This book will help you enter this new world of possibilities."

  1. Mobile devices and computing cloud resources allocation for interactive applications

    Krawczyk Henryk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Using mobile devices such as smartphones or iPads for various interactive applications is currently very common. In the case of complex applications, e.g. chess games, the capabilities of these devices are insufficient to run the application in real time. One of the solutions is to use cloud computing. However, there is an optimization problem of mobile device and cloud resources allocation. An iterative heuristic algorithm for application distribution is proposed. The algorithm minimizes the energy cost of application execution with constrained execution time.

  2. l=1 helical axis heliotron device in Kyoto university

    Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Mizuuchi, T.; Hanatani, K.; Okada, H.; Obiki, T.

    1999-01-01

    Helical systems are an attractive candidate for magnetic fusion reactor. Recently, there has been great progress in theoretical research of three dimensional magnetic field structures, resulting in several kinds of confinement optimization being proposed for toroidal magnetic confinement system. For example, some sophisticated ideas have appeared on stage such as quasi-helical symmetry and quasi-isodynamic system. To find experimentally which way is the best Optimisation, a new helical axis heliotron device, so called 'Heliotron J', is under construction in the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Japan. In this conference, the basic concept and the present status will be presented. In the conventional plane axis helical system, it was difficult to have both good particle confinement and good MHD stability simultaneously. The goal of Heliotron J project is to clarify their compatibility in the spatial axis toroidal device. The best way for Optimising the helical magnetic field configuration will be explored by investigating the plasma response to the change in the field components. The main subjects for plasma experiment are: demonstration of the existence of good magnetic flux surfaces, reduction of neoclassical transport in collisionless regime, MHD Stabilisation in high β plasma, controllability of bootstrap current, good confinement of high energy particles

  3. Immersive Live Event Experiences - Interactive UHDTV on Mobile Devices

    Niamut, O.A.; Thomas, G.A.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Brandenburg, R. van; D’Acunto, L.; Gregory-Clarke, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the latest developments around tiled streaming. As an extension of HTTP adaptive streaming, it retains all the benefits of this streaming technology, while adding the possibility of interaction when consuming UHDTV on mobile devices. In particular, we discuss the underlying

  4. Live event experiences - Interactive UHDTV on mobile devices

    Niamut, O.A.; Thomas, G.A.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Brandenburg, R. van; D'Acunto, L.; Gregory-Clarke, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the latest developments in tiled streaming. As an extension of HTTP adaptive streaming, it retains all the benefits of this streaming technology, while adding the potential of interaction when UHDTV is consumed on mobile devices. In particular, we discuss the underlying

  5. Exploring Social Outcomes of Interactions between University ...

    In particular, female students have had a positive impact on indigenous. Waala youth ... counterparts that university students have influenced their children positively in terms of inspiration for ..... led to domestic conflicts and eventual divorce.

  6. Religiosity, Religious Acceptance, Social Interaction, and Satisfaction with University Experience

    Mohebpour, Ida; Reysen, Stephen; Gibson, Shonda; Hendricks, LaVelle

    2017-01-01

    We tested a mediated moderation model with the interaction of students' degree of religiosity and perception of the university environment as accepting of one's religion predicting satisfaction with the university mediated by positive social relations. When the university was perceived as accepting of one's religion (vs less accepting), greater…

  7. Device interactions in reducing the cost of tidal stream energy

    Vazquez, A.; Iglesias, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical modelling is used to estimate the levelised cost of tidal stream energy. • As a case study, a model of Lynmouth (UK) is implemented and successfully validated. • The resolution of the model allows the demarcation of individual devices on the model grid. • Device interactions reduce the available tidal resource and the cost increases significantly. - Abstract: The levelised cost of energy takes into account the lifetime generated energy and the costs associated with a project. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of device interactions on the energy output and, therefore, on the levelised cost of energy of a tidal stream project, by means of numerical modelling. For this purpose, a case study is considered: Lynmouth (North Devon, UK), an area in the Bristol Channel in which the first tidal stream turbine was installed − a testimony of its potential as a tidal energy site. A state-of-the-art hydrodynamics model is implemented on a high-resolution computational grid, which allows the demarcation of the individual devices. The modification to the energy output resulting from interaction between turbines within the tidal farm is thus resolved for each individual turbine. The results indicate that significant changes in the levelised cost of energy values, of up to £0.221 kW h −1 , occur due to the aforementioned modifications, which should not be disregarded if the cost of tidal stream energy is to be minimised

  8. Investigating Cross-Device Interaction between a Handheld Device and a Large Display

    Paay, Jeni; Raptis, Dimitrios; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    and mid-air gestures, pinching, swiping, swinging and flicking. We look specifically at their relative efficiency, effectiveness and accuracy in bi-directional interaction between a smartphone and large display in a point-click context. We report findings from two user studies, which show that swiping...... is both most effective, fastest and most accurate, closely followed by swinging. What these two approaches have in common is the ability to keep the pointer steady on the large display, unaffected by concurrent gestures or body movements used to complete the interaction, suggesting...... that this is an important factor for designing effective cross-device interaction with large displays....

  9. Mutagenesis: Interactions with a parallel universe.

    Miller, Jeffrey H

    Unexpected observations in mutagenesis research have led to a new perspective in this personal reflection based on years of studying mutagenesis. Many mutagens have been thought to operate via a single principal mechanism, with secondary effects usually resulting in only minor changes in the observed mutation frequencies and spectra. For example, we conceive of base analogs as resulting in direct mispairing as their main mechanism of mutagenesis. Recent studies now show that in fact even these simple mutagens can cause very large and unanticipated effects both in mutation frequencies and in the mutational spectra when used in certain pair-wise combinations. Here we characterize this leap in mutation frequencies as a transport to an alternate universe of mutagenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The early period of the universal Fermi interaction

    Tiomno, J.

    1984-01-01

    A critical analysis of the contributions which lead, in the early period, to the discovery of the universality of Fermi-type weak interactions is made. In particular the current references to this universality as 'Puppi's triangle' are shown to be incorrect. (Author) [pt

  11. Interactive Multimedia Learning: Innovating Classroom Education in a Malaysian University

    Leow, Fui-Theng; Neo, Mai

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted at INTI International University, and aimed at enhancing the quality of classroom learning for University students with three important emphases: Gagne's instructional model, multimedia, and student-centred learning. An Interactive Learning Module (ILM) was developed as the core component in forming the…

  12. Universal Safety Distance Alert Device for Road Vehicles

    Matic Virant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Driving with too short of a safety distance is a common problem in road traffic, often with traffic accidents as a consequence. Research has identified a lack of vehicle-mountable devices for alerting the drivers of trailing vehicles about keeping a sufficient safe distance. The principal requirements for such a device were defined. A conceptual study was performed in order to select the components for the integration of the device. Based on the results of this study, a working prototype of a flexible, self-contained device was designed, built and tested. The device is intended to be mounted on the rear of a vehicle. It uses radar as the primary distance sensor, assisted with a GPS receiver for velocity measurement. A Raspberry Pi single-board computer is used for data acquisition and processing. The alerts are shown on an LED-matrix display mounted on the rear of the host vehicle. The device software is written in Python and provides automatic operation without requiring any user intervention. The tests have shown that the device is usable on almost any motor vehicle and performs reliably in simulated and real traffic. The open issues and possibilities for future improvements are presented in the Discussion.

  13. Wearable Vibrotactile Haptic Device for Stiffness Discrimination during Virtual Interactions

    Andualem Tadesse Maereg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the development of cost effective, wireless, and wearable vibrotactile haptic device for stiffness perception during an interaction with virtual objects. Our experimental setup consists of haptic device with five vibrotactile actuators, virtual reality environment tailored in Unity 3D integrating the Oculus Rift Head Mounted Display (HMD and the Leap Motion controller. The virtual environment is able to capture touch inputs from users. Interaction forces are then rendered at 500 Hz and fed back to the wearable setup stimulating fingertips with ERM vibrotactile actuators. Amplitude and frequency of vibrations are modulated proportionally to the interaction force to simulate the stiffness of a virtual object. A quantitative and qualitative study is done to compare the discrimination of stiffness on virtual linear spring in three sensory modalities: visual only feedback, tactile only feedback, and their combination. A common psychophysics method called the Two Alternative Forced Choice (2AFC approach is used for quantitative analysis using Just Noticeable Difference (JND and Weber Fractions (WF. According to the psychometric experiment result, average Weber fraction values of 0.39 for visual only feedback was improved to 0.25 by adding the tactile feedback.

  14. profile of intrauterine contraceptive device acceptors at the university

    ANNALS

    Conclusion: The acceptors of intrauterine contraceptive devices in our center were ... Conclusion: Les accepteurs de la contraception de substances médicamentenses dans notre centre .... sterilization due to cultural reasons is very low,13 the.

  15. Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in non-flat universe

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    A so-called 'agegraphic dark energy' was recently proposed to explain the dark energy-dominated universe. In this Letter, we generalize the agegraphic dark energy models to the universe with spatial curvature in the presence of interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We show that these models can accommodate w D =-1 crossing for the equation of state of dark energy. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all previous results of agegraphic dark energy in flat universe are restored.

  16. Interactional competence in the institutional setting of the international university

    Hazel, Spencer

    organization as multimodally constituted social action in interaction. Leading on from this, the analyses sought to explore whether situated embodied practices serve to enact-into-being the institution of the international university. Research into these dynamically multilingual and culturally hybrid settings......This project has investigated social practices in co-present encounters between administrative staff and students at an internationalizing university. The project utilized audiovisual data of interactions, recorded at a number of sites at a Danish university. These concerned service encounters...... has often emphasized the linguistic component of such encounters. The current project adds to this by considering participants’ interactional competencies, denoting their situated methods and interactive practices through which they are able to co-construct in situ their social world. The thesis...

  17. Exploring the Utility and Application of Framing Devices in College/University President Speeches

    Young, Ira George

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the utility and application of the framing devices identified by Fairhurst (1993) and Fairhurst and Sarr (1996) in the college/university setting as evidenced through college/university presidents' speeches. Fifty-seven college/university presidents' speeches were collected from institution…

  18. Nomad devices for interactions in immersive virtual environments

    George, Paul; Kemeny, Andras; Merienne, Frédéric; Chardonnet, Jean-Rémy; Thouvenin, Indira Mouttapa; Posselt, Javier; Icart, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Renault is currently setting up a new CAVE™, a 5 rear-projected wall virtual reality room with a combined 3D resolution of 100 Mpixels, distributed over sixteen 4k projectors and two 2k projector as well as an additional 3D HD collaborative powerwall. Renault's CAVE™ aims at answering needs of the various vehicle conception steps [1]. Starting from vehicle Design, through the subsequent Engineering steps, Ergonomic evaluation and perceived quality control, Renault has built up a list of use-cases and carried out an early software evaluation in the four sided CAVE™ of Institute Image, called MOVE. One goal of the project is to study interactions in a CAVE™, especially with nomad devices such as IPhone or IPad to manipulate virtual objects and to develop visualization possibilities. Inspired by nomad devices current uses (multi-touch gestures, IPhone UI look'n'feel and AR applications), we have implemented an early feature set taking advantage of these popular input devices. In this paper, we present its performance through measurement data collected in our test platform, a 4-sided homemade low-cost virtual reality room, powered by ultra-short-range and standard HD home projectors.

  19. Universal structure of a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    Kuhnle, Eva; Dyke, Paul; Hoinka, Sascha; Mark, Michael; Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter; Hannaford, Peter; Vale, Chris, E-mail: cvale@swin.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn 3122 (Australia)

    2011-01-10

    This paper presents studies of the universal properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases using Bragg spectroscopy. We focus on pair-correlations, their relationship to the contact C introduced by Tan, and their dependence on both the momentum and temperature. We show that short-range pair correlations obey a universal law, first derived by Tan through measurements of the static structure factor, which displays a universal scaling with the ratio of the contact to the momentum C/q. Bragg spectroscopy of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms is employed to measure the structure factor for a wide range of momenta and interaction strengths, providing broad confirmation of this universal law. We show that calibrating our Bragg spectra using the f-sum rule leads to a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of the structure factor measurement. We also measure the temperature dependence of the contact in a unitary gas and compare our results to calculations based on a virial expansion.

  20. Cross-Surface: Workshop on Interacting with Multi-Device Ecologies in the Wild

    Houben, Steven; Vermeulen, Jo; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2015-01-01

    In this workshop, we will review and discuss opportunities, technical challenges and problems with cross-device interactions in interactive multi-surface and multi-device ecologies. We aim to bring together researchers and practitioners currently working on novel techniques for cross......-surface interactions, identify application domains and enabling technologies for cross-surface interactions in the wild, and establish a research community to develop effective strategies for successful design of cross-device interactions....

  1. Guided-wave acousto-optics interactions, devices, and applications

    1990-01-01

    The field of integrated- or guided-wave optics has experienced significant and continuous growth since its inception in the late 1960s. There has been a considerable increase in research and development activity in this field worldwide and some significant advances in the realization of working in­ tegrated optic devices and modules have been made in recent years. In fact, there have already been some commercial manufacturing and technical ap­ plications of such devices and modules. The guided-wave-acoustooptics involving Bragg interactions between guided optical waves and surface acoustic waves is one of the areas of in­ tegrated-optics that has reached some degree of scientific and technological maturity. This topical volume is devoted to an in-depth treatment of this emerging branch of science and technology. Presented in this volume are concise treatments on bulk-wave acoustooptics, guided-wave optics, and surface acoustic waves, and detailed studies of guided-wave acoustooptic Bragg diffraction in thr...

  2. Introduction of Interactive Learning into French University Physics Classrooms

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Lamine, Brahim; Joyce, Michael; Vignolles, Hélène; Consiglio, David

    2014-01-01

    We report on a project to introduce interactive learning strategies (ILS) to physics classes at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, one of the leading science universities in France. In Spring 2012, instructors in two large introductory classes, first-year, second-semester mechanics, and second-year introductory electricity and magnetism,…

  3. Microstates of black holes in expanding universe from interacting branes

    Shiba, Shotaro [Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK),1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Thermodynamics of the near extremal black p-branes can be described by collective motions of gravitationally interacting branes. This proposal is called the p-soup model. In this paper, we check this proposal in the case of black brane system which is asymptotically Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe in an infinite distance. As a result, we can show that the gravitationally interacting branes explain free energy, entropy, temperature and other physical quantities in these systems. This implies that the microstates of this kind of brane system can be also understood in the p-soup model.

  4. Statistical effect of interactions on particle creation in expanding universe

    Kodama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    The statistical effect of interactions which drives many-particle systems toward equilibrium is expected to change the qualitative and quantitative features of particle creation in expanding universe. To investigate this problem a simplified model called the finite-time reduction model is formulated and applied to the scalar particle creation in the radiation dominant Friedmann universe. The number density of created particles and the entropy production due to particle creation are estimated. The result for the number density is compared with that in the conventional free field theory. It is shown that the statistical effect increases the particle creation and lengthens the active creation period. As for the entropy production it is shown that it is negligible for scalar particles in the Friedmann universe. (author)

  5. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ^{(2)} Interactions.

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2018-04-20

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized-using only linear optics and χ^{(2)} (three-wave mixing) interactions-in any (n+1)-dimensional qudit basis of the n-pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ^{(2)} Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u(3) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ^{(2)} interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ^{(2)} interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  6. Development of a new universal machine device for eccentric shafts processing

    Михайло Володимирович Маргуліс

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the existing lathe devices for machining of eccentric details and the reasons for the development of a new universal machine device– a shifting lathe center-have been described in the article. The device design, its operating principle, the main parts functions and elements of the case were described and illustrated One of the most complicated cases of eccentric shaft turning, that is turning design and scheme of the eccentric shaft of precessional harmonic drive with intermediate rolling bodies when the proposed device was used was described in the article. The shifting lathe center can reduce the complexity of the machine tool for turning eccentric shafts configuration. The ability to install the shifting center in the tailstock and headstock of the lathe, and the availability of the leash makes it possible to turn various eccentric parts, conical surfaces, to apply the device to compensate for the emerging taper in cylindrical shafts processing. All the above mentioned makes the device universal. The specific feature of this device is the use of a ball center and the connection of the centering element with the adjusting screw by a fine thread screw, this increasing the precision machining. The protective cover of the device makes it possible to reduce the chance of possible injury from protruding parts of the device, namely the leash and the centering element

  7. Universal contact of strongly interacting fermions at finite temperatures

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D, E-mail: hhu@swin.edu.au, E-mail: xiajiliu@swin.edu.au, E-mail: pdrummond@swin.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

    2011-03-15

    The recently discovered universal thermodynamic behavior of dilute, strongly interacting Fermi gases also implies a universal structure in the many-body pair-correlation function at short distances, as quantified by the contact I. Here, we theoretically calculate the temperature dependence of this universal contact for a Fermi gas in free space and in a harmonic trap. At high temperatures above the Fermi degeneracy temperature, T{approx}>T{sub F}, we obtain a reliable non-perturbative quantum virial expansion up to third order. At low temperatures, we compare different approximate strong-coupling theories. These make different predictions, which need to be tested either by future experiments or by advanced quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We conjecture that in the universal unitarity limit, the contact or correlation decreases monotonically with increasing temperature, unless the temperature is significantly lower than the critical temperature, T<universal contact in either homogeneous or harmonically trapped Fermi gases.

  8. Universality Classes of Interaction Structures for NK Fitness Landscapes

    Hwang, Sungmin; Schmiegelt, Benjamin; Ferretti, Luca; Krug, Joachim

    2018-02-01

    Kauffman's NK-model is a paradigmatic example of a class of stochastic models of genotypic fitness landscapes that aim to capture generic features of epistatic interactions in multilocus systems. Genotypes are represented as sequences of L binary loci. The fitness assigned to a genotype is a sum of contributions, each of which is a random function defined on a subset of k ≤ L loci. These subsets or neighborhoods determine the genetic interactions of the model. Whereas earlier work on the NK model suggested that most of its properties are robust with regard to the choice of neighborhoods, recent work has revealed an important and sometimes counter-intuitive influence of the interaction structure on the properties of NK fitness landscapes. Here we review these developments and present new results concerning the number of local fitness maxima and the statistics of selectively accessible (that is, fitness-monotonic) mutational pathways. In particular, we develop a unified framework for computing the exponential growth rate of the expected number of local fitness maxima as a function of L, and identify two different universality classes of interaction structures that display different asymptotics of this quantity for large k. Moreover, we show that the probability that the fitness landscape can be traversed along an accessible path decreases exponentially in L for a large class of interaction structures that we characterize as locally bounded. Finally, we discuss the impact of the NK interaction structures on the dynamics of evolution using adaptive walk models.

  9. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ(2 ) Interactions

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2018-04-01

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized—using only linear optics and χ(2 ) (three-wave mixing) interactions—in any (n +1 )-dimensional qudit basis of the n -pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ(2 ) Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u (3 ) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ(2 ) interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ(2 ) interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  10. Coupling functions: Universal insights into dynamical interaction mechanisms

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Pereira, Tiago; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2017-10-01

    The dynamical systems found in nature are rarely isolated. Instead they interact and influence each other. The coupling functions that connect them contain detailed information about the functional mechanisms underlying the interactions and prescribe the physical rule specifying how an interaction occurs. A coherent and comprehensive review is presented encompassing the rapid progress made recently in the analysis, understanding, and applications of coupling functions. The basic concepts and characteristics of coupling functions are presented through demonstrative examples of different domains, revealing the mechanisms and emphasizing their multivariate nature. The theory of coupling functions is discussed through gradually increasing complexity from strong and weak interactions to globally coupled systems and networks. A variety of methods that have been developed for the detection and reconstruction of coupling functions from measured data is described. These methods are based on different statistical techniques for dynamical inference. Stemming from physics, such methods are being applied in diverse areas of science and technology, including chemistry, biology, physiology, neuroscience, social sciences, mechanics, and secure communications. This breadth of application illustrates the universality of coupling functions for studying the interaction mechanisms of coupled dynamical systems.

  11. Ownership versus on-campus use of mobile IT devices by university students

    Kobus, M.B.W.; Rietveld, P.; van Ommeren, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated ownership and on-campus use of laptops, tablets, and smartphones, using survey information on Dutch university students. We show that 96% of students own at least one of these mobile IT devices (i.e., a laptop, tablet, or smartphone). Using econometric modelling, we also show

  12. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    2010-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  13. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  14. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    2012-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  15. Haldane's statistical interactions and universal properties of anyon systems

    Protogenov, A.

    1995-03-01

    The exclusion principle of fractional statistics proposed by Haldane is applied to systems with internal degrees of freedom. The symmetry of these systems is included in the statistical interaction matrix which contains the Cartan matrix of Lie algebras. The solutions of the equations for the statistical weights, which coincide with the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations are determined in the high temperature limit by the squares of q-deformed dimensions of irreducible representations. The entropy and other thermodynamic properties of anyon systems in this limit are completely characterized by the algebraic structure of symmetry in the universal form. (author). 39 refs

  16. Interaction devices for hands-on desktop design

    Ju, Wendy; Madsen, Sally; Fiene, Jonathan; Bolas, Mark T.; McDowall, Ian E.; Faste, Rolf

    2003-05-01

    Starting with a list of typical hand actions - such as touching or twisting - a collection of physical input device prototypes was created to study better ways of engaging the body and mind in the computer aided design process. These devices were interchangeably coupled with a graphics system to allow for rapid exploration of the interplay between the designer's intent, body motions, and the resulting on-screen design. User testing showed that a number of key considerations should influence the future development of such devices: coupling between the physical and virtual worlds, tactile feedback, and scale. It is hoped that these explorations contribute to the greater goal of creating user interface devices that increase the fluency, productivity and joy of computer-augmented design.

  17. Evaluation of Tissue Interactions with Mechanical Elements of a Transscleral Drug Delivery Device

    Jeffrey T. Borenstein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to evaluate tissue-device interactions due to implantation of a mechanically operated drug delivery system onto the posterior sclera. Two test devices were designed and fabricated to model elements of the drug delivery device—one containing a free-spinning ball bearing and the other encasing two articulating gears. Openings in the base of test devices modeled ports for drug passage from device to sclera. Porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membranes were attached to half of the gear devices to minimize tissue ingrowth through these ports. Test devices were sutured onto rabbit eyes for 10 weeks. Tissue-device interactions were evaluated histologically and mechanically after removal to determine effects on device function and changes in surrounding tissue. Test devices were generally well-tolerated during residence in the animal. All devices encouraged fibrous tissue formation between the sclera and the device, fibrous tissue encapsulation and invasion around the device, and inflammation of the conjunctiva. Gear devices encouraged significantly greater inflammation in all cases and a larger rate of tissue ingrowth. PTFE membranes prevented tissue invasion through the covered drug ports, though tissue migrated in through other smaller openings. The torque required to turn the mechanical elements increased over 1000 times for gear devices, but only on the order of 100 times for membrane-covered gear devices and less than 100 times for ball bearing devices. Maintaining a lower device profile, minimizing microscale motion on the eye surface and covering drug ports with a porous membrane may minimize inflammation, decreasing the risk of damage to surrounding tissues and minimizing disruption of device operation.

  18. A point-based rendering approach for real-time interaction on mobile devices

    LIANG XiaoHui; ZHAO QinPing; HE ZhiYing; XIE Ke; LIU YuBo

    2009-01-01

    Mobile device is an Important interactive platform. Due to the limitation of computation, memory, display area and energy, how to realize the efficient and real-time interaction of 3D models based on mobile devices is an important research topic. Considering features of mobile devices, this paper adopts remote rendering mode and point models, and then, proposes a transmission and rendering approach that could interact in real time. First, improved simplification algorithm based on MLS and display resolution of mobile devices is proposed. Then, a hierarchy selection of point models and a QoS transmission control strategy are given based on interest area of operator, interest degree of object in the virtual environment and rendering error. They can save the energy consumption. Finally, the rendering and interaction of point models are completed on mobile devices. The experiments show that our method is efficient.

  19. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  20. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    Frid, Chris; Andonegi, Eider; Depestele, Jochen; Judd, Adrian; Rihan, Dominic; Rogers, Stuart I.; Kenchington, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: ► We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. ► Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. ► Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. ► Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  1. Human Handheld-Device Interaction : An Adaptive User Interface

    Fitrianie, S.

    2010-01-01

    The move to smaller, lighter and more powerful (mobile) handheld devices, whe-ther PDAs or smart-phones, looks like a trend that is building up speed. With numerous embedded technologies and wireless connectivity, the drift opens up unlimited opportunities in daily activities that are both more

  2. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    Frid, C.; Andonegi, E.; Depestele, J.; Judd, A.; Rihan, D.; Rogers, S.I.; Kenchington, E.

    2012-01-01

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other...

  3. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    Frid, Chris, E-mail: c.l.j.frid@liv.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Andonegi, Eider, E-mail: eandonegi@azti.es [AZTI-Tecnalia, Txatxarramendi ugartea, z/g E-48395 Sukarrieta (Bizkaia) (Spain); Depestele, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.depestele@ilvo.vlaanderen.be [Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Ankerstraat 1, B-8400 Oostende (Belgium); Judd, Adrian, E-mail: Adrian.Judd@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft NR33 0HT United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Rihan, Dominic, E-mail: Dominic.RIHAN@ec.europa.eu [Irish Sea Fisheries Board, P.O. Box 12 Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); Rogers, Stuart I., E-mail: stuart.rogers@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft NR33 0HT United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Kenchington, Ellen, E-mail: Ellen.Kenchington@dfo-mpo.gc.ca [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth Canada, NS B2Y 4A2 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  4. Physicians interrupted by mobile devices in hospitals: understanding the interaction between devices, roles, and duties.

    Solvoll, Terje; Scholl, Jeremiah; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-03-07

    A common denominator of modern hospitals is a variety of communication problems. In particular, interruptions from mobile communication devices are a cause of great concern for many physicians. To characterize how interruptions from mobile devices disturb physicians in their daily work. The gathered knowledge will be subsequently used as input for the design and development of a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communications suitable for hospitals. This study adheres to an ethnographic and interpretive field research approach. The data gathering consisted of participant observations, non-structured and mostly ad hoc interviews, and open-ended discussions with a selected group of physicians. Eleven physicians were observed for a total of 135 hours during May and June 2009. The study demonstrates to what degree physicians are interrupted by mobile devices in their daily work and in which situations they are interrupted, such as surgery, examinations, and during patients/relatives high-importance level conversations. The participants in the study expected, and also indicated, that wireless phones probably led to more interruptions immediately after their introduction in a clinic, when compared to a pager, but this changed after a short while. The unpleasant feeling experienced by the caller when interrupting someone by calling them differs compared to sending a page message, which leaves it up to the receiver when to return the call. Mobile devices, which frequently interrupt physicians in hospitals, are a problem for both physicians and patients. The results from this study contribute to knowledge being used as input for designing and developing a prototype for a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communication suitable for hospitals. We combined these findings with results from earlier studies and also involved actual users to develop the prototype, CallMeSmart. This system intends to reduce such interruptions and at the same time

  5. Contributions to the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    1986-01-01

    The report contains three papers presented in the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices held in Princeton (USA) 5-9 May 1986, all referred to the FT Tokamak

  6. Maternal mobile device use during a structured parent-child interaction task.

    Radesky, Jenny; Miller, Alison L; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Appugliese, Danielle; Kaciroti, Niko; Lumeng, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    To examine associations of maternal mobile device use with the frequency of mother-child interactions during a structured laboratory task. Participants included 225 low-income mother-child pairs. When children were ∼6 years old, dyads were videotaped during a standardized protocol in order to characterize how mothers and children interacted when asked to try familiar and unfamiliar foods. From videotapes, we dichotomized mothers on the basis of whether or not they spontaneously used a mobile device, and we counted maternal verbal and nonverbal prompts toward the child. We used multivariate Poisson regression to study associations of device use with eating prompt frequency for different foods. Mothers were an average of 31.3 (SD 7.1) years old, and 28.0% were of Hispanic/nonwhite race/ethnicity. During the protocol, 23.1% of mothers spontaneously used a mobile device. Device use was not associated with any maternal characteristics, including age, race/ethnicity, education, depressive symptoms, or parenting style. Mothers with device use initiated fewer verbal (relative rate 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.63, 1.03) and nonverbal (0.61; 0.39, 0.96) interactions with their children than mothers who did not use a device, when averaged across all foods. This association was strongest during introduction of halva, the most unfamiliar food (0.67; 0.48, 0.93 for verbal and 0.42; 0.20, 0.89 for nonverbal interactions). Mobile device use was common and associated with fewer interactions with children during a structured interaction task, particularly nonverbal interactions and during introduction of an unfamiliar food. More research is needed to understand how device use affects parent-child engagement in naturalistic contexts. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Composing Interactive Dance Pieces for the MotionComposer, a device for Persons with Disabilities

    Bergsland, Andreas; Wechsler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a new hardware/software device for persons with disabilities (the MotionComposer), and in the process created a number of interactive dance pieces for non- disabled professional dancers. The paper briefly describes the hardware and motion tracking software of the device before going into more detail concerning the mapping strategies and sound design applied to three interactive dance pieces. The paper concludes by discussing a particular philosophy championing trans...

  8. Input Devices and Interaction Techniques for VR-Enhanced Medicine

    Gallo, Luigi; Pietro, Giuseppe De

    Virtual Reality (VR) technologies make it possible to reproduce faithfully real life events in computer-generated scenarios. This approach has the potential to simplify the way people solve problems, since they can take advantage of their real life experiences while interacting in synthetic worlds.

  9. Configurable Input Devices for 3D Interaction using Optical Tracking

    A.J. van Rhijn (Arjen)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional interaction with virtual objects is one of the aspects that needs to be addressed in order to increase the usability and usefulness of virtual reality. Human beings have difficulties understanding 3D spatial relationships and manipulating 3D user interfaces, which

  10. Configurable input devices for 3D interaction using optical tracking

    Rhijn, van A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional interaction with virtual objects is one of the aspects that needs to be addressed in order to increase the usability and usefulness of virtual reality. Human beings have difficulties understanding 3D spatial relationships and manipulating 3D user interfaces, which require the

  11. Investigating Cross-Device Interaction between a Handheld Device and a Large Display

    Paay, Jeni; Raptis, Dimitrios; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    and mid-air gestures, pinching, swiping, swinging and flicking. We look specifically at their relative efficiency, effectiveness and accuracy in bi-directional interaction between a smartphone and large display in a point-click context. We report findings from two user studies, which show that swiping...... is both most effective, fastest and most accurate, closely followed by swinging. What these two approaches have in common is the ability to keep the pointer steady on the large display, unaffected by concurrent gestures or body movements used to complete the interaction, suggesting...

  12. Galaxy Portal: interacting with the galaxy platform through mobile devices.

    Børnich, Claus; Grytten, Ivar; Hovig, Eivind; Paulsen, Jonas; Čech, Martin; Sandve, Geir Kjetil

    2016-06-01

    : We present Galaxy Portal app, an open source interface to the Galaxy system through smart phones and tablets. The Galaxy Portal provides convenient and efficient monitoring of job completion, as well as opportunities for inspection of results and execution history. In addition to being useful to the Galaxy community, we believe that the app also exemplifies a useful way of exploiting mobile interfaces for research/high-performance computing resources in general. The source is freely available under a GPL license on GitHub, along with user documentation and pre-compiled binaries and instructions for several platforms: https://github.com/Tarostar/QMLGalaxyPortal It is available for iOS version 7 (and newer) through the Apple App Store, and for Android through Google Play for version 4.1 (API 16) or newer. geirksa@ifi.uio.no. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. 3D interactive topology optimization on hand-held devices

    Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Aage, Niels; Christiansen, Asger Nyman

    2015-01-01

    This educational paper describes the implementation aspects, user interface design considerations and workflow potential of the recently published TopOpt 3D App. The app solves the standard minimum compliance problem in 3D and allows the user to change design settings interactively at any point...... in time during the optimization. Apart from its educational nature, the app may point towards future ways of performing industrial design. Instead of the usual geometrize, then model and optimize approach, the geometry now automatically adapts to the varying boundary and loading conditions. The app...

  14. Cloud Interaction and Safety Features of Mobile Devices

    Mirsat Yeşiltepe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two current popular mobile operating system, still in relation to the conceptof cloud began to supplant the internet almost Word today, the differences, the concept of cloudsecurity mechanisms they use for themselves and are dealt with in this environment. One ofcomparing mobile operation system is representing open source and the other for close source one.The other issue discussed in this article is how the mobile environment interacts with the cloud thanthe cloud communication with the computers.

  15. Tablet PC interaction with digital micromirror device (DMD)

    Refai, Hakki H.; Dahshan, Mostafa H.; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Digital light processing (DLP) is an innovative display technology that uses an optical switch array, known as a digital micromirror device (DMD), which allows digital control of light. To date, DMDs have been used primarily as high-speed spatial light modulators for projector applications. A tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile PC. Its touch screen or digitizing tablet technology allows the user to operate the notebook with a stylus or digital pen instead of using a keyboard or mouse. In this paper, we describe an interface solution that translates any sketch on the tablet PC screen to an identical mirror-copy over the cross-section of the DMD micromirrors such that the image of the sketch can be projected onto a special screen. An algorithm has been created to control each single micromirror of the hundreds of thousands of micromirrors that cover the DMD surface. We demonstrate the successful application of a DMD to a high-speed two-dimensional (2D) scanning environment, acquiring the data from the tablet screen and launching its contents to the projection screen; with very high accuracy up to 13.68 μm x 13.68 μm of mirror pitch.

  16. Universal crystal cooling device for precession cameras, rotation cameras and diffractometers

    Hajdu, J.; McLaughlin, P.J.; Helliwell, J.R.; Sheldon, J.; Thompson, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A versatile crystal cooling device is described for macromolecular crystallographic applications in the 290 to 80 K temperature range. It utilizes a fluctuation-free cold-nitrogen-gas supply, an insulated Mylar crystal cooling chamber and a universal ball joint, which connects the cooling chamber to the goniometer head and the crystal. The ball joint is a novel feature over all previous designs. As a result, the device can be used on various rotation cameras, precession cameras and diffractometers. The lubrication of the interconnecting parts with graphite allows the cooling chamber to remain stationary while the crystal and goniometer rotate. The construction allows for 360 0 rotation of the crystal around the goniometer axis and permits any settings on the arcs and slides of the goniometer head (even if working at 80 K). There are no blind regions associated with the frame holding the chamber. Alternatively, the interconnecting ball joint can be tightened and fixed. This results in a set up similar to the construction described by Bartunik and Schubert where the cooling chamber rotates with the crystal. The flexibility of the systems allows for the use of the device on most cameras or diffractometers. THis device has been installed at the protein crystallographic stations of the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory and in the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Oxford. Several data sets have been collected with processing statistics typical of data collected without a cooling chamber. Tests using the full white beam of the synchrotron also look promising. (orig./BHO)

  17. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use.

  18. Tritium interactions with steel and construction materials in fusion devices

    Dickson, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    The literature on the interactions of tritium and tritiated water with metals, glasses, ceramics, concrete, paints, polymers and other organic materials is reviewed in this report Some of the processes affecting the amount of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and the conversion of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and conversion of elemental tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO), are also briefly outlined. Tritium permeation in steels is fairly well understood, but effects of surface preparation and coatings on sorption are not yet clear. Permeation of T 2 into other metals with cleaned surfaces has been studied thoroughly at high temperature, and the effect of surface oxidation has also been explored. The room-temperature permeation rates of low-permeability metals with cleaned surfaces are much faster than indicated by high-temperature results, because of grain-boundary diffusion. Elastomers have been studied to a certain extent, but some mechanisms of interaction with tritium gas and sorbed tritium are unclear. Ceramics have some of the lowest sorption and permeation rates, but ceramic coatings on stainless steels do not lower permeation or tritium as effectively as coatings obtained by oxidation of the steel, probably because of cracking caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficient. Studies on concrete are in their early stages; they show that sorption of tritiated water on concrete is a major concern in cleanup of releases of elemental tritium into air in tritium handling facilities. Some of the codes for modelling releases and sorption of T 2 and HTO contain unproven assumptions about sorption and T 2 → HTO conversion. Several experimental programs will be required in order to clear up ambiguities in previous work and to determine parameters for materials which have not yet been investigated. (146 refs., tab.)

  19. University Students Use of Computers and Mobile Devices for Learning and Their Reading Speed on Different Platforms

    Mpofu, Bongeka

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at the investigation of mobile device and computer use at a higher learning institution. The goal was to determine the current use of computers and mobile devices for learning and the students' reading speed on different platforms. The research was contextualised in a sample of students at the University of South Africa.…

  20. How Do Students Use Their Mobile Devices to Support Learning? A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    Farley, Helen; Murphy, Angela; Johnson, Chris; Carter, Brad; Lane, Michael; Midgley, Warren; Hafeez-Baig, Abdul; Dekeyser, Stijn; Koronios, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Though universities are eager to leverage the potential of mobile learning to provide learning flexibly, most balk at the cost of providing students with mobile hardware. The practice of "bring your own device" (BYOD) is often mooted as a cost-effective alternative. This paper provides a snapshot of student ownership of mobile devices at…

  1. Secure and Usable Out-Of-Band Channels for Ad Hoc Mobile Device Interactions

    Kainda , Ronald; Flechais , Ivan; Roscoe , A. W.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Protocols for bootstrapping security in ad hoc mobile device interactions rely on users' ability to perform specific tasks such as transferring or comparing fingerprints of information between devices. The size of fingerprints depends on the level of technical security required by a given application but, at the same time, is limited by users' inability to deal with large amounts of data with high levels of accuracy. Large fingerprints provide high technical security b...

  2. Feasibility Study of Interactive Game Technologies to Improve Experience with Inhaler Spacer Devices in Young Children

    Aslam, Tariq; Shakir, Savana; Murray, Clare

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionThe correct use of inhaler devices with facemasks and spacers in young children can be difficult for both children and parents, resulting in distress for both, poor adherence and ineffective drug delivery. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the utility and impact of an interactive electronic game designed to improve the experience of spacer devices in young asthmatic children.MethodsThe Respiratory Aid For Inhaler (RAFIhaler) technology consists of a smartphone mounte...

  3. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  4. Haptics using a smart material for eyes-free interaction in personal devices

    Wang, Huihui; Lane, William Brian; Pappas, Devin; Duque, Bryam; Leong, John

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a prototype using a dry ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) in interactive personal devices such as bracelet, necklace, pocket key chain or mobile devices for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not possible or practical. This prototype interface is an electro-mechanical system that realizes a shape-changing haptic display for information communication. A dry IPMC will change its dimensions due to the electrostatic effect when an electrical potential is provided to them. The IPMC can operate at a lower voltage (less than 2.5V) which is compatible with requirements for personal electrical devices or mobile devices. The prototype consists of the addressable arrays of the IPMCs with different dimensions which are deformable to different shapes with proper handling or customization. 3D printing technology will be used to form supporting parts. Microcontrollers (about 3cm square) from DigiKey will be imbedded into this personal device. An Android based mobile APP will be developed to talk with microcontrollers to control IPMCs. When personal devices receive information signals, the original shape of the prototype will change to another shape related to the specific sender or types of information sources. This interactive prototype can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, and texture due to the flexible array design. We conduct several studies of user experience to explore how users' respond to shape change information.

