WorldWideScience

Sample records for universal fluctuation behavior

  1. Universal mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of conductance fluctuations in disordered metallic systems with size large compared to the mean free path of the electron but small compared to localization length is considered. It is demonstrates that fluctuations have an universal character and are due to repulsion between levels and spectral rigidity. The basic fluctuation measures for the energy spectrum in the mesoscopic regime of disordered systems are consistent with the Gaussian random matrix ensemble predictions. Although our disordered electron random matrix ensemble does not belong to the Gaussian ensemble the two ensembles turn out to be essentially similar. The level repulsion and the spectral rigidity found in nuclear spectra should also be observed in the metallic regime of Anderson localization. 7 refs. (orig.)

  2. Universal bounds on current fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  3. Fluctuations in the inflationary universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, S. W.; Moss, I. G.

    1983-08-01

    In the usual treatment of the inflationary universe, it is assumed that the expectation value of some component of the Higgs field develops a non-zero symmetry breaking value Φ0. However, in the models normally considered, the expectation value of Φ will be zero at all times because Φ and -Φ are equally probable. To overcome this difficulty, we calculate the effective action as a function of rather than . This also solves the infra-red problem associated with a Coleman-Weinberg condition in de Sitter space. The expectation value of Φ2 grows linearly with time at first and then as (t2 - t-1). The irregularities in the resulting universe are smaller than those predicted by previous authors, though in the case of the standard SU(5) GUT they are still bigger than the limit set by the microwave background.

  4. Electron quantum interferences and universal conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Pichard, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Quantum interferences yield corrections to the classical ohmic behaviour predicted by Boltzmann theory in electronic transport: for instance the well-known ''weak localization'' effects. Furthermore, very recently, quantum interference effects have been proved to be responsible for statistically different phenomena, associated with Universal Conductance Fluctuations and observed on very small devices [fr

  5. Universality in level spacing fluctuations of a chaotic optical billiard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprise, J.F.; Hosseinizadeh, A.; Lamy-Poirier, J. [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Zomorrodi, R. [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert Giffard, Quebec, Quebec G1J 2G3 (Canada); Kroeger, J. [Physics Department and Center for Physics of Materials, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Kroeger, H., E-mail: hkroger@phy.ulaval.c [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Functional Neurobiology, University of Utrecht, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-19

    We study chaotic behavior of a classical optical stadium billiard model. We construct a matrix of time-of-travel along trajectories corresponding to a set of boundary points. We carry out a level spacing fluctuation analysis and compute the Dyson-Mehta spectral rigidity. The distribution of time-of-travel is approximately described by a Gaussian. The results for level spacing distribution and spectral rigidity show universal behavior.

  6. Adiabatic physics of an exchange-coupled spin-dimer system: Magnetocaloric effect, zero-point fluctuations, and possible two-dimensional universal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambleby, J.; Goddard, P. A.; Singleton, John; Jaime, Marcelo; Lancaster, T.

    2017-01-01

    We present the magnetic and thermal properties of the bosonic-superfluid phase in a spin-dimer network using both quasistatic and rapidly changing pulsed magnetic fields. The entropy derived from a heat-capacity study reveals that the pulsed-field measurements are strongly adiabatic in nature and are responsible for the onset of a significant magnetocaloric effect (MCE). In contrast to previous predictions we show that the MCE is not just confined to the critical regions, but occurs for all fields greater than zero at sufficiently low temperatures. We explain the MCE using a model of the thermal occupation of exchange-coupled dimer spin states and highlight that failure to take this effect into account inevitably leads to incorrect interpretations of experimental results. In addition, the heat capacity in our material is suggestive of an extraordinary contribution from zero-point fluctuations and appears to indicate universal behavior with different critical exponents at the two field-induced critical points. Finally, the data at the upper critical point, combined with the layered structure of the system, are consistent with a two-dimensional nature of spin excitations in the system.

  7. Fluctuation effects in bulk polymer phase behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, F.S.; Rosedale, J.H.; Stepanek, P.; Lodge, T.P.; Wiltzius, P.; Hjelm R, Jr.; Fredrickson, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    Bulk polymer-polymer, and block copolymer, phase behaviors have traditionally been interpreted using mean-field theories. Recent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of critical phenomena in model binary polymer mixtures confirm that non-mean-field behavior is restricted to a narrow range of temperatures near the critical point, in close agreement with the Ginzburg criterion. In contrast, strong derivations from mean-field behavior are evident in SANS and rheological measurements on model block copolymers more than 50C above the order-disorder transition (ODT), which can be attributed to sizeable composition fluctuations. Such fluctuation effects undermine the mean-field assumption, conventionally applied to bulk polymers, and result in qualitative changes in phase behavior, such as the elimination of a thermodynamic stability limit in these materials. The influence of fluctuation effects on block copolymer and binary mixture phase behavior is compared and contrasted in this presentation

  8. Universal fluctuations the phenomenology of hadronic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Botet, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to present, in a comprehensive and progressive way, the appearance of universal limit probability laws in physics, and their connection with the recently developed scaling theory of fluctuations. Arising from the probability theory and renormalization group methods, this novel approach has been proved recently to provide efficient investigative tools for the collective features that occur in any finite system. The mathematical background is self-contained and is formulated in terms which are easy to apply to the physical context. After illustrating the problem

  9. Density fluctuations in the de Sitter universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, N.; Mallik, S.

    1991-01-01

    The de Sitter space-time appears to be the most widely chosen manifold to study quantum field theories on curved space-time. The reason is, of course, its high symmetry and the related fact that the mode functions can be obtained exactly in terms of known functions. Thus the different problems of quantization on curved space-time, like the non-uniqueness of the vacuum, regularization and renormalization of the stress tensor, have all been studied extensively in this model. The other reason of interest in the de Sitter geometry is related to the inflationary scenario of the early universe. For a brief period, the energy density of the false (symmetric) vacuum may dominate the total energy density, giving rise to de Sitter space-time. The resulting inflation may solve a number of outstanding problems of cosmology and particle physics. The properties of a Higgs-type scalar field theory is of central importance in the investigation of such a scenario. In this paper, a scalar Higgs field theory in de Sitter space-time has been investigated using the real time formulation of Semenoff and Weiss. The authors calculate the two-point function at late times and use it to obtain a general expression for the amplitude of fluctuation in energy density on scales which come out of the de Sitter horizon

  10. Universal conductance fluctuations in disordered metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author argues that observed and theoretical fluctuations in the electrical conductance of disordered metals, induced by variations in the magnetic field or the chemical potential, are not time-dependent noise but that the conductance is a deterministic albeit fluctuating function for a given realization of the impurity configuration. A method is constructed for representing the sensitivity of the conductance of a given metal to a small change in the impurity configuration as a function of such variables as sample size, impurities per unit volume, and mean free path. The sensitivity helps explain the size of 1/f noise due to defect motion in disordered metals

  11. Squeezing of thermal and quantum fluctuations: Universal features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Flensberg, Karsten

    1993-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum fluctuations of a general damped forced oscillator close to a bifurcation instability. Near the instability point, the fluctuations are strongly phase correlated and are squeezed. In the limit of low damping, it is shown that the system has universal features when...... scaled with the damping. The same scaling law applies to the classical and to the quantum regimes. We furthermore show that the coupling to the environment is crucial in the generation of squeezed fluctuations....

  12. Attentiveness cycles: synchronized behavior and aggregate fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Gomes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A sticky-information macroeconomic model is developed in order to analyze the behavior of the time trajectories of the inflation rate and of the output gap, when disturbed by eventual monetary policy shocks. In opposition to what is typical in the literature on this subject, different paces on information updating explicitly lead to a setting with interaction among heterogeneous agents. Specifically, we consider firms with different information updating frequencies whose behavior implies the emergence of attentiveness cycles of possibly large lengths; within these cycles we deduct a differently shaped Phillips curve for each time period. Systematic changes on the form of the aggregate supply relation will be the engine that triggers a sluggish response to shocks and the eventual persistence of business fluctuations.

  13. Dissipation and fluctuation of quantum fields in expanding universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, M.

    1990-01-01

    A stochastic dynamics of a long-wavelength part of a scalar field in an expanding universe is derived by using the influence functional method. Dissipation as well as fluctuation are derived for general parameters: a mass, a coupling to the scalar curvature, and a cutoff scale parameter. A dissipation-fluctuation relation is found with a temperature which is proportional to the Hawking temperature, but system dependent. The method is further applied to an expanding universe with a power law and yields the dispersion which agrees with that obtained by the regularization method. The back reaction to the background de Sitter space itself is also obtained

  14. Thermodynamic fluctuations and the monopole density of the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diosi, L.; Lukacs, B.

    1984-10-01

    The probability of thermodynamic fluctuations is calculated by explicitly using the Riemannian structure of the thermodynamic state space. By means of this probability distribution, a correlation volume can be defined. Identifying this volume with one domain in the GUT continuum at the symmetry breaking phase transition in the early Universe, a prediction can be obtained for the primordial monopole density. (author)

  15. Models for universal reduction of macroscopic quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diosi, L.

    1988-10-01

    If quantum mechanics is universal, then macroscopic bodies would, in principle, possess macroscopic quantum fluctuations (MQF) in their positions, orientations, densities etc. Such MQF, however, are not observed in nature. The hypothesis is adopted that the absence of MQF is due to a certain universal mechanism. Gravitational measures were applied for reducing MQF of the mass density. This model leads to classical trajectories in the macroscopic limit of translational motion. For massive objects, unwanted macroscopic superpositions of quantum states will be destroyed within short times. (R.P.) 34 refs

  16. Measuring the Behavioral Component of Financial Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Corazzini, Luca; Costola, Michele

    We study the evolution of the behavioral component of the financial market by estimating a Bayesian mixture model in which two types of investors coexist: one rational, with standard subjective expected utility theory (SEUT) preferences, and one behavioral, endowed with an S-shaped utility function...... and the behavioral choices can be estimated by using a criterion function. The estimated parameter can be interpreted as an endogenous market sentiment index. This is confirmed by a number of checks controlling for the correlation of our endogenous index with measures of (implied) financial volatility, market...... sentiments and financial stress. Our results confirm the existence of a significant behavioral component that reaches its peaks during periods of recession. Moreover, after controlling for a number of covariates, we observe a significant correlation between the estimated behavioral component and the S&P 500...

  17. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  18. Electroweak vacuum instability and renormalized Higgs field vacuum fluctuations in the inflationary universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohri, Kazunori [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Matsui, Hiroki, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: matshiro@post.kek.jp [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the electroweak vacuum instability during or after inflation. In the inflationary Universe, i.e., de Sitter space, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} > enlarge in proportion to the Hubble scale H {sup 2}. Therefore, the large inflationary vacuum fluctuations of the Higgs field < δ φ {sup 2} > are potentially catastrophic to trigger the vacuum transition to the negative-energy Planck-scale vacuum state and cause an immediate collapse of the Universe. However, the vacuum field fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} >, i.e., the vacuum expectation values have an ultraviolet divergence, and therefore a renormalization is necessary to estimate the physical effects of the vacuum transition. Thus, in this paper, we revisit the electroweak vacuum instability from the perspective of quantum field theory (QFT) in curved space-time, and discuss the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field φ determined by the effective potential V {sub eff}( φ ) in curved space-time and the renormalized vacuum fluctuations < δ φ {sup 2} >{sub ren} via adiabatic regularization and point-splitting regularization. We simply suppose that the Higgs field only couples the gravity via the non-minimal Higgs-gravity coupling ξ(μ). In this scenario, the electroweak vacuum stability is inevitably threatened by the dynamical behavior of the homogeneous Higgs field φ, or the formations of AdS domains or bubbles unless the Hubble scale is small enough H < Λ {sub I} .

  19. Resonant behavior of a fractional oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soika, Erkki; Mankin, Romi; Ainsaar, Ain

    2010-01-01

    The long-time behavior of the first moment for the output signal of a fractional oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force is considered. Colored fluctuations of the oscillator eigenfrequency are modeled as a dichotomous noise. The viscoelastic type friction kernel with memory is assumed as a power-law function of time. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the response to an external periodic field and for the complex susceptibility are presented. On the basis of the exact formulas it is demonstrated that interplay of colored noise and memory can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonances versus the driving frequency and the friction coefficient as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the cooperation effects are also discussed. Particularly, two different critical memory exponents have been found, which mark dynamical transitions in the behavior of the system.

  20. Inflationary fluctuations, entropy generation and baryogenesis in a cold universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    We study the implications of a generic inflationary model for scenarios of baryogenesis based on the decays of coherent oscillations of squark and slepton fields. We consider the effects of de Sitter fluctuations on the magnitudes of the coherent oscillations of squarks and sleptons. We see that the largest contribution to the entropy density is due to inflation decays which together with the value of the oscillation amplitude determined by the de Sitter fluctuations leads to a baryon to entropy ratio O(10 -10 ). The isothermal density fluctuations produced by the coherent oscillations are found to be negligible compared with the adiabatic fluctuations produced during inflation. (orig.)

  1. The Universe of Fluctuations The Architecture of Spacetime and the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sidharth, B G

    2005-01-01

    The Universe of Fluctuations: The Architecture of Spacetime and the Universe is a path-breaking work which proposes solutions to the impasse and crisis facing fundamental physics and cosmology. It describes a cosmological model based on fuzzy spacetime that has correctly predicted a dark-energy-driven acceleration of our expanding universe - with a small cosmological constant - at a time when the popular belief was quite the contrary. It describes how the Universe is made up of an underpinning of Planck oscillators in a Quantum Vacuum. This leads to, amongst other things, a characterization of gravitation as being distributional over the entire Universe, thereby providing an answer to a puzzle brought to light by Weinberg years ago and since overlooked. There is also a simple formula for the mass spectrum of all known elementary particles, based on QCD dynamics. Many other interesting ramifications and experimental tests for the future are also discussed. This apart, there is a brief survey of some of the exi...

  2. Inflaton and metric fluctuations in the early universe from a 5D vacuum state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Membiela, Agustin [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: membiela@argentina.com; Bellini, Mauricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina) and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONICET) (Argentina)]. E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar

    2006-04-20

    In this Letter we complete a previously introduced formalism to study the gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity, to study the evolution of the early universe. The evolution of both, metric and inflaton field fluctuations are reciprocally related. We obtain that <{delta}{rho}>/{rho}{sub b} depends on the coupling of {phi} with {delta}{phi} and the spectral index of its spectrum is 0.9483

  3. Inflaton and metric fluctuations in the early universe from a 5D vacuum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membiela, Agustin; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-04-01

    In this Letter we complete a previously introduced formalism to study the gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza Klein theory of gravity, to study the evolution of the early universe. The evolution of both, metric and inflaton field fluctuations are reciprocally related. We obtain that /ρ depends on the coupling of Φ with δφ and the spectral index of its spectrum is 0.9483

  4. Inflaton and metric fluctuations in the early universe from a 5D vacuum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membiela, Agustin; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we complete a previously introduced formalism to study the gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity, to study the evolution of the early universe. The evolution of both, metric and inflaton field fluctuations are reciprocally related. We obtain that /ρ b depends on the coupling of Φ with δφ and the spectral index of its spectrum is 0.9483 1 <1

  5. Behavioral medicine in Teikyo University and Toho University

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Takeaki; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral medicine has increased in importance to become a promising field in medical education. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health and Toho University School of Medicine were evaluated in terms of their educational emphasis on behavioral medicine. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health has the following five core requirements, as in the global standards: behavioral medicine, biostatistics, epidemiology, occupational health, and health policy management. B...

  6. Thermal fluctuations and critical behavior in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma are studied by applying standard methods, based on the Einstein rule, to the known thermodynamic potential of the system. It is found in particular that magnetic fluctuations become critical when the anisotropy p ∥ −p ⊥ changes sign. By examining the critical region, additional insight on the equations of state for near-critical anisotropic plasma is obtained

  7. Time-clustering behavior of sharp fluctuation sequences in Chinese stock markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Ying; Zhuang Xintian; Liu Zhiying; Huang Weiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Sharp fluctuations (in particular, extreme fluctuations) of asset prices have a great impact on financial markets and risk management. Therefore, investigating the time dynamics of sharp fluctuation is a challenge in the financial fields. Using two different representations of the sharp fluctuations (inter-event times and series of counts), the time clustering behavior in the sharp fluctuation sequences of stock markets in China is studied with several statistical tools, including coefficient of variation, Allan Factor, Fano Factor as well as R/S (rescaled range) analysis. All of the empirical results indicate that the time dynamics of the sharp fluctuation sequences can be considered as a fractal process with a high degree of time-clusterization of the events. It can help us to get a better understanding of the nature and dynamics of sharp fluctuation of stock price in stock markets.

  8. Large-scale magnetic fields, curvature fluctuations, and the thermal history of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that gravitating magnetic fields affect the evolution of curvature perturbations in a way that is reminiscent of a pristine nonadiabatic pressure fluctuation. The gauge-invariant evolution of curvature perturbations is used to constrain the magnetic power spectrum. Depending on the essential features of the thermodynamic history of the Universe, the explicit derivation of the bound is modified. The theoretical uncertainty in the constraints on the magnetic energy spectrum is assessed by comparing the results obtained in the case of the conventional thermal history with the estimates stemming from less conventional (but phenomenologically allowed) post-inflationary evolutions

  9. Analysis of the Dynamic Evolutionary Behavior of American Heating Oil Spot and Futures Price Fluctuation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Heating oil is an extremely important heating fuel to consumers in northeastern United States. This paper studies the fluctuations law and dynamic behavior of heating oil spot and futures prices by setting up their complex network models based on the data of America in recent 30 years. Firstly, modes are defined by the method of coarse graining, the spot price fluctuation network of heating oil (HSPFN and its futures price fluctuation network (HFPFN in different periods are established to analyze the transformation characteristics between the modes. Secondly, several indicators are investigated: average path length, node strength and strength distribution, betweeness, etc. In addition, a function is established to measure and analyze the network similarity. The results show the cumulative time of new nodes appearing in either spot or futures price network is not random but exhibits a growth trend of straight line. Meanwhile, the power law distributions of spot and futures price fluctuations in different periods present regularity and complexity. Moreover, these prices are strongly correlated in stable fluctuation period but weak in the phase of sharp fluctuation. Finally, the time distribution characteristics of important modes in the networks and the evolution results of the topological properties mentioned above are obtained.

  10. APPLICATIONS OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS IN UNIVERSITY LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGE NICULESCU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the article I have dealt with the role and place of behavioral economics in the economic sciences. Classical economic theories are criticized by the behavioral economy. We think we are rational beings and that we make logical decisions based on the information we have at our disposal. In fact, we have our own cognitive limitations that can lead to hasty decisions or confusing judgments; the real individual is a complex person, with actions that result in failures and incomprehensible behaviors for the economics Behavioral economics is trying to explain why individuals often make irrational choices, and why decisions they take do not follow exactly the patterns predicted by classical and neoclassical economic models. This paper is trying to assess the individual behavior involved in the decision making process in the university space. This article describes aloso a series of experiments on behavioral economics. The experiments are from university life and contest the hypothesis of the perfectly rational person's existence in making decisions and the neoclassical economic theories and models that are based only on the premise of the existence of homo oeconomicus rationalis. Observations and experiments conducted with students at Constantin Brancusi University in Târgu-Jiu are relevant in challenging the hypothesis of perfect rationality, preference stability, perfect information and market efficiency. The research method used in this article is the experiment. Study results are useful for academic management.

  11. Rank-ordered multifractal analysis for intermittent fluctuations with global crossover behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tom; Kintner, Paul M.; Klatt, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    The rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA), a recently developed technique that combines the ideas of parametric rank ordering and one-parameter scaling of monofractals, has the capabilities of deciphering the multifractal characteristics of intermittent fluctuations. The method allows one to understand the multifractal properties through rank-ordered scaling or nonscaling parametric variables. The idea of the ROMA technique is applied to analyze the multifractal characteristics of the auroral zone electric-field fluctuations observed by the SIERRA sounding rocket. The observed fluctuations span across contiguous multiple regimes of scales with different multifractal characteristics. We extend the ROMA technique such that it can take into account the crossover behavior - with the possibility of collapsing probability distribution functions - over these contiguous regimes.

  12. Caldwell University's Department of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Kenneth F; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, faculty members at Caldwell University have developed three successful graduate programs in Applied Behavior Analysis (i.e., PhD, MA, non-degree programs), increased program faculty from two to six members, developed and operated an on-campus autism center, and begun a stand-alone Applied Behavior Analysis Department. This paper outlines a number of strategies used to advance these initiatives, including those associated with an extensive public relations campaign. We also outline challenges that have limited our programs' growth. These strategies, along with a consideration of potential challenges, might prove useful in guiding academicians who are interested in starting their own programs in behavior analysis.

  13. Behavior of Engineering Students in Kuwait University

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Al-Ajmi; R. S. Al-Kandari

    2015-01-01

    This initial study is concerned with the behavior of engineering students in Kuwait University which became a concern due to the global issues of education in all levels. A survey has been conducted to identify academic and societal issues affecting the engineering student performance. The study is drawing major conclusions with regard to private tutoring and the online availability of textbooks’ solution manuals.

  14. Weak antilocalization and universal conductance fluctuations in bismuth telluro-sulfide topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Tanuj, E-mail: tanuj@utexas.edu; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Banerjee, Sanjay K., E-mail: banerjee@ece.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2016-02-07

    We report on van der Waals epitaxial growth, materials characterization, and magnetotransport experiments in crystalline nanosheets of Bismuth Telluro-Sulfide (BTS). Highly layered, good-quality crystalline nanosheets of BTS are obtained on SiO{sub 2} and muscovite mica. Weak-antilocalization (WAL), electron-electron interaction-driven insulating ground state and universal conductance fluctuations are observed in magnetotransport experiments on BTS devices. Temperature, thickness, and magnetic field dependence of the transport data indicate the presence of two-dimensional surface states along with bulk conduction, in agreement with theoretical models. An extended-WAL model is proposed and utilized in conjunction with a two-channel conduction model to analyze the data, revealing a surface component and evidence of multiple conducting channels. A facile growth method and detailed magnetotransport results indicating BTS as an alternative topological insulator material system are presented.

  15. Fluctuation behaviors of financial time series by a stochastic Ising system on a Sierpinski carpet lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wen; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    We develop a financial market model using an Ising spin system on a Sierpinski carpet lattice that breaks the equal status of each spin. To study the fluctuation behavior of the financial model, we present numerical research based on Monte Carlo simulation in conjunction with the statistical analysis and multifractal analysis of the financial time series. We extract the multifractal spectra by selecting various lattice size values of the Sierpinski carpet, and the inverse temperature of the Ising dynamic system. We also investigate the statistical fluctuation behavior, the time-varying volatility clustering, and the multifractality of returns for the indices SSE, SZSE, DJIA, IXIC, S&P500, HSI, N225, and for the simulation data derived from the Ising model on the Sierpinski carpet lattice. A numerical study of the model’s dynamical properties reveals that this financial model reproduces important features of the empirical data.

  16. Analysis of swarm behaviors based on an inversion of the fluctuation theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Heiko; Schmickl, Thomas; Crailsheim, Karl

    2014-01-01

    A grand challenge in the field of artificial life is to find a general theory of emergent self-organizing systems. In swarm systems most of the observed complexity is based on motion of simple entities. Similarly, statistical mechanics focuses on collective properties induced by the motion of many interacting particles. In this article we apply methods from statistical mechanics to swarm systems. We try to explain the emergent behavior of a simulated swarm by applying methods based on the fluctuation theorem. Empirical results indicate that swarms are able to produce negative entropy within an isolated subsystem due to frozen accidents. Individuals of a swarm are able to locally detect fluctuations of the global entropy measure and store them, if they are negative entropy productions. By accumulating these stored fluctuations over time the swarm as a whole is producing negative entropy and the system ends up in an ordered state. We claim that this indicates the existence of an inverted fluctuation theorem for emergent self-organizing dissipative systems. This approach bears the potential of general applicability.

  17. Universal Disorder in Organic Semiconductors Due to Fluctuations in Space Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzu-Cheng

    This thesis concerns the study of charge transport in organic semiconductors. These materials are widely used as thin-film photoconductors in copiers and laser printers, and for their electroluminescent properties in organic light-emitting diodes. Much contemporary research is directed towards improving the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices, which is limited to a large extent by the spatial and energetic disorder that hinders the charge mobility. One contribution to energetic disorder arises from the strong Coulomb interactions between injected charges with one another, but to date this has been largely ignored. We present a mean-field model for the effect of mutual interactions between injected charges hopping from site to site in an organic semiconductor. Our starting point is a modified Fröhlich Hamiltonian in which the charge is linearly coupled to the amplitudes of a wide band of dispersionless plasma modes having a Lorentzian distribution of frequencies. We show that in most applications of interest the hopping rates are fast enough while the plasma frequencies are low enough that random thermal fluctuations in the plasma density give rise to an energetically disordered landscape that is effectively stationary for many thousands of hops. Moreover, the distribution of site energies is Gaussian, and the energy-energy correlation function decays inversely with distance; as such, it can be argued that this disorder contributes to the Poole-Frenkel field dependence seen in a wide variety of experiments. Remarkably, the energetic disorder is universal; although it is caused by the fluctuations in the charge density, it is independent of the charge concentration.

  18. Universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, Vasilii R [B.P. Konstantinov St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Leningrad region, Rusian Federation (Russian Federation); Amusia, M Ya [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Popov, Konstantin G [Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-30

    This review discusses the construction of a theory and the analysis of phenomena occurring in strongly correlated Fermi systems such as high-T{sub c} superconductors, heavy-fermion metals, and quasi-two-dimensional Fermi systems. It is shown that the basic properties and the universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems can be described in the framework of the Fermi-condensate quantum phase transition and the well-known Landau paradigm of quasiparticles and the order parameter. The concept of fermion condensation may be fruitful in studying neutron stars, finite Fermi systems, ultra-cold gases in traps, and quark plasma. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaginyan, Vasilii R; Amusia, M Ya; Popov, Konstantin G

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the construction of a theory and the analysis of phenomena occurring in strongly correlated Fermi systems such as high-T c superconductors, heavy-fermion metals, and quasi-two-dimensional Fermi systems. It is shown that the basic properties and the universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems can be described in the framework of the Fermi-condensate quantum phase transition and the well-known Landau paradigm of quasiparticles and the order parameter. The concept of fermion condensation may be fruitful in studying neutron stars, finite Fermi systems, ultra-cold gases in traps, and quark plasma. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Planets in other universes: habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Fred C.; Coppess, Katherine R. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bloch, Anthony M., E-mail: fca@umich.edu, E-mail: kcoppess@umich.edu, E-mail: abloch@umich.edu [Mathematics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic structure parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of Q lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of Q lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments in the following directions: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of the galaxies, including a range of stellar densities, and find the fraction of the resulting galactic real estate that allows for stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] For high velocity encounters, we perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies: if a galaxy is too compact, the night sky seen from a potentially habitable planet can provide more power than the host star. [D] One consequence of intense galactic background radiation fields is that some portion of the galaxy, denoted as the Galactic Habitable Zone, will provide the right flux levels to support habitable planets for essentially any planetary orbit including freely floating bodies (but excluding close-in planets). As the value of Q increases, the fraction of stars in a galaxy that allow for (traditional) habitable planets decreases due to both orbital disruption and the intense background radiation. However, the outer parts of the galaxy always allow for habitable planets, so that the value of Q does not have a well-defined upper limit (due to scattering or radiation constraints). Moreover, some Galactic Habitable Zones are large enough to support more

  1. Planets in other universes: habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Coppess, Katherine R.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic structure parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of Q lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of Q lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments in the following directions: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of the galaxies, including a range of stellar densities, and find the fraction of the resulting galactic real estate that allows for stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] For high velocity encounters, we perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies: if a galaxy is too compact, the night sky seen from a potentially habitable planet can provide more power than the host star. [D] One consequence of intense galactic background radiation fields is that some portion of the galaxy, denoted as the Galactic Habitable Zone, will provide the right flux levels to support habitable planets for essentially any planetary orbit including freely floating bodies (but excluding close-in planets). As the value of Q increases, the fraction of stars in a galaxy that allow for (traditional) habitable planets decreases due to both orbital disruption and the intense background radiation. However, the outer parts of the galaxy always allow for habitable planets, so that the value of Q does not have a well-defined upper limit (due to scattering or radiation constraints). Moreover, some Galactic Habitable Zones are large enough to support more

  2. Nonlinear Fluctuation Behavior of Financial Time Series Model by Statistical Physics System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a random financial time series model of stock market by one of statistical physics systems, the stochastic contact interacting system. Contact process is a continuous time Markov process; one interpretation of this model is as a model for the spread of an infection, where the epidemic spreading mimics the interplay of local infections and recovery of individuals. From this financial model, we study the statistical behaviors of return time series, and the corresponding behaviors of returns for Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index (SSECI and Hang Seng Index (HSI are also comparatively studied. Further, we investigate the Zipf distribution and multifractal phenomenon of returns and price changes. Zipf analysis and MF-DFA analysis are applied to investigate the natures of fluctuations for the stock market.

  3. On the universe's cybernetics duality behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Erlan H.

    2015-05-01

    Universal cybernetics is the study of control and communications in living and non-living systems. In this paper the universal cybernetics duality principle (UCDP), first identified in control theory in 1978 and expressing a cybernetic duality behavior for our universe, is reviewed. The review is given on the heels of major prizes given to physicists for their use of mathematical dualities in solving intractable problems in physics such as those of cosmology's `dark energy', an area that according to a recent New York Times article has become "a cottage industry in physics today". These dualities are not unlike those of our UCDP that are further enhanced with physical dualities. For instance, in 2008 the UCDP guided us to the derivation of the laws of retention in physics as the space-penalty dual of the laws of motion in physics, including the dark energy thought responsible for the observed increase of the volume of our Universe as it ages. The UCDP has also guided us to the discovery of significant results in other fields such as: 1) in matched processors for quantized control with applications in the modeling of central nervous system (CNS) control mechanisms; 2) in radar designs where the discovery of latency theory, the time-penalty dual of information-theory, has led us to high-performance radar solutions that evade the use of `big data' in the form of SAR imagery of the earth; and 3) in unveiling biological lifespan bounds where the life-expectancy of an organism is sensibly predicted through lingerdynamics, the identified time-penalty dual of thermodynamics, which relates its adult lifespan to either: a. the ratio of its body size to its nutritional consumption rate; or b. its specific heat-capacity; or c. the ratio of its nutritional consumption rate energy to its entropic volume energy, a type of dark energy that is consistent with the observed decrease in the mass density of the organism as it ages.

  4. Characterizing multi-scale self-similar behavior and non-statistical properties of fluctuations in financial time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayantan; Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2011-11-01

    We make use of wavelet transform to study the multi-scale, self-similar behavior and deviations thereof, in the stock prices of large companies, belonging to different economic sectors. The stock market returns exhibit multi-fractal characteristics, with some of the companies showing deviations at small and large scales. The fact that, the wavelets belonging to the Daubechies’ (Db) basis enables one to isolate local polynomial trends of different degrees, plays the key role in isolating fluctuations at different scales. One of the primary motivations of this work is to study the emergence of the k-3 behavior [X. Gabaix, P. Gopikrishnan, V. Plerou, H. Stanley, A theory of power law distributions in financial market fluctuations, Nature 423 (2003) 267-270] of the fluctuations starting with high frequency fluctuations. We make use of Db4 and Db6 basis sets to respectively isolate local linear and quadratic trends at different scales in order to study the statistical characteristics of these financial time series. The fluctuations reveal fat tail non-Gaussian behavior, unstable periodic modulations, at finer scales, from which the characteristic k-3 power law behavior emerges at sufficiently large scales. We further identify stable periodic behavior through the continuous Morlet wavelet.

  5. Anomalous behavior of spin fluctuations in polycrystalline NdBa_2Cu_3O_7-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrazek, M. M.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Moulton, W. G.; Halperin, W. P.; Kishio, K.

    2001-03-01

    Critical slowing down of Nd spin fluctuations have been observed in 92K superconductor NdBa_2Cu_3O_7-δ at temperatures well below Tc and orders of magnitude higher than TN ( ~0.5K). Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 at the planar O(2,3) and bridging O(4) oxygen sites have been measured as a function of temperature in fields up to 37T. Data is characterized by an extremely fast relaxation, roughly two orders of magnitude larger than those of YBCO, suggestive of Nd origin. The temperature dependence shows neither Tc nor the pseudo-gap but rather a well-defined field-dependent peak for both sites. Preliminary analysis suggests 1/T1 follows the typical behavior of freezing of spin fluctuations, when the inverse correlation time of the Nd spins τc becomes comparable to NMR frequency, ω τc ~ 1. The field dependence originates from the tail of the power spectrum beyond the 1/τc cutoff. The implications of these results to superconductivity in these systems will be discussed.

  6. Appearance of deterministic mixing behavior from ensembles of fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi

    2018-04-01

    We obtain numerical solutions of the two-fluid fluctuating compressible Navier-Stokes (FCNS) equations, which consistently account for thermal fluctuations from meso- to macroscales, in order to study the effect of such fluctuations on the mixing behavior in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). The numerical method used was successfully verified in two stages: for the deterministic fluxes by comparison against air-SF6 RMI experiment, and for the stochastic terms by comparison against the direct simulation Monte Carlo results for He-Ar RMI. We present results from fluctuating hydrodynamic RMI simulations for three He-Ar systems having length scales with decreasing order of magnitude that span from macroscopic to mesoscopic, with different levels of thermal fluctuations characterized by a nondimensional Boltzmann number (Bo). For a multidimensional FCNS system on a regular Cartesian grid, when using a discretization of a space-time stochastic flux Z (x ,t ) of the form Z (x ,t ) →1 /√{h ▵ t }N (i h ,n Δ t ) for spatial interval h , time interval Δ t , h , and Gaussian noise N should be greater than h0, with h0 corresponding to a cell volume that contains a sufficient number of molecules of the fluid such that the fluctuations are physically meaningful and produce the right equilibrium spectrum. For the mesoscale RMI systems simulated, it was desirable to use a cell size smaller than this limit in order to resolve the viscous shock. This was achieved by using a modified regularization of the noise term via Z (h3,h03)>x ,t →1 /√ ▵ t max(i h ,n Δ t ) , with h0=ξ h ∀h mixing behavior emerges as the ensemble-averaged behavior of several fluctuating instances, whereas when Bo≈1 , a deviation from deterministic behavior is observed. For all cases, the FCNS solution provides bounds on the growth rate of the amplitude of the mixing layer.

  7. University Students' Eating Behaviors: An Exploration of Influencers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Linda; Blotnicky, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Problem: There is evidence that university students have poor eating behaviors that can lead to short and long term negative health effects. Understanding the influences on eating behaviors will aid universities and health agencies in developing effective healthy eating promotion strategies. Purpose and Method: To determine the impact of a range…

  8. Organizational Behavior Analysis Focusing on the University of Texas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    This project analyzes the organizational behavior of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas System is comprised of nine academic and six health institutions. The University of Texas System has over 85,000 employees; the student enrollment is 202,240 with a budget of $2.25 billion dollars. This project has a total of four parts and…

  9. Appearance of deterministic mixing behavior from ensembles of fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    KAUST Repository

    Narayanan, Kiran

    2018-04-19

    We obtain numerical solutions of the two-fluid fluctuating compressible Navier-Stokes (FCNS) equations, which consistently account for thermal fluctuations from meso- to macroscales, in order to study the effect of such fluctuations on the mixing behavior in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). The numerical method used was successfully verified in two stages: for the deterministic fluxes by comparison against air-SF6 RMI experiment, and for the stochastic terms by comparison against the direct simulation Monte Carlo results for He-Ar RMI. We present results from fluctuating hydrodynamic RMI simulations for three He-Ar systems having length scales with decreasing order of magnitude that span from macroscopic to mesoscopic, with different levels of thermal fluctuations characterized by a nondimensional Boltzmann number (Bo). For a multidimensional FCNS system on a regular Cartesian grid, when using a discretization of a space-time stochastic flux Z(x,t) of the form Z(x,t)→1/-tN(ih,nΔt) for spatial interval h, time interval Δt, h, and Gaussian noise N should be greater than h0, with h0 corresponding to a cell volume that contains a sufficient number of molecules of the fluid such that the fluctuations are physically meaningful and produce the right equilibrium spectrum. For the mesoscale RMI systems simulated, it was desirable to use a cell size smaller than this limit in order to resolve the viscous shock. This was achieved by using a modified regularization of the noise term via Zx,t→1/-tmaxh3,h03Nih,nΔt, with h0=ξhbehavior emerges as the ensemble-averaged behavior of several fluctuating instances, whereas when Bo≈1, a deviation from deterministic behavior is observed. For all cases, the FCNS solution provides bounds on the growth rate of the amplitude of the mixing layer.

  10. Appearance of deterministic mixing behavior from ensembles of fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    KAUST Repository

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi

    2018-01-01

    We obtain numerical solutions of the two-fluid fluctuating compressible Navier-Stokes (FCNS) equations, which consistently account for thermal fluctuations from meso- to macroscales, in order to study the effect of such fluctuations on the mixing behavior in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). The numerical method used was successfully verified in two stages: for the deterministic fluxes by comparison against air-SF6 RMI experiment, and for the stochastic terms by comparison against the direct simulation Monte Carlo results for He-Ar RMI. We present results from fluctuating hydrodynamic RMI simulations for three He-Ar systems having length scales with decreasing order of magnitude that span from macroscopic to mesoscopic, with different levels of thermal fluctuations characterized by a nondimensional Boltzmann number (Bo). For a multidimensional FCNS system on a regular Cartesian grid, when using a discretization of a space-time stochastic flux Z(x,t) of the form Z(x,t)→1/-tN(ih,nΔt) for spatial interval h, time interval Δt, h, and Gaussian noise N should be greater than h0, with h0 corresponding to a cell volume that contains a sufficient number of molecules of the fluid such that the fluctuations are physically meaningful and produce the right equilibrium spectrum. For the mesoscale RMI systems simulated, it was desirable to use a cell size smaller than this limit in order to resolve the viscous shock. This was achieved by using a modified regularization of the noise term via Zx,t→1/-tmaxh3,h03Nih,nΔt, with h0=ξhbehavior emerges as the ensemble-averaged behavior of several fluctuating instances, whereas when Bo≈1, a deviation from deterministic behavior is observed. For all cases, the FCNS solution provides bounds on the growth rate of the amplitude of the mixing layer.

  11. Universal scaling behaviors of meteorological variables’ volatility and relations with original records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feiyu; Yuan, Naiming; Fu, Zuntao; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-10-01

    Volatility series (defined as the magnitude of the increments between successive elements) of five different meteorological variables over China are analyzed by means of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA for short). Universal scaling behaviors are found in all volatility records, whose scaling exponents take similar distributions with similar mean values and standard deviations. To reconfirm the relation between long-range correlations in volatility and nonlinearity in original series, DFA is also applied to the magnitude records (defined as the absolute values of the original records). The results clearly indicate that the nonlinearity of the original series is more pronounced in the magnitude series.

  12. Conductance fluctuations in high mobility monolayer graphene: Nonergodicity, lack of determinism and chaotic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, C R; Mineharu, M; Matsunaga, M; Matsumoto, N; Chuang, C; Ochiai, Y; Kim, G-H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ferry, D K; Aoki, N

    2016-09-09

    We have fabricated a high mobility device, composed of a monolayer graphene flake sandwiched between two sheets of hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance fluctuations as functions of a back gate voltage and magnetic field were obtained to check for ergodicity. Non-linear dynamics concepts were used to study the nature of these fluctuations. The distribution of eigenvalues was estimated from the conductance fluctuations with Gaussian kernels and it indicates that the carrier motion is chaotic at low temperatures. We argue that a two-phase dynamical fluid model best describes the transport in this system and can be used to explain the violation of the so-called ergodic hypothesis found in graphene.

  13. Estrous cycle fluctuations in sex and ingestive behavior are accentuated by exercise or cold ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhay, Amir; Benton, Noah A; Klingerman, Candice M; Krishnamoorthy, Kaila; Brozek, Jeremy M; Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". In female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), low circulating levels of ovarian steroids are associated with increased food hoarding and decreased sexual motivation, but these effects are exaggerated in food-restricted females. To determine whether cold ambient temperature has the same effects as food restriction, groups of hamsters were fed ad libitum while they were housed at either 5 °C or 22 °C, and then tested for behavior for 90 min on each day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 22 °C, high levels of sexual motivation and low levels of food hoarding were seen every day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 5 °C, high levels of sexual motivation were restricted to the periovulatory day. On the three nonestrous days, these females showed high levels of food hoarding, but not food intake. A separate cohort of females were provided with access to running wheels and housed at 22 °C. They showed high levels of sexual motivation restricted to the periovulatory day, similar to the pattern of sexual motivation seen in cold-housed females. Unlike cold-housed females, those with running wheels showed low levels of food hoarding and high levels of food intake. Food restriction, cold housing, and access to wheels had no significant effect on plasma estradiol or progesterone concentrations, but significantly decreased plasma leptin concentrations. All three energetic challenges unmask estrous cycle fluctuations in sexual motivation that are obscured in laboratory conditions, i.e., isolation in a small cage with an overabundance of food. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical behavior of order-parameter fluctuations in liquid 4He near T/sub lambda/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, B.; Perzynski, R.; Salin, D.

    1979-01-01

    We hve measured the critical attenuation of first sound in liquid 4 He from 550 to 1700 MHz. We can describe the attenuation due to the fluctuations of the order parameter up to 1.7 GHz, using experimental data at lower frequencies from various authors. Above T/sub lambda/, the fluctuations are the only phenomena and are analyzed with a scaling function of ωtau 2 with a characteristic time tau 2 = 2 x 10 -12 x t/sup -1.062/ sec, t = vertical-bar (T-T/sub lambda/)/T/sub lambda/vertical-bar. Below T/sub lambda/, several phenomena are present. In the range of 1 GHz, the main contribution is due to the fluctuations. We demonstrate experimentally that the fluctuation attenuation is not symmetric about T/sub lambda/. We fit our data with a scaling function of ωtau 2

  15. Cognitive benefits of last night's sleep: daily variations in children's sleep behavior are related to working memory fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könen, Tanja; Dirk, Judith; Schmiedek, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested substantial fluctuations of cognitive performance in adults both across and within days, but very little is known about such fluctuations in children. Children's sleep behavior might have an important influence on their daily cognitive resources, but so far this has not been investigated in terms of naturally occurring within-person variations in children's everyday lives. In an ambulatory assessment study, 110 elementary school children (8-11 years old) completed sleep items and working memory tasks on smartphones several times per day in school and at home for 4 weeks. Parents provided general information about the children and their sleep habits. We identified substantial fluctuations in the children's daily cognitive performance, self-reported nightly sleep quality, time in bed, and daytime tiredness. All three facets were predictive of performance fluctuations in children's school and daily life. Sleep quality and time in bed were predictive of performance in the morning, and afternoon performance was related to current tiredness. The children with a lower average performance level showed a higher within-person coupling between morning performance and sleep quality. Our findings contribute important insights regarding a potential source of performance fluctuations in children. The effect of varying cognitive resources should be investigated further because it might impact children's daily social, emotional, and learning-related functioning. Theories about children's cognitive and educational development should consider fluctuations on micro-longitudinal scales (e.g., day-to-day) to identify possible mechanisms behind long-term changes. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  16. Polarization fluctuation behavior of lanthanum substituted Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Ni; Xiang, Ping-Hua, E-mail: phxiang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Xing; Tang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Ping-Xiong; Duan, Chun-Gang; Chu, Jun-Hao [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Polarization fluctuation behavior of lanthanum substituted Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Bi{sub 4−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}, BLT) ferroelectric thin films has been examined. Remnant polarization exhibits an initial increase (P{sub up}, 1–10{sup 6} cycles) and a subsequent decrease (P{sub down}, 10{sup 6}–10{sup 9} cycles) with switching cycles, whereas the dielectric constant exhibits a continuous decrease. By careful investigations on the effect of switching frequency and annealing atmosphere on the polarization fluctuation characteristics, we propose that this polarization fluctuation characteristic of BLT films is attributed to the competition between domain pinning and passive layer growing effect, due to the redistribution of oxygen vacancy related defect under external applied field. P{sub up} behavior is dominated by the unpinning of pinned domain, while P{sub down} behavior is dominated by the reduction of applied field on BLT bulk layer, due to the growing of the passive layer between BLT and Pt electrode. By assuming the dielectric constant and initial thickness of passive layer, the passive layer was estimated to be about 2–5 times thicker than the initial state after 10{sup 9} cycling.

  17. Physiological Fluctuations in Brain Temperature as a Factor Affecting Electrochemical Evaluations of Extracellular Glutamate and Glucose in Behavioral Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rate of any chemical reaction or process occurring in the brain depends on temperature. While it is commonly believed that brain temperature is a stable, tightly regulated homeostatic parameter, it fluctuates within 1–4 °C following exposure to salient arousing stimuli and neuroactive drugs, and during different behaviors. These temperature fluctuations should affect neural activity and neural functions, but the extent of this influence on neurochemical measurements in brain tissue of freely moving animals remains unclear. In this Review, we present the results of amperometric evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in awake, behaving rats and discuss how naturally occurring fluctuations in brain temperature affect these measurements. While this temperature contribution appears to be insignificant for glucose because its extracellular concentrations are large, it is a serious factor for electrochemical evaluations of glutamate, which is present in brain tissue at much lower levels, showing smaller phasic fluctuations. We further discuss experimental strategies for controlling the nonspecific chemical and physical contributions to electrochemical currents detected by enzyme-based biosensors to provide greater selectivity and reliability of neurochemical measurements in behaving animals. PMID:23448428

  18. Fluctuations of Imbalanced Fermionic Superfluids in Two Dimensions Induce Continuous Quantum Phase Transitions and Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Strack

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the nature of superfluid pairing in imbalanced Fermi mixtures in two spatial dimensions. We present evidence that the combined effect of Fermi surface mismatch and order parameter fluctuations of the superfluid condensate can lead to continuous quantum phase transitions from a normal Fermi mixture to an intermediate Sarma-Liu-Wilczek superfluid with two gapless Fermi surfaces—even when mean-field theory (incorrectly predicts a first-order transition to a phase-separated “Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer plus excess fermions” ground state. We propose a mechanism for non-Fermi-liquid behavior from repeated scattering processes between the two Fermi surfaces and fluctuating Cooper pairs. Prospects for experimental observation with ultracold atoms are discussed.

  19. Constructive influence of noise flatness and friction on the resonant behavior of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Katrin; Mankin, Romi; Rekker, Astrid

    2009-05-01

    The influences of noise flatness and friction coefficient on the long-time behavior of the first two moments and the correlation function for the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force are considered. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a trichotomous noise. The study is a follow up of the previous investigation of a stochastic oscillator [Phys. Rev. E 78, 031120 (2008)], where the connection between the occurrence of energetic instability and stochastic multiresonance is established. Here we report some unexpected results not considered in the previous work. Notably, we have found a nonmonotonic dependence of several stochastic resonance characteristics such as spectral amplification, variance of the output signal, and signal-to-noise ratio on the friction coefficient and on the noise flatness. In particular, in certain parameter regions spectral amplification exhibits a resonancelike enhancement at intermediate values of the friction coefficient.

  20. Investigation of Universal Behavior in Symmetric Diblock Copolymer Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medapuram, Pavani

    Coarse-grained theories of dense polymer liquids such as block copolymer melts predict a universal dependence of equilibrium properties on a few dimensionless parameters. For symmetric diblock copolymer melts, such theories predict a universal dependence on only chieN and N¯, where chie is an effective interaction parameter, N is the degree of polymerization, and N¯ is a measure of overlap. This thesis focuses on testing the universal behavior hypothesis by comparing results for various properties obtained from different coarse-grained simulation models to each other. Specifically, results from pairs of simulations of different models that have been designed to have matched values of N¯ are compared over a range of values of chiN. The use of vastly different simulation models allows us to cover a vast range of chi eN ≃ 200 - 8000 that includes most of the experimentally relevant range. Properties studied here include collective and single-chain correlations in the disordered phase, block and chain radii of gyration in the disordered phase, the value of chieN at the order-disorder transition (ODT), the free energy per chain, the latent heat of transition, the layer spacing, the composition profile, and compression modulus in the ordered phase. All results strongly support the universal scaling hypothesis, even for rather short chains, confirming that it is indeed possible to give an accurate universal description of simulation models that differ in many details. The underlying universality becomes apparent, however, only if data are analyzed using an adequate estimate of chie, which we obtained by fitting the structure factor S( q) in the disordered state to predictions of the recently developed renormalized one-loop (ROL) theory. The ROL theory is shown to provide an excellent description of the dependence of S(q on chain length and thermodynamic conditions for all models, even for very short chains, if we allow for the existence of a nonlinear dependence of

  1. Interacting price model and fluctuation behavior analysis from Lempel–Ziv complexity and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A financial price model is developed based on the voter interacting system in this work. The Lempel–Ziv complexity is introduced to analyze the complex behaviors of the stock market. Some stock market stylized facts including fat tails, absence of autocorrelation and volatility clustering are investigated for the proposed price model firstly. Then the complexity of fluctuation behaviors of the real stock markets and the proposed price model are mainly explored by Lempel–Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy (MWPE) analysis. A series of LZC analyses of the returns and the absolute returns of daily closing prices and moving average prices are performed. Moreover, the complexity of the returns, the absolute returns and their corresponding intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) derived from the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with MWPE is also investigated. The numerical empirical study shows similar statistical and complex behaviors between the proposed price model and the real stock markets, which exhibits that the proposed model is feasible to some extent. - Highlights: • A financial price dynamical model is developed based on the voter interacting system. • Lempel–Ziv complexity is the firstly applied to investigate the stock market dynamics system. • MWPE is employed to explore the complexity fluctuation behaviors of the stock market. • Empirical results show the feasibility of the proposed financial model.