  5. Students, Mobile Devices and Classrooms: A Comparison of US and Arab Undergraduate Students in A Middle Eastern University

    Mohammad Abu Taleb, Bibi Rahima; Coughlin, Chris; Romanowski, Michael H.; Semmar, Yassir; Hosny, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    The use of mobile devices in the university classroom is not limited to Western cultures. Rather universities in the Middle East, particularly in the Gulf Cooperation Countries (GCC) face similar problems regarding smartphone usage in classrooms. This study utilizes Tindell and Bohlander's (2012) survey to compare results regarding cell phones and…

  6. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  7. Cluster Approach to Network Interaction in Pedagogical University

    Chekaleva, Nadezhda V.; Makarova, Natalia S.; Drobotenko, Yulia B.

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in the article is devoted to the analysis of theory and practice of network interaction within the framework of education clusters. Education clusters are considered to be a novel form of network interaction in pedagogical education in Russia. The aim of the article is to show the advantages and disadvantages of the cluster…

  8. Increased drop formation frequency via reduction of surfactant interactions in flow-focusing microfluidic devices.

    Josephides, Dimitris N; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-01-27

    Glass capillary based microfluidic devices are able to create extremely uniform droplets, when formed under the dripping regime, at low setup costs due to their ease of manufacture. However, as they are rarely parallelized, simple methods to increase droplet production from a single device are sought. Surfactants used to stabilize drops in such systems often limit the maximum flow rate that highly uniform drops can be produced due to the lowering interfacial tension causing jetting. In this paper we show that by simple design changes we can limit the interactions of surfactants and maximize uniform droplet production. Three flow-focused configurations are explored: a standard glass capillary device (consisting of a single round capillary inserted into a square capillary), a nozzle fed device, and a surfactant shielding device (both consisting of two round capillaries inserted into either end of a square capillary). In principle, the maximum productivity of uniform droplets is achieved if surfactants are not present. It was found that surfactants in the standard device greatly inhibit droplet production by means of interfacial tension lowering and tip-streaming phenomena. In the nozzle fed configuration, surfactant interactions were greatly limited, yielding flow rates comparable to, but lower than, a surfactant-free system. In the surfactant shielding configuration, flow rates were equal to that of a surfactant-free system and could make uniform droplets at rates an order of magnitude above the standard surfactant system.

  9. "Pseudo" Faraday cage: a solution for telemetry link interaction between a left ventricular assist device and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Jacob, Sony; Cherian, Prasad K; Ghumman, Waqas S; Das, Mithilesh K

    2010-09-01

    Patients implanted with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) may have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) implanted for sudden cardiac death prevention. This opens the possibility of device-device communication interactions and thus interferences. We present a case of such interaction that led to ICD communication failure following the activation of an LVAD. In this paper, we describe a practical solution to circumvent the communication interference and review the communication links of ICDs and possible mechanisms of ICD-LVAD interactions.

  10. Calibration of a measurement device as a result of efforts of interaction flow and turbo machines impeller; Calibracao de um dispositivo de medida de esforcos resultantes da interacao entre o escoamento e o rotor de turbomaquinas

    Brandao, Jose Geraldo Trani; Tomazini, Jose Elias [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Mecanica]. E-mails: brandao@feg.unesp.br; tomazini@feg.unesp.br

    2000-07-01

    This work reports the static calibration of a device used for measurements of the hydraulic efforts resulting from the interaction between the flow and the turbomachinery rotor, simulating the various operation conditions. The device was developed by the Stuttgart University. A calibration process is described for allowing a real correspondence among real efforts acting on the rotor model and the the measured efforts. The used device consists of load three dimension piezoelectric sensors.

  11. Multi-Axis Force Sensor for Human-Robot Interaction Sensing in a Rehabilitation Robotic Device.

    Grosu, Victor; Grosu, Svetlana; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk; Rodriguez-Guerrero, Carlos

    2017-06-05

    Human-robot interaction sensing is a compulsory feature in modern robotic systems where direct contact or close collaboration is desired. Rehabilitation and assistive robotics are fields where interaction forces are required for both safety and increased control performance of the device with a more comfortable experience for the user. In order to provide an efficient interaction feedback between the user and rehabilitation device, high performance sensing units are demanded. This work introduces a novel design of a multi-axis force sensor dedicated for measuring pelvis interaction forces in a rehabilitation exoskeleton device. The sensor is conceived such that it has different sensitivity characteristics for the three axes of interest having also movable parts in order to allow free rotations and limit crosstalk errors. Integrated sensor electronics make it easy to acquire and process data for a real-time distributed system architecture. Two of the developed sensors are integrated and tested in a complex gait rehabilitation device for safe and compliant control.

  12. Analysis of transient electromagnetic wave interactions on graphene-based devices using integral equations

    Shi, Yifei

    2015-10-26

    Graphene is a monolayer of carbon atoms structured in the form of a honeycomb lattice. Recent experimental studies have revealed that it can support surface plasmons at Terahertz frequencies thanks to its dispersive conductivity. Additionally, characteristics of these plasmons can be dynamically adjusted via electrostatic gating of the graphene sheet (K. S. Novoselov, et al., Science, 306, 666–669, 2004). These properties suggest that graphene can be a building block for novel electromagnetic and photonic devices for applications in the fields of photovoltaics, bio-chemical sensing, all-optical computing, and flexible electronics. Simulation of electromagnetic interactions on graphene-based devices is not an easy task. The thickness of the graphene sheet is orders of magnitude smaller than any other geometrical dimension of the device. Consequently, discretization of such a device leads to significantly large number of unknowns and/or ill-conditioned matrix systems.

  13. Interacting dark energy and the expansion of the universe

    Silbergleit, Alexander S

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a high-level study of cosmology with interacting dark energy and no additional fields. It is known that dark energy is not necessarily uniform when other sources of gravity are present: interaction with matter leads to its variation in space and time. The present text studies the cosmological implications of this circumstance by analyzing cosmological models in which the dark energy density interacts with matter and thus changes with the time. The book also includes a translation of a seminal article about the remarkable life and work of E.B. Gliner, the first person to suggest the concept of dark energy in 1965.

  14. Stimulating Manufacturing Excellence through University-Industry Interaction

    Riis, Jens Ove

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers what a university engineering school can do to stimulate manufacturing excellence in industry. Aalborg University, with its unique use of problem-based learning methods, is used as a case example. This approach is also embedded in a new research initiative, the Centre...... for Industrial Production. Examples of industry involvement in research and development projects are given. Such university–industry collaboration will not only benefit the development of competencies in large and small industrial enterprises, but will also provide a laboratory setting for the study...

  15. Development of MW gyrotrons for fusion devices by University of Tsukuba

    Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Numakura, T.; Endo, Y.; Nakabayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.; Ito, S.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Sakamoto, Keishi; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Over-1 MW power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been developed in the joint program of NIFS and University of Tsukuba. The obtained maximum outputs are 1.9 MW for 0.1 s on the 77 GHz Large Helical Device (LHD) tube and 1.0 MW for 1 ms on the 28 GHz GAMMA 10 one, which are new records in these frequency ranges. In long pulse operation, 300 kW for 40 min at 77 GHz and 540 kW for 2 s at 28 GHz were achieved. A new program of 154 GHz 1 MW development has started for high density plasma heating in LHD and the first tube has been fabricated. These lower frequency tubes like 77 GHz or 28 GHz one are also important for advanced magnetic fusion devices, which use Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating / current drive. As a next activity of 28 GHz gyrotron, we have already started the development of over-1.5 MW gyrotron and a new design study of 28 GHz / 35 GHz dual frequency gyrotron, which indicates the practicability of the multi-purpose gyrotron. (author)

  16. Self-Consistent Monte Carlo Study of the Coulomb Interaction under Nano-Scale Device Structures

    Sano, Nobuyuki

    2011-03-01

    It has been pointed that the Coulomb interaction between the electrons is expected to be of crucial importance to predict reliable device characteristics. In particular, the device performance is greatly degraded due to the plasmon excitation represented by dynamical potential fluctuations in high-doped source and drain regions by the channel electrons. We employ the self-consistent 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, which could reproduce both the correct mobility under various electron concentrations and the collective plasma waves, to study the physical impact of dynamical potential fluctuations on device performance under the Double-gate MOSFETs. The average force experienced by an electron due to the Coulomb interaction inside the device is evaluated by performing the self-consistent MC simulations and the fixed-potential MC simulations without the Coulomb interaction. Also, the band-tailing associated with the local potential fluctuations in high-doped source region is quantitatively evaluated and it is found that the band-tailing becomes strongly dependent of position in real space even inside the uniform source region. This work was partially supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research B (No. 2160160) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  17. Interactional competence in the institutional setting of the international university

    Hazel, Spencer

    includes an overview of activities and linguistic resources encountered in the data. The main lines of analysis, however, are presented in five research articles. One article describes systematic practices for entering into a focused encounter at a help desk. The paper demonstrates how participants orient...... practices. This paper argues for a wider adoption of transcription linking software. The main methodological approach for the research has been Conversation Analysis, supplemented by micro-ethnographic methods for investigating situated embodied conduct in interaction, notably Context Analysis....... These approaches share a commitment to how they treat the phenomena of human interaction, including a reluctance to use contrived data or experimental settings. The current research offers a synthesis of the analytic orientations, specifically in foregrounding the reflexive, conjoint, and co-reliant nature...

  18. Universal relationship connecting various two-body effective residual interactions

    Knuepfer, W.; Huber, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Starting from a momentum space analysis of the two-body matrix elements, a relation has been established between the size of the model space actually used in a specific calculation and the relevant properties of the effective residual interaction. It turns out that the two-body transition density acts like a filter function on the Fourier transform of the force; it exhibits a distinct structure which clearly reflects the size and the detailed properties of the configuration space actually used. From an investigation of this filter function an equivalence criterion for different effective residual two-body interactions has been established both for closed and open shell nuclei. This result can be used to construct simple although realistic effective forces. As an example, a model for a separable residual interaction is proposed in which the corresponding parameters are being clearly related to the nuclear radius (i.e., the mass number), to the quantum numbers (i.e., the angular momentum) of the state under consideration and to the size of the configuration space used. For a number of examples this force has been applied successfully for the description of low energy properties of both closed and open shell nuclei

  19. Natural Environment Illumination: Coherent Interactive Augmented Reality for Mobile and Non-Mobile Devices.

    Rohmer, Kai; Jendersie, Johannes; Grosch, Thorsten

    2017-11-01

    Augmented Reality offers many applications today, especially on mobile devices. Due to the lack of mobile hardware for illumination measurements, photorealistic rendering with consistent appearance of virtual objects is still an area of active research. In this paper, we present a full two-stage pipeline for environment acquisition and augmentation of live camera images using a mobile device with a depth sensor. We show how to directly work on a recorded 3D point cloud of the real environment containing high dynamic range color values. For unknown and automatically changing camera settings, a color compensation method is introduced. Based on this, we show photorealistic augmentations using variants of differential light simulation techniques. The presented methods are tailored for mobile devices and run at interactive frame rates. However, our methods are scalable to trade performance for quality and can produce quality renderings on desktop hardware.

  20. Reclaiming public space: designing for public interaction with private devices

    Eriksson, Eva; Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    . In this paper we explore the implications of interacting in public space and how technology can be rethought to not only act as personal devices, but be the tool to reclaim the right and possibility to interact in public spaces. We introduce information exchange, social support and regulation as three central......Public spaces are changing from being ungoverned places for interaction to be more formalized, controlled, less interactive, and designed places aimed at fulfilling a purpose. Simultaneously, new personal mobile technology aims at providing private individual spaces in the public domain...... aspects for reclaiming public space. The PhotoSwapper application is presented as an example of a system designed to integrate pervasive technology in a public setting. The system is strongly inspired by the activities at a traditional market place. Based on the design of the application we discuss four...

  1. Interactive Near-Field Illumination for Photorealistic Augmented Reality with Varying Materials on Mobile Devices.

    Rohmer, Kai; Buschel, Wolfgang; Dachselt, Raimund; Grosch, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    At present, photorealistic augmentation is not yet possible since the computational power of mobile devices is insufficient. Even streaming solutions from stationary PCs cause a latency that affects user interactions considerably. Therefore, we introduce a differential rendering method that allows for a consistent illumination of the inserted virtual objects on mobile devices, avoiding delays. The computation effort is shared between a stationary PC and the mobile devices to make use of the capacities available on both sides. The method is designed such that only a minimum amount of data has to be transferred asynchronously between the participants. This allows for an interactive illumination of virtual objects with a consistent appearance under both temporally and spatially varying real illumination conditions. To describe the complex near-field illumination in an indoor scenario, HDR video cameras are used to capture the illumination from multiple directions. In this way, sources of illumination can be considered that are not directly visible to the mobile device because of occlusions and the limited field of view. While our method focuses on Lambertian materials, we also provide some initial approaches to approximate non-diffuse virtual objects and thereby allow for a wider field of application at nearly the same cost.

  2. Interacting polytropic gas model of phantom dark energy in non-flat universe

    Karami, K.; Ghaffari, S.; Fehri, J.

    2009-01-01

    By introducing the polytropic gas model of interacting dark energy, we obtain the equation of state for the polytropic gas energy density in a non-flat universe. We show that for an even polytropic index by choosing K>Ba (3)/(n) , one can obtain ω Λ eff <-1, which corresponds to a universe dominated by phantom dark energy. (orig.)

  3. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  4. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  5. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  6. Accelerated expansion of a universe containing a self-interacting Bose-Einstein gas

    Izquierdo, German; Besprosvany, Jaime, E-mail: german.izquierdo@gmail.co, E-mail: bespro@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion CientIfica S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-03-21

    Acceleration of the universe is obtained from a model of non-relativistic particles with a short-range attractive interaction, at low enough temperature to produce a Bose-Einstein condensate. Conditions are derived for negative-pressure behavior. In particular, we show that a phantom-accelerated regime at the beginning of the universe solves the horizon problem, consistently with nucleosynthesis.

  7. Is Industry-University Interaction Promoting Innovation in the Brazilian Pharmaceutical Industry?

    Paranhos, Julia; Hasenclever, Lia

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses industry-university interaction and its characteristics in the Brazilian pharmaceutical system of innovation, taking account of the relevance of company strategies, the approach of the universities and the actions of government. By analysing primary and secondary data the authors show that, for as long as corporate investment…

  8. An Appeal for heritage interpretation and accessibility. Immersive and interactive virtual reality tours for mobile devices

    Guillermo Duclos Bautista; Javier Cousillas Ripoll

    2013-01-01

    We propose an interactive resource for the value enhancement, management, diffusion and accessibility of the architectural and archaeological heritage by means of virtual reality technologies through mobile devices. The resource is, in addition, a tool for the management of the heritage by the employment of intermediate modules that allow the graphical and alphanumeric update of the external and internal databases put in relation with the resource, depending on the interventions and investiga...

  9. Universal interaction-driven gap in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Senger, Mitchell J.; McCulley, Daniel R.; Lotfizadeh, Neda; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Minot, Ethan D.

    2018-02-01

    Suspended metallic carbon nanotubes (m-CNTs) exhibit a remarkably large transport gap that can exceed 100 meV. Both experiment and theory suggest that strong electron-electron interactions play a crucial role in generating this electronic structure. To further understand this strongly interacting system, we have performed electronic measurements of suspended m-CNTs with known diameter and chiral angle. Spectrally resolved photocurrent microscopy was used to determine m-CNT structure. The room-temperature electrical characteristics of 18 individually contacted m-CNTs were compared to their respective diameter and chiral angle. At the charge neutrality point, we observe a peak in m-CNT resistance that scales exponentially with inverse diameter. Using a thermally activated transport model, we estimate that the transport gap is (450 meV nm)/D , where D is CNT diameter. We find no correlation between the gap and the CNT chiral angle. Our results add important constraints to theories attempting to describe the electronic structure of m-CNTs.

  10. Reputation, a universal currency for human social interactions

    Milinski, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Decision rules of reciprocity include ‘I help those who helped me’ (direct reciprocity) and ‘I help those who have helped others’ (indirect reciprocity), i.e. I help those who have a reputation to care for others. A person's reputation is a score that members of a social group update whenever they see the person interacting or hear at best multiple gossip about the person's social interactions. Reputation is the current standing the person has gained from previous investments or refusal of investments in helping others. Is he a good guy, can I trust him or should I better avoid him as a social partner? A good reputation pays off by attracting help from others, even from strangers or members from another group, if the recipient's reputation is known. Any costly investment in others, i.e. direct help, donations to charity, investment in averting climate change, etc. increases a person's reputation. I shall argue and illustrate with examples that a person's known reputation functions like money that can be used whenever the person needs help. Whenever possible I will present tests of predictions of evolutionary theory, i.e. fitness maximizing strategies, mostly by economic experiments with humans. PMID:26729939

  11. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mobile devices and augmented reality in the learning process of university students

    Julio Cabero Alemanra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is an emerging technology having more and more influence on teaching. Together with it, mobile technology is drawn as one of the most effective pairing to support a meaningful and omnipresent learning. However, for it to be able to work with validity, the student must be motivated to use them during the training process, so that the learning process can work with validity. By means of the application of the Instructional Material Motivational Survey by Keller (1983, we have tried to determine the degree of motivation that students, from the Degree of Pedagogy at Seville University (N=148, have about the usage in the  classroom of notes enriched through Augmented Reality and available in mobile devices. Through an application designed exclusively for the subject, it has been valued in a positive way by the students who participate in this research. Moreover, we can highlight that the main finding achieved has been the narrow relationship between the students' motivation to use the enriched notes and the degree of success in the subject when using them. Likewise, we can confirm that Augmented Reality benefits the learning process. Therefore, we conclude the validity and viability of such a paring related to the achievement of an improvement in the students' learning results.

  13. Integrating medical, assistive, and universally designed products and technologies: assistive technology device classification (ATDC).

    Bauer, Stephen; Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne

    2012-09-01

    ISO26000:2010 International Guidance Standard on Organizational Social Responsibility requires that effective organizational performance recognize social responsibility, including the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), engage stakeholders and contribute to sustainable development. Millennium Development Goals 2010 notes that the most vulnerable people require special attention, while the World Report on Disability 2011 identifies improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation as the means to empower PWD. The Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC), Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM) and Matching Person and Technology models provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve data collection and rehabilitation interventions. The ATDC and ATSM encompass and support universal design (UD) principles, and use the language and concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Use ATDC and ICF concepts to differentiate medical, assistive and UD products and technology; relate technology "types" to markets and costs; and support provision of UD products and technologies as sustainable and socially responsible behavior. Supply-side and demand-side incentives are suggested to foster private sector development and commercialization of UD products and technologies. Health and health-related professionals should be knowledgeable of UD principles and interventions.

  14. Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolution, Interactions

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Krasiński, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle

    2009-10-01

    As the structures in our Universe are mapped out on ever larger scales, and with increasing detail, the use of inhomogeneous models is becoming an essential tool for analyzing and understanding them. This book reviews a number of important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology. It shows how inhomogeneous models can be employed to study the evolution of structures such as galaxy clusters and galaxies with central black holes, and to account for cosmological observations like supernovae dimming, the cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations or the dependence of the Hubble parameter on redshift within classical general relativity. Whatever 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' turn out to be, inhomogeneities exist on many scales and need to be investigated with all appropriate methods. This book is of great value to all astrophysicists and researchers working in cosmology, from graduate students to academic researchers. - Presents inhomogeneous cosmological models, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with basic properties of these models - Shows how inhomogeneous models can be used to analyse cosmological observations such as supernovae, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations - Reviews important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology

  15. Universal Behavior of Pair Correlations in a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

    Kuhnle, E. D.; Hu, H.; Liu, X.-J.; Dyke, P.; Mark, M.; Drummond, P. D.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    We show that short-range pair correlations in a strongly interacting Fermi gas follow a simple universal law described by Tan's relations. This is achieved through measurements of the static structure factor which displays a universal scaling proportional to the ratio of Tan's contact to the momentum C/q. Bragg spectroscopy of ultracold 6 Li atoms from a periodic optical potential is used to measure the structure factor for a wide range of momenta and interaction strengths, providing broad confirmation of this universal law. We calibrate our Bragg spectra using the f-sum rule, which is found to improve the accuracy of the structure factor measurement.

  16. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  17. Exploring the tutor-student interaction in a blended university course

    Krasnova, Tatiana Ivanovna; Popova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A meaningful tutor-student interaction requires a new insight into pedagogical principles and proper implementation of modern teaching strategies. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of online tutoring in blended learning settings and the impact of the tutor-student interaction on the learning process. The article reports on the results of the study on students’ evaluation of the tutor’s role and the tutor-student interaction in a blended university course. The findings show th...

  18. Empowering Older Patients to Engage in Self Care: Designing an Interactive Robotic Device

    Tiwari, Priyadarshi; Warren, Jim; Day, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and test an interactive robot mounted computing device to support medication management as an example of a complex self-care task in older adults. Method: A Grounded Theory (GT), Participatory Design (PD) approach was used within three Action Research (AR) cycles to understand design requirements and test the design configuration addressing the unique task requirements. Results: At the end of the first cycle a conceptual framework was evolved. The second cycle informed architecture and interface design. By the end of third cycle residents successfully interacted with the dialogue system and were generally satisfied with the robot. The results informed further refinement of the prototype. Conclusion: An interactive, touch screen based, robot-mounted information tool can be developed to support healthcare needs of older people. Qualitative methods such as the hybrid GT-PD-AR approach may be particularly helpful for innovating and articulating design requirements in challenging situations. PMID:22195203

  19. Heart-pulse Biofeedback in Playful Exercise using a Wearable device and Modular Interactive Tiles

    Shimokakimoto, Tomoya; Lund, Henrik Hautop; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    interactive tiles. The system consists of a wearable device that measures heart-pulse via ear-mounted sensor, and modular interactive tiles which are used for physical rehabilitation exercise through playing a game. The wearable devise enables detection of heart pulse in real-time and therefore provides heart...... beat rate during playful activities, even if the heart pulse wave have motion artifacts. The tiles are designed to build flexible structures and to provide immediate feedback based on the users’ physical interaction with the tiles. We combine the two systems to provide users with heart pulse...... biofeedback in playful exercise. We show that using the developed system it is possible for the users to regulate the exercise intensity on their own with biofeedback, and also possible to analyze exercise activity using number of steps on the tiles and heart beat rate....

  20. Fostering learners' interaction with content: A learner-centered mobile device interface

    Abdous, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the ever-increasing omnipresence of mobile devices in student life, leveraging smart devices to foster students' interaction with course content is critical. Following a learner-centered design iterative approach, we designed a mobile interface that may enable learners to access and interact with online course content efficiently and intuitively. Our design process leveraged recent technologies, such as bootstrap, Google's Material Design, HTML5, and JavaScript to design an intuitive, efficient, and portable mobile interface with a variety of built-in features, including context sensitive bookmarking, searching, progress tracking, captioning, and transcript display. The mobile interface also offers students the ability to ask context-related questions and to complete self-checks as they watch audio/video presentations. Our design process involved ongoing iterative feedback from learners, allowing us to refine and tweak the interface to provide learners with a unified experience across platforms and devices. The innovative combination of technologies built around well-structured and well-designed content seems to provide an effective learning experience to mobile learners. Early feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction with the interface's efficiency, intuitiveness, and robustness from both students and faculty.

  1. Data-driven analysis of interactions between people with dementia and a tablet device

    Doneit Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the project I-CARE a technical system for tablet devices is developed that captures the personal needs and skills of people with dementia. The system provides activation content such as music videos, biographical photographs and quizzes on various topics of interest to people with dementia, their families and professional caregivers. To adapt the system, the activation content is adjusted to the daily condition of individual users. For this purpose, emotions are automatically detected through facial expressions, motion, and voice. The daily interactions of the users with the tablet devices are documented in log files which can be merged into an event list. In this paper, we propose an advanced format for event lists and a data analysis strategy. A transformation scheme is developed in order to obtain datasets with features and time series for popular methods of data mining. The proposed methods are applied to analysing the interactions of people with dementia with the I-CARE tablet device. We show how the new format of event lists and the innovative transformation scheme can be used to compress the stored data, to identify groups of users, and to model changes of user behaviour. As the I-CARE user studies are still ongoing, simulated benchmark log files are applied to illustrate the data mining strategy. We discuss possible solutions to challenges that appear in the context of I-CARE and that are relevant to a broad range of applications.

  2. UniDA: Uniform Device Access Framework for Human Interaction Environments

    Santiago Vazquez-Rodriguez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Human interaction environments (HIE must be understood as any place where people carry out their daily life, including their work, family life, leisure and social life, interacting with technology to enhance or facilitate the experience. The integration of technology in these environments has been achieved in a disorderly and incompatible way, with devices operating in isolated islands with artificial edges delimited by the manufacturers. In this paper we are presenting the UniDA framework, an integral solution for the development of systems that require the integration and interoperation of devices and technologies in HIEs. It provides developers and installers with a uniform conceptual framework capable of modelling an HIE, together with a set of libraries, tools and devices to build distributed instrumentation networks with support for transparent integration of other technologies. A series of use case examples and a comparison to many of the existing technologies in the field has been included in order to show the benefits of using UniDA.

  3. A Self-Organizing Interaction and Synchronization Method between a Wearable Device and Mobile Robot.

    Kim, Min Su; Lee, Jae Geun; Kang, Soon Ju

    2016-06-08

    In the near future, we can expect to see robots naturally following or going ahead of humans, similar to pet behavior. We call this type of robots "Pet-Bot". To implement this function in a robot, in this paper we introduce a self-organizing interaction and synchronization method between wearable devices and Pet-Bots. First, the Pet-Bot opportunistically identifies its owner without any human intervention, which means that the robot self-identifies the owner's approach on its own. Second, Pet-Bot's activity is synchronized with the owner's behavior. Lastly, the robot frequently encounters uncertain situations (e.g., when the robot goes ahead of the owner but meets a situation where it cannot make a decision, or the owner wants to stop the Pet-Bot synchronization mode to relax). In this case, we have adopted a gesture recognition function that uses a 3-D accelerometer in the wearable device. In order to achieve the interaction and synchronization in real-time, we use two wireless communication protocols: 125 kHz low-frequency (LF) and 2.4 GHz Bluetooth low energy (BLE). We conducted experiments using a prototype Pet-Bot and wearable devices to verify their motion recognition of and synchronization with humans in real-time. The results showed a guaranteed level of accuracy of at least 94%. A trajectory test was also performed to demonstrate the robot's control performance when following or leading a human in real-time.

  4. Engineering of kinase-based protein interacting devices: active expression of tyrosine kinase domains

    Diaz Galicia, Miriam Escarlet

    2018-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions modulate cellular processes in health and disease. However, tracing weak or rare associations or dissociations of proteins is not a trivial task. Kinases are often regulated through interaction partners and, at the same time, themselves regulate cellular interaction networks. The use of kinase domains for creating a synthetic sensor device that reads low concentration protein-protein interactions and amplifies them to a higher concentration interaction which is then translated into a FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) signal is here proposed. To this end, DNA constructs for interaction amplification (split kinases), positive controls (intact kinase domains), scaffolding proteins and phosphopeptide - SH2-domain modules for the reading of kinase activity were assembled and expression protocols for fusion proteins containing Lyn, Src, and Fak kinase domains in bacterial and in cell-free systems were optimized. Also, two non-overlapping methods for measuring the kinase activity of these proteins were stablished and, finally, a protein-fragment complementation assay with the split-kinase constructs was tested. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that features such as codon optimization, vector design and expression conditions have an impact on the expression yield and activity of kinase-based proteins. Furthermore, it has been found that the defined PURE cell-free system is insufficient for the active expression of catalytic kinase domains. In contrast, the bacterial co-expression with phosphatases produced active kinase fusion proteins for two out of the three tested Tyrosine kinase domains.

  5. Exploring the tutor-student interaction in a blended university course

    Krasnova Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A meaningful tutor-student interaction requires a new insight into pedagogical principles and proper implementation of modern teaching strategies. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of online tutoring in blended learning settings and the impact of the tutor-student interaction on the learning process. The article reports on the results of the study on students’ evaluation of the tutor’s role and the tutor-student interaction in a blended university course. The findings show that professional tutoring and the effective tutor-student interaction help students to improve their learning efficacy and to have a greater personal responsibility for their outcomes.

  6. Interactive Learning in SME-University Collaborations: A Conceptual Framework for Facilitating Interaction

    Filip, Diane

    2013-01-01

    . The facilitation process focuses on interactive learning and is divided into phases, which makes it easier for SMEs to progressive engage in innovation projects with researchers. In-depth interviews with the facilitators of the programme were conducted and focused on barriers to collaboration, human interaction......, and lessons learned. From the facilitators’ perspective, a conceptual model capturing the main actor’s activities in each phase paralleled with an illustration of the narrowed gap from the human interaction is presented in the paper. The main findings addressed the issues of human-based and system......-based barriers. One of the lessons learned is the importance of human interaction of narrowing the perceived gap by mitigating the human-based barriers, and to some extent also system-based barriers. The case presented in this paper has managerial and innovation policy implications....

  7. Interacting with and via mobile devices and mobile robots in an assisted living setting

    Maria Dagioglou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Using robotic home assistants as a platform for remote health monitoring offers several advantages, but also presents considerable challenges related to both the technical immaturity of home robotics and to user acceptance issues. In this paper we explore tablets and similar mobile devices as the medium of communication between robots and their users, presenting relevant current and planned research in humanrobot interaction that can help the telehealth community circumvent technical shortcomings, improve user acceptance, and maximize the quality of the data collected by robotic home assistants.

  8. Rotation gate for a three-level superconducting quantum interference device qubit with resonant interaction

    Yang, C.-P.; Han Siyuan

    2006-01-01

    We show a way to realize an arbitrary rotation gate in a three-level superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubit using resonant interaction. In this approach, the two logical states of the qubit are represented by the two lowest levels of the SQUID and a higher-energy intermediate level is utilized for the gate manipulation. By considering spontaneous decay from the intermediate level during the gate operation, we present a formula for calculating average fidelity over all possible initial states. Finally, based on realistic system parameters, we show that an arbitrary rotation gate can be achieved with a high fidelity in a SQUID

  9. Establishing Network Interaction between Resource Training Centers for People with Disabilities and Partner Universities

    Panyukova S.V.,

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of accessibility and quality of higher education for students with disabilities. We describe our experience in organising network interaction between the MSUPE Resource and Training Center for Disabled People established in 2016-2017 and partner universities in ‘fixed territories’. The need for cooperation and network interaction arises from the high demand for the cooperation of efforts of leading experts, researchers, methodologists and instructors necessary for improving the quality and accessibility of higher education for persons with disabilities. The Resource and Training Center offers counseling for the partner universities, arranges advanced training for those responsible for teaching of the disabled, and offers specialized equipment for temporary use. In this article, we emphasize the importance of organizing network interactions with universities and social partners in order to ensure accessibility of higher education for students with disabilities.

  10. Interactive Relationship between Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, Organisational Citizenship Behaviour, and Organizational Commitment in Nigerian Universities

    B.M. Nwibere

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the interactive relationship between job involvement, job satisfaction, organisational commitment citizenship behaviour (OCB) and organisational commitment among employees of Nigerian universities. The sample for the study consisted of two hundred and ten academic members of staff (210) from five (5) Federal Government owned universities in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. The study utilized both quantitative data (questionnaire) and qualitative data (interview). The Mult...

  11. An Examination of the Impact of an Assistive Technology Device on the Quality of Adult/Young Child Interactions

    Plunkett, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain greater understanding of the potential benefits of assistive technology (AT) devices on young children's social development. Specifically, changes to the quality of the adult/young child social interactions as a function of the child's access to and use of his/her personal AT device was examined. Using a…

  12. Design and Interaction Control of a New Bilateral Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Device

    Qing Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation device (BULReD with two degrees of freedom (DOFs. The BULReD is portable for both hospital and home environment, easy to use for therapists and patients, and safer with respect to upper-limb robotic exoskeletons. It was implemented to be able to conduct both passive and interactive training, based on system kinematics and dynamics, as well as the identification of real-time movement intention of human users. Preliminary results demonstrate the potential of the BULReD for clinical applications, with satisfactory position and interaction force tracking performance. Future work will focus on the clinical evaluation of the BULReD on a large sample of poststroke patients.

  13. APPLICATION OF FORMS AND METHODS OF COMMERCIALIZATION OF INNOVATIONS THROUGH THE INTERACTION OF UNIVERSITIES AND ENTERPRISES

    Svetlana E. Sitnikova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of formation of economy based on knowledge, a key condition for successful development is the effective integration of science, education and business. Currently, the commercialization of innovation becomes a necessary factor for sustainable development of universities, one of their main tools to increase its competitiveness in the market of educational services and products. The efficiency of the process of innovation commercialization is conditioned by the rational choice of forms and methods of implementing this process. The interaction of universities and enterprises in the innovative clusters provides benefits such as effective dissemination of information about the creation of innovations, the relevant areas of research, the granting of preferences to cluster participants. The creation of technoparks suggests the presence of a specially allocated site, which houses many new businesses, so that existing institutions can only be partners of the technopark. From the point of view of commercialization of University innovation, the cluster seems to be a more attractive method compared with the creation of technology parks, but its application is necessary to adjust the approach to conducting the state policy in the field of innovation management. The interaction of universities and enterprises via an intermediary – the chamber of commerce and industry – can be described as an obstacle to the commercialization of university innovations. On the contrary, technological innovation center protects the interests of universities, rather than enterprises, as it is created to facilitate the commercialization of university innovation. Direct interaction of universities and enterprises becomes possible with the help of methods of a single transaction, a regular cooperation and a contract for the supply of innovation. The choice of methods of commercialization of innovations should be made on the basis of existing university

  14. Democratic Governance through interaction between NGOs, Universities and Science Shops:Experiences, Expectations, Recommendations

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Brodersen, Søsser

    The INTERACTS research project is a pioneer cross-national study by organisations and institutions from seven different countries – Austria, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Romania, Spain, and the United Kingdom conducted in the period of January 2002 until December 2003. The aim of the project...... Shops, and universities in the partner countries. • Twenty-one national case studies analysing experiences of interaction between NGOs, researchers, students and Science Shops and the impact on societal dis-courses, research agendas and university curricula • The expectations for and perspectives of co...

  15. Effects of field interactions upon particle creation in Robertson-Walker universes

    Birrell, N.D.; Davies, P.C.W.; Ford, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Particle creation due to field interactions in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is investigated. A model in which pseudoscalar mesons and photons are created as a result of their mutual interaction is considered, and the energy density of created particles is calculated in model universes which undergo a bounce at some maximum curvature. The free-field creation of non-conformally coupled scalar particles and of gravitons is calculated in the same space-times. It is found that if the bounce occurs at a sufficiently early time the interacting particle creation will dominate. This result may be traced to the fact that the model interaction chosen introduces a length scale which is much larger than the Planck length. (author)

  16. Analysis of plasma behavior and electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and device

    Kobayashi, Tomofumi

    1980-01-01

    A simulation program for the analysis of plasma behavior and the electromagnetic interaction between plasma and device has been developed. The program consists of a part for the analysis of plasma behavior (plasma system) and a part for the analysis of the electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and devices (circuit system). The parameters which connect the plasma system and the circuit system are the electric resistance of plasma, the internal inductance, and the plasma current. For the plasma system, the simultaneous equations which describe the density distribution of plasma particles, the temperature distribution of electrons and ions, and the space-time variation of current density distribution were derived. The one-dimensional plasma column in γ-direction was considered. The electric resistance and the internal inductance can be deduced. The circuit components are a current transformer, a vertical field coil, a quadrupole field coil, a vacuum chamber and others. An equation which describes plasma position and the shape of cross section is introduced. The plasma position can be known by solving the Mukhavatov's formula of equilibrium. By using this program, the build-up process of plasma current in JT-60 was analysed. It was found that the expansion of plasma sub radius and the control of current distribution by gas injection are the effective methods to obtain high temperature and high density plasma. The eddy current induced in a vacuum vessel shields 40 percent of magnetic field made in the plasma region by a vertical field coil. (Kato, T.)

  17. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    Hayward Steven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with molecular graphics has the potential to enhance three dimensional visualisation. Although haptic feedback devices have been used to feel the interaction forces during molecular docking they have not been used explicitly as an aid to visualisation. Results A haptic rendering application for biomolecular visualisation has been developed that allows the user to gain three-dimensional awareness of the shape of a biomolecule. By using a water molecule as the probe, modelled as an oxygen atom having hard-sphere interactions with the biomolecule, the process of exploration has the further benefit of being able to determine regions on the molecular surface that are accessible to the solvent. This gives insight into how awkward it is for a water molecule to gain access to or escape from channels and cavities, indicating possible entropic bottlenecks. In the case of liver alcohol dehydrogenase bound to the inhibitor SAD, it was found that there is a channel just wide enough for a single water molecule to pass through. Placing the probe coincident with crystallographic water molecules suggests that they are sometimes located within small pockets that provide a sterically stable environment irrespective of hydrogen bonding considerations. Conclusion By using the software, named HaptiMol ISAS (available from http://www.haptimol.co.uk, one can explore the accessible surface of biomolecules using a three-dimensional input device to gain insights into the shape and water

  18. Network Interaction of Universities in Higher Education System of Ural Macro-Region

    Garold Efimovich Zborovsky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject-matter of the analysis are the characteristics and forms of cooperation between universities of Ural Federal District on the basis of their typology. The purpose of the article is to substantiate the necessity and possibility of network interaction between universities of the macro-region. We prove the importance and potential effectiveness of universities network interaction in the terms of socio-economic uncertainty of the development of Ural Federal District and its higher education. Networking interaction and multilateral cooperation are considered as a new type of inter-universities relations, which can be activated and intensified by strengthening the relations of universities with stakeholders. The authors examine certain concrete forms and formats of network interaction and cooperation between universities and discuss selected cases of new type of relations. In it, they see the real and potential innovation of higher school nonlinear development processes. The statements of the article allow to confirm the hypothesis about the reality of strengthening the network interaction in macro-region. It can transform higher education in the driver of socio-economic development of Ural Federal District; ensure the competitiveness of higher education of the macro-region in the Russian and global educational space; enhance its role in the society; become one of the most significant elements of nonlinear models of higher education development in the country. The authors’ research is based on the interdisciplinary methodology including the potential of theoretical sociology, sociology of higher education, economic sociology, management theory, regional economics. The results of the study can form the basis for the improvement of the Ural Federal District’s educational policy.

  19. Defining interactions of in-stream hydrokinetic devices in the Tanana River, Alaska

    Johnson, J.; Toniolo, H.; Seitz, A. C.; Schmid, J.; Duvoy, P.

    2012-12-01

    The acceptance, performance, and sustainability of operating in-stream hydrokinetic power generating devices in rivers depends on the impact of the river environment on hydrokinetic infrastructure as well as its impact on the river environment. The Alaska Hydrokinetic Energy Research Center (AHERC) conducts hydrokinetic "impact" and technology studies needed to support a sustainable hydrokinetic industry in Alaska. These include completed and ongoing baseline studies of river hydrodynamic conditions (river stage, discharge, current velocity, power, and turbulence; suspended and bed load sediment transport), ice, fish populations and behavior, surface and subsurface debris flows, and riverbed conditions. Technology and methods studies to minimize the effect of debris flows on deployed turbine system are in-progress to determine their effectiveness at reducing the probability of debris impact, diverting debris and their affect on available river power for conversion to electricity. An anchor point has been placed in the main flow just upstream of Main (Figure 1) to support projects and in preparation for future projects that are being planned to examine hydrokinetic turbine performance including power conversion efficiency, turbine drag and anchor chain loads, wake generation and effects on fish. Baseline fish studies indicate that hydrokinetic devices at the test site will have the most potential interactions with Pacific salmon smolts during their down-migration to the ocean in May and June. At the AHERC test site, the maximum turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) occurs just down stream from the major river bends (e.g., 000 and near the railroad bridge [upper center of the figure]) and over a deep hole at 440 (Figure 1), Minimum TKE occurs between main and 800. River current velocity measurements and simulations of river flow from 000 downstream past the railroad bridge indicate that the most stable current in the river reach is between Main and 800. The stable current

  20. DIGITAL BROADCASTING and INTERACTIVE TELEVISION in DISTANCE EDUCATION: Digital And Interactive Television Infrastructure Proposol for Anadolu University Open Education Faculty

    Reha Recep ERGUL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes and improvements in the communication and information technologies beginning from the midst of the 20th Century and continuing today require new methods, constructions, and arrangements in the production and distribution of information. While television having the ability of presenting complex or difficult to comprehend concepts, subjects, and experimental studies to learners from different points of view, supported by 2D or 3D graphics and animations with audio visual stimulators replaces its technology from analog to digital and towards digital-interactive, it has also begun to convert the broadcasting technology in Turkey in this direction. Therefore, television broadcast infrastructure of Anadolu University Open Education Faculty needs to be replaced with a digital and interactive one. This study contains basic concepts of digital and interactive broadcasting and the new improvements. Furthermore, it includes the approaches in the basis of why and how a digital television broadcasting infrastructure should be stablished.

  1. Crowding of Interacting Fluid Particles in Porous Media through Molecular Dynamics: Breakdown of Universality for Soft Interactions

    Schnyder, Simon K.; Horbach, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of interacting soft disks confined in a heterogeneous quenched matrix of soft obstacles show dynamics which is fundamentally different from that of hard disks. The interactions between the disks can enhance transport when their density is increased, as disks cooperatively help each other over the finite energy barriers in the matrix. The system exhibits a transition from a diffusive to a localized state, but the transition is strongly rounded. Effective exponents in the mean-squared displacement can be observed over three decades in time but depend on the density of the disks and do not correspond to asymptotic behavior in the vicinity of a critical point, thus, showing that it is incorrect to relate them to the critical exponents in the Lorentz model scenario. The soft interactions are, therefore, responsible for a breakdown of the universality of the dynamics.

  2. Language Choice and Identity Construction in Peer Interactions: Insights from a Multilingual University in Hong Kong

    Gu, Mingyue

    2011-01-01

    Informed by linguistic ecological theory and the notion of identity, this study investigates language uses and identity construction in interactions among students with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds in a multilingual university. Individual and focus-group interviews were conducted with two groups of students: Hong Kong (HK) and…

  3. Characterising Learning Interactions: A Study of University Students Solving Physics Problems in Groups

    Berge, Maria; Danielsson, Anna T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore how a group of four university physics students addressed mechanics problems, in terms of student direction of attention, problem solving strategies and their establishment of and ways of interacting. Adapted from positioning theory, the concepts "positioning" and "storyline" are used to describe and to…

  4. The Global Interaction Research Initiative at the IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bjørn, Pernille; Glenstrup, Arne John

    2011-01-01

    This showcase paper describes the Global Interaction Research Initiative – GIRI – recently inaugurated at the IT University of Copenhagen. It presents the motivation for this initiative, namely that the use of information technology is the core enabling factor for global collaboration and business...... initiative, and we invite other researchers to join....

  5. INTERACTION BETWEEN ENTERPRISES AND UNIVERSITIES CIVIL AVIATION BASED TECHNOLOGIES OF DISTANCE EDUCATION

    K. S. Ermakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education based on modern information technology as a tool for interaction between universities and enterprises of civil aviation. The introduction of the learning process real needs of civil aviation, enabling an airline to use scientific potential of educational institutions for the successful implementation of scientific research aimed at solving urgent problems.

  6. Visual interaction: models, systems, prototypes. The Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome La Sapienza.

    Bottoni, Paolo; Cinque, Luigi; De Marsico, Maria; Levialdi, Stefano; Panizzi, Emanuele

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on the research activities performed by the Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome, La Sapienza, during the last 5 years. Such work, essentially is based on the study of humancomputer interaction, spans from metamodels of interaction down to prototypes of interactive systems for both synchronous multimedia communication and groupwork, annotation systems for web pages, also encompassing theoretical and practical issues of visual languages and environments also including pattern recognition algorithms. Some applications are also considered like e-learning and collaborative work.

  7. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  8. Use of speech generating devices can improve perception of qualifications for skilled, verbal, and interactive jobs.

    Stern, Steven E; Chobany, Chelsea M; Beam, Alexander A; Hoover, Brittany N; Hull, Thomas T; Linsenbigler, Melissa; Makdad-Light, Courtney; Rubright, Courtney N

    2017-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that when speech generating devices (SGD) are used as assistive technologies, they are preferred over the users' natural voices. We sought to examine whether using SGDs would affect listener's perceptions of hirability of people with complex communication needs. In a series of three experiments, participants rated videotaped actors, one using SGD and the other using their natural, mildly dysarthric voice, on (a) a measurement of perceptions of speaker credibility, strength, and informedness and (b) measurements of hirability for jobs coded in terms of skill, verbal ability, and interactivity. Experiment 1 examined hirability for jobs varying in terms of skill and verbal ability. Experiment 2 was a replication that examined hirability for jobs varying in terms of interactivity. Experiment 3 examined jobs in terms of skill and specific mode of interaction (face-to-face, telephone, computer-mediated). Actors were rated more favorably when using SGD than their own voices. Actors using SGD were also rated more favorably for highly skilled and highly verbal jobs. This preference for SGDs over mildly dysarthric voice was also found for jobs entailing computer-mediated-communication, particularly skillful jobs.

  9. A 3D character animation engine for multimodal interaction on mobile devices

    Sandali, Enrico; Lavagetto, Fabio; Pisano, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Talking virtual characters are graphical simulations of real or imaginary persons that enable natural and pleasant multimodal interaction with the user, by means of voice, eye gaze, facial expression and gestures. This paper presents an implementation of a 3D virtual character animation and rendering engine, compliant with the MPEG-4 standard, running on Symbian-based SmartPhones. Real-time animation of virtual characters on mobile devices represents a challenging task, since many limitations must be taken into account with respect to processing power, graphics capabilities, disk space and execution memory size. The proposed optimization techniques allow to overcome these issues, guaranteeing a smooth and synchronous animation of facial expressions and lip movements on mobile phones such as Sony-Ericsson's P800 and Nokia's 6600. The animation engine is specifically targeted to the development of new "Over The Air" services, based on embodied conversational agents, with applications in entertainment (interactive story tellers), navigation aid (virtual guides to web sites and mobile services), news casting (virtual newscasters) and education (interactive virtual teachers).

  10. A microdot multilayer oxide device: let us tune the strain-ionic transport interaction.

    Schweiger, Sebastian; Kubicek, Markus; Messerschmitt, Felix; Murer, Christoph; Rupp, Jennifer L M

    2014-05-27

    In this paper, we present a strategy to use interfacial strain in multilayer heterostructures to tune their resistive response and ionic transport as active component in an oxide-based multilayer microdot device on chip. For this, fabrication of strained multilayer microdot devices with sideways attached electrodes is reported with the material system Gd0.1Ce0.9O(2-δ)/Er2O3. The fast ionic conducting Gd0.1Ce0.9O(2-δ) single layers are altered in lattice strain by the electrically insulating erbia phases of a microdot. The strain activated volume of the Gd0.1Ce0.9O(2-δ) is investigated by changing the number of individual layers from 1 to 60 while keeping the microdot at a constant thickness; i.e., the proportion of strained volume was systematically varied. Electrical measurements showed that the activation energy of the devices could be altered by Δ0.31 eV by changing the compressive strain of a microdot ceria-based phase by more than 1.16%. The electrical conductivity data is analyzed and interpreted with a strain volume model and defect thermodynamics. Additionally, an equivalent circuit model is presented for sideways contacted multilayer microdots. We give a proof-of-concept for microdot contacting to capture real strain-ionic transport effects and reveal that for classic top-electrode contacting the effect is nil, highlighting the need for sideways electric contacting on a nanoscopic scale. The near order ionic transport interaction is supported by Raman spectroscopy measurements. These were conducted and analyzed together with fully relaxed single thin film samples. Strain states are described relative to the strain activated volumes of Gd0.1Ce0.9O(2-δ) in the microdot multilayer. These findings reveal that strain engineering in microfabricated devices allows altering the ionic conduction over a wide range beyond classic doping strategies for single films. The reported fabrication route and concept of strained multilayer microdots is a promising path

  11. Global innovation networks and university-firm interactions: an exploratory survey analysis

    Gustavo Britto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The literature on Global Innovation Networks has contributed to identify changes in the innovation activities of multinational corporations. Although university-firm interactions are seen as an important factor for the emergence of GINs, their role has received limited attention. This paper aims to fill this gap in two ways. First, it carries out an exploratory analysis of an original survey dataset, of firms in three industrial sectors from nine developed and developing countries. Second, the paper analyses whether the role of universities in global innovation networks is related to national systems of innovation with varying degrees of maturity. Multiple correspondence analysis and a Probit model are used to establish the relevance of key factors in driving GINs. The results identify distinctive profiles constructed mainly according to firm characteristics, but reflecting country specific patterns of association. The Probit model confirms that internationalization processes and the existence of local interactions substantially increase the probability of interactions with international institutions.

  12. Analysis of mobile devices as a support tool for professional medical education in the university school

    Briz Ponce, Laura; Juanes Méndez, Juan Antonio; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    [EN] According to the report of International Telecommunications Union (ITU), there are approximately 6.800 millions of users in the world with a mobile device. The fast evolution of these mobile devices for the last two decades has made the mobile phone become a minicomputer with a data connection. Because of the use of these mobile phones, the mobile applications appeared just one year later that the launching of the first iPhone and now the number of these applications reach more than 1 mi...

  13. Low Phase Noise Universal Microwave Oscillator for Analog and Digital Devices, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An inherently rugged Universal Oscillator (UO) is needed to enable a superior class of configurable communications for NASA applications. The requirements are a low...

  14. Scaling laws and universality for the strength of genetic interactions in yeast

    Velenich, Andrea; Dai, Mingjie; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Genetic interactions provide a window to the organization of the thousands of biochemical reactions in living cells. If two mutations affect unrelated cellular functions, the fitness effects of their combination can be easily predicted from the two separate fitness effects. However, because of interactions, for some pairs of mutations their combined fitness effect deviates from the naive prediction. We study genetic interactions in yeast cells by analyzing a publicly available database containing experimental growth rates of 5 million double mutants. We show that the characteristic strength of genetic interactions has a simple power law dependence on the fitness effects of the two interacting mutations and that the probability distribution of genetic interactions is a universal function. We further argue that the strength of genetic interactions depends only on the fitness effects of the interacting mutations and not on their biological origin in terms of single point mutations, entire gene knockouts or even more complicated physiological perturbations. Finally, we discuss the implications of the power law scaling of genetic interactions on the ruggedness of fitness landscapes and the consequent evolutionary dynamics.

  15. Plasma edge and plasma-wall interaction modelling: Lessons learned from metallic devices

    S. Wiesen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Robust power exhaust schemes employing impurity seeding are needed for target operational scenarios in present day tokamak devices with metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs. For an electricity-producing fusion power plant at power density Psep/R>15MW/m divertor detachment is a requirement for heat load mitigation. 2D plasma edge transport codes like the SOLPS code as well as plasma-wall interaction (PWI codes are key to disentangle relevant physical processes in power and particle exhaust. With increased quantitative credibility in such codes more realistic and physically sound estimates of the life-time expectations and performance of metallic PFCs can be accomplished for divertor conditions relevant for ITER and DEMO. An overview is given on the recent progress of plasma edge and PWI modelling activities for (carbon-free metallic devices, that include results from JET with the ITER-like wall, ASDEX Upgrade and Alcator C-mod. It is observed that metallic devices offer an opportunity to progress the understanding of underlying plasma physics processes in the edge. The validation of models can be substantially improved by eliminating carbon from the experiment as well as from the numerical system with reduced degrees of freedom as no chemical sputtering from amorphous carbon layers and no carbon or hydro-carbon transport are present. With the absence of carbon as the primary plasma impurity and given the fact that the physics of the PWI at metallic walls is less complex it is possible to isolate the crucial plasma physics processes relevant for particle and power exhaust. For a reliable 2D dissipative plasma exhaust model these are: cross-field drifts, complete kinetic neutral physics, geometry effects (including main-chamber, divertor and sub-divertor structures, SOL transport reflecting also the non-diffusive nature of anomalous transport, as well as transport within the pedestal region in case of significant edge impurity radiation

  16. Nonlinear fluid/structure interaction relating a rupture-disc pressure-relief device

    Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.; Shin, Y.W.; Youngdahl, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Rupture disc assemblies are used in piping network systems as a pressure-relief device. The reverse-buckling type is chosen for application in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. This assembly is used successfully in systems in which the fluid is highly compressible, such as air; the opening up of the disc by the knife setup is complete. However, this is not true for a liquid system; it had been observed experimentally that the disc may open up only partially or not at all. Therefore, to realistically understand and represent a rupture disc assembly in a liquid environment, the fluid-structure interactions between the liquid medium and the disc assembly must be considered. The methods for analyzing the fluid and the disc and the mechanism interconnecting them are presented. The fluid is allowed to cavitate through a column-cavitation model and the disc is allowed to become plastically deformed through the classic Von Mises' yield criteria, when necessary

  17. An Appeal for heritage interpretation and accessibility. Immersive and interactive virtual reality tours for mobile devices

    Guillermo Duclos Bautista

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose an interactive resource for the value enhancement, management, diffusion and accessibility of the architectural and archaeological heritage by means of virtual reality technologies through mobile devices. The resource is, in addition, a tool for the management of the heritage by the employment of intermediate modules that allow the graphical and alphanumeric update of the external and internal databases put in relation with the resource, depending on the interventions and investigations that on the monument are taking place in the time. Furthermore, the resource is a powerful compensatory measure for the virtual accessibility to the heritage by persons with limited mobility and / or sensory deficiencies.

  18. [Mechanical circulatory support saves lives -- three years' experience of the newly established assist device program at Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary].

    Fazekas, Levente; Sax, Balázs; Hartyánszky, István; Pólos, Miklós; Horkay, Ferenc; Varga, Tamás; Rácz, Kristóf; Németh, Endre; Székely, Andrea; Paulovich, Erzsébet; Heltai, Krisztina; Zima, Endre; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Merkely, Béla

    2015-03-29

    Since the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the first heart transplantation in Hungary in 2012 the emerging need for modern heart failure management via mechanical circulatory support has evolved. In May 2012 the opening of a new heart failure and transplant unit with 9 beds together with the procurement of necessary devices at Semmelweis University accomplished this need. The aim of the authors was to report their initial experience obtained in this new cardiac assist device program. Since May, 2012, mechanical circulatory support system was applied in 89 cases in 72 patients. Indication for support were end stage heart failure refractory to medical treatment and acute left or right heart failure. Treatment was initiated for acute graft failure after heart transplantation in 27 cases, for end stage heart failure in 24 cases, for acute myocardial infarction in 21 cases, for acute postcardiotomy heart failure in 14 cases, for severe respiratory insufficiency in 2 cases and for drug intoxication in one case. Among the 30 survivor of the whole program 13 patients were successfully transplanted. The available devices can cover all modalities of current bridge therapy from short term support through medium support to heart transplantation or long term support and destination therapy. These conditions made possible the successful start of a new cardiac assist device program.

  19. Exploring the requirements for multimodal interaction for mobile devices in an end-to-end journey context.

    Krehl, Claudia; Sharples, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the requirements for multimodal interaction on mobile devices in an end-to-end journey context. Traditional interfaces are deemed cumbersome and inefficient for exchanging information with the user. Multimodal interaction provides a different user-centred approach allowing for more natural and intuitive interaction between humans and computers. It is especially suitable for mobile interaction as it can overcome additional constraints including small screens, awkward keypads, and continuously changing settings - an inherent property of mobility. This paper is based on end-to-end journeys where users encounter several contexts during their journeys. Interviews and focus groups explore the requirements for multimodal interaction design for mobile devices by examining journey stages and identifying the users' information needs and sources. Findings suggest that multimodal communication is crucial when users multitask. Choosing suitable modalities depend on user context, characteristics and tasks.

  20. Interacting entropy-corrected new agegraphic dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Karami, Kayoomars [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sorouri, Arash, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Here, we consider the entropy-corrected version of the new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model in the non-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We derive the exact differential equation that determines the evolution of the entropy-corrected NADE density parameter in the presence of interaction with dark matter. We also obtain the equation of state and deceleration parameters and present a necessary condition for the selected model to cross the phantom divide. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the phantom scalar field according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected new agegraphic model.

  1. 76 FR 15986 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    2011-03-22

    ... Clinical Trials. Risk Management and Design Controls. 510(k) SE Decision Making Process. Warning Letter... responsible for subsequent changes to the Web site after this document publishes in the Federal Register. To... payment information for the fee to Xavier University, Attention: Sue Bensman, 3800 Victory Pkwy...

  2. Universal microcomputer ABM 80 for data processing and measurement devices control

    Jagiello, S.; Kozminski, A.; Plominski, M.; Rzymkowski, K.

    1983-01-01

    The main features of the universal microcomputer ABM-80 with microprocessor INTEL 8080 are described. ABM-80 works with the measurer AZAR and the register ERD-102 or with other equipment with similar input/output parameters. Monitor program is an integral part of the microcomputer. (author)

  3. The Target Model of Strategic Interaction of Kazan Federal University and the Region in the Field of Education

    Gabdulchakov, Valerian F.

    2016-01-01

    The subject of the study in the article is conceptual basis of construction of the target model of interaction between University and region. Hence the topic of the article "the Target model of strategic interaction between the University and the region in the field of education." The objective was to design a target model of this…

  4. The weak π − π interaction originated resonant tunneling and fast switching in the carbon based electronic devices

    Jun He

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the nonequilibrium Green's functions and the density functional theory, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of C60 based electronic device with different intermolecular interactions. It is found that the electronic transport properties vary with the types of the interaction between two C60 molecules. A fast electrical switching behavior based on negative differential resistance has been found when two molecules are coupled by the weak π − π interaction. Compared to the solid bonding, the weak interaction is found to induce resonant tunneling, which is responsible for the fast response to the applied electric field and hence the velocity of switching.

  5. Evidence for bifurcation and universal chaotic behavior in nonlinear semiconducting devices

    Testa, J.; Perez, J.; Jeffries, C.

    1982-01-01

    Bifurcations, chaos, and extensive periodic windows in the chaotic regime are observed for a driven LRC circuit, the capacitive element being a nonlinear varactor diode. Measurements include power spectral analysis; real time amplitude data; phase portraits; and a bifurcation diagram, obtained by sampling methods. The effects of added external noise are studied. These data yield experimental determinations of several of the universal numbers predicted to characterize nonlinear systems having this route to chaos

  6. "I Have an iPad. Now What?" Using Mobile Devices in University Physical Education Programs

    Rosenthal, Maura B.; Eliason, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    In response to an iPad initiative at a mid-sized New England university, all faculty, junior and senior undergraduates, and graduate students were required to have iPads by the first day of class in the fall semester of 2013. Goals of the initiative focused on preparing future teachers to use the iPad as a teaching and learning tool so they could…

  7. Quadratic interaction effect on the dark energy density in the universe

    Deveci, Derya G; Aydiner, Ekrem

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we deal with the holographic model of interacting dark components of dark energy and dark matter quadratic case of the equation of state parameter (EoS). The effective equations of states for the interacting holographic energy density are derived and the results are analyzed and compared with the solution of the linear form in the literature. The result of our work shows that the value of interaction term between dark components affects the fixed points at far future in the DE-dominated universe in the case of quadratic EoS parameter; it is a different result from the linear case in the theoretical results in the literature, and as the Quintom scenario the equations of state had coincidence at the cosmological constant boundary of –1 from above to below. (paper)

  8. Facilitating Integration of Electron Beam Lithography Devices with Interactive Videodisc, Computer-Based Simulation and Job Aids.

    Von Der Linn, Robert Christopher

    A needs assessment of the Grumman E-Beam Systems Group identified the requirement for additional skill mastery for the engineers who assemble, integrate, and maintain devices used to manufacture integrated circuits. Further analysis of the tasks involved led to the decision to develop interactive videodisc, computer-based job aids to enable…

  9. Interaction Problems Accessing E-Learning Environments in Multi-Touch Mobile Devices: A Case Study in TelEduc

    da Silva, André Constantino; Freire, Fernanda Maria Pereira; de Arruda, Alan Victor Pereira; da Rocha, Heloísa Vieira

    2013-01-01

    e-Learning environments offer content, such text, audio, video, animations, using the Web infrastructure and they are designed to users interacting with keyboard, mouse and a medium-sized screen. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, have enough computation power to render Web pages, allowing browsing the Internet and access e-Learning…

  10. Interactions of aquatic animals with the ORPC OCGen® in Cobscook Bay, Maine: Monitoring behavior change and assessing the probability of encounter with a deployed MHK device

    Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). School of Marine Sciences; Staines, Garrett [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Viehman, Haley [Acadia Univ., Wolfville, NS (Canada); Shen, Haixue [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Altenritter, Megan [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Commercial viability of the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry is contingent on numerous and diverse factors. A major factor is the effects deployed devices have on animals. This factor is multi-faceted since it is dependent on the availability of appropriate scientific approaches to detect these effects. One of the animal groups with overlapping distributions of MHK devices are fishes. As such, individual fish behavior is likely to be influenced by the presence and operation of MHK devices. Depending on the scale of deployment there are implications for changes to essential fish habitat and effects that can be explored during deployment of a single device yet most changes are likely to be realized when multiple devices are deployed over large areas. It is not only important to document these effects and examine the need for mitigation, but also determine whether the methods involved can be used within the economic constraints of this nascent industry. The results presented in this report benefit the MHK industry by providing transferrable environmental monitoring approaches for MHK projects, specifically related to the interactions between static and dynamic tidal turbines and fish. In addition, some of the data can be used to generalize conditions (e.g., the temporal periodicity of fish presence in tidal regions and probability of fish encountering a device) at other MHK sites with similar physical conditions and fish assemblages. Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) deployed and tested a prototype OCGen® tidal module in Cobscook Bay, Maine, in the summer of 2014. University of Maine researchers proposed an approach to inform other researchers, regulators, and industry members of the effects of this deployment on fish. While the approach was specifically applied to the OCGen® module, results are applicable to other pilot projects and inform future array deployments. Research funded under this grant allowed us to quantify fish presence as well as

  11. Universal chemiluminescence flow-through device based on directed self-assembly of solid-state organic chromophores on layered double hydroxide matrix.

    Wang, Zhihua; Teng, Xu; Lu, Chao

    2013-02-19

    In this work, a universal chemiluminescence (CL) flow-through device suitable for various CL resonance energy transfer (CRET) systems has been successfully fabricated. Highly efficient CRET in solid-state photoactive organic molecules can be achieved by assembling them on the surface of layered double hydroxides (LDHs). We attribute these observations to the suppression of the intermolecular π-π stacking interactions among aromatic rings and the improvement of molecular orientation and planarity in the LDH matrix, enabling a remarkable increase in fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield of organic molecules. Under optimal conditions, using peroxynitrous acid-fluorescein dianion (FLUD) as a model CRET system, trace FLUD (10 μM) was assembled on the surface of LDHs. Peroxynitrous acid/nitrite could be assayed in the range of 1.0-500 μM, and the detection limit for peroxynitrous acid/nitrite (S/N = 3) was 0.6 μM. This CL flow-through device exhibited operational stability, high reproducibility, and long lifetime. While LDHs were immobilized in a flow-through device in the absence of FLUD, the detection limit for peroxynitrous acid/nitrite was 100 μM. On the other hand, FLUD at the same concentration can not enhance the CL intensity of peroxynitrous acid system. This fabricated CL flow-through column has been successfully applied to determine nitrite in sausage samples with recoveries of 98-102%. These satisfactory results demonstrated that our studies pave a novel way toward flow-through column-based CRET using solid-state organic molecules as acceptors for signal amplification.

  12. A pedestrian's view on interacting particle systems, KPZ universality and random matrices

    Kriecherbauer, Thomas [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Krug, Joachim, E-mail: thomas.kriecherbauer@ruhr-uni-bochum.d, E-mail: krug@thp.uni-koeln.d [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2010-10-08

    These notes are based on lectures delivered by the authors at a Langeoog seminar of SFB/TR12 Symmetries and Universality in Mesoscopic Systems to a mixed audience of mathematicians and theoretical physicists. After a brief outline of the basic physical concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, the one-dimensional simple exclusion process is introduced as a paradigmatic nonequilibrium interacting particle system. The stationary measure on the ring is derived and the idea of the hydrodynamic limit is sketched. We then introduce the phenomenological Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation and explain the associated universality conjecture for surface fluctuations in growth models. This is followed by a detailed exposition of a seminal paper of Johansson [59] that relates the current fluctuations of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) to the Tracy-Widom distribution of random matrix theory. The implications of this result are discussed within the framework of the KPZ conjecture. (topical review)

  13. A pedestrian's view on interacting particle systems, KPZ universality and random matrices

    Kriecherbauer, Thomas; Krug, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    These notes are based on lectures delivered by the authors at a Langeoog seminar of SFB/TR12 Symmetries and Universality in Mesoscopic Systems to a mixed audience of mathematicians and theoretical physicists. After a brief outline of the basic physical concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, the one-dimensional simple exclusion process is introduced as a paradigmatic nonequilibrium interacting particle system. The stationary measure on the ring is derived and the idea of the hydrodynamic limit is sketched. We then introduce the phenomenological Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation and explain the associated universality conjecture for surface fluctuations in growth models. This is followed by a detailed exposition of a seminal paper of Johansson [59] that relates the current fluctuations of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) to the Tracy-Widom distribution of random matrix theory. The implications of this result are discussed within the framework of the KPZ conjecture. (topical review)

  14. Assessing the potential roles of silicon and germanium phthalocyanines in planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices and how pentafluoro phenoxylation can enhance π-π interactions and device performance.

    Lessard, Benoît H; White, Robin T; Al-Amar, Mohammad; Plint, Trevor; Castrucci, Jeffrey S; Josey, David S; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Bender, Timothy P

    2015-03-11

    In this study, we have assessed the potential application of dichloro silicon phthalocyanine (Cl2-SiPc) and dichloro germanium phthalocyanine (Cl2-GePc) in modern planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic (PHJ OPV) devices. We have determined that Cl2-SiPc can act as an electron donating material when paired with C60 and that Cl2-SiPc or Cl2-GePc can also act as an electron acceptor material when paired with pentacene. These two materials enabled the harvesting of triplet energy resulting from the singlet fission process in pentacene. However, contributions to the generation of photocurrent were observed for Cl2-SiPc with no evidence of photocurrent contribution from Cl2-GePc. The result of our initial assessment established the potential for the application of SiPc and GePc in PHJ OPV devices. Thereafter, bis(pentafluoro phenoxy) silicon phthalocyanine (F10-SiPc) and bis(pentafluoro phenoxy) germanium phthalocyanine (F10-GePc) were synthesized and characterized. During thermal processing, it was discovered that F10-SiPc and F10-GePc underwent a reaction forming small amounts of difluoro SiPc (F2-SiPc) and difluoro GePc (F2-GePc). This undesirable reaction could be circumvented for F10-SiPc but not for F10-GePc. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction, it was determined that F10-SiPc has significantly enhanced π-π interactions compared with that of Cl2-SiPc, which had little to none. Unoptimized PHJ OPV devices based on F10-SiPc were fabricated and directly compared to those constructed from Cl2-SiPc, and in all cases, PHJ OPV devices based on F10-SiPc had significantly improved device characteristics compared to Cl2-SiPc.

  15. Quality of Student–Faculty Interaction at University: An Empirical Approach of Gender and ICT Usage

    Ana Criado-Gomis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—This paper studies the relationship of gender and ICT usage as significant variables in the formation of perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty to educational institutions, and in the quality of the student-faculty interaction to discuss how these variables determine the bond between students and the University, in order to improve this interaction. Design/methodology/approach—The empirical research designed to test the proposed model was conducted in two Spanish universities (a random sample of 1000 graduates—500 from each university—from two academic years, all areas of knowledge and proportional for men/women. They were individually interviewed by personnel of an external market research institute, using CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interview. For the measurement of the latent variables in the proposed model, we use an 11-point Likert scale (adapted to the particular context of the present study by means of several in-depth interviews with students and academics. ICT usage—classified in communication, author and administration tools, supporting the teaching, research and administrative management processes of the educational service—was measured with a scale of 7 items, which cover the main ICT used by students during their learning process and checked by an expert panel. These items were also examined more rigorously to validate their psychometric properties with the estimation of a confirmatory factor analysis via the maximum-likelihood method of structural equation modeling with LISREL 8.5. The evaluation of discriminant validity was testing by the AVE for each construct, which exhibited all of the constructs, discriminant validity in the model. Moreover, it was also verified through analysis of the confidence interval for the correlation coefficient between ICT usage and quality of interaction, and performing a model with construct correlations constrained to 1.00 was compared to an unconstrained model

  16. Quality of Student–Faculty Interaction at University: An Empirical Approach of Gender and ICT Usage

    M. Angeles Iniesta-Bonillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—This paper studies the relationship of gender and ICT usage as significant variables in the formation of perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty to educational institutions, and in the quality of the student-faculty interaction to discuss how these variables determine the bond between students and the University, in order to improve this interaction.Design/methodology/approach—The empirical research designed to test the proposed model was conducted in two Spanish universities (a random sample of 1000 graduates—500 from each university—from two academic years, all areas of knowledge and proportional for men/women. They were individually interviewed by personnel of an external market research institute, using CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interview.For the measurement of the latent variables in the proposed model, we use an 11-point Likert scale (adapted to the particular context of the present study by means of several in-depth interviews with students and academics. ICT usage—classified in communication, author and administration tools, supporting the teaching, research and administrative management processes of the educational service—was measured with a scale of 7 items, which cover the main ICT used by students during their learning process and checked by an expert panel. These items were also examined more rigorously to validate their psychometric properties with the estimation of a confirmatory factor analysis via the maximum-likelihood method of structural equation modeling with LISREL 8.5.The evaluation of discriminant validity was testing by the AVE for each construct, which exhibited all of the constructs, discriminant validity in the model. Moreover, it was also verified through analysis of the confidence interval for the correlation coefficient between ICT usage and quality of interaction, and performing a model with construct correlations constrained to 1.00 was compared to an unconstrained model

  17. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  18. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems

  19. Quantifying Age-Related Differences in Human Reaching while Interacting with a Rehabilitation Robotic Device

    Vivek Yadav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New movement assessment and data analysis methods are developed to quantify human arm motion patterns during physical interaction with robotic devices for rehabilitation. These methods provide metrics for future use in diagnosis, assessment and rehabilitation of subjects with affected arm movements. Specifically, the current study uses existing pattern recognition methods to evaluate the effect of age on performance of a specific motion, reaching to a target by moving the end-effector of a robot (an X-Y table. Differences in the arm motion patterns of younger and older subjects are evaluated using two measures: the principal component analysis similarity factor (SPCA to compare path shape and the number of Fourier modes representing 98% of the path ‘energy’ to compare the smoothness of movement, a particularly important variable for assessment of pathologic movement. Both measures are less sensitive to noise than others previously reported in the literature and preserve information that is often lost through other analysis techniques. Data from the SPCA analysis indicate that age is a significant factor affecting the shapes of target reaching paths, followed by reaching movement type (crossing body midline/not crossing and reaching side (left/right; hand dominance and trial repetition are not significant factors. Data from the Fourier-based analysis likewise indicate that age is a significant factor affecting smoothness of movement, and movements become smoother with increasing trial number in both younger and older subjects, although more rapidly so in younger subjects. These results using the proposed data analysis methods confirm current practice that age-matched subjects should be used for comparison to quantify recovery of arm movement during rehabilitation. The results also highlight the advantages that these methods offer relative to other reported measures.

  20. [Dynamics and interactions between the university community and public health 2.0].

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    To explore the experiences of a group of participants in a university community with the web in general and with digital contents on public health, to describe their motivations and to understand how social networks influence their interaction with content on public health. Qualitative research. Deep semi-structured interviews were conducted to understand the phenomenon. Five categories emerged after the study: socialization and internalization of the cyberculture, social marketing linked to the web and public health, culture of fear and distrust, the concept of health, and the health system and public health. Participants have internalized the web and have given it a strong symbolic capital. The challenges of public health 2.0 are not only to achieve interaction with users and to get a place in cyberspace, but also to fight against the stigma of the "public" and to take advantage of the influence of the web on small-world networks to communicate.

  1. Tidal interactions in the expanding universe - The formation of prolate systems

    Binney, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The study estimates the magnitude of the anisotropy that can be tidally induced in neighboring initially spherical protostructures, be they protogalaxies, protoclusters, or even uncollapsed density enhancements in the large-scale structure of the universe. It is shown that the linear analysis of tidal interactions developed by Peebles (1969) predicts that the anisotropy energy of a perturbation grows to first order in a small dimensionless parameter, whereas the net angular momentum acquired is of second order. A simple model is presented for the growth of anisotropy by tidal interactions during the nonlinear stage of the development of perturbations. A possible observational test is described of the alignment predicted by the model between the orientations of large-scale perturbations and the positions of neighboring density enhancements.

  2. Ways of Telecommunications Interaction Arrangement for Microprocessor Devices of Different Types in Composition of Multi-Motor Electric Drives

    Shpenst, V. A.; Vasiliev, B. Y.; Kalashnikov, O. V.; Oleynikova, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    The article covers a consideration of various state-of-the-art industrial data transfer protocols, e.g. Modbus, Profibus, Industrial Ethernet and CAN. Their pros and cons are analyzed and conclusions made on advisability of the use of each protocol. It is shown that for the arrangement of effective telecommunication interaction of microprocessor devices of different types in the composition of multi-motor electric drives, it is advisable to use highlevel CAN-protocols, such as CANopen and DeviceNet.

  3. The Effect of Interacting with Two Devices when Creating the Illusion of Internal State in Tangible Widgets

    Bech, Christoffer; Bork, Andreas Heldbjerg; Memborg, Jakob Birch

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the illusion of internal state in passive tangible widgets is stronger when using one touchscreen device or two devices. Passive tangible widgets are an increasingly popular way to interact with tablet games. Since the production of passive widgets is usually cheaper...... than the production of widgets with internal state, it is much more cost-efficient to induce the illusion of internal state in passive widgets than to use tangible widgets with an actual internal state. An experiment was conducted where the participants’ belief in the illusion was determined by means...

  4. Particle interaction and displacement damage in silicon devices operated in radiation environments

    Leroy, Claude; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Silicon is used in radiation detectors and electronic devices. Nowadays, these devices achieving submicron technology are parts of integrated circuits of large to very large scale integration (VLSI). Silicon and silicon-based devices are commonly operated in many fields including particle physics experiments, nuclear medicine and space. Some of these fields present adverse radiation environments that may affect the operation of the devices. The particle energy deposition mechanisms by ionization and non-ionization processes are reviewed as well as the radiation-induced damage and its effect on device parameters evolution, depending on particle type, energy and fluence. The temporary or permanent damage inflicted by a single particle (single event effect) to electronic devices or integrated circuits is treated separately from the total ionizing dose (TID) effect for which the accumulated fluence causes degradation and from the displacement damage induced by the non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) deposition. Understanding of radiation effects on silicon devices has an impact on their design and allows the prediction of a specific device behaviour when exposed to a radiation field of interest

  5. Self-Managing Postoperative Pain with the Use of a Novel, Interactive Device: A Proof of Concept Study

    Luke Mordecai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pain is commonly experienced following surgical procedures. Suboptimal management is multifactorial. Objectives. The primary objective was to assess whether patients used a device (Navimed to self-report pain over and above a normal baseline of observations. Secondary outcome measures included comparison of pain scores and patient use of and feedback on the device. Methods. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, elective gynaecological surgery patients received standard postoperative pain care or standard care plus the Navimed, which allowed them to self-report pain and offered interactive self-help options. Results. 52 female patients, 26 in each of device and standard groups, did not differ in the frequency of nurse-documented pain scores or mean pain scores provided to nurses. The device group additionally reported pain on the device (means 18.50 versus 11.90 pain ratings per day, t(32=2.75, p<0.001 that was significantly worse than reported to nurses but retrospectively rated significantly less anxiety. 80% of patients found the device useful. Discussion and Conclusion. This study demonstrates that patients used the Navimed to report pain and to help manage it. Further work is required to investigate the difference in pain scores reported and to develop more sophisticated software.

  6. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  7. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-29

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  8. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Karami, K.; Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  9. How do health service professionals consider human factors when purchasing interactive medical devices? A qualitative interview study.

    Vincent, Christopher James; Blandford, Ann

    2017-03-01

    We present findings of a UK study into how those involved in purchasing interactive medical devices go about evaluating usability, the challenges that arise, and opportunities for improvement. The study focused on procurement of infusion devices because these are used by various professionals across healthcare. A semi-structured interview study was carried out involving a range of stakeholders (20 in total) involved in or impacted by medical device procurement. Data was analysed using thematic analysis, a qualitative method designed to support the identification, analysis and reporting of patterns. In principle, health service purchasing was found to accommodate consideration of equipment usability. In practice, the evaluation process was driven primarily by engineering standards; assessment of local needs did not accommodate substantive assessment of usability; and choice was limited by the availability of equipment on the marketplace. We discuss ways in which purchasing could be improved through techniques that account for social circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High Power Microwave Emission of Large and Small Orbit Gyrotron Devices in Rectangular Interaction Structures

    Hochman, J. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jaynes, R. L.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Luginsland, J. W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Spencer, T. A.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments utilize large and small orbit e-beam gyrotron devices in a rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. This device is being explored to examine polarization control. Other research issues include pulse shortening, and mode competition. MELBA generates electron beams with parameters of: -800kV, 1-10kA diode current, and 0.5-1.0 μ sec pulselengths. The small orbit gyrotron device is converted to a large orbit experiment by running MELBA's annular electron beam through a magnetic cusp. Initial experiments showed an increase in beam alpha (V_perp/V_par) of a factor of ~ 4 between small and large orbit devices. Experimental results from the RCS gyrotron will be compared for large-orbit and small-orbit electron beams. Beam transport data and frequency measurements will be presented. Computer modeling utilizing the MAGIC and E-gun codes will be shown.