  2. Interacting price model and fluctuation behavior analysis from Lempel–Ziv complexity and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui, E-mail: lirui1401@bjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-08

    A financial price model is developed based on the voter interacting system in this work. The Lempel–Ziv complexity is introduced to analyze the complex behaviors of the stock market. Some stock market stylized facts including fat tails, absence of autocorrelation and volatility clustering are investigated for the proposed price model firstly. Then the complexity of fluctuation behaviors of the real stock markets and the proposed price model are mainly explored by Lempel–Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy (MWPE) analysis. A series of LZC analyses of the returns and the absolute returns of daily closing prices and moving average prices are performed. Moreover, the complexity of the returns, the absolute returns and their corresponding intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) derived from the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with MWPE is also investigated. The numerical empirical study shows similar statistical and complex behaviors between the proposed price model and the real stock markets, which exhibits that the proposed model is feasible to some extent. - Highlights: • A financial price dynamical model is developed based on the voter interacting system. • Lempel–Ziv complexity is the firstly applied to investigate the stock market dynamics system. • MWPE is employed to explore the complexity fluctuation behaviors of the stock market. • Empirical results show the feasibility of the proposed financial model.

  3. Steady State Dynamic Operating Behavior of Universal Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khan Burdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed investigation of the universal motor is developed and used for various dynamic steady state and transient operating conditions of loads. In the investigation, output torque, motor speed, input current, input/output power and efficiency are computed, compared and analyzed for different loads. While this paper discusses the steady-state behavior of the universal motor, another companion paper, ?Transient dynamic behavior of universal motor?, will discuss its transient behavior in detail. A non-linear generalized electric machine model of the motor is considered for the analysis. This study was essential to investigate effect of output load on input current, power, speed and efficiency of the motor during operations. Previously such investigation is not known

  4. Barrancaceae: A new green algal lineage with structural and behavioral adaptations to a fluctuating environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisová, Lenka; Reyes, Carolina Pérez; Álamo, Virginia Cruz; Quintana, Antera Martel; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-09-01

    To enhance our knowledge of the diversity of microalgae, a phycological survey of the Canary Islands (Spain) was undertaken. Here we report the discovery of a (semi)terrestrial green filamentous alga isolated from a steep volcanic canyon on La Palma. This alga is continually exposed to changing weather conditions (floods vs. droughts) and thus provides a good opportunity to investigate possible adaptations to a semiterrestrial habitat with large fluctuations of environmental parameters. We used axenic cultures, simulated flood and drought stresses and studied their effect on the life history of the alga using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy including fluorescent staining. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses using rDNA sequence comparisons were performed. Three specific life-history traits that likely represent adaptations to the fluctuating environment of the canyon were observed: (1) fragmentation through "filament splitting", a unique branching mechanism not reported before in algae and initiated by formation of oblique cross walls, (2) aplanospore formation, and (3) reproduction by multiflagellate zoospores with 4-24 flagella arranged in groups of four. Phylogenetic analyses identified the alga as Barranca multiflagellata gen. et sp. nov. (Barrancaceae fam. nov., Chaetophorales, Chlorophyceae). Moreover, the Chaetophoraceae Greville, 1824 was emended and a new family, Uronemataceae (fam. nov.) erected. The discovery of Barrancaceae fam. nov. highlights the importance of investigating nonconventional habitats to explore microalgal diversity. The reproductive versatility demonstrated by Barranca suggests adaptation to a semiterrestrial habitat with large fluctuations in water availability. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  5. Logarithmic spatial variations and universal f-1 power spectra of temperature fluctuations in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P M; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-05-02

    We report measurements of the temperature variance σ(2)(z,r) and frequency power spectrum P(f,z,r) (z is the distance from the sample bottom and r the radial coordinate) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) for Rayleigh numbers Ra = 1.6 × 10(13) and 1.1 × 10(15) and for a Prandtl number Pr ≃ 0.8 for a sample with a height L = 224 cm and aspect ratio D/L=0.50 (D is the diameter). For z/L ≲ 0.1 σ(2)(z,r) was consistent with a logarithmic dependence on z, and there was a universal (independent of Ra, r, and z) normalized spectrum which, for 0.02 ≲ fτ(0) ≲ 0.2, had the form P(fτ(0)) = P(0)(fτ(0))(-1) with P(0) = 0.208 ± 0.008 a universal constant. Here τ(0) = sqrt[2R] where R is the radius of curvature of the temperature autocorrelation function C(τ) at τ = 0. For z/L ≃ 0.5 the measurements yielded P(fτ(0))∼(fτ(0))(-α) with α in the range from 3/2 to 5/3. All the results are similar to those for velocity fluctuations in shear flows at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, suggesting the possibility of an analogy between the flows that is yet to be determined in detail.

  6. Fluctuations in nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and glucose during motivated glucose-drinking behavior: dissecting the neurochemistry of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken T; Myal, Stephanie E; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2015-02-01

    While motivated behavior involves multiple neurochemical systems, few studies have focused on the role of glutamate, the brain's excitatory neurotransmitter, and glucose, the energetic substrate of neural activity in reward-related neural processes. Here, we used high-speed amperometry with enzyme-based substrate-sensitive and control, enzyme-free biosensors to examine second-scale fluctuations in the extracellular levels of these substances in the nucleus accumbens shell during glucose-drinking behavior in trained rats. Glutamate rose rapidly after the presentation of a glucose-containing cup and before the initiation of drinking (reward seeking), decreased more slowly to levels below baseline during consumption (sensory reward), and returned to baseline when the ingested glucose reached the brain (metabolic reward). When water was substituted for glucose, glutamate rapidly increased with cup presentation and in contrast to glucose drinking, increased above baseline after rats tasted the water and refused to drink further. Therefore, extracellular glutamate show distinct changes associated with key events of motivated drinking behavior and opposite dynamics during sensory and metabolic components of reward. In contrast to glutamate, glucose increased at each stimulus and behavioral event, showing a sustained elevation during the entire behavior and a robust post-ingestion rise that correlated with the gradual return of glutamate levels to their baseline. By comparing active drinking with passive intra-gastric glucose delivery, we revealed that fluctuations in extracellular glucose are highly dynamic, reflecting a balance between rapid delivery because of neural activity, intense metabolism, and the influence of ingested glucose reaching the brain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Fundamental study of FC-72 pool boiling surface temperature fluctuations and bubble behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Alison R.

    A heater designed to monitor surface temperature fluctuations during pool boiling experiments while the bubbles were simultaneously being observed has been fabricated and tested. The heat source was a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) layer commercially deposited on a fused quartz substrate. Four copper-nickel thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) on the heater surface measured the surface temperature, while a thin layer of sapphire or fused silica provided electrical insulation between the TFTCs and the ITO. The TFTCs were micro-fabricated using the liftoff process to deposit the nickel and copper metal films. The TFTC elements were 50 mum wide and overlapped to form a 25 mum by 25 mum junction. TFTC voltages were recorded by a DAQ at a sampling rate of 50 kHz. A high-speed CCD camera recorded bubble images from below the heater at 2000 frames/second. A trigger sent to the camera by the DAQ synchronized the bubble images and the surface temperature data. As the bubbles and their contact rings grew over the TFTC junction, correlations between bubble behavior and surface temperature changes were demonstrated. On the heaters with fused silica insulation layers, 1--2°C temperature drops on the order of 1 ms occurred as the contact ring moved over the TFTC junction during bubble growth and as the contact ring moved back over the TFTC junction during bubble departure. These temperature drops during bubble growth and departure were due to microlayer evaporation and liquid rewetting the heated surface, respectively. Microlayer evaporation was not distinguished as the primary method of heat removal from the surface. Heaters with sapphire insulation layers did not display the measurable temperature drops observed with the fused silica heaters. The large thermal diffusivity of the sapphire compared to the fused silica was determined as the reason for the absence of these temperature drops. These findings were confirmed by a comparison of temperature drops in a 2-D simulation of

  8. Universal bursty behavior in the air transportation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidetaka; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Social activities display bursty behavior characterized by heavy-tailed interevent time distributions. We examine the bursty behavior of airplanes' arrivals in hub airports. The analysis indicates that the air transportation system universally follows a power-law interarrival time distribution with an exponent α=2.5 and an exponential cutoff. Moreover, we investigate the mechanism of this bursty behavior by introducing a simple model to describe it. In addition, we compare the extent of the hub-and-spoke structure and the burstiness of various airline networks in the system. Remarkably, the results suggest that the hub-and-spoke network of the system and the carriers' strategy to facilitate transit are the origins of this universality.

  9. A note on chaotic vs. stochastic behavior of the high-latitude ionospheric plasma density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Wernik

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Four data sets of density fluctuations measured in-situ by the Dynamics Explorer (DE 2 were analyzed in an attempt to study chaotic nature of the high-latitude turbulence and, in this way to complement the conventional spectral analysis. It has been found that the probability distribution function of density differences is far from Gaussian and similar to that observed in the intermittent fluid or MBD turbulence. This indicates that ionospheric density fluctuations are not stochastic but coherent to some extent. Wayland's and surrogate data tests for determinism in a time series of density data allowed us to differentiate between regions of intense shear and moderate shear. We observe that in the region of strong field aligned currents (FAC and intense shear, or along the convection in the collisional regime, ionospheric turbulence behaves like a random noise with non-Gaussian statistics implying that the underlying physical process is nondeterministic. On the other hand, when FACs are weak, and shear is moderate or observations made in the inertial regime the turbulence is chaotic. The attractor dimension is lowest (1.9 for 'old' convected irregularities. The dimension 3.2 is found for turbulence in the inertial regime and considerably smaller (2.4 in the collisional regime. It is suggested that a high dimension in the inertial regime may be caused by a complicated velocity structure in the shear instability region.

  10. Evidence for nonuniversal behavior of paraconductivity caused by predominant short-wavelength Gaussian fluctuations in YBa2Cu3O6.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauzzi, A.; Pavuna, D.

    1995-01-01

    We report on in-plane paraconductivity measurements in thin YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.9 films. Our analysis of the data shows that the temperature dependence of paraconductivity is affected by lattice disorder and deviates at all temperatures from the universal power laws predicted by both scaling and mean-field theories. This gives evidence for the absence of critical fluctuations and for the failure of the Aslamazov-Larkin universal relation between critical exponent and dimensionality of the spectrum of Gaussian fluctuations. We account quantitatively for the data within the experimental error by introducing a short-wavelength cutoff into this spectrum. This implies that three-dimensional short-wavelength Gaussian fluctuations dominate in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.9 and suggests a rapid attenuation of these fluctuations with decreasing wavelength in short-coherence-length systems as compared to the case of the conventional Ginzburg-Landau theory

  11. Association between Eating Behavior and Academic Performance in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Macarena; Durán, Elizabeth; Matheus, Alexis; Durán-Agüero, Samuel; Obregón, Ana María; Ramírez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between academic performance and eating behavior in university students in Chile. A total of 680 college students, 409 (60%) women and 271 (40%) men, were randomly recruited and the mean age of the entire sample was 26. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), which evaluates 3 dimensions of eating behavior-cognitive restriction (limiting own intake), uncontrolled eating (inclination to eat), and emotional eating (control of food intake in the context of negative emotions)-was used. Academic performance was measured by the grade point average (GPA) and was associated with eating behavior. Women had significantly higher scores in the "emotional eating" dimension than men (p = 0.002). The eating behavior analysis showed that female students with higher GPAs (above 5.5) had statistically significantly lower uncontrolled eating scores (p = 0.03) and higher cognitive restriction scores (p = 0.05) than women with lower academic performance (below 5.5). There were no significant associations between eating behavior and academic performance in men. A positive association between eating behavior and academic performance was observed in female university students in Chile. Further studies are needed to explore the causes of this association and determine how to improve the nutritional habits of this population.

  12. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral-Theory-Based Skill Training on Academic Procrastination Behaviors of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Betül; Avci, Rasit

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral theory (CBT) psycho-educational group program on the academic procrastination behaviors of university students and the persistence of any training effect. This was a quasi-experimental research based on an experimental and control group pretest, posttest, and followup test model.…

  13. Thermodynamical fluctuations and critical behavior in weakly disordered YBCO thin and ultra-thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesueur, J.; Aprili, M.; Degoy, S.; Chambonnet, D.; Keller, D.

    1996-01-01

    The specific role of disorder in the transport properties of YBCO has been investigated, using both light-ion irradiation of thin films to finely tune the amount of atomic disorder, and ultra-thin films grown to study possible dimensional effects. For weak disorder, the samples display a resistive transition typical of the mean-field paraconductive regime of a homogeneous media, well described by the Lawrence and Doniach model for layered superconductors. As the disorder increases, two effects take place. First, the c-axis coherence length becomes shorter, leading to a more anisotropic material, as shown by the excess conductivity above T c . Second, an incipient granularity is revealed, leading to a less sharper transition, which is analyzed within the random 3D XY critical model for the paracoherence transition. Two main results are derived: an experimental test of the Ginzburg criteria for the paracoherence transition, and a new fluctuation regime in nanometric grain size superconductors

  14. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekker, A., E-mail: Astrid.Rekker@tlu.ee; Mankin, R., E-mail: Romi.Mankin@tlu.ee [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University, 29 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2015-10-28

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer’s response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed.

  15. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekker, A.; Mankin, R.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer's response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed.

  16. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekker, A.; Mankin, R.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer’s response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed

  17. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative model for breakfast behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eHarvey-Golding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Presently there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program.

  18. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoutre, C.; Guillaument, R.; Marre, S.; Garrabos, Y.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μ K ) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena.

  19. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010-2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees' tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations.

  20. University Student Awareness of Skin Cancer: Behaviors, Recognition, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Estaville, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer, and it often is preventable. The authors sought to evaluate behavior and knowledge regarding skin cancer among students at a Texas university. The authors recruited a diverse group of students in terms of sex, age, and ethnicity to participate in a survey regarding knowledge of skin cancer signs, use of tanning beds, and performance of self-assessment for skin cancer. Participating students could complete surveys in classrooms, at health fairs, or online via Survey Monkey. The authors examined data for the 3 variables in relation to sex, ethnicity, and age. A total of 512 responses were completed. Female students completed 371 (72.46%) surveys, and male students completed 141 (27.54%). The ethnicity of student participants was nearly evenly split among whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. Ethnicity was the most significant factor influencing the knowledge of skin cancer and behaviors to prevent it. Specifically, Hispanic and African American students possessed a lower level of skin cancer awareness. More female students than male students used tanning beds, and although use was self-reported as infrequent, the results imply that 4500 of the university's students might use tanning beds, which is concerning if extrapolated to other university student populations in Texas. Behavioral intervention is critical in reducing students' risk of skin cancer in later years, and university students must acquire knowledge to increase their awareness of skin health and to minimize their risk of developing skin cancer. Radiation therapists are uniquely positioned to share knowledge of skin cancer. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  1. Universal Inverse Power-Law Distribution for Fractal Fluctuations in Dynamical Systems: Applications for Predictability of Inter-Annual Variability of Indian and USA Region Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all scales indicating long-range correlations and, therefore, the statistical normal distribution with implicit assumption of independence, fixed mean and standard deviation cannot be used for description and quantification of fractal data sets. The author has developed a general systems theory based on classical statistical physics for fractal fluctuations which predicts the following. (1) The fractal fluctuations signify an underlying eddy continuum, the larger eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller-scale fluctuations. (2) The probability distribution of eddy amplitudes and the variance (square of eddy amplitude) spectrum of fractal fluctuations follow the universal Boltzmann inverse power law expressed as a function of the golden mean. (3) Fractal fluctuations are signatures of quantum-like chaos since the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability densities analogous to the sub-atomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the photon or electron. (4) The model predicted distribution is very close to statistical normal distribution for moderate events within two standard deviations from the mean but exhibits a fat long tail that are associated with hazardous extreme events. Continuous periodogram power spectral analyses of available GHCN annual total rainfall time series for the period 1900-2008 for Indian and USA stations show that the power spectra and the corresponding probability distributions follow model predicted universal inverse power law form signifying an eddy continuum structure underlying the observed inter-annual variability of rainfall. On a global scale, man-made greenhouse gas related atmospheric warming would result in intensification of natural climate variability, seen immediately in high frequency fluctuations such as QBO and ENSO and even shorter timescales. Model concepts and results of analyses are discussed with reference

  2. Small-scale angular fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and the existence of isolated large-scale structures in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicoechea, L.J.; Sanz, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative fluctuation of the present temperature associated with the microwave background radiation (MBR) on a small angular scale, (deltaT/T) 0 , can be related for a general inhomogeneous cosmological model to the kinematical quantities, their gradients, and the Weyl tensor through the geodesic deviation equation. We apply this result to calculate the induction of temperature fluctuations in the MBR by a spherically symmetric cluster (or void) of matter or radiation or both, considered as a perturbation in a flat Friedmann universe, with negligible pressure. For an isolated object (void or cluster) with radius roughly-equal10 3 h -1 Mpc and located outside our present horizon, we have found, taking into account recent data on the anisotropies of the MBR at an angular scale 6 0 , that the relative mass fluctuation is bounded by deltaVertical BarM/MVertical Bar 2 h -1 Mpc and distance from the observer to the center approx. =10h -1 Mpc), the observational angular fluctuations of the MBR imply that deltaVertical BarM/MVertical Bar< or approx. =10%

  3. Effects of task and age on the magnitude and structure of force fluctuations: insights into underlying neuro-behavioral processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieluf, Solveig; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Berton, Eric; Jirsa, Viktor K; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita

    2015-03-13

    The present study aimed at characterizing the effects of increasing (relative) force level and aging on isometric force control. To achieve this objective and to infer changes in the underlying control mechanisms, measures of information transmission, as well as magnitude and time-frequency structure of behavioral variability were applied to force-time-series. Older adults were found to be weaker, more variable, and less efficient than young participants. As a function of force level, efficiency followed an inverted-U shape in both groups, suggesting a similar organization of the force control system. The time-frequency structure of force output fluctuations was only significantly affected by task conditions. Specifically, a narrower spectral distribution with more long-range correlations and an inverted-U pattern of complexity changes were observed with increasing force level. Although not significant older participants displayed on average a less complex behavior for low and intermediate force levels. The changes in force signal's regularity presented a strong dependence on time-scales, which significantly interacted with age and condition. An inverted-U profile was only observed for the time-scale relevant to the sensorimotor control process. However, in both groups the peak was not aligned with the optimum of efficiency. Our results support the view that behavioral variability, in terms of magnitude and structure, has a functional meaning and affords non-invasive markers of the adaptations of the sensorimotor control system to various constraints. The measures of efficiency and variability ought to be considered as complementary since they convey specific information on the organization of control processes. The reported weak age effect on variability and complexity measures suggests that the behavioral expression of the loss of complexity hypothesis is not as straightforward as conventionally admitted. However, group differences did not completely vanish

  4. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Universal Behavior of Few-Boson Systems Using Potential Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kievsky, A.; Viviani, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, R.; Gattobigio, M.; Deltuva, A.

    2017-01-01

    The universal behavior of a three-boson system close to the unitary limit is encoded in a simple dependence of many observables in terms of few parameters. For example the product of the three-body parameter κ_∗ and the two-body scattering length a, κ_∗a depends on the angle ξ defined by E_3/E_2=tan"2ξ. A similar dependence is observed in the ratio a_A_D/a with a_A_D the boson-dimer scattering length. We use a two-parameter potential to determine this simple behavior and, as an application, to compute a_A_D for the case of three "4He atoms. (author)

  6. Scale-free fluctuations in behavioral performance: delineating changes in spontaneous behavior of humans with induced sleep deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremi K Ochab

    Full Text Available The timing and dynamics of many diverse behaviors of mammals, e.g., patterns of animal foraging or human communication in social networks exhibit complex self-similar properties reproducible over multiple time scales. In this paper, we analyze spontaneous locomotor activity of healthy individuals recorded in two different conditions: during a week of regular sleep and a week of chronic partial sleep deprivation. After separating activity from rest with a pre-defined activity threshold, we have detected distinct statistical features of duration times of these two states. The cumulative distributions of activity periods follow a stretched exponential shape, and remain similar for both control and sleep deprived individuals. In contrast, rest periods, which follow power-law statistics over two orders of magnitude, have significantly distinct distributions for these two groups and the difference emerges already after the first night of shortened sleep. We have found steeper distributions for sleep deprived individuals, which indicates fewer long rest periods and more turbulent behavior. This separation of power-law exponents is the main result of our investigations, and might constitute an objective measure demonstrating the severity of sleep deprivation and the effects of sleep disorders.

  7. Drinking behaviors by stress level in Korean university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Young

    2012-04-01

    The purposes of this study are to estimate the stress level of university students, and to verify the relationships between stress level and drinking behavior. A questionnaire survey was administered to 430 university students in the Gangwon area in Korea from November 5 to November 28, 2008, and data from 391 students were used for the final statistical analysis. The most stressful factor was "Worry about academic achievements" (2.86 by Likert-type 4 point scale). The subjects were divided into two groups, a low stress group (≤ 65.0) and a high stress group (≥ 66.0), by the mean value (65.1) and median value (66.0) of the stress levels. The drinking frequency was not different between the two stress groups, but the amount of alcohol consumption was significantly different (P stress group than in the higher stress group. In addition, factor 6, "Lack of learning ability", was negatively correlated with drinking frequency and the amount of alcohol consumption (P academic achievements", was negatively correlated with the amount of drinking (P stress group showed significantly higher scores on several items in the categories of motives (P stress group. Our results imply that university students at the lower stress level may drink more from social motives in positive drinking environments, while those at the higher stress level may have more problematic-drinking despite their smaller amount of alcohol consumption.

  8. FOOD BEHAVIOR, BODY IMAGE AND ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICES OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Pereira MONTEIRO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this study was to assess food behavior, self-image perception and anthropometric indices of college students. This was a cross-sectional study with 54 students in a public university. The lifestyle and self-image perception was collected using a standardized questionnaire tested. Food behavior was evaluated through the Eating Attitudes Test. Body composition was assessed for Body Mass Index (BMI, circumferences, skinfold analysis and bioelectrical impedance (BIA. The statistics tests used were Chi-square and Pearson correlation (p< 0.05. The students had 19 to 27 years old, 96.3% were non-smokers, 46.3% drank alcoholic beverages and 37.0% practiced regular physical activity. Most of the students (75.5% were considered normal weight (BMI but the body fat percentage was found to be above average. Regarding self- image perception, 40.7% felt overweight. Observing food behavior results, 12.0% were at risk of developing eating disorders. Positive correlations were verifi ed between BMI with skinfold and skinfold with bioelectrical impedance. It was concluded that a considerable number of the college students assessed had a distorted self-image perception. Many of them had normal weight but with high body fat percentage. This study is relevant to investigate the risk of eating disorders and body image perception as part of the nutritional assessment.

  9. Dephasing rates for weak localization and universal conductance fluctuations in two dimensional Si:P and Ge:P δ-layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Saquib; Mahapatra, S; Scappucci, G; Klesse, W M; Simmons, M Y; Ghosh, Arindam

    2017-05-04

    We report quantum transport measurements on two dimensional (2D) Si:P and Ge:P δ-layers and compare the inelastic scattering rates relevant for weak localization (WL) and universal conductance fluctuations (UCF) for devices of various doping densities (0.3-2.5 × 10 18 m -2 ) at low temperatures (0.3-4.2 K). The phase breaking rate extracted experimentally from measurements of WL correction to conductivity and UCF agree well with each other within the entire temperature range. This establishes that WL and UCF, being the outcome of quantum interference phenomena, are governed by the same dephasing rate.

  10. Asymptotic behavior of correlation functions for electric potential and field fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The correlations of the electric potential fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma are studied for large distances between the observation points. The two-point correlation function for these fluctuations is known to decay slowly for large distances, even if exponential clustering holds for

  11. Classical behavior of a scalar field in the inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nambu, Yasusada; Nakao, Ken-ichi.

    1987-09-01

    Extending the coarse-graining approach of Starobinsky, we formulate a theory to deal with the dynamics of a scalar field in inflationary universe models. We find a set of classical Langevin equations which describes the large scale behavior of the scalar field, provided that the coarse-grained size is greater than the effective compton wavelength of the scalar field. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is also derived which is defined on the phase space of the scalar field. We show that our theory is essentially equivalent to the one-loop field theory in de Sitter space and reduces to that of Starobinsky in a strong limit of the slow roll-over condition. Analysis of a simple Higgs potential model is done and the implications are discussed. (author)

  12. Sexual behavior and health problems in university students, University of Antioquia, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga Posada, L; Soto Vélez, C; Vélez, D J

    1995-12-01

    Authorities at the University of Antioquia, Colombia, felt it would be advisable to institute a student orientation program aimed at preventing health problems resulting from risky sexual behavior related to new cultural trends. The purpose of the work reported in this article was to collect information on the existing situation and provide appropriate advice to the Health Division of the University Welfare Office. For this purpose a survey was conducted with the voluntary participation of 836 students enrolled in their final year of study. A survey form containing 45 questions designed to elicit demographic and sexual behavior data was self-administered anonymously by the participating students. Among the participants who were sexually active, 10.9% (17.2% of the men, 3.3% of the women) said they had contracted some variety of sexually transmitted disease (STD). The most common diagnoses were gonorrhea (42%), genital warts (23%), and genital herpes (19%). The risk of contracting STD was 4.2 times greater in those reporting sex with strangers; 3.4 times greater in those reporting four or more sexual partners; and 2.5 times greater in those reporting homosexual relations, as compared to students not practicing such behaviors. Some 28.4% of 790 survey respondents or their partners had been pregnant; 49% of these pregnancies had terminated in abortions, 77% of these being induced abortions. Only 51.3% of the survey participants reported customary use of contraceptives, those most frequently cited being condoms (by 32% of the users), pills (20%), the rhythm method (18%), and extravaginal ejaculation (17%). Generally speaking, it appears that participating students had received little sex education. To obtain information, they had turned primarily to friends and books. Those who said they had received adequate sex education at home participated somewhat less frequently in risky behaviors but appeared a little less apt to have used contraceptives and a little more apt to

  13. Spending Behavior of the Teaching Personnel in an Asian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niño Philip L. Perculeza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Money, through the years, has been a commodity for everyone. As it is termed in international trade parlance, it is considered to be “sine qua non” or without which, nothing could be done. This study aimed to determine the current status of the spending practices of the teaching personnel in Lyceum of the Philippines University – Batangas; specifically, their profile, spending behavior and their encountered problems related to the forgoing matter. This study is descriptive in nature. It was participated by 161 teaching personnel of LPU-Batangas computed and selected through the G* power series with an effective size of 40 percent and power size of 95 percent. It made use of an adopted and modified questionnaire as its primary data gathering instrument which has three parts. The needed data were encoded, tallied and interpreted using different statistical tools such as frequency distribution, ranking, weighted mean and F-Test; and were further analyzed and interpreted through PASW version 19 using 0.05 alpha levels. From the results, it was concluded that the respondents had an often type of spending on the Basic Necessity. Moreover, overspending is the problem that was most encountered by the respondents. Various recommendations were posted by the researchers including a proposed plan of action that could help improve the spending behavior of the faculty members of LPU Batangas.

  14. Nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations may be from a very slowly expanding phase of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piao Yunsong; Zhou, E.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we construct an expanding phase with phantom matter, in which the scale factor expands very slowly but the Hubble parameter increases gradually, and assume that this expanding phase could be matched to our late observational cosmology by the proper mechanism. We obtain the nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations in this scenario; different from the simplest inflation and usual ekpyrotic or cyclic scenario, the tilt of the nearly scale-invariant spectrum in this scenario is blue. Although there exists an uncertainty surrounding the way in which the perturbations propagate through the transition in our scenario, which is dependent on the details of possible 'bounce' physics, compared with inflation and the ekpyrotic or cyclic scenario, our work may provide another feasible cosmological scenario generating the nearly scale-invariant perturbation spectrum

  15. Pre-critical phenomena of two-flavor color superconductivity in heated quark matter. Diquark-pair fluctuations and non-Fermi liquid behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Kunihiro, Teiji; Koide, Tomoi; Nemoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of the diquark-pair field and their effects on observables above the critical temperature T c in two-flavor color superconductivity (CSC) at moderate density using a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type effective model of QCD. Because of the strong-coupling nature of the dynamics, the fluctuations of the pair field develop a collective mode, which has a prominent strength even well above T c . We show that the collective mode is actually the soft mode of CSC. We examine the effects of the pair fluctuations on the specific heat and the quark spectrum for T above but close to T c . We find that the specific heat exhibits singular behavior because of the pair fluctuations, in accordance with the general theory of second-order phase transitions. The quarks display a typical non-Fermi liquid behavior, owing to the coupling with the soft mode, leading to a pseudo-gap in the density of states of the quarks in the vicinity of the critical point. Some experimental implications of the precursory phenomena are also discussed. (author)

  16. Gender Differences in Workplace Deviant Behavior of University Teachers and Modification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Muhammad Nadeem; Sarwar, Muhammad; Awan, Riffat-un-Nisa; Arif, Muhammad Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Any behavior that does not conform to social organizational norms is deviance. This study was conducted to test whether there is any difference in organizational deviance and interpersonal deviance behavior, deviance behavior of male-female university teachers. All teaching staff of the University of Sargodha was target population and for…

  17. Student Co-Creation Behavior in Higher Education: The Role of Satisfaction with the University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharnouby, Tamer H.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what constitutes students' satisfaction with university experience and examines the influence of overall satisfaction with the university experience on students' co-creation behavior-- namely, participation behavior and citizenship behavior. Drawing upon a sample of 379 students and using structural equation modeling, the…

  18. Assessing university students' sexual risk behaviors as predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Rebecca L; Adjei Boakye, Eric; Christopher, Kara M; Geneus, Christian J; Walker, Ronald J; Varvares, Mark A; Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba

    2018-05-09

    There exists a significant gap in vaccine coverage of the human papillomavirus (HPV) among college-aged students. This study assessed sexual risk-taking behavior among university students and analyzed predictors of HPV vaccine initiation and completion in this population. Data (n = 746) were from an anonymous online, cross-sectional survey distributed to university students, between the ages of 19-26 years, at a private Midwestern university. Both chi-square and multivariable logistics regression models estimated the association between sociodemographic characteristics and sexual risk factors (including number of vaginal sexual partners, number of oral sexual partners, initiation of oral sex, and initiation of vaginal sex), with HPV vaccine initiation and completion. A significant number of participants (40%) had not received a single dose of the HPV vaccine series. Of those who initiated the series, more than half (51%) did not achieve completion. Additionally, a greater number of participants have had multiple (4 or more) oral sexual partners than vaginal sexual partners (25.7% vs. 20.3%). After adjusting for covariates, it was found that sexual risk factors were not significantly associated with HPV vaccine initiation or completion. HPV vaccine initiation and completion rates are suboptimal among university students. High levels of sexual-risk taking behaviors associated with HPV infection persist, yet are not significant predictors of HPV vaccine behaviors in this age group. To increase uptake among 18-26-year-old students, future public health interventions should focus on HPV vaccine education and uptake across the entire population, irrespective of sexual risk profile. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Social capital and sexual behavior among Ugandan university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Agardh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uganda has reduced its prevalence of HIV/AIDS from 18 to 6.5% within a decade. An important factor behind this might have been the response from faith-based voluntary organizations, which developed social capital for achieving this. Three behaviors have been targeted: Abstinence, Being faithful, and Condom use (the ABC strategy. The aim of this study was to explore the association between social capital and the ABC behaviors, especially with reference to religious factors. Methods: In 2005, 980 Ugandan university students responded to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 80%. It assessed sociodemographic factors, social capital, importance of religion, sexual debut, number of lifetime sexual partners, and condom use. Logistic regression analysis was applied as the main analytical tool. Results: Thirty-seven percent of the male and 49% of the female students had not had sexual intercourse. Of those with sexual experience, 46% of the males and 23% of the females had had three or more lifetime sexual partners, and 32% of those males and 38% of the females stated they did not always use condoms with a new partner. Low trust in others was associated with a higher risk for not always using condoms with a new partner among male students (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.8, and with a lower risk for sexual debut among female students (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.9. Non-dominant bridging trust among male students was associated with a higher risk for having had many sexual partners (OR1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.9. However, low trust in others was associated with a greater likelihood of sexual debut in men, while the opposite was true in women, and a similar pattern was also seen regarding a high number of lifetime sexual partners in individuals who were raised in families where religion played a major role. Conclusions: In general, social capital was associated with less risky sexual behavior in our sample. However, gender and role of religion modified

  20. Risky Behaviors of University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Ozcebe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to identify certain risky behavior patterns (unsafe sex, tobacco and drug use, and binge drinking and the factors affecting these behaviors among first- and third-year students in a university. Method: The study included a total of 8407 students enrolled as first- (4392 and third- (4015 year students. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. In data analysis, respecting sampling weights, models were formed by logistic regression method to determine factors that affect the risky behaviors. Results: 731 male–1114 female students from the first year and 560 male–1096 female students from the third year were interviewed. Male students were found to be engaged in risky behaviors more frequently than females. Logistic models of the study indicated that gender, place of residence, relationship with parents, and socialization with friends have profound effects on risky behaviors. Conclusion: After leaving home, young people develop their own lifestyles, and this study demonstrates that lifestyle is the main effective factor for risky behaviors in this group. Universities need to assume more responsibility to guide students’ lives and to provide the facilities and opportunities that encourage and facilitate their adoption of a healthy lifestyle.   Key Words: University students, risky behaviours Bir Üniversitede Öğrencilerin Riskli Davranışları: Kesitsel Bir Çalışma Amaç: Bu çalışmanın amacı, bir üniversitenin birinci ve üçüncü sınıf öğrencileri arasında bazı riskli davranış modellerini (güvensiz seks, tütün ve uyuşturucu kullanımı ve aşırı alkol ve bu davranışları etkileyen faktörleri saptamaktır. Yöntem: Araştırmanın evrenini birinci (4392 ve üçüncü (4015 sınıflarda kayıtlı 8407 öğrenci oluşturmaktadır. Veri öğrencilerin gözlem altında doldurdukları anket aracılığı ile toplanmıştır. Riskli davranışları etkileyen fakt

  1. [Sexual behavior and contraceptive practices among university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repossi, A; Araneda, J M; Bustos, L; Puente, C; Rojas, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the knowledge, opinions and sexual behaviour of a sample of 464 students from the Universidad Austral de Chile. Results show that 78% of male and 41% of female students have had a sexual intercourse and that 78% of males and 72% of females with an active sexual life use contraceptive methods. The principal reasons to avoid the use of these methods are the irregularity of sexual intercourse and the reduction in pleasure. Most students think that these methods are harmful for their health but they should be used. The use of contraceptive methods increase with the frequency of sexual relations and university experience, but first year students use them more frequently than second year students. Most students know several contraceptive methods, but their knowledge about mechanisms of action is inadequate or distorted. Likewise, more than 50% think that it is possible to prevent pregnancy after a sexual intercourse. It is concluded that most sexually active students use contraceptive methods, but inappropriately. Stereotypes, myths and lack of information are influencing their sexual and contraceptive practices, showing incoherence between their knowledge and behavior. A possible explanation could be a scarce influence of high school and religion on their sexual formation.

  2. The Ethical Behaviors of Educational Leaders in Ethiopian Public Universities: The Case of the Western Cluster Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsale, Frew; Bekele, Mitiku; Tafesse, Mebratu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which educational leaders in the western cluster public universities of Ethiopia are ethical. Ethical leadership variables such as fairness, equity, multicultural competence, modeling ethical behaviors and altruism are considered in describing the ethical behaviors of the leaders. Descriptive…

  3. Anisotropic universal conductance fluctuations in disordered quantum wires with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction and an applied in-plane magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheid, Matthias; Adagideli, İnanç; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of narrow quantum wires realized in disordered two-dimensional electron gases in the presence of k-linear Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction, and an applied in-plane magnetic field. Building on previous work (Scheid et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 266401), we find that in addition to the conductance, the universal conductance fluctuations also feature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction. This anisotropy can be explained solely from the symmetries exhibited by the Hamiltonian as well as the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction and thus can be utilized to detect this ratio from purely electrical measurements

  4. Fragment production in central heavy-ion collisions: reconciling the dominance of dynamics with observed phase transition signals through universal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankland, J.D.; Chbihi, A.; Hudan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Fragment production in central collisions of Xe+Sn has been systematically studied with the INDRA multidetector from 25 to 150 AMeV. The predominant role of collision dynamics is evidenced in multiple intermediate mass fragment production even at the lowest energies, around the so-called multifragmentation threshold. For beam energies 50 AMeV and above, a promising agreement with suitably modified Anti-symmetrized Molecular Dynamics calculations has been achieved. Intriguingly the same reactions have recently been interpreted as evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in thermodynamically equilibrated systems. The universal fluctuation theory, thanks to its lack of any equilibrium hypothesis, shows clearly that in all but a tiny minority of carefully-selected central collisions fragment production is incompatible with either critical or phase coexistence behaviour. On the other hand, it does not exclude some similarity with aggregation scenarios such as the lattice-gas or Fisher droplet models. (authors)

  5. Fragment production in central heavy-ion collisions: reconciling the dominance of dynamics with observed phase transition signals through universal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankland, J.D.; Chbihi, A.; Hudan, S. [and others

    2002-07-01

    Fragment production in central collisions of Xe+Sn has been systematically studied with the INDRA multidetector from 25 to 150 AMeV. The predominant role of collision dynamics is evidenced in multiple intermediate mass fragment production even at the lowest energies, around the so-called multifragmentation threshold. For beam energies 50 AMeV and above, a promising agreement with suitably modified Anti-symmetrized Molecular Dynamics calculations has been achieved. Intriguingly the same reactions have recently been interpreted as evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in thermodynamically equilibrated systems. The universal fluctuation theory, thanks to its lack of any equilibrium hypothesis, shows clearly that in all but a tiny minority of carefully-selected central collisions fragment production is incompatible with either critical or phase coexistence behaviour. On the other hand, it does not exclude some similarity with aggregation scenarios such as the lattice-gas or Fisher droplet models. (authors)

  6. Faculty Members' Ethical Behaviors: "A Survey Based on Students' Perceptions at Universities in Turkey"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Kenan; Balyer, Aydin; Servi, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    As members of academic team, faculty behaviors have vital influence on students' lives at universities. This study purposes to discover students' perceptions about faculty behaviors concerning their professional responsibilities, dating/sexual harassment, behaviors inside and behaviors outside the classroom and relationship based on self-interest.…

  7. A Case Study on Primary, Secondary and University Students' Environmentally Responsible Behaviors in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to prove the environmentally responsible behaviors of primary, secondary and university students in Turkey. The students', who attended the study as participants, environmentally political behaviors, consumer/economical behaviors, direct behaviors toward protecting the environment and individual and public persuasion…

  8. Gambling behavior among Macau college and university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sut Mei Kam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This survey investigated gambling behavior among Chinese students studying in Macau colleges and universities. It also aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling, affect states and sensation seeking propensity. A convenience sample of 999 students (370 men, 629 women filled a self-administered questionnaire consisted of the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI (Ferris and Wynne in The Canadian problem gambling index: User manual. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto 2001a, the 8-item Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8 (Hoyle et al. Pers Individ Diff 32(3: 401–414, 2002, Bradburn’s Affect Balance Scale (BABS (Bradburn in The structure of psychological well-being. Aldine, Chicago 1969 and questions on gambling activities. The response rate is 65%. Results indicate 32.3% (n = 323 of the survey participants wagered on mahjong (61.8%, soccer matches (40.2%, Mark Six lottery (37.2%, card games (28.1%, land-based casino gambling (13.1%, slot machines (7.5% and online casino games (2.0%. The average monthly stake was MOP $411. Seeking entertainment (18.7%, killing time (12.5% and peer influence (11.1% were the three main reasons for gambling. Using the PGSI, 3.6 and 5.3% of the students could be identified as moderate-risk and problem gamblers respectively. Men were significantly more vulnerable to gambling problems (X2(1 = 35.00, p  0.05. The study findings inform campus prevention programs and future research.

  9. Gambling behavior among Macau college and university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Sut Mei; Wong, Irene Lai Kuen; So, Ernest Moon Tong; Un, David Kin Cheong; Chan, Chris Hon Wa

    2017-01-01

    This survey investigated gambling behavior among Chinese students studying in Macau colleges and universities. It also aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling, affect states and sensation seeking propensity. A convenience sample of 999 students (370 men, 629 women) filled a self-administered questionnaire consisted of the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) (Ferris and Wynne in The Canadian problem gambling index: User manual. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto 2001a), the 8-item Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8) (Hoyle et al. Pers Individ Diff 32(3): 401-414, 2002), Bradburn's Affect Balance Scale (BABS) (Bradburn in The structure of psychological well-being. Aldine, Chicago 1969) and questions on gambling activities. The response rate is 65%. Results indicate 32.3% ( n  = 323) of the survey participants wagered on mahjong (61.8%), soccer matches (40.2%), Mark Six lottery (37.2%), card games (28.1%), land-based casino gambling (13.1%), slot machines (7.5%) and online casino games (2.0%). The average monthly stake was MOP $411. Seeking entertainment (18.7%), killing time (12.5%) and peer influence (11.1%) were the three main reasons for gambling. Using the PGSI, 3.6 and 5.3% of the students could be identified as moderate-risk and problem gamblers respectively. Men were significantly more vulnerable to gambling problems (X2(1) = 35.00, p   0.05). The study findings inform campus prevention programs and future research.

  10. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  11. Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Grantham, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challen...

  12. Compression as a Universal Principle of Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Hernández-Fernández, Antoni; Lusseau, David; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy; Hsu, Minna J.; Semple, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    A key aim in biology and psychology is to identify fundamental principles underpinning the behavior of animals, including humans. Analyses of human language and the behavior of a range of non-human animal species have provided evidence for a common pattern underlying diverse behavioral phenomena: Words follow Zipf's law of brevity (the…

  13. Will the Future Be Greener? The Environmental Behavioral Intentions of University Tourism Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Lan Pan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism is essential for tourism sector development. Environmentally responsible behaviors and behavioral intentions are important prerequisites for sustainable tourism. This research explores the behavioral intentions of university tourism students and significant factors affecting these behavioral intentions. The questionnaire survey method was applied to university students from the tourism departments of nine universities in Taiwan. A total of 390 valid questionnaires were collected. The pro-environmental behavioral intentions of the students ranged from moderate to high. Environmental knowledge positively affected behavioral intentions and positively influenced environmental sensitivity and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, environmental sensitivity and environmental responsibility exerted a full effect in mediating the relationship between environmental knowledge and behavioral intentions. Hence, increasing students’ environmental knowledge will enhance their behavioral intentions. However, by improving students’ sensitivity and responsibility, their intentions to protect the environment can be more effectively elevated. Development implications and recommendations for sustainable tourism and higher education are provided.

  14. Universals of Nonverbal Behavior: A Review of Literature and Statement of Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Patrick H.

    Universals in nonverbal behavior represent an important issue in the study of the cross-cultural communication. Perhaps the most well-known research in nonverbal universals was conducted by Paul Ekman, who examined literate and preliterate cultures from various language groups and identified six universal facial expressions: happiness, sadness,…

  15. The Investigation on Brand Image of University Education and Students' Word-of-Mouth Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Tsu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to find how the brand image and satisfaction of universities influence university students' word-of-mouth behavior, including the sharing of satisfying experiences and recommendations to others. This study conducted a questionnaire survey and distributed 400 questionnaires to students and graduates of universities in Taiwan; 336…

  16. Big Bang or vacuum fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.

    1980-01-01

    Some general properties of vacuum fluctuations in quantum field theory are described. The connection between the ''energy dominance'' of the energy density of vacuum fluctuations in curved space-time and the presence of singularity is discussed. It is pointed out that a de-Sitter space-time (with the energy density of the vacuum fluctuations in the Einstein equations) that matches the expanding Friedman solution may describe the history of the Universe before the Big Bang. (P.L.)

  17. On Misconceptions about Behavior Analysis among University Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Erik; Lokke, Jon; Lokke, Gunn; Eilertsen, Dag-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Students frequently show misconceptions regarding scientific psychology in general and basic concepts in behavior analysis in particular. We wanted to replicate the study by Lamal (1995) and to expand the study by including some additional statements. In the current study, the focus was on misconceptions about behavior analysis held by…

  18. Self-control and academic performance: Two field studies on university citizenship behavior and counterproductive academic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zettler, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Self-control affects, among other things, individuals' performance and criminal or deviant behavior. Herein, the construct of self-control is linked to rather specific criteria in an academic context, as derived from findings in the area of organizational psychology. Specifically, it is assumed...... that students' self-control impacts university citizenship behavior positively and counterproductive academic behavior negatively. Two correlative field studies, at which one is predictive, using different questionnaires to assess self-control support both hypotheses....

  19. Universal versus tailored solutions for alleviating disruptive behavior in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman-Kishony, Talia; Shvarts, Shifra

    2015-01-01

    Disruptive behavior among hospital staff can negatively affect quality of care. Motivated by a standard on disruptive behavior issued by The Joint Commission (LD 3.10), as well as the desire to improve patient care, minimize liability, and improve staff retention, hospitals are setting policies to prevent and resolve disruptive behaviors. However, it is unknown whether uniform conflict management tools are equally effective among different hospital settings. We surveyed residents and nurses to identify similarities and differences among hospital departments in the antecedents, characteristics, and outcomes of disruptive behaviors, and in the effectiveness of conflict management tools. We used a quantitative questionnaire-based assessment to examine conflict perceptions in eight different hospital departments at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel. Most participants (89 %) reported witnessing disruptive behavior either directly or in other parties; the most significant causes were identified as intense work, miscommunication, and problematic personalities. The forms of these behaviors, however, varied significantly between departments, with some more prone to expressed conflicts, while others were characterized by hidden disruptive behaviors. These outcomes were correlated by the antecedents to disruptive behavior, which in turn affected the effectiveness of alleviating strategies and tools. Some tools, such as processes for evaluating complaints, teamwork and conflict management courses, and introducing a behavioral mission statement, are effective across many antecedents. Other tools, however, are antecedent-specific, falling into two principal categories: tools directly removing a specific problem and tools that offer a way to circumvent the problem. Conflict resolution tools and strategies, based on residents and nurse perceptions, may be more effective if tailored to the specific situation, rather than using a "one-size-fits-all" approach.

  20. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  1. Public Universities in Competition with Private Enterprise: The Attitudes and Behaviors of University Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, David Otto

    2010-01-01

    Public universities undertake business activities sometimes considered by private enterprise as unfairly competitive based on nonprofit advantages. This study was an inquiry into the attitudes and actions of chief business officers at public universities regarding these activities. The research population consisted of the 1862 Morrill Act Land…

  2. Predictive models for suicidal thoughts and behaviors among Spanish University students: rationale and methods of the UNIVERSAL (University & mental health) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maria Jesús; Castellví, Pere; Almenara, José; Lagares, Carolina; Roca, Miquel; Sesé, Albert; Piqueras, José Antonio; Soto-Sanz, Victoria; Rodríguez-Marín, Jesús; Echeburúa, Enrique; Gabilondo, Andrea; Cebrià, Ana Isabel; Miranda-Mendizábal, Andrea; Vilagut, Gemma; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Auerbach, Randy P; Kessler, Ronald C; Alonso, Jordi

    2016-05-04

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among young people. While suicide prevention is considered a research and intervention priority, longitudinal data is needed to identify risk and protective factors associate with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Here we describe the UNIVERSAL (University and Mental Health) project which aims are to: (1) test prevalence and 36-month incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors; and (2) identify relevant risk and protective factors associated with the incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among university students in Spain. An ongoing multicenter, observational, prospective cohort study of first year university students in 5 Spanish universities. Students will be assessed annually during a 36 month follow-up. The surveys will be administered through an online, secure web-based platform. A clinical reappraisal will be completed among a subsample of respondents. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be assess with the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI) and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Risk and protective factors will include: mental disorders, measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) and Screening Scales (CIDI-SC), and the Epi-Q Screening Survey (EPI-Q-SS), socio-demographic variables, self-perceived health status, health behaviors, well-being, substance use disorders, service use and treatment. The UNIVERSAL project is part of the International College Surveys initiative, which is a core project within the World Mental Health consortium. Lifetime and the 12-month prevalence will be calculated for suicide ideation, plans and attempts. Cumulative incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and mental disorders will be measured using the actuarial method. Risk and protective factors of suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models. The study will provide valid, innovative and useful data for developing

  3. Mobile Phone and Communication Behaviors of University Students in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharare Mehdizade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between using mobile phone and social realationships of the students studying in Yazd universities. The statistical population included 42426 students all of them studying in Yazd’s universities. Kerjcie and Morgan (1970 table was used to determine the sample size and regarding the dispersion of statistical population stratified random sampling was used and 380 students were selected as the study sample. In this study the independent variable was degree of using mobile phone and the dependent variable, social relationships, was divided into three subscales of the relationship with family, friends, and the organization of the university. Using Campbell model (2005 the above mentioned subscales were extracted and examined. Based on Kim and Mitomu’s (2002 and 2006 model the use of mobile phone was also examined in relation to the depth and width of students’ social relationships. The results showed that there was a significant relationship between using mobile phone and the students’ relationships with theirfamily and friends and their relationships within the university. The results also showed that using mobile phone causes the increased depth of social relationships but no correlation with the width of social relationships was observed.

  4. Export Market Orientation Behavior of Universities: The British Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Yousra; Melewar, T. C.; Cohen, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to extend our knowledge of export market orientation (EMO) in the context of British universities with regard to recruitment of international students. Export marketing remains an area of limited focus in the marketization of higher education literature. The study predominantly follows a quantitative research design using survey…

  5. Universal fluctuations in orbital diamagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Pal

    published online 31 January 2018. Abstract. Bohr–van ... friction and (c) particle moving in a medium with space-dependent temperature. For all the three cases, the average ..... A M J thanks Department of Science and Technology,. India, for ...

  6. Changing Trends in Nutritional Behavior among University Students in Greece, between 2006 and 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Kyrkou, Charikleia; Tsakoumaki, Foteini; Fotiou, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Aristea; Symeonidou, Maria; Menexes, Georgios; Biliaderis, Costas G.; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study the dietary behavior of university students residing away from the family home. In this context, we (a) compared their dietary habits in two time periods, namely 2006 and 2016; and (b) explored the possible impact of gender on the behavioral changes in nutritional choices. A total of four hundred and five university students (2006, n = 242; 2016, n = 163) participated in the study. Dietary assessment was carried out using a qualitative Food Fre...

  7. Study on Major Factors Influencing University Students’ Behavior of Consumption on Online Tourism in Shijiazhuang

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Feng Xu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have a study of the major factors influencing university students’ behavior of consumption on online tourism in Shijiazhuang. The major factors influencing university students’ behavior of consumption on online tourism in Shijiazhuang include personal motivation, attitude, sense of security and satisfaction. The external factors include price, brand and reputation of the online tourism and tourism websites. Some suggestions for network marketing can be drawn from the feature...

  8. Psychological distress and risk for suicidal behavior among university students in contemporary China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Byrne, Majella; Qin, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Psychological distress and suicidal behavior are important mental health problems among university students and warrant research to inform strategies for effective prevention in this young population. The present study aimed to assess psychological distress and suicidal behavior and to unravel their associations among university students. A total of 5972 undergraduate students, randomly selected from six universities in central China, comprised the sample. The Chinese version of the Symptom Checklist-90-revised (SCL-90-R) was used to assess various psychological symptoms. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between psychological distress and risk for suicidal behavior. 40.7% of the university students reported positive in a least one of the 9 psychological symptom dimensions assessed by the SCL-90-R. 7.6% of the students reported suicidal behavior in the previous twelve months. The risk of suicidal behavior was significantly associated with psychological symptoms of all types, but there were notable differences by sex. For male students, depression and phobic anxiety increased the risk of suicidal behavior. Meanwhile, depression and obsessive-compulsiveness were positively associated with suicidal behavior in female students. Furthermore, increasing risk of suicidal behavior was associated with increasing positive symptom total (PST) score and a statistically significant trend was observed. Data collected from a cross-sectional survey does not allow any examination of causal inference. Psychological distress and suicidal behavior were both common among university students; and psychological distress was highly associated with suicidal behavior. The findings underscore the importance of mental health care for university students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum fluctuations are an essential feature of quantum field theory. Yet, the smallness of the scalar curvature of our universe suggests that the zero-point energy associated with these fluctuations does not curve spacetime. A possible way out of this paradox is suggested by the fact that microscopic fluctuations are generally accompanied by dissipative behavior in macroscopic systems. The intimate relation between the two is expressed by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem which extends to general relativity. The connection between quantum fluctuations and dissipation suggests a mechanism for the conversion of coherent stresses in the curvature of space into ordinary matter or radiation, thereby relaxing the effective cosmological ''constant'' to zero over time. The expansion of the universe may be the effect of this time-asymmetric relaxation process

  10. A Comprehensive Profile of Health Risk Behaviors Among Students at a Small Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer P.; McCarthy, Mary Jean; Herbert, Rosemary J.; Smith, Philip B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent attention to health promotion and illness prevention, young people continue to engage in a variety of risk behaviors, which may negatively influence current and future health status. The purpose of this study was to create a comprehensive profile of health risk behaviors among undergraduate students at the University of Prince…

  11. The perceived impact of a university outdoor education program on students' environmental behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Boland; Paul Heintzman

    2010-01-01

    Outdoor educators often seek to design programs that influence participants' daily lifestyles, especially environmental behaviors. Research on the impact of outdoor education programs on environmental behaviors has typically focused on schoolchildren and teenagers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived impact of a university outdoor education...

  12. Verification of Social Network Site Use Behavior of the University Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Wei; Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Hsiu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationships among performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating condition, behavioral intention and use behavior of university physical education students in Taiwan. Moreover, it also intends to examine the moderating effects of gender, age, and experience on the UTAUT model. The targets…

  13. The Relationship between University Students' Environmental Identity, Decision-Making Process, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Allison

    2018-01-01

    Environmental education scholars have argued for the need to focus on identity as a more predictive factor than attitude of individuals' environmental behavior. We examine individuals' decision-making as a mediating process between identity and behavior. University undergraduates (N = 299) were surveyed, with a select sub-sample interviewed. As…

  14. Surveillance on University Students' Living Behaviors in the Private Residence, Prathumthani, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckanavanich, Suwannee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among lifestyles, personal relationship (friendship and romantic relationship), and living behaviors shared with closed friends and romantic friends. The study undertook a quantitative research of university students' living behaviors in the private residence. A survey questionnaire was…

  15. Mesoscopic Fluctuations for the Thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Tomas; Duits, Maurice

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations for the thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble. The effect of thinning is that the eigenvalues start to decorrelate. The decorrelation is stronger on the larger scales than on the smaller scales. We investigate this behavior by studying mesoscopic linear statistics. There are two regimes depending on the scale parameter and the thinning parameter. In one regime we obtain a CLT of a classical type and in the other regime we retrieve the CLT for CUE. The two regimes are separated by a critical line. On the critical line the limiting fluctuations are no longer Gaussian, but described by infinitely divisible laws. We argue that this transition phenomenon is universal by showing that the same transition and their laws appear for fluctuations of the thinned sine process in a growing box. The proofs are based on a Riemann-Hilbert problem for integrable operators.

  16. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field

  17. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Watson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts—support by the administration (authorization or from students’ peers (endorsement—as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students’ environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs. Using survey data collected from fourth-year students at a university in the Southeastern US, we employ Seeming Unrelated Regression to analyze the impact of perceived legitimacy and context on recycling and conservation behaviors, controlling for demographic characteristics, pro-environmental attitudes, and environmental identity. Our findings indicate that students’ perceptions of what university administrators support affect the likelihood of students to enact recycling and conservation behaviors, and peer support influences conservation behaviors. This research contributes to the literature on legitimacy by examining how legitimacy processes work in natural, rather than experimental, settings.

  18. The main problem solving differences between high school and university in mathematical beliefs and professional behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhlaghi Garmjani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching science and math has been underdeveloped in nurturing the talents and motivations of young people who are in search of professions in these fields. Identifying and strengthening the students' problem solving beliefs and behaviors, can be a great help to those involved in teaching mathematics. This study investigates on the university and high school students, teachers and professors' problem solving beliefs and behaviors. Considering the research method, this study is a field research in which questionnaire is used. Participants in this research were senior high school and university students, math teachers and math professors. Data collection method for beliefs and behavior variables was via the use of a questionnaire. The Mann-Whitney test results showed that problem solving in high school and university was different and the main difference was in mathematical professional beliefs and behaviors.

  19. Research on sportswear buying behavior of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öndoğan Ziynet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sport is a necessary element for maintaining life in a healthier and more balanced way. There has been a rising trend of wearing sportswear in daily life besides sports. Developments in technology have raised expectations from sportswear. Individuals expect not only durability, design and being fashionable, but also demand performance and clothing comfort. This study aims to investigate university students’ awareness while buying sportswear. Professional sportsmen from Physical Education and Sports School students and Textile Engineering students having technical knowledge about clothes are included in this study. 100 students from each group were interviewed face to face. Results showed that Textile Engineering students pay more attention to technical characteristics due to their knowledge, however, aesthetic properties are revealed to be another important factor affecting buying decision. Buying decision of Physical Education and Sports School students is expected to be positively affected if they are given a seminar about raw material properties.

  20. Behavioral and Personality Predictors of Acceptance and Rejection in University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bartholomeu

    Full Text Available Abstract: Acceptance and rejection in the group are related to both personality characteristics and social skills and most studies focus on children instead of college students. The objective of this study was to investigate whether acceptance and rejection would be more associated with personality tendencies, specifically socialization or social skills. We collected data from 187 college students attending the Physical Education (67% and Psychology (32% courses. The instruments were the sociometric test, the Factorial Scale of Socialization and the Social Skills Inventory. A moderating effect of gender in the relationship between assertiveness and acceptance and rejection to go out on college was observed. Social skills were better predictors of acceptance and social rejection in the university group.

  1. Programming a massively parallel, computation universal system: static behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1986-01-01

    In previous work by the authors, the ''optimum finding'' properties of Hopfield neural nets were applied to the nets themselves to create a ''neural compiler.'' This was done in such a way that the problem of programming the attractors of one neural net (called the Slave net) was expressed as an optimization problem that was in turn solved by a second neural net (the Master net). In this series of papers that approach is extended to programming nets that contain interneurons (sometimes called ''hidden neurons''), and thus deals with nets capable of universal computation. 22 refs.

  2. Investigation of Risky Behaviors and Some Sociodemographic Factors in University Students: Sample From a State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inci Arikan

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Accordingly, it is seen that in youth, risky behavior is seen more in males and affected by various socio-demographic factors.We hope that the data obtained from this work will be a guide for health education to be done. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(4.000: 348-354

  3. The relationship between emotion regulation strategies and job search behavior among fourth-year university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Xue; Fang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    The job search process is a stressful experience. This study investigated the effect of emotion regulation strategies on job search behavior in combination with anxiety and job search self-efficacy among Chinese university fourth-year students (N = 816, mean age = 21.98, 31.5% male, 34.9% majored in science, 18.0% from "211 Project" universities). Results showed that cognitive reappraisal was positively related to job search behavior, while expressive suppression was negatively related to job search behavior. Additionally, anxiety was negatively related to job search behavior, while job search self-efficacy was positively associated with job search behavior. Moreover, both anxiety and job search self-efficacy mediated the relationship between emotion regulation strategies and job search behavior. In general, emotion regulation strategies played an important role in job search behavior. Implications include the notion that emotion regulation interventions may be helpful to increase job search behavior among university students. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Affecting the Behavior of University Community to Use Credit Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Sari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to gain insights and tested the factors that influence credit cards usage in university community of UPI through Theory of Planned Behavior model approach. Using Path Analysis to explain the direct and indirect influence of attitude, subjective norm and behavioral control to intention and behavior of credit card usage. The results showed all respondents have a positive attitude towards credit cards usage, with high influence of subjective norm, high behavior control, high intention to use credit cards and all respondents used credit cards wisely. There was positive and significant effect either simultaneously or partially between behavioral attitudes, subjective norms, and behavior control toward the intention to use credit card. The partial test results showed behavioral attitude has the greatest influence on the intention to use credit card. There was a positive and significant influence both simultaneously and partially between behavioral attitudes, subjective norms, and behavioral control on default-risk debt behavior. The partial results showed that attitude gives the greatest influence on default debt risk behavior. The result also proved there was a positive and significant influence of the intention to use credit card on default debt risk behavior.

  5. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Watson; Karen A. Hegtvedt; Cathryn Johnson; Christie L. Parris; Shruthi Subramanyam

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts—support by the administration (authorization) or from students’ peers (endorsement)—as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students’ environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs). Using survey data collected from fourth-year students at a university in the Southeastern US, we employ Seeming Unrelated Regression to analyze the impact of perceived legitimacy and context o...

  6. Attitudes and Behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology Students Towards the Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Abdel Raman

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes and behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST) students towards the environment according to their gender and college. The research was based on a descriptive approach. The sample consisted of (375) students (230 males and 145 females) from different colleges (Law, Information Technology, Mass Communication and Humanities, Engineering, Dentistry and Pharmacy). The Attitudes and Behavior Scale Towards the Environment (ABSTE) w...

  7. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant ( P < 0.05). The results of this study indicated that dental students achieved better oral health attitudes and behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students ( P < 0.05). Students in advanced academic levels and female students demonstrated better oral health attitudes and behavior. Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted.

  8. Fluctuation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews sources of noise in Josephson junctions, and the limits they impose on the sensitivity of dc and rf SQUIDS. The results are strictly valid only for a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) with zero capacitance, but should be applicable to point contact junctions and microbridges in so far as these devices can be approximated by the RSJ model. Fluctuations arising from Nyquist noise in the resistive shunt of a single junction are discussed in the limit eI/sub o/R/k/sub B/T << 1 in which a classical treatment is appropriate, and then extend the treatment to the limit eI/sub o/R/k/sub B/T greater than or equal to 1 in which quantum effects become important. The Nyquist limit theory is used to calculate the noise in a dc SQUID, and the results are compared with a number of practical devices. The quantum limit is briefly considered. Results for the predicted sensitivity of rf SQUIDS are presented, and also compared with a number of practical devices. Finally, the importance of l/f noise (f is the frequency) in limiting the low frequency performance of SQUIDS is discussed

  9. A gender discrepancy analysis of heterosexual sexual behaviors in two university samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N; Satinsky, Sonya A

    2013-12-01

    The current study aimed to (1) offer a large-scale enumeration of college students' lifetime sexual behaviors and sexual behaviors at last event, and (2) apply a gender discrepancy lens to college students' sexual behaviors in order to examine potential gender differences in heterosexual college students' experiences. Nine-hundred and seventy college students between the ages of 18 and 27 from two large universities in the United States participated in the current study. Participants filled out a paper-pencil questionnaire during the last 30 min of class. Measures of lifetime sexual behaviors and engagement in behaviors at last sexual event were replicated from the National Survey of Sexual Health Behavior. Most college students engaged in some form of sexual behavior (manual, oral, vaginal-penile, anal). Men more frequently reported engaging in receptive sexual behaviors (e.g., receiving oral sex) where as women were more likely to engage in performative sexual behaviors (e.g., performing oral sex). At most recent sexual event, men were more likely than women to report being the sexual initiator. Findings highlight gender differences in sexual behavior and provide a foundation for social norms interventions. Holistic sexual health promotion for young adults includes acknowledging and discouraging sites of disparity in equity and pleasure. Therefore, college-level sexual health educators should pay attention to the potential pleasure gap between men and women in heterosexual encounters, and to see pleasure as an important part of sexual health that should be included in social norms campaigns.

  10. University Students' Views about Their Cyber Bullying Behaviors and Self-Exposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the views of university students on the presence and exposure of cyber bully behavior. The research study group consists of 10 male students who are higher education students. One of the qualitative research methods is "case study". In this direction, a "semi-structured interview form"…

  11. Voices of University Students with ADHD about Test-Taking: Behaviors, Needs, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofiesh, Nicole; Moniz, Erin; Bisagno, Joan

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the test-taking behavior, needs, and strategies of postsecondary students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), focus group comments from 17 university students with ADHD were analyzed. These comments formed the basis for a series of research studies that are in progress regarding test-taking and individuals…

  12. Attitudes and Behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology Students towards the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rasha Abdel

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes and behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST) students towards the environment according to their gender and college. The research was based on a descriptive approach. The sample consisted of (375) students (230 males and 145 females) from different colleges (Law, Information Technology, Mass…

  13. Research and Teaching: A New Tool for Measuring Student Behavioral Engagement in Large University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Erin S.; Harris, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    The authors developed a classroom observation protocol for quantitatively measuring student engagement in large university classes. The Behavioral Engagement Related to instruction (BERI) protocol can be used to provide timely feedback to instructors as to how they can improve student engagement in their classrooms.

  14. Brief Behavioral Interventions for Symptoms of Depression and Insomnia in University Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburk, Jennifer S.; Shepardson, Robyn L.; Krenek, Marketa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe how behavioral activation (BA) for depression and stimulus control (SC) for insomnia can be modified to a brief format for use in a university primary care setting, and to evaluate preliminarily their effectiveness in reducing symptoms of depression and insomnia, respectively, using data collected in routine clinical care.…

  15. Intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual behaviors of Chinese university students: gender differences in prevalence and correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, X.; van de Bongardt, D.; Hawk, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate gender differences among university students in contemporary China regarding (1) the prevalence of various types of intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual behaviors and (2) their sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors. A total of 1,397

  16. Nudging Waste Diversion at Western State Colorado University: Application of Behavioral Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kimberly; Oliver, Justin J.; Borden, D. Scott; Cohn, Scott I.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to test a nudge, or intervention, designed through behavioral insights at a university campus to discover cost-effective means for increasing recycling participation and methods for estimating waste removal cost savings. Design/methodology/approach: A series of studies were conducted demonstrating the effectiveness of…

  17. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lesley; Hegtvedt, Karen A.; Johnson, Cathryn; Parris, Christie L.; Subramanyam, Shruthi

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts--support by the administration (authorization) or from students' peers (endorsement)--as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students' environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs). Using survey data collected from…

  18. Investigating the Perceptions and Behaviors of Elementary Students and Teachers when Internet Access is Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a preliminary investigation into changes in the perceptions and behaviors of teachers and students when all have universal Internet access at home and school using Internet-on-TV technology. Four hundred fourth-grade students and their teachers from seven schools participated in the WISH TV (WorldGate Internet School to Home)…

  19. Disordered Eating Behaviors and Sexual Harassment in Italian Male and Female University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Patrizia; Cedolin, Carlotta; Bastiani, Federica; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe sexual harassment among Italian university students and analyze the relationship between harassment and disordered eating behaviors. An observational survey was conducted among university students at Trieste University (Italy) in spring 2014. Students answered an anonymous self-administered questionnaire about sexual harassment, including three domains-sexual harassment, unwanted comments on physical appearance, cyber-harassment-and disordered eating behaviors. The global sexual harassment index was computed with three levels: Level 0, no harassment; Level 1, harassment in at least one of the three domains; and Level 2, harassment in two or three domains. Disordered eating behaviors were classified by at least one of the following: (a) eating without being able to stop or vomiting at least once or twice a month, (b) using laxatives or diuretics at least once or twice a week, (c) monitoring weight every day, and (d) dieting at least very often. The sample included 759 students (347 men and 412 women; 18-29 years old). Experiencing sexual harassment was related to eating disorder symptoms for both genders with a regular gradient: the higher the harassment score, the more frequent the disordered eating behavior symptoms, even after adjusting for age and previous sexual violence. The association was stronger for males than females. Sexual harassment and disordered eating behaviors have long been considered mainly a female problem. Men are not exempt from these problems and in some cases may be more affected than women. The topics should be assessed in men and women.

  20. Fluctuations in the hadronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajaczak, M.

    1992-01-01

    The multiscaling in the fluctuations of the multiparticle distributions at small scales is studied. Similarly to the multiscaling effect, recently found in multifractal models, the dependence of the intermittency patterns on the low density cut-off in the cascade is analyzed. The effect changes the scaling behaviour and leads to stronger dependence of the scaled factorial moments on the resolution than the power law. This could be an explanation of the behaviour observed recently in the experimental 3-dimensional data. The multiscaling analysis allows to restore the universality in the processes with different cut-offs and could be used in the analysis of the experimental data. (author) 17 refs., 5 figs

  1. The Association between Cultural Orientation and Drinking Behaviors among University Students in Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongxiu; Cai, Weibin; Wang, Hongjing; Zhang, Qing; Qian, Ling; Shell, Duane F.; Newman, Ian M.; Yin, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. Methods In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, Pstudent being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, Pstudents (OR = 2.59, Pstudents from urban areas (OR = 1.79, Pstudents attending key universities (OR = 0.48, Pattending general universities. Conclusions Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender, hometown and university attendance is partially moderated through the influence of cultural orientation. The relationship between a traditional cultural orientation and alcohol drinking suggests that traditional Chinese cultural values should be examined for their role in possibly reducing alcohol-related risks through education and policy initiatives. PMID:23359611

  2. FACTORS RELATED TO MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT RISK BEHAVIOR AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IN NORTHEASTERN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpawadee, Urai; Homchampa, Pissamai; Thongkrajai, Pramote; Suwanimitr, Amorn; Chadbunchachai, Witaya

    2015-07-01

    Young motorcycle drivers in Thailand are at high risk for road traffic accidents. We conducted this study to identify factors associated with motorcycle accident risk behavior (MARB). We studied 372 randomly selected university students aged 18-22 years (mean 20.2 years; women comprised 68.0% of our participants), who attend a government university in northeastern Thailand. Each student was asked to fill out a questionnaire asking about MARB and factors associated with this behavior. The respondents had an average of 6.2 years (SD+3.09) motorcycle driving experience, 72.3% had a motorcycle driver's license and 83.0% had accident insurance. The prevalence of self-reported motorcycle accident injuries was 42.7%. Their major MARB were using a telephone while driving (69.3%), speeding (45.4%), driving with more than one passenger (40.1%), drunk driving (22.1%), and not wearing a helmet (23.3%). Factors related to MARB were: gender, with men engaged in risky behavior more often than women (p motorcycle driving--drivers with > 5 years experience were more likely to engage in risky behavior (p < 0.05); and knowledge of safe driving, those with a greater knowledge of safe driving were more likely to drive safely (p < 0.001). Having a greater awareness of MARB was associated with lower risk of engaging in risky behavior (p < 0.001). Students who engaged in risky behavior were more likely to view it as normal behavior (p < 0.001) and less likely to have adequate self-control (p < 0.001). Our findings indicate a need to strengthen accident prevention programs for university students in northeastern Thailand.

  3. Of mice and men--universality and breakdown of behavioral organization.

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    Toru Nakamura

    Full Text Available Mental or cognitive brain functions, and the effect on them of abnormal psychiatric diseases, are difficult to approach through molecular biological techniques due to the lack of appropriate assay systems with objective measures. We therefore study laws of behavioral organization, specifically how resting and active periods are interwoven throughout daily life, using objective criteria, and first discover that identical laws hold both for healthy humans subject to the full complexity of daily life, and wild-type mice subject to maximum environmental constraints. We find that active period durations with physical activity counts successively above a predefined threshold, when rescaled with individual means, follow a universal stretched exponential (gamma-type cumulative distribution, while resting period durations below the threshold obey a universal power-law cumulative distribution with identical parameter values for both of the mammalian species. Further, by analyzing the behavioral organization of mice with a circadian clock gene (Period2 eliminated, and humans suffering from major depressive disorders, we find significantly lower parameter values (power-law scaling exponents for the resting period durations in both these cases. Such a universality and breakdown of the behavioral organization of mice and humans, revealed through objective measures, is expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular basis of the pathophysiology of neurobehavioral diseases, including depression, and lay the foundations for formulating a range of neuropsychiatric behavioral disorder models.

  4. Associations Between Violence Related Behaviors and Self Perceived Health Among Trakya University Students

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    Halil Evren

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to determine the association between violence related behaviors and self-reported health among university students. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which included a representative sample of all students of Trakya University. The sample of 1620 students enrolled at Trakya University was stratified according to sex and actual student number of faculties and colleges and selected by systematic sampling. In addition to descriptive statistics, Chi Square analysis and Logistic Regression analysis were used for statistical evaluation.Results: 6.3% of the respondents reported that they were exposed to violence, 33.5% of them stated they were involved in a physical fight during the past 12 months, 4.9% of them stated they did not go to school at least one day during the past 30 days because they felt unsafe and 4.4% of the students reported they had attempted suicide during the past 12 months. The analyses have shown that violence related behaviors were significantly associated with poor health after controlling the potential confounders. Conclusion: There is a need for more prospective studies for exploring the effects of violence related behaviors to health. Interventions targeting youths who engage in violence should consider that violence related behaviors may be markers for poor health.

  5. The impact of socio-demographic and religious factors upon sexual behavior among Ugandan university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agardh, Anette; Tumwine, Gilbert; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2011-01-01

    More knowledge is needed about structural factors in society that affect risky sexual behaviors. Educational institutions such as universities provide an opportune arena for interventions among young people. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between sociodemographic and religious factors and their impact on sexual behavior among university students in Uganda. In 2005, 980 university students (response rate 80%) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Validated instruments were used to assess socio-demographic and religious factors and sexual behavior. Logistic regression analyses were applied. Our findings indicated that 37% of the male and 49% of the female students had not previously had sex. Of those with sexual experience, 46% of the males and 23% of the females had had three or more sexual partners, and 32% of the males and 38% of the females did not consistently use condoms. For those who rated religion as less important in their family, the probability of early sexual activity and having had a high number of lifetime partners increased by a statistically significant amount (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4 and OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.3, respectively). However, the role of religion seemed to have no impact on condom use. Being of Protestant faith interacted with gender: among those who had debuted sexually, Protestant female students were more likely to have had three or more lifetime partners; the opposite was true for Protestant male students. Religion emerged as an important determinant of sexual behavior among Ugandan university students. Our findings correlate with the increasing number of conservative religious injunctions against premarital sex directed at young people in many countries with a high burden. of HIV/AIDS. Such influence of religion must be taken into account in order to gain a deeper understanding of the forces that shape sexual behavior in Uganda.

  6. Sexual behaviors and awareness of sexually transmitted infections among Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dangui; Pan, Hui; Cui, Binglin; Law, Frieda; Farrar, Jeremy; Ba-Thein, William

    2013-12-15

    This study investigated the current state of attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge concerning sex and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among Chinese university students. A cross-sectional anonymous university intranet-based survey was given to students attending the Shantou University, Guangdong, China using a 28-item questionnaire. Of 3425 website visitors, 1030 university students completed the survey, of which 80% were between 20 and 25 years of age, 76% considered pre-marital sex acceptable, 21% had had sexual intercourse, and 45% of sexually active students had engaged in oral sex, anal intercourse, or sex with strangers. Students had limited knowledge and awareness about common STIs, symptoms, and complications. Three percent of the sexually active students reported having had STIs and another 8% were not sure whether they had or not. Most students had misconceptions about transmission and prevention of STIs. The internet was the main information resource for 76% of students. Despite having more open attitudes and behaviors towards sex, students' STI knowledge and awareness of STI risks was considerably limited, raising concerns about a likely rise in STI incidence. Prior knowledge of STIs had no significant influence. Targeted educational measures such as online education and counseling via Chinese websites and social media, and the provision of safer sex and STI-related information by health experts to university students are suggested.

  7. Health behavior disparities: a universal trend or a peculiarity for the developed countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva, Tatiana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. It is generally recognized that those poorer and less educated are more likely to have unhealthy behaviors. These disparities by socio-economic status (SES are observed with regards to different behaviors known to influence health outcomes in terms of diseases and deaths. However, this consistent pattern was found in population-wide studies in developed countries, while in certain demographic groups it was not seen. So the objective was to check if the SES-behavior association pattern was present in available data collected in Ukraine.METHODS. For current study, all available datasets were considered if they included data on SES, education, and gender. Outcomes were measurements of health behaviors including use of psychoactive substances, food consumption, and physical activity.RESULTS. Prevalence of many health behaviors differs in men and women in Ukraine. More men than women use legal and illegal drugs. With regard to education and SES, Ukrainian data reveals either absence of association found in developed countries or its inverted pattern: till recently, women with university education were more likely to smoke than those less educated; teenagers from more affluent families use alcohol more likely than those from poorer ones.CONCLUSION. Inconsistency of SES-behavior association patterns in Ukraine with those seen in the West may be due to a different perception of health behaviors in people who grew up in the former Soviet Union. Behaviors pertinent to men were considered rather masculine and risky than those health-related. We theorize that the revealed absence of SES-behavior association may be because the behaviors are not perceived as those related to health which is an important resource for life. If a behavior is not known as a ‘health behavior’, the society is less likely to stratify with regard to its practicing. So, if the hypothesis is correct, there may be more disparities in younger cohorts than in older ones

  8. Fluctuations in quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, G.; Chirikov, B.V.

    1996-01-01

    Various fluctuations in quantum systems with discrete spectrum are discussed, including recent unpublished results. Open questions and unexplained peculiarities of quantum fluctuations are formulated [ru

  9. Investigation of Exercise Self - Efficacy and Stage of Exercise Behavior Change in University Students

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    Celal ORAL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change in students who were studying in school of physical education and sport (PES and students who were studying in other faculty and departments (OFD in Akdeniz University and to evaluate their sport participation habits. Par ticipants were 360 students who were studying in Akdeniz University. Stage of Exercise Behavior Change Questionnaire and Exercise Self - Efficacy Questionnaire were applied to the participants in classroom environment. Results: Results of statistical analyse s revealed that , 27.5 % of men and 19.2% of women were in preparation stage of exercise behavior. There were no significant differences between genders ( p>.05. According to the result of exercise self - efficacy analyses, there were no significant differen ces between male and female students ( p>.05. When examining exercise self - efficacy in student studying different department, there were significant differences between the PES and OFD students (p<.05. Discussion and According to the results o f present study, it was conclude that there were no significant gender differences in both exercise self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change. It was found that, PES students had significantly higher score in exercise self - efficacy and in highe r stage of exercise behavior than OFD students.

  10. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively. As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother’s education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  11. Intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual behaviors of Chinese university students: gender differences in prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Bongardt, Daphne van de; Hawk, Skyler T

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate gender differences among university students in contemporary China regarding (1) the prevalence of various types of intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual behaviors and (2) their sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors. A total of 1,397 university students (M(age) = 20.3 years) completed related questionnaires. Intrapersonal behaviors (i.e., sexual fantasizing, solitary masturbation, and viewing pornography) were generally reported more frequently than interpersonal behaviors (i.e., petting, oral sex, and intercourse). Gender differences were most evident for intrapersonal sexual behaviors, all of which were reported more frequently by men. Men reported significantly more heterosexual intercourse than women but not petting or oral sex. Several correlates (i.e., age, educational aspiration, family income, urbanity, relationship experience, and Internet use) were significant predictors of various intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual behaviors. Gender significantly moderated these correlations in three cases: Family income was a stronger negative predictor of intercourse for women, romantic relationship history was a stronger positive predictor of intercourse for men, and Internet use was a stronger positive predictor of sexual fantasizing for men. We discuss the implications of these findings for sexuality education and sexual health policies and practices in contemporary China.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Wenjie; Bai, Ruixue; Zhang, Fan; Sharma, Manoj; Shi, Zumin; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Abdullah, Abu S; Zhao, Yong

    2016-07-12

    In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB) related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively). As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother's education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  13. Prevalence and correlates of sexual behaviors among university students: a study in Hefei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Yu, Lu; Winter, Sam

    2012-11-13

    In China, sexual health and behaviors of young people have become a growing public concern but few studies have been conducted to investigate the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of the phenomenon. A self-reported questionnaire survey on youth sexual behaviors was conducted among 1,500 university students in 2011 at Hefei, a middle-size city in eastern China. A total of 1,403 students (age = 20.30 ± 1.27 years) completed the questionnaire with a high response rate of 93.5%. Among the respondents, 12.6% (15.4% of male versus 8.6% of female) students reported having pre-marital heterosexual intercourse; 10.8% (10.5% of males versus 11.2% females) had oral sex; 2.7% (3.4% of males versus 1.7% females) reported same-sex activities; 46% (70.3% of males versus 10.8% of females) reported masturbation behaviors; 57.4% (86.2% of males versus 15.6% females) students viewed pornography. In terms of sexual communication about sexual knowledge acquisition, 13.7% (10.7% of males versus 18% of females) talked to their parents about sex; 7.1% (6.1% of males versus 8.4% of females) students reported having conversation with parents on contraception. About forcing sexual behavior, 2.7% (4% of males versus 0.9% of females) reported forcing their sexual partners to have sex, and 1.9% (2.4% of males versus 1.2% of females) reported being forced to have sex. Gender was found to be significant predictor of sexual behaviors in university students: males reported more sexual behaviors including sexual fantasy, heterosexual intercourse, masturbation, viewing pornography and talking about sex with friends. Several correlates of sexual behaviors were identified for students of different gender separately. For males, having romantic relationships, past sex education experiences, low educational aspirations, time spent on the Internet, and urban native settings were significantly associated with more sexual behaviors. For female students, having romantic relationships and urban native

  14. Prevalence and correlates of sexual behaviors among university students: a study in Hefei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xinli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, sexual health and behaviors of young people have become a growing public concern but few studies have been conducted to investigate the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of the phenomenon. Methods A self-reported questionnaire survey on youth sexual behaviors was conducted among 1,500 university students in 2011 at Hefei, a middle-size city in eastern China. A total of 1,403 students (age = 20.30 ± 1.27 years completed the questionnaire with a high response rate of 93.5%. Results Among the respondents, 12.6% (15.4% of male versus 8.6% of female students reported having pre-marital heterosexual intercourse; 10.8% (10.5% of males versus 11.2% females had oral sex; 2.7% (3.4% of males versus 1.7% females reported same-sex activities; 46% (70.3% of males versus 10.8% of females reported masturbation behaviors; 57.4% (86.2% of males versus 15.6% females students viewed pornography. In terms of sexual communication about sexual knowledge acquisition, 13.7% (10.7% of males versus 18% of females talked to their parents about sex; 7.1% (6.1% of males versus 8.4% of females students reported having conversation with parents on contraception. About forcing sexual behavior, 2.7% (4% of males versus 0.9% of females reported forcing their sexual partners to have sex, and 1.9% (2.4% of males versus 1.2% of females reported being forced to have sex. Gender was found to be significant predictor of sexual behaviors in university students: males reported more sexual behaviors including sexual fantasy, heterosexual intercourse, masturbation, viewing pornography and talking about sex with friends. Several correlates of sexual behaviors were identified for students of different gender separately. For males, having romantic relationships, past sex education experiences, low educational aspirations, time spent on the Internet, and urban native settings were significantly associated with more sexual behaviors. For female students

  15. Prevalence and correlates of sexual behaviors among university students: a study in Hefei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In China, sexual health and behaviors of young people have become a growing public concern but few studies have been conducted to investigate the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of the phenomenon. Methods A self-reported questionnaire survey on youth sexual behaviors was conducted among 1,500 university students in 2011 at Hefei, a middle-size city in eastern China. A total of 1,403 students (age = 20.30 ± 1.27 years) completed the questionnaire with a high response rate of 93.5%. Results Among the respondents, 12.6% (15.4% of male versus 8.6% of female) students reported having pre-marital heterosexual intercourse; 10.8% (10.5% of males versus 11.2% females) had oral sex; 2.7% (3.4% of males versus 1.7% females) reported same-sex activities; 46% (70.3% of males versus 10.8% of females) reported masturbation behaviors; 57.4% (86.2% of males versus 15.6% females) students viewed pornography. In terms of sexual communication about sexual knowledge acquisition, 13.7% (10.7% of males versus 18% of females) talked to their parents about sex; 7.1% (6.1% of males versus 8.4% of females) students reported having conversation with parents on contraception. About forcing sexual behavior, 2.7% (4% of males versus 0.9% of females) reported forcing their sexual partners to have sex, and 1.9% (2.4% of males versus 1.2% of females) reported being forced to have sex. Gender was found to be significant predictor of sexual behaviors in university students: males reported more sexual behaviors including sexual fantasy, heterosexual intercourse, masturbation, viewing pornography and talking about sex with friends. Several correlates of sexual behaviors were identified for students of different gender separately. For males, having romantic relationships, past sex education experiences, low educational aspirations, time spent on the Internet, and urban native settings were significantly associated with more sexual behaviors. For female students, having romantic

  16. Prevalence and correlates of sexual behaviors among university students: a study in Hefei, China

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Xinli; Yu, Lu; Winter, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In China, sexual health and behaviors of young people have become a growing public concern but few studies have been conducted to investigate the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of the phenomenon. Methods A self-reported questionnaire survey on youth sexual behaviors was conducted among 1,500 university students in 2011 at Hefei, a middle-size city in eastern China. A total of 1,403 students (age = 20.30 ± 1.27 years) completed the questionnaire with a high response...

  17. A Research about Attitudes and Behaviors of University Students with Having Different Cultures towards the Environment through Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the environmental attitudes and behaviors of the university students with different cultures. This research was prepared in accordance with survey model. The population of the research is composed of 300 university students with different cultures studying at Near East University in 2015-2016 academic…

  18. Universal behavior of magnetoconductance due to weak localization in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zduniak, A.; Dyakonov, M. I.; Knap, W.

    1997-07-01

    Magnetoconductance due to weak localization is studied experimentally for different semiconductor heterostructures. We observe that, when presented as a function of the appropriately normalized magnetic field, different samples show very similar high-field behavior. A theoretical description is developed that allows one to describe in a consistent way both the high- and low-field limits. The theory predicts universal magnetic field dependence (B-1/2) of the conductivity correction for two-dimensional systems in the high-field limit. Low-field magnetoconductance depends strongly on spin and phase relaxation processes. Comparison of the theory with experiment confirms the universal behavior in high fields and allows one to estimate the spin and phase relaxation times.

  19. Dietary habits and sedentary behaviors among health science university students in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Awadhalla, Muyssar S; Al-Mannai, Mariam; AlSawad, Muneera; Asokan, G V

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary patterns and sedentary behaviors among university students in Bahrain. A cross-sectional study was carried out with students of the College of Health Sciences in Bahrain using a self-reported questionnaire. All the students enrolled in this college were included in this study (642 students; 90 males and 552 females). The mean age of the sample was 20.1±2.0 years. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information on the students' breakfast intake, snacking, food frequency intake, and sedentary habits. More than 50% of the students did not consume breakfast on a daily basis. A statistically significant difference (psleep; however, the only significant difference found was for Internet use (psleep for less time (students in Bahrain had unhealthy dietary habits and sedentary behaviors. Thus, an intervention program to promote healthy dietary patterns and lifestyle habits among university students is highly recommended.

  20. Universal and nonuniversal allometric scaling behaviors in the visibility graphs of world stock market indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Mengcen; Jiang Zhiqiang; Zhou Weixing

    2010-01-01

    The investigations of financial markets from a complex network perspective have unveiled many phenomenological properties, in which the majority of these studies map the financial markets into one complex network. In this work, we investigate 30 world stock market indices through their visibility graphs by adopting the visibility algorithm to convert each single stock index into one visibility graph. A universal allometric scaling law is uncovered in the minimal spanning trees, whose scaling exponent is independent of the stock market and the length of the stock index. In contrast, the maximal spanning trees and the random spanning trees do not exhibit universal allometric scaling behaviors. There are marked discrepancies in the allometric scaling behaviors between the stock indices and the Brownian motions. Using surrogate time series, we find that these discrepancies are caused by the fat-tailedness of the return distribution and the nonlinear long-term correlation.

  1. Association between Self-Reported Academic Performance and Risky Sexual Behavior among Ugandan University Students- A Cross Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mehra, Devika; Kyagaba, Emmanuel; ?stergren, Per-Olof; Agardh, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors and if this differs by gender, among university students. Academic performance can create psychological pressure in young students. Poor academic performance might thus potentially contribute to risky sexual behavior among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors, and whether gende...

  2. Speaking up behaviors and safety climate in an Austrian university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David; Sendlhofer, Gerald; Häsler, Lynn; Gombotz, Veronika; Leitgeb, Karina; Hoffmann, Magdalena; Jantscher, Lydia; Brunner, Gernot

    2018-04-26

    To analyze speaking up behavior and safety climate with a validated questionnaire for the first time in an Austrian university hospital. Survey amongst healthcare workers (HCW). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha was calculated as a measure of internal consistencies of scales. Analysis of variance and t-tests were used. The survey was conducted in 2017. About 2.149 HCW from three departments were asked to participate. To measure speaking up behavior and safety climate. To explore psychological safety, encouraging environment and resignation towards speaking up. About 859 evaluable questionnaires were returned (response rate: 40%). More than 50% of responders perceived specific concerns about patient safety within the last 4 weeks and observed a potential error or noticed rule violations. For the different items, between 16% and 42% of HCW reported that they remained silent though concerns for safety. In contrast, between 96% and 98% answered that they did speak up in certain situations. The psychological safety for speaking up was lower for HCW with a managerial function (P speak up (P speaking up behaviors for the first time in an Austrian university hospital. Only moderately frequent concerns were in conflict with frequent speaking up behaviors. These results clearly show that a paradigm shift is needed to increase speaking up culture.

  3. Prevalence of risky health behaviors among the students of Khorramabad universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maziye Momen-nasab

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Certain behaviors put people at high risk of premature death, disability or chronic diseases. The most common of such behaviors are smoking, bad eating habits, low physical activity, drug abusing and alcohol consumption, violent and injury and finally sexual high risk behavior. These behaviors are established during youth and extend to the adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of these behaviors among young people in Khorramabad. Materials and methods: In this cross sectional study, 700 students were participated. The assessment tool was a two – part self administrated questionnaire, consisted of demographic data and questions in 10 parts. Data was analyzed with SPSS V9.6 by X2 and Fisher exact test. Results: 67.1% of the students were female and 87.6% were single. The mean of their age was 21.26 years. 44.1% of them never used the seat belt of their cars. 13.9% had carried a weapon. 5.7% had an attempt for suicide. 25.1% of the university students had smoked cigarettes, 6% had drank alcohol an 8.3% had drug abuse. 32% of whom that experienced sexual intercourse had more than two partners and 39.8% of them had not used a condom. More than 90% had not eaten 5 servings /day of fruits and vegetables. More than 70 % had insufficient amount of physical activity. Conclusion: Health education at national and local levels can reduce these behaviors among youth.

  4. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Bereaved University Students' Hope

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    Seyyed Nahid Hosseininezhad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to study the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT on bereaved students' hope. This is an applied research of quasi-experimental type and pretest and posttest design with control group. We selected 30 bereaved university students using stratified sampling method. We used Schneider Hope Questionnaire as the pretest-posttest in the research and analyzed using the statistical method of covariance analysis. The data analysis results indicate that cognitive-behavioral therapy increases bereaved students' hope and there is a significant difference between the two groups. The results of this study show that cognitive-behavioral group therapy influences hope and increases bereaved students' hope by helping them in their emotional discharge and acceptance of death.

  5. The association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students in Wuhan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Tang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study examines the association between cultural orientation and drinking behaviors among university students. Cultural orientation is the measure of how the cultural values of individuals living in their own society are influenced by cultural values introduced from the outside. METHODS: In 2011, a cross-sectional survey collected data from 1279 university students from six universities in central China. Participants used a likert scale to rank a series of statements reflecting cultural values from the previously validated Chinese Cultural Orientation Scale and answered questions about their drinking behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences in cultural orientation were observed for gender, hometown and type of university attendance. Traditional-oriented students were more likely to be occasional drinkers or nondrinkers, while marginal-oriented students, bicultural-oriented students and western-oriented students were more likely to be regular drinkers. Bicultural orientation (OR = 1.80, P<0.05 and marginal orientation (OR = 1.64, P<0.05 increased the likelihood of the student being regular drinking, compared to students with traditional orientations. Males (OR = 4.40, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than females, graduate students (OR = 2.59, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than undergraduates, students from urban areas (OR = 1.79, P<0.05 had a higher likelihood of regular drinking than those from towns/rural areas, and students attending key universities (OR = 0.48, P<0.05 had a lower likelihood of regular drinking than those attending general universities. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural orientation influences drinking behaviors. Traditional cultural orientation was associated with less drinking while western cultural orientation, marginal cultural orientation and bicultural orientation were associated with more drinking. The role of gender

  6. Origin of cosmological density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    The density fluctuations required to explain the large-scale cosmological structure may have arisen spontaneously as a result of a phase transition in the early Universe. There are several ways in which such fluctuations may have ben produced, and they could have a variety of spectra, so one should not necessarily expect all features of the large-scale structure to derive from a simple power law spectrum. Some features may even result from astrophysical amplification mechanisms rather than gravitational instability. 128 references

  7. Dental health status and oral health behavior among university students from five ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental health status and oral health behavior and associated factors among university students in five ASEAN countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam). Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 3,344 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.5, SD=1.6; 58.3% female) from five ASEAN countries. Results indicate that 27.7% of students reported to have sometimes, most of the time or always having tooth ache in the past 12 months, 39.4% reported to have one or more cavities, 20.3% did not brush their teeth twice or more times a day, and 30.9% had never been to a dentist (or did not know it). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, older age, living in a lower middle income country, consumption of chocolate or candy, having made a dental care visit, and poor mental health was associated with tooth ache in the past 12 months. Being male, being 20 to 21 years old, coming from a wealthier family background, living in a lower middle income country, frequent consumption of soft drinks, not having consulted with a dentist in the past 12 months and weak beliefs in the benefits of tooth brushing were associated with inadequate tooth brushing frequency (health status and oral health behaviors were found and various risk factors identified that can be utilized to guide interventions to improve oral health programs among university students.

  8. Fluctuation Relations for Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Akimov, Alexei; Chernyak, Vladimir; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-03-01

    We consider a non-equilibrium statistical system on a graph or a network. Identical particles are injected, interact with each other, traverse, and leave the graph in a stochastic manner described in terms of Poisson rates, possibly strongly dependent on time and instantaneous occupation numbers at the nodes of the graph. We show that the system demonstrates a profound statistical symmetry, leading to new Fluctuation Relations that originate from the supersymmetry and the principle of the geometric universality of currents rather than from the relations between probabilities of forward and reverse trajectories. NSF/ECCS-0925618, NSF/CHE-0808910 and DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. Fluctuations in the multiparticle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1993-01-01

    The appearance and properties of intermittent fluctuations in physical systems, in particular the formation of rare structures in transport phenomena are discussed. The distribution of fluctuations approaches a limiting log-normal statistical distribution. The log-normal distribution is introduced as a simple parametrization of the energy fluctuations leading to the subthreshold production of particles in nuclear collisions, and it is shown that it fits all available data both for total π 0 production cross section as well as the π 0 kinetic energy spectra for E/A < 90 MeV. It is suggested that the same universal distribution should also describe the subthreshold production of other hadrons like η and K. (author) 36 refs., 11 figs

  10. Soft behavior of a closed massless state in superstring and universality in the soft behavior of the dilaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchia, Paolo Di [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Marotta, Raffaele [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli,Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo ed. 6, via Cintia, 80126, Napoli (Italy); Mojaza, Matin [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-12-06

    We consider the tree-level scattering amplitudes in the NS-NS (Neveu-Schwarz) massless sector of closed superstrings in the case where one external state becomes soft. We compute the amplitudes generically for any number of dimensions and any number and kind of the massless closed states through the subsubleading order in the soft expansion. We show that, when the soft state is a graviton or a dilaton, the full result can be expressed as a soft theorem factorizing the amplitude in a soft and a hard part. This behavior is similar to what has previously been observed in field theory and in the bosonic string. Differently from the bosonic string, the supersymmetric soft theorem for the graviton has no string corrections at subsubleading order. The dilaton soft theorem, on the other hand, is found to be universally free of string corrections in any string theory.

  11. Soft behavior of a closed massless state in superstring and universality of the soft behavior of the dilaton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Vecchia, Paolo; Marotta, Raffaele; Mojaza, Matin

    2016-01-01

    We consider the tree-level scattering amplitudes in the NS-NS (Neveu-Schwarz) massless sector of closed superstrings in the case where one external state becomes soft. We compute the amplitudes generically for any number of dimensions and any number and kind of the massless closed states through...... the subsubleading order in the soft expansion. We show that, when the soft state is a graviton or a dilaton, the full result can be expressed as a soft theorem factorizing the amplitude in a soft and a hard part. This behavior is similar to what has previously been observed in field theory and in the bosonic string....... Differently from the bosonic string, the supersymmetric soft theorem for the graviton has no string corrections at subsubleading order. The dilaton soft theorem, on the other hand, is found to be universally free of string corrections in any string theory....

  12. Sexual behavior survey and screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in university students in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Ju; Cho, Yong-Hyun; Ha, U-Syn; Kim, Sae Woong; Yoon, Moon Soo; Bae, Kyunghee

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to define the prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections and status of sexual risk behavior among university students (18-25 years old) in the capital region of South Korea. Participants filled out a self-administered questionnaire related to sexuality. First-void urine was analyzed for chlamydial and gonococcal infection by strand displacement amplification (BDProbTecET, BD Diagnostic Systems, MD). A total of 622 students from 15 colleges in three universities took part in the study. The median age was 21 and 39.1% of them reported having sexual intercourse at least once. The prevalence of C. trachomatis among sexually active men and women was 8.4% and 10.6%, respectively. Gonococcal infection was noted in one symptomatic male. Factors significantly associated with infection were the number of sexual partners during past year and lifetime and condom use. This is the first sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening in university students in South Korea. Urine-based STI screening was both feasible and acceptable in university students in South Korea. It should be considered a routine part of programs to control STI nationally.