  11. Universal Quantum Criticality in the Metal-Insulator Transition of Two-Dimensional Interacting Dirac Electrons

    Yuichi Otsuka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The metal-insulator transition has been a subject of intense research since Mott first proposed that the metallic behavior of interacting electrons could turn to an insulating one as electron correlations increase. Here, we consider electrons with massless Dirac-like dispersion in two spatial dimensions, described by the Hubbard models on two geometrically different lattices, and perform numerically exact calculations on unprecedentedly large systems that, combined with a careful finite-size scaling analysis, allow us to explore the quantum critical behavior in the vicinity of the interaction-driven metal-insulator transition. Thereby, we find that the transition is continuous, and we determine the quantum criticality for the corresponding universality class, which is described in the continuous limit by the Gross-Neveu model, a model extensively studied in quantum field theory. Furthermore, we discuss a fluctuation-driven scenario for the metal-insulator transition in the interacting Dirac electrons: The metal-insulator transition is triggered only by the vanishing of the quasiparticle weight, not by the Dirac Fermi velocity, which instead remains finite near the transition. This important feature cannot be captured by a simple mean-field or Gutzwiller-type approximate picture but is rather consistent with the low-energy behavior of the Gross-Neveu model.

  12. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54w

    Lesley J. Morrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Audience response systems (‘clickers’ are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost can be overcome using students’ personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc. when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  13. Interactive Technologies of Foreign Language Teaching in Future Marine Specialists’ Training: from Experience of the Danube River Basin Universities

    Olga Demchenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the investigation of the interactive technologies of foreign language teaching in future marine specialists’ training in the Danube river basin universities. The author gives definitions of the most popular interactive technologies aimed to form communicative competence as a significant component of future mariners’ key competencies. Typology and analysis of some interactive technologies of foreign language teaching in future marine specialists’ training are provided.

  14. Superweakly interacting massive particle dark matter signals from the early Universe

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Rajaraman, Arvind; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2003-01-01

    Cold dark matter may be made of superweakly interacting massive particles, super-WIMP's, that naturally inherit the desired relic density from late decays of metastable WIMP's. Well-motivated examples are weak-scale gravitinos in supergravity and Kaluza-Klein gravitons from extra dimensions. These particles are impossible to detect in all dark matter experiments. We find, however, that super-WIMP dark matter may be discovered through cosmological signatures from the early Universe. In particular, super-WIMP dark matter has observable consequences for big bang nucleosynthesis and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and may explain the observed underabundance of 7 Li without upsetting the concordance between deuterium and CMB baryometers. We discuss the implications for future probes of CMB blackbody distortions and collider searches for new particles. In the course of this study, we also present a model-independent analysis of entropy production from late-decaying particles in light of Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe data

  15. Interactive Lab to Learn Radio Astronomy, Microwave & Antenna Engineering at the Technical University of Cartagena (Spain

    Fernando Daniel Quesada-Pereira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An initiative carried out at the Technical University of Cartagena (UPCT, Spain to encourage students and promote the interest for Scientific and Engineering Culture between society is presented in this contribution. For this purpose, a long-term project based on the set-up of an interactive laboratory surrounding a small Radio Telescope (SRT system has been carried out. The main novelty is that this project is entirely being developed by students of last courses of our Telecommunication Engineering Faculty, under the supervision of four lecturers. This lab offers the possibility to remotely control the SRT, and it provides a set of multimedia web-based applications to produce a novel, practical, multidisciplinary virtual laboratory to improve the learning and teaching processes in related sciences and technologies.

  16. Geometric universality of currents in an open network of interacting particles

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a non-equilibrium statistical system on a graph or network. Identical particles are injected, interact with each other, traverse, and leave the graph in a stochastic manner described in terms of Poisson rates, possibly dependent on time and instantaneous occupation numbers at the nodes of the graph. We show that under the assumption of the relative rates constancy, the system demonstrates a profound statistical symmetry, resulting in geometric universality of the particle currents statistics. The phenomenon applies broadly to many man-made and natural open stochastic systems, such as queuing of packages over internet, transport of electrons and quasi-particles in mesoscopic systems, and chains of reactions in bio-chemical networks. We illustrate the utility of the general approach using two enabling examples from the two latter disciplines.

  17. A universal parameterization of chaos in various beam-wave interactions

    Lee, Jae Koo; Lee, Hae June; Hur, Min Sup; Bae, InDeog; Yang, Yi

    1998-01-01

    The comprehensive parameter space of sell-oscillation and its period-doubling route to chaos are shown for a bounded collisionless beam-plasma system. In this parameterization, it is helpful to use a potentially universal parameter in close analogy with free-electron-laser chaos. A common parameter, which is related to the velocity slippage and the ratio of bounce to oscillation frequencies, is shown to have similar significance for different physical systems. This single parameter replaces the dependences on many input parameters, thus suitable for a simplifying and diagnostic measure of nonlinear dynamical and chaotic phenomena for various systems of particle-wave interactions. The results of independent kinetic-simulations verify those of nonlinear fluid-simulations. Other standard routes to chaos via intermittent or quasiperiodic oscillations are also shown for the undriven plasma systems. Some correlation of linear characteristics to nonlinear phenomena was noted. (author)

  18. Exact gate sequences for universal quantum computation using the XY interaction alone

    Kempe, J.; Whaley, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous publication [J. Kempe et al., Quantum Computation and Information (Rinton Press, Princeton, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, special issue, p. 33] we showed that it is possible to implement universal quantum computation with the anisotropic XY-Heisenberg exchange acting as a single interaction. To achieve this we used encodings of the states of the computation into a larger Hilbert space. This proof is nonconstructive, however, and did not explicitly give the trade-offs in time that are required to implement encoded single-qubit operations and encoded two-qubit gates. Here we explicitly give the gate sequences needed to simulate these operations on encoded qubits and qutrits (three-level systems) and analyze the trade-offs involved. We also propose a possible layout for the qubits in a triangular arrangement

  19. Current algebra formulation of radiative corrections in gauge theories and the universality of the weak interactions

    Sirlin, A.

    1978-07-01

    A current algebra formulation of the radiative corrections in gauge theories, with special applications to the analysis of the universality of the weak interactions, is developed in the framework of quantum chromodynamics. For definiteness, we work in the SU(2) x U(1) model with four quark flavors, but the methods are quite general and can be applied to other theories. The explicit cancellation of ultraviolet divergences for arbitrary semileptonic processes is achieved relying solely on the Ward identities and general considerations, both in the W and Higgs sectors. The finite parts of order G/sub F/..cap alpha.. are then evaluated in the case of the superallowed Fermi transitions, including small effects proportional to g/sup -2//sub S/(kappa/sup 2/), which are induced by the strong interactions in the asymptotic domain. We consider here both the simplest version of the Weinberg--Salam model in which the Higgs scalars transform as a single isospinsor, as well as the case of general symmetry breaking. Except for the small effects proportional to g/sup -2//sub S/(kappa/sup 2/), the results are identical to the answers previously found on the basis of heuristic arguments. The phenomenological verification of Cabibbo universality on the basis of these corrections and the superallowed Fermi transitions has been discussed before and found to be in very good agreement with present experimental evidence. The analogous calculation for the transition rate of pion ..beta.. decay is given. Theoretical alternatives to quantum chromdynamics as a framework for the evaluate ion of the radiative corrections are briefly discussed. The appendixes contain a generalization of an important result in the theory of radiative corrections, an analysis of the hadronic contributions to the W and phi propagators, mathematical methods for evaluating the g/sup -2//sub S/(kappa/sup 2/) corrections, and discussions of quark mass renormalization and the absence of operator &apos

  20. Flavor non-universal gauge interactions and anomalies in B-meson decays

    Tang, Yong; Wu, Yue-Liang

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by flavor non-universality and anomalies in semi-leptonic B-meson decays, we present a general and systematic discussion about how to construct anomaly-free U(1)‧ gauge theories based on an extended standard model with only three right-handed neutrinos. If all standard model fermions are vector-like under this new gauge symmetry, the most general family non-universal charge assignments, (a,b,c) for three-generation quarks and (d,e,f) for leptons, need satisfy just one condition to be anomaly-free, 3(a+b+c) = - (d+e+f). Any assignment can be linear combinations of five independent anomaly-free solutions. We also illustrate how such models can generally lead to flavor-changing interactions and easily resolve the anomalies in B-meson decays. Probes with {{B}}{s} - {{\\bar B}}{s} mixing, decay into τ ±, dilepton and dijet searches at colliders are also discussed. Supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Innovative Areas (16H06490)

  1. Combining multi-criteria decision analysis and mini-health technology assessment: A funding decision-support tool for medical devices in a university hospital setting.

    Martelli, Nicolas; Hansen, Paul; van den Brink, Hélène; Boudard, Aurélie; Cordonnier, Anne-Laure; Devaux, Capucine; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; Borget, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    At the hospital level, decisions about purchasing new and oftentimes expensive medical devices must take into account multiple criteria simultaneously. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is increasingly used for health technology assessment (HTA). One of the most successful hospital-based HTA approaches is mini-HTA, of which a notable example is the Matrix4value model. To develop a funding decision-support tool combining MCDA and mini-HTA, based on Matrix4value, suitable for medical devices for individual patient use in French university hospitals - known as the IDA tool, short for 'innovative device assessment'. Criteria for assessing medical devices were identified from a literature review and a survey of 18 French university hospitals. Weights for the criteria, representing their relative importance, were derived from a survey of 25 members of a medical devices committee using an elicitation technique involving pairwise comparisons. As a test of its usefulness, the IDA tool was applied to two new drug-eluting beads (DEBs) for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The IDA tool comprises five criteria and weights for each of two over-arching categories: risk and value. The tool revealed that the two new DEBs conferred no additional value relative to DEBs currently available. Feedback from participating decision-makers about the IDA tool was very positive. The tool could help to promote a more structured and transparent approach to HTA decision-making in French university hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. From the universe to the elementary particles. A first introduction to cosmology and the fundamental interactions

    Ellwanger, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this book, the author leads the reader, step by step and without any advanced mathematics, to a clear understanding of the foundations of modern elementary particle physics and cosmology. He also addresses current and controversial questions on topics such as string theory. The book contains gentle introductions to the theories of special and general relativity, and also classical and quantum field theory. The essential aspects of these concepts are understood with the help of simple calculations; for example, the force of gravity as a consequence of the curvature of the space-time. Also treated are the Big Bang, dark matter and dark energy, as well as the presently known interactions of elementary particles: electrodynamics, the strong and the weak interactions including the Higgs boson. Finally, the book sketches as yet speculative theories: Grand Unification theories, supersymmetry, string theory and the idea of additional dimensions of space-time. Since no higher mathematical or physics expertise is required, the book is also suitable for college and university students at the beginning of their studies. Hobby astronomers and other science enthusiasts seeking a deeper insight than can be found in popular treatments will also appreciate this unique book.

  3. Effects of iPod Touch™ Technology as Communication Devices on Peer Social Interactions across Environments

    Mancil, G. Richmond; Lorah, Elizabeth R.; Whitby, Peggy Schaefer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of the iPod Touch™ as a Speech Generated Device (SGD) for Functional Communication Training (FCT). The evaluation of the effects on problem behavior, the effects on generalization and maintenance of the acquired communication repertoire, and the social initiations of peers between the new SGD (iPod…

  4. Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction Design Education: Teaching Affordance Design for Emerging Mobile Devices

    Faiola, Anthony; Matei, Sorin Adam

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of human-computer interaction design (HCID) over the last 20 years suggests that there is a growing need for educational scholars to consider new and more applicable theoretical models of interactive product design. The authors suggest that such paradigms would call for an approach that would equip HCID students with a better…

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo Modeling of Charge Carriers in Organic Electronic Devices: Suppression of the Self-Interaction Error

    Li, Haoyuan

    2017-05-18

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have emerged as an important tool to help improve the efficiency of organic electronic devices by providing a better understanding of their device physics. In the KMC simulation of an organic device, the reliability of the results depends critically on the accuracy of the chosen charge-transfer rates, which are themselves strongly influenced by the site-energy differences. These site-energy differences include components coming from the electrostatic forces present in the system, which are often evaluated through electric potentials described by the Poisson equation. Here we show that the charge-carrier self-interaction errors that appear when evaluating the site-energy differences can lead to unreliable simulation results. To eliminate these errors, we propose two approaches that are also found to reduce the impact of finite-size effects. As a consequence, reliable results can be obtained at reduced computational costs. The proposed methodologies can be extended to other device simulation techniques as well.

  6. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  7. Device Process and Circuit Application Interaction for Harsh Electronics: Hf-In-Zn-O Thin Film Transistors as an Example

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    2017-06-27

    The effects of Hf content on the radiation hardness of Hf-In-Zn-O thin-film transistors (HIZO TFTs) and HIZO TFTbased circuits are systemically examined. The evaluated circuits, including current-starved ring oscillator, energy harvesting and RF circuits are essential for space electronic systems. It is shown that HIZO TFTs with low Hf concentration have better initial performance while TFTs with high Hf concentration are more stable against radiation. On the other hand, for circuit application, the stable HIZO TFTs are not necessarily preferred for all circuits. The work demonstrates that understanding the device-circuit interactions is necessary for device optimization and circuit reliability improvements for harsh electronic systems.

  8. Device Process and Circuit Application Interaction for Harsh Electronics: Hf-In-Zn-O Thin Film Transistors as an Example

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Tsai, Dung-Sheng; Lu, Chao; Kim, Soo Youn; Mungan, Selin; Yang, Shih-Guo; Zhang, Yuanzhi; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-01

    The effects of Hf content on the radiation hardness of Hf-In-Zn-O thin-film transistors (HIZO TFTs) and HIZO TFTbased circuits are systemically examined. The evaluated circuits, including current-starved ring oscillator, energy harvesting and RF circuits are essential for space electronic systems. It is shown that HIZO TFTs with low Hf concentration have better initial performance while TFTs with high Hf concentration are more stable against radiation. On the other hand, for circuit application, the stable HIZO TFTs are not necessarily preferred for all circuits. The work demonstrates that understanding the device-circuit interactions is necessary for device optimization and circuit reliability improvements for harsh electronic systems.

  9. Engineering of kinase-based protein interacting devices: active expression of tyrosine kinase domains

    Diaz Galicia, Miriam Escarlet

    2018-01-01

    is then translated into a FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) signal is here proposed. To this end, DNA constructs for interaction amplification (split kinases), positive controls (intact kinase domains), scaffolding proteins and phosphopeptide - SH2-domain

  10. Dynamic stress of impeller blade of shaft extension tubular pump device based on bidirectional fluid-structure interaction

    Kan, Kan; Liu, Huiwen; Yang, Chunxia [Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Zheng, Yuan [National Engineering Research Center of Water Resources Efficient Utilization and Engineering Safety, Nanjing (China); Fu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xin [Power China Huadong Engineering Corporation, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-04-15

    Current research on the stability of tubular pumps is mainly concerned with the transient hydrodynamic characteristics. However, the structural response under the influence of fluid-structure interaction hasn't been taken fully into consideration. The instability of the structure can cause vibration and cracks, which may threaten the safety of the unit. We used bidirectional fluid-structure interaction to comprehensively analyze the dynamic stress characteristics of the impeller blades of the shaft extension tubular pump device. Furthermore, dynamic stress of impeller blade of shaft extension tubular pump device was solved under different lift conditions of 0° blade angle. Based on Reynolds-average N-S equation and SST k-ω turbulence model, numerical simulation was carried out for three-dimensional unsteady incompressible turbulent flow field of the pump device whole flow passage. Meanwhile, the finite element method was used to calculate dynamic characteristics of the blade structure. The blade dynamic stress distribution was obtained on the basis of fourth strength theory. The research results indicate that the maximum blade dynamic stress appears at the joint between root of inlet side of the blade suction surface and the axis. Considering the influence of gravity, the fluctuation of the blade dynamic stress increases initially and decreases afterwards within a rotation period. In the meantime, the dynamic stress in the middle part of inlet edge presents larger relative fluctuation amplitude. Finally, a prediction method for dynamic stress distribution of tubular pump considering fluid-structure interaction and gravity effect was proposed. This method can be used in the design stage of tubular pump to predict dynamic stress distribution of the structure under different operating conditions, improve the reliability of pump impeller and analyze the impeller fatigue life.

  11. Reconstructing interacting entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Karami, K; Khaledian, M S [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: MS.Khaledian@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics (CAMP), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-02-15

    Here we consider the entropy-corrected version of the holographic dark energy (DE) model in the non-flat universe. We obtain the equation of state parameter in the presence of interaction between DE and dark matter. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected holographic DE model.

  12. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  13. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage

  14. Interaction of dense nitrogen plasma with SS304 surface using APF plasma focus device

    Afrashteh, M.; Habibi, M.; Heydari, E.

    2012-04-01

    The nitridation of SS304 surfaces is obtained by irradiating nitrogen ions from Amirkabir plasma focus device, which use multiple focus deposition shots at optimum distance 10 cm from the anode. The Vickers Micro-Hardness values are improved more than twice for the nitrided samples comparing to the nonnitrided ones. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is carried out in order to explore the phase changes in the near surface structure of the metals. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) indicate changes in surface morphology which are the emergence of smooth and uniform film on the surface of the nitrided metals.

  15. Replication Kits for the papers "Automated Usability Evaluation of Virtual Reality Applications" and "VR Interaction Modalities for the Evaluation of Technical Device Prototypes" submitted to the CHI 2018

    Harms, Patrick; Holderied, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    This replication kit contains all necessary data to reproduce the setup and results of both papers 'Automated Usability Evaluation of Virtual Reality Applications' and 'VR Interaction Modalities for the Evaluation of Technical Device Prototypes' as submitted to the CHI 2018. It includes the Unity Projects that show a coffee machine and a copier scene (sometimes refered to as printer scene, as well, as it is an integrated device) that can be interacted with with the help of the four interactio...

  16. Interactions of DNA with graphene and sensing applications of graphene field-effect transistor devices: A review

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Norton, Michael L., E-mail: norton@marshall.edu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction of DNA, including DNA nanostructures, and graphene is reviewed. • Comparison of DNA graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) with other detection methods. • Discussion of challenges present in the detection mechanism of GFETs. • Use of DNA aptamer GFET sensors for the detection of small molecules and proteins. - Abstract: Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) have emerged as powerful detection platforms enabled by the advent of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production of the unique atomically thin 2D material on a large scale. DNA aptamers, short target-specific oligonucleotides, are excellent sensor moieties for GFETs due to their strong affinity to graphene, relatively short chain-length, selectivity, and a high degree of analyte variability. However, the interaction between DNA and graphene is not fully understood, leading to questions about the structure of surface-bound DNA, including the morphology of DNA nanostructures and the nature of the electronic response seen from analyte binding. This review critically evaluates recent insights into the nature of the DNA graphene interaction and its affect on sensor viability for DNA, small molecules, and proteins with respect to previously established sensing methods. We first discuss the sorption of DNA to graphene to introduce the interactions and forces acting in DNA based GFET devices and how these forces can potentially affect the performance of increasingly popular DNA aptamers and even future DNA nanostructures as sensor substrates. Next, we discuss the novel use of GFETs to detect DNA and the underlying electronic phenomena that are typically used as benchmarks for characterizing the analyte response of these devices. Finally, we address the use of DNA aptamers to increase the selectivity of GFET sensors for small molecules and proteins and compare them with other, state of the art, detection methods.

  17. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  18. The effects of interaction with the device described by procedural text on recall, true/false, and task performance.

    Diehl, V A; Mills, C B

    1995-11-01

    In two experiments, subjects interacted to different extents with relevant devices while reading two complex multistep procedural texts and were then tested with task performance time, true/false, and recall measures. While reading, subjects performed the task (read and do), saw the experimenter perform the task (read and see experimenter do), imagined doing the task (read and imagine), looked at the device while reading (read and see), or only read (read only). Van Dijk and Kintsch's (1983) text representation theory led to the prediction that exposure to the task device (in the read-and-do, read-and-see, and read-and-see-experimenter-do conditions) would lead to the development of a stronger situation model and therefore faster task performance, whereas the read-only and read-and-see conditions would lead to a better textbase, and therefore better performance on the true/false and recall tasks. Paivio's (1991) dual coding theory led to the opposite prediction for recall. The results supported the text representation theory with task performance and recall. The read-and-see condition produced consistently good performance on the true/false measure. Amount of text study time contributed to recall performance. These findings support the notion that information available while reading leads to differential development of representations in memory, which, in turn, causes differences in performance on various measures.

  19. Interactive learning environments to support independent learning: the impact of discernability of embedded support devices

    Martens, Rob; Valcke, Martin; Portier, Stanley

    2017-01-01

    In this article the effectivity of prototypes of interactive learning environments (ILE) is investigated. These computer-based environments are used for independent learning. In the learning materials, represented in the prototypes, a clear distinction is made between the basic content and embedded

  20. Thumb Reach of Indonesian Young Adult When Interacting with Touchscreen of Single-Handed Device: A Preliminary Study

    Umami, M. K.

    2018-01-01

    This study is a preliminary survey on thumb reach of Indonesian population when interacting with single-handed device. This study was aimed to know the thumb reach envelope on the screen of mobile phone. The correlation between the thumb reach vs. the hand length and thumb length was also identified. Thirty young adults participated in the study. All participants had normal body stature and were right-handed person. In the observational phase, the participant was asked to colour the canvas area on the screen of the mobile phone by using his/her thumb. The participant had to complete the task by applying the single hand interaction. The participant should grab the mobile phone as he/she use it normally in his/her daily activities. The thumb reach envelope of participants was identified from the coloured area of the canvas. The results of this study found that participants with a large hand length and thumb length tend to have a large thumb reach. The results of this study also show the thumb reach area of the participants is forming an elliptical shape that runs from the northeast to southwest on the device screen.

  1. Characterizing and modeling protein-surface interactions in lab-on-chip devices

    Katira, Parag

    Protein adsorption on surfaces determines the response of other biological species present in the surrounding solution. This phenomenon plays a major role in the design of biomedical and biotechnological devices. While specific protein adsorption is essential for device function, non-specific protein adsorption leads to the loss of device function. For example, non-specific protein adsorption on bioimplants triggers foreign body response, in biosensors it leads to reduced signal to noise ratios, and in hybrid bionanodevices it results in the loss of confinement and directionality of molecular shuttles. Novel surface coatings are being developed to reduce or completely prevent the non-specific adsorption of proteins to surfaces. A novel quantification technique for extremely low protein coverage on surfaces has been developed. This technique utilizes measurement of the landing rate of microtubule filaments on kinesin proteins adsorbed on a surface to determine the kinesin density. Ultra-low limits of detection, dynamic range, ease of detection and availability of a ready-made kinesin-microtubule kit makes this technique highly suitable for detecting protein adsorption below the detection limits of standard techniques. Secondly, a random sequential adsorption model is presented for protein adsorption to PEO-coated surfaces. The derived analytical expressions accurately predict the observed experimental results from various research groups, suggesting that PEO chains act as almost perfect steric barriers to protein adsorption. These expressions can be used to predict the performance of a variety of systems towards resisting protein adsorption and can help in the design of better non-fouling surface coatings. Finally, in biosensing systems, target analytes are captured and concentrated on specifically adsorbed proteins for detection. Non-specific adsorption of proteins results in the loss of signal, and an increase in the background. The use of nanoscale transducers as

  2. The Effect of Interactive e-Book on Students' Achievement at Najran University in Computer in Education Course

    Ebied, Mohammed Mohammed Ahmed; Rahman, Shimaa Ahmed Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to examine the effect of interactive e-books on students' achievement at Najran University in computer in education course. Quasi-experimental study design is used in the study and to collect data the researchers built achievement test to measure the dependent variable represented in the achievement affected by experimental…

  3. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  4. Obstacles to Innovation in Brazil: The Lack of Qualified Individuals to Implement Innovation and Establish University-Firm Interactions

    Rapini, Marcia Siqueira; Chiarini, Tulio; Bittencourt, Pablo Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Through an investigation of data available from the Brazilian Innovation Survey (Pesquisa de Inovação) of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística) and from a national survey on university-firm interactions (the BR Survey), the authors show that Brazilian industrial firms lack qualified…

  5. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  6. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People’s Republic of China

    Zhu, Ling-ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Ling-ling Zhu,1 Wei Li,2 Ping Song,3 Quan Zhou3 1Geriatric VIP Ward, Division of Nursing, 2Division of Medical Administration, 3Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors origi...

  7. Design and Application of Interactive Simulations in Problem-Solving in University-Level Physics Education

    Ceberio, Mikel; Almudí, José Manuel; Franco, Ángel

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, interactive computer simulations have been progressively integrated in the teaching of the sciences and have contributed significant improvements in the teaching-learning process. Practicing problem-solving is a key factor in science and engineering education. The aim of this study was to design simulation-based problem-solving teaching materials and assess their effectiveness in improving students' ability to solve problems in university-level physics. Firstly, we analyze the effect of using simulation-based materials in the development of students' skills in employing procedures that are typically used in the scientific method of problem-solving. We found that a significant percentage of the experimental students used expert-type scientific procedures such as qualitative analysis of the problem, making hypotheses, and analysis of results. At the end of the course, only a minority of the students persisted with habits based solely on mathematical equations. Secondly, we compare the effectiveness in terms of problem-solving of the experimental group students with the students who are taught conventionally. We found that the implementation of the problem-solving strategy improved experimental students' results regarding obtaining a correct solution from the academic point of view, in standard textbook problems. Thirdly, we explore students' satisfaction with simulation-based problem-solving teaching materials and we found that the majority appear to be satisfied with the methodology proposed and took on a favorable attitude to learning problem-solving. The research was carried out among first-year Engineering Degree students.

  8. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety.

  9. Referential Interactions of Turkish-Learning Children with Their Caregivers about Non-Absent Objects: Integration of Non-Verbal Devices and Prior Discourse

    Ates, Beyza S.; Küntay, Aylin C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the way children younger than two use non-verbal devices (i.e., deictic gestures and communicative functional acts) and pay attention to discourse status (i.e., prior mention vs. newness) of referents in interactions with caregivers. Data based on semi-naturalistic interactions with caregivers of four children, at ages 1;00,…

  10. Probing Interaction Between Platinum Group Metal (PGM) and Non-PGM Support Through Surface Characterization and Device Performance

    Saha, Shibely

    High cost and limited abundance of Platinum (Pt) have hindered effective commercialization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer. Efforts have been undertaken to reduce precious group metal (PGM) requirement for these devices without compromising the activity of the catalyst by using transition metal carbides (TMC) as non-PGM support thanks to their similar electronic and geometric structures as Pt. In this work Mo2C was selected as non-PGM support and Pt was used as the PGM of interest. We hypothesize that the hollow nanotube morphology of Mo2C support combined with Pt nano particles deposited on it via atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique would allow increased interaction between them which may increase the activity of Pt and Mo2C as well as maximize the Pt active surface area. Specifically, a rotary ALD equipment was used to grow Pt particles from atomic level to 2--3 nanometers by simply adjusting number of ALD cycles in order to probe the interaction between the deposited Pt nanoparticles and Mo2C nanotube support. Interaction between the Pt and Mo2 C was analyzed via surface characterization and electrochemical characterization. Interaction between Pt and Mo2C arises due to the lattice mismatch between Pt and Mo2C as well as electron migration between them. Lattice spacing analysis using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, combined with Pt binding energy shift in XPS results, clearly showed strong bonding between Pt nanoparticles and the Mo2C nanotube support in all the resultant Pt/Mo2C samples. We postulate that this strong interaction is responsible for the significantly enhanced durability observed in our constant potential electrolysis (CPE) and accelerated degradation testing (ADT). Of the three samples from different ALD cycles (15, 50 and 100), Mo2C nanotubes modified by 50 (1.07 wt% Pt loading) and 100 cycles (4.4 wt% Pt) of Pt deposition, showed higher HER and HOR activity per Pt mass than commercial

  11. Practical microwave electron devices

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  12. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  13. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  14. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  15. 60th Scottish Universities Summer School in Physics: 6th Laser-plasma interactions

    Cairns, R A; Jaroszinski, D A

    2009-01-01

    Presents diagnostic methods, experimental techniques, and simulation tools used to study and model laser-plasma interactions. This book discusses the basic theory of the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation fields with matter.

  16. Effects of interactive technology, teacher scaffolding and feedback on university students' conceptual development in motion and force concepts

    Stecklein, Jason Jeffrey

    The utilization of interactive technologies will affect learning in science classrooms of the future. And although these technologies have improved in form and function, their effective employment in university science classrooms has lagged behind the rapid development of new constructivist pedagogies and means of instruction. This dissertation examines the enlistment of instructional technologies, in particular tablet PCs and DyKnow Interactive Software, in a technologically enhanced, university-level, introductory physics course. Results of this qualitative case study of three university students indicate that (1) the use of interactive technology positively affects both student learning within force and motion and self-reported beliefs about physics, (2) ad hoc use of instructional technologies may not sufficient for effective learning in introductory physics, (3) student learners dictate the leveraging of technology in any classroom, and (4) that purposeful teacher structuring of classroom activities with technologies are essential for student construction of knowledge. This includes designing activities to elicit attention and make knowledge visible for low-level content, while augmenting student interactions and modelling procedural steps for higher-level content.

  17. Kitchen talk – Exploring linguistic practices in liminal institutional interactions in a multilingual university setting

    Hazel, Spencer; Mortensen, Janus

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reports on a small-scale investigation of how linguistic diversity is managed and turned into a resource for social meaning making in an informal, multilingual setting at Danish university. Although firmly located within the institution of the university, the particular setting (know...

  18. University Interaction with National Development Plans: A Case Study from Iraq.

    Al-Naimi, Taha T.; Al-Nassri, Sabah A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the University of Technology in Baghdad, Iraq, is discussed, illustrating how it has adjusted its work to national needs as expressed in national development plans. As industry in Iraq has broadened its scope, the curriculum in the university has widened. (Author/MLW)

  19. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China

    Zhu LL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ling-ling Zhu,1 Wei Li,2 Ping Song,3 Quan Zhou3 1Geriatric VIP Ward, Division of Nursing, 2Division of Medical Administration, 3Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1 improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2 complications associated with vascular access; 3 incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4 liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan–do–check–act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. Keywords

  20. Critical plasma-wall interaction issues for plasma-facing materials and components in near-term fusion devices

    Federici, G.; Coad, J.P.; Haasz, A.A.; Janeschitz, G.; Noda, N.; Philipps, V.; Roth, J.; Skinner, C.H.; Tivey, R.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in pulse duration and cumulative run-time, together with the increase of the plasma energy content, will represent the largest changes in operation conditions in future fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) compared to today's experimental facilities. These will give rise to important plasma-physics effects and plasma-material interactions (PMIs) which are only partially observed and accessible in present-day experiments and will open new design, operation and safety issues. For the first time in fusion research, erosion and its consequences over many pulses (e.g., co-deposition and dust) may determine the operational schedule of a fusion device. This paper identifies the most critical issues arising from PMIs which represent key elements in the selection of materials, the design, and the optimisation of plasma-facing components (PFCs) for the first-wall and divertor. Significant advances in the knowledge base have been made recently, as part of the R and D supporting the engineering design activities (EDA) of ITER, and some of the most relevant data are reviewed here together with areas where further R and D work is urgently needed

  1. Exploring Light’s Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    Stevens, John Colby [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2012-12-01

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods with an average center-­to-­center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-­20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  2. Enzyme-semiconductor interactions: Routes from fundamental aspects to photoactive devices

    Lewerenz, H.J. [Division of Solar Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Institut GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments at protein-semiconductor systems are analyzed using concepts from applied semiconductor physics such as Fermi level pinning and MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) junction electronics. Routes for immobilization of enzymes (proteins) on nanostructured surfaces of MoTe{sub 2} and Si are outlined using so-called DLVO and non-DLVO interaction forces. An overview of the catalytic activity of the imaged enzymes, reverse transcriptases of the retroviruses HIV 1 and AMV (avian myeloblastosis virus), is given including their tertiary structural properties which is revealed also in the STM and tapping mode AFM images. For the interpretation of STM images, a resonant charge transfer mechanism is invoked, based on the potential dependence of the image contrast and the energy band structure of MoTe{sub 2} near the valence band maximum. First analyses of the charge transport from the semiconductor to the STM tip at negative bias of MoTe{sub 2} suggest that the observed uninhibited conductivity in the constant current experiments results from solvation-assisted release of electrons from traps that exist along the polypeptide chains and that charge transport occurs at the circumference of the enzymes where biological water is present. Therefore, charge injection into catalytically active enzymes such as hydrogenase or water oxidase of photosystem I and II with subsequent charge transport to the active sites appears difficult to realize. Possibilities of radiation-less long-distance energy transfer based on the Foerster mechanism, its multichromic extension and on Dexter exciton hopping are considered for catalytically active hybrid inorganic/organic absorber-enzyme structures. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Effects of interactive teaching on university students’ knowledge and attitude toward reproductive health: a pilot study in Jordan

    Ali RA

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Reem A Ali,1 Ahlam Alnatour,2 Karimeh Alnuaimi,1 Fatmeh Alzoubi,1 Maysa Almomani,3 Areej Othman4 1Department of Maternal and Child Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Community and Mental Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3Department of Adult Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 4Department of Maternal and Child Health Nursing, School of Nursing, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan Background: Youths in Jordan lack knowledge related to reproductive health (RH. Interactive teaching methods showed positive results in enhancing health awareness and adopting healthy practices among students. Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the usefulness of interactive teaching in promoting health awareness of RH among nonmedical university students in Jordan.Methods: We employed a quasi-experimental one group pretest and posttest design for a purposive sample of 210 students (18–24 years. Knowledge and attitudes regarding RH issues were assessed using a questionnaire developed by the researchers. Results: A significant improvement in students’ knowledge and attitudes toward RH was evident. Female students had higher scores on knowledge than male students in the pretest; this difference was smaller in the posttest. Also, female students had significantly more positive attitudes toward RH in pretest than males, although this difference vanished in the posttest. Study results indicated that students benefit from study intervention regardless their gender. Conclusion: Integrating RH into university’s curriculum coupled with interactive learning approach is a powerful way to promote RH awareness among youths. Keywords: STIs, young adult, family planning, premarital examination, health promotion

  4. University-Industry Interaction: Reserach and Career Opportunities - Good for Industry, Faculty and Students

    Schneider, John

    1997-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of research at universities is growing and becoming more important as funding resources change. In addition, re-engineering at industries has forced them to review how and what they sponsor at universities. Well thought out and understood "partnerships" between companies and universities can be good for everyone. Students receive scholarships, research opportunities, exposure to industry life and career/job opportunities. Faculty receive funds for their research, exposure to real-world problems, equipment, consulting opportunities and more. . Universities receive funds for research, scholarships, etc. In addition, there are opportunities for royalties and donations that help everyone. . The public gains trained students, research advances that lead to better and lower cost products, and economic growth. A concern faculty often express is that they would have to do "applied" and not leading edge research. It is true that industry will not fund "any" research; they want to support research that solves their current needs or could lead to break-throughs in products they can commercialize. Many industrial scientists counter academic concerns by stating that doing practical research can and usually is fundamental and discovery oriented. University-Industry collaboration research has been good for all and can continue to be so. Leading organizations such as the National Science Foundation and the Council on Competitiveness are stressing the need for collaborative partnerships. Universities are creating education programs that bring the basic sciences in contact with the applied world.

  5. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  6. D Virtual CH Interactive Information Systems for a Smart Web Browsing Experience for Desktop Pcs and Mobile Devices

    Scianna, A.; La Guardia, M.

    2018-05-01

    Recently, the diffusion of knowledge on Cultural Heritage (CH) has become an element of primary importance for its valorization. At the same time, the diffusion of surveys based on UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) technologies and new methods of photogrammetric reconstruction have opened new possibilities for 3D CH representation. Furthermore the recent development of faster and more stable internet connections leads people to increase the use of mobile devices. In the light of all this, the importance of the development of Virtual Reality (VR) environments applied to CH is strategic for the diffusion of knowledge in a smart solution. In particular, the present work shows how, starting from a basic survey and the further photogrammetric reconstruction of a cultural good, is possible to built a 3D CH interactive information system useful for desktop and mobile devices. For this experimentation the Arab-Norman church of the Trinity of Delia (in Castelvetrano-Sicily-Italy) has been adopted as case study. The survey operations have been carried out considering different rapid methods of acquisition (UAV camera, SLR camera and smartphone camera). The web platform to publish the 3D information has been built using HTML5 markup language and WebGL JavaScript libraries (Three.js libraries). This work presents the construction of a 3D navigation system for a web-browsing of a virtual CH environment, with the integration of first person controls and 3D popup links. This contribution adds a further step to enrich the possibilities of open-source technologies applied to the world of CH valorization on web.

  7. 3D Virtual CH Interactive Information Systems for a smart web browsing experience for desktop PCs and mobile devices

    A. Scianna

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the diffusion of knowledge on Cultural Heritage (CH has become an element of primary importance for its valorization. At the same time, the diffusion of surveys based on UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV technologies and new methods of photogrammetric reconstruction have opened new possibilities for 3D CH representation. Furthermore the recent development of faster and more stable internet connections leads people to increase the use of mobile devices. In the light of all this, the importance of the development of Virtual Reality (VR environments applied to CH is strategic for the diffusion of knowledge in a smart solution. In particular, the present work shows how, starting from a basic survey and the further photogrammetric reconstruction of a cultural good, is possible to built a 3D CH interactive information system useful for desktop and mobile devices. For this experimentation the Arab-Norman church of the Trinity of Delia (in Castelvetrano-Sicily-Italy has been adopted as case study. The survey operations have been carried out considering different rapid methods of acquisition (UAV camera, SLR camera and smartphone camera. The web platform to publish the 3D information has been built using HTML5 markup language and WebGL JavaScript libraries (Three.js libraries. This work presents the construction of a 3D navigation system for a web-browsing of a virtual CH environment, with the integration of first person controls and 3D popup links. This contribution adds a further step to enrich the possibilities of open-source technologies applied to the world of CH valorization on web.

  8. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  9. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Patients and the General Public towards the Interactions of Physicians with the Pharmaceutical and the Device Industry: A Systematic Review.

    Racha Fadlallah

    Full Text Available To systematically review the evidence on the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of patients and the general public towards the interactions of physicians with the pharmaceutical and the device industry.We included quantitative and qualitative studies addressing any type of interactions between physicians and the industry. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE in August 2015. Two reviewers independently completed data selection, data extraction and assessment of methodological features. We summarized the findings narratively stratified by type of interaction, outcome and country.Of the 11,902 identified citations, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Many studies failed to meet safeguards for protecting from bias. In studies focusing on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, the percentages of participants reporting awareness was higher for office-use gifts relative to personal gifts. Also, participants were more accepting of educational and office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. The findings were heterogeneous for the perceived effects of physician-industry interactions on prescribing behavior, quality and cost of care. Generally, participants supported physicians' disclosure of interactions through easy-to-read printed documents and verbally. In studies focusing on surgeons and device manufacturers, the majority of patients felt their care would improve or not be affected if surgeons interacted with the device industry. Also, they felt surgeons would make the best choices for their health, regardless of financial relationship with the industry. Participants generally supported regulation of surgeon-industry interactions, preferably through professional rather than governmental bodies.The awareness of participants was low for physicians' receipt of personal gifts. Participants also reported greater acceptability and fewer perceived influence for office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. Overall, there appears to be lower awareness

  10. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Patients and the General Public towards the Interactions of Physicians with the Pharmaceutical and the Device Industry: A Systematic Review.

    Fadlallah, Racha; Nas, Hala; Naamani, Dana; El-Jardali, Fadi; Hammoura, Ihsan; Al-Khaled, Lina; Brax, Hneine; Kahale, Lara; Akl, Elie A

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of patients and the general public towards the interactions of physicians with the pharmaceutical and the device industry. We included quantitative and qualitative studies addressing any type of interactions between physicians and the industry. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE in August 2015. Two reviewers independently completed data selection, data extraction and assessment of methodological features. We summarized the findings narratively stratified by type of interaction, outcome and country. Of the 11,902 identified citations, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Many studies failed to meet safeguards for protecting from bias. In studies focusing on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, the percentages of participants reporting awareness was higher for office-use gifts relative to personal gifts. Also, participants were more accepting of educational and office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. The findings were heterogeneous for the perceived effects of physician-industry interactions on prescribing behavior, quality and cost of care. Generally, participants supported physicians' disclosure of interactions through easy-to-read printed documents and verbally. In studies focusing on surgeons and device manufacturers, the majority of patients felt their care would improve or not be affected if surgeons interacted with the device industry. Also, they felt surgeons would make the best choices for their health, regardless of financial relationship with the industry. Participants generally supported regulation of surgeon-industry interactions, preferably through professional rather than governmental bodies. The awareness of participants was low for physicians' receipt of personal gifts. Participants also reported greater acceptability and fewer perceived influence for office-use gifts compared to personal gifts. Overall, there appears to be lower awareness, less concern and

  11. The universal sound velocity formula for the strongly interacting unitary Fermi gas

    Liu Ke; Chen Ji-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Due to the scale invariance, the thermodynamic laws of strongly interacting limit unitary Fermi gas can be similar to those of non-interacting ideal gas. For example, the virial theorem between pressure and energy density of the ideal gas P = 2E/3V is still satisfied by the unitary Fermi gas. This paper analyses the sound velocity of unitary Fermi gases with the quasi-linear approximation. For comparison, the sound velocities for the ideal Boltzmann, Bose and Fermi gas are also given. Quite interestingly, the sound velocity formula for the ideal non-interacting gas is found to be satisfied by the unitary Fermi gas in different temperature regions. (general)

  12. Computation of many-particle quantum trajectories with exchange interaction: application to the simulation of nanoelectronic devices

    Alarcón, A; Yaro, S; Cartoixà, X; Oriols, X

    2013-01-01

    Following Oriols (2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 066803), an algorithm to deal with the exchange interaction in non-separable quantum systems is presented. The algorithm can be applied to fermions or bosons and, by construction, it exactly ensures that any observable is totally independent of the interchange of particles. It is based on the use of conditional Bohmian wave functions which are solutions of single-particle pseudo-Schrödinger equations. The exchange symmetry is directly defined by demanding symmetry properties of the quantum trajectories in the configuration space with a universal algorithm, rather than through a particular exchange–correlation functional introduced into the single-particle pseudo-Schrödinger equation. It requires the computation of N 2 conditional wave functions to deal with N identical particles. For separable Hamiltonians, the algorithm reduces to the standard Slater determinant for fermions (or permanent for bosons). A numerical test for a two-particle system, where exact solutions for non-separable Hamiltonians are computationally accessible, is presented. The numerical viability of the algorithm for quantum electron transport (in a far-from-equilibrium time-dependent open system) is demonstrated by computing the current and fluctuations in a nano-resistor, with exchange and Coulomb interactions among electrons. (paper)

  13. Interactions of Cosmic Rays around the Universe. Models for UHECR data interpretation

    Boncioli Denise

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs are expected to be accelerated inastrophysical sources and to travel through extragalactic space before hitting the Earth atmosphere. They interact both with the environment in the source and with the intergalactic photon fields they encounter, causing different processes at various scales depending on the photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. UHECR interactions are sensitive to uncertainties in the extragalactic background spectrum and in the photo-disintegration models.

  14. University-Firm Interactions in Brazil: Beyond Human Resources and Training Missions

    Rapini, Marcia Siqueira; Chiarini, Tulio; Bittencourt, Pablo Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this article comes from the proposition in the literature that Latin American universities are detached from the research needs of the productive sector and that they limit their role to the human resources and training missions. The authors investigated the Brazilian scenario, using data from a survey conducted in 2008-2009…

  15. Faith-Learning Interaction in Graphic Design Courses in Protestant Evangelical Colleges and Universities

    Bower, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Integration or connectedness between faith and learning is a core aim of Protestant evangelical colleges and universities. It is pursued in a number of different ways in the academic programs of these institutions, even in commercially oriented courses that they offer, such as graphic design. However, the different ways that practical and…

  16. Facebook Mediated Interaction and Learning in Distance Learning at Makerere University

    Mayende, Godfrey; Muyinda, Paul Birevu; Isabwe, Ghislain Maurice Norbert; Walimbwa, Michael; Siminyu, Samuel Ndeda

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the use of Facebook as a tool to mediate learning amongst distance learners at Makerere University, a dual-mode institution offering both conventional and distance learning programs. While conventional courses take 17 weeks in a semester, the distance learners come in for two residential sessions, each…

  17. Productive interactions for societal impact: Developing a research information system for agriculture (RIS-Agric) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa

    Boshoff, N.; Esterhuyse, H.

    2016-07-01

    Assessments of the societal impact of research rely on primary data as input to the relevant indicators. In the current project, the data collection for indicator construction is guided by the SIAMPI approach to societal impact assessment. According to SIAMPI, the achievement of societal impact involves two elements: stakeholders and productive interactions. The latter includes three kinds of interactions: direct personal interactions; indirect interactions where contact is mediated by a material or human ‘carrier’; and financial interactions that refer to the economic exchanges between researchers and stakeholders. The question to be explored is whether the assessment of the societal impact of research can be facilitated by capturing any direct, indirect and financial interactions between researchers and societal stakeholders in a research information system. CREST/SciSTIP is developing such a system, called RIS-Agric, in cooperation with the Faculty of AgriSciences at Stellenbosch University and four agricultural research funders in South Africa that represent different agricultural commodities. A RIS with productive interactions at its core – and the funded research project as the unit of observation – will produce the necessary data for indicators linked to the societal impact of research, in addition to generating insights about the ‘pathway’ from research to societal impact. The indicators need to be ‘socially robust’ in the sense that their validation processes should include the research beneficiaries and their representatives. In doing so, RIS-Agric will produce a useful, standardised measurement mechanism that is aligned across the different commodities. The focus on productive interactions will be supplemented by other methods in order to enable the quantification of societal impact in the form of ‘impact scores’. (Author)

  18. Explaining the large numbers by a hierarchy of ''universes'': a unified theory of strong and gravitational interactions

    Caldirola, P.; Recami, E.

    1978-01-01

    By assuming covariance of physical laws under (discrete) dilatations, strong and gravitational interactions have been described in a unified way. In terms of the (additional, discrete) ''dilatational'' degree of freedom, our cosmos as well as hadrons can be considered as different states of the same system, or rather as similar systems. Moreover, a discrete hierarchy can be defined of ''universes'' which are governed by force fields with strengths inversely proportional to the ''universe'' radii. Inside each ''universe'' an equivalence principle holds, so that its characteristic field can be geometrized there. It is thus easy to derive a whole ''numerology'', i.e. relations among numbers analogous to the so-called Weyl-Eddington-Dirac ''large numbers''. For instance, the ''Planck mass'' happens to be nothing but the (average) magnitude of the strong charge of the hadron quarks. However, our ''numerology'' connects the (gravitational) macrocosmos with the (strong) microcosmos, rather than with the electromagnetic ones (as, e.g., in Dirac's version). Einstein-type scaled equations (with ''cosmological'' term) are suggested for the hadron interior, which - incidentally - yield a (classical) quark confinement in a very natural way and are compatible with the ''asymptotic freedom''. At last, within a ''bi-scale'' theory, further equations are proposed that provide a priori a classical field theory of strong interactions (between different hadrons). The relevant sections are 5.2, 7 and 8. (author)

  19. Microbial profiling of cpn60 universal target sequences in artificial mixtures of vaginal bacteria sampled by nylon swabs or self-sampling devices under different storage conditions.

    Schellenberg, John J; Oh, Angela Yena; Hill, Janet E

    2017-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is increasingly characterized by deep sequencing of universal genes. However, there are relatively few studies of how different specimen collection and sample storage and processing influence these molecular profiles. Here, we evaluate molecular microbial community profiles of samples collected using the HerSwab™ self-sampling device, compared to nylon swabs and under different storage conditions. In order to minimize technical variation, mixtures of 11 common vaginal bacteria in simulated vaginal fluid medium were sampled and DNA extracts prepared for massively parallel sequencing of the cpn60 universal target (UT). Three artificial mixtures imitating commonly observed vaginal microbiome profiles were easily distinguished and proportion of sequence reads correlated with the estimated proportion of the organism added to the artificial mixtures. Our results indicate that cpn60 UT amplicon sequencing quantifies the proportional abundance of member organisms in these artificial communities regardless of swab type or storage conditions, although some significant differences were observed between samples that were stored frozen and thawed prior to DNA extraction, compared to extractions from samples stored at room temperature for up to 7days. Our results indicate that an on-the-market device developed for infectious disease diagnostics may be appropriate for vaginal microbiome profiling, an approach that is increasingly facilitated by rapidly dropping deep sequencing costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hands-on-Universe, Europe Bringing frontline interactive astronomy to the classroom

    Ferlet, R.

    Hands-on-Universe, Europe (EU-HOU) aims at re-awakening the interest for science in the young generations through astronomy and new technologies. It relies on real observations acquired through a worldwide internet-based network of automatic telescopes or with didactical tools (webcam, radiotelescope). Pupils manipulate images in the classroom environment, using specific software within pedagogical resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. EU-HOU is freely available on the web, and trains european teachers.

  1. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. I. Universal screening in the atomic-sphere approximation

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    2002-01-01

    We have used the locally self-consistent Green's-function (LSGF) method in supercell calculations to establish the distribution of the net charges assigned to the atomic spheres of the alloy components in metallic alloys with different compositions and degrees of order. This allows us to determine......-site local interaction zone. We demonstrate that the basic mechanism that governs the charge distribution is the screening of the net charges of the alloy components that makes the direct Coulomb interactions short ranged. In the atomic-sphere approximation, this screening appears to be almost independent...

  2. The Interaction of Language-Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions.

    Baer-Henney, Dinah; Kügler, Frank; van de Vijver, Ruben

    2015-09-01

    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance (phonetic motivation), and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix vowel. This process is not based in substance, but it reflects a phonotactic property of German and our participants benefit from this language-specific factor. We found that learners use both cues, while substantive bias surfaces mainly in the most unstable situation. We show that language-specific and universal factors interact in learning. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Proceedings of Japan-U.S. workshop P-196 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next devices

    Wilson, K.N.; Yamashina, T.

    1993-03-01

    The Japan-US Workshop P-196 was successfully carried out in Kyushu University, Chikushi Campus, from November 17 to 19. The major concern was on the research and development required both for international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Large Helical Device (LHD). Most of the discussion items was similar to that of the last workshop, e.g. PFC and PSI in Large Device, High Heat Flux Component, Laboratory Studies and Neutron Damage. The presentation number concerning High Heat Flux Component was largest. (J.P.N.)

  4. MEVA--An Interactive Visualization Application for Validation of Multifaceted Meteorological Data with Multiple 3D Devices.

    Carolin Helbig

    Full Text Available To achieve more realistic simulations, meteorologists develop and use models with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. The analyzing, comparing, and visualizing of resulting simulations becomes more and more challenging due to the growing amounts and multifaceted character of the data. Various data sources, numerous variables and multiple simulations lead to a complex database. Although a variety of software exists suited for the visualization of meteorological data, none of them fulfills all of the typical domain-specific requirements: support for quasi-standard data formats and different grid types, standard visualization techniques for scalar and vector data, visualization of the context (e.g., topography and other static data, support for multiple presentation devices used in modern sciences (e.g., virtual reality, a user-friendly interface, and suitability for cooperative work.Instead of attempting to develop yet another new visualization system to fulfill all possible needs in this application domain, our approach is to provide a flexible workflow that combines different existing state-of-the-art visualization software components in order to hide the complexity of 3D data visualization tools from the end user. To complete the workflow and to enable the domain scientists to interactively visualize their data without advanced skills in 3D visualization systems, we developed a lightweight custom visualization application (MEVA - multifaceted environmental data visualization application that supports the most relevant visualization and interaction techniques and can be easily deployed. Specifically, our workflow combines a variety of different data abstraction methods provided by a state-of-the-art 3D visualization application with the interaction and presentation features of a computer-games engine. Our customized application includes solutions for the analysis of multirun data, specifically with respect to data uncertainty and

  5. Development of Students' Conceptual Thinking by Means of Video Analysis and Interactive Simulations at Technical Universities

    Hockicko, Peter; Krišták, Luboš; Nemec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Video analysis, using the program Tracker (Open Source Physics), in the educational process introduces a new creative method of teaching physics and makes natural sciences more interesting for students. This way of exploring the laws of nature can amaze students because this illustrative and interactive educational software inspires them to think…

  6. Interaction in Classes at a New Zealand University: Some International Students' Experiences.

    Mills, Colleen

    1997-01-01

    Data from 5 Indonesian, 5 Thai, 21 Singaporean, and 85 Malaysian students in a New Zealand college were obtained through interviews, surveys, and observations. Differences in level and style of teacher-student interaction, difficulties learning English, perceptions of local students, lack of a common experience, and acculturation were the issues…

  7. Design and Application of Interactive Simulations in Problem-Solving in University-Level Physics Education

    Ceberio, Mikel; Almudí, José Manuel; Franco, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, interactive computer simulations have been progressively integrated in the teaching of the sciences and have contributed significant improvements in the teaching-learning process. Practicing problem-solving is a key factor in science and engineering education. The aim of this study was to design simulation-based problem-solving…

  8. Two-Way Interactive Television: An Emerging Technology for University Level Business School Instruction.

    Heiens, Richard A.; Hulse, Deborah B.

    1996-01-01

    An organizational behavior course was delivered via two-way interactive television to a campus site (71 students) and three remote locations (48 students). Remote students were slightly older and predominantly female. There were no significant differences in academic performance between on-campus and remote students. (SK)

  9. ToxCast Data Expands Universe of Chemical-Gene Interactions (SOT)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets. Thi...

  10. [Coupled Analysis of Fluid-Structure Interaction of a Micro-Mechanical Valve for Glaucoma Drainage Devices].

    Siewert, S; Sämann, M; Schmidt, W; Stiehm, M; Falke, K; Grabow, N; Guthoff, R; Schmitz, K-P

    2015-12-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. In therapeutically refractory cases, alloplastic glaucoma drainage devices (GDD) are being increasingly used to decrease intraocular pressure. Current devices are mainly limited by fibrotic encapsulation and postoperative hypotension. Preliminary studies have described the development of a glaucoma microstent to control aqueous humour drainage from the anterior chamber into the suprachoroidal space. One focus of these studies was on the design of a micro-mechanical valve placed in the anterior chamber to inhibit postoperative hypotension. The present report describes the coupled analysis of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) as basis for future improvements in the design micro-mechanical valves. FSI analysis was carried out with ANSYS 14.5 software. Solid and fluid geometry were combined in a model, and the corresponding material properties of silicone (Silastic Rx-50) and water at room temperature were assigned. The meshing of the solid and fluid domains was carried out in accordance with the results of a convergence study with tetrahedron elements. Structural and fluid mechanical boundary conditions completed the model. The FSI analysis takes into account geometric non-linearity and adaptive remeshing to consider changing geometry. A valve opening pressure of 3.26 mmHg was derived from the FSI analysis and correlates well with the results of preliminary experimental fluid mechanical studies. Flow resistance was calculated from non-linear pressure-flow characteristics as 8.5 × 10(-3) mmHg/µl  · min(-1) and 2.7 × 10(-3) mmHg/µl  · min(-1), respectively before and after valve opening pressure is exceeded. FSI analysis indicated leakage flow before valve opening, which is due to the simplified model geometry. The presented bidirectional coupled FSI analysis is a powerful tool for the development of new designs of micro-mechanical valves for GDD and may help to minimise the time and cost

  11. Design and implementation of practical bidirectional texture function measurement devices focusing on the developments at the University of Bonn.

    Schwartz, Christopher; Sarlette, Ralf; Weinmann, Michael; Rump, Martin; Klein, Reinhard

    2014-04-28

    Understanding as well as realistic reproduction of the appearance of materials play an important role in computer graphics, computer vision and industry. They enable applications such as digital material design, virtual prototyping and faithful virtual surrogates for entertainment, marketing, education or cultural heritage documentation. A particularly fruitful way to obtain the digital appearance is the acquisition of reflectance from real-world material samples. Therefore, a great variety of devices to perform this task has been proposed. In this work, we investigate their practical usefulness. We first identify a set of necessary attributes and establish a general categorization of different designs that have been realized. Subsequently, we provide an in-depth discussion of three particular implementations by our work group, demonstrating advantages and disadvantages of different system designs with respect to the previously established attributes. Finally, we survey the existing literature to compare our implementation with related approaches.

  12. Energy Choices and Climate Change: A New Interactive Feature on Windows to the Universe

    Gardiner, L. S.; Russell, R. M.; Ward, D.; Johnson, R. M.; Henderson, S.; Foster, S. Q.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a new, self-paced online module to foster understanding of how choices made about energy production and energy use affect greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. The module, entitled “Energy Choices and Climate Change” is available on Windows to the Universe (www.windows.ucar.edu), an extensive educational Web site used by over 20 million people each year. “Energy Choices and Climate Change” provides a new way to look at issues related to energy and climate change, emphasizing the climate implications of the choices we make. “Energy Choices and Climate Change” allows users to explore two different scenarios through which they make decisions about energy production or use. In the “Ruler of the World” scenario, the user is given the authority to make decisions about the mix of energy sources that will be used worldwide with the aim of reducing emissions while meeting global energy demand and monitoring costs and societal implications. In “The Joules Family” scenario, the user makes decisions about how to change the way a hypothetical family of four uses energy at home and for transportation with the aim of reducing the family’s carbon emissions and fossil fuel use while keeping costs less than long-term savings. While this module is intended for a general public audience, an associated teacher’s guide provides support for secondary educators using the module with students. Windows to the Universe is a project of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach. Funding for the Energy Choices and Climate Change online module was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  13. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  14. An Interactive Computer-Based Circulation System for Northwestern University: The Library Puts It to Work

    Velma Veneziano

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Northwestern University Library's on-line circulation system has resulted in dramatic changes in practices and procedures in the Circulation Services Section. After a hectic period of implementation, the staff soon began to adjust to the system. Over the past year and a half, they have devised ways to use the system to maximum advantage, so that manual and machine systems now mesh in close harmony. Freed from time-consuming clerical chores, the staff have been challenged to use their released time to best advantage, with the result that the "service" in "Circulation Services" is much closer to being a reality.

  15. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  16. From the universe to the elementary particles a first introduction to cosmology and the fundamental interactions

    Ellwanger, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this book, the author leads the reader, step by step and without any advanced mathematics, to a clear understanding of the foundations of modern elementary particle physics and cosmology. He also addresses current and controversial questions on topics such as string theory. The book contains gentle introductions to the theories of special and general relativity, and also classical and quantum field theory. The essential aspects of these concepts are understood with the help of simple calculations; for example, the force of gravity as a consequence of the curvature of the space-time. Also treated are the Big Bang, dark matter and dark energy, as well as the presently known interactions of elementary particles: electrodynamics, the strong and the weak interactions including the Higgs boson. Finally, the book sketches as yet speculative theories: Grand Unification theories, supersymmetry, string theory and the idea of additional dimensions of space-time. Since no higher mathematical or physics expertise is r...

  17. Holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter in a closed Universe

    Cruz, Norman; Lepe, Samuel; Pena, Francisco; Saavedra, Joel

    2008-01-01

    A cosmological model of an holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter throughout a decaying term of the form Q=3(λ 1 ρ DE +λ 2 ρ m )H is investigated. General constraint on the parameters of the model are found when accelerated expansion is imposed and we found a phantom scenario, without any reference to a specific equation of state for the dark energy. The behavior of equation of state for dark energy is also discussed

  18. Bianchi type I expanding universe in Weyl-invariant gravity with a quartic interaction term

    Kao, W.F.; Lin, Ing-Chen [National Chiao Tung University, Institute of Physics, Hsinchu (China)

    2017-11-15

    We will focus on the effect of a Weyl-invariant model with a quadratic interaction term and a free scalar field ψ. A set of analytic solutions will be obtained for this model. This model provides a dynamical alternative to the standard ΛCDM model. In particular, we will show that the quartic Weyl-invariant model prediction is consistent with the Hubble diagram observations. (orig.)

  19. Universality of hadron jets in soft and hard particle interactions at high energies

    Baldin, A.M.; Didenko, L.A.; Grishin, V.G.; Kuznetsov, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The hadron jet production in soft π - p- and cumulative π - pC-interactions at a 40 GeV/c momentum is studied. The collective characteristics of jets and the functions of the quark and diquark fragmentation into charged pions and neutral strange particles are analysed. The results obtained are compared with analogous data for e + e - - and ν(anti ν)p- interactions. The hadron jet properties are also studied using relativistic invariant variables - the squared relative 4-velocities b sub(ik).-(Psub(i)/msub(i)-Psub(k)sup(2)/msub(k) (where Psub(i), Psub(k) are 4-momenta of i-th and K-th particles and msub(i), msub(k) are their masses). The results obtained show that the quark (diquark) fragmentation proceed in a similar manner in soft hadron-hadron collisions, cumulative interactions on light nuclei, in e + e - -annihilation and deep inelastic ν(anti ν)p-scattering

  20. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  1. Interactive Universal Design Kiosks: Explanations About Social Inclusion Features in Architectural Design.

    Guimarães, Marcelo Pinto; Picceli, Angélica Fátima Baldin; Sabino, Paulo Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper details a set of self-supporting and illuminated panels that work together but independently in order to emphasize the explanation of building features and activities that are based on Universal Design guidelines. The exhibition is based on two structures that are arranged in semi-circles (A and B). They are integrated to form a carpeted path where the visitor will be gradually exposed to the concepts related to the principles of Universal Design. Following the sequence of three-dimensional objects and swivelling box elements that support the tactile information on the subject, it is expected that visitors become familiar with each of the principles being demonstrated. Operated by a control system consisting of keys with colour signage, textures and high relief, the panel on the control table allows the user to choose information about paired relationships between some of seven principles contained in printed images about the architectural design on the set of panels. The effectiveness of the composition can be verified by the time people remain enough to hear, see and touch the kiosks for all the information, or by successive visits users make to the setting.

  2. Impact of ultralight axion self-interactions on the large scale structure of the Universe

    Desjacques, Vincent; Kehagias, Alex; Riotto, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Ultralight axions have sparked attention because their tiny mass m ˜10-22 eV , which leads to a kiloparsec-scale de Broglie wavelength comparable to the size of a dwarf galaxy, could alleviate the so-called small-scale crisis of massive cold dark matter (CDM) candidates. However, recent analyses of the Lyman-α forest power spectrum set a tight lower bound on their mass of m ≳10-21 eV which makes them much less relevant from an astrophysical point of view. An important caveat to these numerical studies is that they do not take into account self-interactions among ultralight axions. Furthermore, for axions which acquired a mass through nonperturbative effects, this self-interaction is attractive and, therefore, could counteract the quantum "pressure" induced by the strong delocalization of the particles. In this work, we show that even a tiny attractive interaction among ultralight axions can have a significant impact on the stability of cosmic structures at low redshift. After a brief review of known results about solitons in the absence of gravity, we discuss the stability of filamentary and pancakelike solutions when quantum pressure, attractive interactions and gravity are present. The analysis based on 1 degree of freedom, namely the breathing mode, reveals that pancakes are stable, while filaments are unstable if the mass per unit length is larger than a critical value. However, we show that pancakes are unstable against transverse perturbations. We expect this to be true for halos and filaments as well. Instabilities driven by the breathing mode will not be seen in the low column density Lyman-α forest unless the axion decay constant is extremely small, f ≲1013 GeV . Notwithstanding, axion solitonic cores could leave a detectable signature in the Lyman-α forest if the normalization of the unknown axion core—filament mass relation is ˜100 larger than it is for spherical halos. We hope our work motivates future numerical studies of the impact of axion

  3. Distance-Based Tear Lactoferrin Assay on Microfluidic Paper Device Using Interfacial Interactions on Surface-Modified Cellulose.

    Yamada, Kentaro; Henares, Terence G; Suzuki, Koji; Citterio, Daniel

    2015-11-11

    "Distance-based" detection motifs on microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) allow quantitative analysis without using signal readout instruments in a similar manner to classical analogue thermometers. To realize a cost-effective and calibration-free distance-based assay of lactoferrin in human tear fluid on a μPAD not relying on antibodies or enzymes, we investigated the fluidic mobilities of the target protein and Tb(3+) cations used as the fluorescent detection reagent on surface-modified cellulosic filter papers. Chromatographic elution experiments in a tear-like sample matrix containing electrolytes and proteins revealed a collapse of attractive electrostatic interactions between lactoferrin or Tb(3+) and the cellulosic substrate, which was overcome by the modification of the paper surface with the sulfated polysaccharide ι-carrageenan. The resulting μPAD based on the fluorescence emission distance successfully analyzed 0-4 mg mL(-1) of lactoferrin in complex human tear matrix with a lower limit of detection of 0.1 mg mL(-1) by simple visual inspection. Assay results of 18 human tear samples including ocular disease patients and healthy volunteers showed good correlation to the reference ELISA method with a slope of 0.997 and a regression coefficient of 0.948. The distance-based quantitative signal and the good batch-to-batch fabrication reproducibility relying on printing methods enable quantitative analysis by simply reading out "concentration scale marks" printed on the μPAD without performing any calibration and using any signal readout instrument.

  4. Precision measurements in the weak interaction framework: development of realistic simulations for the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL

    Fabian, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    This work belongs to the effort presently deployed to measure the angular correlation parameter a_β_ν in three nuclear beta decays ("6He"+, "3"5Ar"+ and "1"9Ne"+). The V-A structure of the weak interaction implies that a_β_ν = +1 for a pure Fermi transition and a_β_ν = -1/3 for a pure Gamow-Teller transition. A thorough measurement of this parameter to check any deviation from these values may lead to the discovery of possible exotic currents. Furthermore, the measurement of a_β_ν in mirror transitions allows the extraction of V_u_d, the first element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. The LPCTrap apparatus, installed at GANIL, is designed to ready a continuous ion beam for injection in a dedicated Paul trap. This latter device allows to have a quasi-punctual source from which the decay products are detected in coincidence. It is from the study of the recoil ion time-of-flight (TOF) distribution that a_β_ν is withdrawn and, since 2010, the associated Shake-Off (SO) probabilities. This study requires the complete simulation of the LPCTrap experiments. The major part of this work is dedicated to such simulations, especially to the modeling of the trapped ion cloud dynamic. The Clouda program, which takes advantage of graphics processing unit (GPU), was developed in this context and its full characterization is presented here. Three important aspects are addressed: the electromagnetic trapping field, the realistic collisions between the ions and the buffer gas atoms and the space charge effect. The present work shows the importance of these simulations to increase the control of the systematic errors on a_β_ν. (author) [fr

  5. An Application of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction and College and University Classroom Environment Inventory in a Multicultural Tertiary Context

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil; Fisher, Darrell L.

    2002-02-01

    The research reported in this inquiry consisted of the application of two classroom learning environment questionnaires developed in a Western context to a culturally diverse context, namely, the Pacific Islands. The College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) and Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) instruments were administered to intact classes of first- and second-year science students ( n= 257) at a regional university in the Pacific Islands, containing a total of 12 ethnicities. The data reveal that the QTI instrument holds good reliability for all scales, whereas the CUCEI holds reliability for only two scales. This may be due to the simple nature of the questions on the QTI whereas the questions on the CUCEI require more interpretation, the latter exacerbated by the fact that English is a second or third language for most participants. Surprisingly, there were few differences in perceptions of teacher student interaction based on ethnicity, but substantial differences based on gender. As reported in previous classroom environment research at the secondary school level, in this study, females perceived their environment more favourably than males. The data for the QTI reveal that the students perceive their classrooms to be highly teacher dominated, consistent with previous naturalistic studies of secondary schools and exploratory studies at the tertiary level in Fiji. Since almost all the graduates from this institution become science teachers, a cycle is completed.

  6. Interactive Online Modules and Videos for Learning Geological Concepts at the University of Toronto Department of Earth Sciences

    Veglio, E.; Graves, L. W.; Bank, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    We designed various computer-based applications and videos as educational resources for undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto in the Earth Science Department. These resources were developed in effort to enhance students' self-learning of key concepts as identified by educators at the department. The interactive learning modules and videos were created using the programs MATLAB and Adobe Creative Suite 5 (Photoshop and Premiere) and range from optical mineralogy (extinction and Becke line), petrology (equilibrium melting in 2-phase systems), crystallography (crystal systems), geophysics (gravity anomaly), and geologic history (evolution of Canada). These resources will be made available for students on internal course websites as well as through the University of Toronto Earth Science's website (www.es.utoronto.ca) where appropriate; the video platform YouTube.com may be used to reach a wide audience and promote the material. Usage of the material will be monitored and feedback will be collected over the next academic year in order to gage the use of these interactive learning tools and to assess if these computer-based applications and videos foster student engagement and active learning, and thus offer an enriched learning experience.

  7. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  8. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    NYGREN, RICHARD E.; STAVROS, DIANA T.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed

  9. Literature and Imagology: a productive interaction: the contribution of comparative literature at the University of Aache

    Celeste H. M. Ribeiro de Sousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Aachen harbored for years the main centre of Studies on Imagology of Germany and perhaps of the world. The Center was founded by Hugo Dyserinck, who, in 1966, with the article "Zum Problem der 'images' und 'mirages' und ihrer Untersuchung im Rahmen der vergleichenden Literaturwissenschaft" opened the doors to a new Imagology. He gathered there disciples, who roamed the new horizons with extensive research, which led to the publication of the collection "Aachener Beiträge zur Komparatistik". In Brazil, the influence of Dyserinck was also felt, for example, in the publication of my book Do cá e do lá. Introdução à Imagologia, whose content is in part commented and illustrated.

  10. CONCERNING THE NETWORKING INTERACTION EXPERIENCE OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY

    E. A. Dmitrieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify the possibilities for the formation knowledge and practical skills related to the use of the professional activity of software and network resource of teaching communities in the pedagogical sphere.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of the literary sources, regulatory documents, Internet resources within the researched problem; an analysis of the practical experience of teachers of secondary schools, work of high school teachers and establishment of training teachers on the research problem; the experimental work and monitoring the learning process.Results. The process of teachers’ training inYaroslavl, in particular preparation of students-biologists at theYaroslavlStatePedagogicalUniversityis reflected. Activity of network pedagogical community of Yaroslavl is considered as a platform for network interaction; the analysis of such platform, use of its resources, and also conversations with subject teachers and students have shown that the given electronic and communication resources cause a great interest for practicing teachers and future experts, however, they not always possess necessary knowledge and abilities concerning its operation.Scientific novelty. The author describes in detail the process of forming a competence of networking of professional interaction in terms of its methodological support that is relevant to the educational process, both in the high school, and post-graduate education.Practical significance. The research implementations can be useful while developing specific guidelines to explain the content and methodology of the training network of professional interaction with examples of practicing teachers and students ofPedagogicalUniversity– future teachers of biology.The article is addressed to researchers, dealing with networking, specialists of teaching service centers (institutions of educational development, the practicing subject teachers and teachers of high

  11. Holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter in a closed Universe

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de La Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D Temuco (Chile); Saavedra, Joel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: joel.saavedra@ucv.cl

    2008-11-27

    A cosmological model of an holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter throughout a decaying term of the form Q=3({lambda}{sub 1}{rho}{sub DE}+{lambda}{sub 2}{rho}{sub m})H is investigated. General constraint on the parameters of the model are found when accelerated expansion is imposed and we found a phantom scenario, without any reference to a specific equation of state for the dark energy. The behavior of equation of state for dark energy is also discussed.

  12. The Effectiveness of an Interactive Training Program in Developing a Set of Non-Cognitive Skills in Students at University of Petra

    Gheith, Eman; Aljaberi, Nahil M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of interactive training programs in developing a set of non-cognitive skills in students at the University of Petra. Furthermore, it sought to examine the impact of the sex, academic year, and university major variables on developing these skills in students who underwent the training program, as…

  13. The Interactional Effects of the Internal and External University Environment, and the Influence of Personal Values, on Satisfaction among International Postgraduate Students

    Arambewela, Rodney; Hall, John

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the interactional effects of internal and external university learning environments, and the influence of personal values, in the satisfaction formation process of international postgraduate students from Asia. Past research on student satisfaction has been narrowly focused on certain aspects of the university internal…

  14. The generalized second law of thermodynamics for the interacting polytropic dark energy in non-flat FRW universe enclosed by the apparent horizon

    Karami, K.; Ghaffari, S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in a non-flat FRW universe containing the interacting polytropic dark energy with cold dark matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon. We show that for this model under thermal equilibrium with the Hawking radiation, the generalized second law is always satisfied throughout the history of the universe for any spatial curvature, independently of the deceleration parameter.

  15. The generalized second law of thermodynamics for the interacting polytropic dark energy in non-flat FRW universe enclosed by the apparent horizon

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-03

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in a non-flat FRW universe containing the interacting polytropic dark energy with cold dark matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon. We show that for this model under thermal equilibrium with the Hawking radiation, the generalized second law is always satisfied throughout the history of the universe for any spatial curvature, independently of the deceleration parameter.

  16. Real-Time Climate Simulations in the Interactive 3D Game Universe Sandbox ²

    Goldenson, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Exploration in an open-ended computer game is an engaging way to explore climate and climate change. Everyone can explore physical models with real-time visualization in the educational simulator Universe Sandbox ² (universesandbox.com/2), which includes basic climate simulations on planets. I have implemented a time-dependent, one-dimensional meridional heat transport energy balance model to run and be adjustable in real time in the midst of a larger simulated system. Universe Sandbox ² is based on the original game - at its core a gravity simulator - with other new physically-based content for stellar evolution, and handling collisions between bodies. Existing users are mostly science enthusiasts in informal settings. We believe that this is the first climate simulation to be implemented in a professionally developed computer game with modern 3D graphical output in real time. The type of simple climate model we've adopted helps us depict the seasonal cycle and the more drastic changes that come from changing the orbit or other external forcings. Users can alter the climate as the simulation is running by altering the star(s) in the simulation, dragging to change orbits and obliquity, adjusting the climate simulation parameters directly or changing other properties like CO2 concentration that affect the model parameters in representative ways. Ongoing visuals of the expansion and contraction of sea ice and snow-cover respond to the temperature calculations, and make it accessible to explore a variety of scenarios and intuitive to understand the output. Variables like temperature can also be graphed in real time. We balance computational constraints with the ability to capture the physical phenomena we wish to visualize, giving everyone access to a simple open-ended meridional energy balance climate simulation to explore and experiment with. The software lends itself to labs at a variety of levels about climate concepts including seasons, the Greenhouse effect

  17. Designing an Interactive OER Course Development at Athabasca University Based on ODL Principles

    Hongxin Yan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Failure rates in first year calculus courses are high in most post-secondary institutions across North America and other parts of the world. This Inukshuk-funded open education project involved the development of five stand-alone pre-calculus learning modules. The design and revision phases of this project occurred between the fall of 2007 and late spring of 2009. These modules were designed to support learners enrolled in first year calculus by providing just-in-time instruction in five areas: algebraic operations, factorization, polynomials and rational expressions, radical expressions, linear and quadratic equations. One of the major challenges of the project was developing dynamic activities that could support the display of a variety of mathematical formulas. To this end an open source Flash-based authoring tool was developed called the Athabasca University Tutor Authoring Tool (AUTAT. This paper explores the design and development of the AUTAT based on the needs assessment and design principles discussed.

  18. Severe slowing-down and universality of the dynamics in disordered interacting many-body systems: ageing and ultraslow diffusion

    Sanders, Lloyd P; Fogelmark, Karl; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Lomholt, Michael A; Lizana, Ludvig; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Low-dimensional, many-body systems are often characterized by ultraslow dynamics. We study a labelled particle in a generic system of identical particles with hard-core interactions in a strongly disordered environment. The disorder is manifested through intermittent motion with scale-free sticking times at the single particle level. While for a non-interacting particle we find anomalous diffusion of the power-law form 〈x 2 (t)〉≃t α of the mean squared displacement with 0<α<1, we demonstrate here that the combination of the disordered environment with the many-body interactions leads to an ultraslow, logarithmic dynamics 〈x 2 (t)〉≃log 1/2 t with a universal 1/2 exponent. Even when a characteristic sticking time exists but the fluctuations of sticking times diverge we observe the mean squared displacement 〈x 2 (t)〉≃t γ with 0<γ<1/2, that is slower than the famed Harris law 〈x 2 (t)〉≃t 1/2 without disorder. We rationalize the results in terms of a subordination to a counting process, in which each transition is dominated by the forward waiting time of an ageing continuous time process. (paper)

  19. Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions: Near earth manifestations of the plasma universe

    Faelthammar, C.G.; Brenning, N.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmical plasmas cover a large range of densities and temperatures, but in important respects they can be classified into three main categories: high, medium and low density plasmas. Virtually without exception cosmical plasmas are magnetized. Because of the key role played by the magnetic fields -- and by the electric currents, without which they would not exist -- it is obvious that the ability of the cosmical plasma to carry electric current is a property of crucial importance. Intimately related to this property is the plasma's ability to support magnetic-field aligned electric fields -- for brevity often called ''parallel'' electric fields. Such fields are now believed to play an important role in the auroral process. The evidence includes measurements of naturally occurring fields and particles as well as results of active experiments in the magnetosphere. The dc magnetic-field aligned electric fields are accompanied by a variety of wave fields, which are also important, for example in modifying the distribution function of accelerated particle populations. For a magnetic-field aligned electric field to exist other than as a brief transient, the momentum that such a field continually imparts to the charged particles must be balanced by some other force. In the very nearly collisionless plasmas that occupy most of the universe, this cannot be achieved by collisional friction, and something else is required. A small number of processes responsible for this has been identified. They include anomalous resistivity, magnetic mirror effect, and electric double layers. One of the consequences is possible violation of the frozen field condition, which greatly simplifies the analysis but can be dangerously misleading. Another is the possibility of extremely efficient release of magnetically stored energy

  20. Interactive tele-education applied to a distant clinical microbiology specialization university course.

    Andreazzi, Denise B; Rossi, Flávia; Wen, Chao L

    2011-09-01

    The microbiology laboratory provides a strategic support for infectious disease diagnosis and also alerts the medical community about bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The microbiologists' training is a challenge in Brazil, a country with an extensive territory, a diverse population, and disparity of resource allocation. The aim of this study was to implement an interactive tele-educational course in clinical microbiology to reach distant laboratory workers and to improve their professional skills. The course scientific content was defined according to competences associated, distributed in 560 h, with laboratory practices (knowledge matrix-contextual education). The 11-module course structure comprised 70% distance learning, 22% on campus (integrated modules), and 8% monographs. The group included 7 physicians and 21 microbiologists from 20 different Brazilian cities. The time flexibility and location were the two main reasons for student participation, thus decreasing absences to the workplace, different from the traditional teaching methodologies. The group performance was measured by monthly evaluations, and 1 year postcourse, the researcher visited their workplace. There was significant improvement in microbiological practices performed before compared with after group participation. Therefore, 76.9% of laboratory practices were modified because of the knowledge acquired in the course. Students showed behavioral changes in relation to performance in infection control as well as on the dissemination of their knowledge. This specialization course using distance education did not compromise the quality. This educational methodology represents an alternative to teach clinical microbiology to laboratory workers from remote hospitals, as a nationwide continuing educational strategy.