  13. Behavioral Health Risk Profiles of Undergraduate University Students in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ansari, Walid; Ssewanyana, Derrick; Stock, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    Background: Limited research has explored clustering of lifestyle behavioral risk factors (BRFs) among university students. This study aimed to explore clustering of BRFs, composition of clusters, and the association of the clusters with self-rated health and perceived academic performance. Method......: We assessed (BRFs), namely tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, unhealthy nutrition, and inadequate sleep, using a self-administered general Student Health Survey among 3,706 undergraduates at seven UK universities. Results: A two-step cluster analysis...... generated: Cluster 1 (the high physically active and health conscious) with very high health awareness/consciousness, good nutrition, and physical activity (PA), and relatively low alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use. Cluster 2 (the abstinent) had very low ATOD use, high health awareness, good...

  14. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Phobos Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/ overlinepp and e +e - data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with √ s in a similar way as Nch in e +e - collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  15. [Food habits and health-related behaviors in a university population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Socarrás, Violeida; Aguilar Martínez, Alicia

    2014-09-18

    The university population is considered a particularly vulnerable group from the nutritional point of view as it begins to take responsibility for their food and going through a critical period in the consolidation of habits and food-related behaviors. Previous studies highlight the loss of healthy dietary patterns and the need to develop educational and nutritional interventions. To analyze habits and food-related behaviors in a university population in Catalonia as a starting point to develop effective strategies for health promotion. Cross-sectional observational study of dietary habits and food-related behaviors (alcohol, tobacco and physical activity) in Catalan university students. Lunch and dinner at home were the essential meals of the surveyed students while breakfast and afternoon snack were omitted about 20% of cases. The obtained dietary pattern was characterized by an excessive consumption of red meat (84%) and poor or very poor consumption of vegetables (39.8%), cereals (92.6%) and fruit (73.9%). The consumption of alcohol was low, and the most consumed beverage was beer. The majority of students reported not being regular smokers. Among regular smokers predominated women. Alcohol consumption was also low and beer was the most consumed beverage. A considerable number of students were used to performing moderate or intense physical activity three or more times a week, although a similar proportion not perform any physical activity regularly. In the studied population, food habits that deviate from the recommendations of the Mediterranean Diet are detected in a large number of students: low consumption of fruits and vegetables, increased consumption of dairy products and a predominance in the consumption of red meat in front of poultry. These changes are in line with those that occurred in recent years in Spain and in other industrialized countries. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. A study of university student behaviors in using eBooks in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hokyin Lai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The adoption rate of eBooks has multiplied exponentially in University libraries. Libraries prefer buying eBooks rather than in-print books, mainly because of their low cost-structure and also because eBooks are easier to store. However, many library users still prefer to read in-print books, as compared to reading eBooks. This therefore leads to a potential mismatch between the expectations of the library and its users. This study aims to investigate the usage of eBooks in Universities in Hong Kong. The focus of this research is to analyze the behaviors of students using eBooks at Universities in Hong Kong. Their usage experience would be observed and examined in order to identify and discover a more sustainable system for the future development of eBooks in Universities in Hong Kong. In this study, a questionnaire has been utilized for collecting the experiences of students using eBooks. The results very clearly demonstrated that printed books are the preferential choice for most students, although they were willing to accept eBooks as a substitute for printed books. The concerns of students corresponding to acceptance of eBooks have been examined in this study. This study would be beneficial for academic libraries in Hong Kong, as it would provide valuable assistance in enhancing and refining their services and developing their collection of eBooks, through understanding and appreciating the behaviors of students who use eBooks.

  17. Sexual behavior of unmarried Colombian University students: a five-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, H

    1984-04-01

    The results of a 5-year follow-up survey on the sexual behavior of unmarried Colombian University students are reported. On the whole, these findings corroborate the earlier data. Coital incidences of 93.9% among males and 38.3% among females, as well as the important role prostitution still plays in the sexual lives of males, show that the double standard is much in force. However, there are indicators of its erosion, such as male students' decreasing reliance on prostitutes as sources of sexual outlet and the appreciable incidence of female premarital coitus, which could reach 50% among those students that eventually marry.

  18. The Origin and Evolution of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Linda J; Houmanfar, Ramona A; Ghezzi, Patrick M; Williams, W Larry; Locey, Matthew; Hayes, Steven C

    2016-05-01

    The origins of the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Nevada, Reno by way of a self-capitalized model through its transition to a more typical graduate program is described. Details of the original proposal to establish the program and the funding model are described. Some of the unusual features of the program executed in this way are discussed, along with problems engendered by the model. Also included is the diversification of faculty interests over time. The status of the program, now, after 25 years of operation, is presented.

  19. Users Behavior in Selecting Cited Bibliographies-A Case Study of National Taiwan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This project analyzes the behavior of selecting cited bibliographies of college and graduate students in National Taiwan University when they are writing their term papers and graduate theses. After instruction, 33 subjects searched through the semester, doing 41 searches and finishing 40 papers. This research studies the overlaps between the bibliographies from online searching and the cited references of those subjects’ works. In addition, this project attempts to identify the sources of articles that are not retrieved by the Dialog system and the reasons why students did not cite relevant articles.[Article content in Chinese

  20. Attitudes toward Same-Sex Attraction and Behavior among Chinese University Students: Tendencies, Correlates, and Gender Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Chi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined Chinese university students’ attitudes toward same-sex attraction and behavior, the socio-demographic correlates of these attitudes, and the potential gender differences in both tendencies and correlates. A total of 2,644 Chinese university students (49.7% male, mean age = 20.27 years indicated generally negative attitudes toward same-sex attraction and behavior, with males reporting more negative attitudes than females. More years in university (i.e., higher grade levels, higher levels of maternal education, growing up in an urban area, and more frequent Internet use significantly predicted more positive attitudes. Gender significantly moderated one correlate: For female participants, a higher university grade was related to more positive attitudes; this correlation was not significant for male participants. The findings suggest valuable directions for related intervention practices for young people in China. Key words: Chinese university students, same-sex attraction and behavior, gender differences

  1. Sexual behavior of unmarried Colombian university students: a follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, H

    1989-06-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the author has conducted periodic surveys of the sexual behavior of the students of Caldas University, Manizales, Colombia. This study presents the results of the latest follow-up. It documents the accelerated convergence of male and female sexual behavior in a culture which, up to a few years ago, fully adhered to the double standard. The most striking change relates to the increase in the incidence of female premarital coitus, from 38.3% five years earlier to 64.6%, and perhaps 80% among those students who eventually marry. However, the study also shows that prostitution still plays an important role in the sexual lives of male students.

  2. The behavior of the Higgs field in the new inflationary universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Alan H.; Pi, So-Young

    1986-01-01

    Answers are provided to questions about the standard model of the new inflationary universe (NIU) which have raised concerns about the model's validity. A baby toy problem which consists of the study of a single particle moving in one dimension under the influence of a potential with the form of an upside-down harmonic oscillator is studied, showing that the quantum mechanical wave function at large times is accurately described by classical physics. Then, an exactly soluble toy model for the behavior of the Higgs field in the NIU is described which should provide a reasonable approximation to the behavior of the Higgs field in the NIU. The dynamics of the toy model is described, and calculative results are reviewed which, the authors claim, provide strong evidence that the basic features of the standard picture are correct.

  3. Universality in the phase behavior of soft matter: a law of corresponding states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malescio, G

    2006-10-01

    We show that the phase diagram of substances whose molecular structure changes upon varying the thermodynamic parameters can be mapped, through state-dependent scaling, onto the phase diagram of systems of molecules having fixed structure. This makes it possible to identify broad universality classes in the complex phase scenario exhibited by soft matter, and enlightens a surprisingly close connection between puzzling phase phenomena and familiar behaviors. The analysis presented provides a straightforward way for deriving the phase diagram of soft substances from that of simpler reference systems. This method is applied here to study the phase behavior exhibited by two significative examples of soft matter with temperature-dependent molecular structure: thermally responsive colloids and polymeric systems. A region of inverse melting, i.e., melting upon isobaric cooling, is predicted at relatively low pressure and temperature in polymeric systems.

  4. Universal behavior of a dispersive Dirac cone in gradient-index plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Matthias; Mattheakis, Marios; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Luskin, Mitchell; Margetis, Dionisios

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate analytically and numerically that the dispersive Dirac cone emulating an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) behavior is a universal property within a family of plasmonic crystals consisting of two-dimensional (2D) metals. Our starting point is a periodic array of 2D metallic sheets embedded in an inhomogeneous and anisotropic dielectric host that allows for propagation of transverse-magnetic (TM) polarized waves. By invoking a systematic bifurcation argument for arbitrary dielectric profiles in one spatial dimension, we show how TM Bloch waves experience an effective dielectric function that averages out microscopic details of the host medium. The corresponding effective dispersion relation reduces to a Dirac cone when the conductivity of the metallic sheet and the period of the array satisfy a critical condition for ENZ behavior. Our analytical findings are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  5. Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use at Brown University: 1975-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipert, Benjamin J; Scott, Dana Marie; Matteson, Kristen A; Clark, Melissa A; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2016-01-01

    To assess sexual behaviors and contraceptive use in a sample of Brown University students. A total of 255 undergraduate students responded to an anonymous online survey in May 2011. The survey addressed level of sexual activity, behaviors, and contraceptive use. Female responders were compared to results from surveys conducted in 1975, 1986, 1989, and 1995. Of the surveyed undergraduates 62% were sexually active. Sexual activity among women was similar to that of previous survey years. Contraceptive pills were the most common primary contraceptive method, reported by 59% of students, and 32% used dual method contraceptive use for sexually transmitted disease (STD) and pregnancy prevention. We observed a plateau in condom use among women in 2011 after an increase from 1975-1995. Use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) was uncommon (3%). Educational efforts should emphasize the effectiveness of LARC and dual method contraceptive use to reduce the risk of STDs and unintended pregnancies.

  6. [Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in childhood anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, Hildegard; Yang, Young-Im; Suhr-Dachs, Lydia; Walter, Daniel; Döpfner, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    Only few studies have examined whether the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) generalizes to clinical practice. This study examines the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for juvenile anxiety disorders under routine care conditions in a university-based psychiatric outpatient clinic. 92 children and adolescents with parent-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms and 61 children and adolescents with self-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms were treated with cognitive-behavioral interventions. Pre/post mean comparisons, effect sizes, and the clinical significance of changes in symptoms were examined. The effect size for reduction of anxiety symptoms was .81 for children whose parents had completed the rating scale and .79 for children who had filled in a self-rating scale. Effect sizes for reduction of comorbid symptoms varied between .37 and .84 for parent ratings and between .21 and .62 for self-ratings. The percentage of children and adolescents who achieved clinically significant improvements in anxiety symptoms was 55.1 % according to the parent ratings and 65.7 % according to the children's self-ratings. More than 50 % of parents and children reported clinically significant improvements in comorbid symptoms. Significant reductions in both anxiety and comorbid symptoms were demonstrated over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy of juvenile anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic. The effect sizes for anxiety symptoms were found to be comparable to the effect sizes reported in RCTs. Similarly, clinically significant improvements were as frequent as the rates of remission of anxiety symptoms reported in RCTs.

  7. Non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David S

    2012-01-01

    We discuss non-equilibrium aspects of fluctuation-induced interactions. While the equilibrium behavior of such interactions has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood, the study of these interactions out of equilibrium is relatively new. We discuss recent results on the non-equilibrium behavior of systems whose dynamics is of the dissipative stochastic type and identify a number of outstanding problems concerning non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions.

  8. East Tennessee State University's "Make a Difference" Project: Using a Team-Based Consultative Model To Conduct Functional Behavioral Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Kelley; Hales, Cindy; Bush, Marta; Fox, James

    1998-01-01

    Describes implementation of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) through collaboration between a university (East Tennessee State University) and the local school system. Discusses related issues such as factors in team training, team size, FBA adaptations, and replicability of the FBA team model. (Author/DB)

  9. A Demonstration of the Universal Problem-Solving Approach to Address Children's Inappropriate Behavior in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Martha E.; Voorhees, Mary D.; Walker, Virginia L.; Berlin, Rebecca A.; Jamison, Kristen Roorbach; Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate a universal intervention during teacher-identified routines that were characterized by significant classwide problem behavior. Six Head Start classrooms (seven groups of children, with one classroom divided into two groups) received two workshops and two coaching sessions on universal Positive…

  10. Changing Trends in Nutritional Behavior among University Students in Greece, between 2006 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakoumaki, Foteini; Fotiou, Maria; Dimitropoulou, Aristea; Symeonidou, Maria; Menexes, Georgios; Biliaderis, Costas G.; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study the dietary behavior of university students residing away from the family home. In this context, we (a) compared their dietary habits in two time periods, namely 2006 and 2016; and (b) explored the possible impact of gender on the behavioral changes in nutritional choices. A total of four hundred and five university students (2006, n = 242; 2016, n = 163) participated in the study. Dietary assessment was carried out using a qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaire, while data about demographic and lifestyle factors were also collected. Students’ dietary habits have been modified in a generally desirable direction, as reflected, e.g., in the elevated consumption of several plant-based foods. Gender was also significantly associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) and changes in dietary attitudes. Possible reasons for the transition towards healthier and more balanced dietary habits could involve the budgetary constraints facing Greece in the last decade, as well as increasing nutritional awareness and other socio-cultural factors characterizing this target group. A deeper understanding of these relations would be crucial to foster nutritional education and further enhance the effectiveness of health promotion campaigns. PMID:29320449

  11. Oral health attitudes and behavior of dental students at the University of Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badovinac, Ana; Božić, Darko; Vučinac, Ivana; Vešligaj, Jasna; Vražić, Domagoj; Plancak, Darije

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral health behavior and attitudes of dental students in years 1 to 6 at the University of Zagreb, Croatia. The Croatian version of the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) was administered to predoctoral dental students, and collected data were analyzed. A total of 503 students (22.3 ± 2.6 mean age) completed the questionnaire. The response rate was 85.1 percent, and 72.4 percent of the respondents were female. These dental students' answers to eleven out of twenty HU-DBI items differed significantly by academic year. The mean questionnaire score was 6.62 ± 1.54, and the highest value of the HU-DBI score was in the fourth year (7.24 ± 1.54). First-year students were most likely to have a toothbrush with hard bristles and felt they had not brushed well unless done with hard strokes. Students in the sixth year were least worried about visiting a dentist and most frequently put off going to a dentist until having a toothache, indicating that rise of knowledge contributes to higher self-confidence. The mean HU-DBI score for these students showed average value, pointing out the need for a comprehensive oral hygiene and preventive program from the start of dental school.

  12. Sexual orientation and sexual risk behaviors among male students of a university in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureerut, Rongruang; Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Duangmala, Padoongyot

    2013-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of sexual orientation, identify predictors of being homosexual or bisexual (HB), and assess the association of sexual orientation with sexual risk behaviors among university male students in southern Thailand. A cross-sectional study was conducted on third year male university students between June 2008 and February 2009 using anonymous self-administered questionnaires. Among 1,101 eligible students, 1,013 (92%) responded The prevalence of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality among respondents were 90.2%, 6.7%, and 3.1%, respectively giving a prevalence of HB of 9.8%. Significant factors predicting HB included having separated parents. Overall lifetime prevalence of men having sex with men (MSM) was 6.3% (2% in heterosexual males and 46.5% among HB males). HB males were more likely to have multiple sex partners and engage in group sex, and less likely to use condoms than were heterosexual males. The prevalence of sexual risk behaviors among these male students, especially HB, was high.

  13. Job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior of personnel at one university hospital in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaraprasong, Bhusita; Dityen, Warunee; Krugkrunjit, Peera; Subhadrabandhu, Thanya

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between job satisfaction and Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) of the personnel at one university hospital in Thailand. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 296 respondents who worked in the Office of the Dean, 13 departments and 2 Offices of Research Center and Office of Community Medicine Center. All of them were personnel in one university hospital in Thailand. The Organizational Citizenship Behavior Questionnaire of Niehoff and Moorman using the five dimensions scale developed by Podsakoff and Mackenzie and Job Descriptive Index (JDI) were used for assessing job satisfaction. For inferential statistics, Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used for correlation. The percentage mean score of job satisfaction was 58.67 and subscale of job satisfaction was found that satisfaction with supervision held the highest of the mean score, while satisfaction with pay and promotion had the lowest and low of the mean score. The mean score of OCB was high and the facets of OCB was found that conscientiousness had the highest mean score and sportsmanship had the lowest. By using Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient to analyze the relationships between satisfaction and OCB, it showed that there were statistically significant low positive correlations between job satisfaction and OCB (r = 0.173, p pay, promotion and supervision factors which encourage personnel to be satisfied and demonstrate their OCB as their reciprocal reaction.

  14. A cross-sectional investigation of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and health-behavior participation in Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Geoff P; Nash, Kim; Sharman, Rachael; Lane, Ben R

    2014-05-06

    Transitioning to university involves a major life change that can have implications for physical and mental health. This study had three objectives: first, assess the mental health and health-behavior participation of Australian university students; second, evaluate clustering of health behaviors; and third, examine how mental health relates to health behaviors. University students (n = 751) enrolled at an Australian regional university completed an online survey containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and a health-behavior questionnaire. Over one-third of students reported mild or higher mental illness symptoms and most reported engaging in multiple unhealthy behaviors. Furthermore, mental health was associated with unhealthy behaviors. For males, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast and poor sleep quality. For females, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast, inadequate vigorous physical activity, and short or long sleep hours. Stress symptoms in females were associated with healthy sleep hours, but poor sleep quality. Future research may consider whether an intervention targeting one or two key health behaviors has utility in improving participation in other health behaviors and mental health. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Theory of Planned Behavior: Sensitivity and Specificity in Predicting Graduation and Drop-Out among College and University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Amsel, Rhonda; Jorgensen, Mary; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Budd, Jillian; King, Laura; Jorgensen, Shirley; Asuncion, Jennison

    2016-01-01

    We examined sensitivity and specificity when using the three theory of planned behavior (TPB) scales (Perceived Behavioral Control, Subjective Norms, Attitude) to predict graduation and drop-out in a longitudinal study of 252 college and university students with disabilities and in a separate cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1380…

  16. Knowledge, Behavior and Attitudes of University Students toward Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtuluş Didem Yazganoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study evaluates the knowledge, behavior and attitudes about sexually transmitted infections (STIs among university students attending faculties other than medicine. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive study was designed. A self-administered questionnaire comprising 37 questions was administered to students of Turkish nationality in a six-week period who attended to medico. Three hundred and eighty eight students completed the questionnaire. Results: Among students, 56.9% were female and 43.1% were male. Mean age was 21.18±2.46. Of the students, 76.9% claimed that they knew about STIs. ?Internet? (63.9% was the most common source of information, followed-by ?friends? (48%. HIV was the most common known disease as a STI (96.8%, followed-by gonorrhea, syphilis, hepatitis-B, genital herpes, genital warts, hepatitis-C. Of the respondents, 93.7% knew that STIs could be transmitted by vaginal sex, while 69% knew about transmission by blood, 48.9% by anal sex and 32% by oral sex. The rate of students who did not know any of the symptoms of STIs was 32.9%. Of the females 13.3% and of the males 51.6% stated to have sexual experience with statistically significant difference among sexes (c2=62.722, p=0.001. Females reported first sexual intercourse at an older age than males (t=3.970, p=0.001. Approximately half of the males (55.8% and nearly all of the females (95.8% who reported to have sexual activity had 2 or less sexual partners (c2=9.564, p=0.008. Both sexes showed risky sexual behavior about condom use (c2=3.210, p=0.523. Conclusion: It seems that most of the Turkish university students are not aware of STIs other than HIV. They especially lack knowledge about symptoms, complications and transmission routes of STIs. The low rate of condom use shows their risky behavior to get STI. Lack of knowledge about STIs, condom use and risky sexual behaviors among university students deserve attention to the

  17. Health and behavioral factors associated with binge drinking among university students in nine ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Ngin, Chanrith; Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2017-06-26

    Heavy drinking among university students has been globally recognized as a major public health burden. In the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region, studies on this issue have been scant, country-specific and in different time frames. The aim of this study was to identify social and behavioral factors associated with binge drinking among university students in nine ASEAN countries. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 among 8809 undergraduate university students from 13 universities in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam using self-administered questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the associated factors. More than half (62.3%) of the study sample were female with a mean age of 20.5 (SD = 2.0) years. Of total, 12.8% were infrequent (

  18. The Information Seeking Behavior of Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Students of Bogor Agricultural University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Gristinawati Sujana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological expansion and the changing way individuals gain access to information has deeply impacted the structure of libraries – physically as well as conceptually. A new generation of digital services platforms for libraries is emerging, designed to provide a more comprehensive  approach  to  the  management  and  access  to  all  formats  of  library  materials. Despite the modernization of libraries and their adaption to the digital age, the library still hold a critical role within community to serve its users, continuing to be beacons of information sharing, learning, and entertainment even amidst tight fiscal times.  As one of the leading university in Indonesia, Bogor Agricultural University Library must find solutions to new challenges, overhaul many of their entrenched business processes, and foster systems that engage students.  This study examined the information seeking behavior of the digital native and digital immigrant students of Bogor Agricultural University, in order to remind the library that there are some changes happened in its users and to recommend the new services should be taken by the library. The similarities and differences in seeking information of those two group students were discussed.

  19. Impact of Parents and Peers Smoking on Tobacco Consumption Behavior of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resen, Hussein Mohammed

    2018-03-27

    Introduction: In the United Arab Emirates, smoking prevalence has increased in both sexes, especially among young adults. Various factors have led to this catastrophe; examples include coverage on TV and social media, as well as market availability. One major influence is smoking by parents and peers. A lot of students may start smoking because of the behavior of their family and friends, and therefore it is necessary to quantify adverse contributions. The aim of this project was to study to what degree parents and peers smoking habits may impact on smoking behavior of students at the University of Sharjah. Methods: This cross-sectional observational study with a non-probability convenient type of sampling, was conducted with university students aged 18 to 23. Information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire, comprising 23 questions, developed by ourselves. Results: A total of 400 University of Sharjah students (50% males and 50% females) were included.Some 15.8% of the smoking students had smoking parents, and 17.1% of them had smoking peers. The respective figures were 22.2% and 21.7% for males and 10% and 7.8% for females. Conclusions: Peers had a stronger impact than parents and both parents and peers had greater influence on males than on females. Interestingly, almost 80% of the smoking students did not have smoking parents or peers, which leaves the question unanswered of why they started smoking in the first place. Actions at a societal level should be taken into consideration to prevent smoking and thus help create a non-smoking generation. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Youth Sexual Health: Sexual Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Among Students at a University in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraçoğlu, Gamze Varol; Erdem, İlknur; Doğan, Sultan; Tokuç, Burcu

    2014-09-01

    To determine sexual attitudes, behavior, and knowledge of Namik Kemal University (NKU) students about sexual health and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A sample representing 10% of the undergraduate population of NKU in 2009-2010, was studied. Of 1,500 questionnaires distributed, 1,314 (87.6%) were filled out. The mean age of the respondents (52.9% male) was 20.07±1.75 years. The rate of students who had received sexual health education was 32.0%, and 15.3% had previously used a sexual health service. Eleven percent of the female students and 50.3% of the male students had had sexual intercourse. The average age of initial sexual intercourse was 16.83±2.07 years. Of the students who had had sexual intercourse, 46.6% reported that they did not use any contraception method. The most preferred method was condoms (37.6%). The rate of contraceptive use was 58.7% in sexually educated students and 43.9% in those not educated (p=.004). The most well-known STI was AIDS (96.5%), with sexually educated students giving higher rates of correct answers about STIs (psexual health education were more knowledgeable about vital consequences of STI's, even though it is not sufficient, than sexually active students. Awareness of safe sexual practices and changes in behavior, in particular, promoting condom use should be established in higher risk youths. Deficiencies in knowledge could be addressed by adding a sexual healthtraining component to the university curriculum, and unmet requirements could be met by reorganizing medico-social centers in universities.

  1. The Bond Fluctuation Model and Other Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcus

    Lattice models constitute a class of coarse-grained representations of polymeric materials. They have enjoyed a longstanding tradition for investigating the universal behavior of long chain molecules by computer simulations and enumeration techniques. A coarse-grained representation is often necessary to investigate properties on large time- and length scales. First, some justification for using lattice models will be given and the benefits and limitations will be discussed. Then, the bond fluctuation model by Carmesin and Kremer [1] is placed into the context of other lattice models and compared to continuum models. Some specific techniques for measuring the pressure in lattice models will be described. The bond fluctuation model has been employed in more than 100 simulation studies in the last decade and only few selected applications can be mentioned.

  2. Out-of-time-order fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Shitara, Tomohiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    We prove a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem for a certain class of out-of-time-ordered correlators (OTOCs) with a modified statistical average, which we call bipartite OTOCs, for general quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. The difference between the bipartite and physical OTOCs defined by the usual statistical average is quantified by a measure of quantum fluctuations known as the Wigner-Yanase skew information. Within this difference, the theorem describes a universal relation between chaotic behavior in quantum systems and a nonlinear-response function that involves a time-reversed process. We show that the theorem can be generalized to higher-order n -partite OTOCs as well as in the form of generalized covariance.

  3. Feasibility of retrofitting a university library with active workstations to reduce sedentary behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hotaka; Quartiroli, Alessandro; Vos, Paul W; Carr, Lucas J; Mahar, Matthew T

    2014-05-01

    Libraries are an inherently sedentary environment, but are an understudied setting for sedentary behavior interventions. To investigate the feasibility of incorporating portable pedal machines in a university library to reduce sedentary behaviors. The 11-week intervention targeted students at a university library. Thirteen portable pedal machines were placed in the library. Four forms of prompts (e-mail, library website, advertisement monitors, and poster) encouraging pedal machine use were employed during the first 4 weeks. Pedal machine use was measured via automatic timers on each machine and momentary time sampling. Daily library visits were measured using a gate counter. Individualized data were measured by survey. Data were collected in fall 2012 and analyzed in 2013. Mean (SD) cumulative pedal time per day was 95.5 (66.1) minutes. One or more pedal machines were observed being used 15% of the time (N=589). Pedal machines were used at least once by 7% of students (n=527). Controlled for gate count, no linear change of pedal machine use across days was found (b=-0.1 minutes, p=0.75) and the presence of the prompts did not change daily pedal time (p=0.63). Seven of eight items that assessed attitudes toward the intervention supported intervention feasibility (plibrary with pedal machines to reduce sedentary behavior seems feasible, but improvement of its effectiveness is needed. This study could inform future studies aimed at reshaping traditionally sedentary settings to improve public health. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluctuations in email size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Musashi, Yasuo

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain fluctuations in email size. We have previously investigated the long-term correlations between email send requests and data flow in the system log of the primary staff email server at a university campus, finding that email size frequency follows a power-law distribution with two inflection points, and that the power-law property weakens the correlation of the data flow. However, the mechanism underlying this fluctuation is not completely understood. We collected new log data from both staff and students over six academic years and analyzed the frequency distribution thereof, focusing on the type of content contained in the emails. Furthermore, we obtained permission to collect "Content-Type" log data from the email headers. We therefore collected the staff log data from May 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, creating two subdistributions. In this paper, we propose a model to explain these subdistributions, which follow log-normal-like distributions. In the log-normal-like model, email senders -consciously or unconsciously- regulate the size of new email sentences according to a normal distribution. The fitting of the model is acceptable for these subdistributions, and the model demonstrates power-law properties for large email sizes. An analysis of the length of new email sentences would be required for further discussion of our model; however, to protect user privacy at the participating organization, we left this analysis for future work. This study provides new knowledge on the properties of email sizes, and our model is expected to contribute to the decision on whether to establish upper size limits in the design of email services.

  5. Fluctuations and Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2007-01-01

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence

  6. Fluctuations and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2007-02-01

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence.

  7. Fluctuations and Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sourendu [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2007-02-15

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence.

  8. Experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östergren Per-Olof

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing worldwide evidence shows that the experience of sexual coercion is fairly prevalent among young people and is associated with risky sexual behavior thereafter. The causal mechanisms behind this are unclear but may be dependent on specific contextual determinants. Little is known about factors that could buffer the negative effects of coercion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among university students of both sexes in Uganda. Methods In 2005, 980 (80% out of a total of 1,220 students enrolled in Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda participated in a self-administered questionnaire covering socio-demographic and religious factors, social capital, mental health, alcohol use, and sexual behavior. A validated scale of six items was used to assess the experience of sexual coercion. Logistic regression analyses were applied to control for confounders. Potential buffering factors were analyzed by testing for effect modification. Results Fifty-nine percent of those who responded had previously had sexual intercourse. Among the male students 29.0%, and among the female students 33.1% reported having had some experience of sexual coercion. After controlling for age, gender, and educational level of household of origin, role of religion and trust in others sexual coercion was found to be statistically significantly associated with previously had sex (OR 1.6, 95% CI; 1.1-2.3, early sexual debut (OR 2.4, 95% CI; 1.5-3.7, as well as with having had a great number of sexual partners (OR 1.9, 95% CI; 1.2-3.0, but not with inconsistent condom use. Scoring low on an assessment of mental health problems, reporting high trust in others, or stating that religion played a major role in one's family of origin seemed to buffer the negative effect that the experience of sexual coercion had on the likelihood of having many sexual partners

  9. Experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing worldwide evidence shows that the experience of sexual coercion is fairly prevalent among young people and is associated with risky sexual behavior thereafter. The causal mechanisms behind this are unclear but may be dependent on specific contextual determinants. Little is known about factors that could buffer the negative effects of coercion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among university students of both sexes in Uganda. Methods In 2005, 980 (80%) out of a total of 1,220 students enrolled in Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda participated in a self-administered questionnaire covering socio-demographic and religious factors, social capital, mental health, alcohol use, and sexual behavior. A validated scale of six items was used to assess the experience of sexual coercion. Logistic regression analyses were applied to control for confounders. Potential buffering factors were analyzed by testing for effect modification. Results Fifty-nine percent of those who responded had previously had sexual intercourse. Among the male students 29.0%, and among the female students 33.1% reported having had some experience of sexual coercion. After controlling for age, gender, and educational level of household of origin, role of religion and trust in others sexual coercion was found to be statistically significantly associated with previously had sex (OR 1.6, 95% CI; 1.1-2.3), early sexual debut (OR 2.4, 95% CI; 1.5-3.7), as well as with having had a great number of sexual partners (OR 1.9, 95% CI; 1.2-3.0), but not with inconsistent condom use. Scoring low on an assessment of mental health problems, reporting high trust in others, or stating that religion played a major role in one's family of origin seemed to buffer the negative effect that the experience of sexual coercion had on the likelihood of having many sexual partners. Conclusion The findings

  10. Experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agardh, Anette; Odberg-Pettersson, Karen; Ostergren, Per-Olof

    2011-07-04

    Growing worldwide evidence shows that the experience of sexual coercion is fairly prevalent among young people and is associated with risky sexual behavior thereafter. The causal mechanisms behind this are unclear but may be dependent on specific contextual determinants. Little is known about factors that could buffer the negative effects of coercion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among university students of both sexes in Uganda. In 2005, 980 (80%) out of a total of 1,220 students enrolled in Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda participated in a self-administered questionnaire covering socio-demographic and religious factors, social capital, mental health, alcohol use, and sexual behavior. A validated scale of six items was used to assess the experience of sexual coercion. Logistic regression analyses were applied to control for confounders. Potential buffering factors were analyzed by testing for effect modification. Fifty-nine percent of those who responded had previously had sexual intercourse. Among the male students 29.0%, and among the female students 33.1% reported having had some experience of sexual coercion. After controlling for age, gender, and educational level of household of origin, role of religion and trust in others sexual coercion was found to be statistically significantly associated with previously had sex (OR 1.6, 95% CI; 1.1-2.3), early sexual debut (OR 2.4, 95% CI; 1.5-3.7), as well as with having had a great number of sexual partners (OR 1.9, 95% CI; 1.2-3.0), but not with inconsistent condom use.Scoring low on an assessment of mental health problems, reporting high trust in others, or stating that religion played a major role in one's family of origin seemed to buffer the negative effect that the experience of sexual coercion had on the likelihood of having many sexual partners. The findings of this study suggest that the

  11. Students' drinking behavior and perceptions towards introducing alcohol policies on university campus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Eva Ladekjær; Andsager Smorawski, Gitte; Lund Krabak, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    . The aim of this study is to explore students’ perceptions of alcohol policies on campus in relation to attitudes and practices of alcohol consumption. Methods We conducted six focus group interviews with students from the University of Southern Denmark at two different campuses. The interviews discussed...... topics such as experiences and attitudes towards alcohol consumption among students, regulations, and norms of alcohol use on campus. The analysis followed a pre-determined codebook. Results Alcohol consumption is an integrated practice on campus. Most of the participants found it unnecessary to make...... major restrictions. Instead, regulations were socially controlled by students themselves and related to what was considered to be appropriate behavior. However students were open minded towards smaller limitations of alcohol availability. These included banning the sale of alcohol in vending machines...

  12. Nonstandard primordial fluctuations from a polynomial inflation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, H.M.; Kofman, L.A.; Primack, J.R.; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1990-01-01

    We examine in detail the properties of inflation determined from the most general renormalizable potential for a single real scalar field Φ: V(Φ)=AΦ 4 /4+BΦ 3 /3+CΦ 2 /2+V 0 . We find sets of parameters that can strongly break scale invariance, with a valley in the usual Zel'dovich spectrum. Such a valley can lead to earlier galaxy formation and more large scale structure in the Universe than in the usual scale-invariant cold dark matter scenario. We also find that the parameters of the potential can be many orders of magnitude larger than what would be allowed without the inclusion of the cubic term, which can lead to high reheat temperatures T reh ≅ 10 15 GeV. We have mapped out all regions of parameter space and have identified those regions that produce interesting behavior, as well as the entire region that leads to an acceptable inflationary scenario with small enough fluctuations. We further explore the possibility of generating interesting non-gaussian adiabatic density fluctuations from this potential, and find that it is unlikely for general single scalar field potentials that do not contain false vacua in the path of the inflaton, as significant non-gaussian behavior implies too large a fluctuation amplitude. (orig.)

  13. Study of Health-promotion behaviors among university of medical science students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Motlagh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health promoting activities and a healthy lifestyle are major strategies to preserve health. Regarding the importance of health in young people, health promotion in society and also lack of related studies in Iran, this study was designed to determine the performance of the health-enhancing behaviors in medical university students and its effective factors.Materials and Method: This study was a cross-sectional-descriptive survey assessing health-promoting lifestyle among students of Yazd university of medical sciences. A total number of 440 students were recruited in this study using a stratified sampling method. Health-promoting lifestyle was measured using walker’s health–promoting life style profile II (HPLP-II instrument. Data were analyzed by χ2, student t-tests and one way ANOVA, using SPSS -11.5.Result: Age range of participants was from 17 to 33 years with a mean age of 21.1 years and was composed of 67.4% females and 32.6% males. Totally, the overall health-promoting lifestyle profile had a mean of 130.31 ±19. The highest mean in the subscales was 26.03±5.04 for spiritual growth and the lowest was 16.24±4.28 for physical activity. Statistical significant association was seen between the socio-demographic variables particularly employment situation (p=0.002, study field (p=0.001, mother’s education level (p=0.007 and mother’s job (p=0.01 with mean of overall health-promoting lifestyle profile.Conclusion: Regarding the situation of health-promoting behaviors due to low physical activity among students especially in girls providing health education programs toward increasing physical activity is recommended.

  14. Food Insecurity and Behavioral Characteristics for Academic Success in Young Adults Attending an Appalachian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Rebecca L; Olfert, Melissa D

    2018-03-16

    In order to investigate the impact of food insecurity on college students in a highly health disparate region we (1) assessed the prevalence of food insecurity among young adults at a large, rural university in Appalachia, and (2) investigated the relationship between food insecurity and behavioral characteristics including academic performance, coping strategies, and money expenditure. A cross-sectional design was used to capture a representative sample of young adults attending a large, central Appalachian university in Fall 2016. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Adult Food Security Survey was used to measure food insecurity. Independent variables include money expenditure (MES), coping strategies (CSS), academic performance (APS), and demographic, health, economic and culinary variables. Participant responses ( n = 692) showed one third (36.6%) of respondents were food-insecure. Students with higher scores for MES and CSS had significantly higher odds of being food-insecure (odds ratio (OR) = 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.81 to 2.38 and OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.23, respectively). The odds of high APS scores (OR = 0.79; 95% CI 0.73 to 0.86) were inversely related to food insecurity. Results of the logistic regression showed MES, CSS, health, and school year remained a significant predictor of food insecurity in college students. These findings suggest behavioral differences in terms of coping strategies, money expenditure, and academic progress among food-insecure students and can be used to identify and target at-risk students to promote student food security and well-being.

  15. Thailand's universal coverage scheme and its impact on health-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Seung Chun; Meemon, Natthani; Wan, Thomas T H

    2016-01-01

    Thailand's Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) has improved healthcare access and utilization since its initial introduction in 2002. However, a substantial proportion of beneficiaries has utilized care outside the UCS boundaries. Because low utilization may be an indication of a policy gap between people's health needs and the services available to them, we investigated the patterns of health-seeking behavior and their social/contextual determinants among UCS beneficiaries in the year 2013. The study findings from the outpatient analysis showed that the use of designated facilities for care was significantly higher in low-income, unemployed, and chronic status groups. The findings from the inpatient analysis showed that the use of designated facilities for care was significantly higher in the low-income, older, and female groups. Particularly, for the low-income group, we found that they (1) had greater health care needs, (2) received a larger number of services from designated facilities, and (3) paid the least for both inpatient and outpatient services. This pro-poor impact indicated that the UCS could adequately respond to beneficiaries' needs in terms of vertical equity. However, we also found that a considerable proportion of beneficiaries utilized out-of-network services, which implied a lack of universal access to policy services from a horizontal equity point of view. Thus, the policy should continue expanding and diversifying its service benefits to strengthen horizontal equity. Particularly, private sector involvement for those who are employed as well as the increased unmet health needs of those in rural areas may be important policy priorities for that. Lastly, methodological issues such as severity adjustment and a detailed categorization of health-seeking behaviors need to be further considered for a better understanding of the policy impact.

  16. Universal biomimetic preparation and immobilization of layered double hydroxide films and adsorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wenpeng; Chen, Zilin

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An in situ method is developed for immobilization of nanoscale LDHs. • The universal method can be applied on multiple substrates. • The homogeneous LDHs film can be synthesis and immobilized in one step. • The LDHs film showed good adsorption performance towards anionic compounds. - Abstract: Preparation and immobilization of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) film onto multiple substrates is important and challenging in functional materials fields by date. In this work, a simple and universal polydopamine (PD)-based layer-by-layer assembly strategy was developed for the immobilization of LDHs film onto surfaces such as polypropylene chip, glass slides and metal coins. The surface of substrates was firstly modified by polydopamine functionalization, and then LDHs film was synthesized via urea method and directly immobilized on the PD layer by in situ growing strategy in one step. The PD layer as well as the final LDHs film was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern and X-ray photoelectron spectra. It has been demonstrated the formation of the dense and homogeneous nanoscaled LDHs film with 400 nm thickness. Adsorption behavior of the fabricated NiAl-LDHs film toward anionic dyes and pharmaceuticals was further assessed. To demonstrate their extensive application, fast and high efficient adsorption of anionic dyes and pharmaceuticals was achieved by NiAl-LDHs-modified polypropylene centrifugal tube.

  17. Spanish version of the Time Management Behavior Questionnaire for university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ros, Rafael; Pérez-González, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of the study is to analyze the psychometric properties and predictive capacity on academic performance in university contexts of a Spanish adaptation of the Time Management Behavior Questionnaire. The scale was applied to 462 students newly admitted at the Universitat de València in the 2006-2007 school year. The analyses performed made it possible to reproduce the factorial structure of the original version of the questionnaire with slight modifications in the ascription of various items. The underlying factorial structure includes four interrelated dimensions (Establishing objectives and priorities, Time management tools, Perception of time control and Preference for disorganization), which present satisfactory levels of reliability and an adequate convergent validity with the Time management subscale of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The scores on the dimensions of time management show significant levels of association with academic performance in the first year of university studies, especially highlighting the predictive capacity of the subscale dealing with the Establishment of objectives and priorities. These results show the reliability and validity of this adaptation of the scale for evaluating how the students manage their academic time, and predicting their performance in the year they initiate the degree program, thus aiding in the development of intervention proposals directed towards improving these skills.

  18. Origin of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Fluctuations in arc plasma devices are extremely important for any technological application in thermal plasma. The origin of such fluctuations remains unexplained. This paper presents a theory for observed fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices. A qualitative explanation for observed behavior on atmospheric pressure arc plasma fluctuations, reported in the literature, can be obtained from the theory. The potential of the theory is demonstrated through comparison of theoretical predictions with reported experimental observations

  19. E-Health Literacy and Health Information Seeking Behavior Among University Students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mohaimenul; Touray, Musa; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Poly, Tahmina Nasrin; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Syed Abdul, Shabbir

    2017-01-01

    Web 2.0 has become a leading health communication platform and will continue to attract young users; therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the impact of Web 2.0 on health information seeking behavior among university students in Bangladesh. A random sample of adults (n = 199, mean 23.75 years, SD 2.87) participated in a cross-sectional, a survey that included the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) assessed use of Web 2.0 for health information. Collected data were analyzed using a descriptive statistical method and t-tests. Finally logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between sociodemographic, social determinants, and use of Web 2.0 for seeking and sharing health information. Almost 74% of older Web 2.0 users (147/199, 73.9%) reported using popular Web 2.0 websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to find and share health information. Current study support that current Web-based health information seeking and sharing behaviors influence health-related decision making.

  20. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario-Josefa Marrero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning constructs in a convenience sample. Participants analysed were 48 university students (mean age 22.25, 25 assigned nonrandomized to intervention condition and 23 to no-treatment waiting-list control condition. All participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention to test the treatment program effectiveness. Repeated-measures ANCOVAs, controlling baseline differences between the two groups, indicated that the intervention group reported greater social support after the intervention period than the waiting-list control group. Within-group differences were found for happiness, selfacceptance, positive relations with others, optimism, and self-esteem in the intervention group; these differences did not appear in the waiting-list control group. These findings suggest the limited capacity of this intervention program for improving well-being through positive activities combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy. Future research should analyse what kind of activities could be more effective in promoting well-being depending on the characteristics of participants.

  1. Obesity among Saudi Female University Students: Dietary Habits and Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qauhiz, Norah M

    2010-01-01

    The remarkable economic growth in Saudi Arabia has affected the population life style negatively. The increasing problem of obesity has been reported from different regions in the kingdom. The rate of overweight and obesity reached 65.4% in the eastern region among females aged 18-74 years old. Although there is considerable amount of data on prevalence of obesity, yet, data on dietary habits and food consumption pattern are limited. The present study is a cross- sectional descriptive study aimed at exploring the BMI distribution among university female students. Food consumption pattern and health related behaviors were also assessed. 799 students participated in the study; data were collected using self administered questionnaire. Body weight and height were measured to calculate the BMI. Among the study participants, overweight and obesity reached 47.9%. Marriage, presence of obesity among family members, frequency of drinking aerated beverages increased the risk of obesity significantly. Misperception of body image was reported by 17.4% and 54.2% of obese and overweight students respectively. Analysis of dietary habits and life styles indicated the predominance of unhealthy behaviors. The study results mandate the need for a national strategy to adopt healthy dietary habits and life styles.

  2. Measurement invariance of an instrument assessing sustainability of school-based universal behavior practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Sterett H; McIntosh, Kent; Strickland-Cohen, M Kathleen; Horner, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which the School-Wide Universal Behavior Sustainability Index: School Teams (SUBSIST; McIntosh, Doolittle, Vincent, Horner, & Ervin, 2009), a measure of school and district contextual factors that promote the sustainability of school practices, demonstrated measurement invariance across groups of schools that differed in length of time implementing school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS; Sugai & Horner, 2009), student ethnic composition, and student socioeconomic status (SES). School PBIS team members and district coaches representing 860 schools in 14 U.S. states completed the SUBSIST. Findings supported strong measurement invariance, for all items except 1, of a model with two school-level factors (School Priority and Team Use of Data) and 2 district-level factors (District Priority and Capacity Building) across groups of schools at initial implementation, institutionalization, and sustainability phases of PBIS implementation. Schools in the sustainability phase were rated significantly higher on School Priority and Team Use of Data than schools in initial implementation. Strong measurement invariance held across groups of schools that differed in student ethnicity and SES. The findings regarding measurement invariance are important for future longitudinal investigations of factors that may promote the sustained implementation of school practices. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. AWARENESS, KNOWLEDGE, AND BEHAVIOR REGARDING HIV/AIDS AMONG FRESHMAN STUDENTS AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Mackman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV causes a sexually transmitted disease (STD affecting the human immune system. It is mainly transmitted through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions, hypodermic needles, and parenterally. Multiple actions can be taken to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, such as condom and sterile needle use and HIV testing for pregnant women. This study aims to assess freshmen students’ awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral perceptions regarding HIV/AIDS at Oakland University (OU in Michigan. This study is a cross-sectional survey targeting freshman students at OU. The questionnaire is comprised of seven sections including demographics, risk perception, protection measures, alcohol tendencies, health-seeking behaviors, culturally sensitive issues, and methods of dissemination of information. The mean age of respondents was 20. The majority of respondents knew that HIV is transmitted sexually (98% and by sharing needles (98%. Many misconceptions about transmission of HIV were expressed by 53%. Data showed that while there was good knowledge regarding HIV transmission and prevention, some misconceptions still prevailed. Our results indicate the need to develop educational programs with specific interventions to raise awareness about preventive measures, clear misconceptions, and promote healthy lifestyle in order to prevent new HIV infections among young college students.

  4. Contraceptive behavior as risk factor for reproductive health of junior students attending a medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Govyazina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 1–3 year students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university were our research object. Our research had many stages, and at the first one our goal was to examine and to assess basic behavioral risks for reproductive health of students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university. We conducted a sociological examination via questioning. 428 students were questioned as per materials collecting program which included 74 parameters; they accounted for 91.6 % out of the overall official number of students, 45.0 % male students and 40.0 % female students combined work and studies. We detected that, as per questioning results, the specific weight of students who took care of their health amounted to 79.2 % boys and 95.2 % girls. However, the students tended to have bad habits, i.e. constant alcohol intake or smoking. And although information on diseases prevention and on how to pursue healthy lifestyle was perfectly available to them, students didn't try to use it and preserve their health. All the respondents said they were against abortion. Girls were likely to adopt a complex approach when choosing a contraceptive, they resorted to hormonal agents, and, with their partners' consent, to condoms. But they often took hormonal agents without any consultations with a gynecologist or an endocrinologist. Contraceptives were rather rarely applied, and students appeared to have no knowledge on risk factors causing reproductive health deterioration. They also tended to be negligent and too self-confident when it came to reproductive health protection. A risk of abortions was very high for girls who didn't use contraceptives, and also all students ran rather high risk of catching sexual diseases. Sexual education is needed to correct contraceptive behavior; medical workers are a main source of information on reproductive health of young people in 7–10 % cases only. We need to create interactive educational programs

  5. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  6. The Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    Wind is a variable energy source whose fluctuations threaten electrical grid stability and complicate dynamical load balancing. The power generated by a wind turbine fluctuates due to the variable wind speed that blows past the turbine. Indeed, the spectrum of wind power fluctuations is widely believed to reflect the Kolmogorov spectrum; both vary with frequency f as f - 5 / 3. This variability decreases when aggregate power fluctuations from geographically distributed wind farms are averaged at the grid via a mechanism known as geographic smoothing. Neither the f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum nor the mechanism of geographic smoothing are understood. In this work, we explain the wind power fluctuation spectrum from the turbine through grid scales. The f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum results from the largest length scales of atmospheric turbulence of order 200 km influencing the small scales where individual turbines operate. This long-range influence spatially couples geographically distributed wind farms and synchronizes farm outputs over a range of frequencies and decreases with increasing inter-farm distance. Consequently, aggregate grid-scale power fluctuations remain correlated, and are smoothed until they reach a limiting f - 7 / 3 spectrum. This work was funded by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, Japan.

  7. Attitudes toward Same-Sex Attraction and Behavior among Chinese University Students: Tendencies, Correlates, and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined Chinese university students' attitudes toward same-sex attraction and behavior, the socio-demographic correlates of these attitudes, and the potential gender differences in both tendencies and correlates. A total of 2,644 Chinese university students (49.7% male, mean age = 20.27 years) indicated generally negative attitudes toward same-sex attraction and behavior, with males reporting more negative attitudes than females. More years in university (i.e., higher grade levels), higher levels of maternal education, growing up in an urban area, and more frequent Internet use significantly predicted more positive attitudes. Gender significantly moderated one correlate: For female participants, a higher university grade was related to more positive attitudes; this correlation was not significant for male participants. The findings suggest valuable directions for related intervention practices for young people in China.