  1. Fundamental Particles and Interaction, Frontiers in Contemporary Physics: An International Lecture and Workshop Series at Vanderbilt University. Proceedings

    Panvini, R.S.; Weiler, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings are based on papers given in the plenary sessions, lectures, and oral presentations at the Frontiers in Contemporary Physics: Fundamental Particles and Interactions Conference held in May, 1997 at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, USA. The papers included in these proceedings cover wide ranging topics in particle physics, including hadron collider physics, electroweak physics, flavor physics, particle astrophysics, quantum chromodynamics and other particle theories etc. The Conference was widely attended. More than 130 participants took part in it; many came from non-US institutions. The full program of the talks can be found in the FCP97 web page at: http:backslash backslash fcp97.vanderbilt.edu backslash-fcp97. There were 19 papers in the proceedings, out of these, 10 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  2. Interacting with mobile devices by fusion eye and hand gestures recognition systems based on decision tree approach

    Elleuch, Hanene; Wali, Ali; Samet, Anis; Alimi, Adel M.

    2017-03-01

    Two systems of eyes and hand gestures recognition are used to control mobile devices. Based on a real-time video streaming captured from the device's camera, the first system recognizes the motion of user's eyes and the second one detects the static hand gestures. To avoid any confusion between natural and intentional movements we developed a system to fuse the decision coming from eyes and hands gesture recognition systems. The phase of fusion was based on decision tree approach. We conducted a study on 5 volunteers and the results that our system is robust and competitive.

  3. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  4. Game Design Narrative for Learning: Appropriating Adventure Game Design Narrative Devices and Techniques for the Design of Interactive Learning Environments

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual analysis is to investigate how contemporary video and computer games might inform instructional design by looking at how narrative devices and techniques support problem solving within complex, multimodal environments. Specifically, this analysis presents a brief overview of game genres and the role of narrative in…

  5. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy [Department of Anesthesiology Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  6. The generalized second law in irreversible thermodynamics for the interacting dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe enclosed by the apparent horizon

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law in irreversible thermodynamics in a non-flat FRW universe containing the interacting dark energy with cold dark matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon. We show that for the present time, the generalized second law in nonequilibrium thermodynamics is satisfied for the special range of the energy transfer constants.

  7. The generalized second law in irreversible thermodynamics for the interacting dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe enclosed by the apparent horizon

    Karami, K.; Ghaffari, S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law in irreversible thermodynamics in a non-flat FRW universe containing the interacting dark energy with cold dark matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon. We show that for the present time, the generalized second law in nonequilibrium thermodynamics is satisfied for the special range of the energy transfer constants.

  8. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54w

    Lesley J. Morrell; Domino A. Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems (?clickers?) are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students? personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using question...

  9. A Mobile Personal Informatics System with Interactive Visualizations of Mobility and Social Interactions

    Cuttone, Andrea; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2013-01-01

    We describe a personal informatics system for Android smartphones that provides personal data on mobility and social interactions through interactive visualization interfaces. The mobile app has been made available to N=136 first year university students as part of a study of social network...... interactions in a university campus setting. The design of the interactive visualization interfaces enabling the participants to gain insights into own behaviors is described. We report initial findings based on device logging of participant interactions with the interactive visualization app on the smartphone...

  10. A study of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on tunneling magnetoresistance of a nano-scale device

    Modarresi, M.; Roknabadi, M.R.; Shahtahmasbi, N.; Vahedi Fakhrabad, D.; Arabshahi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we have studied the effect of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on current-voltage characteristic and tunneling magnetoresistance of a polythiophene molecule that is sandwiched between two cobalt electrodes using modified Green's function method as proposed by Walczak. The molecule is described with a modified Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian. The ground state of the molecule is obtained by Hellman-Feynman theorem. Electrodes are described in the wide-band approximation and spin-flip is neglected during conduction. Our calculation results show that with increase in voltage the currents increase and tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. Change in tunneling magnetoresistance due to inelastic interactions is limited in a small bias voltage interval and can be neglected in the other bias voltages. -- Research Highlights: →We investigate the effect of inelastic interaction on transport properties. →Due to inelastic interactions tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. →Decrease in TMR is restricted in a small voltage interval.

  11. Oligo- and polymeric FET devices: Thiophene-based active materials and their interaction with different gate dielectrics

    Porzio, W.; Destri, S.; Pasini, M.; Bolognesi, A.; Angiulli, A.; Di Gianvincenzo, P.; Natali, D.; Sampietro, M.; Caironi, M.; Fumagalli, L.; Ferrari, S.; Peron, E.; Perissinotti, F.

    2006-01-01

    Derivatives of both oligo- and polythiophene-based FET were recently considered for low cost electronic applications. In the device optimization, factors like redox reversibility of the molecule/polymer, electronic level compatibility with source/drain electrodes, packing closeness, and orientation versus the electrodes, can determine the overall performance. In addition, a gate insulator with a high dielectric constant, a low leakage current, and capability to promote ordering in the semiconductor is required to increase device performances and to lower the FET operating voltage. In this view, Al 2 O 3 appears a good candidate, although its widespread adoption is limited by the disorder that such oxide induces on the semiconductor with detrimental consequences on semiconductor electrical properties. In this contribution, an overview of recent results obtained on thiophene-derivative-based FET devices, fabricated by different growth techniques, and using both thermally grown SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 from atomic layer deposition gate insulators will be reported and discussed with particular reference to organic solid state aggregation, morphology, and organic-inorganic interface

  12. WWC Review of the Report "Interactive Online Learning on Campus: Testing MOOCs and Other Platforms in Hybrid Formats in the University System of Maryland." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the 2014 study, "Interactive Online Learning on Campus: Testing MOOCs and Other Platforms in Hybrid Formats in the University System of Maryland," researchers examined the impact of using hybrid forms of interactive online learning in seven undergraduate courses across seven universities in Maryland. Hybrid forms of interactive online…

  13. Proceedings of US/Japan Workshop (97FT5-06) on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Nygren, Richard; Kureczko, Diana

    1998-10-01

    The 1997 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices was held at the Warwick Regis Hotel in San Francisco, California, on December 8-11, 1997. There were 53 presentations as well as discussions on technical issues and on planning for future collaborations, and 35 researchers from japan and the US participated in the workshop. Over the last few years, with the strong emphasis in the US on technology for ITER, there has been less work done in the US fusion program on basic plasma materials interaction and this change in emphasis workshops. The program this year emphasized activities that were not carried out under the ITER program and a new element this year in the US program was planning and some analysis on liquid surface concepts for advanced plasma facing components. The program included a ceremony to honor Professor Yamashina, who was retiring this year and a special presentation on his career

  14. Using the Web as Input and Discourse Interactions for the Construction of Meaning and the Acquisition of Lexical Units in University Level English as a Foreign Language

    Mora Piedra, Marco Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to examine the impact of Web multimodality plus dialogical interactions in the acquisition and retention of novel lexical items among EFL students under a social constructionist framework. The lexical acquisition of 107 1st-year English majors at the University of Costa Rica was analyzed through…

  15. Seeking Common Ground: First-Year U.S. University Students' Experiences with Intercultural Interaction and Friendship in an On-Campus Residential Community

    Gaston, Michelle Elise

    2017-01-01

    The number of international students on U.S. campuses has increased more than 84 percent over the past decade (IIE, 2016). Although it has been well-established that interaction and friendship with local students is a key element for international student adjustment to a foreign university, few studies have grappled with how these intercultural…

  16. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated from patients exposed to invasive devices in a university hospital in Argentina: molecular typing, susceptibility and detection of potential virulence factors.

    Alcaraz, Eliana; Garcia, Carlos; Papalia, Mariana; Vay, Carlos; Friedman, Laura; Passerini de Rossi, Beatriz

    2018-05-25

    The aim of this work was to investigate the presence of selected potential virulence factors, susceptibility and clonal relatedness among 63 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates recovered from patients exposed to invasive devices in a university hospital in Argentina between January 2004 and August 2012. Genetic relatedness was assessed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates were characterized by antimicrobial resistance, the presence and/or expression of potential virulence determinants, and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model.Results/Key findings. ERIC-PCR generated 52 fingerprints, and PFGE added another pattern. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (6.35 %), levofloxacin (9.52 %) and ciprofloxacin (23.80 %) was detected. All isolates were susceptible to minocycline. All isolates were lipase, protease and siderophore producers, while all but Sm61 formed biofilms. However, 11/63 isolates did not amplify the major extracellular protease-coding gene (stmPr1). Sm61 is an stmPr1-negative isolate, and showed (as did Sm13 and the reference strain K279a) strong proteolysis and siderophore production, and high resistance to hydrogen peroxide. The three isolates were virulent in the G. mellonella model, while Sm10, a low-resistance hydrogen peroxide stmPr1-negative isolate, and weak proteolysis and siderophore producer, was not virulent. This is the first epidemiological study of the clonal relatedness of S. maltophilia clinical isolates in Argentina. Great genomic diversity was observed, and only two small clusters of related S. maltophilia types were found. Minocycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were the most active agents. S. maltophilia virulence in the G. mellonella model is multifactorial, and further studies are needed to elucidate the role of each potential virulence factor.

  17. Design and implementation of I2Vote--an interactive image-based voting system using windows mobile devices.

    van Ooijen, P M A; Broekema, A; Oudkerk, M

    2011-08-01

    To develop, implement and test a novel audience response system (ARS) that allows image based interaction for radiology education. The ARS developed in this project is based on standard Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) (HP iPAQ 114 classic handheld) running Microsoft® Windows Mobile® 6 Classic with a large 3.5 in. TFT touch screen (320×240 pixel resolution), high luminance and integrated IEEE 802.11b/g wireless. For software development Visual Studio 2008 professional (Microsoft) was used and all components were written in C#. Two test sessions were conducted to test the software technically followed by two real classroom tests in a radiology class for medical students on thoracic radiology. The novel ARS, called I2Vote, was successfully implemented and provided an easy to use, stable setup. The acceptance of both students and teachers was very high and the interaction with the students improved because of the anonymous interaction possibility. An easy to use handheld based ARS that enables interactive, image-based, teaching is achieved. The system effectively adds an extra dimension to the use of an ARS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and implementation of I2Vote-An interactive image-based voting system using windows mobile devices

    van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Broekema, A.; Oudkerk, M.

    Purpose: To develop, implement and test a novel audience response system (ARS) that allows image based interaction for radiology education. Methods: The ARS developed in this project is based on standard Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) (HP iPAQ 114 classic handheld) running Microsoft (R) Windows

  19. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD

    Jolanta Karpowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W or general public (GP members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons. Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs, by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users. Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated. Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment.

  20. Active particle control experiments and critical particle flux discriminating between the wall pumping and fuelling in the compact plasma wall interaction device CPD spherical tokamak

    Zushi, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Higashizono, Y.; Hanada, K.; Yoshida, N.; Tokunaga, K.; Kawasaki, S.; Sato, K. N.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Bhattacharyay, R.; Okamoto, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Honma, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Nishino, N.; Kado, S.; Shikama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Two approaches associated with wall recycling have been performed in a small spherical tokamak device CPD (compact plasma wall interaction experimental device), that is, (1) demonstration of active particle recycling control, namely, 'active wall pumping' using a rotating poloidal limiter whose surface is continuously gettered by lithium and (2) a basic study of the key parameters which discriminates between 'wall pumping and fuelling'. For the former, active control of 'wall pumping' has been demonstrated during 50 kW RF current drive discharges whose pulse length is typically ∼300 ms. Although the rotating limiter is located at the outer board, as soon as the rotating drum is gettered with lithium, hydrogen recycling measured with H α spectroscopy decreases by about a factor of 3 not only near the limiter but also in the centre stack region. Also, the oxygen impurity level measured with O II spectroscopy is reduced by about a factor of 3. As a consequence of the reduced recycling and impurity level, RF driven current has nearly doubled at the same vertical magnetic field. For the latter, global plasma wall interaction with plasma facing components in the vessel is studied in a simple torus produced by electron cyclotron waves with I p -4 to ∼0.1 x 10 -4 Torr during the experimental campaign (∼3000 shots). In the wall pumping pressure range the wall pumping fraction is reduced with increasing surface temperature up to 150 deg. C.

  1. The CHANGE program: comparing an interactive vs. prescriptive approach to self-management among university students with obesity.

    Pearson, Erin S; Irwin, Jennifer D; Morrow, Don; Battram, Danielle S; Melling, C W James

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of 2 self-management (SM) approaches on obesity via a 12-week telephone-based intervention. An interactive motivational interviewing administered via Co-Active Life Coaching (MI-via-CALC) and a structured lifestyle treatment following the LEARN Program for Weight Management were compared. A secondary purpose was to explore the experiences of participants qualitatively. University students 18-24 years of age with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (n = 45) were randomized to either the: 1) MI-via-CALC condition that involved working with a certified Co-Active coach to achieve personal goals through dialogue, or 2) LEARN Program that entailed learning from a trained specialist who provided scripted, education-based lessons pertaining to lifestyle, exercise, attitudes, relationships and nutrition. Food consumption patterns, anthropometric and lipid profiles were examined at baseline, mid- and immediately posttreatment, and 3 and 6 months after the program. A semistructured questionnaire was completed at all follow-ups. Analyses revealed a significant time effect for weight (p = 0.01) with the LEARN group decreasing more (M = -7.76 lb) than the MI-VIA-CALC group (M = -2.5 lb) between baseline and week 12. MI-via-CALC participants decreased caloric intake more (M = -662.76) than LEARN participants (M = -105.5) during this same period. The MI-via-CALC group focused on self-understanding, and self-responsibility as primary outcomes of their experience; the LEARN group stressed their appreciation of practical knowledge gained. Both conditions seem similarly effective and are warranted as SM treatments. The best fit and unique contributions of each approach should be considered when working with this population. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. INTERACT

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  3. Exercise physiology with a left ventricular assist device: Analysis of heart-pump interaction with a computational simulator.

    Fresiello, Libera; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Meyns, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Patients with a Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) are hemodynamically stable but show an impaired exercise capacity. Aim of this work is to identify and to describe the limiting factors of exercise physiology with a VAD. We searched for data concerning exercise in heart failure condition and after VAD implantation from the literature. Data were analyzed by using a cardiorespiratory simulator that worked as a collector of inputs coming from different papers. As a preliminary step the simulator was used to reproduce the evolution of hemodynamics from rest to peak exercise (ergometer cycling) in heart failure condition. Results evidence an increase of cardiac output of +2.8 l/min and a heart rate increase to 67% of the expected value. Then, we simulated the effect of a continuous-flow VAD at both rest and exercise. Total cardiac output increases of +3.0 l/min (+0.9 l/min due to the VAD and +2.1 l/min to the native ventricle). Since the left ventricle works in a non-linear portion of the diastolic stiffness line, we observed a consistent increase of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (from 14 to 20 mmHg) for a relatively small increase of end-diastolic volume (from 182 to 189 cm3). We finally increased VAD speed during exercise to the maximum possible value and we observed a reduction of wedge pressure (-4.5 mmHg), a slight improvement of cardiac output (8.0 l/min) and a complete unloading of the native ventricle. The VAD can assure a proper hemodynamics at rest, but provides an insufficient unloading of the left ventricle and does not prevent wedge pressure from rising during exercise. Neither the VAD provides major benefits during exercise in terms of total cardiac output, which increases to a similar extend to an unassisted heart failure condition. VAD speed modulation can contribute to better unload the ventricle but the maximal flow reachable with the current devices is below the cardiac output observed in a healthy heart.

  4. E-Learning Interactions, Information Technology Self Efficacy and Student Achievement at the University of Sharjah, UAE

    Abulibdeh, Enas Said; Hassan, Sharifah Sariah Syed

    2011-01-01

    The purpose for this study is to validate a model of student interactions (student-content, student-instructor and student-student interactions and vicarious interaction), information technology self efficacy and student achievement. Investigation of the relationships was undertaken with structural equation modeling analyses, in a study with 250…

  5. Theoretical aspects of the electronical devices operating due to interaction between annular electron beams and the azimuthal surface waves

    Girka, V O; Girka, I O [Kharkiv State Univ. (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The physical basis is discussed of electronic devices whose operation is based on the beam or dissipative instability of the azimuthal surface waves (ASW). The ASW are electromagnetic surface waves with extraordinary polarization (with field components E{sub r}, E{sub {phi}}, H{sub z}), propagating across the axial external steady magnetic field in the cylindrical metal waveguide with cold plasma filling. The ASW fields are described by Maxwell equations. To solve the problem, the authors used the Fourier method and numerical simulation of the equations obtained. The ASW excitation was examined under conditions of beam and dissipative instabilities due to the electron beam motion. The correction to ASW eigenfrequencies caused by the waveguide chamber noncircularity was also studied. ASW delaying leads to a negative frequency correction. The ASW energy can be emitted from the narrow slot in the metallic chamber of the waveguide. The optimum wavenumber range was found where the increment values are much greater than those of the ASW decrement caused by their energy radiation. (author). 2 figs., 3 refs.

  6. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Laguardia, L., E-mail: laguardia@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Caniello, R.; Cremona, A. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Dell’Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In this work results of the first D{sub 2}/N{sub 2} experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (n{sub e} 5 ⋅ 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3–5 ⋅ 10{sup 20} m{sup −2}s{sup −1}) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ⋅ 10{sup 23} m{sup −2}. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of W{sub x}N{sub y} layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1–10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  7. Distance and Campus Universities: Tensions and Interactions. A Comparative Study of Five Countries. Issues in Higher Education Series.

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

    This book compares the emergence and development of autonomous, fully fledged distance teaching universities in the higher education systems of the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, Canada, and Israel. It examines the evolution and functional roles of these universities and outlines their commonalties and divergences. Main lessons are synthesized…

  8. Interaction of Gravitational field and Brans-Dicke field in R/W universe containing Dark Energy like fluid

    Singh, Kangujam Priyokumar; Dewri, Mukunda; Singh, Koijam Manihar

    2016-01-01

    On studying some new models of Robertson-Walker universes with a Brans-Dicke scalar field, it is found that most of these universes contain a dark energy like fluid which confirms the present scenario of the expansion of the universe. In one of the cases, the exact solution of the field equations gives a universe with a false vacuum, while in another it reduces to that of dust distribution in the Brans-Dicke cosmology when the cosmological constant is not in the picture. In one particular model it is found that the universe may undergo a Big Rip in the future, and thus it will be very interesting to investigate such models further. (paper)

  9. Communication 2.0, visibility and interactivity: fundaments of corporate image of Public Universities in Madrid on YouTube

    Carlos OLIVA MARAÑÓN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, marketing in Higher Education has been growing interest not only for its economic and commercial value but for its strategic and promotion, training and strengthening the brand communication "University". The platform YouTube has positioned itself as an audiovisual medium of reference in which the user decides what content you want to see, where and when. The objectives of this research are to analyze the audiovisual institutional advertising of the Public Universities of Madrid and verify the adequacy of YouTube as a communication from these Universities. Degrees adapted to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA and modern installations make up the identity of these Universities. The results confirm the consolidation of YouTube as a channel for transmitting audiovisual corporate messages of these Universities to their target audience.

  10. Voltage-controlled low-energy switching of nanomagnets through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions for magnetoelectric device applications

    Ghosh, Bahniman, E-mail: bghosh@utexas.edu; Dey, Rik; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 160, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    In this article, we consider through simulation low-energy switching of nanomagnets via electrostatically gated inter-magnet Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interactions on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators, for possible memory and nonvolatile logic applications. We model the possibility and dynamics of RKKY-based switching of one nanomagnet by coupling to one or more nanomagnets of set orientation. Potential applications to both memory and nonvolatile logic are illustrated. Sub-attojoule switching energies, far below conventional spin transfer torque (STT)-based memories and even below CMOS logic appear possible. Switching times on the order of a few nanoseconds, comparable to times for STT switching, are estimated for ferromagnetic nanomagnets, but the approach also appears compatible with the use of antiferromagnets which may allow for faster switching.

  11. Voltage-controlled low-energy switching of nanomagnets through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions for magnetoelectric device applications

    Ghosh, Bahniman; Dey, Rik; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider through simulation low-energy switching of nanomagnets via electrostatically gated inter-magnet Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interactions on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators, for possible memory and nonvolatile logic applications. We model the possibility and dynamics of RKKY-based switching of one nanomagnet by coupling to one or more nanomagnets of set orientation. Potential applications to both memory and nonvolatile logic are illustrated. Sub-attojoule switching energies, far below conventional spin transfer torque (STT)-based memories and even below CMOS logic appear possible. Switching times on the order of a few nanoseconds, comparable to times for STT switching, are estimated for ferromagnetic nanomagnets, but the approach also appears compatible with the use of antiferromagnets which may allow for faster switching.

  12. A Universal Standard for the Validation of Blood Pressure Measuring Devices: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation/European Society of Hypertension/International Organization for Standardization (AAMI/ESH/ISO) Collaboration Statement.

    Stergiou, George S; Alpert, Bruce; Mieke, Stephan; Asmar, Roland; Atkins, Neil; Eckert, Siegfried; Frick, Gerhard; Friedman, Bruce; Graßl, Thomas; Ichikawa, Tsutomu; Ioannidis, John P; Lacy, Peter; McManus, Richard; Murray, Alan; Myers, Martin; Palatini, Paolo; Parati, Gianfranco; Quinn, David; Sarkis, Josh; Shennan, Andrew; Usuda, Takashi; Wang, Jiguang; Wu, Colin O; O'Brien, Eoin

    2018-03-01

    In the past 30 years, several organizations, such as the US Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), the British Hypertension Society, the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) Working Group on Blood Pressure (BP) Monitoring, and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), have developed protocols for clinical validation of BP measuring devices. However, it is recognized that science, as well as patients, consumers, and manufacturers, would be best served if all BP measuring devices were assessed for accuracy according to an agreed single validation protocol that had global acceptance. Therefore, an international initiative was taken by the AAMI, ESH, and ISO experts who agreed to develop a universal standard for device validation. This statement presents the key aspects of a validation procedure, which were agreed by the AAMI, ESH, and ISO representatives as the basis for a single universal validation protocol. As soon as the AAMI/ESH/ISO standard is fully developed, this will be regarded as the single universal standard and will replace all other previous standards/protocols. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc., and Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

  13. Development of a novel device to trap heavy metal cations: application of the specific interaction between heavy metal cation and mismatch DNA base pair.

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Fukushi, Miyako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    We have already found that Hg(II) cation specifically binds to T:T mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving T:T mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. We have also found that Ag(I) cation specifically binds to C:C mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving C:C mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. Using the specific interaction, we developed a novel device to trap each of Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation. The device is composed of 5'-biotinylated T-rich or C-rich DNA oligonucleotides, BIO-T20: 5'-Bio-T(20)-3' or BIO-C20: 5'-Bio-C(20)-3' (Bio is a biotin), immobilized on streptavidin-coated polystylene beads. When the BIO-T20-immobilized beads were added to a solution containing Hg(II) cation, and the beads trapping Hg(II) cation were collected by centrifugation, almost all of Hg(II) cation were removed from the solution. Also, when the BIO-C20-immobilized beads were added to a solution containing Ag(I) cation, and the beads trapping Ag(I) cation were collected by centrifugation, almost all of Ag(I) cation were removed from the solution. We conclude that, using the novel device developed in this study, Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation can be effectively removed from the solution.

  14. A comparative study: use of a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device by people with cerebral palsy in interaction with computers.

    Heidrich, Regina O; Jensen, Emely; Rebelo, Francisco; Oliveira, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study among people with cerebral palsy and healthy controls, of various ages, using a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device. The research is qualitative in its approach. Researchers worked with Observational Case Studies. People with cerebral palsy and healthy controls were evaluated in Portugal and in Brazil. The study aimed to develop a study for product evaluation in order to perceive whether people with cerebral palsy could interact with the computer and compare whether their performance is similar to that of healthy controls when using the Brain-computer Interface. Ultimately, it was found that there are no significant differences between people with cerebral palsy in the two countries, as well as between populations without cerebral palsy (healthy controls).

  15. Emory University: MEDICI (Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions) for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has developed a computational methodology to combine high-throughput knockdown data with known protein network topologies to infer the importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for the survival of cancer cells.  Applying these data to the Achilles shRNA results, the CCLE cell line characterizations, and known and newly identified PPIs provides novel insights for potential new drug targets for cancer therapies and identifies important PPI hubs.

  16. Communication 2.0, visibility and interactivity: fundaments of corporate image of Public Universities in Madrid on YouTube

    Carlos OLIVA MARAÑÓN

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marketing in Higher Education has been growing interest not only for its economic and commercial value but for its strategic and promotion, training and strengthening the brand communication "University". The platform YouTube has positioned itself as an audiovisual medium of reference in which the user decides what content you want to see, where and when. The objectives of this research are to analyze the audiovisual institutional advertising of the Public Universities of Mad...

  17. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  18. Providers with Limited Experience Perform Better in Advanced Life Support with Assistance Using an Interactive Device with an Automated External Defibrillator Linked to a Ventilator.

    Busch, Christian Werner; Qalanawi, Mohammed; Kersten, Jan Felix; Kalwa, Tobias Johannes; Scotti, Norman Alexander; Reip, Wikhart; Doehn, Christoph; Maisch, Stefan; Nitzschke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Medical teams with limited experience in performing advanced life support (ALS) or with a low frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while on duty, often have difficulty complying with CPR guidelines. This study evaluated whether the quality of CPR of trained medical students, who served as an example of teams with limited experience in ALS, could be improved with device assistance. The primary outcome was the hands-off time (i.e., the percentage of the entire CPR time without chest compressions). The secondary outcome was seven time intervals, which should be as short as possible, and the quality of ventilations and chest compressions on the mannequin. We compared standard CPR equipment to an interactive device with visual and acoustic instructions for ALS workflow measures to guide briefly trained medical students through the ALS algorithm in a full-scale mannequin simulation study with a randomized crossover study design. The study equipment consisted of an automatic external defibrillator and ventilator that were electronically linked and communicating as a single system. Included were regular medical students in the third to sixth years of medical school of one class who provided written informed consent for voluntary participation and for the analysis of their CPR performance data. No exclusion criteria were applied. For statistical measures of evaluation we used an analysis of variance for crossover trials accounting for treatment effect, sequence effect, and carry-over effect, with adjustment for prior practical experience of the participants. Forty-two medical students participated in 21 CPR sessions, each using the standard and study equipment. Regarding the primary end point, the study equipment reduced the hands-off time from 40.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.9-43.4%) to 35.6% (95% CI 32.4-38.9%, p = 0.031) compared with the standard equipment. Within the prespecified secondary end points, study equipment reduced the time interval until

  19. A Correlational Study on Interactive Technology Use and Student Persistence in eLearning Classes at an Online University

    Edwards, Carol T.

    2017-01-01

    The increase in enrollments in online courses in higher education have led to a corresponding decrease in student persistence. Educators in an effort to increase student persistence have included interactive technologies in some of their courses. However, there was no empirical evidence on whether the use of interactive technology in on online…

  20. Investigation of plasma interaction with carbon based and mixed materials related to next-generation fusion devices

    Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Korshunov, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites, tungsten and beryllium are considered at present as candidate-materials for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The presence of various materials, as the divertor and the first wall components, will unavoidably result in the formation of mixed layers on the surfaces of plasma facing components. In this review, processes of plasma interaction with these materials and layers formed by mixing of the materials are considered. Mixed W-Be and W-C layers were prepared by deposition of two species atoms upon a substrate under simultaneous sputtering of two targets by 20 keV Ar + -ions. The thickness of the deposited mixed layers was 100-500 nm. The most important processes investigated here are: a) erosion at threshold energies and at various temperatures, b) erosion at plasma disruption, c) surface modification at normal operation regime and disruption, d) the influence of the surface modification on material erosion, e) erosion product formation at plasma disruption (dust creation), f) hydrogen isotopes retention in materials. An experimental method of determination of sputtering yield under ion bombardment in the near-threshold energy range has been developed. The method is based on the use of special regimes of field ion microscopic analysis. The method has been used for measurement of the sputtering yield of C-C composite, technically pure tungsten, tungsten oxide and mixed W-C layer on the tungsten by deuterium ions. The energy dependences of the sputtering yield of those materials by deuterium ions at energies ranging from 10 to 500 eV was investigated. Temperature dependences of pure and B-doped C-C composites erosion by deuterium ions were investigated. Material erosion was studied in a steady state plasma at the LENTA facility with parameters close to those expected at normal operation of ITER, and in the MKT plasma accelerator simulating plasma disruption. Surface modifications of graphite materials and tungsten

  1. The Effectiveness of Interacting with Scientific Animations in Chemistry Using Mobile Devices on Grade 12 Students' Spatial Ability and Scientific Reasoning Skills

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Musawi, Ali S.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah K.; Al-Hajri, Fatemah H.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effectiveness of interacting with animations using mobile devices on grade 12 students' spatial and reasoning abilities. The study took place in a grade 12 context in Oman. A quasi-experimental design was used with an experimental group of 32 students and a control group of 28 students. The experimental group studied chemistry using mobile tablets that had a digital instructional package with different animation and simulations. There was one tablet per student. A spatial ability test and a scientific reasoning test were administered to both groups prior and after the study, which lasted for 9 weeks. The findings showed that there were significant statistical differences between the two groups in terms of spatial ability in favour of the experimental group. However, there were no differences between the two groups in terms of reasoning ability. The authors reasoned that the types of animations and simulations used in the current study featured a wide range of three-dimensional animated illustrations at the particulate level of matter. Most probably, this decreased the level of abstractness that usually accompanies chemical entities and phenomena and helped the students to visualize the interactions between submicroscopic entities spatially. Further research is needed to decide on types of scientific animations that could help students improve their scientific reasoning.

  2. Association of medical students' reports of interactions with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and medical school policies and characteristics: a cross-sectional study.

    Yeh, James S; Austad, Kirsten E; Franklin, Jessica M; Chimonas, Susan; Campbell, Eric G; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-10-01

    Professional societies use metrics to evaluate medical schools' policies regarding interactions of students and faculty with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. We compared these metrics and determined which US medical schools' industry interaction policies were associated with student behaviors. Using survey responses from a national sample of 1,610 US medical students, we compared their reported industry interactions with their schools' American Medical Student Association (AMSA) PharmFree Scorecard and average Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP) Conflicts of Interest Policy Database score. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to determine the association between policies and students' gift acceptance, interactions with marketing representatives, and perceived adequacy of faculty-industry separation. We adjusted for year in training, medical school size, and level of US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. We used LASSO regression models to identify specific policies associated with the outcomes. We found that IMAP and AMSA scores had similar median values (1.75 [interquartile range 1.50-2.00] versus 1.77 [1.50-2.18], adjusted to compare scores on the same scale). Scores on AMSA and IMAP shared policy dimensions were not closely correlated (gift policies, r = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.44; marketing representative access policies, r = 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.63). Students from schools with the most stringent industry interaction policies were less likely to report receiving gifts (AMSA score, odds ratio [OR]: 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.72; IMAP score, OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.19-1.04) and less likely to interact with marketing representatives (AMSA score, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.69; IMAP score, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-0.95) than students from schools with the lowest ranked policy scores. The association became nonsignificant when fully adjusted for NIH funding level, whereas adjusting for year of education, size of school, and publicly versus

  3. Association of medical students' reports of interactions with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and medical school policies and characteristics: a cross-sectional study.

    James S Yeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Professional societies use metrics to evaluate medical schools' policies regarding interactions of students and faculty with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. We compared these metrics and determined which US medical schools' industry interaction policies were associated with student behaviors.Using survey responses from a national sample of 1,610 US medical students, we compared their reported industry interactions with their schools' American Medical Student Association (AMSA PharmFree Scorecard and average Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP Conflicts of Interest Policy Database score. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to determine the association between policies and students' gift acceptance, interactions with marketing representatives, and perceived adequacy of faculty-industry separation. We adjusted for year in training, medical school size, and level of US National Institutes of Health (NIH funding. We used LASSO regression models to identify specific policies associated with the outcomes. We found that IMAP and AMSA scores had similar median values (1.75 [interquartile range 1.50-2.00] versus 1.77 [1.50-2.18], adjusted to compare scores on the same scale. Scores on AMSA and IMAP shared policy dimensions were not closely correlated (gift policies, r = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.44; marketing representative access policies, r = 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.63. Students from schools with the most stringent industry interaction policies were less likely to report receiving gifts (AMSA score, odds ratio [OR]: 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.72; IMAP score, OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.19-1.04 and less likely to interact with marketing representatives (AMSA score, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.69; IMAP score, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-0.95 than students from schools with the lowest ranked policy scores. The association became nonsignificant when fully adjusted for NIH funding level, whereas adjusting for year of education, size of school, and publicly

  4. An Impact Analysis of Regional Industry--University Interactions: The Case of Industrial PhD Schools

    Gustavsson, Linda; Nuur, Cali; Söderlind, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss Triple Helix collaborations in the context of regional competitiveness. Through an exploratory case study, they identify and analyse the impact of the establishment of industrial PhD schools for participating industry and universities. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2014 and focuses on three industry--university…

  5. An Impact Analysis of Regional Industry-University Interactions: The Case of Industrial PhD Schools

    Gustavsson, Linda; Nuur, Cali; Söderlind, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss Triple Helix collaborations in the context of regional competitiveness. Through an exploratory case study, they identify and analyse the impact of the establishment of industrial PhD schools for participating industry and universities. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2014 and focuses on three industry-university…

  6. Differences in Chemical Engineering Student-Faculty Interactions by Student Age and Experience at a Large, Public, Research University

    Ciston, Shannon; Sehgal, Sanya; Mikel, Tressa; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students aged 25+ in engineering disciplines are an important demographic bringing a wealth of life experience to the classroom. This study uses qualitative data drawn from semi-structured interviews with two groups of undergraduate chemical engineering students at a large, public research university: adult students with…

  7. Error Management Practices Interacting with National and Organizational Culture: The Case of Two State University Departments in Turkey

    Göktürk, Söheyda; Bozoglu, Oguzhan; Günçavdi, Gizem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Elements of national and organizational cultures can contribute much to the success of error management in organizations. Accordingly, this study aims to consider how errors were approached in two state university departments in Turkey in relation to their specific organizational and national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  8. Technology's Latest Wave: Colleges and Universities Are Increasingly Exploring the Academic Use of Digital Mobile Devices-But Lack of Money Sometimes Stands in the Way

    Galuszka, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Using mobile digital devices--iPods, personal digital assistants (PDAs), Tablet PCs or advanced cell phones--is becoming a big campus trend. Their advantages include convenience and the ability to hear lectures or course-related music just about anywhere. PDA's such as Palm Pilots and BlackBerrys, iPods such as Apple's and Tablet PCs, including…

  9. Kinematic reconstruction of tau leptons and test for lepton universality in charged weak interactions with the CMS experiment

    Sauerland, Philip

    2011-04-15

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM) postulates the universal coupling of the three lepton families to the weak current. The most precise measurement of lepton universality in W decays comes from the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). If one compares the couplings of muons and tau leptons to the charged weak current, there is a discrepancy of nearly three standard deviations w.r.t. the SM expectation. There are models beyond the SM, which could explain the violation of lepton universality with new physics processes, if it is more than a statistical fluctuation. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers a great opportunity to study decays of the charged-weak gauge bosons at very high event rates and at unmatched collision energies. This thesis presents an analysis strategy to test lepton universality with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the LHC. The analysis focusses on the decays of the W{sup {+-}} boson to particles of the second and third lepton family. For this purpose detector-simulated proton-proton events are used. The identification and reconstruction of tau leptons is a difficult task at the LHC. The reconstruction is often restricted by the limited precision of the commonly used collinear approximation. The application of a kinematic fit to particular tau-decay modes can improve the experimental resolution and provides an efficient background suppression. The development of such a fit with kinematic constraints derived from the topology of the decay {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{sup {+-}} + {nu}{sub {tau}} is described. The kinematic fit of tau leptons is not limited to the test for lepton universality, but can be deployed by various physics analyses in a broad energy range of the tau leptons. The event topology of W{sup {+-}} decays with leptonic final states is studied. Two event selections are developed: one for the W{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{nu} and one for the W{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{nu} decay. A common online

  10. Kinematic reconstruction of tau leptons and test for lepton universality in charged weak interactions with the CMS experiment

    Sauerland, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM) postulates the universal coupling of the three lepton families to the weak current. The most precise measurement of lepton universality in W decays comes from the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). If one compares the couplings of muons and tau leptons to the charged weak current, there is a discrepancy of nearly three standard deviations w.r.t. the SM expectation. There are models beyond the SM, which could explain the violation of lepton universality with new physics processes, if it is more than a statistical fluctuation. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers a great opportunity to study decays of the charged-weak gauge bosons at very high event rates and at unmatched collision energies. This thesis presents an analysis strategy to test lepton universality with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the LHC. The analysis focusses on the decays of the W ± boson to particles of the second and third lepton family. For this purpose detector-simulated proton-proton events are used. The identification and reconstruction of tau leptons is a difficult task at the LHC. The reconstruction is often restricted by the limited precision of the commonly used collinear approximation. The application of a kinematic fit to particular tau-decay modes can improve the experimental resolution and provides an efficient background suppression. The development of such a fit with kinematic constraints derived from the topology of the decay τ → 3π ± + ν τ is described. The kinematic fit of tau leptons is not limited to the test for lepton universality, but can be deployed by various physics analyses in a broad energy range of the tau leptons. The event topology of W ± decays with leptonic final states is studied. Two event selections are developed: one for the W ± → τν and one for the W ± → μν decay. A common online selection is proposed, which is independent of the leptonic final state of

  11. Interactions Among Indicators of B1, B2, B6 and Vitamin C Status in University Students

    Avila, AV; Liuzzi, JP; Cioccia, AM; Hevia, P

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY: In 209 young university students (109 males and 80 females) with body mass index within the normal range, the activation coefficient of the erythrocyte transketolase (ETKAC) glutathione reductase (EGRAC) and aspartate amino transferase (EASTAC) as well as the circulating levels of vitamin C were determined. Using the usual cutoff points for ETKAC and serum vitamin C and higher than usual cutoff points for EASTAC and EGRAC 99, 95, 92, and 87% of the study subjects exhibited activation...