  8. Disturbed eating tendencies, health-related behaviors, and depressive symptoms among university students in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Seo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background & aims: There were few studies to investigate the related factors of depression among Korean students. Therefore, this study examined disturbed eating tendencies, health-related behaviors, and depressive symptoms among university students in Korea. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey on a total of 637 students (279 men and 358 women, and the Korean version of the Beck depression rating scale (K-BDI was used to evaluate the students' depression status. Results: Of the 637 students, 419 (65.8% had no depressive symptoms (normal: K-BDI<10, whereas 136 (21.4%: K-BDI 10–16, 69 (10.8%: K-BDI 17–29, and 13 (2.0%: K-BDI≥30 had mild, moderate, and severe depressive symptoms, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed that depressive symptoms (K-BDI≥10 were associated with female gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26 to 2.76; p = .002, high level of life stress (OR = 4.37, 95% CI = 2.23 to 8.55; p < .001, and disturbed eating behaviors (Korean version of Eating Attitude Test-26 ≥ 20; OR = 5.14, 95% CI = 2.52 to 10.5; p < .001. In contrast, depressive symptoms were inversely associated with a high body image satisfaction (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.68; p = .001 and self-esteem (self-esteem score≥30 (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.43; p < .001. Conclusions: This study confirmed that students with depressive symptoms tended to have disturbed eating behaviors, low body image satisfaction, low self-esteem, and high levels of stress. Keywords: Depression, Disturbed eating attitude, Health behavior, Depressive symptoms, Korean students

  9. Superconductivity and spin fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalapino, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The organizers of the Memorial Session for Herman Rietschel asked that the author review some of the history of the interplay of superconductivity and spin fluctuations. Initially, Berk and Schrieffer showed how paramagnon spin fluctuations could suppress superconductivity in nearly-ferromagnetic materials. Following this, Rietschel and various co-workers wrote a number of papers in which they investigated the role of spin fluctuations in reducing the Tc of various electron-phonon superconductors. Paramagnon spin fluctuations are also believed to provide the p-wave pairing mechanism responsible for the superfluid phases of 3 He. More recently, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations have been proposed as the mechanism for d-wave pairing in the heavy-fermion superconductors and in some organic materials as well as possibly the high-Tc cuprates. Here the author will review some of this early history and discuss some of the things he has learned more recently from numerical simulations

  10. Distinctive behavior of superconducting fluctuations and pseudogap in nearly optimally doped single crystal of HgBa2CuO4+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grbic, M.S.; Barisic, N.; Dulcic, A.; Kupcic, I.; Li, Y.; Zhao, X.; Yu, G.; Dressel, M.; Greven, M.; Pozek, M.

    2010-01-01

    We have applied an unconventional microwave measurement approach to a nearly optimally doped HgBa 2 CuO 4+δ single crystal. The sample geometry assured the total lateral penetration of microwaves due to weak c-axis screening currents. With this configuration, one can achieve excellent sensitivity to small changes in conductivity. The data show that the pseudogap opens at T*=185(15)K, which is almost twice the superconducting critical temperature T c =94.3 K. In contrast, the superconducting fluctuation regime is clearly confined to a narrow temperature range T c ' ∼105(2)K, far below T*. This is confirmed by the magnetic field dependence of the microwave absorption. Hence, our results support the distinction between the physical processes of pseudogap and the superconducting ordering.

  11. Universal sol state behavior and gelation kinetics in mixed clay dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujala, Ravi Kumar; Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H B

    2011-05-03

    Sol and gel state behavior, in aqueous salt free dispersions, of clays Laponite (L) and Na montmorillonite (MMT) was studied at various mixing ratios (L:MMT = r = 1:0.5, 1:1, and 1:2). In the sol state, the zeta potential and gelation concentration of L-MMT obeyed the universal relation, X(L-MMT) = (rX(L) + X(MMT))/(1 + r), where X is zeta potential or gelation concentration (c(g)), implying that these properties are linear combinations of the same of their individual components. The low frequency storage modulus (G(0)'), relative viscosity (η(r)), and apparent cluster size (R) could be universally described by the power-law, G(0)' ∼ ((c/c(g)) - 1)(t) (c > c(g)), and η(r), R ∼ (1 - (c/c(g)))(-k,ν) (c < c(g)), with t = 1.5, k = 1.1, and υ = 0.8 close to the gelation concentration, for r = 1:1 cogel, consistent with the percolation model description of gelation. Interestingly, the hyperscaling relation δ = t/(k + t) yielded δ = 0.56 not too different from the predicted value ∼0.7, while the experimental value of δ obtained from G''(ω) ∼ ω(δ) close to c ≈ c(g) yielded δ = 1.5, which was at variance with the hyperscaling result. The experimental data, on hand, mostly supported percolation type gelation mechanism. As the cogels were slowly heated, at a characteristic temperature, T(g), a sharp increase in G' value was noticed, implying a transition to gel hardening (a new phase state). The temperature-dependent behavior followed the power-law description, G' ∼ (T(g) - T)(-γ) (T < T(g)), with γ = 0.40 ± 0.05 invariant of composition of the cogel, whereas for MMT and Laponite, γ = 0.25 and 0.55, respectively. It has been shown that the cogel has significantly enhanced mechanical (G(0) increased by 10 times for r = 1:1 cogel) and thermal properties (T(g) increased by 13 °C for 1:1 cogel) that can be exploited to design customized soft materials.

  12. Home Medication Cabinets and Medication Taking Behavior of the Staffs in a University in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chengbin; Ye, Juan; Dong, Yuzhen; Xu, Chunmei

    2018-01-01

    Background: A growing sum of medicines is stored in home medication cabinets in China, with the behavior of self-medication increasing. Although responsible self-medication can help prevent and treat ailments that do not need professional consultation, it bears the risk of misuse of medicines issued on prescription due to inadequate prescription medicine administration. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the condition and safety of medication storage and intended self-medication in a University in China. Method: The study was conducted over 10 month period (May 2015-March 2016) and involved a random sample of households. The questionnaire survey and personal insight into household medicine supplies was performed by a team of trained pharmacy staffs. Interviewees (N = 398, aged 16-88 y) were visited door to door and the home medication cabinets were catalogued after the participants were interviewed. Results: The majority (89.71%) households have home medicine cabinets. The total number of medicine items in the 398 households was 5600, with a median of 14 per household. The most frequently encountered categories of registered medicines were cough and cold medcines (47.8%), antibacterials for systemic use (30.0%), topical products for joint and muscular pain(26.1%), vitamins (23.2%), medication for functional gastrointestinal disorders (23.2%), oral and external forms have not kept separately(55.1%). The most treatment related problems recorded were curative effect not ideal (57.9%). 68% of the sample population would choose doctors as medication consultation object about medicines purchased. Conclusion: Large sum of medicines were found per household, with a high prevalence of cough and cold medcines. Public services in China, mainly government and health organizations, need put more effort on educating people on how to store medicines, as well as finding a way to raise awareness of the public in promoting behavioral change about medication

  13. Primordial black holes from passive density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we show that if passive fluctuations are considered, primordial black holes (PBHs) can be easily produced in the framework of single-field, slow-roll inflation models. The formation of PBHs is due to the blue spectrum of passive fluctuations and an enhancement of the spectral range which exits horizon near the end of inflation. Therefore the PBHs are light with masses ≲10 15 g depending on the number of e-folds when the scale of our observable universe leaves horizon. These PBHs are likely to have evaporated and cannot be a candidate for dark matter but they may still affect the early universe.

  14. A Comparative Study of Health-risk Behaviors of Boys and Girls of Freshmen Year at Tehran University, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rahmati-Najarkolaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose: Priority health-risk behaviors, often are established during childhood and adolescence, extend into adulthood, and are interrelated and preventable. This study was conducted to determine and compare the prevalence of risky behaviors on both sexes of freshman students enrolled in Tehran University, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive-analytical type of cross-sectional survey which has used stratified sampling to select 432 students during 2011-2012. A questionnaire including, 14 demographic questions and 38 questions about risky behaviors such as unintentional intentional injuries, smoking habits, alcohol and drug use, sexual behaviors, nutritional habits, and physical activities was used as the instrument of the study. Attending student’s club and passing medical examination, each student completed the self- reported questionnaire. Results: The mean age of participants was 23/2 ± 5/1, the majority of them were single (90.5%, 80.6% were unemployed, and 60.2% were from other cities. The prevalence of smoking cigarette (P 0.05. Conclusion: Some health risk behaviors in boys were more than girls, and there is a possibility of increasing these high-risk behaviors in the university environment. Thus, keeping students under surveillance and adopting preventive actions play a crucial role, and comprehensive training plans to promote health behavior should be designed and implemented.

  15. Relationship between healthy lifestyle behaviors and health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açıkgöz Çepni, Serap; Kitiş, Yeter

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between the healthy lifestyle behaviors and the health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students. The study included 572 undergraduate students of a university in the central Anatolia region of Turkey. The data were collected with the General Characteristics Form, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Health Competence Scale and investigated with the structural equation model. Health-specific self-efficacy was an important predictor of healthy lifestyle behaviors. The Internal health locus of control influenced the healthy lifestyle behaviors through health-specific self-efficacy. The other dimension was the Powerful Others health locus of control that affected healthy lifestyle behaviors, both directly and indirectly, through health-specific self-efficacy. There was a chance that the health locus of control had a negative effect on healthy lifestyle behaviors through self-efficacy. Health-specific self-efficacy is an important prerequisite for changes in healthy lifestyle behaviors, which supports Pender's model. The subscales of the health locus of control vary in their effects on healthy lifestyle behaviors, which partly supports Pender's model. Nurses, by using this model, can examine ways of improving these cognitive-perceptual factors and implement health education programs that are directed towards improving them in young persons. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  16. Lecturers' Behaviors and Beliefs about the Use of Social Media in Higher Education: A Study at Mahasarakham University in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes lecturers' behaviors and beliefs regarding social media in higher education at the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University. Thirty-one lecturers were surveyed about their attitudes toward the use of social media in their classes. Their responses were analyzed using arithmetic mean and standard deviation. The results are…

  17. Understanding E-Learning Adoption among Brazilian Universities: An Application of the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Luiz Miguel Renda; Okazaki, Shintaro

    2013-01-01

    This study sheds light on the organizational dimensions underlying e-learning adoption among Brazilian universities. We propose an organizational e-learning adoption model based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB). A series of hypotheses are posited with regard to the relationships among the proposed constructs. The model is…

  18. Information Needs and Information Seeking Behavior of Foreign Students in University of Delhi: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the information needs and information seeking behavior of foreign students. A survey method was used for the undertaken study. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire, self-administered to 120 foreign students (60 males & 60 females with 88 (47 males & 41 females returns. The research is limited to post-graduate, M.Phil. and Ph.D. foreign students in University of Delhi. It was found that post-graduate students need information regarding their program of study while research scholars need information for writing research articles and for doing their research work. Most of them seek information through the internet. Research scholars used electronic resources such as databases, e-journals and e-theses and dissertations. 88.6% of the respondents also use books for seeking information. Their use of the library is limited with complaints about library staff and too few computer terminals. The present study will be helpful in designing new systems and services for the foreign students so that their information needs can be fulfilled easily. Further, findings of the study indicate that how the library professionals should assist foreign students to accomplish their information needs.

  19. Stability and fluctuations in black hole thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    2007-01-01

    I examine thermodynamic fluctuations for a Kerr-Newman black hole in an extensive, infinite environment. This problem is not strictly solvable because full equilibrium with such an environment cannot be achieved by any black hole with mass M, angular momentum J, and charge Q. However, if we consider one (or two) of M, J, or Q to vary so slowly compared with the others that we can regard it as fixed, instances of stability occur, and thermodynamic fluctuation theory could plausibly apply. I examine seven cases with one, two, or three independent fluctuating variables. No knowledge about the thermodynamic behavior of the environment is needed. The thermodynamics of the black hole is sufficient. Let the fluctuation moment for a thermodynamic quantity X be √( 2 >). Fluctuations at fixed M are stable for all thermodynamic states, including that of a nonrotating and uncharged environment, corresponding to average values J=Q=0. Here, the fluctuation moments for J and Q take on maximum values. That for J is proportional to M. For the Planck mass it is 0.3990(ℎ/2π). That for Q is 3.301e, independent of M. In all cases, fluctuation moments for M, J, and Q go to zero at the limit of the physical regime, where the temperature goes to zero. With M fluctuating there are no stable cases for average J=Q=0. But, there are transitions to stability marked by infinite fluctuations. For purely M fluctuations, this coincides with a curve which Davies identified as a phase transition

  20. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  1. Quantum fluctuations and inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, J.M.; Bublik, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    We study the effect of quantum fluctuations on the roll-down rate of the inflation field in a semiclassical approximation; this is done by treating the inflation field as a classical random field. The quantum fluctuations are simulated by a noise term in the equation of motion. We consider two different inflationary scenarios (new and chaotic inflation) and find that the roll-down rate of the median value of the inflation field is increased by the quantum fluctuations. Non-linear effects may become important in the later stages of the inflationary regime. 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Quantum fluctuations and inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, J.M.; Bublik, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the effect of quantum fluctuations on the roll-down rate of the inflation field in a semiclassical approximation; this is done by treating the inflation field as a classical random field. The quantum fluctuations are simulated by a noise term in the equation of motion. Two different inflationary scenarios (new and chaotic inflation) are considered and it is found that the roll-down rate of the median value of the inflation field is increased by the quantum fluctuations. Non-linear effects may become important in the later stages of the inflationary regime. (author)

  3. Can Universal SEL Programs Benefit Universally? Effects of the Positive Action Program on Multiple Trajectories of Social-Emotional and Misconduct Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert; Washburn, Isaac J; Lewis, Kendra M; Bavarian, Niloofar; DuBois, David L; Acock, Alan C; Vuchinich, Samuel; Flay, Brian R

    2017-02-01

    Behavioral trajectories during middle childhood are predictive of consequential outcomes later in life (e.g., substance abuse, violence). Social and emotional learning (SEL) programs are designed to promote trajectories that reflect both growth in positive behaviors and inhibited development of negative behaviors. The current study used growth mixture models to examine effects of the Positive Action (PA) program on behavioral trajectories of social-emotional and character development (SECD) and misconduct using data from a cluster-randomized trial that involved 14 schools and a sample of predominately low-income, urban youth followed from 3rd through 8th grade. For SECD, findings indicated that PA was similarly effective at improving trajectories within latent classes characterized as "high/declining" and "low/stable". Favorable program effects were likewise evident to a comparable degree for misconduct across observed latent classes that reflected "low/rising" and "high/rising" trajectories. These findings suggest that PA and perhaps other school-based universal SEL programs have the potential to yield comparable benefits across subgroups of youth with differing trajectories of positive and negative behaviors, making them promising strategies for achieving the intended goal of school-wide improvements in student outcomes.

  4. Fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banday, A.J.; Wolfendale, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    In view of the importance to contemporary cosmology, and to our understanding of the Universe, of the precise nature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectrum, we consider the effects on this spectrum of contamination by other radiation fields of both galactic and extragalactic origin. Particular attention is given to the significance of measurements of the fluctuations in the 'background' radiation detected at 10.46 GHz and we conclude that these fluctuations are of the same magnitude as those expected from galactic cosmic-ray effects. A more detailed study of the cosmic-ray induced fluctuations and measurements at higher frequencies will be needed before genuine CMB fluctuations can be claimed. (author)

  5. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  6. Fully Quantum Fluctuation Theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, Johan

    2018-02-01

    Systems that are driven out of thermal equilibrium typically dissipate random quantities of energy on microscopic scales. Crooks fluctuation theorem relates the distribution of these random work costs to the corresponding distribution for the reverse process. By an analysis that explicitly incorporates the energy reservoir that donates the energy and the control system that implements the dynamic, we obtain a quantum generalization of Crooks theorem that not only includes the energy changes in the reservoir but also the full description of its evolution, including coherences. Moreover, this approach opens up the possibility for generalizations of the concept of fluctuation relations. Here, we introduce "conditional" fluctuation relations that are applicable to nonequilibrium systems, as well as approximate fluctuation relations that allow for the analysis of autonomous evolution generated by global time-independent Hamiltonians. We furthermore extend these notions to Markovian master equations, implicitly modeling the influence of the heat bath.

  7. Assessment of risky sexual behavior and practice among Aksum University students, Shire Campus, Shire Town, Tigray, Ethiopia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Awoke; Molla, Bogale; Gerensea, Hadgu

    2018-01-31

    Having sex at early age, having multiple sexual partners, having sex while under the influence of alcohol or drugs and unprotected sexual behaviors are the common characteristics of risky sexual behavior which increases risk of individuals to sexuality and reproductive health problems. Risky sexual behavior is the most common problem in adolescents and young adults which may expose individuals for permanent social, economical, psychological and physical problem. So that this study focus on assessment of risk sexual behavior using institution based cross-sectional study design on 287 randomly selected subjects among Aksum University students. Almost 60% students reported to have ever had sexual activity. Of which 86 (83.5%) and 112 (64.4%) reported having inconsistent condom use and multiple sexual partners respectively. Even though more than half of first sexual intercourse (61.5%) starts due to their desire but still peer pressure and alcohol have significant effect. Similarly the study indicated that a significant segment of students have risk sexual behaviors which increase individuals' risk of acquiring HIV/AIDS. Unless appropriate age and institutional targeted interventions exist, certain behaviors can place the university students at greater risk of HIV infection and sexually transmitted disease.

  8. Fluctuation Scaling, Calibration of Dispersion, and Detection of Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Rianne; Rebmann, Roman; Williams, Craig; Hanley, Quentin S

    2017-11-07

    Fluctuation scaling describes the relationship between the mean and standard deviation of a set of measurements. An example is Horwitz scaling, which has been reported from interlaboratory studies. Horwitz and similar studies have reported simple exponential and segmented scaling laws with exponents (α) typically between 0.85 (Horwitz) and 1 when not operating near a detection limit. When approaching a detection limit, the exponents change and approach an apparently Gaussian (α = 0) model. This behavior is often presented as a property of interlaboratory studies, which makes controlled replication to understand the behavior costly to perform. To assess the contribution of instrumentation to larger scale fluctuation scaling, we measured the behavior of two inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) systems, in two laboratories measuring thulium using two emission lines. The standard deviation universally increased with the uncalibrated signal, indicating the system was heteroscedastic. The response from all lines and both instruments was consistent with a single exponential dispersion model having parameters α = 1.09 and β = 0.0035. No evidence of Horwitz scaling was found, and there was no evidence of Poisson noise limiting behavior. The "Gaussian" component was a consequence of background subtraction for all lines and both instruments. The observation of a simple exponential dispersion model in the data allows for the definition of a difference detection limit (DDL) with universal applicability to systems following known dispersion. The DDL is the minimum separation between two points along a dispersion model required to claim they are different according to a particular statistical test. The DDL scales transparently with the mean and works at any location in a response function.

  9. University Students' Behavioral Intention to Use Mobile Learning: Evaluating the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Youl; Nam, Min-Woo; Cha, Seung-Bong

    2012-01-01

    As many Korean universities have recommended the implementation of mobile learning (m-learning) for various reasons, the number of such tertiary learning opportunities has steadily grown. However, little research has investigated the factors affecting university students' adoption and use of m-learning. A sample of 288 Konkuk university students…

  10. Collective fluctuations in networks of noisy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Kawamura, Yoji; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Collective dynamics result from interactions among noisy dynamical components. Examples include heartbeats, circadian rhythms and various pattern formations. Because of noise in each component, collective dynamics inevitably involve fluctuations, which may crucially affect the functioning of the system. However, the relation between the fluctuations in isolated individual components and those in collective dynamics is not clear. Here, we study a linear dynamical system of networked components subjected to independent Gaussian noise and analytically show that the connectivity of networks determines the intensity of fluctuations in the collective dynamics. Remarkably, in general directed networks including scale-free networks, the fluctuations decrease more slowly with system size than the standard law stated by the central limit theorem. They even remain finite for a large system size when global directionality of the network exists. Moreover, such non-trivial behavior appears even in undirected networks when nonlinear dynamical systems are considered. We demonstrate it with a coupled oscillator system.

  11. Fluctuation conductivity of thin superconductive vanadium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrenko, I.M.; Sidorenko, A.S.; Fogel, N.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Resistive transitions into the superconductive state are studied in thin [d >T/sub c/ the experimental data on the excess conductivity of the films agree qualitatively and quantitively with Aslamazov--Larkin theory. There is no Maki--Thompson contribution to fluctuation conductivity. Near T/sub c/ the excess conductivity sigma' changes exponentially with temperature in accordance with the predictions of the theory of the critical fluctuations of the order parameter. The values of the effective charge carrier mass defined from data on sigma' for the low fluctuation and critical fluctuation regions differ markedly. This difference is within the spread of effective masses for various charge carrier groups already known for vanadium. Causes of the difference in resistive behavior for the regions T >T/sub c/ are considered

  12. Analysis of fluctuations in semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Petru

    The random nature of ion implantation and diffusion processes as well as inevitable tolerances in fabrication result in random fluctuations of doping concentrations and oxide thickness in semiconductor devices. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in ultrasmall (nanoscale) semiconductor devices when the spatial scale of doping and oxide thickness variations become comparable with the geometric dimensions of devices. In the dissertation, the effects of these fluctuations on device characteristics are analyzed by using a new technique for the analysis of random doping and oxide thickness induced fluctuations. This technique is universal in nature in the sense that it is applicable to any transport model (drift-diffusion, semiclassical transport, quantum transport etc.) and it can be naturally extended to take into account random fluctuations of the oxide (trapped) charges and channel length. The technique is based on linearization of the transport equations with respect to the fluctuating quantities. It is computationally much (a few orders of magnitude) more efficient than the traditional Monte-Carlo approach and it yields information on the sensitivity of fluctuations of parameters of interest (e.g. threshold voltage, small-signal parameters, cut-off frequencies, etc.) to the locations of doping and oxide thickness fluctuations. For this reason, it can be very instrumental in the design of fluctuation-resistant structures of semiconductor devices. Quantum mechanical effects are taken into account by using the density-gradient model as well as through self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger computations. Special attention is paid to the presenting of the technique in a form that is suitable for implementation on commercial device simulators. The numerical implementation of the technique is discussed in detail and numerous computational results are presented and compared with those previously published in literature.

  13. Development of a Behavior Change Intervention to Improve Sexual Health Service Use Among University Undergraduate Students: Mixed Methods Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Christine; Steenbeek, Audrey; Langille, Donald; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Curran, Janet

    2017-11-02

    University students are at risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections and suffering other negative health outcomes. Sexual health services offer preventive and treatment interventions that aim to reduce these infections and associated health consequences. However, university students often delay or avoid seeking sexual health services. An in-depth understanding of the factors that influence student use of sexual health services is needed to underpin effective sexual health interventions. In this study, we aim to design a behavior change intervention to address university undergraduate students' use of sexual health services at two universities in Nova Scotia, Canada. This mixed methods study consists of three phases that follow a systematic approach to intervention design outlined in the Behaviour Change Wheel. In Phase 1, we examine patterns of sexual health service use among university students in Nova Scotia, Canada, using an existing dataset. In Phase 2, we identify the perceived barriers and enablers to students' use of sexual health services. This will include focus groups with university undergraduate students, health care providers, and university administrators using a semistructured guide, informed by the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour Model and Theoretical Domains Framework. In Phase 3, we identify behavior change techniques and intervention components to develop a theory-based intervention to improve students' use of sexual health services. This study will be completed in March 2018. Results from each phase and the finalized intervention design will be reported in 2018. Previous intervention research to improve university students' use of sexual health services lacks a theoretical assessment of barriers. This study will employ a mixed methods research design to examine university students' use of sexual health service and apply behavior change theory to design a theory- and evidence-based sexual health service intervention. Our

  14. A comparative study of oral health attitudes and behavior using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) between dental and civil engineering students in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A; Jaramillo, Fredy; Kador, Itzjak; Masuoka, David; Tong, Liyue; Ahn, Chul; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Hiroshima University - Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of dental and civil engineering students in Colombia. The HU-DBI's survey consisting of twenty dichotomous responses (agree-disagree) regarding tooth brushing, was completed at University Antonio Narino for the dental students and the University of Cauca for the civil engineering students. The Spanish version of the HU-DBI questionnaire was taken by 182 of 247 dental students and 411 of 762 engineering students. The data was-statistically analyzed by the chi-square test and backward logistic regression. Compared to the engineering students, the dental students were more likely to agree with questions such as "I am bothered by the color of my gums"(OR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.7),"I think I can clean my teeth well without using toothpaste" (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.5-5.9), "I have used a dye to see how clean my teeth are" (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9-4.3), and "I have had my dentist tell me that I brush very well" (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1). The dental education curriculum in a dental school compared to a civil engineering school in Colombia indicated that a three-phase curriculum in didactics and clinics increased oral health attitudes and behavior from entry to graduation.

  15. Impulsive behaviors in female patients with eating disorders in a university hospital in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Yu Liang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders (EDs are often associated with various impulsive behaviors. This study investigated the prevalence of impulsive behaviors in ED patients in Taiwan. Three hundred sixteen female outpatients with ED and 142 psychiatric controls were recruited. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires assessing lifetime presence of impulsive behaviors, including suicide, self-injury, stealing, alcohol use, illicit drug use, excessive spending, sexual promiscuity, and general psychopathology. More than 60% of the ED patients had at least one impulsive behavior. The most common impulsive behaviors among ED patients were excessive spending (34.9%, deliberate self-harm (32.7%, and stealing (26.3%. However, there were no significant differences in prevalences of any impulsive behaviors between ED patients and psychiatric controls. Clinicians should routinely assess and treat impulsive behaviors in female psychiatric patients with negative affectivity, regardless of the presence of ED, to help prevent potential adverse outcomes related to impulsive behaviors.

  16. Attitudes towards the Inclusion of University Students with Disabilities: Development and Validation of a Scale Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Faúndez, Eva María

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The focus of our research converges on the analysis of attitudes and the prediction of the behavior of university students towards the inclusion of students with disabilities in university. The evaluation of attitudes and the prediction of behavior are complex, but it is fundamental because of the decisive impact they have on the…

  17. Fluctuations in models with primordial inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, R.; Brandenberger, R.

    1984-01-01

    The recently proposed general framework for calculating the growth of primordial energy density fluctuations in cosmological models is applied to two models of phenomenological interest in which the cosmological evolution differs crucially from that in new inflationary universe models. Both in a model of primordial supersymmetric inflation and in Linde's proposal of chaotic inflation we verify the conjectured results. (orig.)

  18. Overestimation of own body weights in female university students: associations with lifestyles, weight control behaviors and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Miso; Lee, Hongmie

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to analyze the lifestyles, weight control behavior, dietary habits, and depression of female university students. The subjects were 532 students from 8 universities located in 4 provinces in Korea. According to percent ideal body weight, 33 (6.4%), 181 (34.0%), 283 (53.2%), 22 (4.1%) and 13 (2.5%) were severely underweight, underweight, normal, overweight and obese, respectively, based on self-reported height and weight. As much as 64.1% and only 2.4%, respectively, overestima...

  19. Emotional Effects on University Choice Behavior: The Influence of Experienced Narrators and Their Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Callejas-Albi?ana, Ana I.; Callejas-Albi?ana, Fernando E.; Mart?nez-Rodr?guez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence that experienced users of university resources might have as narrative sources of information for other students in the process of choosing their schools. Informative videos about the benefits of studying at the university provide a reference model. In these videos, a group of young people present their views and explain their reasons for choosing the university in which they are pursuing their degrees; the various narrators detail all the resources available...

  20. Self-Control and Academic Performance: Two Field Studies on University Citizenship Behavior and Counterproductive Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettler, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Self-control affects, among other things, individuals' performance and criminal or deviant behavior. Herein, the construct of self-control is linked to rather specific criteria in an academic context, as derived from findings in the area of organizational psychology. Specifically, it is assumed that students' self-control impacts university…

  1. Long-term analysis of health status and preventive behavior in music students across an entire university program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Claudia; Nusseck, Manfred; Zander, Mark

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze longitudinal data concerning physical and psychological health, playing-related problems, and preventive behavior among music students across their complete 4- to 5-year study period. In a longitudinal, observational study, we followed students during their university training and measured their psychological and physical health status and preventive behavior using standardized questionnaires at four different times. The data were in accordance with previous findings. They demonstrated three groups of health characteristics observed in beginners of music study: healthy students (cluster 1), students with preclinical symptoms (cluster 2), and students who are clinically symptomatic (cluster 3). In total, 64% of all students remained in the same cluster group during their whole university training. About 10% of the students showed considerable health problems and belonged to the third cluster group. The three clusters of health characteristics found in this longitudinal study with music students necessitate that prevention programs for musicians must be adapted to the target audience.

  2. Association between Self-Reported Academic Performance and Risky Sexual Behavior among Ugandan University Students- A Cross Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Devika; Kyagaba, Emmanuel; Östergren, Per-Olof; Agardh, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors and if this differs by gender, among university students. Academic performance can create psychological pressure in young students. Poor academic performance might thus potentially contribute to risky sexual behavior among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors, and whether gender affects this relationship among Ugandan university students. In 2010, 1,954 students participated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda (72% response rate). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for the analysis. 1,179 (60.3%) students in our study sample reported having debuted sexually. Of these 440 (42.2%) used condoms inconsistently with new sexual partners, and 344 (33.6%) had had multiple sexual partners. We found a statistically significant association between poor academic performance and inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner and this association remained significant even after adjusting for all the potential confounders. There was no such association detected regarding multiple sexual partners. We also found that gender modified the effect of poor academic performance on inconsistent condom use. Females, who were poor academic performers, were found to be at a higher risk of inconsistent condom use than their male counterparts. Interventions should be designed to provide extra support to poor academic performers, which may improve their performance and self-esteem, which in turn might reduce their risky sexual behaviors. PMID:24999121

  3. Association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students- a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Devika; Kyagaba, Emmanuel; Ostergren, Per-Olof; Agardh, Anette

    2014-04-16

    Little is known about the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors and if this differs by gender, among university students. Academic performance can create psychological pressure in young students. Poor academic performance might thus potentially contribute to risky sexual behavior among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-reported academic performance and risky sexual behaviors, and whether gender affects this relationship among Ugandan university students. In 2010, 1,954 students participated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda (72% response rate). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for the analysis. 1,179 (60.3%) students in our study sample reported having debuted sexually. Of these 440 (42.2%) used condoms inconsistently with new sexual partners, and 344 (33.6%) had had multiple sexual partners. We found a statistically significant association between poor academic performance and inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner and this association remained significant even after adjusting for all the potential confounders. There was no such association detected regarding multiple sexual partners. We also found that gender modified the effect of poor academic performance on inconsistent condom use. Females, who were poor academic performers, were found to be at a higher risk of inconsistent condom use than their male counterparts. Interventions should be designed to provide extra support to poor academic performers, which may improve their performance and self-esteem, which in turn might reduce their risky sexual behaviors.

  4. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  5. Consumer Behavior and Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-31

    Of the 16,000 students at the University of Rhode Island, about 55% percent commute to campus. Between students, staff and faculty there could be up to 11,000 commuters at the University, most of which drive alone. A high volume of single-occupancy v...

  6. The Effect of the Servant Leadership on Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Case Study of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem GÜÇEL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effectsofservant leadershiponorganizational citizenship behaviors. For this aim,firstly, theservant leadership,then organizational citizenship behaviorsare explained. In the application part,aquestionnaire including the measures of theservant leadership andorganizationalcitizenship behaviors is distributed to employees of one of the leadingprivateuniversitiesinTurkey and the data were assessed by statistical analysis methods.Finally, it isfoundthat there is a positive relationshipbetweenservant leadershipandorganizational citizenship behaviors.

  7. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  8. The fluctuating gap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-01

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T c in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the quasi

  9. Brief Report: Predictors of Heavy Internet Use and Associations with Health-Promoting and Health Risk Behaviors among Hong Kong University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jean H.; Lau, C. H.; Cheuk, Ka-Kin; Kan, Pauline; Hui, Heidi L. C.; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the correlates of heavy Internet use and determine the associations of heavy Internet use with various health risk behaviors and health-promoting behaviors among Chinese adolescents, an anonymous, self-administered health behavior questionnaire was completed by 2427 matriculants into a Hong Kong university (mean age = 18.9 y) and…

  10. Risk Perception of HIV/AIDS and Low Self-Control Trait: Explaining Preventative Behaviors Among Iranian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Safooreh; Allahverdipour, Hamid; Fathi, Behrouz; Shirzadi, Shayesteh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of developed countries there are progressive trend about HIV/AIDS and its’ aspects of transmission in the low socio-economic societies. The aim of this was to explain the youth's behavior in adopting HIV/AIDS related preventive behaviors in a sample of Iranian university students by emphasizing on fear appeals approaches alongside examining the role of self-control trait for explaining adoption on danger or fear control processes based on Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM). Methods: A sample of 156 randomly selected university students in Jolfa, Iran was recruited in a predictive cross-sectional study by application of a researcher-designed questionnaire through self-report data collection manner. Sexual high risk behaviors, the EPPM variables, self-control trait, and general self-efficacy were measured as theoretical framework. Results: Findings indicated that 31.3% of participants were in the fear control process versus 68.7% in danger control about HIV/AIDS and also the presence of multi-sex partners and amphetamine consumption amongst the participants. Low self-control trait and low perceived susceptibility significantly were related to having a history of multi-sex partners while high level of self-efficacy significantly increased the probability of condom use. Conclusion: Findings of the study were indicative of the protective role of high level of self-control, perceived susceptibility and self-efficacy factors on youth's high-risk behaviors and their preventative skills as well. PMID:26573026

  11. Factors Associated with Milk Consumption among College Students of Yazd University of Medical Sciences Based on Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Baghianimoghadam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Daily milk consumption can be introduced as a healthy dietary pattern associated with a range of health benefits. This study aimed to determine factors associated with milk consumption among students of Yazd university of medical sciences based on the theory of planned behavior. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 385 students in 2014, who were selected via stratified random sampling. The study data was collected from a questionnaire based on the indirect construct of theory of planned behavior. Finally, the study data were analyzed using the T-test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: In the present study, 64% of the students consumed milk daily. The behavioral intention, behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, control beliefs, and perceived power were significantly associated with the milk consumption (p<0.05. Conclusion: Educating the students in regard with the importance of receiving enough amount of milk, modifying their misconceptions as well as reinforcing positive beliefs can be effective in increasing milk consumption. In addition, increasing access to milk in university campuses should be taken into consideration.

  12. Intentions and willingness to drive while drowsy among university students: An application of an extended theory of planned behavior model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Clark J; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Beck, Kenneth H

    2016-08-01

    A web-based questionnaire was used to assess the utility of constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Prototype Willingness Model (PWM) to predict intentions and willingness to engage in drowsy driving in a sample of 450 university students. Those students who reported more favorable attitudes and subjective norm and greater perceived control and willingness in relation to drowsy driving behavior were more likely to report stronger intentions to engage in drowsy driving behavior. Augmenting the TPB constructs with the PWM construct of willingness significantly explained up to an additional 8 percent of the variance in drowsy driving intention. Perceived behavioral control and willingness were consistently the strongest predictors of drowsy driving intention in the augmented model, which together with the control (personal) variables explained up to 70 percent of the variance in intention. Thus, the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Prototype Willingness Model may be useful for understanding motivational influences on drowsy driving behavior in young people and present promising theoretical frameworks for designing more effective interventions against drowsy driving in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Primordial black holes from passive density fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Min; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we show that if passive fluctuations are considered, primordial black holes (PBHs) can be easily produced in the framework of single-field, slow-roll inflation models. The formation of PBHs is due to the blue spectrum of passive fluctuations and an enhancement of the spectral range which exits horizon near the end of inflation. Therefore the PBHs are light with masses $\\lesssim 10^{15}g$ depending on the number of e-folds when the scale of our observable universe leaves horizon...

  14. Fluctuations and localization in mesoscopic electron

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The quantum phenomena of tunneling and interference show up not only in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, but also in cold materials of the real world, such as metals and semiconductors. Though not fully macroscopic, such mesoscopic systems contain a huge number of particles, and the holistic nature of quantum mechanics becomes evident already in simple electronic measurements. The measured quantity fluctuates as a function of applied fields in an unpredictable, yet reproducible way. Despite this fingerprint character of fluctuations, their statistical properties are universal, i.e

  15. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field the associated pair-creation in several anisotropic universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu

    1981-01-01

    As a sequel to previous works on the definition of a positive frequency part of a quantized scalar field near an initial stage of several Robertson-Walker universes with flat, open or closed 3-space and the associated pair-creation of those particles, an attempt is made to seek for the same concept in several Bianchi-type I anisotropic universes. It is shown that, if the positive frequency part is introduced, the pair-creation of scalar particles and their spectral law are uniquely determined, as in the case of isotropic universes. (author)

  16. Universal Behavior of Pair Correlations in a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnle, E. D.; Hu, H.; Liu, X.-J.; Dyke, P.; Mark, M.; Drummond, P. D.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    We show that short-range pair correlations in a strongly interacting Fermi gas follow a simple universal law described by Tan's relations. This is achieved through measurements of the static structure factor which displays a universal scaling proportional to the ratio of Tan's contact to the momentum C/q. Bragg spectroscopy of ultracold 6 Li atoms from a periodic optical potential is used to measure the structure factor for a wide range of momenta and interaction strengths, providing broad confirmation of this universal law. We calibrate our Bragg spectra using the f-sum rule, which is found to improve the accuracy of the structure factor measurement.

  17. Analyzing and Improving the Water-Table Fluctuation Method of Estimating Groundwater Recharge: Field Considerations Patros, T.B. and Parkin, G.W., School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patros, T.; Parkin, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the project is on measuring and quantifying groundwater recharge (GWR) using the water-table fluctuation (WTF) method. This method requires measuring the change in water-table (WT) height (Δh) during recharge (R) events and volumetric soil specific yield water content (θsy), (&/or) perhaps more correctly volumetric soil fillable water content (θf). The rise in WT can also result from other non-precipitation-related WTF causes (e.g., Lisse effect, temperature variations, barometric, lateral flow, Reverse Wieringermeer effect, encapsulated air, pumping), which must be counted for. The measurement of the storativity (S) terms (θsy) and/or θf) is, indeed, not clear-cut and often they are taken as being constant with depth, time, WT movement (Drying-Wetting & Freezing-Thawing) history and heterogeneity. In fact, these two terms (θsy & θf) are controversial in their definition, thus in their use, in the literature and may either overestimate the R, when using θsy, or underestimate it, when using θf. To resolve some of these questions, a novel-automated method is under development, at the University of Guelph's Elora Research Station (ERS) and Arboretum, along with a novel multi-event time series model. The long-term expected outcomes and significance of this study are; 1. Establishing accuracy in defining and evaluating the θsy and θf and using them accordingly in estimating GWR with the WTF method in order to overcome some of the existing substantial gaps in our knowledge of groundwater (GW) storage variation. 2. Obtaining GWR measurements at the local scale on a year-round basis, which are currently scarce or even completely lacking for many regions of Ontario and thus would provide a valuable database for guiding development of any policy requiring GWR. 3. Using this database to calibrate and test estimates of the spatial and temporal variability in regional-scale (watershed scale) GWR from approximate statistical techniques or deterministic

  18. Sexual Behaviors of College Freshmen and the Need for University-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tammy; Oswalt, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Problem: College life offers several challenges for students, particularly freshmen who often find themselves in an unsupervised environment with multiple opportunities to engage in a variety of risk behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the sexual behaviors of college freshmen enrolled at a U.S. Hispanic Serving Institution. Method:…

  19. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  20. Association between Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Educational Performance of Faculty Members in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences- 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazratian Teimour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding the educational goals of university and academic performance, it seems that organizational citizenship behavior (OCB is one of the effective variables in increasing the educational performance of university faculty members. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior (OCB and educational performance of the faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2013-14. Methods: Researchers selected 127 faculty members and 1,120 students from different grades in order to investigate the relationship between altruism, conscientiousness, sportsmanship, civic virtue and respect and the educational performance of faculty members. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used in this method. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software and the significance level of 0.05. Results: There was a significant relationship between altruism and educational performance (P =0.043. There was a significant relationship between conscientiousness and educational performance (p=0.046. A significant relationship was observed between sportsmanship and educational performance (p=0.004. There was no significant relationship between civic virtue and educational performance (p=0.98. A significant relationship was observed between respect and educational performance (P>0.001. There was no relationship between citizenship behavior and gender of the faculty members (P> 0.05.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the more faculty members have the spirit of cooperation and assistance to colleagues and students and try to understand the specific situations that students face, the more effective they are in increasing the educational performance at the university level.

  1. Leadership behaviors for successful university--community collaborations to change curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, C J; Starnaman, S; Hembroff, L; Perlstadt, H; Henry, R; Richards, R

    1999-11-01

    What constitutes effective leadership in a collaborative effort to achieve enduring curricular and student career changes? This question was investigated as part of a larger evaluation of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation's Community Partnership Health Professions Education, a five-year initiative involving projects at seven sites. The goal was to produce more primary care health providers by making enduring curricular change. Data were collected from participants with respect to predictors of project success and leaders' use of 16 behaviors via telephone interviews, mailed surveys, and focus groups. Focus groups also gathered project leaders' views of skills and knowledge necessary for effective leadership. Leadership strategies associated with positive outcomes were: consistent leader; use of multiple cognitive frames, especially a human resource frame; use of a broad range of leadership behaviors, particularly participative governance and cultural influence; and a majority of community representatives on the partnership board. The primary leader, compared with a leadership team, is most influential in achieving positive outcomes. Effective leaders use a broad array of behaviors, but particularly emphasize the use of participative governance and culture/value-influencing behaviors. In addition, the more frequent use of these behaviors compared with the use of organizational power behaviors is important. It is helpful to perceive the project from a human-relations frame and at least one other frame. Using a leadership team can be helpful, especially in building coalitions, but the importance of the primary leader's behaviors to project outcomes is striking.

  2. Preventing Sexual Violence Through Bystander Intervention: Attitudes, Behaviors, Missed Opportunities, and Barriers to Intervention Among Australian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Rachel; Cale, Jesse

    2018-03-01

    The concept of bystander intervention is gaining popularity in universities as a mechanism to prevent sexual violence. Prior research has focused on correlates of bystanders' intentions to intervene and intervention behaviors in situations where there is a risk of sexual violence. The current study builds on this literature by exploring the nature of missed opportunities, including perceived barriers to intervention. In all, 380 Australian undergraduate university students completed an online survey. Measures included a rape myth acceptance scale, bystander intentions to intervene, actual intervention behaviors, missed opportunities for intervention, and perceived barriers for missed opportunities. Promisingly, students reported high levels of intentions to intervene in situations where there was a risk of sexual violence and reported relatively few missed opportunities to do so when these situations did occur. Intervention behaviors varied by important demographic characteristics such as gender, age, attitudes toward sexual violence, and the nature of the situation. Younger female students, with lower levels of rape myth acceptance, who had previously engaged in bystander intervention behaviors were more likely to report intentions to intervene in future risky situations, and female international students reported fewer missed opportunities for intervention. The most common barrier to intervention for identified missed opportunities was a failure to recognize situations as having a potential risk for sexual violence, and students were most likely to intervene in situations when the opportunity to help a friend in distress arose. This study provides some preliminary empirical evidence about bystander intervention against sexual violence among Australian university students, and identifies unique contexts for intervention and what current barriers to intervention may be.

  3. Predictors of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students: association between evening typology, lifestyle behaviors, and sleep habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrita, Colette S; Hajjar-Muça, Theresa A; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2014-01-01

    Adequate, good night sleep is fundamental to well-being and is known to be influenced by myriad biological and environmental factors. Given the unavailability of sleep data about Lebanon, the cultural shifts and socioeconomic pressures that have affected many aspects of society, particularly for students and working adults, as well as our understanding of sleep in university students in other countries, we conducted a national study to assess sleep quality and factors contributing to sleep and general health in a culture-specific context. A self-filled questionnaire, inquiring about sociodemographics, health-risk behaviors, personal health, and evaluating sleep quality and chronotype using standard scales was completed by 540 students at private and public universities in Lebanon. Overall, they reported sleeping 7.95±1.34 hours per night, although 12.3% reported sleeping Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Sleep timing differed markedly between weekdays and weekends, with bedtimes and wake-up times delayed by 1.51 and 2.43 hours, respectively, on weekends. While most scored in the "neither type" category on the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), 24.5% were evening types and 7.3% were morning types. MEQ score was significantly correlated with smoking behavior and daily study onset, as well as with PSQI score, with eveningness associated with greater number of cigarettes, later study times, and poor sleep. We conclude that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students is associated with reduced sleep duration and shifts in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends, especially among evening types. While chronotype and certain behavioral choices interact to affect sleep dimensions and quality, raising awareness about the importance of obtaining adequate nighttime sleep on daily performance and avoiding risky behaviors may help Lebanese students make better choices in school and work schedules.

  4. Crossover transition in the fluctuation of Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jiang-Hai

    2018-06-01

    The inconsistent fluctuation behavior of Internet predicted by preferential attachment(PA) and Gibrat's law requires empirical investigations on the actual system. By using the interval-tunable Gibrat's law statistics, we find the actual fluctuation, characterized by the conditional standard deviation of the degree growth rate, changes with the interval length and displays a crossover transition from PA type to Gibrat's law type, which has not yet been captured by any previous models. We characterize the transition dynamics quantitatively and determine the applicative range of PA and Gibrat's law. The correlation analysis indicates the crossover transition may be attributed to the accumulative correlation between the internal links.

  5. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin S Hanley

    Full Text Available Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026 while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029 indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes. Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  6. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S; Khatun, Suniya; Yosef, Amal; Dyer, Rachel-May

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026) while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029) indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs) to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes). Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  7. Stochastic dark energy from inflationary quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavan, Dražen; Prokopec, Tomislav; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2018-05-01

    We study the quantum backreaction from inflationary fluctuations of a very light, non-minimally coupled spectator scalar and show that it is a viable candidate for dark energy. The problem is solved by suitably adapting the formalism of stochastic inflation. This allows us to self-consistently account for the backreaction on the background expansion rate of the Universe where its effects are large. This framework is equivalent to that of semiclassical gravity in which matter vacuum fluctuations are included at the one loop level, but purely quantum gravitational fluctuations are neglected. Our results show that dark energy in our model can be characterized by a distinct effective equation of state parameter (as a function of redshift) which allows for testing of the model at the level of the background.

  8. Risk of suicide ideation associated with problem-solving ability and attitudes toward suicidal behavior in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Carmel; Corcoran, Paul; Keeley, Helen S; Perry, Ivan J

    2003-01-01

    The present paper investigates the risk of lifetime suicide ideation associated with problem-solving ability and attitudes toward suicidal behavior in a sample of 328 university students (41% male, 59% female). The response rate was 77% based on the total number of students registered for the relevant courses. A series of questions assessed lifetime suicide ideation, while problem solving and attitudes toward suicide were measured using the Self-Rating Problem Solving scale and four subscales of the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire, respectively (McLeavey, 1986; Domino et al., 1989). Almost one-third of the students surveyed had lifetime suicide ideation. Both genders were similar in terms of their suicide ideation history, problem solving, and attitudes toward suicidal behavior with the exception that male students were more in agreement with the attitude that suicidal behavior lacks real intent. Compared with 2% of nonideators and ideators, one in four planners reported that they would more than likely attempt suicide at some point in their life. Greater agreement with the attitude that suicidal behavior is normal was associated with significantly increased risk of being an ideator, as was poor problem solving and less agreement with the attitude that suicidal behavior is associated with mental illness.

  9. Predictors of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students: association between evening typology, lifestyle behaviors, and sleep habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabrita CS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colette S Kabrita,1 Theresa A Hajjar-Muça,2 Jeanne F Duffy31Department of Sciences, 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Notre Dame University – Louaize, Zouk Mosbeh, Lebanon; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adequate, good night sleep is fundamental to well-being and is known to be influenced by myriad biological and environmental factors. Given the unavailability of sleep data about Lebanon, the cultural shifts and socioeconomic pressures that have affected many aspects of society, particularly for students and working adults, as well as our understanding of sleep in university students in other countries, we conducted a national study to assess sleep quality and factors contributing to sleep and general health in a culture-specific context. A self-filled questionnaire, inquiring about sociodemographics, health-risk behaviors, personal health, and evaluating sleep quality and chronotype using standard scales was completed by 540 students at private and public universities in Lebanon. Overall, they reported sleeping 7.95±1.34 hours per night, although 12.3% reported sleeping <6.5 hours and more than half scored in the poor-sleeper category on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Sleep timing differed markedly between weekdays and weekends, with bedtimes and wake-up times delayed by 1.51 and 2.43 hours, respectively, on weekends. While most scored in the "neither type" category on the Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ, 24.5% were evening types and 7.3% were morning types. MEQ score was significantly correlated with smoking behavior and daily study onset, as well as with PSQI score, with eveningness associated with greater number of cigarettes, later study times, and poor sleep. We conclude that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students is associated

  10. Emotional Effects on University Choice Behavior: The Influence of Experienced Narrators and Their Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas-Albiñana, Ana I.; Callejas-Albiñana, Fernando E.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence that experienced users of university resources might have as narrative sources of information for other students in the process of choosing their schools. Informative videos about the benefits of studying at the university provide a reference model. In these videos, a group of young people present their views and explain their reasons for choosing the university in which they are pursuing their degrees; the various narrators detail all the resources available. This study investigates whether the individual identifiers of these narrators (e.g., gender, age, physical appearance, nonverbal gestures such as smiling, posture) influence perceptions of the credibility of the information they provide. Among a sample of 150 students in their last year of pre-university training, the results demonstrate that the students' ability to identify with the narrators provides information and arouses emotions that inform their perceptions of reliability and therefore their consumption choices. None of these predictors appear to serve as determinants that can be generalized, but if emotional attitudes in response to narratives about the topic (i.e., the university) are positive, then they prompt a change in attitude toward that reference topic too. PMID:27252664

  11. Emotional Effects on University Choice Behavior: The Influence of Experienced Narrators and Their Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas-Albiñana, Ana I; Callejas-Albiñana, Fernando E; Martínez-Rodríguez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence that experienced users of university resources might have as narrative sources of information for other students in the process of choosing their schools. Informative videos about the benefits of studying at the university provide a reference model. In these videos, a group of young people present their views and explain their reasons for choosing the university in which they are pursuing their degrees; the various narrators detail all the resources available. This study investigates whether the individual identifiers of these narrators (e.g., gender, age, physical appearance, nonverbal gestures such as smiling, posture) influence perceptions of the credibility of the information they provide. Among a sample of 150 students in their last year of pre-university training, the results demonstrate that the students' ability to identify with the narrators provides information and arouses emotions that inform their perceptions of reliability and therefore their consumption choices. None of these predictors appear to serve as determinants that can be generalized, but if emotional attitudes in response to narratives about the topic (i.e., the university) are positive, then they prompt a change in attitude toward that reference topic too.

  12. Emotional effects on university choice behavior: The influence of experienced narrators and their characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando E. eCallejas-Albiñana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the influence that experienced users of university resources might have as narrative sources of information for other students in the process of choosing their schools. Informative videos about the benefits of studying at the university provide a reference model. In these videos, a group of young people present their views and explain their reasons for choosing the university in which they are pursuing their degrees; the various narrators detail all the resources available. This study investigates whether the individual identifiers of these narrators (e.g., gender, age, physical appearance, nonverbal gestures such as smiling, posture influence perceptions of the credibility of the information they provide. Among a sample of 150 students in their last year of pre-university training, the results demonstrate that the students’ ability to identify with the narrators provides information and arouses emotions that inform their perceptions of reliability and therefore their consumption choices. None of these predictors appear to serve as determinants that can be generalized, but if emotional attitudes in response to narratives about the topic (i.e., the university are positive, then they prompt a change in attitude toward that reference topic too.

  13. Development of a Universal Safety Behavior Management System for Coal Mine Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Jizu; LI, Yuejiao; LIU, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Background: In China, over 80% of all work-related deaths in the mining industry occur in coal mines and human factors constitute 85% of the direct causes of coal mine accidents, which indicates that significant shortcomings currently exist in the safety behavior management of Chinese coal mine workers. We aimed to verify the impact of human psychological behavior in coal mine accidents systematically through experimental study, theoretical analysis and management application. Methods: Four test instruments (Sensory and cognitive capacity test, Sixteen-Personal Factor Questionnaire, Symptom Checklist 90 Questionnaire and the supervisors’ evaluation) were employed from November 2013 to June 2014 to identify unsafe behavior factors, the self-established Questionnaire of Safety Behavior Norms (QSBN) was also used to propose the safety behavior countermeasures of coal mine employees. Results: The mental health of most coal mine workers’ is relatively poor. The sensory and cognitive capacity of those in different work posts varies greatly, as does the sense of responsibility. Workers are susceptible to external influences, and score low in site management. When the 16-PF and SCL-90 sensory and cognitive assessments were combined, the psychological index predictive power was greatest for estimating sense of efficiency and degree of satisfaction in internal evaluations, while at the same time lowest for estimating control of introversion-extroversion and stress character. Conclusion: The psychological indicators can predict part of employee safety behavior, and assist a coal mine enterprise to recruit staff, develop occupational safety norms and improve the working environment. PMID:26258088

  14. Sexual and contraceptive behavior among female university students in Sweden - repeated surveys over a 25-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, Christina; Ehrsson, Ylva Tiblom; Åkerud, Helena; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja

    2015-03-01

    To study female students' sexual and contraceptive behavior and compare these results with earlier surveys. Comparative, repeated cross-sectional surveys, started in 1989 and repeated every fifth year. Contraceptive counseling delivered at a Student Health Center in Sweden. Female university students (n = 359). Multiple-choice waiting-room questionnaire. Sexual and contraceptive behavior. In 1989, age at first intercourse was 17.6 years vs. 16.7 years in 2014, number of lifetime sexual partners was 4.0 vs. 12.1 in 2014, and number of sexual partners during the previous 12 months was 1.0 vs. 2.8 in 2014. Condom use during first intercourse with the latest partner decreased from 49% to 41% (n = 172 in 2009 vs. n = 148 in 2014: p used a condom during anal sex. A total of 70% (n = 251) made use of pornography, and 48% (n = 121) considered their sexual behavior affected by pornography. Eighty-nine percent (n = 291) wanted two to three children and 9% (n = 33) had thought about freezing eggs for the future. The female students' knowledge about increasing age being correlated with decreased fertility varied. Sexual behavior among female university students has gradually changed during the last 25 years and behavior appears more risky today. As this may have consequences on future reproductive health, it is vital to inform women about consistent and correct condom use and about the limitations of the fertile window. © 2015 The Authors. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG).

  15. A Study of Health-Promoting Behaviors of Medical Sciences Students of Islamic Azad University of Sari, Iran 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghahraman Mahmoodi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose:Health-promoting activities and a healthy lifestyle are major strategies to preserve health. The purpose of this research study, health-promoting behaviors of medical sciences student of Islamic Azad University of Sari, Iran, was carried out in order to determine the compliance and to promote the medical community. Materials and Methods:This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 285 university students, School of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran, who were selected using stratified random sampling. Tools for data collection questionnaire were health-promoting lifestyle profile-II, which includes two main categories of health behaviors and psychosocial health of six sub-categories. Data were entered into the SPSS statistical software and for analysis, Friedman and One-sample test was used. Results:Of the six dimensions of health-promoting behaviors, spiritual growth, averaging 25.11 ± 4.57 most, and the area of physical activity with a mean 18.33 ± 4.40 was the lowest score accounted in this study. The results of Freidman test showed that the ranking of dimensions (aspects are as following: 1 - personnel inter-relationship 2 - spiritual growth 3 - nutrition 4 - management stress 5 - health responsibility and 6 - physical activity. Conclusion:The finding was shown that doing the facilitator behavior and health promotion in the students are at the acceptable level. Furthermore, the terms of personnel inter-relationship, spiritual growth, nutrition, and stress management are at the important level of health promotion aspects. Regarding the above situations of health-promoting behaviors for health education programs among medical group students is recommended.

  16. Personality of young drivers in Oman: Relationship to risky driving behaviors and crash involvement among Sultan Qaboos University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Azri, Mohammed; Al Reesi, Hamed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Freeman, James

    2017-02-17

    Drivers' behaviors such as violations and errors have been demonstrated to predict crash involvement among young Omani drivers. However, there is a dearth of studies linking risky driving behaviors to the personality of young drivers. The aim of the present study was to assess such traits within a sample of young Omani drivers (as measured through the behavioral inhibition system [BIS] and the behavioral activation system [BAS]) and determine links with aberrant driving behaviors and self-reported crash involvement. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Sultan Qaboos University that targeted all licensed Omani's undergraduate students. A total of 529 randomly selected students completed the self-reported questionnaire that included an assessment of driving behaviors (e.g., Driver Behaviour Questionnaire, DBQ) as well as the BIS/BAS measures. A total of 237 participants (44.8%) reported involvement in at least one crash since being licensed. Young drivers with lower BIS-Anxiety scores and higher BAS-Fun Seeking tendencies as well as male drivers were more likely to report driving violations. Statistically significant gender differences were observed on all BIS and BAS subscales (except for BAS-Fun) and the DBQ subscales, because males reported higher trait scores. Though personality traits were related to aberrant driving behaviors at the bivariate level, the constructs were not predictive of engaging in violations or errors. Furthermore, consistent with previous research, a supplementary multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only driving experience was predictive of crash involvement. The findings highlight that though personality traits influence self-reported driving styles (and differ between the genders), the relationship with crash involvement is not as clear. This article further outlines the key findings of the study in regards to understanding core psychological constructs that increase crash risk.

  17. Patterns of alcohol consumption and risky sexual behavior: a cross-sectional study among Ugandan university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Vikas; Agardh, Anette; Stafström, Martin; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2014-02-06

    As reflected in elevated rates of sexually transmitted infections, there is a high prevalence of risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students. It has been assumed that alcohol contributes to risky sexual behavior. However, perhaps owing to methodological issues, this relationship has found only mixed support in empirical research. The present study analyzes the association between alcohol use and risky sexual behavior at the global, situational, and event level among Uganda university students with sexual experience. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010 among 1954 students at Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda, using a self-administered questionnaire. Alcohol use was measured as consumption over the previous 12 months, during situations related to sexual activity and on the most recent occasion of sexual intercourse. Risky sexual behavior was defined as having two or more sexual partners in the previous 12 months or inconsistent condom use with new partners. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between alcohol use and risky sexual behavior separately for males and females. Even after adjusting for confounders, the odds ratio (OR) of having two or more sexual partners in the past year indicated a statistically significant association with alcohol use on all levels (global, situational, and event) for both males and females. The ORs of inconsistent condom use with a new partner were significant for males who often consumed alcohol in relation to sexual activity--even after adjusting for potential confounders (OR, 1.75; confidence interval, 1.01-3.08). The risk of inconsistent condom use with a new partner was twice as high for females who often consumed alcohol in relation to sexual activity, although this association was not statistically significant. The study supports previous research that alcohol consumption is associated with having multiple sexual partners. Inconsistent

  18. A study of university student behaviors in using eBooks in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Hokyin Lai; Marco Li

    2013-01-01

    The adoption rate of eBooks has multiplied exponentially in University libraries. Libraries prefer buying eBooks rather than in-print books, mainly because of their low cost-structure and also because eBooks are easier to store. However, many library users still prefer to read in-print books, as compared to reading eBooks. This therefore leads to a potential mismatch between the expectations of the library and its users. This study aims to investigate the usage of eBooks in Universities in Ho...

  19. Drink driving and risky behavior among university students in southwestern Nigeria-Implications for policy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, O; Babalola, O R; Olakulehin, O A; Ighoroje, M

    2016-05-18

    Drink driving contributes significantly to road traffic injuries. Little is known about the relationship between drink driving and other high-risk behaviors in non-Western countries. The study aimed to assess the relationship between drink driving and other risky behaviors including making phone calls, sending text messages, nonuse of protective gear, and driving against traffic. A cross-sectional survey of risky behavior among undergraduates was conducted. A stratified random sampling method was used to identify young undergraduates who had driven a motorized vehicle in the past year. The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) and other tools developed by researchers were used to identify the risky behaviors. Of 431 respondents, 10.7% had engaged in drink driving in the past 12 months. The most common risky behavior was making phone calls (63.7%), followed by nonuse of helmets (54.7%), driving against traffic (49.2%), nonuse of seat belts (46.8%), and sending text messages (26.1%). Alcohol use was significantly associated with making phone calls (U = 1.148; P < .0001), sending text messages (U = 1.598; P = .021), nonuse of helmets (U = 1.147; P < .0001), driving against traffic (U = 1.234; P < .0001), and nonuse of seat belts (U = 3.233; P = .001). Drink driving was associated with all risky behaviors except nonuse of seat belts (U = 1.842; P = .065). Alcohol use and drink driving were associated with multiple risky driving behaviors. This provides useful insight for policy development and presents additional challenges for traffic injury prevention.

  20. Association between perception of body image and stages of behavioral changes among physical education university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Pinheiro Ferrari

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the percep­tion of body image and the stages of behavioral changes related to physical activity among Physical Education Students. Two hundred thirty six students were included. We measured the perception of body image (silhouettes scale, the stages of changes in behavior related to physical activity using a questionnaire developed by Marcus et al., and socio-demographic variables (gender, age, parental education, marital status, course, employment situation, housing, period of study and income. We used descriptive analysis, chi-square test, Fischer’s exact test, crude and adjusted multinomial regression to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. The prevalence of physically inactive behavior was 18.2% for males and 23.9% for females. Dissatisfaction with body image was associated with the stages of behavioral changes in females, with women with physically inactive behavior having greater odds of experiencing dissatisfaction with their body image, both for underweight (OR: 9.69; 95% CI: 1.05-89.30 and overweight (OR: 5.49; 95% CI: 1.07-28.11 when compared with women who were satisfied with their body image. We suggest the development of in­terventions aimed at the adoption of regular physical activity in order to promote greater satisfaction with body image.

  1. Fluctuations in quantum devices

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    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  2. Effectively universal behavior of rotating neutron stars in general relativity makes them even simpler than their Newtonian counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, George; Apostolatos, Theocharis A

    2014-03-28

    Recently, it was shown that slowly rotating neutron stars exhibit an interesting correlation between their moment of inertia I, their quadrupole moment Q, and their tidal deformation Love number λ (the I-Love-Q relations), independently of the equation of state of the compact object. In the present Letter a similar, more general, universality is shown to hold true for all rotating neutron stars within general relativity; the first four multipole moments of the neutron star are related in a way independent of the nuclear matter equation of state we assume. By exploiting this relation, we can describe quite accurately the geometry around a neutron star with fewer parameters, even if we don't know precisely the equation of state. Furthermore, this universal behavior displayed by neutron stars could promote them to a more promising class of candidates (next to black holes) for testing theories of gravity.

  3. The Relationship of Sexual Knowledge to Sexual Behavior among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Robert H.; Brown, Idalyn S.

    Current data on the widespread nature of sexual activity among unmarried teenagers and young adults and the rise in unplanned pregnancy among these groups offer evidence of a lack of knowledge about reproduction and contraception. Male (N=75) and female (N=78) university students participated in a study of the effects of authoritarianism,…

  4. Bibliotherapeutic Influence on Nigerian Female University Students: Self-Report on Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwilagwe, Oshiotse Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the influence of self-prescribed literature on sex education of female students at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. The sample population consists of 303 married, engaged, those in love and those yet to fall in love female students. The analysis of data reveals that they read books specifically on friendship, love, marriage…

  5. Electronic Waste is a Mess: Awareness and Proenvironmental Behavior among University Students in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edumadze, John K. E.; Tenkorang, Eric Y.; Armah, Frederick A.; Luginaah, Isaac; Edumadze, Gladys E.

    2013-01-01

    E-waste contains hazardous chemicals and materials that threaten the environment and human health, when improperly disposed. This study examined levels of awareness of e-waste disposal among university students in Ghana, and their proenvironmental decision-making using two outcome variables: "knowledge on environmental impact and policy…

  6. Impact of Change Management on Employee Behavior in a University Administrative Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kendra

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative case study focused on the effect of a system implementation upgrade on employees' job performance within a central administration department of a major research university in the Southern United States. Review of literature revealed a lack of a specific model or process for system implementation upgrades and its impact on…

  7. Does the addiction in online pornography affect the behavioral pattern of undergrad private university students in Bangladesh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Md. Razwan Hasan Khan; Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan; Kabir, Russell; Perera, Nirmala K P; Kader, Manzur

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Anecdotal reports from Bangladesh indicated that some young adults were becoming addicted to online pornography similar to how others become addicted to gambling, drugs, and alcohol. Such behaviors can have social, academic, and behavioral implications in this population. This study investigated the association between consumption of online pornography and sociobehavioral patterns among students from a private university in Bangladesh. Methods: In total, 299 undergraduate students (70.6% male) at the First Capital University of Bangladesh were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The questions included sociodemographic characteristics, online-based pornography consumption habits and sociobehavioral characteristics. Chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to examine correlations between online pornography addiction and sociobehavioral factors such as socializing habits, nature of interactions, university attendance and study focus, sleeping habits, and consumption of main meals. Results: The use of pornography was significantly higher among students who gathered late nights with their friends (58.4%, P pornography. Students who fooled around with their friends and those did not go to bed on time were more than twice as likely to watch pornography than students who did not fool around, and those went to bed on time. Conclusion: The study provides the first overview of online pornography consumption. A significant proportion of male students consumed erotic materials online than females. Students who did not go to bed emerged to consume online pornography. Such behaviors can have negative impacts on studies education outcomes as well as wider social and moral impacts for students and the society as a whole. In this digital era, technology has invaded every aspect of our lives, with increasing access to the internet. Therefore, it is imperative to provide specifically designed pornography addiction education programs

  8. General description of magnetic fluctuations in TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic fluctuations in TEXT (R = 1m, a = 0.26m, ohmically heated tokamak with a full poloidal limiter) have been extensively measured with magnetic probes in the shadow of the limiter with an instrumental range of f -1 (m rms p (f > 50kHz) at the limiter radius is found to be of order 10 -5 T, which is too small to produce significant transport directly. Over the range of discharge parameters in TEXT, the B rms p (f > 50kHz) is observed to have a strong q a dependence (q a -2.2 ) and also a density dependence (n eo -0.8 ). Furthermore, the magnetic fluctuations show a significant correlation with edge electrostatic density fluctuations measured by Langmiur probe inside the limiter radius, and extending along magnetic field lines. Phase variation of the correlated components suggests k double-prime/k perpendicular ∼ 0.005. The B p rms (f >50kHz) is also found to be little dependent on parallel electric field E double-prime. Magnetic fluctuations in both low and high frequency ranges have been characterized by their response to gas puffing, pellet injection, impurity injection, and the effect of an ergodic magnetic limiter. The behavior of magnetic fluctuations with electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has been also investigated in detail

  9. Remarks on transport theories of interplanetary fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhou; Matthaeus, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of approximate transport theories for the radial behavior of interplanetary fluctuations is reconsidered. The emphasis is on theories derived under the assumption of scale separation; i.e., the correlation length of the fluctuations is much less than the scale of large inhomogeneities. In these cases the zero-wavelength limit provides a first approximation to the spectral evolution equations for the radial dependence of interplanetary fluctuation spectra. The goal here is to investigate the structure of a recently presented (Zhou and Matthaeus, 1989) transport theory, in which coupling of inward- and outward-type fluctuations appears in the leading order, an effect the authors call mixing. In linear theory, mixing-type couplings of inward-type and outward-type waves are formally a nonresonant effect. However, leading order mixing terms do not vanish at zero wavelength for fluctuations that vary nearly perpendicular to the local magnetic field, or when the mean magnetic field is weak. Leading order mixing terms also survive when the dispersion relation fails and there is a nonunique relationship between frequency and wave number. The former case corresponds to nearly two-dimensional structures; these are included, for example, in isotropic models of turbulence. The latter instance occurs when wave-wave couplings are sufficiently strong. Thus there are a variety of situations in which leading order mixing effects are expected to be present

  10. A Study on the Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior of University Students’ Towards the Well Known Branded Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azize Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays branding, marketing literature appears to be an important concept. Consumers' attitudes towards goods and services together with increased levels of education also have become more sensitive. Many of the young people are the actual mass for the brand. At this point, young people's attitudes towards brands and information are important to determine the behavior. Heading from this importance, it was tried to measure knowledge, attitude and behavior of high brand awareness for products among 384 students who are learning in Gölbaşı Campus of Gazi University. As a result of this research it was found that the joining students preferred the high brand awareness products. Accordingly, high brand awareness products are seen by students, as mostly reliable products, which provides possibility of protection to consumers that can be easily found on the shelves and have more promotions but they are thinking that their prices are not the same everywhere.

  11. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, É lisabeth; Hinch, John

    2011-01-01

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations

  12. Impact of ambient fine particulate matter air pollution on health behaviors: a longitudinal study of university students in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R; Yu, H

    2018-03-19

    Poor air quality has become a national public health concern in China. This study examines the impact of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) air pollution on health behaviors among college students in Beijing, China. Prospective cohort study. Health surveys were repeatedly administered among 12,000 newly admitted students at Tsinghua University during 2012-2015 over their freshman year. Linear individual fixed-effect regressions were performed to estimate the impacts of ambient PM 2.5 concentration on health behaviors among survey participants, adjusting for various time-variant individual characteristics and environmental measures. Ambient PM 2.5 concentration was found to be negatively associated with time spent on walking, vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior in the last week, but positively associated with time spent on nighttime/daytime sleep among survey participants. An increase in the ambient PM 2.5 concentration by one standard deviation (36.5 μg/m³) was associated with a reduction in weekly total minutes of walking by 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3-9.4), a reduction in weekly total minutes of vigorous physical activity by 10.1 (95% CI = 8.5-11.7), a reduction in daily average hours of sedentary behavior by 0.06 (95% CI = 0.02-0.10) but an increase in daily average hours of nighttime/daytime sleep by 1.07 (95% CI = 1.04-1.11). Ambient PM 2.5 air pollution was inversely associated with physical activity level but positively associated with sleep duration among college students. Future studies are warranted to replicate study findings in other Chinese cities and universities, and policy interventions are urgently called to reduce air pollution level in China's urban areas. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EQUIPping High School Students. Effects of a universal prevention program on antisocial behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aggression and delinquency among youth form a major social concern, since adolescent externalizing problem behavior is associated with immediate and lasting problems throughout life. In response, there has been a surge of research investigating preventive strategies aiming to reduce these problem

  14. Teachers' Perceptions of a Multiple High-Risk Behavior Prevention Program and Delivery of Universal Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Crystal; Henriksen, Richard C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the success of high-risk behavior prevention programs rests with teachers who deliver the curriculum however; few studies have investigated teachers' perceptions of program implementation. The objective of this phenomenological study was to answer the question, "What are the experiences of teachers who are asked to be involved in the…

  15. Sustainability in Higher Education: An explorative approach on sustainable behavior in two universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Juárez Nájera (Margarita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on identifying psychological factors related to personality features which can influence sustainable behavior of individuals in higher educational institutions (HEI), as well as to present the areas where these individuals work, and in which higher education for

  16. The emergence and early development of prosocial behavior: universalities and cultural specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Y.; Dubas, J.J.S.; Broekhuizen, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a long standing interest in the early development of prosocial behaviors, there is still considerable controversy about their origins and development. While some researchers propose that humans are born with a fundamental motivation to help, share and comfort others (nature), some

  17. Alcohol Use, Eating Patterns, and Weight Behaviors in a University Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Melissa C.; Lust, Katherine; Story, Mary; Ehlinger, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore associations between alcohol, alcohol-related eating, and weight-related health indicators. Methods: Cross-sectional, multivariate regression of weight behaviors, binge drinking, and alcohol-related eating, using self-reported student survey data (n = 3206 undergraduates/graduates). Results: Binge drinking was associated with…

  18. Evaluating a Web-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Maladaptive Perfectionism in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhu, Natasha; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Arpin-Cribbie, Chantal A.; Irvine, Jane; Ritvo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed a Web-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for maladaptive perfectionism, investigating perfectionism, anxiety, depression, negative automatic thoughts, and perceived stress. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students defined as maladaptive perfectionists through a screening questionnaire at an urban…

  19. Attracting Women to Psychology: Effects of University Behavior and the Labor Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmon, Lewis C.

    1978-01-01

    This article reviews certain behaviors of graduate departments in regard to possible sex discrimination. It also evaluates job market conditions for men and women with data from a national sample of doctorate holders and from a recent survey of mobile or nontraditionally employed PhD's in psychology. (Author)

  20. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweya MN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mussa N Sweya,1 Sia E Msuya,2,3 Michael J Mahande,2 Rachel Manongi1,3 1Community Health Department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University, 3Community Health Department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania Background: Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of <5% (two-tailed was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 401 students were involved in the study. Two-thirds (260, 64.8% of the participants had had sexual intercourse. The majority (93.8% of the participants had knowledge of contraception. One hundred and seventy-five (43.6% sexually active women reported that they used contraceptives in the past, while 162 (40.4% were current contraceptive users. More than half (54.2% of the sexually active group started sexual activity between the ages of 20–24 years. The most popular methods of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal, and periodic abstinence. The main

  1. A fuzzy ANP application for prioritizing the productivity factors based on university employees' counterproductive behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alipour Darvishi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the relative efficiency of employee plays essential role on the success of any organization including universities. In this paper, we present a survey to detect and to prioritize important factors influencing on the productivity of employees who work for one of Iranian universities located in city of Tehran, Iran. The study also uses analytical network process to prioritize the factors. Based on the results of our survey, we have categorized effective productivity factors into three groups of research, educational and administration groups. In our survey, coherence and unity with no dispersion of the employee's duties, systematic job rotation and correct design communication job are among the most important factors influencing on employees’ productivity.

  2. Fluctuations in Schottky barrier heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    A double Schottky barrier is often formed at the grain boundary in polycrystalline semiconductors. The barrier height is shown to fluctuate in value due to the random nature of the impurity positions. The magnitude of the fluctuations is 0.1 eV, and the fluctuations cause the barrier height measured by capacitance to differ from the one measured by electrical conductivity

  3. Information searching behavior in the Internet age: A users’ study of Aligarh Muslim University

    OpenAIRE

    Nazim, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey conducted at Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) to determine the extent to which Internet users are aware and make use of the Internet resources and services. Examines the information searching behaviour of Internet users. A questionnaire and follow-up interviews with the postgraduate students, research scholars and academic staff were conducted to collect data. The sample used consisted of 489 persons of eight faculties. The data was analysed according to the...

  4. Evidence for bifurcation and universal chaotic behavior in nonlinear semiconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, J.; Perez, J.; Jeffries, C.

    1982-01-01

    Bifurcations, chaos, and extensive periodic windows in the chaotic regime are observed for a driven LRC circuit, the capacitive element being a nonlinear varactor diode. Measurements include power spectral analysis; real time amplitude data; phase portraits; and a bifurcation diagram, obtained by sampling methods. The effects of added external noise are studied. These data yield experimental determinations of several of the universal numbers predicted to characterize nonlinear systems having this route to chaos

  5. What Else after Behavior Was Changed? the Effects of a University's Policy on Student Participation in Motorcycle Emission Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    With an attempt to realize the effectiveness of a university's policy on motorcycle emission, this study compared its students' participation behavior, associated knowledge, and attitudes toward relevant environmental issues with those of three other universities without similar measures. The results of a survey on a total of 504 students revealed…

  6. Cosmological implications of modified gravity induced by quantum metric fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xing [Sun Yat-Sen University, School of Physics, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, Yat Sen School, Guangzhou (China); Harko, Tiberiu [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom); Liang, Shi-Dong [Sun Yat-Sen University, School of Physics, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-Sen University, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Material and Technology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, School of Physics, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the cosmological implications of modified gravities induced by the quantum fluctuations of the gravitational metric. If the metric can be decomposed as the sum of the classical and of a fluctuating part, of quantum origin, then the corresponding Einstein quantum gravity generates at the classical level modified gravity models with a non-minimal coupling between geometry and matter. As a first step in our study, after assuming that the expectation value of the quantum correction can be generally expressed in terms of an arbitrary second order tensor constructed from the metric and from the thermodynamic quantities characterizing the matter content of the Universe, we derive the (classical) gravitational field equations in their general form. We analyze in detail the cosmological models obtained by assuming that the quantum correction tensor is given by the coupling of a scalar field and of a scalar function to the metric tensor, and by a term proportional to the matter energy-momentum tensor. For each considered model we obtain the gravitational field equations, and the generalized Friedmann equations for the case of a flat homogeneous and isotropic geometry. In some of these models the divergence of the matter energy-momentum tensor is non-zero, indicating a process of matter creation, which corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the matter fluid, and which is direct consequence of the non-minimal curvature-matter coupling. The cosmological evolution equations of these modified gravity models induced by the quantum fluctuations of the metric are investigated in detail by using both analytical and numerical methods, and it is shown that a large variety of cosmological models can be constructed, which, depending on the numerical values of the model parameters, can exhibit both accelerating and decelerating behaviors. (orig.)

  7. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18–53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices. PMID:25983709

  8. Hope, Core Self-Evaluations, Emotional Well-Being, Health-Risk Behaviors, and Academic Performance in University Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Stephanie; Crawford, Sybil L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the current online cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between hope, core self-evaluations (CSE), emotional well-being, health-risk behaviors, and academic performance in students enrolled in their first year of college. Freshmen (N = 495) attending a large public university in the Northeastern United States completed an online survey between February 1 and 13, 2017. Linear regression, path analysis, and structural equation modeling procedures were performed. CSE mediated the relationship between hope and emotional well-being and academic performance. Contrary to the hypotheses, higher hope predicted more sexual risk-taking behaviors and alcohol use. CSE is an important component of Hope Theory, which is useful for predicting emotional well-being and academic performance, but not as useful for predicting drug use, alcohol use, and sexual risk taking. Hope and CSE interventions are needed to improve academic performance and emotional well-being in university freshmen. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(9), 33-42.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Predictive factors of health promoting behavior in nursing teachers from three universities in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaider Gloria Triviño-Vargas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health promotion has been a constant concern in the human being. It allows to understand behaviors related to it and orientates towards the generation of health promoting behaviors (HPB that promote personal well-being. Objective: To determine the predictor factors influencing the HPB of the teachers according to Pender’s health promotion model. Materials and methods: A correlational descriptive design was made with a representative sample of the teachers with current contract during the study. Instruments such as the EVPS II scale of Pender were applied to measure the dependent variable CPS, as well as for the independent ones such as sociodemographic, knowledge on health promotion, perception of health status and perception of self-efficacy. Results: They are descriptive, according to the coefficient of variation in each of the subdimensions of the behaviors: spiritual growth, interpersonal relations, responsibility in health, nutrition, management of stress and physical activity. The predictor factors were based on the multiple regression model. Conclusions: Favorable HPB were spiritual growth, interpersonal relationships and nutrition. Predictors that have effect on HPB were presented on the basis of teacher rankings, age, senior adult performance area, stratum, income and area of performance, mental health and psychiatry.

  10. Sensation Seeking or Empathy? Physically Aggressive and Non-Aggressive Antisocial Behaviors (ASBs Amongst University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Eman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has linked anti-social behavior (ASB to subtypes of empathy and also to sensation seeking, but there is limited research on the relative roles of empathy subtypes and sensation seeking traits in predicting ASB subtypes. The current study therefore investigated the relationship between sensation seeking, the three subtypes of empathy (emotional reactivity, cognitive empathy and social skills and the two subtypes of ASB (physically aggressive and non-aggressive. An online survey consisting of Demographic Variables Questionnaire, Brief Sensation Seeking Scale, Empathy Quotient and the Antisocial Behavior Measure was sent to student volunteers, leading to a total of 537 respondents. Empathy alone accounted for a relatively modest proportion of the total variance in the ASBs, with emotional reactivity being the only significant predictor. Adding sensation seeking to the regression led to a marked improvement in prediction for non-aggressive ASB and a slight but significant improvement for physically aggressive ASB. Sensation seeking, emotional reactivity and social skills (but not cognitive empathy contributed unique variance for both ASB subtypes. The greatest variance for physically aggressive and non-aggressive ASB were accounted for by emotional reactivity and sensation seeking, respectively. The results indicate that both sensation seeking and sub-types of empathy are important in predicting ASBs. This has theoretical implications for different personality models and has practical implications for the development of preventive measures to avoid such behaviors.

  11. Need for Cognition and Electronic Health Literacy and Subsequent Information Seeking Behaviors Among University Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K. Britt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available eHealth literacy (eHEALS has yet to be examined with regard to need for cognition (NFC, as well as whether NFC moderates the relationship between eHealth literacy and seeking out online health information. Past research that has examined NFC as an interaction between whether interactivity on health web sites affected comprehension and attitudes, but no research to date has examined whether cognitive need interacts with eHEALS and subsequent information seeking behaviors. The present study tests eHEALS and its connection to need for cognition (NFC in the role of online health information seeking behaviors. Results showed that high eHEALS individuals were more likely to seek out online health information and were more likely to have higher NFC scores. NFC did not emerge as a moderator on the relationship between eHealth literacy and online health information seeking behaviors. Future directions are discussed, in particular, examining eHEALS as a construct of efficacy and further need to examine eHEALS with need for cognition in health communication research.

  12. Development of constructivist behaviors among four new science teachers prepared at the University of Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Lee Yuen

    The development of constructivist behaviors among four new science teachers was studied during a four year period---student teaching through their first three years of teaching. Constructivist behaviors were examined from four perspectives: actual classroom performances as viewed from videotapes; teacher and student perceptions of use of constructivist practices from surveys; and teacher beliefs as gained from open-ended interviews. Data analyses involved constant comparison of data from two or more sources---descriptive statistics, statistical analyses, levels of teacher expertise regarding constructivist behaviors, qualitative descriptions, and direct quotes from videotapes and interview transcripts. The results indicate that the new teachers were largely early constructivist teachers. Constructivist teaching approaches were used during student teaching. Socialization and induction processes had minimal effects. Both observed practices and beliefs about teaching and learning were student-centered; after declines in years one and two, constructivist behaviors improved by the third year of teaching. Students of the new teachers perceived their lessons as being more interesting, more relevant to them, and that they had more autonomy about instruction than reported by students in other programs. Their perceptions better matched those of students taught by more experienced teachers, who were identified as expert constructivists. Although individual teachers were unique with different focuses and strengths, eleven dominant and consistently espoused student-centered beliefs were identified. The new teachers also shared a range of constructivist behaviors that correspond to national standards. These include: (1) Students sharing the responsibility of learning with teachers; (2) Student engagement in activities and experiences; (3) Students with positive attitudes who are motivated to learn; (4) Teaching that focuses on student relevance; (5) Variation in teaching

  13. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  14. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  15. Students' drinking behavior and perceptions towards introducing alcohol policies on university campus in Denmark: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladekjær Larsen, Eva; Smorawski, Gitte Andsager; Kragbak, Katrine Lund; Stock, Christiane

    2016-04-29

    High alcohol consumption among university students is a well-researched health concern in many countries. At universities in Denmark, policies of alcohol consumption are a new phenomenon if existing at all. However, little is known of how students perceive campus alcohol policies. The aim of this study is to explore students' perceptions of alcohol policies on campus in relation to attitudes and practices of alcohol consumption. We conducted six focus group interviews with students from the University of Southern Denmark at two different campuses. The interviews discussed topics such as experiences and attitudes towards alcohol consumption among students, regulations, and norms of alcohol use on campus. The analysis followed a pre-determined codebook. Alcohol consumption is an integrated practice on campus. Most of the participants found it unnecessary to make major restrictions. Instead, regulations were socially controlled by students themselves and related to what was considered to be appropriate behavior. However students were open minded towards smaller limitations of alcohol availability. These included banning the sale of alcohol in vending machines and limiting consumption during the introduction week primarily due to avoiding social exclusion of students who do not drink. Some international students perceived the level of consumption as too high and distinguished between situations where they perceived drinking as unusual. The study showed that alcohol is a central part of students' lives. When developing and implementing alcohol policies on campus, seeking student input in the process and addressing alcohol policies in the larger community will likely improve the success of the policies.

  16. Attitudes and behaviors related to introduction of Electronic Health Record (EHR among Shiraz University students in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Nematollahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electronic Health Record contains all the information related to the health of citizens, from before birth to death have been consistently over time is electronically stored and will be available without regard to location or time all or part of it to authorized persons. The acceptance of EHR by citizens is important in successful implementation of it. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and behaviors related to the introduction of electronic health records among Shiraz university student. Method:The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive survey. The study population consisted of all Shiraz University students. The data gathering tool was a questionnaire and data were analyzed in SPSS v.16 software, using descriptive statistical tests. Also, the samples, i.e. 384 students, were selected through convenient sampling. Results: The results showed that most of the students kept their medical records at home to show them to a specialist and only 15% of them were familiar with the Electronic Health Records term. The use of Electronic Health Records for Maintenance of drug prescriptions was of the most importance. Conclusion: Among the students who are educated class and the source of change, the university students’ familiarity with Electronic Health Records is too low and most of them were not even familiar with its name and it is very important to implement this system familiarize the users on how to use it sufficiently

  17. Behavioral Health Risk Profiles of Undergraduate University Students in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland: A Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Ssewanyana, Derrick; Stock, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    Limited research has explored clustering of lifestyle behavioral risk factors (BRFs) among university students. This study aimed to explore clustering of BRFs, composition of clusters, and the association of the clusters with self-rated health and perceived academic performance. We assessed (BRFs), namely tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, unhealthy nutrition, and inadequate sleep, using a self-administered general Student Health Survey among 3,706 undergraduates at seven UK universities. A two-step cluster analysis generated: Cluster 1 (the high physically active and health conscious) with very high health awareness/consciousness, good nutrition, and physical activity (PA), and relatively low alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use. Cluster 2 (the abstinent) had very low ATOD use, high health awareness, good nutrition, and medium high PA. Cluster 3 (the moderately health conscious) included the highest regard for healthy eating, second highest fruit/vegetable consumption, and moderately high ATOD use. Cluster 4 (the risk taking) showed the highest ATOD use, were the least health conscious, least fruit consuming, and attached the least importance on eating healthy. Compared to the healthy cluster (Cluster 1), students in other clusters had lower self-rated health, and particularly, students in the risk taking cluster (Cluster 4) reported lower academic performance. These associations were stronger for men than for women. Of the four clusters, Cluster 4 had the youngest students. Our results suggested that prevention among university students should address multiple BRFs simultaneously, with particular focus on the younger students.

  18. Suicidal behaviors and associated factors among university students in six countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Yi, Siyan; Pengpid, Supa

    2017-04-01

    A large data gap remains on suicidal behaviors among youth in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries, despite the increasing rates of suicide in Asian cultures that may be related to rapid economic changes and the loss of social stability. This study was therefore conducted to explore the prevalence of and factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among university students in six ASEAN member states. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of 4675 undergraduate university students, mean age 20.6 years (SD=2.7), range of 18-30 years, from Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The overall prevalence of ever suicidal ideation and ever suicide attempt among students in this study was 11.7% and 2.4%, respectively. Different rates of these suicidal behaviors were observed across the countries. In multivariable logistic regression models, suicidal ideation was significantly associated with psychosocial factors including childhood sexual abuse, depressive symptoms, involvement in physical fights, and poor academic performance as well as socio-environmental factors including living with parents or guardians and low involvement in organized religious activity. Suicide attempt was significantly associated with childhood sexual abuse, depressive symptoms, low involvement in organized religious activity and being underweight or overweight. Our findings suggest that individual-level strategies for suicide prevention should be targeted toward students with poor academic performance, mental health problems and a history of adverse childhood experiences. Particular attention should be paid to the role of families that could be a potential stressor in the lives of university students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on behaviors and performances of universal N-glycopeptide enrichment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yu; Xie, Juanjuan; Fang, Pan; Yao, Jun; Yan, Guoquan; Shen, Huali; Yang, Pengyuan

    2018-04-16

    Glycosylation is a crucial process in protein biosynthesis. However, the analysis of glycopeptides through MS remains challenging due to the microheterogeneity and macroheterogeneity of the glycoprotein. Selective enrichment of glycopeptides from complex samples prior to MS analysis is essential for successful glycoproteome research. In this work, we systematically investigated the behaviors and performances of boronic acid chemistry, ZIC-HILIC, and PGC of glycopeptide enrichment to promote understanding of these methods. We also optimized boronic acid chemistry and ZIC-HILIC enrichment methods and applied them to enrich glycopeptides from mouse liver. The intact N-glycopeptides were interpreted using the in-house analysis software pGlyco 2.0. We found that boronic acid chemistry in this study preferred to capture glycopeptides with high mannose glycans, ZIC-HILIC enriched most N-glycopeptides and did not show significant preference during enrichment and PGC was not suitable for separating glycopeptides with a long amino acid sequence. We performed a detailed study on the behaviors and performances of boronic acid chemistry, ZIC-HILIC, and PGC enrichment methods and provide a better understanding of enrichment methods for further glycoproteomics research.

  20. Addiction treatment outcomes, process and change: Texas Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D Dwayne; Joe, George W; Dansereau, Donald F; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-10-01

    For more than 40 years the Texas Institute of Behavioral Research (IBR) has given special attention to assessment and evaluation of drug user populations, addiction treatment services and various cognitive and behavioral interventions. Emphasis has been on studies in real-world settings and the use of multivariate methodologies to address evaluation issues within the context of longitudinal natural designs. Historically, its program of addiction treatment research may be divided into three sequential epochs-the first era dealt mainly with client assessment and its role in treatment outcome and evaluation (1969-89), the second focused upon modeling the treatment process and the importance of conceptual frameworks (1989-2009) in explaining the relationships among treatment environment, client attributes, treatment process and outcome, and the third (and current) era has expanded into studying tactical deployment of innovations and implementation. Recent projects focus upon adapting and implementing innovations for improving early engagement in adolescent residential treatment settings and drug-dependent criminal justice populations. Related issues include the spread of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases, organizational and systems functioning, treatment costs and process related to implementation of evidence-based practices. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Universality class of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in mixed-valence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Zhao-Bin; Yu, Lu

    1996-01-01

    A generalized Anderson single-impurity model with off-site Coulomb interactions is derived from the extended three-band Hubbard model, originally proposed to describe the physics of the copper oxides. Using the Abelian bosonization technique and canonical transformations, an effective Hamiltonian is derived in the strong-coupling limit, which is essentially analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem. In this limit, the effective Hamiltonian can be exactly solved, with a mixed-valence quantum critical point separating two different Fermi-liquid phases, i.e., the Kondo phase and the empty orbital phase. In the mixed-valence quantum critical regime, the local moment is only partially quenched and x-ray edge singularities are generated. Around the quantum critical point, a type of non-Fermi-liquid behavior is predicted with an extra specific heat Cimp~T1/4 and a singular spin susceptibility χimp~T-3/4. At the same time, the effective Hamiltonian under single occupancy is transformed into a resonant-level model, from which the correct Kondo physical properties (specific heat, spin susceptibility, and an enhanced Wilson ratio) are easily rederived. Finally, a brief discussion is given to relate these theoretical results to observations in UPdxCu5-x (x=1,1.5) alloys, which show single-impurity critical behavior consistent with our predictions.

  2. The Undesirable Behaviors of Students in Academic Classrooms, and the Discipline Strategies Used by Faculty Members to Control Such Behaviors from the Perspective of the College of Education Students in King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Norah Saad Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the undesirable students' behaviors in academic classrooms, and the disciplinary, preventive and therapeutic strategies that will be used by faculty members to control those behaviors from the perspective of the College of Education's students in King Saud University. The results of the study has shown that the…

  3. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  4. [The relationships among self-identity, self-esteem and attitude towards sexual behavior in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Takako; Tachi, Etsuko; Ogasawara, Akihiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2002-10-01

    It has been reported that the young people of today tend to engage in sexual behavior at an early age and the abortion rate is high. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of post-adolescents with regard to sexual behaviors and the relationship to self-identity and self-esteem. The subjects were 234 males (mean +/- SD 20.2 +/- 1.1 years) and 460 females (mean +/- SD 19.5 +/- 1.1 years) 4-year university students aged 18 to 23 years in Aichi Prefecture. An anonymous, self-report questionnaire was used to survey the subjects with regard to self-identity ("Establishment of Self" scale), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), and sexual attitude and behavior. The scores on both scales and subscales of the "Establishment of Self" scale, "Foundation of Identity (Foundation)" and "Establishment of Identity (Establishment)", were calculated and intercompared, along with sexual attitude and behavior, controlled for age and school type. The mean total score of the "Establishment of Self" scale for males was 55.3 (SD9.2) and for females 52.2 (SD9.3), while those for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were 27.2 (SD5.5) and 25.7 (SD5.2), respectively. There was significant positive correlation all scales in both sexes. Both male and female students had positive attitude towards sex and a negative view of "traditional gender roles" particularly females. Of the subjects, 82.4% of males and 69.5% of females were thinking of accepting a request for sexual intercourse from their partners. Many students understood the "need for contraception", that is a component of contraceptive behavior. Most of them, however, didn't acquire the other components. A total of 68.3% of males and 48.2% of females had experienced sexual intercourse during the last year. Of these, 50.6% of males and 58.2% of females consistently used contraception. The score on the "Establishment of Self" scale was higher among both the male and female students who responded positively to having

  5. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  6. Does the addiction in online pornography affect the behavioral pattern of undergrad private university students in Bangladesh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Md Razwan Hasan Khan; Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan; Kabir, Russell; Perera, Nirmala K P; Kader, Manzur

    2018-01-01

    Anecdotal reports from Bangladesh indicated that some young adults were becoming addicted to online pornography similar to how others become addicted to gambling, drugs, and alcohol. Such behaviors can have social, academic, and behavioral implications in this population. This study investigated the association between consumption of online pornography and sociobehavioral patterns among students from a private university in Bangladesh. In total, 299 undergraduate students (70.6% male) at the First Capital University of Bangladesh were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The questions included sociodemographic characteristics, online-based pornography consumption habits and sociobehavioral characteristics. Chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to examine correlations between online pornography addiction and sociobehavioral factors such as socializing habits, nature of interactions, university attendance and study focus, sleeping habits, and consumption of main meals. The use of pornography was significantly higher among students who gathered late nights with their friends (58.4%, P < 0.001). Furthermore, those who frequently argue/fight with their friends (51.0%, P = 0.001) frequently fooled around with their friends (48.4%, P < 0.001) and those who did not go to bed on time (57.7%, P < 0.001) reported greater consumption of pornography. Students who fooled around with their friends and those did not go to bed on time were more than twice as likely to watch pornography than students who did not fool around, and those went to bed on time. The study provides the first overview of online pornography consumption. A significant proportion of male students consumed erotic materials online than females. Students who did not go to bed emerged to consume online pornography. Such behaviors can have negative impacts on studies education outcomes as well as wider social and moral impacts for students and the society as a whole. In this

  7. Standard Male Body Image and its Influence on Food Values, Attitudes and Behavior in Food University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela de Souza Dias

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Body image corresponds to the way the individual sees his body. The beauty standards body are established from references in which illusory short fall. The great changes in recent years in markets as food and fitness show mainly focused on developing new habits for health concerns and aesthetics. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between body image values, attitudes and dietary behavior in college men. We used a range of silhouettes adapted model Stunkard, Sorenson e Schlusinger (1983 as cited in Kety, Rowland, Sidman & Matthysse, 1983 and Lima, Orlando, Teixeira, Castro e Damasceno (2008,

  8. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  9. Concentration fluctuations in gas releases by industrial accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Chatwin, P.C.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2002-01-01

    The COFIN project studied existing remote-sensing Lidar data on concentration fluctuations in atmospheric dispersion from continuous sources at ground level. Fluctuations are described by stochastic models developed by a combination of statisticalanalyses and surface-layer scaling. The statistical...... and the probability distribution for the plume centreline. The distance-neighbour function generalizedfor higher-order statistics has a universal exponential shape. Simulation tools for concentration fluctuations have been developed for either multiple correlated time series or multi-dimensional fields. These tools...... moments and probability density distribution of the fluctuations are most accurately determined in a frame of reference following the instantaneous plume centreline. The spatial distribution of thesemoments is universal with a gaussian core and exponential tails. The instantaneous plume width...

  10. Gambling behaviors among university youth: does one's religious affiliation and level of religiosity play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Lilian A; El Sayed, Donna S

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the association between religion, religiosity, and gambling using a cross-sectional sample of 570 American University of Beirut students, who self-filled an anonymous English questionnaire. About half (55%) were lifetime gamblers, of which 12% screened as problem/pathological gamblers. Controlling for other demographics and lifetime substance use, Christian students (vs. Muslims) had higher odds of lifetime gambling [6.6 (3.6, 12.2)], any strategic gambling [2.7 (1.2, 5.9)], social nonproblem gambling (SNPG) [7.6 (4.6, 12.3)], and problem/pathological gambling (PG) [6.8(1.8, 26.5)]. Students who never/rarely practiced their faith were 3.6 times as likely [95% CI: 1.5, 8.7] to report lifetime gambling, 3.7 times as likely to report SNPG (vs. NG) [95% CI: 1.3, 10.6], and 7 times as likely to screen for PG (vs. NG) [95% CI: 1.8, 27.4]. Decreased religious importance was associated with greater odds of lifetime gambling, SNPG and PG (vs. nongambling). Stronger associations were observed among Muslims. Religion and religiosity seem to play a protective role, particularly among Muslims whose faith strictly prohibits gambling. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Universal tunneling behavior in technologically relevant P/N junction diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Paul M.; Jopling, Jason; Frank, David J.; D'Emic, Chris; Dokumaci, O.; Ronsheim, P.; Haensch, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    Band-to-band tunneling was studied in ion-implanted P/N junction diodes with profiles representative of present and future silicon complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) field effect transistors. Measurements were done over a wide range of temperatures and implant parameters. Profile parameters were derived from analysis of capacitance versus voltage characteristics, and compared to secondary-ion mass spectroscopy analysis. When the tunneling current was plotted against the effective tunneling distance (tunneling distance corrected for band curvature) a quasi-universal exponential reduction of tunneling current versus, tunneling distance was found with an attenuation length of 0.38 nm, corresponding to a tunneling effective mass of 0.29 times the free electron mass (m 0 ), and an extrapolated tunneling current at zero tunnel distance of 5.3x10 7 A/cm 2 at 300 K. These results are directly applicable for predicting drain to substrate currents in CMOS transistors on bulk silicon, and body currents in CMOS transistors in silicon-on-insulator

  12. Detecting and describing preventive intervention effects in a universal school-based randomized trial targeting delinquent and violent behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoolmiller, M; Eddy, J M; Reid, J B

    2000-04-01

    This study examined theoretical, methodological, and statistical problems involved in evaluating the outcome of aggression on the playground for a universal preventive intervention for conduct disorder. Moderately aggressive children were hypothesized most likely to benefit. Aggression was measured on the playground using observers blind to the group status of the children. Behavior was micro-coded in real time to minimize potential expectancy biases. The effectiveness of the intervention was strongly related to initial levels of aggressiveness. The most aggressive children improved the most. Models that incorporated corrections for low reliability (the ratio of variance due to true time-stable individual differences to total variance) and censoring (a floor effect in the rate data due to short periods of observation) obtained effect sizes 5 times larger than models without such corrections with respect to children who were initially 2 SDs above the mean on aggressiveness.