  12. Potential drug–drug interactions in pediatric wards of Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A cross sectional study

    Henok Getachew

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The study showed that most of the interactions had moderate severity followed by minor severity. Age and polypharmacy were found to show statistically significant association with the occurrence of PDDIs. Due to sensitive nature of pediatrics population, close monitoring is recommended for the detection and management of PDDIs to prevent its negative consequences.

  13. Language-Building Activities and Interaction Variations with Mixed-Ability ESL University Learners in a Content-Based Course

    Serna Dimas, Héctor Manuel; Ruíz Castellanos, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of both language-building activities and a variety of teacher/student interaction patterns increase both oral language participation and content learning in a course of manual therapy with mixed-language ability students. In this article, the researchers describe their collaboration in a content-based course in English with English…

  14. (Mis)Use of Email in Student-Faculty Interaction: Implications for University Instruction in Germany, Saudi Arabia, and Japan

    Danielewicz-Betz, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines student-faculty communication by email and the lack of clear guidelines that leads to misuse of email in student-faculty interaction, whereby status-incongruent pragmatic markers are employed, resulting in impoliteness and inappropriateness. The main objective is to bridge the gap in research on other than requestive speech…

  15. Chemical-Gene Interactions from ToxCast Bioactivity Data Expands Universe of Literature Network-Based Associations (SOT)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in the literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets....

  16. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  17. Improvement of Professional Training of Maritime Fleet Specialists: Experience of Interactive Technologies Introduction in the Danube Institute of National University «Odessa Maritime Academy»

    Olga Demchenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the coverage of the most effective methods and technologies on improving communicative skills during the professional training of maritime fleet specialists. A complex study of skills formation process for communication in a foreign language in the Danube Institute of National University «Odessa Maritime Academy» has identified its the most problematic areas. In the result of using interactive technologies («brainstorming», project techniques, etc. was established positive dynamics in formation of skills of professional communication.

  18. Anisotropic universal conductance fluctuations in disordered quantum wires with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction and an applied in-plane magnetic field

    Scheid, Matthias; Adagideli, İnanç; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of narrow quantum wires realized in disordered two-dimensional electron gases in the presence of k-linear Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction, and an applied in-plane magnetic field. Building on previous work (Scheid et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 266401), we find that in addition to the conductance, the universal conductance fluctuations also feature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction. This anisotropy can be explained solely from the symmetries exhibited by the Hamiltonian as well as the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction and thus can be utilized to detect this ratio from purely electrical measurements

  19. Giessen international workshop on interactions of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic diseases. Castle of Rauischholzhausen of the Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany. March 18-19, 2005.

    Andren-Sandberg, Ake; Hardt, Philip D

    2005-07-08

    The 'Giessen International Workshop on Interactions of Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Diseases' was held on March 18-19, 2005 at the Castle of Rauischolzhausen, Giessen University, Germany. About 50 international clinicians and researchers attended the workshop. It was structured into three sessions: A: Pancreatic Autoimmunity - Interaction Between Exocrine and Endocrine Tissue; B: Diabetes Mellitus - Possible Implications of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency; C: Chronic Pancreatitis - Update on Prevalence, Understanding and Pathophysiological Concepts. Several new aspects of pancreatic diseases were discussed, including new classifications of pancreatitis, new insights into prevalence, pathophysiology and new therapeutical considerations. The meeting resulted in more cooperation and a number of new concepts for clinical study which will provide data for future developments.

  20. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  1. Students' interaction for enhancing learning motivation and learning success: findings from integrating a simulation game into a university course

    Otto, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, a vast amount of literature has been published discussing the educational use of simulation games in higher education. Since their emergence in the 1960s, simulation games have had a substantial effect on the way we think about teaching and learning in higher education. One reason simulation games are regarded as superior to traditional teaching is that they encourage students to interact and collaborate. Simulation games can therefore be subsumed under Kolbs learning model...

  2. From the universe to the elementary particles. A first introduction to cosmology and the fundamental interactions. 2. ed.

    Ellwanger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    This book serves for a representation of the foundations of modern elementary-particle physics and cosmology as well as the actual open questions up to the string theory. It contains elementary introductions to the special and general relativity theory, the classical and quantum field theory. The essential aspects of these concepts and many phenomena are understood by means of simple calculations like for instance the gravitational force as consequence of the curvature of the space. Treated are the big bang, the dark matter and the dark energy, as well as the contemporarily known interactions of the elementary-particle physics, electrodynamics, the strong and the weak interactions including the Higgs boson. Finally today (still?) speculative theories are sketched: Theories of the grand unification of the interactions, supersymmetry, the string theory, and additional dimensions of the space-time. The second edition contains significantly extended descriptions of the functionality of the LHC accelerator, the search for the Higgs boson, as well as the search for dark matter. No bigger mathematical and physical knowledges are presupposed; the book is also suited for grammar-school absolvents and students of the first semesters.

  3. The Relationship between Leadership Style (Transformational Leadership and Interactive of Principals and Job Satisfaction of Shiraz University Staff Employees

    Hussein Mokhtarpour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identification of the styles of behavior management as related to job attitudes and satisfaction level of management has been among the topics of interest in the past few decades. This study aimed to examine the leadership styles of managers (heads and its correlation with job satisfaction among university employees. Method: The study population included all employees working at Shiraz University. A sample of 107 subjects as the manager (head who had their position for two consecutive years was randomly selected from each set of three. To review and assess the transformative interactionism managers, Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ designed by Boss and Vlyv (1995 was used. A questionnaire was used to assess the level of job satisfaction. Content validity and reliability of the method was assessed by calculating the reliability coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha. The alpha for job satisfaction was obtained 0.79. Results: The results showed that the correlations between job satisfaction and leadership style (R=0.58, transformational leadership style (R=0.58 and the transactional leadership style (R=0.46 were significant (P<0.001. The results of this study indicated that leadership style can be used as a facilitator which motivates the direct and indirect impact on job satisfaction. Conclusion: People’s values influence the way they manage and especially determines their satisfaction about the organization. The concepts of transformational leadership styles of managers, their gender and level of mental stimulation showed the greatest effect on job satisfaction

  4. Off-equilibrium infrared structure of self-interacting scalar fields: Universal scaling, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and Bose-Einstein condensation

    Deng, Jian; Schlichting, Soeren; Venugopalan, Raju; Wang, Qun

    2018-05-01

    We map the infrared dynamics of a relativistic single-component (N =1 ) interacting scalar field theory to that of nonrelativistic complex scalar fields. The Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation, describing the real-time dynamics of single-component ultracold Bose gases, is obtained at first nontrivial order in an expansion proportional to the powers of λ ϕ2/m2 where λ , ϕ , and m are the coupling constant, the scalar field, and the particle mass respectively. Our analytical studies are corroborated by numerical simulations of the spatial and momentum structure of overoccupied scalar fields in (2+1)-dimensions. Universal scaling of infrared modes, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and the off-equilibrium formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate are observed. Our results for the universal scaling exponents are in agreement with those extracted in the numerical simulations of the GP equation. As in these simulations, we observe coarsening phase kinetics in the Bose superfluid with strongly anomalous scaling exponents relative to that of vertex resummed kinetic theory. Our relativistic field theory framework further allows one to study more closely the coupling between superfluid and normal fluid modes, specifically the turbulent momentum and spatial structure of the coupling between a quasiparticle cascade to the infrared and an energy cascade to the ultraviolet. We outline possible applications of the formalism to the dynamics of vortex-antivortex formation and to the off-equilibrium dynamics of the strongly interacting matter formed in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Modelling of plasma-antenna coupling and non-linear radio frequency wave-plasma-wall interactions in the magnetized plasma device under ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    Lu, LingFeng

    2016-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) by waves in 30-80 MHz range is currently used in magnetic fusion plasmas. Excited by phased arrays of current straps at the plasma periphery, these waves exist under two polarizations. The Fast Wave tunnels through the tenuous plasma edge and propagates to its center where it is absorbed. The parasitically emitted Slow Wave only exists close to the launchers. How much power can be coupled to the center with 1 A current on the straps? How do the emitted radiofrequency (RF) near and far fields interact parasitically with the edge plasma via RF sheath rectification at plasma-wall interfaces? To address these two issues simultaneously, in realistic geometry over the size of ICRH antennas, this thesis upgraded and tested the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for ICH (SSWICH) code. SSWICH couples self-consistently RF wave propagation and Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs) at plasma/wall interfaces. Its upgrade is full wave and was implemented in two dimensions (toroidal/radial). New SBCs coupling the two polarizations were derived and implemented along shaped walls tilted with respect to the confinement magnetic field. Using this new tool in the absence of SBCs, we studied the impact of a density decaying continuously inside the antenna box and across the Lower Hybrid (LH) resonance. Up to the memory limits of our workstation, the RF fields below the LH resonance changed with the grid size. However the coupled power spectrum hardly evolved and was only weakly affected by the density inside the box. In presence of SBCs, SSWICH-FW simulations have identified the role of the fast wave on RF sheath excitation and reproduced some key experimental observations. SSWICH-FW was finally adapted to conduct the first electromagnetic and RF-sheath 2D simulations of the cylindrical magnetized plasma device ALINE. (author) [fr

  6. A Preliminary Investigation of Malaysian Student’s Daily Use of Mobile Devices as Potential Tools for STEM in a Local University Context

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning is a fairly new approach to the educational paradigm where learning is concerned.  The usage of mobile learning may also be extended to various fields including Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM.   As Malaysia is lagging behind in STEM, this research is conducted to study preliminary information concerning mobile learning in a local university context, particularly, STEM. The method for this research is a descriptive survey. The results indicate that students already have some skills in using mobile phones, particularly multimedia skills, which can be applied to STEM.

  7. Hadron jets in deep inelastic ν-bar N interactions and universality of the jet properties in relative four-velocity space

    Baldin, A.M.; Didenko, L.A.; Grishin, V.G.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Maneva, G.M.; Temnikov, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    A new definition of the jets as clusters in the four-velocity space has been used to make an invariant analysis of the jet production processes in ν-barN collisions for the three energy intervals of the hadron system: W=3.5; 4.9; 8.0 GeV. The obtained results are compared with the characteristics of the four-dimensional jets in various types of interactions: pp, p-barp, π - p, π - C, pC and pTa at energies from 6 to 205 GeV. The characteristics of the four-dimensional jets in soft and hard interactions are shown to be universal, i.e., independent of neither the type of the fragmenting system (p, p-bar, π - , C, q), nor the collision energy for P lab ≥ 22 GeV/c (√S=W > 6 GeV). The obtained result means that the hadronization of the colour charges is determined by the dynamics of their interaction with vacuum

  8. [1,2,4]Triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine as Building Blocks for Universal Host Materials for High-Performance Red, Green, Blue and White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    Song, Wenxuan; Shi, Lijiang; Gao, Lei; Hu, Peijun; Mu, Haichuan; Xia, Zhenyuan; Huang, Jinhai; Su, Jianhua

    2018-02-14

    The electron-accepting [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine (TP) moiety was introduced to build bipolar host materials for the first time, and two host materials based on this TP acceptor and carbazole donor, namely, 9,9'-(2-([1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (o-CzTP) and 9,9'-(5-([1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (m-CzTP), were designed and synthesized. These two TP-based host materials possess a high triplet energy (>2.9 eV) and appropriate highest occupied molecular orbital/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels as well as the bipolar transporting feature, which permits their applicability as universal host materials in multicolor phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs). Blue, green, and red PhOLEDs based on o-CzTP and m-CzTP with the same device configuration all show high efficiencies and low efficiency roll-off. The devices hosted by o-CzTP exhibit maximum external quantum efficiencies (η ext ) of 27.1, 25.0, and 15.8% for blue, green, and red light emitting, respectively, which are comparable with the best electroluminescene performance reported for FIrpic-based blue, Ir(ppy) 3 -based green, and Ir(pq) 2 (acac)-based red PhOLEDs equipped with a single-component host. The white PhOLEDs based on the o-CzTP host and three lumophors containing red, green, and blue emitting layers were fabricated with the same device structure, which exhibit a maximum current efficiency and η c of 40.4 cd/A and 17.8%, respectively, with the color rendering index value of 75.

  9. The student-institution fit at university: Interactive effects of academic competition and social class on achievement goals.

    Nicolas eSommet

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As compared to continuing-generation students, first-generation students are struggling more at university. In the present article, we question the unconditional nature of such a phenomenon and argue that it depends on structural competition. Indeed, most academic departments use harsh selection procedure all throughout the curriculum, fostering between-student competition. In these departments, first-generation students tend to suffer from a lack of student-institution fit, that is, inconsistencies with the competitive institution's culture, practices, and identity. However, one might contend that in less competitive academic departments continuing-generation students might be the ones experiencing a lack of fit. Using a cross-sectional design, we investigated the consequences of such a context- and category-dependent lack of fit on the endorsement of scholastically adaptive goals. We surveyed N = 378 first- and continuing-generation students from either a more competitive or a less competitive department in their first or final year of bachelor’s study. In the more competitive department, first-to-third year decrease of mastery goals (i.e., the desire to learn was found to be steeper for first- than for continuing-generation students. In the less competitive department, the reversed pattern was found. Moreover, first-to-third year decrease of performance goals (i.e., the desire to outperform others was found to be steeper within the less competitive department but did not depend on social class. This single-site preliminary research highlights the need to take the academic context into account when studying the social class graduation gap.

  10. Basic Color Terms (BCTs) and Categories (BCCs) in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors

    Lillo, Julio; González-Perilli, Fernando; Prado-León, Lilia; Melnikova, Anna; Álvaro, Leticia; Collado, José A.; Moreira, Humberto

    2018-01-01

    color in the flags and the arrival of an important number of Italian immigrants). Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants. PMID:29867702

  11. Basic Color Terms (BCTs and Categories (BCCs in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors

    Julio Lillo

    2018-05-01

    use of the color in the flags and the arrival of an important number of Italian immigrants. Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants.

  12. Basic Color Terms (BCTs) and Categories (BCCs) in Three Dialects of the Spanish Language: Interaction Between Cultural and Universal Factors.

    Lillo, Julio; González-Perilli, Fernando; Prado-León, Lilia; Melnikova, Anna; Álvaro, Leticia; Collado, José A; Moreira, Humberto

    2018-01-01

    ). Nevertheless, these cultural factors seem to nurture from a perceptive structuring of the color space, which nature is universal, as the boundaries of this category can be delimited from the responses of Spanish and Mexican participants.

  13. Towards a universal method for calculating hydration free energies: a 3D reference interaction site model with partial molar volume correction.

    Palmer, David S; Frolov, Andrey I; Ratkova, Ekaterina L; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2010-12-15

    We report a simple universal method to systematically improve the accuracy of hydration free energies calculated using an integral equation theory of molecular liquids, the 3D reference interaction site model. A strong linear correlation is observed between the difference of the experimental and (uncorrected) calculated hydration free energies and the calculated partial molar volume for a data set of 185 neutral organic molecules from different chemical classes. By using the partial molar volume as a linear empirical correction to the calculated hydration free energy, we obtain predictions of hydration free energies in excellent agreement with experiment (R = 0.94, σ = 0.99 kcal mol (- 1) for a test set of 120 organic molecules).

  14. Towards a universal method for calculating hydration free energies: a 3D reference interaction site model with partial molar volume correction

    Palmer, David S; Frolov, Andrey I; Ratkova, Ekaterina L; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple universal method to systematically improve the accuracy of hydration free energies calculated using an integral equation theory of molecular liquids, the 3D reference interaction site model. A strong linear correlation is observed between the difference of the experimental and (uncorrected) calculated hydration free energies and the calculated partial molar volume for a data set of 185 neutral organic molecules from different chemical classes. By using the partial molar volume as a linear empirical correction to the calculated hydration free energy, we obtain predictions of hydration free energies in excellent agreement with experiment (R = 0.94, σ = 0.99 kcal mol -1 for a test set of 120 organic molecules). (fast track communication)

  15. Experimental research of the NN scattering with polarized particles at the VdG accelerator of Charles University. Project 'NN interactions'

    Borisov, N.S.; Broz, J.; Cerny, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to study three-nucleon interactions using 14-16 MeV polarized neutron beam in conjunction with polarized deuteron target. Spin-dependent total cross-section differences Δρ L and Δρ T will be measured in the energy range, where there are no experimental data, with sufficient accuracy to check the contribution of the three-nucleon forces. In the test run, the obtained deuteron vector polarizations were P - = (- 39.5 ± 2)% and P + = (32.9 ± 2)%. The proposed experiment is the continuation of the preceding measurements of the same quantities in the np scattering at the Van de Graaff accelerator of Charles University

  16. Grasp interaction with tablets

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  17. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    Leahey Matt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s. Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices

  18. Smart portable rehabilitation devices.

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-07-12

    The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to meet their design

  19. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Findings of Device-Associated Infections Rate in an Intensive Care Unit of a Lebanese University Hospital

    Kanj, SS; Kanafani, ZA; Sidani, N; Alamuddin, L; Zahreddine, N; Rosenthal, VD

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the rates of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAI), microbiological profile, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS), excess mortality and hand hygiene compliance in one intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital member of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in Beirut, Lebanon. Materials and Methods: An open label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted on adults admitted to a tertiary-care ICU in Lebanon from November 2007 to March 2010. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at INICC headquarters on proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were recorded by applying the definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We analyzed the DA-HAI, mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates, microorganism profile, excess LOS, excess mortality, and hand hygiene compliance. Results: A total of 666 patients hospitalized for 5,506 days acquired 65 DA-HAIs, an overall rate of 9.8% [(95% confidence interval (CI) 7.6–12.3], and 11.8 (95% CI 9.1–15.0) DA-HAIs per 1000 ICU-days. The CLA-BSI rate was 5.2 (95% CI 2.8–8.7) per 1000 catheter-days; the VAP rate was 8.1 (95% CI 5.5–11.7) per 1000 ventilator-days; and the CAUTI rate was 4.1 (95% CI 2.6–6.2) per 1000 catheter-days. LOS of patients was 7.3 days for those without DA-HAI, 13.8 days for those with CLA-BSI, 18.8 days for those with VAP. Excess mortality was 40.9% [relative risk (RR) 3.14; P 0.004] for CLA-BSI. Mortality of VAP and CAUTI was not significantly different from patients without DA-HAI. Escherichia coli was the most common isolated microorganism. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 84.9% (95% CI 82

  20. International nosocomial infection control consortium findings of device-associated infections rate in an intensive care unit of a Lebanese university hospital

    S S Kanj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the rates of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAI, microbiological profile, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS, excess mortality and hand hygiene compliance in one intensive care unit (ICU of a hospital member of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC in Beirut, Lebanon. Materials and Methods: An open label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted on adults admitted to a tertiary-care ICU in Lebanon from November 2007 to March 2010. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at INICC headquarters on proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were recorded by applying the definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. We analyzed the DA-HAI, mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI, and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI rates, microorganism profile, excess LOS, excess mortality, and hand hygiene compliance. Results: A total of 666 patients hospitalized for 5,506 days acquired 65 DA-HAIs, an overall rate of 9.8% [(95% confidence interval (CI 7.6-12.3], and 11.8 (95% CI 9.1-15.0 DA-HAIs per 1000 ICU-days. The CLA-BSI rate was 5.2 (95% CI 2.8-8.7 per 1000 catheter-days; the VAP rate was 8.1 (95% CI 5.5-11.7 per 1000 ventilator-days; and the CAUTI rate was 4.1 (95% CI 2.6-6.2 per 1000 catheter-days. LOS of patients was 7.3 days for those without DA-HAI, 13.8 days for those with CLA-BSI, 18.8 days for those with VAP. Excess mortality was 40.9% [relative risk (RR 3.14; P 0.004] for CLA-BSI. Mortality of VAP and CAUTI was not significantly different from patients without DA-HAI. Escherichia coli was the most common isolated microorganism. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 84.9% (95% CI 82

  1. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  2. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  3. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  4. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    Ibrahim M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ibrahim, Rahul Verma, Lucila Garcia-ContrerasDepartment of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided.Keywords: pulmonary delivery, asthma, nebulizers, metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler

  5. EPICS GPIB device support

    Winans, J.

    1993-01-01

    A GPIB device support module is used to provide access to the operating parameters of a GPIB device. GPIB devices may be accessed via National Instruments 1014 cards or via Bitbus Universal Gateways. GPIB devices typically have many parameters, each of which may be thought of in terms of the standard types of database records available in EPICS. It is the job of the device support module designer to decide how the mapping of these parameters will be made to the available record types. Once this mapping is complete, the device support module may be written. The writing of the device support module consists primarily of the construction of a parameter table. This table is used to associate the database record types with the operating parameters of the GPIB instrument. Other aspects of module design include the handling of SRQ events and errors. SRQ events are made available to the device support module if so desired. The processing of an SRQ event is completely up to the designer of the module. They may be ignored, tied to event based record processing, or anything else the designer wishes. Error conditions may be handled in a similar fashion

  6. Our Particle Universe

    and “why is the universe the way it is?” Not long before ... to each other. The interactions of particles in the universe ... theory by Jean Perrin in 1908 convinced people that atoms and ..... ing the origin and evolution of our universe13. This is an ...

  7. Hybrid Universities in Malaysia

    Lee, Molly; Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi

    2017-01-01

    Are Asian universities different from those in Western countries? Premised on the hypothesis that Asian universities are different because of hybridization between Western academic models and local traditional cultures, this paper investigates the hybrid characteristics in Malaysian universities resulting from interaction between contemporary…

  8. Sealing device

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  9. Microfluidic Device

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  10. Gauging device

    Qurnell, F.D.; Patterson, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    A gauge supporting device for measuring say a square tube comprises a pair of rods or guides in tension between a pair of end members, the end members being spaced apart by a compression member or members. The tensioned guides provide planes of reference for measuring devices moved therealong on a carriage. The device is especially useful for making on site dimensional measurements of components, such as irradiated and therefore radioactive components, that cannot readily be transported to an inspection laboratory. (UK)

  11. Depth of interaction in scintillation crystal by light collimation for the design of open-quotes universal nuclear medicine imagerclose quotes

    Bosnjakovic, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The detector head for a dual headed open-quotes Universal Nuclear Medicine Imagerclose quotes (UNMI) is designed. It is based on position sensitive (PS) area detectors fitted with a thick (0.75 inches) NaI(Tl) crystal. In order to make it open-quotes universalclose quotes, a means for determining the depth of interaction (DOI) in the crystal is devised. Crystal thickness is divided into two layers, each 3/8 inches thick, by insertion of a thin (0.03 inches) quartz (glass) layer; these layers added to the external lower and upper surfaces of crystal, too, form two internal open-quotes light collimatorclose quotes (LC) channels by their reflectively (specular) polished couplings. These DOI channels, according to the light refraction / reflection law direct the light reflected from quartz layers (as exceeding a critical angle) through NaI(Tl) layers to the external parts of LC system; these are connected via quartz optical cables to the DOI determining PM tubes. DOI electronics including a coincidence circuit, connecting signals from conventional PS and DOI PM tubes arrays, identifies a DOI layer and shifts an, x, y, address to the particular DOI memory stack. The UNMI design is likely to retain spatial resolution of PS detectors - gamma cameras for low energy single photon emitters and to improve spatial resolution in PET studies done by PS detectors fitted with thick NaI crystals, enabling a proper correction for parallax error

  12. Intelligent Interactive Multimedia

    Watanabe, Toyohide; Takahashi, Naohisa; 5th International Conference on Intelligent Interactive Multimedia Systems and Services

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Intelligent Interactive Multimedia Systems and Services (KES-IIMSS-12).  The Conference was jointly organised by Nagoya University in Japan and the KES International organisation, and held in the attractive city of Gifu.   The KES-IIMSS conference series, (series chairs Prof. Maria Virvou and Prof. George Tsihrintzis), presents novel research in various areas of intelligent multimedia system relevant to the development of a new generation of interactive, user-centric devices and systems.  The aim of the conference is to provide an internationally respected forum for scientific research in the technologies and applications of this new and dynamic research area.

  13. Fabrication of type I collagen microcarrier using a microfluidic 3D T-junction device and its application for the quantitative analysis of cell-ECM interactions.

    Yoon, Junghyo; Kim, Jaehoon; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Sudo, Ryo; Park, Myung-Jin; Chung, Seok

    2016-08-26

    We presented a new quantitative analysis for cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, using cell-coated ECM hydrogel microbeads (hydrobeads) made of type I collagen. The hydrobeads can carry cells as three-dimensional spheroidal forms with an ECM inside, facilitating a direct interaction between the cells and ECM. The cells on hydrobeads do not have a hypoxic core, which opens the possibility for using as a cell microcarrier for bottom-up tissue reconstitution. This technique can utilize various types of cells, even MDA-MB-231 cells, which have weak cell-cell interactions and do not form spheroids in conventional spheroid culture methods. Morphological indices of the cell-coated hydrobead visually present cell-ECM interactions in a quantitative manner.

  14. Fusion devices

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  15. BRAKE DEVICE

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  16. PLASMA DEVICE

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  17. Wireless device connection problems and design solutions

    Song, Ji-Won; Norman, Donald; Nam, Tek-Jin; Qin, Shengfeng

    2016-09-01

    Users, especially the non-expert users, commonly experience problems when connecting multiple devices with interoperability. While studies on multiple device connections are mostly concentrated on spontaneous device association techniques with a focus on security aspects, the research on user interaction for device connection is still limited. More research into understanding people is needed for designers to devise usable techniques. This research applies the Research-through-Design method and studies the non-expert users' interactions in establishing wireless connections between devices. The "Learning from Examples" concept is adopted to develop a study focus line by learning from the expert users' interaction with devices. This focus line is then used for guiding researchers to explore the non-expert users' difficulties at each stage of the focus line. Finally, the Research-through-Design approach is used to understand the users' difficulties, gain insights to design problems and suggest usable solutions. When connecting a device, the user is required to manage not only the device's functionality but also the interaction between devices. Based on learning from failures, an important insight is found that the existing design approach to improve single-device interaction issues, such as improvements to graphical user interfaces or computer guidance, cannot help users to handle problems between multiple devices. This study finally proposes a desirable user-device interaction in which images of two devices function together with a system image to provide the user with feedback on the status of the connection, which allows them to infer any required actions.

  18. Universal Instability in a Thermal Plasma Device (Q-Machine); Instabilite Universelle dans une Machine a Plasma Thermique (Machine-Q); Issledovaniya universal'noj neustojchivosti v ustrojstve dlya termicheski ionizovannoj plazmy; Inestabilidad Universal en un Dispositivo de Plasma Termico (Maquina Q)

    Lashinsky, H. [University Of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1966-04-15

    The fully ionized column in, a thermal plasma device (Q-machine) provides a convenient medium for studying the universal (drift-wave) instability arising from the joint effect of the finite ion Larmor radius and the density gradient perpendicular to the magnetic confining field. The pertinent dimensionless parameters can be varied over a range such that the results can be scaled to make comparisons.with plasmas of thermonuclear interest, and the instability can be excited in controlled fashion by appropriate adjustment of the sheath conditions at the metal end plates by using sheath-control techniques that are discussed together with the underlying theory. By exploiting these techniques the oscillation amplitude can be held at arbitrarily low levels and the behaviour of the instability can be traced from the low-amplitude (e Empty-Set /kT {approx}10{sup -3}) ''quasilinear'' regime, characterized by a monochromatic ''locked-mode'' spectrum, into the non-linear regime; and then into a weakly turbulent state (e Empty-Set /kT Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1) characterized by a noisy ''hash'' spectrum. A novel ''raster-display'' method provides a complete picture of the development of the instability and the transition to turbulence. The experimentally determined basic characteristics of the instability such as the mode frequencies, direction of azimuthal propagation, coherence properties, density independence, magnetic field dependence, and spatial dependence of mode amplitude, are in good qualitative agreement with the linear theory of the universal instability. Experiments have also been carried out on the effect of column length on the real part of the frequency (approximately a 10% correction) and on the imaginary part. The effect on the latter is due to ion Landau damping and the method provides an excellent means of studying the Landau damping mechanism itself. The results of these experiments are also in good agreement with the linear theory and have, in addition

  19. Ageing, exposure to pollution, and interactions between climate change and local seasons as oxidant conditions predicting incident hematologic malignancy at KINSHASA University clinics, Democratic Republic of CONGO (DRC).

    Nkanga, Mireille Solange Nganga; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Ngwidiwo, Jacques Bikaula; Katawandja, Antoine Lufimbo; Kazadi, Paul Roger Beia; Nzonzila, Alain Nganga

    2017-08-23

    The global burden of hematologic malignancy (HM) is rapidly rising with aging, exposure to polluted environments, and global and local climate variability all being well-established conditions of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no information on the extent and predictors of HM at Kinshasa University Clinics (KUC), DR Congo (DRC). This study evaluated the impact of bio-clinical factors, exposure to polluted environments, and interactions between global climate changes (EL Nino and La Nina) and local climate (dry and rainy seasons) on the incidence of HM. This hospital-based prospective cohort study was conducted at Kinshasa University Clinics in DR Congo. A total of 105 black African adult patients with anaemia between 2009 and 2016 were included. HM was confirmed by morphological typing according to the French-American-British (FAB) Classification System. Gender, age, exposure to traffic pollution and garages/stations, global climate variability (El Nino and La Nina), and local climate (dry and rainy seasons) were potential independent variables to predict incident HM using Cox regression analysis and Kaplan Meier curves. Out of the total 105 patients, 63 experienced incident HM, with an incidence rate of 60%. After adjusting for gender, HIV/AIDS, and other bio-clinical factors, the most significant independent predictors of HM were age ≥ 55 years (HR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-4.3; P = 0.003), exposure to pollution and garages or stations (HR = 4.9; 95% CI 2-12.1; P pollution, combined local dry season + La Nina and combined local dry season + El Nino were the most significant predictors of incident hematologic malignancy. These findings highlight the importance of aging, pollution, the dry season, El Nino and La Nina as related to global warming as determinants of hematologic malignancies among African patients from Kinshasa, DR Congo. Cancer registries in DRC and other African countries will provide more robust database for future researches on

  20. The Developing Purposes of Low-Income College Students in China's Elite Universities: A Longitudinal Case Study of How Socioeconomic Background and University Culture Interact to Influence the Development and Realization of Low Income College Students' Goals

    Zhao, Wanxia

    2014-01-01

    In the process of China's transformation from a socialist to a post-socialist society, China's entire system of education has experienced breathtaking expansion and reform. In this context, first-tier universities increasingly accept students from more financially well off backgrounds. While second-tier universities are inclined to accept more…

  1. [Anesthesia simulators and training devices].

    Hartmannsgruber, M; Good, M; Carovano, R; Lampotang, S; Gravenstein, J S

    1993-07-01

    Simulators and training devices are used extensively by educators in 'high-tech' occupations, especially those requiring an understanding of complex systems and co-ordinated psychomotor skills. Because of advances in computer technology, anaesthetised patients can now be realistically simulated. This paper describes several training devices and a simulator currently being employed in the training of anaesthesia personnel at the University of Florida. This Gainesville Anesthesia Simulator (GAS) comprises a patient mannequin, anaesthesia gas machine, and a full set of normally operating monitoring instruments. The patient can spontaneously breathe, has audible heart and breath sounds, and palpable pulses. The mannequin contains a sophisticated lung model that consumes and eliminates gas according to physiological principles. Interconnected computers controlling the physical signs of the mannequin enable the presentation of a multitude of clinical signs. In addition, the anaesthesia machine, which is functionally intact, has hidden fault activators to challenge the user to correct equipment malfunctions. Concealed sensors monitor the users' actions and responses. A robust data acquisition and control system and a user-friendly scripting language for programming simulation scenarios are key features of GAS and make this system applicable for the training of both the beginning resident and the experienced practitioner. GAS enhances clinical education in anaesthesia by providing a non-threatening environment that fosters learning by doing. Exercises with the simulator are supported by sessions on a number of training devices. These present theoretical and practical interactive courses on the anaesthesia machine and on monitors. An extensive system, for example, introduces the student to the physics and clinical application of transoesophageal echocardiography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of an interactive cardiopulmonary resuscitation assist device with an automated external defibrillator synchronised with a ventilator on the CPR performance of emergency medical service staff: a randomised simulation study.

    Nitzschke, Rainer; Doehn, Christoph; Kersten, Jan F; Blanz, Julian; Kalwa, Tobias J; Scotti, Norman A; Kubitz, Jens C

    2017-04-04

    The present study evaluates whether the quality of advanced cardiac life support (ALS) is improved with an interactive prototype assist device. This device consists of an automated external defibrillator linked to a ventilator and provides synchronised visual and acoustic instructions for guidance through the ALS algorithm and assistance for face-mask ventilations. We compared the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality of emergency medical system (EMS) staff members using the study device or standard equipment in a mannequin simulation study with a prospective, controlled, randomised cross-over study design. Main outcome was the effect of the study device compared to the standard equipment and the effect of the number of prior ALS trainings of the EMS staff on the CPR quality. Data were analysed using analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) and binary logistic regression, accounting for the study design. In 106 simulations of 56 two-person rescuer teams, the mean hands-off time was 24.5% with study equipment and 23.5% with standard equipment (Difference 1.0% (95% CI: -0.4 to 2.5%); p = 0.156). With both types of equipment, the hands-off time decreased with an increasing cumulative number of previous CPR trainings (p = 0.042). The study equipment reduced the mean time until administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by 23 s (p = 0.003) and that of amiodarone by 17 s (p = 0.016). It also increased the mean number of changes in the person doing chest compressions (0.6 per simulation; p < 0.001) and decreased the mean number of chest compressions (2.8 per minute; p = 0.022) and the mean number of ventilations (1.8 per minute; p < 0.001). The chance of administering amiodarone at the appropriate time was higher, with an odds ratio of 4.15, with the use of the study equipment CPR.com compared to the standard equipment (p = 0.004). With an increasing number of prior CPR trainings, the time intervals in the ALS algorithm until the

  3. Neural Signatures of Trust During Human-Automation Interactions

    2016-04-01

    also automated devices such as a Global Positioning System. For instance, to provide advanced safety measures, the Transportation Safety...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0160 Neural Signatures of Trust during Human- Automation Interactions Frank Krueger GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Final Report 04/01...SUBTITLE Neural Signatures of Trust during Human- Automation Interactions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0017 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Experience of three-dimensional vision in the era of digital interaction new devices : opportunity and challenges for applied mathematics and visual design

    Brunetti, Federico Alberto

    2014-01-01

    It will be soon presented to the public a new version of stereoscopic viewers designed for observing files and video projected images through a system of transparent optical prisms which allow the simultaneous perception of the surrounding environment. The real challenge for applied mathematics and visual design will be to prefigure how to use them and their applications, since these new devices can actually enable a deeper visual experience. A specific case study concerns the visualizations of the collisions at the LHC at CERN, selected to verify the traces of the boson theorized by Francois Englert and Peter Higgs, with Robert Brout, who recently (2013) received the Nobel Prize for their research.

  5. Weak interactions

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  6. Sealing devices

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  7. Ferroelectric devices

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  8. Guide device

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  9. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  10. Medical Devices

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Mahieu, H.F.; Geertsema, A.A.; Hermann, I.F.; van Horn, J.R.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Loon, J.P.; Mihaylov, D.; van der Plaats, A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Schutte, H.K.; Veth, R.P.H.; de Vries, M.P.; Rakhorst, G.; Shi, Donglu

    2004-01-01

    The development of new medical devices is a very time-consuming and costly process. Besides the time between the initial idea and the time that manufacturing and testing of prototypes takes place, the time needed for the development of production facilities, production of test series, marketing,

  11. Electrochemical device

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  12. Assistive Devices

    If you have a disability or injury, you may use a number of assistive devices. These are tools, products or types of equipment that help you perform tasks and activities. They may help you move around, see, communicate, eat, or get ...

  13. Detection device

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  14. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  15. Biomolecular detection device

    Huo, Qisheng [Albuquerque, NM; Liu, Jun [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-10-21

    A device for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode.

  16. Assistive device with conventional, alternative, and brain-computer interface inputs to enhance interaction with the environment for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a feasibility and usability study.

    Schettini, Francesca; Riccio, Angela; Simione, Luca; Liberati, Giulia; Caruso, Mario; Frasca, Vittorio; Calabrese, Barbara; Mecella, Massimo; Pizzimenti, Alessia; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usability of an assistive technology (AT) prototype designed to be operated with conventional/alternative input channels and a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) in order to provide users who have different degrees of muscular impairment resulting from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with communication and environmental control applications. Proof-of-principle study with a convenience sample. An apartment-like space designed to be fully accessible by people with motor disabilities for occupational therapy, placed in a neurologic rehabilitation hospital. End-users with ALS (N=8; 5 men, 3 women; mean age ± SD, 60 ± 12 y) recruited by a clinical team from an ALS center. Three experimental conditions based on (1) a widely validated P300-based BCI alone; (2) the AT prototype operated by a conventional/alternative input device tailored to the specific end-user's residual motor abilities; and (3) the AT prototype accessed by a P300-based BCI. These 3 conditions were presented to all participants in 3 different sessions. System usability was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (written symbol rate, time for correct selection, workload), and end-user satisfaction (overall satisfaction) domains. A comparison of the data collected in the 3 conditions was performed. Effectiveness and end-user satisfaction did not significantly differ among the 3 experimental conditions. Condition III was less efficient than condition II as expressed by the longer time for correct selection. A BCI can be used as an input channel to access an AT by persons with ALS, with no significant reduction of usability. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assistive technologies for the interaction of the elderly the development of a communication device for the elderly with complementing illustrations and examples

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a wealth of insights and new conceptualizations for the development of Assistive Technologies for the Interaction of the Elderly. The book arranges the chapters according to important aspects of maximizing the use value in innovation projects. Every chapter will include an executive summary reporting the main results, a storyline using everyday language, and scientific excursions, wherever useful. The book shows how an innovation project should be structured towards maximum use value and how a project should be structured in order to make a difference. It describes the useful categorization of the large group of the elderly to maximize the focus of the innovation and demonstrates the user involvement into innovation activities. Of course, the assessment of such innovative projects is discussed as well as the “lessons learned”. The book also explores the business opportunities and the financial evaluation of aspects of assistive technology.  