  13. Fluctuating Thermodynamics for Biological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Sihyun

    Because biomolecular processes are largely under thermodynamic control, dynamic extension of thermodynamics is necessary to uncover the mechanisms and driving factors of fluctuating processes. The fluctuating thermodynamics technology presented in this talk offers a practical means for the thermodynamic characterization of conformational dynamics in biomolecules. The use of fluctuating thermodynamics has the potential to provide a comprehensive picture of fluctuating phenomena in diverse biological processes. Through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics, we provide a thermodynamic perspective on the misfolding and aggregation of the various proteins associated with human diseases. In this talk, I will present the detailed concepts and applications of the fluctuating thermodynamics technology for elucidating biological processes. This work was supported by Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Project Number SSTF-BA1401-13.

  14. Comparison on information-seeking behavior of postgraduated students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and University of Isfahan in writing dissertation based on Kuhlthau model of information search process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Mahnaz; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Nouri, Rasoul; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Information-seeking behaviors have been one of the main focuses of researchers in order to identify and solve the problems users face in information recovery. The aim of this research is Comparative on Information-Seeking Behavior of the Postgraduate Students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Isfahan University in Writing Dissertation based on Kuhlthau Model of Information Search Process in 2012. The research method followed is survey and the data collection tool is Narmenji questionnaire. Statistical population was all postgraduate students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Isfahan University. The sample size was 196 people and sampling was stratified randomly. The type of statistical analyses were descriptive (mean and frequency) and inferential (independent t test and Pearson's correlation) and the software used was SPSS20. The findings showed that Isfahan Medical Sciences University followed 20% of the order steps of this model and Isfahan University did not follow this model. In the first stage (Initiation) and sixth (Presentation) of feelings aspects and in actions (total stages) significant difference was found between students from the two universities. Between gender and fourth stage (Formulation) and the total score of feelings the Kuhlthau model there has a significant relationship. Also there was a significant and inverse relationship between the third stage (Exploration) of feelings and age of the students. The results showed that in writing dissertation there were some major differences in following up the Kuhlthau model between students of the two Universities. There are significant differences between some of the stages of feelings and actions of students' information-seeking behavior from the two universities. There is a significant relationship between the fourth stage (Formulation) of feelings in the Kuhlthau Model with gender and third stage of the Feelings (Exploration) with age.

  15. High pressure study of high temperatures superconductors: Material base, universal Tc-behavior, and charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.W.; Hor, P.H.; Lin, J.G.; Xiong, Q.; Huang, Z.J.; Meng, R.L.; Xue, Y.Y.; Jean, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    The superconducting transition temperature (T c ) has been measured in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.7 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , Y 2 Ba 4 Cu 7 O 15 , YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , Tl 2 Ba 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O n+4-δ , La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , and La 2-x Ba x CuO 4 under high pressures. The pressure effect on the positron lifetime (τ) has also been determined in the first four compounds. Based on these and other high pressure data, the authors suggest that (1) all known cuprate high temperature superconductors (HTS's) may be no more than mere modifications of either 214-T, 214-T', 123, or a combination of 214-T' and 123, (2) a nonmonotonic T c -behavior may govern the T c -variation of all hole cuprate HTS's and (3) pressure can induce charge transfer leading to a T c -change. The implications of these suggestions will also be discussed

  16. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  17. Behavioral Health Risk Profiles of Undergraduate University Students in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland: A Cluster Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid El Ansari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLimited research has explored clustering of lifestyle behavioral risk factors (BRFs among university students. This study aimed to explore clustering of BRFs, composition of clusters, and the association of the clusters with self-rated health and perceived academic performance.MethodWe assessed (BRFs, namely tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, unhealthy nutrition, and inadequate sleep, using a self-administered general Student Health Survey among 3,706 undergraduates at seven UK universities.ResultsA two-step cluster analysis generated: Cluster 1 (the high physically active and health conscious with very high health awareness/consciousness, good nutrition, and physical activity (PA, and relatively low alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD use. Cluster 2 (the abstinent had very low ATOD use, high health awareness, good nutrition, and medium high PA. Cluster 3 (the moderately health conscious included the highest regard for healthy eating, second highest fruit/vegetable consumption, and moderately high ATOD use. Cluster 4 (the risk taking showed the highest ATOD use, were the least health conscious, least fruit consuming, and attached the least importance on eating healthy. Compared to the healthy cluster (Cluster 1, students in other clusters had lower self-rated health, and particularly, students in the risk taking cluster (Cluster 4 reported lower academic performance. These associations were stronger for men than for women. Of the four clusters, Cluster 4 had the youngest students.ConclusionOur results suggested that prevention among university students should address multiple BRFs simultaneously, with particular focus on the younger students.

  18. [BEHAVIOR OF HEMOGLOBIN CONCENTRATION, HEMATOCRIT AND OXYGEN SATURATION IN COLOMBIAN UNIVERSITY POPULATION AT DIFFERENT ALTITUDES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetero González, Andrea Catalina; Cristancho Mejía, Edgar; Benavides Pinzón, William Fernando; Serrato Roa, Mauricio; Landinez Macias, María Paula; Rojas, Joel

    2015-11-01

    the development of this research is base on the growing interest in understanding the adaptations to chronic hipoxia mainly in the range of intermediate altitudes (1 500-3 000 m.s.n.m) and the need to establish parameters of normality in the variables [Hb], Hct and SO2 for diagnostic and characterization of the population purposes. to analyze the behavior of the [Hb], Hct and SaO2 at different intermediate altitudes (970 m.s.n.m, 1 520 m.s.n.m, 1 728 m.s.n.m, 1 923 m.s.n.m, 2 180 m.s.n.m and 2 600 m.s.n.m) in order to contribute to the knowledge of the high altitude physiology and the clinical field to support the diagnosis of anemia. clinically healthy subjects with low levels of physical activity and food consumption report containing iron. Total of 264 participants of both genders between 18 and 30 years. The blood samples were collected from the antecubital vein and the earlobe and analyzed in a radiometer. A non-parametric statistical analysis was performed. with increasing of altitude, [Hb] and Hct values were increased while the SO2 decreased. Men showed higher values than women in [Hb] and Hct, related to lower values of SO2 than women. a threshold variable was not found, perhaps because of the small distance between the altitudes. The values reported were similar but not identical to other studies. This difference could be explained by genetic diversity among populations. this study allows for the first values of characterization of the study population. All altitudes were above the cutoff for the diagnosis of anemia ([Hb] 12 g/dl). Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular And Behavioral Analysis of the R6/1 Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naver, Bjarke; Stub, C.; Møller, M.

    2003-01-01

    behavior, cannabinoid receptor 1, fluctuating asymmetry, developmental instability, neuronal inclusions......behavior, cannabinoid receptor 1, fluctuating asymmetry, developmental instability, neuronal inclusions...

  20. Fluctuations in a Levy flight gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogedby, H.C.; Jensen, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the density fluctuations of an ideal Brownian gas of particles performing Levy flights characterized by the index f. We find that the fluctuations scale as ΔN(t)∝t H , where the Hurst exponent H locks onto the universal value 1/4 for Levy flights with a finite root mean square range (f>2). For Levy flights with a finite mean range but infinite root mean square range (1< f<2) the Hurst exponent H=1/2f. For infinite range Levy flights (f<1) the Hurst exponent locks onto the value 1/2. The corresponding power spectrum scales with an exponent 1+2H, independent of dimension. (orig.)

  1. Detecting quantum critical points using bipartite fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Stephan; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Song, H Francis; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-03-16

    We show that the concept of bipartite fluctuations F provides a very efficient tool to detect quantum phase transitions in strongly correlated systems. Using state-of-the-art numerical techniques complemented with analytical arguments, we investigate paradigmatic examples for both quantum spins and bosons. As compared to the von Neumann entanglement entropy, we observe that F allows us to find quantum critical points with much better accuracy in one dimension. We further demonstrate that F can be successfully applied to the detection of quantum criticality in higher dimensions with no prior knowledge of the universality class of the transition. Promising approaches to experimentally access fluctuations are discussed for quantum antiferromagnets and cold gases.

  2. Modified diffusion with memory for cyclone track fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernido, Christopher C., E-mail: cbernido@mozcom.com [Research Center for Theoretical Physics, Central Visayan Institute Foundation, Jagna, Bohol 6308 (Philippines); Carpio-Bernido, M. Victoria [Research Center for Theoretical Physics, Central Visayan Institute Foundation, Jagna, Bohol 6308 (Philippines); Escobido, Matthew G.O. [W. Sycip Graduate School of Business, Asian Institute of Management, 123 Paseo de Roxas Ave., Makati City 1260 (Philippines)

    2014-06-13

    Fluctuations in a time series for tropical cyclone tracks are investigated based on an exponentially modified Brownian motion. The mean square displacement (MSD) is evaluated and compared to a recent work on cyclone tracks based on fractional Brownian motion (fBm). Unlike the work based on fBm, the present approach is found to capture the behavior of MSD versus time graphs for cyclones even for large values of time. - Highlights: • Cyclone track fluctuations are modeled as stochastic processes with memory. • Stochastic memory functions beyond fractional Brownian motion are introduced. • The model captures the behavior of cyclone track fluctuations for longer periods of time. • The approach can model time series for other fluctuating phenomena.

  3. Correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns at Yale University, New Haven, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Doolittle

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns in internal medicine, primary care, and internal medicine/pediatrics residency programs at two institutions. Methods: Intern physicians completed anonymous voluntary surveys prior to starting the internship in June 2009 and in the middle of the internship in February 2010. Three validated survey instruments were used to explore burnout, coping, and spiritual attitudes: the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the COPE Inventory, and the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale. The interns were in programs at the Yale University School of Medicine and a Yale-affiliated community hospital, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Results: The prevalence of self-identified burnout prior to starting the internship was 1/66 (1.5% in June 2009, increasing to 10/53 (18.9% in February 2010 (P<0.0001. From June 2009 to February 2010, the prevalence of high emotional exhaustion increased from 30/66 (45.5% to 45/53 (84.9% (P<0.0001, and that of high depersonalization increased from 42/66 (63.6% to 45/53 (84.9% (P=0.01. Interns who employed the strategies of acceptance and active coping were less likely to experience emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (P<0.05. Perceptions of high personal accomplishment was 75.5% and was positively correlated with total scores on the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale, as well as the internal/fluid and existential/meditative domains of that instrument. Specific behaviors did not impact burnout. Conclusion: Burnout increased during the intern year. Acceptance, active coping, and spirituality were correlated with less burnout. Specific behaviors were not correlated with burnout domains.

  4. Correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns at Yale University, New Haven, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Benjamin R; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns in internal medicine, primary care, and internal medicine/pediatrics residency programs at two institutions. Intern physicians completed anonymous voluntary surveys prior to starting the internship in June 2009 and in the middle of the internship in February 2010. Three validated survey instruments were used to explore burnout, coping, and spiritual attitudes: the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the COPE Inventory, and the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale. The interns were in programs at the Yale University School of Medicine and a Yale-affiliated community hospital, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. The prevalence of self-identified burnout prior to starting the internship was 1/66 (1.5%) in June 2009, increasing to 10/53 (18.9%) in February 2010 (P<0.0001). From June 2009 to February 2010, the prevalence of high emotional exhaustion increased from 30/66 (45.5%) to 45/53 (84.9%) (P<0.0001), and that of high depersonalization increased from 42/66 (63.6%) to 45/53 (84.9%) (P=0.01). Interns who employed the strategies of acceptance and active coping were less likely to experience emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (P<0.05). Perceptions of high personal accomplishment was 75.5% and was positively correlated with total scores on the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale, as well as the internal/fluid and existential/meditative domains of that instrument. Specific behaviors did not impact burnout. Burnout increased during the intern year. Acceptance, active coping, and spirituality were correlated with less burnout. Specific behaviors were not correlated with burnout domains.

  5. Perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Melaku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors of preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pharmacy clerkship students and preceptors during June 2014 and December 2015. A 52-item structured questionnaire was self-administered to 126 students and 23 preceptors. The responses are presented using descriptive statistics. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test the significance of differences between students and preceptors. The response rate was 89.4% for students and 95.6% for preceptors. Statistically significant differences were observed in the responses regarding two of the five communication skills that were examined, six of the 26 clinical skills, and five of the 21 parameters involving feedback. The mean scores of preceptors (2.6/3 and students (1.9/3 regarding instructors’ ability to answer questions were found to be significantly different (P= 0.01. Students and preceptors gave mean scores of 1.9 and 2.8, respectively, to a question regarding preceptors’ application of appropriate up-to-date knowledge to individual patients (P= 0.00. Significant differences were also noted between students and instructors regarding the degree to which preceptors encouraged students to evaluate their own performance (P= 0.01. Discrepancies were noted between students and preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors. Preceptors rated their teaching behaviors more highly than students did. Short-term training is warranted for preceptors to improve some aspects of their teaching skills.

  6. Animal health care seeking behavior of pets or livestock owners and knowledge and awareness on zoonoses in a university community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosanya, Emmanuel J; Akande, H O

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the attitude of pets or livestock owning households in a university community to animal health care services and assessed the knowledge and awareness level of the residents on zoonoses. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, pet or livestock ownership, animal health care seeking behavior, awareness and knowledge of zoonoses from 246 households. We did descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis to determine the level of association in discrete variables between owners and non-owners of pets or livestock at a significant level of panimal health care seeking behavior of the 80 pets or livestock owners in terms of treatment and vaccination was 70%. Of the 56 (70%) who provided health care services for their animals, about 48 (85.7%) engaged the services of a veterinarian. Dog owning households (42) had the highest frequency of treating their pets against endoparasites (97.6%); ectoparasites (81%) and vaccination against diseases (73.8%). Of the 246 respondents, only 47 (19.1%) have heard of the term zoonoses. Of the considered zoonoses; their awareness of rabies (79.3%) was the highest, followed by Lassa fever (66.3%), the least was pasteurellosis with 18.7%. Having pets or livestock was significantly associated (p=0.04) with rabies awareness. However, there is no significant difference in the level of awareness of zoonoses; knowledge of zoonoses, knowledge of prevention of zoonoses and knowledge of risk of zoonoses between owners and non-owners of pets or livestock. The animal health care seeking behavior of households with pets or livestock is good and should be encouraged. Public education should be created for other zoonoses aside from rabies, Lassa fever, and avian influenza.

  7. Magnetic fluctuations associated with density fluctuations in the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Gentle, K.W.; Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic density and potential fluctuations occurring with high amplitude near the edge of a tokamak are correlated with components of the fluctuating magnetic field measured outside the limiter radius. It has been established that this turbulence is associated with fluctuations in current as well as density and potential. The correlation extends for substantial toroidal distances, but only if the probes are displaced approximately along field lines, consistent with the short coherence lengths poloidally but long coherence lengths parallel to the field which are characteristic for this turbulence. Furthermore, the correlation can be found only with density fluctuations measured inside the limiter radius; density fluctuations behind the limiter have no detectable magnetic concomitant for the toroidally spaced probes used here. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 12 refs, 3 figs

  8. Fluctuations and the nuclear Meissner effect in rapidly rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, L F; Ring, P; Rasmussen, J O

    1985-10-24

    The phase transition from a superfluid system to a normal fluid system in nuclei under the influence of a strong Coriolis field is investigated by the generator coordinate method (GCM). The strange behavior of the experimental moments of inertia in the nucleus WYHf is well reproduced in this theory. The pairing collapse of the neutrons, however, is completely washed out by the fluctuations. It is found that the fluctuations of the orientation in gauge space, taken into account by number projection before the variation play the most important role. Fluctuations connected with the virtual admixture of pairing vibrations add only small corrections. (orig.).

  9. Theoretical studies on rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the emission of solar bursts may have many different origins, e.g., the acceleration process can have a pulsating structure, the propagation of energetic electrons and ions can be interrupted from plasma instabilities and finally the electromagnetic radiation produced by the interaction of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves may have a pulsating behavior in time. In two separate studies the conditions for rapid fluctuations in solar flare driven emission were analyzed

  10. Theoretical studies on rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    1986-01-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the emission of solar bursts may have many different origins e.g., the acceleration process can have a pulsating structure, the propagation of energetic electrons and ions can be interrupted from plasma instabilities and finally the electromagnetic radiation produced by the interaction of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves may have a pulsating behavior in time. In two separate studies the conditions for rapid fluctuations in solar flare driven emission were analyzed.

  11. Extremal-point densities of interface fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroczkai, Z.; Korniss, G.; Das Sarma, S.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2000-01-01

    We introduce and investigate the stochastic dynamics of the density of local extrema (minima and maxima) of nonequilibrium surface fluctuations. We give a number of analytic results for interface fluctuations described by linear Langevin equations, and for on-lattice, solid-on-solid surface-growth models. We show that, in spite of the nonuniversal character of the quantities studied, their behavior against the variation of the microscopic length scales can present generic features, characteristic of the macroscopic observables of the system. The quantities investigated here provide us with tools that give an unorthodox approach to the dynamics of surface morphologies: a statistical analysis from the short-wavelength end of the Fourier decomposition spectrum. In addition to surface-growth applications, our results can be used to solve the asymptotic scalability problem of massively parallel algorithms for discrete-event simulations, which are extensively used in Monte Carlo simulations on parallel architectures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  13. Factors Related to the Sexual Behaviors among Youth in Universities Located in the Eastern Region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongnopakun, Saowanee; Maharachpong, Nipa; Abdullakasim, Pajaree

    2016-01-01

    Youth is a "crisis period", as it is a transitional period between childhood and adulthood. This period incites the youth to have curiosity, especially to sexual contents. As a result, they have higher risk behavior leading to the percentage of newly HIV infected persons among youth in the eastern region that is proportionally higher. This research aimed to study factors related to sexual health behaviors among youth in universities located in the eastern region of Thailand. This research was a cross-sectional survey research. The data collection process was conducted from June-September 2011. There were 405 informants, who participated in this study. They were students from both government and private universities in the eastern region. The age of the youth was 20-24 years old. The students' field of study varied. The tool of the study was self-answered questionnaires. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and presented as frequency, percentage, average score, deviation standard scale, and it was analyzed by Crude odds ratio. It was found that three-fifths of the youth already had sexual experiences, and more than half did not use condoms during their first-time sex. Regarding sexual behavior, it was found that almost one-fourth of the students did not use condoms at any time when they had sex, and did not negotiate for safer safe when they had sex. The statistical significance was (p = 0.012, Crude OR = 1.65). Youth who already had sex had more chances to have unprotected sex than those who never had sex (p = 0.014, Crude OR = 1.64). Youth who had casual sex partner(s) had more chances to have unprotected sex than youth who did not have casual sex partner(s) (p = 0.026, Crude OR = 1.78). Youth who had little knowledge on AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases would have more chances to have unprotected sex than youth who had high level of knowledge on these topics (p = 0.010, Crude OR = 2.83). Youth who had negative attitudes towards

  14. Charge Fluctuations in Nanoscale Capacitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limmer, D.T.; Merlet, C.; Salanne, M.; Chandler, D.; Madden, P.A.; van Roij, R.H.H.G.; Rotenberg, B.

    2013-01-01

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with

  15. Fluctuating attention in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Aarsland, Dag; Janvin, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Lewy body dementia (DLB), which share many clinical and pathological features with Parkinson’s disease (PD), is charac- terised by marked fluctuations in cognition and consciousness. Fluctuating cognition has not been formally studied in PD, although some studies indicate that PD patients show...

  16. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in a resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, N; Ciliberto, S

    2005-06-01

    In small systems where relevant energies are comparable to thermal agitation, fluctuations are of the order of average values. In systems in thermodynamical equilibrium, the variance of these fluctuations can be related to the dissipation constant in the system, exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In nonequilibrium steady systems, fluctuations theorems (FT) additionally describe symmetry properties of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations of injected and dissipated energies. We experimentally probe a model system: an electrical dipole driven out of equilibrium by a small constant current I, and show that FT are experimentally accessible and valid. Furthermore, we stress that FT can be used to measure the dissipated power P = R I2 in the system by just studying the PDFs' symmetries.

  17. A universal approach to the study of nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2004-07-01

    A large variety of nonlinear systems have been treated by a common approach that emphasizes the fluctuation of spatial patterns. By using the same method of analysis it is possible to discuss the chaotic behaviors of quark jets and logistic map in the same language. Critical behaviors of quark-hadron phase transition in heavy-ion collisions and of photon production at the threshold of lasing can also be described by a common scaling behavior. The universal approach also makes possible an insight into the recently discovered phenomenon of wind reversal in cryogenic turbulence as a manifestation of self-organized criticality.

  18. The Importance of Leadership Behavior and Motivation İn Creating Employee Performance: (A Study at the Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Brawijaya)

    OpenAIRE

    Abdo-Alaziz H. E Mihrez; Armanu Thoyib

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted at the faculty of economics and business, Brawijaya University which aimed to determine whether there is a direct effect of leadership behavior on intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and employee performance. In addition, it was done to determine the effect of indirect leadership behavior on employee performance through intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. In this study, the data were collected using a questionnaire with Likert scale, and then distributed to...

  19. Quantum fluctuations from thermal fluctuations in Jacobson formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Ashour, Amani; Alcheikh, Mohammad [Damascus University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Alasfar, Lina [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Alsaleh, Salwa; Mahroussah, Ahmed [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-09-15

    In the Jacobson formalism general relativity is obtained from thermodynamics. This is done by using the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. However, as a black hole gets smaller, its temperature will increase. This will cause the thermal fluctuations to also increase, and these will in turn correct the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. Furthermore, with the reduction in the size of the black hole, quantum effects will also start to dominate. Just as the general relativity can be obtained from thermodynamics in the Jacobson formalism, we propose that the quantum fluctuations to the geometry can be obtained from thermal fluctuations. (orig.)

  20. The Effect of Peer Education upon Breast Self-Examination Behaviors and Self-Esteem among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayran, Gulsun; Fırat, Meryem; Kucukakca, Gulden; Cuneydioğlu, Beyazıt; Tahta, Kubra; Avcı, Esra

    2017-01-01

    Objective The current study was semi-experimentally designed in order to identify the effect of peer education upon breast self-examination (BSE) behaviors and self-esteem among university students. Materials and methods The study was undertaken with 100 female students who studied at Erzincan University. Peer educators were recruited from the 4th year students. The data were collected with a questionnaire form, BSE skill form and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale in two phases one month before and after the BSE peer education. For the data assessment; percentage distributions, frequency, mean, standard deviation and Simple T test were employed. Results The mean age of the participant students was 20.45±1.67 year and all of them were single. It was found that during the first data collection phase, only 16 % of the students performed BSE while during the final data collection phase, the rate of the students performing BSE rose to 77 %. During the first data collection phase, students received a mean score of 2.36±4.13 from BSE skill form while during the last data collection phase they had a mean score of 10.70±3.40 from BSE skill form. When the scores obtained from Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale by the students were examined, it was seen that they received a mean score of 1.20±1.34 during the first data collection phase while they had a mean score of 0.84±1.07 during the final data collection phase. Conclusion Although short-term feedback was obtained, it was noted that students’ BSE knowledge and skills increased considerably. PMID:28894853

  1. The Effect of Peer Education upon Breast Self-Examination Behaviors and Self-Esteem among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayran, Gulsun; Fırat, Meryem; Kucukakca, Gulden; Cuneydioğlu, Beyazıt; Tahta, Kubra; Avcı, Esra

    2017-07-01

    The current study was semi-experimentally designed in order to identify the effect of peer education upon breast self-examination (BSE) behaviors and self-esteem among university students. The study was undertaken with 100 female students who studied at Erzincan University. Peer educators were recruited from the 4th year students. The data were collected with a questionnaire form, BSE skill form and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale in two phases one month before and after the BSE peer education. For the data assessment; percentage distributions, frequency, mean, standard deviation and Simple T test were employed. The mean age of the participant students was 20.45±1.67 year and all of them were single. It was found that during the first data collection phase, only 16 % of the students performed BSE while during the final data collection phase, the rate of the students performing BSE rose to 77 %. During the first data collection phase, students received a mean score of 2.36±4.13 from BSE skill form while during the last data collection phase they had a mean score of 10.70±3.40 from BSE skill form. When the scores obtained from Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale by the students were examined, it was seen that they received a mean score of 1.20±1.34 during the first data collection phase while they had a mean score of 0.84±1.07 during the final data collection phase. Although short-term feedback was obtained, it was noted that students' BSE knowledge and skills increased considerably.

  2. Overestimation of own body weights in female university students: associations with lifestyles, weight control behaviors and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miso; Lee, Hongmie

    2010-12-01

    The study aimed to analyze the lifestyles, weight control behavior, dietary habits, and depression of female university students. The subjects were 532 students from 8 universities located in 4 provinces in Korea. According to percent ideal body weight, 33 (6.4%), 181 (34.0%), 283 (53.2%), 22 (4.1%) and 13 (2.5%) were severely underweight, underweight, normal, overweight and obese, respectively, based on self-reported height and weight. As much as 64.1% and only 2.4%, respectively, overestimated and underestimated their body weight status. Six overweight subjects were excluded from overestimation group for the purpose of this study, resulting in overestimation group consisting of only underweight and normal weight subjects. Compared to those from the normal perception group, significantly more subjects from the overestimation group were currently smoking (P = 0.017) and drank more often than once a week (P = 0.015), without any significant differences in dietary habits. Despite similar BMIs, subjects who overestimated their own weight statuses had significantly higher weight dissatisfaction (P = 0.000), obesity stress (P = 0.000), obsession to lose weight (P = 0.007) and depression (P = 0.018). Also, more of them wanted to lose weight (P = 0.000), checked their body weights more often than once a week (P = 0.025) and had dieting experiences using 'reducing meal size' (P = 0.012), 'reducing snacks' (P = 0.042) and 'taking prescribed pills' (P = 0.032), and presented 'for a wider range of clothes selection' as the reason for weight loss (P = 0.039), although none was actually overweight or obese. Unlike the case with overestimating one's own weight, being overweight was associated with less drinking (P = 0.035) and exercising more often (P = 0.001) and for longer (P = 0.001) and healthier reasons for weight control (P = 0.002), despite no differences in frequency of weighing and depression. The results showed that weight overestimation, independent of weight status

  3. Voltage fluctuations in neurons: signal or noise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Yosef; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss noise-free neuronal signaling and detrimental and beneficial forms of noise in large-scale functional neural networks. Evidence that noise and variability in some cases go hand in hand with behavioral variability and increase behavioral choice, richness, and adaptability opens new avenues......Noise and variability are fundamental companions to ion channels and synapses and thus inescapable elements of brain function. The overriding unresolved issue is to what extent noise distorts and limits signaling on one hand and at the same time constitutes a crucial and fundamental enrichment...... that allows and facilitates complex adaptive behavior in an unpredictable world. Here we review the growing experimental evidence that functional network activity is associated with intense fluctuations in membrane potential and spike timing. We trace origins and consequences of noise and variability. Finally...

  4. Prácticas y comportamientos sexuales en estudiantes universitarios Sexual behaviors and Practices among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN MANUEL OSPINA DÍAZ

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Desde 1995 se validaron estudios de tipo descriptivo, como necesidad de investigar previamente a las intervenciones educativas, dada la pluralidad cultural que descalifica modelos de aplicación universal en lo referente a la educación sexual. Objetivo: Describir prácticas y comportamientos sexuales en estudiantes universitarios de la UPTC de Tunja. Métodos: Estudio de corte transversal, muestreo secuencial, muestra de 764 estudiantes. En Epiinfo 2002® se estiman frecuencias, cruce de variables, porcentajes. Resultados: Edad promedio: 20,4 años; 56,7% mujeres; 82,8% clase media-baja; 79,7% católico o cristiano; para resolver intimidades, 11,4% confía en el padre, 33,5% en la madre; apenas 36,2% tiene 100% de certeza de evitar un embarazo no deseado y27%,de contraeruna ETS. 61,2% considera necesario incrementar sus conocimientos sexuales; 40,5% ha tenido al menos una laguna alcohólica; 30% ha tenido sexo no deseado, al menos una vez, bajo el efecto del alcohol. Razón global de fertilidad: 25,4%. 45,3% de embarazos termina en aborto provocado. Conclusiones: Problemas más relevantes: altas tasas de fecundidad, natalidad y aborto provocado, elevado consumo de alcohol.Introduction: Since 1995 we validated descriptive studies, as a need to research prior educational interventions, given the cultural plurality that disqualifies the application of universal models in as far as sexual education. Purpose: Describing practices and sexual behavior of university students of the UPTC, in the city of Tunja. Methods: transversal cut, sequential sampling study with a sample of 764 students. In the Epiinfo 2002® they estimated frequencies, cross variables, percentages. Results: Average age: 20,4 years; 56,7% females; 82,8% lower middle class; 79,7% catholic o Christian; when solving intimacy matters, 11,4% trust the father, 33,5% on the mother; only 36,2% have 100% certainty to avoidaundesiredpregnancy and 27% in contracting a STD. 61

  5. Concentration fluctuations in gas releases by industrial accidents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Chatwin, P.C.; Joergensen, H.E.; Mole, N.; Munro, R.J.; Ott, S.

    2002-05-01

    The COFIN project studied existing remote-sensing Lidar data on concentration fluctuations in atmospheric dispersion from continuous sources at ground level. Fluctuations are described by stochastic models developed by a combination of statistical analyses and surface-layer scaling. The statistical moments and probability density distribution of the fluctuations are most accurately determined in a frame of reference following the instantaneous plume centreline. The spatial distribution of these moments is universal with a gaussian core and exponential tails. The instantaneous plume width is fluctuating with a log-normal distribution. The position of the instantaneous plume centre-line is modelled by a normal distribution and a Langevin equation, by which the meander effect on the time-averaged plume width is predicted. Fixed-frame statistics are modelled by convolution of moving-frame statistics and the probability distribution for the plume centreline. The distance-neighbour function generalized for higher-order statistics has a universal exponential shape. Simulation tools for concentration fluctuations have been developed for either multiple correlated time series or multi-dimensional fields. These tools are based on Karhunen-Loeve expansion and Fourier transformations using iterative or correlation-distortion techniques. The input to the simulation is the probability distribution of the individual processes, assumed stationary, and the cross-correlations of all signal combinations. The use in practical risk assessment is illustrated by implementation of a typical heavy-gas dispersion model, enhanced for prediction and simulation of concentration fluctuations. (au)

  6. Current density fluctuations and ambipolarity of transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, W.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.

    1991-10-01

    The fluctuation in the plasma current density is measured in the MIST reversed field pinch experiment. Such fluctuations, and the measured radial profile of the k spectrum of magnetic fluctuations, supports the view and that low frequency fluctuations (f r >) demonstrates that radial particle transport from particle motion parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field is ambipolar over the full frequency range

  7. Healthy Life Style Behaviors of University Students of School of Physical Education and Sports in Terms of Body Mass Index and Other Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozlar, Volkan; Arslanoglu, Cansel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of students in the Schools of Physical Education and Sport (SPES) utilizing Body Mass Index (BMI) and other various variables. The study is composed of 1,695 students studying in SPES, in 14 different universities across Turkey. It is made up of 1,067 male and 624 female students.…

  8. Test Review for Preschool-Wide Evaluation Tool (PreSET) Manual: Assessing Universal Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    The Preschool-Wide Evaluation Tool (PreSET; Steed & Pomerleau, 2012) is published by Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company in Baltimore, MD. The PreSET purports to measure universal and program-wide features of early childhood programs' implementation fidelity of program-wide positive behavior intervention and support (PW-PBIS) and is,…

  9. Impact of a universal intervention targeting childhood disruptive behavior problems on tobacco and alcohol initiation from age 10 to 13 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, P.A.C.; Huizink, A.C.; Crijnen, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The distal impact of a school based universal preventive intervention targeting disruptive behavior problems on tobacco and alcohol use from age 10 to 13 years was explored. Second grade classrooms (children aged 7 years) were randomly assigned to the intervention or a control condition. Tobacco and

  10. Educational Cloud Services and the Mathematics Confidence, Affective Engagement, and Behavioral Engagement of Mathematics Education Students in Public University in Benue State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iji, Clement Onwu; Abah, Joshua Abah; Anyor, Joseph Wuave

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of cloud services on mathematics education students' mathematics confidence, affective engagement, and behavioral engagement in public universities in Benue State, Nigeria. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. The instrument for the study was the researcher-developed Cloud Services Mathematics…

  11. Alumni Giving: A Case Study of the Factors That Influence Philanthropic Behavior of Alumni Donors of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Rasheed, Lupita D.

    2012-01-01

    This research project was a study of the philanthropic behavior of local alumni donors at two historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the South Central Region. Specifically, the research explored HBCUs' local alumni donors' experiences, perceptions, triggers, and motivations and how these factors influence alumni giving. This…

  12. The Relationship of Organizational Citizenship Behavior with Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment of Nurses among Public Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dargahi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Considering the undesirable aspects of the research among nurses of Tehran University of Medical Sciences hospitals, It is recommended to improve the quality of work life, preventing burnout and creating an appropriate organizational atmosphere for nurses in the workplace. However, organizational justice, and other organizational variables should be assessed for improving of organizational citizenship behavior.  

  13. Effectiveness of peer-led education on knowledge, attitude and risk behavior practices related to HIV among students at a Malaysian public university--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Normala; Rampal, Lekhraj; Jamil, Zubaidah; Zain, Azhar Mohd

    2012-11-01

    Develop, implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led education program related to HIV/AIDS among university students. randomized controlled trial with 276 university students at Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang in 2011. A peer-led education program on HIV prevention by university students. differences in knowledge, attitude and risk behavior practices related to HIV between baselines, immediate follow-up after intervention and after three months. Significant improvement in sound knowledge in the intervention group as compared to the control group (Odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI 1.01, 3.00; p=0.04) and improvement in good attitude related to HIV (Odds ratio 2.22; 95% CI 1.37, 3.61; p=0.01). The odds of high substance risk behavior was significantly reduced in the intervention group as compared to the control group (Odds ratio 0.07; 95% CI 0.02, 0.34; p=0.01). The association between good knowledge and intervention was modified by the different time points (baseline, immediately after intervention and 3 months after intervention), ethnicity and gender. Peer-led education program in HIV prevention improves knowledge, attitude and substance risk behavior. Changes in sexual risk behavior may require a longer follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive Vocational Personality Questionnaire Development and Validation of an adaptive personality questionnaire to analyze the vocational behavior of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Gómez-Artiga

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a personality evaluation instrument adapted to the vocational setting: the Adaptive Vocational Personality Questionnaire (AVPQ. The questionnaire was developed and tested in a sample of 2160 university students in the final years of their degree programs. The purpose of the study is to validate the questionnaire, providing evidence about its internal structure and its usefulness for predicting scores on a criterion scale. A confirmatory factor analysis combined with a cross-validation design was used: the exploratory sample (n = 879 helped to identify the model with the factorial structure that best fit the relations among the items. As expected, this model had two related but clearly separate factors: Adaptive Personality Characteristics (AC with 9 items and Non-Adaptive Personality Characteristics (NAC with 11 items. The validation sample (n =932 was used to test the generalization capacity of this model, which was satisfactory and showed a good reliability index. Regarding its usefulness in predicting proactive job-search behaviors, the results were also satisfactory. The questionnaire and keys are provided, as well as the criteria for calculating the scores on each scale and on the entire questionnaire.

  15. Efficiencies and coefficients of performance of heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps with friction: a universal limiting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, João P S; Rodrigues, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    For work-producing heat engines, or work-consuming refrigerators and heat pumps, the percentage decrease caused by friction in their efficiencies, or coefficients of performance (COP's), is approximately given by the ratio W(fric)/W between the work spent against friction forces and the work performed by, or delivered to, the working fluid. This universal scaling, which applies in the limit of small friction (W(fric)/W heat-engine efficiencies), allows a simple and quick estimate of the impact that friction losses can have on the FOM's of thermal engines and plants, or of the level of those losses from the observed and predicted FOM's. In the case of refrigerators and heat pumps, if W(fric)/W heat engines), the COP percentage decrease due to friction approaches asymptotically (W(fric)/W)/(1+W(fric)/W) instead of W(fric)/W. Estimates for the level of frictional losses using the Carnot (or, for heat engines and power plants only, the Curzon-Ahlborn) predictions and observed FOM's of real power plants, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps show that they usually operate in domains where these behaviors are valid.

  16. Effects of Contextual Factors on Information Seeking Behavior on the Web by Postgraduate Students at Kerman University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rahimi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the influence of contextual factors on information seeking behavior. This survey investigates search tactics used and users’ perceptions of the search results on the Web by postgraduate students at Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted through a mixed method. Thirty postgraduate students voluntarily participated. The study was carried out in the first semester of the academic year 2012-2013. The data was gathered using two questionnaires and log files recorded with Camtasia Studio software. The findings indicated more than half of the participants (53.3 percent used Google, short queries were more used than long queries, advanced search options were used rarely (23 percent, and the participants view few search result pages. According to the results, the contextual factors significantly influenced the search time, search tactics (including querying and navigating and users’ perceptions of the search results (including ease of use, usefulness, satisfaction and relevance judgment. Navigating tactic was primarily used by the participants. Among different aspects of users’ perceptions of the search results, ease of use and relevance judgments were significantly different based on the contextual factors, whereas scanning, extracting, and confidence were less affected by the contextual factors. The findings suggest practical implications for information retrieval systems designers that can design of systems with better user interface in order to meet the needs of users with different knowledge and skills, in this way it leads in promotion of search process and improvement of search results quality.

  17. Bi-stability resistant to fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruel, M.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2017-12-01

    We study a simple micro-mechanical device that does not lose its snap-through behavior in an environment dominated by fluctuations. The main idea is to have several degrees of freedom that can cooperatively resist the de-synchronizing effect of random perturbations. As an inspiration we use the power stroke machinery of skeletal muscles, which ensures at sub-micron scales and finite temperatures a swift recovery of an abruptly applied slack. In addition to hypersensitive response at finite temperatures, our prototypical Brownian snap spring also exhibits criticality at special values of parameters which is another potentially interesting property for micro-scale engineering applications.

  18. Localized description of valence fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alascio, B.; Allub, R.; Aligia, A.

    1979-07-01

    The authors set up a model for intermediate valence equivalent to the ''atomic'' limit of the Anderson Hamiltonian. Detailed analysis of this model shows that most of the essential characteristics of valence fluctuators are already present in this crudely simplified Hamiltonian. The spin-spin and the 4f charge-charge correlation functions are studied and it is shown that it is possible to define a spin fluctuation frequency ωsub(s.f.) and a charge fluctuation frequency ωsub(ch.f.).ωsub(s.f.) and ωsub(ch.f.) can differ considerably for some values of the parameters of the model. The magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are calculated as functions of temperature and it is shown how the results simulate the behaviour found in valence fluctuators. (author)

  19. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Terradas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and ecophysiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and interannual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  20. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terradas, J.; Penuelas, J.; Lloret, F.; Penuelas, J.

    2009-01-01

    Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and eco physiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and inter annual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  1. Insects in fluctuating thermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Hervé; Sinclair, Brent J; Vernon, Philippe; Renault, David

    2015-01-07

    All climate change scenarios predict an increase in both global temperature means and the magnitude of seasonal and diel temperature variation. The nonlinear relationship between temperature and biological processes means that fluctuating temperatures lead to physiological, life history, and ecological consequences for ectothermic insects that diverge from those predicted from constant temperatures. Fluctuating temperatures that remain within permissive temperature ranges generally improve performance. By contrast, those which extend to stressful temperatures may have either positive impacts, allowing repair of damage accrued during exposure to thermal extremes, or negative impacts from cumulative damage during successive exposures. We discuss the mechanisms underlying these differing effects. Fluctuating temperatures could be used to enhance or weaken insects in applied rearing programs, and any prediction of insect performance in the field-including models of climate change or population performance-must account for the effect of fluctuating temperatures.

  2. Nonequilibrium quantum fluctuations of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-09-01

    The concept of work is basic for statistical thermodynamics. To gain a fuller understanding of work and its (quantum) features, it needs to be represented as an average of a fluctuating quantity. Here I focus on the work done between two moments of time for a thermally isolated quantum system driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. I formulate two natural conditions needed for the fluctuating work to be physically meaningful for a system that starts its evolution from a nonequilibrium state. The existing definitions do not satisfy these conditions due to issues that are traced back to noncommutativity. I propose a definition of fluctuating work that is free of previous drawbacks and that applies for a wide class of nonequilibrium initial states. It allows the deduction of a generalized work-fluctuation theorem that applies for an arbitrary (out-of-equilibrium) initial state.

  3. Quantum fluctuations in insulating ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: It has been proposed that in a ferroelectric insulator, an applied magnetic field may couple the transverse phonon modes and produce left and right circularly polarized phonon modes which are no longer degenerate. We quantize the theory and examine the effects of quantal fluctuations. In particular, we show that the zero point fluctuations result in a large diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility. - Abstract: It has been proposed that in a ferroelectric insulator, an applied magnetic field may couple the transverse phonon modes and produce left and right circularly polarized phonon modes which are no longer degenerate. We quantize the theory and examine the effects of quantal fluctuations. In particular, we show that the zero-point fluctuations result in a large diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility.

  4. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  5. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    -stiffening behavior and compare this behavior to the yield stress flow seen in soft glassy fluids. I extend this theory to account for coordination number inhomogeneities and predict a breakdown of universal scaling near the critical point at sufficiently high disorder, and discuss the utility for this type of model in describing biopolymer networks.

  6. Principle of minimal work fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality 〈e-βW〉=e-βΔF, a change in the fluctuations of e-βW may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-βW converges towards the theoretical value e-βΔF, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and ΔF is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014)].

  7. Quantum critical scaling and fluctuations in Kondo lattice materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-feng; Pines, David; Lonzarich, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological framework for three classes of Kondo lattice materials that incorporates the interplay between the fluctuations associated with the antiferromagnetic quantum critical point and those produced by the hybridization quantum critical point that marks the end of local moment behavior. We show that these fluctuations give rise to two distinct regions of quantum critical scaling: Hybridization fluctuations are responsible for the logarithmic scaling in the density of states of the heavy electron Kondo liquid that emerges below the coherence temperature T∗, whereas the unconventional power law scaling in the resistivity that emerges at lower temperatures below TQC may reflect the combined effects of hybridization and antiferromagnetic quantum critical fluctuations. Our framework is supported by experimental measurements on CeCoIn5, CeRhIn5, and other heavy electron materials. PMID:28559308

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation relations for small systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Liang; Ke Pu; Qiao Li-Yan; Zheng Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we give a retrospect of the recent progress in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and thermodynamics in small dynamical systems. For systems with only a few number of particles, fluctuations and nonlinearity become significant and contribute to the nonequilibrium behaviors of the systems, hence the statistical properties and thermodynamics should be carefully studied. We review recent developments of this topic by starting from the Gallavotti—Cohen fluctuation theorem, and then to the Evans—Searles transient fluctuation theorem, Jarzynski free-energy equality, and the Crooks fluctuation relation. We also investigate the nonequilibrium free energy theorem for trajectories involving changes of the heat bath temperature and propose a generalized free-energy relation. It should be noticed that the non-Markovian property of the heat bath may lead to the violation of the free-energy relation. (topical review - statistical physics and complex systems)

  9. Holocene glacial fluctuations in southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynhout, S.; Sagredo, E. A.; Kaplan, M. R.; Aravena, J. C.; Martini, M. A.; Strelin, J. A.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the timing and magnitude of former glacier fluctuations is critical to decipher long-term climatic trends and to unravel both natural cycles and human impact on the current glacial behavior. Despite more than seven decades of research efforts, a unifying model of Holocene glacial fluctuations in Southern South America remains elusive. Here, we present the state-of-the-art regarding the timing of Holocene glacial fluctuation in southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego, with a focus on a new generation of high-resolution radiocarbon and 10Be surface exposure dating chronologies. Recently acquired evidence suggest that after receding from advanced Late Glacial positions, Patagonian glaciers were for the most part close to, or even behind, present ice margins during the Early Holocene. On the other hand, emerging chronologies indicate that in some areas there were extensive expansions (century scale?) that punctuated the warm interval. Subsequently, we have evidence of multiple millennial timescale glacial advances starting in the middle Holocene. Several glacial maxima are defined by moraines and other landforms from 7000 years ago to the 19th century, with a gap sometime between 4,500 and 2,500 years ago. The last set of advances began around 800-600 years ago. Although glacial activity is documented in Patagonia at the same time as the European Little Ice Age, the extent of these glacial events are less prominent than those of the mid-Holocene. The causes that may explain these glacial fluctuations remain elusive. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to better define the timing and extent of Holocene glaciations in southern South America, and to establish the basis to test competing hypothesis of regional Holocene climate variability.

  10. X-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy in the energy range from 1 to 4 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retsch, C.C.

    2001-06-01

    X-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy was developed in the energy range of 1 to 4 keV and was used to study complex sample structures and dynamics in a liquid-crystal - aerosil dispersion. The advantages of a focusing versus a nonfocusing setup were explored, and the effects of using X-ray energies near absorption edges were investigated to enhance the capabilities of the method. It was found that even though excellent real space resolution and an increase in flux density can be gained from a Fresnel zone plate focusing setup, this usually comes at the expense of speckle contrast. At absorption edges, the speckle contrast is dominated by the imaginary part of the sample's index of refraction and therefore varies in a way similar to the total transmitted intensity. Employing these results, the dynamics of a dispersion of low-density silica aerosil in octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) were studied. It was found that the known cross-over behavior of 8CB - aerosil samples towards the 3d-XY universality class should be understood as the coupling of the aerosil-gel dynamics to the dynamics of the director fluctuations in the liquid-crystal. This work indicates that the aerosil-gel mimics and dampens these director fluctuations and thus, by suppressing the director fluctuations, achieves a pure 3d-XY system. (orig.)

  11. Near-Milne realization of scale-invariant fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magueijo, Joao

    2007-01-01

    A near-Milne universe produces a very red spectrum of vacuum quantum fluctuations but has the potential to produce near-scale-invariant thermal fluctuations. This happens if the energy and entropy are mildly subextensive, for example, if there is a Casimir contribution. Therefore, one does not need to invoke corrections to Einstein gravity (as in loop quantum cosmology) for a thermal scenario to be viable. Neither do we need the energy to scale like the area, as in scenarios where the thermal fluctuations are subject to a phase transition in the early universe. Some odd features of this model are pointed out: whether they are fatal or merely unusual will need to be investigated further

  12. The environmental self-management in the university community: a road to propitiate desirable changes in the environmental behaviors of the university youths, from their own cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio García-Tejera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cuban Education System power to the school as a promoter of development center, its social projection includes meeting the educational needs of the community, and community environmental education for sustainable development is inserted into the educational management of the school as cultural center of Higher Education. Consider the space as a community college gives the possibility of self-management actions, with the aim of improving environmental way the university community, using experiences that characterize the cultural practices of the university. For non-formal way contributes to environmental training, to stimulate responsibility for the planning and implementation of methods that characterize the management of their environment.

  13. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  14. Scalar metric fluctuations in space-time matter inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anabitarte, Mariano; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Using the Ponce de Leon background metric, which describes a 5D universe in an apparent vacuum: G-bar AB =0, we study the effective 4D evolution of both, the inflaton and gauge-invariant scalar metric fluctuations, in the recently introduced model of space-time matter inflation

  15. Fluctuation analysis of rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doessing, T.; Bracco, A.; Broglia, R.A.; Matsuo, M.

    1996-01-01

    The compound state rotational degree of freedom is ''damped'' in the sense that the electric quadrupole decay of a single quantum state with angular momentum I exhibits a spectrum of final states all having spin I-2. In actual experiments, the cascade of γ-rays associated with each of the members of the ensemble of compound nuclei uses each of the ''discrete'' transitions many more times than the ''continuum'' transitions. Relatively large and small fluctuations in the recorded coincidence spectrum ensue, respectively. The analysis of the fluctuations will be shown to be instrumental to gain insight into the phenomenon of rotational damping. For this purpose, two- and higher-fold coincidence spectra emitted from rotating nuclei are analyzed with respect to the count fluctuations. The coincidences from consecutive γ-rays emitted from discrete rotational bands generate ridges in the E γ1 .E γ2 spectrum, and the fluctuation analysis of the ridges is based upon the ansatz of a random selection of transition energies from band to band. This ansatz is supported by a cranked mean-field calculation for the nucleus 168 Yb, as well as by analyzing resolved bands in 168 Yb and its neighbors. The fluctuation analysis of the central valley (E γ1 =E γ2 ) is based upon the ansatz of fluctuations in the intensity of the transitions of Porter-Thomas type superposed on a smooth spectrum of transition energies. This ansatz is again supported by a mixed-band calculation. The mathematical treatment of count fluctuations is formulated in general (orig.)

  16. Fluctuating asymmetry, sociosexuality, and intrasexual competitive tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J A; Gangestad, S W; Christensen, P N; Leck, K

    1999-01-01

    Heterosexual men and women were told they were competing with another same-sex individual for a date with an attractive opposite-sex interviewer. After answering 6 questions, participants were asked to tell the competitor why the interviewer should choose them over the competitor. Participants' videotaped behavior was coded for different behavioral tactics. Men who were more symmetrical and who had a more unrestricted sociosexual orientation were more likely to use direct competition tactics than were less symmetrical and restricted men. Restricted men accentuated their positive personal qualities, presenting themselves as "nice guys." Structural equation modeling revealed that fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was directly associated with the use of direct competition tactics. However, the link between FA and presenting oneself as a nice guy was mediated through sociosexuality. No effects were found for women.

  17. Gluon Green functions free of quantum fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Athenodorou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports on how the Wilson flow technique can efficaciously kill the short-distance quantum fluctuations of 2- and 3-gluon Green functions, remove the ΛQCD scale and destroy the transition from the confining non-perturbative to the asymptotically-free perturbative sector. After the Wilson flow, the behavior of the Green functions with momenta can be described in terms of the quasi-classical instanton background. The same behavior also occurs, before the Wilson flow, at low-momenta. This last result permits applications as, for instance, the detection of instanton phenomenological properties or a determination of the lattice spacing only from the gauge sector of the theory.

  18. Predictors of Health Promotion Behavior of female Students of Azad Islamic University, Kazerun Branch: Role of Social Support and Health Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheyla Ziaee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Health promoting behaviors and life style at the young age is regarded as very important issues. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between social support and health literacy whit health promoting behaviors among female students in Islamic Azad University, in Kazerun, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, 200 female Azad University students were selected as the sample using random cluster sampling. The required data were collected using the Sarason's Social Support Questionnaire, Health Literacy Questionnaire devised by Montazeri et al., and Walker's Promoting Behaviors Questionnaire.  The data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 22, Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis. Results: Health promoting behaviors and health literacy scores in students were 74.32 and 76.68, respectively. The average for individuals in the students’ social support network was 3.8 ± 1.9 and the mean score of their satisfaction from their own social network was 4.9 ± 1.5. The results obtained from regression analysis showed that health literacy comprised 22.2% of health promoting behaviors while social support demonstrated 17.8% of these behaviors. Conclusion: Though health literacy and health promoting behaviors have been in a desirable condition for students, it seems necessary to carry out health education programs on the basis of the areas of health promoting behaviors and health literacy components as well as assisting students to improve social networking and to moderate their expectations with respect to this network. Paper Type: Research Article.

  19. Topics in fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    Models of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics have enjoyed much success in explaining the effect of long-wavelength fluctuations in diverse hydrodynamic systems. This thesis explores two such problems; in both, the body of hydrodynamic assumptions powerfully constrains the predictions of a well-posed theory. The effects of layer fluctuations in smectic-A liquid crystals are first examined. The static theory (introduced by Grinstein and Pelcovits) is reviewed. Ward identities, resulting from the arbitrariness of the layering direction, are derived and exploited. The static results motivate an examination of dynamic fluctuation effects. A new sound-damping experiment is proposed that would probe singular dependence of viscosities on applied stress. A theory of Procaccia and Gitterman that reaction rates of chemically reacting binary mixtures are drastically reduced near their thermodynamic critical points is analyzed. Hydrodynamic arguments and Van Hove theory are applied, concluding that the PG idea is drastically slowed, and spatially varying composition fluctuations are at best slowed down over a narrow range of wavenumbers

  20. Electric Field Fluctuations in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Dayton; Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2013-03-01

    Charge transfer in solution, such as autoionization and ion pair dissociation in water, is governed by rare electric field fluctuations of the solvent. Knowing the statistics of such fluctuations can help explain the dynamics of these rare events. Trajectories short enough to be tractable by computer simulation are virtually certain not to sample the large fluctuations that promote rare events. Here, we employ importance sampling techniques with classical molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water to study statistics of electric field fluctuations far from their means. We find that the distributions of electric fields located on individual water molecules are not in general gaussian. Near the mean this non-gaussianity is due to the internal charge distribution of the water molecule. Further from the mean, however, there is a previously unreported Bjerrum-like defect that stabilizes certain large fluctuations out of equilibrium. As expected, differences in electric fields acting between molecules are gaussian to a remarkable degree. By studying these differences, though, we are able to determine what configurations result not only in large electric fields, but also in electric fields with long spatial correlations that may be needed to promote charge separation.

  1. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongxi; Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensate collapse and dynamical squeezing of vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, E.A.; Hu, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the phenomena of condensate collapse, as described by Donley et al. [Nature 412, 295 (2001)] and N. Claussen [Ph. D thesis, University of Colorado, 2003 (unpublished)] by focusing on the behavior of excitations or fluctuations above the condensate, as driven by the dynamics of the condensate, rather than the dynamics of the condensate alone or the kinetics of the atoms. The dynamics of the condensate squeezes and amplifies the quantum excitations, mixing the positive and negative frequency components of their wave functions thereby creating particles that appear as bursts and jets. By analyzing the changing amplitude and particle content of these excitations, our simple physical picture explains well the overall features of the collapse phenomena and provides excellent quantitative fits with experimental data on several aspects, such as the scaling behavior of the collapse time and the number of particles in the jet. The prediction of the bursts at this level of approximation is less than satisfactory but may be improved by including the backreaction of the excitations on the condensate. The mechanism behind the dominant effect--parametric amplification of vacuum fluctuations and freezing of modes outside of horizon--is similar to that of cosmological particle creation and structure formation in a rapid quench (which is fundamentally different from Hawking radiation in black holes). This shows that Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics is a promising venue for doing 'laboratory cosmology'

  3. Investigating the Views of Male Students on Using Bicycles Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in Yazd University of Medical Sciences, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Baghianimoghadam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, it is somewhat possible for general Population to use bicycle as a means of transportation or sport. Physical activity is considered as an important strategy for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other critical metabolic diseases in the different ages of life. Since the Theory of Planned Behavior assesses perceived control beliefs about behaviors, it seems appropriate to study exercise. In the study, the views of male students - as a group which are affective on community norms- about bicycle use were investigated. Method: In this cross-sectional study 250 male students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences responded to a researcher made questionnaire which was designed for assessing their views about bicycle use, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The data were analyzed using SPSS v16. Results: The mean age of participants was 23. 01± 3. 83. Findings revealed that the scale means of the theory constructs were as follows: behavioral intention: 8. 54 ±3. 9, Attitude: 2. 97 ± 15. 2, subjective norm: 12. 1± 2. 9 and perceived behavioral control: 17. 5 ±4. 6. Regression analysis indicated that attitude and subjective norm explained 29. 7% of behavioral intention variations (P<0. 001. Conclusion: According to results which indicated that Attitude and subjective norm had more powerful relationship with and predictive power of behavioral intention about using bicycle it is recommended that cultural activities and interventions may be effective to promote using bicycle among students.

  4. Multiscale fluctuations in nuclear response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear collective response is investigated in the framework of a doorway picture in which the spreading width of the collective emotion is described as a coupling to more and more complex configurations. It is shown that this coupling induces fluctuations of the observed strength. In the case of a hierarchy of overlapping decay channels, Ericson fluctuations are observed at different scales. Methods for extracting these scales and the related lifetimes are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the coupling of different states at one level of complexity to some common decay channels at the next level, may produce interference-like patterns in the nuclear response. This quantum effect leads to anew type of fluctuations with a typical width related to the level spacing. (author)

  5. Fluctuation relations for anomalous dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechkin, A V; Klages, R

    2009-01-01

    We consider work fluctuation relations (FRs) for generic types of dynamics generating anomalous diffusion: Lévy flights, long-correlated Gaussian processes and time-fractional kinetics. By combining Langevin and kinetic approaches we calculate the probability distributions of mechanical and thermodynamical work in two paradigmatic nonequilibrium situations, respectively: a particle subject to a constant force and a particle in a harmonic potential dragged by a constant force. We check the transient FR for two models exhibiting superdiffusion, where a fluctuation-dissipation relation does not exist, and for two other models displaying subdiffusion, where there is a fluctuation-dissipation relation. In the two former cases the conventional transient FR is not recovered, whereas in the latter two it holds either exactly or in the long-time limit. (letter)

  6. Multiscale fluctuations in nuclear response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D.; Chomaz, Ph

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear collective response is investigated in the framework of a doorway picture in which the spreading width of the collective emotion is described as a coupling to more and more complex configurations. It is shown that this coupling induces fluctuations of the observed strength. In the case of a hierarchy of overlapping decay channels, Ericson fluctuations are observed at different scales. Methods for extracting these scales and the related lifetimes are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the coupling of different states at one level of complexity to some common decay channels at the next level, may produce interference-like patterns in the nuclear response. This quantum effect leads to anew type of fluctuations with a typical width related to the level spacing. (author) 25 refs.

  7. The Stock Market Fluctuations and Consumer Behaviour in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stock market is a common feature of a modern economy as it promotes the growth and development of the economy. This paper examines the likely influence of recent stock market fluctuations on consumer behavior and the economy, focusing on wealth effects and consumption. After reviewing the relevant theoretical ...

  8. Lyapunov spectra of density fluctuations in TBR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiwa, N.N.; Fidler-Ferrara, N.

    1993-01-01

    The results for the Lyapunov exponents associated with density fluctuations measured by Langmuir probes placed in the scrape-off layer of the Tokamak TBR-1 are reported. By a judicious use of the Sano-Sawada and Eckmann-Ruelle algorithms conclusive values for the positive Lyapunov exponents for most of the analysed signals are used showing evidences of chaotic behavior. (author)

  9. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  10. Fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background on a 2.3 deg angular scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Mandolesi, N.

    1982-01-01

    The study of fluctuations in the temperature of the cosmic microwave background may provide important information on the origin of the large scale structures in the Universe. An experiment is in operation at Medicina (Bologna) for studying such temperature fluctuations on a 2 deg 3 angular scale at lambda=2.8 cm. Preliminary results seem to indicate ΔT/T -4

  11. Self-reported health status, body mass index, and healthy lifestyle behaviors: differences between Baby Boomer and Generation X employees at a southeastern university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melondie R; Kelly, Rebecca K

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess differences in self-reported health status, body mass index (BMI), and healthy lifestyle behaviors between Baby Boomer and Generation X faculty and staff at a southeastern university. Data were drawn from employee health risk assessment and BMI measures. A total of 730 Baby Boomer and 765 Generation X employees enrolled in a university health promotion and screening program were included in the study. Ordered logistic regressions were calculated separately for BMI, perceived health status, and three healthy lifestyle behaviors. After covariates such as job role, gender, race, education, and income were controlled, Baby Boomers were more likely than Generation X employees to report better health status and dietary habits. Baby Boomers were also more likely to engage in weekly aerobic physical activity (p generational differences when developing health promotion programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Phase space fluctuations and dynamics of fluctuations of collective variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhassine, B.; Farine, M.; Idier, D.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3/CNRS, 44 - Nantes (France) Nantes Univ., 44 (France)); Hernandez, E.S. (Dept. de Fisica, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1992-08-03

    Within the framework of theoretical approaches based on stochastic transport equation of one-body distribution function, a numerical treatment of the fluctuations of collective observables is studied and checked in comparison with analytical results either at equilibrium or close to it. (orig.).

  13. Phase space fluctuations and dynamics of fluctuations of collective variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhassine, B.; Farine, M.; Idier, D.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.; Hernandez, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of theoretical approaches based on stochastic transport equation of one-body distribution function, a numerical treatment of the fluctuations of collective observables is studied and checked in comparison with analytical results either at equilibrium or close to it. (orig.)

  14. Fluctuations of wormlike micelle fluids in capillary flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salipante, Paul; Meek, Stephen; Hudson, Steven; Polymers; Complex Fluids Group Team

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of entrance geometry on the flow stability of wormlike micelles solutions in capillary flow. These solutions exhibit strong shear thinning behavior resulting from micelle breakage and have been observed to undergo large flow rate fluctuations. We investigate these fluctuations using simultaneous measurements of flow rate and pressure drop across a capillary, and we adjust entrance geometry. With a tapered constriction, we observe large persistent fluctuations above a critical flow rate, characterized by rapid decreases in the pressure drop with corresponding increase in flow rate followed by a period of recovery where pressure increases and flow rate decreases. Flow field observations in the tapered entrance show large flow circulations. An abrupt contraction produces smaller transient fluidized jets forming upstream of the constriction and the magnitude of the fluctuations are significantly diminished. The effect of fluid properties is studied by comparing the magnitude and timescales of the fluctuations for surfactant systems with different relaxation times. The onset of fluctuations is compared to a criterion for the onset of elastic instabilities and the magnitude is compared to estimates for changes in channel resistance. NIST on a Chip.

  15. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  16. Entropic Repulsion Between Fluctuating Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, W.

    The statistical mechanics of fluctuating surfaces plays an important role in a variety of physical systems, ranging from biological membranes to world sheets of strings in theories of fundamental interactions. In many applications it is a good approximation to assume that the surfaces possess no tension. Their statistical properties are then governed by curvature energies only, which allow for gigantic out-of-plane undulations. These fluctuations are the “entropic” origin of long-range repulsive forces in layered surface systems. Theoretical estimates of these forces for simple model surfaces are surveyed and compared with recent Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Association between Health Locus of Control and Health Promotion Behaviors among Employees’ Bushehr University of Medical Sciences in 2013-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqayeh Chenary

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work is an important source for establishing livelihoods and social occasions; however, it can also damage on person's health. The aim of the present study was to study of association between health locus of control and health promoting behaviors among employees of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 208 employees of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences by using convenience sampling method. Data were collected by using standard questionnaires of health-promoting lifestyle and multidimensional health locus of control. Data analysis done by SPSS software version 20. Descriptive indicators and linear regression test was used. Results: Among regression models which related to health promoting behavior and its six dimensions, only there was a significant association between total behavior, physical activity and interpersonal relationship dimensions. Between demographic factors and health locus of control only internal health locus of control explained the health promoting behavior and it explained health promoting behavior changes  within 3.2% (R2=3.2%. None of the three health locus of control explained physical activity dimensions, while internal health locus of control explained interpersonal relation dimension positively and chance locus of control explained interpersonal relation dimension negatively and explained interpersonal relation changes within 4.9% (R2=4.9%. Conclusion: Due to the effect of internal health locus of control on health promotion behavior and interpersonal relationships, we should try to internalize locus of control by performing counseling programs to step toward improving employee health by improving behaviors related to health.

  18. The Relationship between Learning Styles and Information Seeking Behavior in Master Degree Students of Medical Sciences in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Parsaeian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Learning styles influence the methods and ways of obtaining information and lead to the variety of information seeking behaviors from the searchers. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between learning styles and information seeking behavior in master degree students of medical science in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional analytic study. The population of the study was 601 master degree students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd in 2013-2015. They were all freshmen. The sample size of 234 students was determined using Cochran formula. Data were collected by two questionnaires (Kolb questionnaire and researcher-made seeking behavior questionnaire. The validity of questionnaires was confirmed by a panel of experts and their reliability was confirmed by Cronbach`s alpha. Data analysis was done by inferential statistics and statistical software SPSS (version 18. Measuring the significant relationship between learning styles and information seeking behavior was done with Pierson correlation coefficient. The significant difference between learning styles and information seeking behavior in terms of gender and faculty was examined by Fisher`s test. Results: Learning styles had effect on information seeking behavior; also correlation coefficients between the learning styles and information seeking behavior had significant difference, but there was no difference in terms of faculty. Conclution: Recognition of learning styles and including it into designing of information systems may increase system`s interactivity that it may lead to have better and faster accessibility to information resources.

  19. Effects of the big-five personality traits and organizational commitments on organizational citizenship behavior of support staff at Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Siripapun Leephaijaroen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the effects of the big-five personality traits and organizational commitments on organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The research method of this study was a mixed method combining quantitative and qualitative methods. For the quantitative research method, data were collected from 144 support staff at Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Thailand and the hypotheses were tested using the stepwise multiple regression analysis technique. For t...

  20. Stages of Behavior Change for physical activity and associated factors among technicaladministrative servers of a federal university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Berria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n4p471   The benefits that the regular practice of physical activity (PA provides to health and its importance in preventing and fighting chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the Stages of Behavior Change (SBC for PA among technicaladministrative servers and its association with sociodemographic and health risk factors. This cross-sectional study investigated 622 technical-administrative servers (337 women from a Brazilian federal university. SBC for PA, sociodemographic information (gender, age, marital status and educational level and health risk factors (inadequate eating habits, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, commuting and PA at work were collected through questionnaires. Multinomial regression with adjustment for the hierarchical level was applied and significance level of 5% was adopted. The distribution of technical-administrative servers in SBC for PA identified prevalence of 9.1% and 6.5% in the pre-contemplation stage, 24.6% and 33.5% in contemplation, 33.3% and 22 6% in preparation, 5.6% and 12.2% in action and 27.4% and 25.2% in maintenance stages between men and women, respectively. Lower odds ratio of being in the preparation stage was identified among women (OR=0.62; CI95%=0.41; 0.93 while those with inadequate eating habits were more odds to be in the “pre-contemplation + contemplation” (OR=2.77; CI95%=1.85; 4.15 and preparation stages (OR=1.75; CI95%=1.12; 2.70. Over 60% of technical-administrative servers are insufficiently active (pre-contemplation, contemplation and preparation stages and factors associated with SBC were female sex and inadequate eating habits.

  1. 10 non seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors: therapeutic results and behavior at the University Hospital in the last 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Xavier, F.; Cepellini, R.; Fresco, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Retrospectively analyze about the characteristics, therapeutic behavior and treatment results in patients with non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumours (NSGCT) Stage III assisted in the University Hospital. Materials and Methods: The medical records of patients (pts) with histologically reviewed of NSGCT assisted in the Department of Clinical Oncology, Hospital das Clinicas (H C), among January 2000 and December 2009. We analyzed in detail the clinico pathological features of those belonging to pts with stage III tumors TNM classification. Results: 23 pts were included; median age 24 years (range: 17-40); median follow-up: 19 months (range: 2-104). Stadiums: I: 9/23; II: 7/23; III: 7/23. Among ptes E III.They corresponded to: high risk: 3/7; means: 3/7; Low: 1/7. Only in 1 patient (pte) of the E III It is not explicitly consisted risk rating in history but, based on data present is able to allocate retrospectively. The chemotherapy was the first line chosen, PE B plan pts 6/7 and 1/7 VIP (pte. athlete). All patients received 4 sets of PE B / VIP (including low risk). Imaging responses post chemotherapy (Q T): Complete: 1/7; Partial: 5/7; Stabilization: 1/7. In the 7 pts M T post Q T were normal. In 4 of the 7 pts who achieved partial response and normalized MTwe proceeded to surgery residual mass. The current status of patients is alive: 6/23; Dead: 4/23; monitoring loss (PDS): 13/23. The patients E III: Live 2/7, 4/7 dead, PDS 1/7.4 E III patients were dead with diagnosis (high risk 3/4, 1/4 medium). He did not make the survival analysis given the low and high percentage of patients PDS. Conclusions: In the last 10 years only 7 patients with NSGCT E III attended the H C (0.7 / year). Overall front line management adjusted to the recommendations international but the management of patients with residual mass and not normal M T necessarily. While the number of patients is too low to definitive conclusions, the C R rate to Q T 1st line impresses be

  2. Sleep and Behavioral Correlates of Napping among Young Adults: A Survey of First-Year University Students in Madrid, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Olavarrieta-Bernardino, Sara; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; de la Cruz-Troca, Juan Jose; Rodriguez-Munoz, Alfredo; Olivan-Palacios, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Between November 2002 and March 2003, the authors assessed the prevalence and correlates of napping among Spanish university students. Participants: The sample comprised 1,276 first-year university students; the mean age was 18.74 [plus or minus] 1.24 years, and 35.45% were men. Methods: The study was cross-sectional, and the students…

  3. Perceived Quality of Service and Behavioral Intentions of First-Time Students Enrolled at The University of North Carolina Asheville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrice Black

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the SERVQUAL (Service Quality Instrument) to examine the perceptions of first-time enrolled students at University of North Carolina Asheville regarding the services they receive from a selected group of departments in the university's One Stop area. In addition, the study examined whether a relationship…

  4. The impact of the Good Behavior Game, a universal classroom-based preventive intervention in first and second grades, on high-risk sexual behaviors and drug abuse and dependence disorders into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, Sheppard G; Wang, Wei; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Brown, C Hendricks; Ompad, Danielle C; Or, Flora; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Poduska, Jeanne M; Windham, Amy

    2014-02-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG), a method of teacher classroom behavior management, was tested in first- and second-grade classrooms in 19 Baltimore City Public Schools beginning in the 1985-1986 school year. The intervention was directed at the classroom as a whole to socialize children to the student role and reduce aggressive, disruptive behaviors, confirmed antecedents of a profile of externalizing problem outcomes. This article reports on the GBG impact on the courses and interrelationships among aggressive, disruptive behavior through middle school, risky sexual behaviors, and drug abuse and dependence disorders through ages 19-21. In five poor to lower-middle class, mainly African American urban areas, classrooms within matched schools were assigned randomly to either the GBG intervention or the control condition. Balanced assignment of children to classrooms was made, and teachers were randomly assigned to intervention or control. Analyses involved multilevel growth mixture modeling. By young adulthood, significant GBG impact was found in terms of reduced high-risk sexual behaviors and drug abuse and dependence disorders among males who in first grade and through middle school were more aggressive, disruptive. A replication with the next cohort of first-grade children with the same teachers occurred during the following school year, but with minimal teacher mentoring and monitoring. Findings were not significant but generally in the predicted direction. A universal classroom-based prevention intervention in first- and second-grade classrooms can reduce drug abuse and dependence disorders and risky sexual behaviors.

  5. An Investigation on Dentistry Students' Attitude on Accepted Behavior in Classroom at Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mahdi Yaghooti Khorasani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Inappropriate behaviors in academic environments can strongly disturb both teaching and learning processes and make conflict and anxiety between instructor and student. The main objective of this study was to investigate students' attitude on inappropriate behaviors in academic environments. Materials and Methods: This research was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in 2012. A questionnaire was designed by the researcher and all students of Faculty of Dentistry voluntarily participated. Data was analyzed using SPSS18 software, descriptive, independent T, ANOVA, and Spearman’s correlation coefficient; P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Results of this study indicated that the majority of students considered sleeping in class as an inappropriate behavior, while checking the time at the end of class was the most common behavior which was reported by them. A significant relationship was observed between students’ perspective on inappropriate behaviors and the manner they did them; as Spearman statistical test indicated a high correlation between their perspective and frequency of inappropriate behaviors (R = 0.55 and P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Findings indicated that the majority of students had a negative attitude towards inappropriate behaviors. Besides, the frequency of doing these behaviors cannot be justified by this research team. Regarding the negative effects of inappropriate behaviors on education process, it is recommended to take some actions for cherishing instructors and students in academic environments.

  6. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    . The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  7. Magnetic fluctuations in turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    For dynamo excitation of the magnetic fluctuations in infinite fluid only a sufficient large magnetic Reynolds number is needed. In a infinite region an additional condition appears. Due to the diffusion of the magnetic field through the boundaries a size of the region must be large enough compare with a correlation length of the turbulence. Author)

  8. Firm default and aggregate fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson, Tor; Linde, Jesper; Roszbach, Kasper

    This paper studies the relationship between macroeconomic fluctuations and corporate defaults while conditioning on industry affiliation and an extensive set of firm-specific factors. By using a panel data set for virtually all incorporated Swedish businesses over 1990-2009, a period which includes

  9. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States); Wickham, Logan [Department of Computer Science, Washington State University, Richland, 99354 (United States); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.voulgarakis@wsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States)

    2017-04-25

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau–Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids. - Highlights: • A new fluctuating hydrodynamics method for ionic liquids. • Description of ionic liquid morphology in bulk and near electrified surfaces. • Direct comparison with experimental measurements.

  10. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-08-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balanced dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify the constraints on excess heat and dissipated work necessary to control a system that is kept far from equilibrium by background, uncontrolled "housekeeping" forces. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes thermodynamic feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. We also generalize an approach recently used to determine the work dissipated when driving between functionally relevant configurations of an active energy-consuming complex system. Altogether, these results highlight universal thermodynamic laws that apply to the accessible degrees of freedom within the effective dynamic at any emergent level of hierarchical organization. By way of illustration, we analyze a voltage-gated sodium ion channel whose molecular conformational dynamics play a critical functional role in propagating action potentials in mammalian neuronal membranes.

  11. Exploration of the Dietary and Lifestyle Behaviors and Weight Status and Their Self-Perceptions among Health Sciences University Students in North Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kassas, Germine; Ziade, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    University students may experience significant environmental changes that exert a negative influence on the quality of their diet and lifestyle. There is scarcity of data concerning the dietary and lifestyle behaviors and weight status of students in the health field in North Lebanon. To investigate these data, a cross-sectional survey was conducted including 369 health sciences students aged 18–25 chosen from four public and private universities in North Lebanon. Data were collected using a standardized interview questionnaire to determine sociodemographic, dietary, and lifestyle behaviors, appetite changes, stress related dietary behaviors, and food cravings, as well as self-perceptions of dietary adequacy, physical activity levels, and weight status. Body mass index was assessed. Results had revealed significant differences in some of the dietary consumption patterns and weight status among seniors compared to juniors. However, the overall prevalence of overweight and obesity recorded 32.2% and the dietary consumption patterns fall below recommended levels. Multivariate regression analysis showed that parental obesity, comfort eating, increased appetite, food cravings, and stressful eating were associated with increased risk of obesity while a healthy diet score was associated with decreased risk. The study's findings call for tailoring culture specific intervention programs which enable students to improve their dietary and lifestyle behaviors and control stress. PMID:27429989

  12. Effects of the big-five personality traits and organizational commitments on organizational citizenship behavior of support staff at Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripapun Leephaijaroen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to examine the effects of the big-five personality traits and organizational commitments on organizational citizenship behavior (OCB. The research method of this study was a mixed method combining quantitative and qualitative methods. For the quantitative research method, data were collected from 144 support staff at Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Thailand and the hypotheses were tested using the stepwise multiple regression analysis technique. For the qualitative research method, in-depth interviews with 11 support staff were used to explain the quantitative findings. The findings revealed that the components of the big-five personality traits and organizational commitments which significantly affected OCB were agreeable personality, continuance commitment, conscientious personality, affective commitment, and emotionally-stable personality. In examining intensively each dimension of the OCB as a dependent variable, the results showed the following: 1 agreeable personality, affective commitment, conscientious personality, and normative commitment had positive significant effects on altruistic behavior; 2 conscientious personality, agreeable personality, and continuance commitment had positive significant effects on conscientious behavior; 3 affective commitment and agreeable personality had positive significant effects on sportsmanship behavior; 4 emotionally stable personality and continuance commitment had positive significant effects on courteous behavior; and 5 continuance commitment, agreeable personality, conscientious personality, and emotionally-stable personality had positive significant effects on civic virtue behavior.

  13. USE OF TRANS-CONTEXTUAL MODEL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE IN DEVELOPING LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müftüler, Mine; İnce, Mustafa Levent

    2015-08-01

    This study examined how a physical activity course based on the Trans-Contextual Model affected the variables of perceived autonomy support, autonomous motivation, determinants of leisure-time physical activity behavior, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and leisure-time physical activity behaviors. The participants were 70 Turkish university students (M age=23.3 yr., SD=3.2). A pre-test-post-test control group design was constructed. Initially, the participants were randomly assigned into an experimental (n=35) and a control (n=35) group. The experimental group followed a 12 wk. trans-contextual model-based intervention. The participants were pre- and post-tested in terms of Trans-Contextual Model constructs and of self-reported leisure-time physical activity behaviors. Multivariate analyses showed significant increases over the 12 wk. period for perceived autonomy support from instructor and peers, autonomous motivation in leisure-time physical activity setting, positive intention and perceived behavioral control over leisure-time physical activity behavior, more fulfillment of psychological needs, and more engagement in leisure-time physical activity behavior in the experimental group. These results indicated that the intervention was effective in developing leisure-time physical activity and indicated that the Trans-Contextual Model is a useful way to conceptualize these relationships.

  14. The Mediator Role of Emotion Regulation Difficulties in Relationship between Alexithymia and Disordered Eating Behaviors among Students Allameh Tabataba’i University, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khodabakhsh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Emotion regulation difficulties predicts disordered eating, but how emotion regulation difficulties lead to disordered eating remains an unanswered question. In this research, the role of alexithymia and emotion regulation difficulties was investigated in the prediction of disordered eating behaviors among students. Methods: This descriptive study was performed on 264 students of Allameh Tabataba’i University, who were selected by multiple cluster sampling. Data were collected using Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Eating Attitudes Test, and Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Analysis of data was performed using Pearson correlation coefficient and stepwise regression. The significance level was considered to be p<0.01. Results: Results showed that there was a significant correlation among emotion regulation difficulties, alexithymia, and disordered eating behaviors (p<0.01. The results of stepwise regression analysis indicated that alexithymia and emotion regulation difficulties significantly predicted disoredered eating behaviors (p<0.01 and emotion regulation difficulties has a mediator role in the relationship between alexithymia and disordered eating behaviors (p<0.01. Conclusion: The results of this study is indicative of the importance of emotion regulation difficulties and alexithymia in the prediction of disordered eating behaviors, and these factors can explain the high rate of disordered eating behaviors variance.

  15. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field and the associated pair-creation in several isotropic closed and open universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a positive frequency part near the initial epoch in a big-bang universe or its counterpart in other (say, de Sitter) one for a canonically quantized scalar field is important in discussing the associated pair-creation of those particles. Therefore, an attempt is made to define the positive frequency part in such isotropic closed and open universes that the scalar wave equation can be exactly solved. Except for some closed universe, the parts in question and, therefore, the Feynman propagators in the remaining universes are uniquely settled. Then it is shown that (1) the pair-creation in the Friedmann open universe (which is very interesting not only from observational, but also from theoretical viewpoints) is essentially equivalent to that in the Chitre-Hartle universe with flat 3-space and (2) the respective pair-creations in expanding metrics with open and flat 3-spaces of the de Sitter universe are different from each other, as insisted upon by Gibbons and Hawking basing on the original static metric. (author)

  16. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field and the associated pair-creation in several isotropic closed and open universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a positive frequency part near the initial epoch in a big-bang universe or its counterpart in other (say, de Sitter) one for a canonically quantized scalar field is important in discussing the associated pair-creation of those particles. Therefore, an attempt is made to define the positive frequency part in such isotropic closed and open universes that the scalar wave equation can be exactly solved. Except for some closed universe, the parts in question and, therefore, the Feynman propagators in the remaining universes are uniquely settled. Then it is shown that (1) the pair-creation in the Friedmann open universe (which is very interesting not only from observational, but also from theoretical viewpoints) is essentially equivalent to that in the Chitre-Hartle universe with flat 3-space and (2) the respective pair-creations in expanding metrics with open and flat 3-spaces of the de Sitter universe are different from each other, as insisted upon by Gibbons and Hawking basing on the original static metric. (author)

  17. Relationship of Interpersonal Behaviors and Health-Related Control Appraisals to Patient Satisfaction and Compliance in a University Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas A.; Auerbach, Stephen M.; Kiesler, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' aim was to evaluate patient-provider relationships in a college health center. Participants: Eighty student patients and their health-care providers. Methods: Patients completed a measure of perceived health competence before a consultation and measures of provider participatory behavior and interpersonal behavior before…

  18. Electrostatic fluctuation in Low-{beta} plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krane, B

    1997-11-01

    The thesis gives an overview, which by no means is complete, to two dimensional plasma flows. The plasma is taken to be strongly magnetized such that magnetic fields generated by internal currents are small compared to the background magnetic field. This requires that the magnetic pressure exerted by the ambient magnetic field is large compared to the pressure due to thermal fluctuations, i.e. low-{beta} plasma. The author also assume low frequency electrostatic fluctuations with {omega}<<{omega}{sub c}i where {omega}{sub c}i is the ion gyro frequency. A brief introduction to nonlinear phenomena in two dimensional plasma flows has been presented. Particular attention was given to simple models describing flute and drift modes. Although the derivations of the model equations are based on different assumptions regarding the plasma conditions, the resulting equations exhibit similar behavior in some respects. For instance, both the simple guiding center model and the Hasegawa-Mima model have stable dipolar structures. The inverse cascade was also found in both models. However, it is evident that there are significant differences, first of all the Hasegawa-Mima model assumes a background density gradient which makes it an inhomogeneous model. Secondly, in this model the electrons respond instantaneously to variations in the ion density by moving along the magnetic field, thereby introducing Debye shielding.

  19. Electrostatic fluctuation in Low-β plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, B

    1997-11-01

    The thesis gives an overview, which by no means is complete, to two dimensional plasma flows. The plasma is taken to be strongly magnetized such that magnetic fields generated by internal currents are small compared to the background magnetic field. This requires that the magnetic pressure exerted by the ambient magnetic field is large compared to the pressure due to thermal fluctuations, i.e. low-β plasma. The author also assume low frequency electrostatic fluctuations with ω c i where ω c i is the ion gyro frequency. A brief introduction to nonlinear phenomena in two dimensional plasma flows has been presented. Particular attention was given to simple models describing flute and drift modes. Although the derivations of the model equations are based on different assumptions regarding the plasma conditions, the resulting equations exhibit similar behavior in some respects. For instance, both the simple guiding center model and the Hasegawa-Mima model have stable dipolar structures. The inverse cascade was also found in both models. However, it is evident that there are significant differences, first of all the Hasegawa-Mima model assumes a background density gradient which makes it an inhomogeneous model. Secondly, in this model the electrons respond instantaneously to variations in the ion density by moving along the magnetic field, thereby introducing Debye shielding

  20. Elastic constants from microscopic strain fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta; Nielaba; Rao; Binder

    2000-02-01

    Fluctuations of the instantaneous local Lagrangian strain epsilon(ij)(r,t), measured with respect to a static "reference" lattice, are used to obtain accurate estimates of the elastic constants of model solids from atomistic computer simulations. The measured strains are systematically coarse-grained by averaging them within subsystems (of size L(b)) of a system (of total size L) in the canonical ensemble. Using a simple finite size scaling theory we predict the behavior of the fluctuations as a function of L(b)/L and extract elastic constants of the system in the thermodynamic limit at nonzero temperature. Our method is simple to implement, efficient, and general enough to be able to handle a wide class of model systems, including those with singular potentials without any essential modification. We illustrate the technique by computing isothermal elastic constants of "hard" and "soft" disk triangular solids in two dimensions from Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. We compare our results with those from earlier simulations and theory.

  1. Learning in neural networks based on a generalized fluctuation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Information maximization has been investigated as a possible mechanism of learning governing the self-organization that occurs within the neural systems of animals. Within the general context of models of neural systems bidirectionally interacting with environments, however, the role of information maximization remains to be elucidated. For bidirectionally interacting physical systems, universal laws describing the fluctuation they exhibit and the information they possess have recently been discovered. These laws are termed fluctuation theorems. In the present study, we formulate a theory of learning in neural networks bidirectionally interacting with environments based on the principle of information maximization. Our formulation begins with the introduction of a generalized fluctuation theorem, employing an interpretation appropriate for the present application, which differs from the original thermodynamic interpretation. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that the learning mechanism presented in our theory allows neural networks to efficiently explore their environments and optimally encode information about them.

  2. Curvature of fluctuation geometry and its implications on Riemannian fluctuation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, L

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuation geometry was recently proposed as a counterpart approach of the Riemannian geometry of inference theory (widely known as information geometry). This theory describes the geometric features of the statistical manifold M of random events that are described by a family of continuous distributions dp(x|θ). A main goal of this work is to clarify the statistical relevance of the Levi-Civita curvature tensor R ijkl (x|θ) of the statistical manifold M. For this purpose, the notion of irreducible statistical correlations is introduced. Specifically, a distribution dp(x|θ) exhibits irreducible statistical correlations if every distribution dp(x-check|θ) obtained from dp(x|θ) by considering a coordinate change x-check = φ(x) cannot be factorized into independent distributions as dp(x-check|θ) = prod i dp (i) (x-check i |θ). It is shown that the curvature tensor R ijkl (x|θ) arises as a direct indicator about the existence of irreducible statistical correlations. Moreover, the curvature scalar R(x|θ) allows us to introduce a criterium for the applicability of the Gaussian approximation of a given distribution function. This type of asymptotic result is obtained in the framework of the second-order geometric expansion of the distribution family dp(x|θ), which appears as a counterpart development of the high-order asymptotic theory of statistical estimation. In physics, fluctuation geometry represents the mathematical apparatus of a Riemannian extension for Einstein’s fluctuation theory of statistical mechanics. Some exact results of fluctuation geometry are now employed to derive the invariant fluctuation theorems. Moreover, the curvature scalar allows us to express some asymptotic formulae that account for the system fluctuating behavior beyond the Gaussian approximation, e.g.: it appears as a second-order correction of the Legendre transformation between thermodynamic potentials, P(θ)=θ i x-bar i -s( x-bar |θ)+k 2 R(x|θ)/6. (paper)

  3. Topology of microwave background fluctuations - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Park, Changbom; Bies, William E.; Bennett, David P.; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1990-01-01

    Topological measures are used to characterize the microwave background temperature fluctuations produced by 'standard' scenarios (Gaussian) and by cosmic strings (non-Gaussian). Three topological quantities: total area of the excursion regions, total length, and total curvature (genus) of the isotemperature contours, are studied for simulated Gaussian microwave background anisotropy maps and then compared with those of the non-Gaussian anisotropy pattern produced by cosmic strings. In general, the temperature gradient field shows the non-Gaussian behavior of the string map more distinctively than the temperature field for all topology measures. The total contour length and the genus are found to be more sensitive to the existence of a stringy pattern than the usual temperature histogram. Situations when instrumental noise is superposed on the map, are considered to find the critical signal-to-noise ratio for which strings can be detected.

  4. Current fluctuations in quantum absorption refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2018-05-01

    Absorption refrigerators transfer thermal energy from a cold bath to a hot bath without input power by utilizing heat from an additional "work" reservoir. Particularly interesting is a three-level design for a quantum absorption refrigerator, which can be optimized to reach the maximal (Carnot) cooling efficiency. Previous studies of three-level chillers focused on the behavior of the averaged cooling current. Here, we go beyond that and study the full counting statistics of heat exchange in a three-level chiller model. We explain how to obtain the complete cumulant generating function of the refrigerator in a steady state, then derive a partial cumulant generating function, which yields closed-form expressions for both the averaged cooling current and its noise. Our analytical results and simulations are beneficial for the design of nanoscale engines and cooling systems far from equilibrium, with their performance optimized according to different criteria, efficiency, power, fluctuations, and dissipation.

  5. Solidity of viscous liquids. IV. Density fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series exploring the physical consequences of the solidity of highly viscous liquids. It is argued that the two basic characteristics of a flow event (a jump between two energy minima in configuration space) are the local density change and the sum of all particle...... displacements. Based on this it is proposed that density fluctuations are described by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation with rates in k space of the form C+Dk^2 with D>>C a^2 where a is the average intermolecular distance. The inequality expresses a long-wavelength dominance of the dynamics which...... with Debye behavior at low frequencies and an omega^{−1/2} decay of the loss at high frequencies. Finally, a general formalism for the description of viscous liquid dynamics, which supplements the density dynamics by including stress fields, a potential energy field, and molecular orientational fields...

  6. Fluctuation-induced long-range interactions in polymer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, A N; Obukhov, S P

    2005-01-01

    We discover a new universal long-range interaction between solid objects in polymer media. This polymer-induced interaction is directly opposite to the van der Waals attraction. The predicted effect is deeply related to the classical Casimir interactions, providing a unique example of universal fluctuation-induced repulsion rather than normal attraction. This universal repulsion comes from the subtracted soft fluctuation modes in the ideal counterpart of the real polymer system. The effect can also be interpreted in terms of subtracted (ghost) large-scale polymer loops. We establish the general expressions for the energy of polymer-induced interactions for arbitrary solid particles in a concentrated polymer system. We find that the correlation function of the polymer density in a concentrated solution of very long chains follows a scaling law rather than an exponential decay at large distances. These novel universal long-range interactions can be of importance in various polymer systems. We discuss the ways to observe/simulate these fluctuation-induced effects

  7. Buckling of stiff polymers: Influence of thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Marc; Mohrbach, Hervé; Sayar, Mehmet; Schiessel, Helmut; Kulić, Igor M.

    2007-12-01

    The buckling of biopolymers is a frequently studied phenomenon The influence of thermal fluctuations on the buckling transition is, however, often ignored and not completely understood. A quantitative theory of the buckling of a wormlike chain based on a semiclassical approximation of the partition function is presented. The contribution of thermal fluctuations to the force-extension relation that allows one to go beyond the classical Euler buckling is derived in the linear and nonlinear regimes as well. It is shown that the thermal fluctuations in the nonlinear buckling regime increase the end-to-end distance of the semiflexible rod if it is confined to two dimensions as opposed to the three-dimensional case. The transition to a buckled state softens at finite temperature. We derive the scaling behavior of the transition shift with increasing ratio of contour length versus persistence length.

  8. Towards uncovering the structure of power fluctuations of wind farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiwen; Jin, Yaqing; Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2017-12-01

    The structure of the turbulence-driven power fluctuations in a wind farm is fundamentally described from basic concepts. A derived tuning-free model, supported with experiments, reveals the underlying spectral content of the power fluctuations of a wind farm. It contains two power-law trends and oscillations in the relatively low- and high-frequency ranges. The former is mostly due to the turbulent interaction between the flow and the turbine properties, whereas the latter is due to the advection between turbine pairs. The spectral wind-farm scale power fluctuations Φ_{P} exhibit a power-law decay proportional to f^{-5/3-2} in the region corresponding to the turbulence inertial subrange and at relatively large scales, Φ_{P}∼f^{-2}. Due to the advection and turbulent diffusion of large-scale structures, a spectral oscillation exists with the product of a sinusoidal behavior and an exponential decay in the frequency domain.

  9. Resistance Fluctuations in GaAs Nanowire Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marasović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study on resistance fluctuations in a series of nanowire-based grids. Each grid is made of GaAs nanowires arranged in parallel with metallic contacts crossing all nanowires perpendicularly. Electrical properties of GaAs nanowires known from previous experimental research are used as input parameters in the simulation procedure. Due to the nonhomogeneous doping, the resistivity changes along nanowire. Allowing two possible nanowire orientations (“upwards” or “downwards”, the resulting grid is partially disordered in vertical direction which causes resistance fluctuations. The system is modeled using a two-dimensional random resistor network. Transfer-matrix computation algorithm is used to calculate the total network resistance. It is found that probability density function (PDF of resistance fluctuations for a series of nanowire grids changes from Gaussian behavior towards the Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution when both nanowire orientations are equally represented in the grid.

  10. Fluctuation diamagnetism near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    Fluctuations of the magnetic moment and of the specific heat near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors are studied. Fluctuations near a surface yield an additional contribution to the effect of the usual bulk fluctuations on the diamagnetic moment. Such an additional contribution has a singularity near a temperature T/sub c/3(H), which is higher than the bulk superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field T/sub c/2(H). Depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the singularity of the additional contribution to the magnetic moment can be either logarithmic (strong fields) or of square-root type (weak fields). Experiments which could reveal the aforementioned anomalous behavior are discussed in detail

  11. Backreaction of Cosmological Fluctuations during Power-Law Inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marozzi, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the renormalized energy-momentum tensor of cosmological scalar fluctuations during the slow-rollover regime for power-law inflation and find that it is characterized by a negative energy density at the leading order, with the same time behavior as the background energy. The average expansion rate appears decreased by the backreaction of the effective energy of cosmological fluctuations, but this value is comparable with the energy of the background only if inflation starts at a Planckian energy. We also find that, for this particular model, the first- and second-order inflaton fluctuations are decoupled and satisfy the same equation of motion. To conclude, the fourth-order adiabatic expansion for the inflaton scalar field is evaluated for a general potential V(φ)

  12. New PHOBOS results on event-by-event fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Harnarine, I.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-04-01

    We present new results from the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC on event-by-event fluctuations of particle multiplicities and angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC. Our data for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV show that at a level of 10-4 or less, no rare, large-amplitude fluctuations in the total multiplicity distributions or the shape of the pseudorapidity distributions are observed. We however find significant short-range multiplicity correlations in these data, that can be described as particle production in clusters. In Cu+Cu collisions, we observe large final-state azimuthal anisotropies ν2. A common scaling behavior for Cu+Cu and Au+Au for these anisotropies emerges when fluctuations in the initial state geometry are taken into account.

  13. The Importance of Leadership Behavior and Motivation İn Creating Employee Performance: (A Study at the Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Brawijaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo-Alaziz H. E Mihrez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted at the faculty of economics and business, Brawijaya University which aimed to determine whether there is a direct effect of leadership behavior on intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and employee performance. In addition, it was done to determine the effect of indirect leadership behavior on employee performance through intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. In this study, the data were collected using a questionnaire with Likert scale, and then distributed to 65 employees UB. To answer the purpose of this study, the method of analysis used was used Partial Least Square (PLS. The results of the analysis in this study inform that leadership behavior has a positive and significant effect on intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and employee performance. Later in this study it was found that intrinsic motivation variable does not have significant and negative effect on the performance of employees and it is unable to mediate the effect of leadership behavior on employee performance. Meanwhile, extrinsic motivation variable gives positive and significant effect on the performance of employees and it is said that extrinsic motivation is also able to mediate the influence of leadership behaviors on employee performance.

  14. Fluctuation current in superconducting loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting loop that encloses noninteger flux holds a permanent current. On the average, this current is also present above T c , and has been measured in recent years. We are able to evaluate the permanent current within the TDGL or the Kramer-Watts-Tobin models for loops of general configuration, i.e., we don't require uniform cross section, material or temperature. We can also consider situations in which the width is not negligible in comparison to the radius. Our results agree with experiments. The situations with which we deal at present include fluctuation superconductivity in two-band superconductors, equilibrium thermal fluctuations of supercurrent along a weak link, and ratchet effects.

  15. Fluctuations and confinement in ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Harris, J.H.; Murakami, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the period immediately prior to the suspension of ATF operation in November, 1991, a great deal of emphasis was palced on investigations of the fundamental mechanisms controlling confinement in this device. At that time, measurements of the density fluctuations throughout the plasma volume indicated the existence of theoretically predicted dissipative trapped electron and resistive interchange instabilities. These identifications were supported by results of dynamic configuration scans of the magnetic fields during which the extent of the magnetic well, shear, and fraction of confined trapped particles were changed continuously. Interpretation of the data from these experiments has been an ongoing exercise. Most recently, analysis of discharges employing strong gas puffing to change density gradients and fluctuation levels have strengthened the view that dissipative trapped electron modes may be present but do not play a significant direct role in energy transport. The present paper summarizes the current understanding concerning the identification of instabilities and their relationship to confinement in ATF

  16. Charge Fluctuations in Nanoscale Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T.; Merlet, Céline; Salanne, Mathieu; Chandler, David; Madden, Paul A.; van Roij, René; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with histogram reweighting techniques. This approach offers, in particular, an efficient, accurate, and physically insightful route to the differential capacitance that is broadly applicable. We demonstrate these methods with three different capacitors: pure water between platinum electrodes and a pure as well as a solvent-based organic electrolyte each between graphite electrodes. The total charge distributions with the pure solvent and solvent-based electrolytes are remarkably Gaussian, while in the pure ionic liquid the total charge distribution displays distinct non-Gaussian features, suggesting significant potential-driven changes in the organization of the interfacial fluid.

  17. Charge fluctuations in nanoscale capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T; Merlet, Céline; Salanne, Mathieu; Chandler, David; Madden, Paul A; van Roij, René; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-09-06

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with histogram reweighting techniques. This approach offers, in particular, an efficient, accurate, and physically insightful route to the differential capacitance that is broadly applicable. We demonstrate these methods with three different capacitors: pure water between platinum electrodes and a pure as well as a solvent-based organic electrolyte each between graphite electrodes. The total charge distributions with the pure solvent and solvent-based electrolytes are remarkably Gaussian, while in the pure ionic liquid the total charge distribution displays distinct non-Gaussian features, suggesting significant potential-driven changes in the organization of the interfacial fluid.

  18. Fluctuation theorems and atypical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, M; Lahiri, S; Jayannavar, A M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have studied simple models that can be solved analytically to illustrate various fluctuation theorems. These fluctuation theorems provide symmetries individually to the distributions of physical quantities such as the classical work (W c ), thermodynamic work (W), total entropy (Δs tot ) and dissipated heat (Q), when the system is driven arbitrarily out of equilibrium. All these quantities can be defined for individual trajectories. We have studied the number of trajectories which exhibit behaviour unexpected at the macroscopic level. As the time of observation increases, the fraction of such atypical trajectories decreases, as expected at the macroscale. The distributions for the thermodynamic work and entropy production in nonlinear models may exhibit a peak (most probable value) in the atypical regime without violating the expected average behaviour. However, dissipated heat and classical work exhibit a peak in the regime of typical behaviour only.

  19. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Chng, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  20. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Chng, Brenda [Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2016-07-25

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.