  18. Cooling device in thermonuclear device

    Honda, Tsutomu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent loss of cooling effect over the entire torus structure directly after accidental toubles in a cooling device of a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Coolant recycling means of a cooling device comprises two systems, which are alternately connected with in-flow pipeways and exit pipeways of adjacent modules. The modules are cooled by way of the in-flow pipeways and the exist pipeways connected to the respective modules by means of the coolant recycling means corresponding to the respective modules. So long as one of the coolant recycling means is kept operative, since every one other modules of the torus structure is still kept cooled, the heat generated from the module put therebetween, for which the coolant recycling is interrupted, is removed by means of heat conduction or radiation from the module for which the cooling is kept continued. No back-up emergency cooling system is required and it can provide high economic reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. FY 1999 achievement report on the project on the R and D of university-cooperation industrial science technology. Semiconductor device production process by Cat-CVD method (Semiconductor device production process by Cat-CVD method); 1999 nendo Cat-CVD ho ni yoru handotai device seizo process seika hokokusho

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The paper described the results obtained by FY 1999 of the semiconductor device production using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. As to the thermal fluid simulation modeling in the thermal insulation thin film formation process, elucidated were the decomposition rate (40%) of SiH{sub 4} gas on catalyst body and the gas use efficiency (60% in two collisions with catalyst body). The range where the gas flow has effects was made clear. In researches on the substrate temperature control and catalyst body structure, thermal radiation effects from catalyst body were evaluated, which led to a success in high-speed deposition of high-quality a-Si. Concerning the optical monitor technology in film deposition, the identification of decomposition species (Si, etc.) and temperature of decomposition species could be made clear. Effects of pollutant removal were also monitored. Relating to the basic technology for thermal insulation thin film formation, conditions for Si nitride film formation were made clear, and stoichiometric composition films of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were acquired at low temperature of 300 degrees C. Also acquired were high etching resistant/high wetting resistant films. As to the ultra-high purity thin film formation, it was successful to find out the metal pollution resource and remove it. In regard to the Cat-CVD application on to metal oxide ferroelectric substances, low temperature Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films could be formed at deposition speed of 20nm/min. by making the temperature condition (200 degrees C or less) clear and controlling the substrate temperature. (NEDO)

  20. Developing Classroom Interactions Which Signal Effective Teaching. A Module for Undergraduate Instruction in Teacher Education in the RAFT Program at Mississippi State University.

    Handley, Herbert M., Ed.

    In this module, developed by the Research Applications for Teaching (RAFT) project, preservice teachers study the major types of classroom interactions which occur between teachers and students and review the research findings showing how these interactions are related to effective teaching. Much effort is spent on describing procedures for…

  1. [Universal electrogustometer EG-2].

    Wałkanis, Andrzej; Czesak, Michał; Pleskacz, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Electrogustometry is a method for taste diagnosis and measurement. The EG-2 project is being developed in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military institute of Medicine in Warsaw. The device is an evolution of the recent universal electrogustometer EG-1 prototype. Due to considerations and experiences acquired during prototype usage, many enhancements have been incorporated into device. The aim was to create an easy-to-use, portable, battery powered device, enabled for fast measurements. Developed electrogustometer is using innovative, low-power microprocessor system, which control whole device. User interface is based on 5.7" graphical LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and touchscreen. It can be directly operated by finger or with optional stylus. Dedicated GUI (Graphical User Interface) offers simple, predefined measurements and advance settings of signal parameters. It is also possible to store measurements results and patients data in an internal memory. User interface is multilanguage. Signals for patients examinations, supplied with bipolar electrode, are generated by an on-board circuit using DDS (Direct-Digital Synthesis) and DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter). Electrogustometer is able to generate DC, sinus, triangle or rectangle signals with current amplitude from 0 to 500 pA and frequency form 0 to 500 Hz. Device is designed for manual and automeasurement modes. By using USB (Universal Serial Bus) port it is possible to retrieve data stored in internal memory and charging of built-in Li-lon battery as a source of power.

  2. Designing for mobile interaction

    Nazzi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The theme of this PhD project is designing for mobile interaction with devices and services, for the accessing, making, and sharing of information, taking into account the dynamic physical and social settings that embrace this interaction. To narrow down this theme, the whole project focuses...... on the exploitation of social interaction --- in particular among senior citizens --- to enhance and support mobile interaction....

  3. Nanotechnologies and advanced devices; Nanotechnology to sentan device

    Arakawa, Y [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1994-11-01

    This paper introduces studies on nanotechnologies performed at the Production Technology Research Institute at Tokyo University. Conceiving the future optical devices is based on a desire to control electrons and lights by means of nano construction technologies to use the interactions between electrons and photons in ways as they are wanted and realize the next generation laser. The nano-construction making technology targets working on making boxes and lines with a size of 10 nm in arbitrary patterns at high precision. The method using an atom operating technology is such a method as building a house with bricks of atoms bringing them one by one. The crystallization technology applies some kind of magic on a crystallizing substrate, and then sprinkle crystalline seeds over the substrate to have them grow to crystals that build a structure. The Production Technology Research Institute uses a crystal growing technique called an MOCVD process. This is a representative technology comparable with the MBO in the thin film forming technologies. Because of chemically reactive process entering into the technique, building an interesting self-structural construction can occur. 14 figs.

  4. Thermonuclear device

    Tezuka, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    Protrusions and recesses are formed to a vacuum vessel and toroidal magnetic coils, and they are engaged. Since the vacuum vessel is generally supported firmly by a rack or the like by support legs, the toroidal magnetic field coils can be certainly supported against tumbling force. Then, there can be attained strong supports for the toroidal magnetic field coils, in addition to support by wedges on the side of inboard and support by share panels on the side of outboard, capable of withstanding great electromagnetic forces which may occur in large-scaled next-generation devices. That is, toroidal magnetic field coils excellent from a view point of deformation and stress can be obtained, to provide a thermonuclear device of higher reliability. (N.H.)

  5. Thermonuclear device

    Oosaki, Osamu; Masuda, Kenju.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide excellent electric properties and high reliability in a thermonuclear device by improving a current collecting board connected to a coil device. Constitution: A current collecting board element perforated with an opening for enserting a connecting terminal is sized to be inserted into a plating tank, and is surface treated in the plating tank. Only the current collecting board element preferably surface treated is picked up. A plurality of such current collecting board elements are connected and welded to form a large current collecting board. In this manner, the current collecting board having several m 2 to several ten order m 2 in area can be obtained as preferably surface treated at the connecting terminal hole. The current collecting board element can be determined in shape with the existing facility without increasing the size of a surface treating tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Thermonuclear device

    Yagi, Yasuomi; Takahashi, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining performances by bringing the irregular magnetic fields nearly to zero and decreasing the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields at every positions. Constitution: The winding direction of a plurality of coil elements, for instance, double pan cake coils of toroidal coils in a torus type or mirror type thermonuclear device are reversed to each other in their laminating direction, whereby the irregular magnetic fields due to the coil-stepped portions in each toroidal coils are brought nearly to zero. This enables to bring the average irregular magnetic fields as a whole in the thermonuclear device nearly to zero, as well as, decrease the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields in each positions. Thus, the plasma confining performances can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. "Distinvar" device

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  8. Latching device

    Ulrich, G. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A latching device is suited for use in establishing a substantially motionless connection between a stationary receiver and a movable latching mechanism. The latching mechanism includes a pivotally supported restraining hook continuously urged into a capturing relationship with the receiver, characterized by a spring-biased pawl having a plurality of aligned teeth. The teeth are seated in the surface of the throat of the hook and positionable into restraining engagement with a rigid restraining shoulder projected from the receiver.

  9. Flexible devices: from materials, architectures to applications

    Zou, Mingzhi; Ma, Yue; Yuan, Xin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Jie; Jin, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Flexible devices, such as flexible electronic devices and flexible energy storage devices, have attracted a significant amount of attention in recent years for their potential applications in modern human lives. The development of flexible devices is moving forward rapidly, as the innovation of methods and manufacturing processes has greatly encouraged the research of flexible devices. This review focuses on advanced materials, architecture designs and abundant applications of flexible devices, and discusses the problems and challenges in current situations of flexible devices. We summarize the discovery of novel materials and the design of new architectures for improving the performance of flexible devices. Finally, we introduce the applications of flexible devices as key components in real life. Project supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (Nos. 2017YFA0208200, 2016YFB0700600, 2015CB659300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21403105, 21573108), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 020514380107).

  10. Atherectomy devices: technology update

    Akkus NI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuri I Akkus,1 Abdulrahman Abdulbaki,1 Enrique Jimenez,2 Neeraj Tandon2 1Department of Cardiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA; 2Department of Cardiology, Overton Brooks VA Medical Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Atherectomy is a procedure which is performed to remove atherosclerotic plaque from diseased arteries. Atherosclerotic plaques are localized in either coronary or peripheral arterial vasculature and may have different characteristics depending on the texture of the plaque. Atherectomy has been used effectively in treatment of both coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Atherectomy devices are designed differently to either cut, shave, sand, or vaporize these plaques and have different indications. In this article, current atherectomy devices are reviewed. Keywords: coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease

  11. Geneva University

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  12. Collocated Interaction

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    interactions. Yet, new challenges abound as people wear and carry more devices than ever, creating fragmented device ecologies at work, and changing the ways we socialise with each other. In this workshop we seek to start a dialogue to look back as well as forward, review best practices, discuss and design......In the 25 years since Ellis, Gibbs, and Rein proposed the time-space taxonomy, research in the ‘same time, same place’ quadrant has diversified, perhaps even fragmented. This one-day workshop will bring together researchers with diverse, yet convergent interests in tabletop, surface, mobile...

  13. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich

  14. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    Anon.

    1987-06-15

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich.

  15. Relationships between Diversity Climate and Organizational Performance in Accredited, U.S. Evangelical Christian Colleges and Universities: Applying Cox's Interactional Model of Cultural Diversity

    Kissell, Bradley W.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine whether relationships existed between workplace diversity and organizational performance in accredited U.S. evangelical Christian colleges and universities. Evidence points to a rapidly changing demographic landscape. The U.S. and its workforce are quickly becoming racially and ethnically diverse.…

  16. The Brief Classroom Interaction Observation-Revised: An Observation System to Inform and Increase Teacher Use of Universal Classroom Management Practices

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Herman, Keith C.; Wachsmuth, Sean; Newcomer, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Schools are increasingly using multi-tiered prevention models to address the academic and behavior needs of students. The foundation of these models is the implementation of universal, or Tier 1, practices designed to support the academic and behavioral needs of the vast majority of students. To support teachers in the use of effective Tier 1…

  17. Using Real-Life Activities in an Interactive Engagement Manner in the Teaching and Learning of Newton's First Law of Motion in a Ghanaian University

    Antwi, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Most Ghanaian university physics students depend on rote learning and rote problem solving, without having the conceptual knowledge of concepts that are being studied. This is so because the Ghanaian style of setting and answering of questions favour those students who have the ability to do rote memorization of learning. The instructors start…

  18. User Experience of Mobile Devices

    Raptis, Dimitrios

    that the overall physical form of a mobile device has a significant effect on the perceived usability of an application: the more attractive the physical form, the higher the perceived usability. The other study validated the effect of a particular physical form element on usability and showed that the screen size......This thesis focuses on mobile devices and it specifically investigates the effect of their physical form on two perceived user experience qualities, usability and coolness. With the term mobile devices, I refer to interactive products that users interact with while being on the move......, and with the term physical form I refer to the physical elements that constitute a mobile device as a whole, such as weight, size and materials. The selected research area was addressed through two research questions, one focusing on effects of physical form on usability and the other on effects on coolness...

  19. Coprocessors for quantum devices

    Kay, Alastair

    2018-03-01

    Quantum devices, from simple fixed-function tools to the ultimate goal of a universal quantum computer, will require high-quality, frequent repetition of a small set of core operations, such as the preparation of entangled states. These tasks are perfectly suited to realization by a coprocessor or supplementary instruction set, as is common practice in modern CPUs. In this paper, we present two quintessentially quantum coprocessor functions: production of a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state and implementation of optimal universal (asymmetric) quantum cloning. Both are based on the evolution of a fixed Hamiltonian. We introduce a technique for deriving the parameters of these Hamiltonians based on the numerical integration of Toda-like flows.

  20. Damping device

    Banks, E.L. Jr.; Dowell, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a damper which includes a pair of telescopic components interconnected by relative linear movement one in relation to the other, by a screw and ball nut device, with a braking surface on one of the components, a brake engaging the braking surface, an inertia mass entrained by the other components, non-deformable and distinct brake actuating gear, independently mobile in relation to the other braking system and fixed and controlled by the inertia mass, positively to engage the braking surface. This damper is for retaining the parts of a nuclear power station so that can withstand earthquakes [fr

  1. Thermonuclear device

    Inoue, Toyokazu; Murata, Toru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To shield superconducting coils for use in the generation of magnetic field against neutron irradiation thereby preventing tritium contamination. Constitution: The thermonuclear device comprises, in its inside, a vacuum container for containing plasmas, superconducting coils disposed to the outside of the vacuum container and neutron absorbers disposed between the super-conducting coils and the vacuum container. since neutrons issued from the plasma are absorbed by neutron absorbers and not irradiated to the superconducting coils, generation of tritium due to the reaction between 3 He in the liquid helium as the coolants for the super-conducting coils and the neutrons is prevented. (Aizawa, K.)

  2. Strainer device

    Mokuya, Kenji.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a strainer device, which is adapted to facilitate flushing and is particularly suited for installation in the cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeding reactor. Structure: A casing accommodating a strainer and a blind plate for the selection of a flow path is provided at a suitable portion of the duct line. The blind plate is adapted to be rotated by an opening and closing means consisting of a rod. bellows, shaft and so forth. At the time of flushing, the duct line is sealed by the blind plate. (Nakamura, S.)

  3. Using Personal Portable Devices as Learning Tools in the English Class

    Luz Edith Herrera Díaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A group of university students used a variety of personal portable devices (cellphones, tablets, laptops, and netbooks which distracted them in English class. This qualitative action research aimed to implement activities entailing the use of such devices and to learn their impact on students’ learning and the use of English in class. Thus, a series of applications was used to promote the use of these devices for the benefit of the English as a Foreign Language class. These applications included a learning management system that resembled a social network, a live interaction application, and an online dictionary. It was found that students were able to productively use these devices as learning tools plus they expressed comfort and interest in using them.

  4. Surgical tools and medical devices

    Jackson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents information and knowledge on the field of biomedical devices and surgical tools. The authors look at the interactions between nanotechnology, nanomaterials, design, modeling, and tools for surgical and dental applications, as well as how nanostructured surfaces can be created for the purposes of improving cell adhesion between medical devices and the human body. Each original chapter is revised in this second edition and describes developments in coatings for heart valves, stents, hip and knee joints, cardiovascular devices, orthodontic applications, and regenerative materials such as bone substitutes. There are also 8 new chapters that address: Microvascular anastomoses Inhaler devices used for pulmonary delivery of medical aerosols Surface modification of interference screws Biomechanics of the mandible (a detailed case study) Safety and medical devices The synthesis of nanostructured material Delivery of anticancer molecules using carbon nanotubes Nano and micro coatings for medic...

  5. Scalable devices

    Krüger, Jens J.

    2014-01-01

    In computer science in general and in particular the field of high performance computing and supercomputing the term scalable plays an important role. It indicates that a piece of hardware, a concept, an algorithm, or an entire system scales with the size of the problem, i.e., it can not only be used in a very specific setting but it\\'s applicable for a wide range of problems. From small scenarios to possibly very large settings. In this spirit, there exist a number of fixed areas of research on scalability. There are works on scalable algorithms, scalable architectures but what are scalable devices? In the context of this chapter, we are interested in a whole range of display devices, ranging from small scale hardware such as tablet computers, pads, smart-phones etc. up to large tiled display walls. What interests us mostly is not so much the hardware setup but mostly the visualization algorithms behind these display systems that scale from your average smart phone up to the largest gigapixel display walls.

  6. Thermonuclear device

    Honda, Takuro; Maki, Koichi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a thermonuclear device, in which integrity of a measuring device is kept, the reactor wall temperature and wear of armour materials are monitored accurately even under intense radiation rays, so that the flow rate of coolants and plasma power can be controlled by using the signals. Infrared rays generated from the surface of the armour materials disposed on a first wall are detected to measure the reactor wall temperature. Coolant flow rate and plasma power are controlled based on the obtained reactor wall temperature. In addition, infrared rays generated from the back of the armour materials are detected to obtain the surface temperature in order to avoid intense radiation rays from plasmas. The coolant flow rate and the plasma power are controlled based on the obtained temperature on the surface of the reactor thereby controlling the temperature of the first wall and the armour material to 300degC or lower in a case of the first wall made of stainless steel and 1000degC or lower in a case of the armour material made of graphite. (I.S.)

  7. Thermonuclear device

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Furuyama, Masayuki; Saito, Ryusei.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the efficient and rapid cooling of a vacuum vessel by cooling with gas when the temperature of the vacuum vessel is higher than the boiling point of water and cooling with water when the temperature is lower than the boiling point of water. Constitution: A cooling pipe is provided through an insulating pipe on the outer periphery of a vacuum vessel. The cooling pipe communicates through a cooling gas valve and a coolant valve with a cooling gas supply device and a coolant supply device, and a heat exchanger is disposed at the pipe. When the vessel is higher than the boiling point of the coolant the coolant valve is closed and the cooling gas valve is opened and gas is supplied to cool the vessel. The gas is recoverd through a heat exchanger. On the other hand, when the temperature of vessel is lower than the boiling point of the coolant, the gas valve is closed, the coolant valve is opened, and the vessel is cooled with coolant. The vacuum vessel can be cooled for short time employing both the gas and the coolant together. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Thermonuclear device

    Takano, Hirohisa; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Hanai, Satoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To provide coils of high mechanical strength for use at the center of a torus type thermonuclear device. Constitution: A plurality of copper plates having cooling holes and bolt holes and insulation paper sheets of the same shape are prepared. The copper plate is different from the insulation paper sheet only in that the position-phase angle of the opening portion is larger by 15 - 30 0 . The copper plates and the insulation paper sheets are alternately stacked by a required number of turns while displacing the angle, and then clamped by bolts to form a mechanically strong coil with no metallurgical joining. Further, since the insulation paper sheets are not present in the radial direction and only one insulation paper sheet is inserted for each turn in the direction of the coil height, the space occupied by the coil can be decreased. According to this invention, the magnetic flux density at the center of the device can be increased as compared with the conventional case to thereby apply a higher voltage on the side of plasmas. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Irradiation device

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  10. Do implicit motives and basic psychological needs interact to predict well-being and flow? : Testing a universal hypothesis and a matching hypothesis

    Schüler, Julia; Brandstätter, Veronika; Sheldon, Kennon M.

    2013-01-01

    Self-Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan in Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. Plenum Press, New York, 1985) suggests that certain experiences, such as competence, are equally beneficial to everyone’s well-being (universal hypothesis), whereas Motive Disposition Theory (McClelland in Human motivation. Scott, Foresman, Glenview, IL, 1985) predicts that some people, such as those with a high achievement motive, should benefit particularly from such experiences (match...

  11. Application of nanomaterials in two-terminal resistive-switching memory devices

    Jianyong Ouyang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanometer materials have been attracting strong attention due to their interesting structure and properties. Many important practical applications have been demonstrated for nanometer materials based on their unique properties. This article provides a review on the fabrication, electrical characterization, and memory application of two-terminal resistive-switching devices using nanomaterials as the active components, including metal and semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs, nanotubes, nanowires, and graphenes. There are mainly two types of device architectures for the two-terminal devices with NPs. One has a triple-layer structure with a metal film sandwiched between two organic semiconductor layers, and the other has a single polymer film blended with NPs. These devices can be electrically switched between two states with significant different resistances, i.e. the ‘ON’ and ‘OFF’ states. These render the devices important application as two-terminal non-volatile memory devices. The electrical behavior of these devices can be affected by the materials in the active layer and the electrodes. Though the mechanism for the electrical switches has been in argument, it is generally believed that the resistive switches are related to charge storage on the NPs. Resistive switches were also observed on crossbars formed by nanotubes, nanowires, and graphene ribbons. The resistive switches are due to nanoelectromechanical behavior of the materials. The Coulombic interaction of transient charges on the nanomaterials affects the configurable gap of the crossbars, which results into significant change in current through the crossbars. These nanoelectromechanical devices can be used as fast-response and high-density memory devices as well. Dr. Jianyong Ouyang received his bachelor degree from the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and MSc from the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science. He received his PhD from the Institute for Molecular

  12. The Characteristics of University Students ’ Social Interaction in Network Virtual Community and Its Intervention Strategies%网络虚拟社区中大学生社会交往的特点及其干预策略

    郑生勇

    2014-01-01

    互联网及移动网络基础上的虚拟社区的出现为大学生参与社会交往提供了更加便利的条件,虚拟社区中的社会交往具有的自由性、间接性和匿名性等特点一方面开拓了大学生社交的空间,而另一方面也带来了随意性、网络成瘾等负面影响。高校管理者和教师应加强对大学生网络素养的教育,通过加强大学生休闲教育、营造大学生健康的“亚文化”等措施,帮助大学生正确认识网络虚拟社区及相关活动。%The emergence of virtual community based on Internet and mobile network has provided univer-sity students with more convenient conditions to participate in social interaction .Social interaction in virtual community has characterized itself as freedom , indirectness and anonymity , which on the one hand has extend-ed university students ’ social space , on the other hand also brought about such negative effects as casualness , Internet addiction and so on .University administrators and teachers should strengthen the cultivation of univer-sity students ’ network literacy through such measures as strengthening their leisure education , creating a healthy“subculture” and so on, so as to help students correctly understand the network virtual community and its related activities .

  13. Modelos Interactivos en el Proceso de la Ensenanza y el Aprendizaje en el Nivel Universitario (Interactive Models in the Process of Teaching and Learning at the University Level).

    Carrasquillo, Angela; Lopez, Carmen

    This article, written in Spanish (with an abstract in English) presents an overview of recommended interactive instructional models at the college level. The first section lists characteristics of a reflective college professor stressing that reflection revolves around the students, the curriculum, the methodology, and the college's overall…

  14. Design of Intelligent Robot as A Tool for Teaching Media Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning to Improve the Skill of University Student

    Zuhrie, M. S.; Basuki, I.; Asto B, I. G. P.; Anifah, L.

    2018-01-01

    The focus of the research is the teaching module which incorporates manufacturing, planning mechanical designing, controlling system through microprocessor technology and maneuverability of the robot. Computer interactive and computer-assisted learning is strategies that emphasize the use of computers and learning aids (computer assisted learning) in teaching and learning activity. This research applied the 4-D model research and development. The model is suggested by Thiagarajan, et.al (1974). 4-D Model consists of four stages: Define Stage, Design Stage, Develop Stage, and Disseminate Stage. This research was conducted by applying the research design development with an objective to produce a tool of learning in the form of intelligent robot modules and kit based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. From the data of the Indonesia Robot Contest during the period of 2009-2015, it can be seen that the modules that have been developed confirm the fourth stage of the research methods of development; disseminate method. The modules which have been developed for students guide students to produce Intelligent Robot Tool for Teaching Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. Results of students’ responses also showed a positive feedback to relate to the module of robotics and computer-based interactive learning.

  15. Joint marketing cites excellence: Fairview-University Medical Center advertises cooperatively with University of Minnesota Physicians.

    Botvin, Judith D

    2004-01-01

    Fairview-University Medical Center and University of Minnesota Physicians, both in Minneapolis, are enjoying the benefits of a co-branded advertising campaign. It includes print ads, brochures, and other marketing devices.

  16. Thermonuclear device

    Furuyama, Masayuki.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the subject device wherein a conductive short-circuiting ring is installed in the vicinity of the bonded part of bellows and thick portion of vacuum vessel in the small circumferential direction of torus, thereby to reduce the electromagnetic force generated at the bellows. Constitution: A conductive short-circuiting ring is provided in the vicinity of the connected part of a thick portion and bellows portion. By this organization, a saddle type current generated at the thick portion by a vertical magnetic field flows through the short-circuiting ring because the resistance at a part where the short-circuiting ring is provided is reduced, and the current flowing through the bellows is remarkably reduced. For this reason, the electromagnetic force generated at the bellows is reduced thereby to prevent the bellows from being destroyed by the electromagnetic force. (Yoshihara, H.)

  17. Electrophoresis device

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  18. Thermonuclear device

    Suzuki, Shohei

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain high voltage withstanding current introduction terminals not suffering from the effects of the reduction in the creeping voltage withstanding property by the application of magnetic fields. Constitution: This invention concerns a current introduction terminal for supplying electric current to coils for use in a thermonuclear device, etc. The conductor of the current introduction terminal on the side of vacuum is completely covered with solid insulator. This can eliminate the portion of securing the creeping withstanding voltage. The voltage withstanding characteristics of the solid insulator covering the portion of the conductor on the side of vacuum has a constant value irrespective of the atmosphere or the absence or presence of magnetic fields. Accordingly, the voltage withstanding characteristics of the current introduction terminal on the side of vacuum are determined by the property of the solid insulator, which is not reduced by the application of magnetic fields. (Ikeda, J.)

  19. Safety device of thermonuclear device

    Aoki, Isao; Ueda, Shuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Sakurai, Akiko; Kasahara, Fumio; Obara, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a safety device against an event of intrusion of coolants in a vacuum vessel. Namely, a coolant supply system comprises cooling tubes for supplying coolants to main reactor structure components including a vacuum vessel. A detection means detects leakage of coolants in the vacuum vessel. A coolant supply control means controls the supply of coolants to the main reactor structural components based on the leakage detection signals of the detection means. A stagnated material discharging means discharges stagnated materials in the main reactor structural components caused by the leakage of coolants. The leakage of coolants (for example, water) in the vacuum vessel can thus be detected by the water detection device in the vacuum vessel. A control value of a coolant supply means is closed by the leakage detection signals. The supply of coolants to the main reactor structural components is restricted to suppress the leakage. The stagnated materials are discharged to a tank by way of a water draining valve. (I.S.)

  20. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  1. Interacting with a personal wearable device

    Haan, de G.; Wright, P.; Hollnagel, E.; Dekker, S.

    2000-01-01

    Comris is a research project that aims to create a wearable assistant, "the parrot", for conference and workshop visitors. A personal interest profile and an active badge system enable agents in a virtual information space to provide context-sensitive information about interesting persons and events

  2. Optical-Microwave Interactions in Semiconductor Devices.

    1981-03-01

    Interdigital Photoconductors ( IDPC ) ......... ..... 112 G. Conclusions.. ....... .. 120 6 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK . 121...The detector developed at the Hughes Research Laboratories ( IDPC ) involves placing an interdigital metal electrode 53- 5 5 structure on top of a F...easier to perform with the IDPC detector. We believe the interdigital photoconductive detector has many advantages over existing detectors. First, the

  3. Continuity in Multi-Device Interaction

    Raptis, Dimitrios; Kjeldskov, Jesper; Skov, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    ’s Continuity. The study was done through surveying 3361 posts from technology web sites, discussion forums, and blogs, with a qualitative analysis of 1603 posts. Our findings present challenges in six themes of privacy, appropriation, customization, awareness, exclusion, and troubleshooting in relation...

  4. Geneva University

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  5. Study of Near Field Communication Technology in University Scenarios

    Ruiz, Irene Luque; Miraz, Guillermo Matas; Gómez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present an introduction to the possibilities of NFC (Near Field Communication) technology in the University environment. NFC is the key for the development of interactive systems where "intelligent" objects interact with the user just only by touching the objects with a NFC device. We support that a University environment with active objects dispatching information and services to the users (students and teachers) can introduce an appropriate environment for the fulfillment of the new Educational European directives. Here, we briefly describe some of the possibilities of the NFC technology and we include an example of the use of NFC through a Smart Poster for a scenario where a Department directory is considered.

  6. Effects of radiation on MOS structures and silicon devices

    Braeunig, D.; Fahrner, W.

    1983-02-01

    A comprehensive view of radiation effects on MOS structures and silicon devices is given. In the introduction, the interaction of radiation with semiconductor material is presented. In the next section, the electrical degradation of semiconductor devices due to this interaction is discussed. The commonly used hardening techniques are shown. The last section deals with testing of radiation hardness of devices. (orig.) [de

  7. Design and evaluation of pointing devices; Gestaltung und Evaluation von koordinatengebenden Interaktionsgeraeten

    Krauss, L.; Zuehlke, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Pointing devices e.g. the computer mouse are gaining considerable importance in modern human-machine-systems as a major part of the interaction interface between human beings and machines. During the dialogues with window-based operating systems the human being - the user - moves the cursor to a certain position on the screen by means of pointing devices. Microsoft products like WINDOWS have asserted themselves in the meantime in office applications and are currently conquering the market of industrial control systems as well. In office applications the mouse has become established as the most important pointing device for interaction. However, an 'office mouse' is not really suitable in a manufacturing environment. Only a few investigations exist evaluating alternatives to the mouse, which are suitable for industrial applications. At the Center of Human-Machine-Interaction (ZMMI) of the Institute of Production Automation (pak) at the University of Kaiserslautern a comparative investigation was carried out for alternative pointing devices like mouse, mousepad, mousebutton, mousestick, trackball, joystick, touchscreen, digitizing tablet and keyboard to determine their industrial suitability. This paper presents the methods of investigation and the most important results. The known Fitts' law model is mainly used in the field of HCl for office applications in order to evaluate interaction devices. This paper presents the new method DEVICE and is applied in the field of HMI for the evaluation of pointing devices. Tests with DEVICE and Fitts' method were conducted with machine operators under industrial environments to determine the suitability of thirty different pointing devices. The comparison between DEVICE and Fitts' law model shows that the results of certain partial tests correlate with each other. DEVICE can be used as substitute for Fitts' law model and offers additional parameters such as e.g. error rates and pointing deviation

  8. Thermonuclear device

    Suzuki, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining efficiency in a thermonuclear device having magnet coils using super-conducting wires by decreasing the uneven magnetic field resulted from current supply terminals and wirings. Constitution: Current introduction terminals of magnet coils using superconducting wires are short circuitted with a superconducting short circuit wire. Upon supplying current to the coils, the resistance of the coils is rendered superconductive and the resistance of the short circuit wire is rendered normally conductive heated by a heater and the switch is closed. In this case, most parts of the current are flown through the resistance of the coils and the switch is opened when the current arrives at a predetermined value to render the resistance of the short circuit wire superconductive. Then, the current transfers from the thyristor power source to the resistance of the short circuit wire, whereby the resistance of the coils and that of the short circuit wire from a permanent current loop. In this conditions, since current flows through the short circuit wire and the coils and not to the current introduction terminals, no uniform magnetic field is generated. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Reluctance device

    Claridge, A.N.; Smith, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    A reluctance device comprises two or more phases, each of which has a rotor mounted for rotation within a tubular member and an annular stator positioned externally of the tubular member. The rotor and the internal surface of the tubular member are each provided with aligned, axially spaced apart annular arrays of teeth, the teeth on the rotor confronting those on the tubular member in radially spaced apart relationship. The stator encloses a coil which, when electrically energised, creates a plurality of magnetic flux paths each of which extends radially between the rotor and stator via the confronting teeth and the tubular member, and axially along both the rotor and the portion of the stator located radially outwardly of the coil. The portion of the tubular member intermediate the teeth thereon is provided with a non-magnetic insert in order to resist the axial passage of magnetic flux therethrough. In one of the claims, the tubular member comprises a portion of a nuclear reactor which is adapted to contain a reactor control rod, the rotor constituting a portion of the drive mechanism for the control rod contained in operation within the tubular member. (author)

  10. Protection device for a thermonuclear device

    Kawashima, Shuichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To exactly detect the void coefficients of coolants even under high magnetic fields thereby detect the overheat of a thermonuclear device at an early stage. Constitution: The protecting device of this invention comprises a laser beam generation device, a laser beam detection device and an accident detection device. The laser generation device always generates laser beams, which are permeated through coolants and detected by the laser beam detection device, the optical amount of which is transmitted to the accident detection device. The accident detection device judges the excess or insufficiency of the detected optical amount with respect to the optical amount of the laser beams under the stationary state as a reference and issues an accident signal. Since only the optical cables that do not undergo the effect of the magnetic fields are exposed to high magnetic fields in the protection device of this invention, a high reliability can be maintained. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Investigation Of The Charisma And Intellectuality Effect In Determining A Leadership Model In The Light Of University Students’ Interaction With Their Academicians And Parents

    Gönül Konakay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Those who were born between 1980 and 2000 and nearly consist more than of 30% of the Turkish population are called Gen-Yers.Gen Yers are described as independent, entrepreneurial, self-confident individuals who expect to succeed in a short period of time, like freedom and flexibility, dislike micromindividual decision-making mechanisms and are good at using information technology. This research aims to investigate what kind of a leadership profile university students, most of whom are Gen Yers, desire to have under the effect of their academicians and parents, and whether charismatic or intellectual effect is higher in terms of demographic variables. As a result of the Factor Analysis, T test and ANOVA analyses, differences have been found regarding leadership characteristics in terms of gender and education variables, whereas no differences have been found according to age, income, consumption, region and educational status of parents

  12. RESEARCH ON THE PROBLEMS OF interaction BETWEEN SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN UNIVERSITY COURSE OF PHILOSOPHY (BASED ON WORKS BY RUSSIAN RELIGIOUS THINKERS

    Aleksey I. Belkin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article explores the interrelations between science and religion in the context of shaping integrated world outlook of future specialists in the framework of the competence-based approach. Axiological and ethical aspects of the interaction between the two major branches of human culture are considered using the example of works by Russian religious thinkers: Archbishop Luke (V. F. Voyno-Yasenetsky, V. S. Soloviev, N. A. Berdyaev. Materials and Methods: materials and methods: the study employed the method of original sources, i. e. works by N. A. Berdyaev, V. F. Voino-Yasenetsky, V. S. Solovyov, considering the problems of interaction between science and religion. The method of original sources was combined with methods of analysis, synthesis and generalisation. Results: attention is paid to different approaches to addressing this problem over the historical development of human thought. When analysing the works by V. S. Solovyov emphasis is made on the concept of integral knowledge, considering the true knowledge as a result of the interaction of rational, empirical and mystical aspects. Much attention is paid to the interpretation of Archbishop Luke’s thoughts (V. F. Voyno-Yasenetsky who advocated theoretically and practically the idea of the synthesis of the knowledge and belief in their inextricable link to the genuine scientific and philosophical works. When discussing N. A. Berdyaev’s ideas the focus is on the critical analysis of the three types of relationships between science and religion, established in human culture: 1 supremacy of knowledge and denial of faith, 2 supremacy of faith and denial of knowledge, and 3 the dualism of knowledge and faith. The article also gives a thorough account of the philosopher’s idea about the synthesis of knowledge, faith and intuition that contradicts traditional approach. The article presents the arguments of modern science about the importance of interaction between religious

  13. Trends in University Programs in Nanoelectronics

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2013-01-01

    and non-electronic devices (such as bio-devices or chemical devices), and possibilities for developing fundamentally new nanoscale electronic devices. Engineering curricula taking this development into account have been around for a number of years. The development over the past five years is examined...... in three representative programs and an overview of present programs in the Nordic countries is given. Also, the services provided for universities by the EuroTraining program1 are described....

  14. Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation

    Murad, C; Rubio, D; Ponce, S; Alvarez Abri, A; Terron, A; Vicencio, D; Fascioli, E

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University

  15. Fast reactor recharging device

    Artemiev, L.N.; Kurilkin, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Disclosure is made of a device for recharging a fast-neutron reactor, intended for the transfer of fuel assemblies and rods of the control and safety system, having profiled heads to be gripped on the outside. The device comprises storage drums whose compartments for rods of the control and safety system are identical to compartments for fuel assemblies. In order to store and transport rods of the control and safety system from the storage drums to the recharging mechanism provision is made for sleeve-type holders. When placed in such a holder, the dimensions of a rod of the control and safety system are equal to those of a fuel assembly. To join a holder to a rod of the control and safety system, on the open end of each holder there is mounted a collet, whereas on the surface of each rod of the control and safety system, close to its head, there is provided an encircling groove to interact with the collet. The grip of the recharging mechanism is provided with a stop interacting with the collet in order to open the latter and withdraw the safety and control system rod from its holder

  16. Progress and Prospects in Stretchable Electroluminescent Devices

    Wang Jiangxin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stretchable electroluminescent (EL devices are a new form of mechanically deformable electronics that are gaining increasing interests and believed to be one of the essential technologies for next generation lighting and display applications. Apart from the simple bending capability in flexible EL devices, the stretchable EL devices are required to withstand larger mechanical deformations and accommodate stretching strain beyond 10%. The excellent mechanical conformability in these devices enables their applications in rigorous mechanical conditions such as flexing, twisting, stretching, and folding.The stretchable EL devices can be conformably wrapped onto arbitrary curvilinear surface and respond seamlessly to the external or internal forces, leading to unprecedented applications that cannot be addressed with conventional technologies. For example, they are in demand for wide applications in biomedical-related devices or sensors and soft interactive display systems, including activating devices for photosensitive drug, imaging apparatus for internal tissues, electronic skins, interactive input and output devices, robotics, and volumetric displays. With increasingly stringent demand on the mechanical requirements, the fabrication of stretchable EL device is encountering many challenges that are difficult to resolve. In this review, recent progresses in the stretchable EL devices are covered with a focus on the approaches that are adopted to tackle materials and process challenges in stretchable EL devices and delineate the strategies in stretchable electronics. We first introduce the emission mechanisms that have been successfully demonstrated on stretchable EL devices. Limitations and advantages of the different mechanisms for stretchable EL devices are also discussed. Representative reports are reviewed based on different structural and material strategies. Unprecedented applications that have been enabled by the stretchable EL devices are

  17. Low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Fleischmann, Andreas; Enss, Christian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency noise is a rather universal phenomenon and appears in physical, chemical, biological or even economical systems. However, there is often very little known about the underlying processes leading to its occurrence. In particular, the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices has been an unresolved puzzle for many decades. Its existence limits, for example, the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits or makes high-precision measurements of low-frequency signals using SQUIDs rather challenging. Recent experiments suggest that low-frequency excess flux noise in Josephson junction based devices might be caused by the random reversal of interacting spins in surface layer oxides and in the superconductor-substrate interface. Even if it turns out to be generally correct, the underlying physical processes, i.e. the origin of these spins, their physical nature as well as the interaction mechanisms, have not been resolved so far. In this contribution we discuss recent measurements of low-frequency SQUID noise which we performed to investigate the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices. Within this context we give an overview of our measurement techniques and link our data with present theoretical models and literature data.

  18. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  19. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-08-10

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules.

  20. Why all John’s friends are Dutch, not German; on differences in West Germanic in the interaction between universal quantifiers and genitives

    Robert Cirillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike English and Dutch, German does not allow a genitive to follow a universal quantifier: (i All John’s friends… (ii Al Jans vrienden… (Dutch (iii *All(e Johanns Freunde… (German In this article I show that this discrepancy results from two facts. Firstly, the German Saxon Genitive is a true case ending assigned in [Spec, NP] or [Spec, PossP] while in Dutch and English genitive case cannot be assigned at the N or n level (without a preposition and the Saxon Genitive is more like a possessive adjective, initiating as the head of PossP and terminating in D. Secondly, in Germanic, D or [Spec, DP] must be overtly occupied in case of definiteness, and if the D node is already overtly occupied, and if genitive case has already been assigned, there is no motivation for moving a genitive phrase to the D level. I also show that Germanic dative of possession constructions (possessor doubling can be explained within the same framework. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the potential applicability of this analysis to Scandinavian.